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1

GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA to extend our thanks to the authors of various West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

2

Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological carbon sequestration: critical legal issues Ray Purdy and Richard Macrory January 2004 Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research Working Paper 45 #12;1 Geological carbon sequestration an integrated assessment of geological carbon sequestration (Project ID code T2.21). #12;2 1 Introduction

Watson, Andrew

3

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Equation  2   5  Carbon  capture  technology  requires  for  Geologic  Carbon  Capture  and   Sequestration."  the  additional  carbon  capture  system  (1.24  assuming  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Federal Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­?year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. In response, the U.S. Department of Energy is making significant efforts to help develop and implement a commercial scale program of geologic carbon sequestration that involves capturing and storing carbon dioxide emitted from coal-­?burning electric power plants in deep underground formations. This article explores the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. It covers the responsibilities of the United States Environmental Protection Agency and the Departments of Energy, Transportation and Interior. It discusses the use of the Safe Drinking Water Act, the Clean Air Act, the National Environmental Policy Act, the Endangered Species Act, and other applicable federal laws. Finally, it discusses the provisions related to carbon sequestration that have been included in the major bills dealing with climate change that Congress has been considering in 2009 and 2010. The article concludes that the many legal issues that exist can be resolved, but whether carbon sequestration becomes a commercial reality will depend on reducing its costs or by imposing legal requirements on fossil-­?fired power plants that result in the costs of carbon emissions increasing to the point that carbon sequestration becomes a feasible option.

Reitze, Arnold

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

5

Computational Geosciences Improved Semi-Analytical Simulation of Geological Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Computational Geosciences Improved Semi-Analytical Simulation of Geological Carbon Sequestration of Geological Carbon Sequestration Article Type: Manuscript Keywords: Semi-Analytical Modeling; Iterative Methods; Geological Carbon Sequestration; Injection Site Assessment Corresponding Author: Brent Cody

Bau, Domenico A.

6

Invitation to Present, Sponsor, and Attend Geologic Carbon Sequestration Site Integrity: Characterization and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Invitation to Present, Sponsor, and Attend Geologic Carbon Sequestration Site Integrity and long-term sustainability of geologic carbon sequestration sites depends upon the ability on geologic carbon sequestration site monitoring. The management framework and costs will be similar

Daniels, Jeffrey J.

7

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You August 11, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops and tests technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts Here's a riddle for you: What do spelunkers, mineralogists and the latest Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) awardees have in common? They're all experts in tapping into projects of geological proportions! Today, Secretary Chu announced the selection of 15 projects aimed at developing and testing technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts (just to name a few). Funded with $21.3

8

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You Geological Carbon Sequestration, Spelunking and You August 11, 2010 - 2:45pm Addthis Niketa Kumar Niketa Kumar Public Affairs Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this project do? Develops and tests technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts Here's a riddle for you: What do spelunkers, mineralogists and the latest Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) awardees have in common? They're all experts in tapping into projects of geological proportions! Today, Secretary Chu announced the selection of 15 projects aimed at developing and testing technologies to store CO2 in oil and gas reservoirs, deep saline formations, and basalts (just to name a few). Funded with $21.3

9

An Overview of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Potential in California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB), the California Geological Survey (CGS) conducted an assessment of geologic carbon sequestration potential in California. An inventory of sedimentary basins was screened for preliminary suitability for carbon sequestration. Criteria included porous and permeable strata, seals, and depth sufficient for critical state carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) injection. Of 104 basins inventoried, 27 met the criteria for further assessment. Petrophysical and fluid data from oil and gas reservoirs was used to characterize both saline aquifers and hydrocarbon reservoirs. Where available, well log or geophysical information was used to prepare basin-wide maps showing depth-to-basement and gross sand distribution. California's Cenozoic marine basins were determined to possess the most potential for geologic sequestration. These basins contain thick sedimentary sections, multiple saline aquifers and oil and gas reservoirs, widespread shale seals, and significant petrophysical data from oil and gas operations. Potential sequestration areas include the San Joaquin, Sacramento, Ventura, Los Angeles, and Eel River basins, followed by the smaller Salinas, La Honda, Cuyama, Livermore, Orinda, and Sonoma marine basins. California's terrestrial basins are generally too shallow for carbon sequestration. However, the Salton Trough and several smaller basins may offer opportunities for localized carbon sequestration.

Cameron Downey; John Clinkenbeard

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Advancing the Science of Geologic Carbon Sequestration (Registration: www.earthsciences.osu.edu/~jeff/carbseq/carbseq 2009)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advancing the Science of Geologic Carbon Sequestration (Registration: www & American Electric Power Agenda March 9 ­ Morning Session 1 ­ Geological Carbon Sequestration: Introductions, AEP) 3. Field Testing: The Laboratory for Geological Carbon Sequestration (Neeraj Gupta, Battelle

Daniels, Jeffrey J.

11

Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the build decision for carbon capture and sequestrationTenth Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration.be managed early on. Carbon capture technology is water-,

Breunig, H.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and HB 90:Carbon capture and sequestration, http://legisweb.6th annual conference on carbon capture and sequestration,7th annual conference on carbon capture & seques- tration,

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration J. L the success of geologic carbon sequestration projects. To detect subtle CO2 leakage signals, we present), An improved strategy to detect CO2 leakage for verification of geologic carbon sequestration, Geophys. Res

Hilley, George

14

State and Regional Control of Geological Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States has economically recoverable coal reserves of about 261 billion tons, which is in excess of a 250-­?year supply based on 2009 consumption rates. However, in the near future the use of coal may be legally restricted because of concerns over the effects of its combustion on atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations. Carbon capture and geologic sequestration offer one method to reduce carbon emissions from coal and other hydrocarbon energy production. While the federal government is providing increased funding for carbon capture and sequestration, recent congressional legislative efforts to create a framework for regulating carbon emissions have failed. However, regional and state bodies have taken significant actions both to regulate carbon and facilitate its capture and sequestration. This article explores how regional bodies and state government are addressing the technical and legal problems that must be resolved in order to have a viable carbon sequestration program. Several regional bodies have formed regulations and model laws that affect carbon capture and storage, and three bodies comprising twenty-­?three states—the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative, the Midwest Regional Greenhouse Gas Reduction Accord, and the Western Climate initiative—have cap-­?and-­?trade programs in various stages of development. State property, land use and environmental laws affect the development and implementation of carbon capture and sequestration projects, and unless federal standards are imposed, state laws on torts and renewable portfolio requirements will directly affect the liability and viability of these projects. This paper examines current state laws and legislative efforts addressing carbon capture and sequestration.

Reitze, Arnold; Durrant, Marie

2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

15

Carbon Trading Protocols for Geologic Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

H. , 2005, IPCC: Carbon Capture and Storage: Technical05CH11231. INTRODUCTION Carbon capture and storage (CCS)Development Mechanism CCS: Carbon Capture and Storage C02e:

Hoversten, Shanna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

1. BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES For geological carbon sequestration, it is essential to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. BACKGROUND & OBJECTIVES · For geological carbon sequestration, it is essential to understand Material Characterization for Intermediate-scale Testing to Develop Strategies for Geologic Sequestration to generate comprehensive data sets. Due to the nature of the CO2 geological sequestration where supercritical

17

Evaluating variable switching and flash methods in modeling carbon sequestration in deep geologic formations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating variable switching and flash methods in modeling carbon sequestration in deep geologic performance computing to assess the risks involved in carbon sequestration in deep geologic formations-thermal- chemical processes in variably saturated, non-isothermal porous media is applied to sequestration

Mills, Richard

18

Economics of geological sequestration and carbon management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In this carbon-constrained world, carbon management options for climate change mitigation are becoming increasingly important, especially in China, one of the largest energy consuming and… (more)

Su, Hui, 1976-

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Carbon Trading Protocols for Geologic Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Liability for the Site EOR Projects For a leakage over 0.1%the permitting authority. EOR projects may be consideredproduced oil is "carbon free". EOR projects wishing to be

Hoversten, Shanna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

CO2 leakage in a Geological Carbon Sequestration system: Scenario development and analysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? The aim of this project was to study the leakage of CO2 in a Geological Carbon Sequestration (GCS) system. To define the GCS system,… (more)

Basirat, Farzad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

On leakage and seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic carbon sequestration is one strategy for reducing the rate of increase of global atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2} ) concentrations (IEA, 1997; Reichle, 2000). As used here, the term geologic carbon sequestration refers to the direct injection of supercritical CO{sub 2} deep into subsurface target formations. These target formations will typically be either depleted oil and gas reservoirs, or brine-filled permeable formations referred to here as brine formations. Injected CO{sub 2} will tend to be trapped by one or more of the following mechanisms: (1) permeability trapping, for example when buoyant supercritical CO{sub 2} rises until trapped by a confining caprock; (2) solubility trapping, for example when CO{sub 2} dissolves into the aqueous phase in water-saturated formations, or (3) mineralogic trapping, such as occurs when CO{sub 2} reacts to produce stable carbonate minerals. When CO{sub 2} is trapped in the subsurface by any of these mechanisms, it is effectively sequestered away from the atmosphere where it would otherwise act as a greenhouse gas. The purpose of this report is to summarize our work aimed at quantifying potential CO{sub 2} seepage due to leakage from geologic carbon sequestration sites. The approach we take is to present first the relevant properties of CO{sub 2} over the range of conditions from the deep subsurface to the vadose zone (Section 2), and then discuss conceptual models for how leakage might occur (Section 3). The discussion includes consideration of gas reservoir and natural gas storage analogs, along with some simple estimates of seepage based on assumed leakage rates. The conceptual model discussion provides the background for the modeling approach wherein we focus on simulating transport in the vadose zone, the last potential barrier to CO{sub 2} seepage (Section 4). Because of the potentially wide range of possible properties of actual future geologic sequestration sites, we carry out sensitivity analyses by means of numerical simulation and derive the trends in seepage flux and near-surface CO{sub 2} concentrations that will arise from variations in fundamental hydrogeological properties.

Oldenburg, C.M.; Unger, A.J.A.; Hepple, R.P.; Jordan, P.D.

2002-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

22

Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coal Bed Methane. US DOE, NETL. Ventyx, 2012. Velocity SuiteCarbon Sequestration. NETL. Earles, M.J. , Halog, A. , 2011.

Breunig, H.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic CO2 Sequestration Geologic reservoirs offer promising option for long- term storage of captured CO 2 Accumulations of gases (including CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs, by natural processes or through enhanced oil recovery operations, demonstrate that gas can be stored for long periods of time and provide insights to the efficacy and impacts of geological gas storage. Los Alamos scientists in the Earth and Environmental Sciences (EES) Division have been involved in geologic CO 2 storage research for over a decade. Research Highlights * Led first-ever US field test on CO 2 sequestration in depleted oil reservoirs * Participant in two Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (Southwest Regional and Big Sky) * Part of the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) for CO

24

Impacts of Geochemical Reactions on Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the face of increasing energy demands, geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) is a promising option to mitigate the adverse effects of climate change. To ensure the environmental sustainability of this option, we must understand the rates and mechanisms of ...

Young-Shin Jun; Daniel E. Giammar; Charles J. Werth

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

25

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic  Geology Billion  Gallons  per  Year Brine  Use  Sequence Carbon  dioxide  Capture  and  Storage Carbon  Dioxide Coal-­?

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Carbon sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Leaver and Howard Dalton Carbon sequestration Rattan Lal * * ( lal.1...and biotic technologies. Carbon sequestration implies transfer of atmospheric...and biomass burning. 3. Carbon sequestration Emission rates from fossil...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

March 9 Morning Session 1 Geological Carbon Sequestration: Introductions (8:30-10:15), Jeff Daniels, Moderator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agenda March 9 ­ Morning Session 1 ­ Geological Carbon Sequestration: Introductions (8 Testing: The Laboratory for Geological Carbon Sequestration (Neeraj Gupta, Battelle) Session 2 ­ Carbon in Reducing the Costs for Carbon Capture (Bruce Sass, Battelle) 2. Capture and sequestration challenges

Daniels, Jeffrey J.

28

CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA: REPORT TO THE LEGISLATURE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) studies that we used, including Cameron Downey

29

Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

“Carbon sequestration” refers to a portfolio of activities for ... capture, separation and storage or reuse of carbon or CO2. Carbon sequestration technologies encompass both the prevention of CO2 emissions into ...

Robert L. Kane MS; Daniel E. Klein MBA

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a certification framework (CF) for certifying the safety and effectiveness of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. Safety and effectiveness are achieved if CO{sub 2} and displaced brine have no significant impact on humans, other living things, resources, or the environment. In the CF, we relate effective trapping to CO{sub 2} leakage risk which takes into account both the impact and probability of leakage. We achieve simplicity in the CF by using (1) wells and faults as the potential leakage pathways, (2) compartments to represent environmental resources that may be impacted by leakage, (3) CO{sub 2} fluxes and concentrations in the compartments as proxies for impact to vulnerable entities, (4) broad ranges of storage formation properties to generate a catalog of simulated plume movements, and (5) probabilities of intersection of the CO{sub 2} plume with the conduits and compartments. We demonstrate the approach on a hypothetical GCS site in a Texas Gulf Coast saline formation. Through its generality and flexibility, the CF can contribute to the assessment of risk of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage as part of the certification process for licensing and permitting of GCS sites around the world regardless of the specific regulations in place in any given country.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Bryant, Steven L.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

31

Risk assessment framework for geologic carbon sequestration sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a simple and transparent approach for assessing CO{sub 2} and brine leakage risk associated with CO{sub 2} injection at geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites. The approach, called the Certification Framework (CF), is based on the concept of effective trapping, which takes into account both the probability of leakage from the storage formation and impacts of leakage. The effective trapping concept acknowledges that GCS can be safe and effective even if some CO{sub 2} and brine were to escape from the storage formation provided the impact of such leakage is below agreed-upon limits. The CF uses deterministic process models to calculate expected well- and fault-related leakage fluxes and concentrations. These in turn quantify the impacts under a given leakage scenario to so-called 'compartments,' which comprise collections of vulnerable entities. The probabilistic part of the calculated risk comes from the likelihood of (1) the intersections of injected CO{sub 2} and related pressure perturbations with well or fault leakage pathways, and (2) intersections of leakage pathways with compartments. Two innovative approaches for predicting leakage likelihood, namely (1) fault statistics, and (2) fuzzy rules for fault and fracture intersection probability, are highlighted here.

Oldenburg, C.; Jordan, P.; Zhang, Y.; Nicot, J.-P.; Bryant, S.L.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

andrea Mcnemar andrea Mcnemar National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 304-285-2024 andrea.mcnemar@netl.doe.gov Gregory J. Elbring Principal Investigator Sandia National Laboratory P.O. Box 5800 Albuquerque, NM 87185 505-844-4904 gjelbri@sandia.gov GeoloGic SequeStration of carbon DioxiDe in a DepleteD oil reServoir: a comprehenSive moDelinG anD Site monitorinG project Background The use of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) to enhance oil recovery (EOR) is a familiar and frequently used technique in the United States. The oil and gas industry has significant experience with well drilling and injecting CO 2 into oil-bearing formations to enhance production. While using similar techniques as in oil production, this sequestration field

33

Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Co. (2008) Carbon capture and storage: Assessing theof Carbon Dioxide, in Carbon Capture and SequestrationWilson and Gerard, editors, Carbon Capture and Sequestration

Oldenburg, C.M.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

RESEARCH SUMMARY BY QUANLIN ZHOU During my stay at LBNL from March 2001, I have been working on (1) geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on (1) geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) projects for mitigating global climate change, (2) the DOE projects. 1 Research Highlights 1.1. Geological Carbon Sequestration I have been working on eight research projects in the area of geologic carbon sequestration since 2006. I have been PI or Co-PI for six projects

Zhou, Quanlin

35

House Committee on Natural Resources The Future of Fossil Fuels: Geological and Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Howard Herzog Principal Research Engineer Massachusetts Institute to the Technical Group of the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (see www.cslforum.org). Just two weeks ago, thank you for the opportunity to appear before you today to discuss Carbon Dioxide (CO2) geological

36

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fired  Power  Plants”,  DOE/NETL,  2010.   Chelme-­?Ayala,  Capture. ”   RADS  LLC,  DOE/NETL.  2011.   Gong,  Y.  and  Geologic   Formations. ”  NETL.  2009.   Texas  Water  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Induced seismicity within geologic carbon sequestration projects: Maximum earthquake magnitude and leakage potential from undetected faults  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wilson and Gerard, editors, Carbon Capture and Sequestration2010, Shell's Barendrecht Carbon-Capture Project Canceled,s-barendrecht-carbon-capture-project-canceled.html. Pruess,

Mazzoldi, A.P.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

LUCI: A facility at DUSEL for large-scale experimental study of geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wilson, Gerard, editors. Carbon Capture and SequestrationSpecial Report on carbon dioxide capture and storage, Metzof cement. In: Carbon Dioxide Capture for Storage in Deep

Peters, C. A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium--Validation Phase  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Geological Sequestration Consortium-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies, electric utilities,

40

Coupling geothermal energy capture with carbon dioxide sequestration in naturally permeable, porous geologic formations  – a novel approach for expanding geothermal energy utilization.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis research presents a new method to harness geothermal energy by combining it with geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration. CO2 is injected into deep,… (more)

Randolph, Jimmy Bryan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide - an energy resource perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most energy used to meet human needs is derived from the combustion of fossil fuels (natural gas, oil, and coal), which releases carbon to the atmosphere, primarily as carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The atmospheric concentration of CO{sub 2}, a greenhouse gas, is increasing, raising concerns that solar heat will be trapped and the average surficial temperature of the Earth will rise in response. Global warming studies predict that climate changes resulting from increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} will adversely affect life on Earth. In the 200 years since the industrial revolution, the world's population has grown from about 800 million to over 6 billion people and the CO{sub 2} content of the atmosphere has risen from about 280 to about 360 parts per million by volume, a 30 percent increase. International concern about potential global climate change has spurred discussions about limiting the amount of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases released to the atmosphere. 1 ref., 3 figs.

Robert C. Burruss; Sean T. Brennan

2003-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Carbon Sequestration Project Portfolio  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Home > Technologies > Carbon Storage > Reference Shelf > Project Portfolio Carbon Storage 2011 Carbon Storage Project Portfolio Table of Contents CARBON STORAGE OVERVIEW Carbon Storage Program Contacts [PDF-26KB] Carbon Storage Projects National Map [PDF-169KB] State Projects Summary Table [PDF-39KB] Carbon Storage Program Structure [PDF-181KB] Selected Carbon Sequestration Program Papers and Publications The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Program to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions Through Beneficial Uses of Carbon Dioxide (2011) [PDF-3.3MB] Greenhouse Gas Science and Technology Carbon Capture and Sequestration: The U.S. Department of Energy's R&D Efforts to Characterize Opportunities for Deep Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide in Offshore Resources (2011) [PDF-445KB]

43

Influence of Shrinkage and Swelling Properties of Coal on Geologic Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for enhanced methane production and geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide in coalbeds needs to be evaluated before large-scale sequestration projects are undertaken. Geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide in deep unmineable coal seams with the potential for enhanced coalbed methane production has become a viable option to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. The coal matrix is believed to shrink during methane production and swell during the injection of carbon dioxide, causing changes in tlie cleat porosity and permeability of the coal seam. However, the influence of swelling and shrinkage, and the geomechanical response during the process of carbon dioxide injection and methane recovery, are not well understood. A three-dimensional swelling and shrinkage model based on constitutive equations that account for the coupled fluid pressure-deformation behavior of a porous medium was developed and implemented in an existing reservoir model. Several reservoir simulations were performed at a field site located in the San Juan basin to investigate the influence of swelling and shrinkage, as well as other geomechanical parameters, using a modified compositional coalbed methane reservoir simulator (modified PSU-COALCOMP). The paper presents numerical results for interpretation of reservoir performance during injection of carbon dioxide at this site. Available measured data at the field site were compared with computed values. Results show that coal swelling and shrinkage during the process of enhanced coalbed methane recovery can have a significant influence on the reservoir performance. Results also show an increase in the gas production rate with an increase in the elastic modulus of the reservoir material and increase in cleat porosity. Further laboratory and field tests of the model are needed to furnish better estimates of petrophysical parameters, test the applicability of thee model, and determine the need for further refinements to the mathematical model.

Siriwardane, H.J.; Gondle, R.; Smith, D.H.

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

David a. Lang David a. Lang Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236 412-386-4881 david.lang@netl.doe.gov andrew chizmeshya Arizona State University Center for Solid State Science Tempe, AZ 85287-1704 480-965-6072 chizmesh@asu.edu A Novel ApproAch to MiNerAl cArboNAtioN: eNhANciNg cArboNAtioN While AvoidiNg MiNerAl pretreAtMeNt process cost Background Carbonation of the widely occurring minerals of the olivine group, such as forsterite (Mg 2 SiO 4 ), is a potential large-scale sequestration process that converts CO 2 into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO 3 ). Because the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is the key to economic viability. Previous

45

Relevance of underground natural gas storage to geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The practice of underground natural gas storage (UNGS), which started in the USA in 1916, provides useful insight into the geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide--the dominant anthropogenic greenhouse gas released into the atmosphere. In many ways, UNGS is directly relevant to geologic CO{sub 2} storage because, like CO{sub 2}, natural gas (essentially methane) is less dense than water. Consequently, it will tend to rise to the top of any subsurface storage structure located below the groundwater table. By the end of 2001 in the USA, about 142 million metric tons of natural gas were stored underground in depleted oil and gas reservoirs and brine aquifers. Based on their performance, UNGS projects have shown that there is a safe and effective way of storing large volumes of gases in the subsurface. In the small number of cases where failures did occur (i.e., leakage of the stored gas into neighboring permeable layers), they were mainly related to improper well design, construction, maintenance, and/or incorrect project operation. In spite of differences in the chemical and physical properties of the gases, the risk-assessment, risk-management, and risk-mitigation issues relevant to UNGS projects are also pertinent to geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration.

Lippmann, Marcelo J.; Benson, Sally M.

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

CALIFORNIA CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN WASHINGTON. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use in Washington: Costs and Opportunities. California for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock International. #12;ii #12;iii Preface

47

Multiphase Sequestration Geochemistry: Model for Mineral Carbonation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Mineral Carbonation. Abstract: Carbonation of formation minerals converts low viscosity supercritical CO2 injected into deep saline reservoirs for geologic sequestration...

48

An Assessment of Geological Carbon Sequestration Options in the Illinois Basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) has investigated the options for geological carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in the 155,400-km{sup 2} (60,000-mi{sup 2}) Illinois Basin. Within the Basin, underlying most of Illinois, western Indiana, and western Kentucky, are relatively deeper and/or thinner coal resources, numerous mature oil fields, and deep salt-water-bearing reservoirs that are potentially capable of storing CO{sub 2}. The objective of this Assessment was to determine the technical and economic feasibility of using these geological sinks for long-term storage to avoid atmospheric release of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel combustion and thereby avoid the potential for adverse climate change. The MGSC is a consortium of the geological surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by six private corporations, five professional business associations, one interstate compact, two university researchers, two Illinois state agencies, and two consultants. The purpose of the Consortium is to assess carbon capture, transportation, and storage processes and their costs and viability in the three-state Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey serves as Lead Technical Contractor for the Consortium. The Illinois Basin region has annual emissions from stationary anthropogenic sources exceeding 276 million metric tonnes (304 million tons) of CO{sub 2} (>70 million tonnes (77 million tons) carbon equivalent), primarily from coal-fired electric generation facilities, some of which burn almost 4.5 million tonnes (5 million tons) of coal per year. Assessing the options for capture, transportation, and storage of the CO{sub 2} emissions within the region has been a 12-task, 2-year process that has assessed 3,600 million tonnes (3,968 million tons) of storage capacity in coal seams, 140 to 440 million tonnes (154 to 485 million tons) of capacity in mature oil reservoirs, 7,800 million tonnes (8,598 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs deep beneath geological structures, and 30,000 to 35,000 million tonnes (33,069 to 38,580 million tons) of capacity in saline reservoirs on a regional dip >1,219 m (4,000 ft) deep. The major part of this effort assessed each of the three geological sinks: coals, oil reservoirs, and saline reservoirs. We linked and integrated options for capture, transportation, and geological storage with the environmental and regulatory framework to define sequestration scenarios and potential outcomes for the region. Extensive use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and visualization technology was made to convey results to project sponsors, other researchers, the business community, and the general public. An action plan for possible technology validation field tests involving CO{sub 2} injection was included in a Phase II proposal (successfully funded) to the U.S. Department of Energy with cost sharing from Illinois Clean Coal Institute.

Robert Finley

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

49

Characterizing fault-plume intersection probability for geologic carbon sequestration risk assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leakage of CO{sub 2} out of the designated storage region via faults is a widely recognized concern for geologic carbon sequestration. The probability of such leakage can be separated into the probability of a plume encountering a fault and the probability of flow along such a fault. In the absence of deterministic fault location information, the first probability can be calculated from regional fault population statistics and modeling of the plume shape and size. In this study, fault statistical parameters were measured or estimated for WESTCARB's Phase III pilot test injection in the San Joaquin Valley, California. Combining CO{sub 2} plume model predictions with estimated fault characteristics resulted in a 3% probability that the CO{sub 2} plume will encounter a fault fully offsetting the 180 m (590 ft) thick seal. The probability of leakage is lower, likely much lower, as faults with this offset are probably low-permeability features in this area.

Jordan, Preston D.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Nicot, Jean-Philippe

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Case studies of the application of the Certification Framework to two geologic carbon sequestration sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a certification framework (CF) for certifying that the risks of geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites are below agreed-upon thresholds. The CF is based on effective trapping of CO2, the proposed concept that takes into account both the probability and impact of CO2 leakage. The CF uses probability estimates of the intersection of conductive faults and wells with the CO2 plume along with modeled fluxes or concentrations of CO2 as proxies for impacts to compartments (such as potable groundwater) to calculate CO2 leakage risk. In order to test and refine the approach, we applied the CF to (1) a hypothetical large-scale GCS project in the Texas Gulf Coast, and (2) WESTCARB's Phase III GCS pilot in the southern San Joaquin Valley, California.

Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Nicot, J.-P.; Bryant, S.L.

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Coda-wave interferometry analysis of time-lapse VSP data for monitoring geological carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Injection and movement/saturation of carbon dioxide (CO2) in a geological formation will cause changes in seismic velocities. We investigate the capability of coda-wave interferometry technique for estimating CO2-induced seismic velocity changes using time-lapse synthetic vertical seismic profiling (VSP) data and the field VSP datasets acquired for monitoring injected CO2 in a brine aquifer in Texas, USA. Synthetic VSP data are calculated using a finite-difference elastic-wave equation scheme and a layered model based on the elastic Marmousi model. A possible leakage scenario is simulated by introducing seismic velocity changes in a layer above the CO2 injection layer. We find that the leakage can be detected by the detection of a difference in seismograms recorded after the injection compared to those recorded before the injection at an earlier time in the seismogram than would be expected if there was no leakage. The absolute values of estimated mean velocity changes, from both synthetic and field VSP data, increase significantly for receiver positions approaching the top of a CO2 reservoir. Our results from field data suggest that the velocity changes caused by CO2 injection could be more than 10% and are consistent with results from a crosswell tomogram study. This study demonstrates that time-lapse VSP with coda-wave interferometry analysis can reliably and effectively monitor geological carbon sequestration.

Zhou, R.; Huang, L.; Rutledge, J.T.; Fehler, M.; Daley, T.M.; Majer, E.L.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

NETL: Gasifipedia - Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coal: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization: Carbon Sequestration Coal: SNG from Coal: Process & Commercialization: Carbon Sequestration Carbon sequestration, also termed carbon storage, is the permanent storage of CO2, usually in deep geologic formations. Industrially-generated CO2 -- resulting from fossil fuel combustion, gasification, and other industrial processes -- is injected as a supercritical fluid into geologic reservoirs, where it is held in place by natural traps and seals. Carbon storage is one approach to minimizing atmospheric emissions of man-made CO2. As discussed above, the main purpose of CO2 EOR such as the Weyburn Project is tertiary recovery of crude oil, but in effect substantial CO2 remains sequestered/stored as a result. Current Status of CO2 Storage CO2 storage is currently underway in the United States and around the world. Large, commercial-scale projects, like the Sleipner CO2 Storage Site in Norway and the Weyburn-Midale CO2 Project in Canada, have been injecting CO2 into geologic storage formations more than a decade. Each of these projects stores more than 1 million tons of CO2 per year. Large-scale efforts are currently underway in Africa, China, Australia, and Europe, as well. These commercial-scale projects are demonstrating that large volumes of CO2 can be safely and permanently stored. In addition, a number of smaller pilot projects are underway in different parts of the world to determine suitable locations and technologies for future long-term CO2 storage. To date, more than 200 small-scale CO2 storage projects have been carried out worldwide. A demonstration project that captures CO2 from a pulverized coal power plant and pipes it to a geologic formation for storage recently came online in Alabama.

53

Comprehensive Review of Caprock-Sealing Mechanisms for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO2 capture and geologic sequestration is one of the most promising options for reducing atmospheric emissions of CO2. Its viability and long-term safety, which depends on the caprock’s sealing capacity and integrity, is crucial for implementing CO2 ...

Juan Song; Dongxiao Zhang

2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

54

Economic Screening of Geologic Sequestration Options in the United States with a Carbon Management Geographic Information System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Developing a carbon management strategy is a formidable task for nations as well as individual companies. It is often difficult to understand what options are available, let alone determine which may be optimal. In response to the need for a better understanding of complex carbon management options, Battelle has developed a state-of-the-art Geographic Information System (GIS) model with economic screening capability focused on carbon capture and geologic sequestration opportunities in the United States. This paper describes the development of this GIS-based economic screening model and demonstrates its use for carbon management analysis.

Dahowski, Robert T. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Dooley, James J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Brown, Daryl R. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Stephan, Alex J. (BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Badie I. Morsi

2001-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

55

Probability Estimation of CO2 Leakage Through Faults at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Leakage of CO{sub 2} and brine along faults at geologic carbon sequestration (GCS) sites is a primary concern for storage integrity. The focus of this study is on the estimation of the probability of leakage along faults or fractures. This leakage probability is controlled by the probability of a connected network of conduits existing at a given site, the probability of this network encountering the CO{sub 2} plume, and the probability of this network intersecting environmental resources that may be impacted by leakage. This work is designed to fit into a risk assessment and certification framework that uses compartments to represent vulnerable resources such as potable groundwater, health and safety, and the near-surface environment. The method we propose includes using percolation theory to estimate the connectivity of the faults, and generating fuzzy rules from discrete fracture network simulations to estimate leakage probability. By this approach, the probability of CO{sub 2} escaping into a compartment for a given system can be inferred from the fuzzy rules. The proposed method provides a quick way of estimating the probability of CO{sub 2} or brine leaking into a compartment. In addition, it provides the uncertainty range of the estimated probability.

Zhang, Yingqi; Oldenburg, Curt; Finsterle, Stefan; Jordan, Preston; Zhang, Keni

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Carbon Sequestration - Public Meeting  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Public Meeting Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Public Meeting May 18, 2004 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Scott Klara Carbon Sequestration Technology Manager Carbon Sequestration Program Overview * What is Carbon Sequestration * The Fossil Energy Situation * Greenhouse Gas Implications * Pathways to Greenhouse Gas Stabilization * Sequestration Program Overview * Program Requirements & Structure * Regional Partnerships * FutureGen * Sources of Information What is Carbon Sequestration? Capture can occur: * at the point of emission * when absorbed from air Storage locations include: * underground reservoirs * dissolved in deep oceans * converted to solid materials * trees, grasses, soils, or algae Capture and storage of CO 2 and other Greenhouse Gases that

57

Development and Deployment of a Compact Eye-safe Scanning Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Spatial Mapping of Carbon Dioxide for MVA at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Deployment of a Deployment of a Compact Eye-safe Scanning Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Spatial Mapping of Carbon Dioxide for MVA at Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites Description Through its core research and development program administered by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) emphasizes monitoring, verification, and accounting (MVA), as well as computer simulation, of possible carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) leakage at CO 2

58

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MIDWEST GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION CONSORTIUM THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) is a consortium of the geologic surveys of Illinois, Indiana, and Kentucky joined by private corporations, professional business associations, the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission, three Illinois state agencies, and university researchers to assess carbon capture, transportation, and geologic storage processes and their costs and viability in the Illinois Basin region. The Illinois State Geological Survey is the Lead Technical Contractor for MGSC, which covers all of Illinois, southwest Indiana, and western Kentucky. To avoid atmospheric release of CO

59

NETL: First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Plenary Session Industry Focus Panel Discussion Session 1A. Geologic Sequestration I - Overview Session 1B. Capture & Separation I - Industrial Efforts Session 1C. Modeling I - Case Studies & Deployment Session 2A. Geologic Sequestration II - EOR/EGR Session 2B. Capture & Separation II - Improved Processes Session 2C. Modeling II - Economics Poster Presentations International Panel Discussion Session 3A. Geologic Sequestration III - Enhanced Coalbed Methane Session 3B. Capture & Separation III - Adsorption Studies Session 3C. Terrestrial Sequestration I - Ecosystem Behavior Session 4A. Geologic Sequestration IV - Saline Aquifers Session 4B. Capture & Separation IV - Power Systems Concepts

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Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Science & Innovation » Carbon Capture and Storage » Regional Science & Innovation » Carbon Capture and Storage » Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program DOE has created a network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSPs) to help develop the technology, infrastructure, and regulations to implement large-scale CO2 storage (also called carbon sequestration) in different regions and geologic formations within the Nation. Collectively, the seven RCSPs represent regions encompassing: 97 percent of coal-fired CO2 emissions; 97 percent of industrial CO2 emissions; 96 percent of the total land mass; and essentially all the geologic sequestration sites in the U.S. potentially available for carbon storage.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

LUCI: A facility at DUSEL for large-scale experimental study of geologic carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

LUCI, the Laboratory for Underground CO{sub 2} Investigations, is an experimental facility being planned for the DUSEL underground laboratory in South Dakota, USA. It is designed to study vertical flow of CO{sub 2} in porous media over length scales representative of leakage scenarios in geologic carbon sequestration. The plan for LUCI is a set of three vertical column pressure vessels, each of which is {approx}500 m long and {approx}1 m in diameter. The vessels will be filled with brine and sand or sedimentary rock. Each vessel will have an inner column to simulate a well for deployment of down-hole logging tools. The experiments are configured to simulate CO{sub 2} leakage by releasing CO{sub 2} into the bottoms of the columns. The scale of the LUCI facility will permit measurements to study CO{sub 2} flow over pressure and temperature variations that span supercritical to subcritical gas conditions. It will enable observation or inference of a variety of relevant processes such as buoyancy-driven flow in porous media, Joule-Thomson cooling, thermal exchange, viscous fingering, residual trapping, and CO{sub 2} dissolution. Experiments are also planned for reactive flow of CO{sub 2} and acidified brines in caprock sediments and well cements, and for CO{sub 2}-enhanced methanogenesis in organic-rich shales. A comprehensive suite of geophysical logging instruments will be deployed to monitor experimental conditions as well as provide data to quantify vertical resolution of sensor technologies. The experimental observations from LUCI will generate fundamental new understanding of the processes governing CO{sub 2} trapping and vertical migration, and will provide valuable data to calibrate and validate large-scale model simulations.

Peters, C. A.; Dobson, P.F.; Oldenburg, C.M.; Wang, J. S. Y.; Onstott, T.C.; Scherer, G.W.; Freifeld, B.M.; Ramakrishnan, T.S.; Stabinski, E.L.; Liang, K.; Verma, S.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Mobilization and Transport of Organic Compounds from Reservoir Rock and Caprock in Geological Carbon Sequestration Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is an excellent solvent for organic compounds, including benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylene (BTEX), phenols, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Monitoring results from geological carbon sequestration (GCS) field tests has shown that organic compounds are mobilized following CO2 injection. Such results have raised concerns regarding the potential for groundwater contamination by toxic organic compounds mobilized during GCS. Knowledge of the mobilization mechanism of organic compounds and their transport and fate in the subsurface is essential for assessing risks associated with GCS. Extraction tests using scCO2 and methylene chloride (CH2Cl2) were conducted to study the mobilization of volatile organic compounds (VOCs, including BTEX), the PAH naphthalene, and n-alkanes (n-C20 – n-C30) by scCO2 from representative reservoir rock and caprock obtained from depleted oil reservoirs and coal from an enhanced coal-bed methane recovery site. More VOCs and naphthalene were extractable by scCO2 compared to the CH2Cl2 extractions, while scCO2 extractable alkane concentrations were much lower than concentrations extractable by CH2Cl2. In addition, dry scCO2 was found to extract more VOCs than water saturated scCO2, but water saturated scCO2 mobilized more naphthalene than dry scCO2. In sand column experiments, moisture content was found to have an important influence on the transport of the organic compounds. In dry sand columns the majority of the compounds were retained in the column except benzene and toluene. In wet sand columns the mobility of the BTEX was much higher than that of naphthalene. Based upon results determined for the reservoir rock, caprock, and coal samples studied here, the risk to aquifers from contamination by organic compounds appears to be relatively low; however, further work is necessary to fully evaluate risks from depleted oil reservoirs.

Zhong, Lirong; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Mitroshkov, Alexandre V.; Shewell, Jesse L.

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

63

Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4966 jose.figueroa@netl.doe.gov Kevin o'Brien Principal Investigator SRI International Materials Research Laboratory 333 Ravenswood Avenue Menlo Park, AK 94025 650-859-3528 kevin.obrien@sri.com Fabrication and Scale-Up oF polybenzimidazole - baSed membrane SyStem For pre - combUStion captUre oF carbon dioxide Background In order to effectively sequester carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from a gasification plant, there must be an economically viable method for removing the CO 2 from other gases. While CO 2 separation technologies currently exist, their effectiveness is limited. Amine-based separation technologies work only at low temperatures, while pressure-swing absorption and cryogenic distillation consume significantly

64

Intro to Carbon Sequestration  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program is helping to develop technologies to capture, purify, and store carbon dioxide (CO2) in order to reduce greenhouse gas emissions without adversely influencing energy use or hindering economic growth. Carbon sequestration technologies capture and store CO2 that would otherwise reside in the atmosphere for long periods of time.

None

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

65

An Industry Perspective on Geologic Storage & Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

5, 2001, NETL's 1st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 5, 2001, NETL's 1st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 1 An Industry Perspective on Geologic Storage & Sequestration Gardiner Hill, BP Craig Lewis, Chevron 15 th May'01 1 st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 2 Disclaimer * The following may not be the only Industry Perspective on Storage & Sequestration * It represents the opinions of BP and Chevron and some other energy companies that we have talked to 15 th May'01 1 st National Conference on Carbon Sequestration 3 Overview * Potential New Business Impact * Business Drivers for R&D * Technology Objectives * Definitions of Storage & Sequestration * Break-down of Geologic Storage R&D Categories * Where We Think Industry (and others) are already strong * Where We Think Additional R&D Gaps Still

66

DOE/EA-1482: Environmental Assessment for Pilot Experiment for Geological Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide in Saline Aquifer Brine Formations (October 2003)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

82 82 ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PILOT EXPERIMENT FOR GEOLOGICAL SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE IN SALINE AQUIFER BRINE FORMATIONS FRIO FORMATION, LIBERTY COUNTY, TEXAS OCTOBER 2003 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY NATIONAL ENERGY TECHNOLOGY LABORATORY ii iii National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Compliance Cover Sheet Proposed Action: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to provide funds for a field test of the geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). The Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) at The University of Texas at Austin, under contract with DOE, has studied the potential for sequestration of CO 2 in geologic formations of the United States as part of a broader series of DOE-sponsored research projects to

67

NETL: The Carbon Sequestration Newsletter: July 2001  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

July 2001 July 2001 This newsletter is produced by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and presents summaries of significant events related to carbon sequestration that have taken place over the past month. TABLE OF CONTENTS Sequestration in the News Events / Announcements from NETL's Carbon Sequestration Program Publications Legislative Activity Related to Carbon Sequestration Sequestration in the News New York Times The June 17 edition of the New York Times contains an article on carbon sequestration in geologic formations, Strategy has a Greenhouse Gas Bottled Up Under Land and Sea. The article mentions President Bush's support of carbon sequestration technologies, the $15 million Southern Saskatchewan project in Weyburn oil fields, and the reactions from environmental groups. Go to the New York Times to find the article by entering "Weyburn" on the web site's search feature.

68

Geological sequestration of carbon dioxide by hydrous carbonate formation in steelmaking slag .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??"The formation of carbonate solids from the alkaline earth oxide phases in steelmaking slag was investigated in dry and aqueous conditions as a vehicle for… (more)

Rawlins, C. Hank, 1968-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Maximizing Storage Rate and Capacity and Insuring the Environmental Integrity of Carbon dioxide Sequestration in Geological Reservoirs L. A. Davis Lorne.Davis@coe.ttu.edu Department of Petroleum Engineering A. L. Graham Alan.Graham@coe.ttu.edu H. W. Parker** Harry.Parker@coe.ttu.edu Department of Chemical Engineering Texas Tech University Lubbock, Texas 79409 M. S. Ingber ingber@me.unm.edu A. A. Mammoli mammoli@me.unm.edu Department of Mechanical Engineering University of New Mexico Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 L. A. Mondy lamondy@engsci.sandia.gov Energetic and Multiphase Processes Department Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0834 Quanxin Guo quan@advantekinternational.com Ahmed Abou-Sayed a.abou-sayed@att.net

70

Carbon Sequestration 101  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

R&D Overview R&D Overview Office of Fossil Energy Justin "Judd" R. Swift Asst. Secretary for International Affairs Office of Fossil Energy U.S. Department of Energy 2 nd U.S/China CO 2 Emission Control Science & Technology Symposium May 28-29, 2008 Hangzhou, China Office of Fossil Energy Technological Carbon Management Options Improve Efficiency Sequester Carbon  Renewables  Nuclear  Fuel Switching  Demand Side  Supply Side  Capture & Store  Enhance Natural Sinks Reduce Carbon Intensity All options needed to:  Affordably meet energy demand  Address environmental objectives Office of Fossil Energy DOE's Sequestration Program Structure Infrastructure Regional Carbon Sequestration

71

Summary Report on CO2 Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

10 th Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration,2 saturated brines. In 10th Carbon Capture and SequestrationIn: 9 th Annual Carbon Capture & Sequestration Meeting,

Varadharajan, C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Coal Bed Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

COAL BED SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE COAL BED SEQUESTRATION OF CARBON DIOXIDE R. Stanton (rstanton@usgs.gov; 703-648-6462) U.S. Geological Survey MS 956 National Center Reston, VA 20192 R. Flores (rflores@usgs.gov; 303-236-7774) U.S. Geological Survey MS 939, Denver Federal Center Denver, CO 80225 P.D. Warwick (pwarwick@usgs.gov; 703-648-6469) H. Gluskoter (halg@usgs.gov; 703-648-6429) U.S. Geological Survey MS 956 National Center Reston, VA 20192 G.D. Stricker (303-236-7763) U.S. Geological Survey MS 939, Denver Federal Center Denver, CO 80225 Introduction Geologic sequestration of CO 2 generated from fossil fuel combustion may be an environmentally attractive method to reduce the amount of greenhouse gas emissions. Of the geologic options, sequestering CO

73

geologic-sequestration | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geological Sequestration Training and Research Program in Capture and Transport: Development of the Most Economical Separation Method for CO2 Capture Project No.: DE-FE0001953 NETL...

74

Geological Sequestration of CO2: The GEO-SEQ Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GeoloGical SequeStration of co GeoloGical SequeStration of co 2 : the Geo-Seq Project Background Growing concern over the potential adverse effects of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) buildup in the atmosphere leading to global climate change may require reductions in carbon emissions from industrial, transportation, and other sources. One promising option is the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent sequestration in geologic formations. For this approach to achieve wide acceptance, t assurances that safe, permanent, and verifiable CO 2 geologic storage is attained during sequestration operations must be made. Project results are made available to potential CO 2 storage operators and other interested stakeholders. The primary performing organizations of the GEO-SEQ project team are Lawrence

75

Preliminary Geologic Characterization of West Coast States for Geologic Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization of geological sinks for sequestration of CO{sub 2} in California, Nevada, Oregon, and Washington was carried out as part of Phase I of the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) project. Results show that there are geologic storage opportunities in the region within each of the following major technology areas: saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and coal beds. The work focused on sedimentary basins as the initial most-promising targets for geologic sequestration. Geographical Information System (GIS) layers showing sedimentary basins and oil, gas, and coal fields in those basins were developed. The GIS layers were attributed with information on the subsurface, including sediment thickness, presence and depth of porous and permeable sandstones, and, where available, reservoir properties. California offers outstanding sequestration opportunities because of its large capacity and the potential of value-added benefits from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and enhanced gas recovery (EGR). The estimate for storage capacity of saline formations in the ten largest basins in California ranges from about 150 to about 500 Gt of CO{sub 2}, depending on assumptions about the fraction of the formations used and the fraction of the pore volume filled with separate-phase CO{sub 2}. Potential CO{sub 2}-EOR storage was estimated to be 3.4 Gt, based on a screening of reservoirs using depth, an API gravity cutoff, and cumulative oil produced. The cumulative production from gas reservoirs (screened by depth) suggests a CO{sub 2} storage capacity of 1.7 Gt. In Oregon and Washington, sedimentary basins along the coast also offer sequestration opportunities. Of particular interest is the Puget Trough Basin, which contains up to 1,130 m (3,700 ft) of unconsolidated sediments overlying up to 3,050 m (10,000 ft) of Tertiary sedimentary rocks. The Puget Trough Basin also contains deep coal formations, which are sequestration targets and may have potential for enhanced coal bed methane recovery (ECBM).

Larry Myer

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

76

Experimental Study of Carbon Sequestration Reactions Controlled  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental Study of Carbon Sequestration Reactions Controlled by the Percolation of CO2-Rich. Carbonation of ultramafic rocks in geological reservoirs is, in theory, the most efficient way to trap CO2 irreversibly; however, possible feedback effects between carbonation reactions and changes in the reservoir

Demouchy, Sylvie

77

Please cite this article in press as: Birkholzer, J.T., et al., Brine flow up a well caused by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic evaluations. Int. J. Greenhouse Gas Control (2011), doi:10.1016/j.ijggc.2011.01.003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static and dynamic evaluations. Int. J.elsevier.com/locate/ijggc Brine flow up a well caused by pressure perturbation from geologic carbon sequestration: Static carbon sequestration (GCS) has drawn increasing con- sideration as a promising method to mitigate

Zhou, Quanlin

78

Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide T. Mill (ted.mill@sri.com; 650-859-3605) SRI, PS273 333 Ravenswood Menlo Park, CA 94025 D. Ross (dsross3@yahoo.com; 650-327-3842) U.S. Geological Survey, Bldg 15 MS 999 345 Middlefield Rd. Menlo Park, CA 94025 Introduction The United States currently meets 80% of its energy needs by burning fossil fuels to form CO 2 . The combustion-based production of CO 2 has evolved into a major environmental challenge that extends beyond national borders and the issue has become as politically charged as it is technologically demanding. Whereas CO 2 levels in the atmosphere had remained stable over the 10,000 years preceeding the industrial revolution, that event initiated rapid growth in CO 2 levels over the past 150 years (Stevens, 2000). The resulting accelerating accumulation of

79

Delayed carbon sequestration and rising carbon prices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We set out a dynamic model to investigate optimal time paths of emissions, carbon stocks and carbon sequestration by land conversion, allowing for non-instantaneous carbon sequestration. Previous research in a dy...

Alejandro Caparrós

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The role of optimality in characterizing CO2 seepage from geological carbon sequestration sites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clim. Change 2002. Workshop carbon capture storage. Proc.this concern, various Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS)Special Report on carbon dioxide capture and storage, ISBN

Cortis, Andrea

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects In September 2009, the U.S. Department of Energy announced more than $12.7 million in funding for geologic sequestration training and research projects. The 43 projects will offer training opportunities for graduate and undergraduate students that will provide the human capital and skills required for implementing and deploying carbon capture and storage technologies. The results of these projects (detailed below) will make a vital contribution to the scientific, technical, and institutional knowledge necessary to establish frameworks for the development of commercial CCS projects. These projects will produce a trained workforce necessary for the

82

Pacific Northwest rangeland carbon sequestration.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This paper models the supply curve of carbon sequestration on Pacific Northwest rangelands. Rangeland managers have the ability to sequester carbon in agricultural soils by… (more)

Wiggins, Seth T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks; development of GIS-based reporting framework; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. At the first two Partnership meetings the groundwork was put in place to provide an assessment of capture and storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. During the third quarter, planning efforts are underway for the next Partnership meeting which will showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks, discuss the methods and analysis underway for assessing geological and terrestrial sequestration potentials. The meeting will conclude with an ASME workshop. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. Efforts are also being made to find funding to include Wyoming in the coverage areas for both geological and terrestrial sinks and sources. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts begun in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies. Two key deliverables were completed in the second quarter--a literature review/database to assess the soil carbon on rangelands, and the draft protocols, contracting options for soil carbon trading. The protocols developed for soil carbon trading are unique and provide a key component of the mechanisms that might be used to efficiently sequester GHG and reduce CO{sub 2} concentrations. While no key deliverables were due during the third quarter, progress on other deliverables is noted in the PowerPoint presentations and in this report. A series of meetings held during the second and third quarters have laid the foundations for assessing the issues surrounding carbon sequestration in this region, the need for a holistic approach to meeting energy demands and economic development potential, and the implementation of government programs or a market-based setting for soil C credits. These meetings provide a connection to stakeholders in the region and a basis on which to draw for the DOE PEIS hearings. In the fourth quarter, three deliverables have been completed, some in draft form to be revised and updated to include Wyoming. This is due primarily to some delays in funding to LANL and INEEL and the approval of a supplemental proposal to include Wyoming in much of the GIS data sets, analysis, and related materials. The de

Susan M. Capalbo

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

Uncertainty quantification for the impact of injection rate fluctuation on the geomechanical response of geological carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an analysis of the geomechanical effects of injection rate fluctuations for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Initially, we present analytical solutions for the effects of injection rate fluctuations on CO2 fluid pressure spatial distribution and temporal evolution for a typical injection scenario. Numerical calculations are performed using a finite element method to investigate the effects of injection rate fluctuations on geomechanical deformation, stresses, and potential failure of the aquifer and caprock layers. The numerical method was first validated by the fluid pressure distribution’s good agreement with the analytical solution. It was shown that for any Gaussian fluctuations of injection rate Q with given mean Q ? and variance ?_Q, the coefficients of variance for fluid pressure (?_p=?_p?p ? ), deformation (?_u=?_u?u ? ), and stresses (?_?=?_??? ? ) increase linearly with the coefficient of variance for injection rate (?_Q=?_Q?Q ? ). The proportional constants are identified, and the fluctuations have the most pronounced effect on the geomechanical stresses, and, therefore, on the potential failure of the aquifer and caprock layers. Instead of expensive computational simulation, this study provides an efficient tool to estimate the geomechanical response variance to injection rate fluctuation. A failure analysis was presented based on the numerical results, where probability of failure was estimated for fluctuating injection rates with different mean and variance during the entire injection period. It was found that with increasing injection rate fluctuation, the failure probability increases significantly. Therefore, the risk associated with injection rate fluctuations should be carefully evaluated.?

Bao, Jie; Chu, Yanjun; Xu, Zhijie; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Fang, Yilin

2014-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

85

Carbon Sequestration in Agroforestry Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Agroforestry systems have great potential as carbon (C) sinks, through C sequestration both above- and belowground. The C-sequestration potentials of tropical agroforestry systems are highly ... caused by (i) the...

Alain Atangana; Damase Khasa; Scott Chang; Ann Degrande

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

SWP Carbon Sequestration Training Center  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Training Center Presentation, Training Center Presentation, October 2010 SWP Carbon Sequestration Training Center Principal Investigators: New Mexico Tech, Andrew Campbell and Peter Mozley University of Utah, Brian McPherson Texas A&M University, Tarla Peterson SWP Training Center Presentation, October 2010 Background  Funded by DOE/NETL.  Purpose is to train more scientists and engineers for work in geological sequestration.  Three year grant.  Designed to be self sustaining. SWP Training Center Presentation, October 2010 Our goal is provide education about CCS at a variety of educational levels in order to promote a pipeline of future CCS scientists and engineers.  High School  K-12 Teachers  Undergraduate  Graduate  Professionals  Outreach SWP Training Center Presentation,

87

Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fossil fuels are abundant, inexpensive to produce, and are easily converted to usable energy by combustion as demonstrated by mankind's dependence on fossil fuels for over 80% of its primary energy supply (13). This reliance on fossil fuels comes with the cost of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions that exceed the rate at which CO{sub 2} can be absorbed by terrestrial and oceanic systems worldwide resulting in increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration as recorded by direct measurements over more than five decades (14). Carbon dioxide is the main greenhouse gas linked to global warming and associated climate change, the impacts of which are currently being observed around the world, and projections of which include alarming consequences such as water and food shortages, sea level rise, and social disruptions associated with resource scarcity (15). The current situation of a world that derives the bulk of its energy from fossil fuel in a manner that directly causes climate change equates to an energy-climate crisis. Although governments around the world have only recently begun to consider policies to avoid the direst projections of climate change and its impacts, sustainable approaches to addressing the crisis are available. The common thread of feasible strategies to the energy climate crisis is the simultaneous use of multiple approaches based on available technologies (e.g., 16). Efficiency improvements (e.g., in building energy use), increased use of natural gas relative to coal, and increased development of renewables such as solar, wind, and geothermal, along with nuclear energy, are all available options that will reduce net CO{sub 2} emissions. While improvements in efficiency can be made rapidly and will pay for themselves, the slower pace of change and greater monetary costs associated with increased use of renewables and nuclear energy suggests an additional approach is needed to help bridge the time period between the present and a future when low-carbon energy is considered cheap enough to replace fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is one such bridging technology (1). CCS has been the focus of an increasing amount of research over the last 15-20 years and is the subject of a comprehensive IPCC report that thoroughly covers the subject (1). CCS is currently being carried out in several countries around the world in conjunction with natural gas extraction (e.g., 2, 3) and enhanced oil recovery (17). Despite this progress, widespread deployment of CCS remains the subject of research and future plans rather than present action on the scale needed to mitigate emissions from the perspective of climate change. The reasons for delay in deploying CCS more widely are concerns about cost (18), regulatory and legal uncertainty (19), and potential environmental impacts (21). This chapter discusses the long-term (decadal) sustainability and environmental hazards associated with the geologic CO{sub 2} storage (GCS) component of large-scale CCS (e.g., 20). Discussion here barely touches on capture and transport of CO{sub 2} which will occur above ground and which are similar to existing engineering, chemical processing, and pipeline transport activities and are therefore easier to evaluate with respect to risk assessment and feasibility. The focus of this chapter is on the more uncertain part of CCS, namely geologic storage. The primary concern for sustainability of GCS is whether there is sufficient capacity in sedimentary basins worldwide to contain the large of amounts of CO{sub 2} needed to address climate change. But there is also a link between sustainability and environmental impacts. Specifically, if GCS is found to cause unacceptable impacts that are considered worse than its climate-change mitigation benefits, the approach will not be widely adopted. Hence, GCS has elements of sustainability insofar as capacity of the subsurface for CO{sub 2} is concerned, and also in terms of whether the associated environmental risks are acceptable or not to the public.

Oldenburg, C.M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Carbon Sequestration Science  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Science Science July 2001 Focus Area Overview Presentation Mission and Scope Program Relationships Scientific Challenges Research Plans Facility Plans Princeton.ppt 7/16/01 Carbon Sequestration Science Focus Area New Projects Contribute to Sequestration Science Systems Integration Virtual Simulation of CO 2 Capture Technologies Cleanup Stream Gas Gasification Gasification MEA CO 2 Capture Facility Oxygen Membrane 3 km 2 inch tube 800m - 20 °C, 20 atm Liquid CO 2 , 100 tons ~1 kg CO 2 / s = 5 MW ^ CO 2 Coal Other Fuels Coal Other Fuels CO 2 Sequestration Aquifer H 2 O Flue gas H 2 O CH 4 CH 4 CO 2 Oil field Oil well Power plant CH 4 Coal - bed Aquiclude H 2 O CO 2 /N 2 CO 2 N 2 CO 2 CO 2 CO 2 CO 2 CO 2 Water Rock , 2 Coal Other Fuels Coal Other Fuels Combustor Oxygen Membrane Princeton.ppt 7/16/01 Carbon Sequestration Science Focus Area

89

Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Lessons  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Lessons Learned Small-Scale Carbon Sequestration Field Test Yields Significant Lessons Learned May 20, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon capture and storage technologies, has completed a preliminary geologic characterization and sequestration field test at FirstEnergy's R. E. Burger Plant near Shadyside, Ohio. The project provided significant geologic understanding and "lessons learned" from a region of the Appalachian Basin with few existing deep well penetrations for geologic characterization. The initial targets for the geologic storage of carbon dioxide (CO2) at the

90

MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MIDWEST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) region consists of nine neighboring states: Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. Battelle Memorial Institute leads MRCSP, which includes nearly 40 organizations from the research community, energy industry, universities, non-government, and government organizations. The region has a diverse range of CO 2 sources and many opportunities for reducing CO 2 emissions through geologic storage and/or EOR. Potential locations for geologic storage in the MRCSP states extend from the deep rock formations in the broad

91

LUCI: A facility at DUSEL for large-scale experimental study of geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wellbores. Fourth annual NETL (US DOE) Conference on Carbonwith CO 2 . Fifth Annual NETL (US DOE) Conference on Carbon

Peters, C. A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework; (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts) and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan Capalbo

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

BIG SKY CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I fall into four areas: evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; designing an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies and assessment frameworks; and initiating a comprehensive education and outreach program. The groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that would complement the ongoing DOE research. Efforts are underway to showcase the architecture of the GIS framework and initial results for sources and sinks. The region has a diverse array of geological formations that could provide storage options for carbon in one or more of its three states. Likewise, initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil C on forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Both options include the potential for offsetting economic benefits to industry and society. Steps have been taken to assure that the GIS-based framework is consistent among types of sinks within the Big Sky Partnership area and with the efforts of other western DOE partnerships. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological sequestration reflect this concern. Research is also underway to identify and validate best management practices for soil C in the Partnership region, and to design a risk/cost effectiveness framework to make comparative assessments of each viable sink, taking into account economic costs, offsetting benefits, scale of sequestration opportunities, spatial and time dimensions, environmental risks, and long-term viability. Scientifically sound information on MMV is critical for public acceptance of these technologies.

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

NETL: 2008 Conference Proceedings - Regional Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

- Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) Webinar with the American Waterworks Association - Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting (MVA) Webinar with the American Waterworks Association December 8, 2008 Table of Contents Disclaimer Agenda [PDF-20KB] Presentations PRESENTATIONS Introductions of Webinar Participants Sarah Wade, Moderator, RCSP Public Outreach Working Group/ Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Brief Overview of AWWA and Their Interest, Roles/Responsibilities, Specific Concerns Cynthia Lane, AWWA Brief Overview of DOE Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program [PDF-1.4MB] Dawn Deel, Project Manager, National Energy Technology Laboratory Ensuring Integrity of Geologic Sequestration: Integrated Application of Simulation, Risk Assessment, and MVA [PDF-1.5MB] Brian McPherson, Principal Investigator, Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP)

95

Leakage and Sepage of CO2 from Geologic Carbon SequestrationSites: CO2 Migration into Surface Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic carbon sequestration is the capture of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and its storage in deep geologic formations. One of the concerns of geologic carbon sequestration is that injected CO{sub 2} may leak out of the intended storage formation, migrate to the near-surface environment, and seep out of the ground or into surface water. In this research, we investigate the process of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage into saturated sediments and overlying surface water bodies such as rivers, lakes, wetlands, and continental shelf marine environments. Natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are well studied and provide insight into the expected transport mechanisms and fate of seepage fluxes of similar magnitude. Also, natural CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} fluxes are pervasive in surface water environments at levels that may mask low-level carbon sequestration leakage and seepage. Extreme examples are the well known volcanic lakes in Cameroon where lake water supersaturated with respect to CO{sub 2} overturned and degassed with lethal effects. Standard bubble formation and hydrostatics are applicable to CO{sub 2} bubbles in surface water. Bubble-rise velocity in surface water is a function of bubble size and reaches a maximum of approximately 30 cm s{sup -1} at a bubble radius of 0.7 mm. Bubble rise in saturated porous media below surface water is affected by surface tension and buoyancy forces, along with the solid matrix pore structure. For medium and fine grain sizes, surface tension forces dominate and gas transport tends to occur as channel flow rather than bubble flow. For coarse porous media such as gravels and coarse sand, buoyancy dominates and the maximum bubble rise velocity is predicted to be approximately 18 cm s{sup -1}. Liquid CO{sub 2} bubbles rise slower in water than gaseous CO{sub 2} bubbles due to the smaller density contrast. A comparison of ebullition (i.e., bubble formation) and resulting bubble flow versus dispersive gas transport for CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4} at three different seepage rates reveals that ebullition and bubble flow will be the dominant form of gas transport in surface water for all but the smallest seepage fluxes or shallowest water bodies. The solubility of the gas species in water plays a fundamental role in whether ebullition occurs. We used a solubility model to examine CO{sub 2} solubility in waters with varying salinity as a function of depth below a 200 m-deep surface water body. In this system, liquid CO{sub 2} is stable between the deep regions where supercritical CO{sub 2} is stable and the shallow regions where gaseous CO{sub 2} is stable. The transition from liquid to gaseous CO{sub 2} is associated with a large change in density, with corresponding large change in bubble buoyancy. The solubility of CO{sub 2} is lower in high-salinity waters such as might be encountered in the deep subsurface. Therefore, as CO{sub 2} migrates upward through the deep subsurface, it will likely encounter less saline water with increasing capacity to dissolve CO{sub 2} potentially preventing ebullition, depending on the CO{sub 2} leakage flux. However, as CO{sub 2} continues to move upward through shallower depths, CO{sub 2} solubility in water decreases strongly leading to greater likelihood of ebullition and bubble flow in surface water. In the case of deep density-stratified lakes in which ebullition is suppressed, enhanced mixing and man-made degassing schemes can alleviate the buildup of CO{sub 2} and related risk of dangerous rapid discharges. Future research efforts are needed to increase understanding of CO{sub 2} leakage and seepage in surface water and saturated porous media. For example, we recommend experiments and field tests of CO{sub 2} migration in saturated systems to formulate bubble-driven water-displacement models and relative permeability functions that can be used in simulation models.

Oldenburg, Curt M.; Lewicki, Jennifer L.

2005-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

96

Carbon Sequestration: A Comparative Analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration refers to the provision and safe storage of carbon dioxide that otherwise would be emitted to ... isolation, and final storage of the produced carbon dioxide, utilizing biological, chemical, ...

Christopher J. Koroneos; Dimitrios C. Rovas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Geological Sequestration of CO2 by Hydrous Carbonate Formation with Reclaimed Slag  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concept of this project is to develop a process that improves the kinetics of the hydrous carbonate formation reaction enabling steelmakers to directly remove CO2 from their furnace exhaust gas. It is proposed to bring the furnace exhaust stream containing CO2 in contact with reclaimed steelmaking slag in a reactor that has an environment near the unit activity of water resulting in the production of carbonates. The CO2 emissions from the plant would be reduced by the amount sequestered in the formation of carbonates. The main raw materials for the process are furnace exhaust gases and specially prepared slag.

Von L. Richards; Kent Peaslee; Jeffrey Smith

2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

98

Carbon Sequestration Atlas IV Video  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Carbon Sequestration Atlas is a collection of all the storage sites of CO2 such as, petroleum, natural gas, coal, and oil shale.

Rodosta, Traci

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

99

Simulating Geologic Co-sequestration of Carbon Dioxide and Hydrogen Sulfide in a Basalt Formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Co-sequestered CO2 with H2S impurities could affect geologic storage, causing changes in pH and oxidation state that affect mineral dissolution and precipitation reactions and the mobility of metals present in the reservoir rocks. We have developed a variable component, non-isothermal simulator, STOMP-COMP (Water, Multiple Components, Salt and Energy), which simulates multiphase flow gas mixtures in deep saline reservoirs, and the resulting reactions with reservoir minerals. We use this simulator to model the co-injection of CO2 and H2S into brecciated basalt flow top. A 1000 metric ton injection of these supercritical fluids, with 99% CO2 and 1% H2S, is sequestered rapidly by solubility and mineral trapping. CO2 is trapped mainly as calcite within a few decades and H2S is trapped as pyrite within several years.

Bacon, Diana H.; Ramanathan, Ramya; Schaef, Herbert T.; McGrail, B. Peter

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

100

Prospects for Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Prospects for Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation of Degraded Lands with Fossil-fuel Combustion By-products. Prospects for Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Carbon Sequestration Newsletter: September 2001  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

PBS News-Hour with Jim Lehrer On August 6, Spencer Michaels presented a fifteen minute report on carbon sequestration, emphasizing MBARI’s work on ocean sequestration research and the Weyburn geologic sequestration project. For a transcript or video of the report, see CO2: Burial at Sea? PBS News-Hour with Jim Lehrer On August 6, Spencer Michaels presented a fifteen minute report on carbon sequestration, emphasizing MBARI’s work on ocean sequestration research and the Weyburn geologic sequestration project. For a transcript or video of the report, see CO2: Burial at Sea? Washington Post On August 19th Eileen Claussen and Elliot Diringer of the Pew Center on Global Climate Change published an editorial, "The Climate Challenge Begins at Home," which highlights bills currently in congress, including Jefford’s four pollutant bill, the Stevens/Byrd Climate Change Act, and McCain and Lieberman’s Cap-and-Trade proposal. USA Today An August 27th article talks about the United States’ strong reliance on coal and indicated the Bush Administration may look towards coal gasification as a means of reducing GHG emissions.

102

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards November 17, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Regional Partner to Demonstrate Safe and Permanent Storage of 2 Million Tons of CO2 at Wyoming Site WASHINGTON, DC - Completing a series of awards through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded $66.9 million to the Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership for the Department's seventh large-scale carbon sequestration project. Led by Montana State University-Bozeman, the Partnership will conduct a large-volume test in the Nugget Sandstone formation to demonstrate the ability of a geologic formation to safely, permanently and economically

103

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards DOE Completes Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Awards November 17, 2008 - 4:58pm Addthis Regional Partner to Demonstrate Safe and Permanent Storage of 2 Million Tons of CO2 at Wyoming Site WASHINGTON, DC - Completing a series of awards through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded $66.9 million to the Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership for the Department's seventh large-scale carbon sequestration project. Led by Montana State University-Bozeman, the Partnership will conduct a large-volume test in the Nugget Sandstone formation to demonstrate the ability of a geologic formation to safely, permanently and economically

104

NETL: Carbon Storage - Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

MRCSP MRCSP Carbon Storage Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing MRCSP efforts can be found on their website. The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) was established to assess the technical potential, economic viability, and public acceptability of carbon storage within a region consisting of nine contiguous states: Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia. A group of leading universities, state geological surveys, non-governmental organizations and private companies, led by Battelle Memorial Institute, has been assembled to carry out this research. The MRCSP currently consists of nearly 40 members; each contributing technical knowledge, expertise and cost sharing.

105

Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Woodland Carbon Code Requirements for voluntary carbon sequestration projects ® Version 1.2 July trademark 10 3. Carbon sequestration 11 3.1 Units of carbon calculation 11 3.2 Carbon baseline 11 3.3 Carbon leakage 12 3.4 Project carbon sequestration 12 3.5 Net carbon sequestration 13 4. Environmental quality 14

106

Map of Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A larger map of FE's Geologic Sequestration Training and Research Projects awarded as part of the Recovery Act.

107

Shallow Carbon Sequestration Demonstration Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shallow Carbon SequeStration Shallow Carbon SequeStration DemonStration ProjeCt Background The Shallow Carbon Sequestration Pilot Demonstration Project is a cooperative effort involving City Utilities of Springfield (CU); Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR); Missouri State University (MSU); Missouri University of Science & Technology (MS&T); AmerenUE; Aquila, Inc.; Associated Electric Cooperative, Inc.; Empire District Electric Company; and Kansas City Power & Light. The purpose of this project is to assess the feasibility of carbon sequestration at Missouri power plant sites. The six electric utilities involved in the project account for approximately 90 percent of the electric generating capacity in Missouri. Description The pilot demonstration will evaluate the feasibility of utilizing the Lamotte and

108

WithCarbonSequestration Biological-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

WithCarbonSequestration Biomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil Biological BARRIERS · Cost · Feedstock availability · Fermentative micro-organisms #12;Targets and Status 322726Net

109

CHARTER FOR THE CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

CHARTER FOR THE CARBON SEQUESTRATION CHARTER FOR THE CARBON SEQUESTRATION LEADERSHIP FORUM (CSLF): A CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE TECHNOLOGY INITIATIVE The undersigned national governmental entities (collectively the "Members") set forth the following Terms of Reference for the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (CSLF), a framework for international cooperation in research and development for the separation, capture, transportation and storage of carbon dioxide. The CSLF will seek to realize the promise of carbon capture and storage over the coming decades, making it commercially competitive and environmentally safe. 1. Purpose of the CSLF To facilitate the development of improved cost-effective technologies for the separation and capture of carbon dioxide for its transport and long-term safe storage; to make these

110

NETL: News Release - DOE Announces Release of Second Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

November 17, 2008 November 17, 2008 DOE Announces Release of Second Carbon Sequestration Atlas New Version Provides Additional Information on Carbon Dioxide Storage 2008 Carbon Sequestration Atlas II WASHINGTON, D. C.- The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced the release of its second Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada, which documents more than 3,500 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage potential in oil and gas reservoirs, coal seams, and saline formations. Preliminary estimates suggest the availability of more than 1,100 years of CO2 storage for the United States and Canada in these geologic formations. "In the year since it was first published, the carbon sequestration atlas has proven to be an invaluable tool to the entire sequestration community," said Acting Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy James Slutz. "The second edition will bolster our efforts to find environmentally sound, cost-effective methods to sequester carbon dioxide."

111

Geologic CO2 sequestration inhibits microbial growth | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

community and could improve overall efficiency of CO2 sequestration. The Science Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in deep subsurface environments has received...

112

The urgent need for carbon dioxide sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The danger of global warming has put in question the use of fossil fuels which constitute the most abundant and most reliable energy resource. Meeting the ever growing world demand for cheap energy, while simultaneously achieving the required drastic reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions can only be accomplished by actively preventing carbon dioxide generated in the combustion of fuels from accumulating in the atmosphere, i.e. by sequestration. Sequestration is possible and economically viable and is currently the only realistic solution to the dilemma of CO{sub 2} emissions. The authors have developed a very promising approach that disposes of carbon dioxide by chemically combining it in an exothermic reaction with readily available minerals to form carbonates. The resulting carbonates are stable solids that are known to be environmentally benign and to be stable on geological time scales. This stands in contrast to most other methods that do not appear to fully solve the long term problem.

Lackner, K.S.; Butt, D.P.; Jensen, R.; Ziock, H.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership Presented to: Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Annual Review Meeting Development Phase Field Tests Pittsburgh, PA October 5, 2010 Presented by: Gerald R. Hill, Ph.D. Senior Technical Advisor Southern States Energy Board Acknowledgements  This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory.  Cost share and research support provided by SECARB/SSEB Carbon Management Partners Through innovations in energy and environmental policies, programs and technologies, the Southern States Energy Board enhances economic development and the quality of life in the South. - SSEB Mission Statement SSEB Carbon Management Program  Established 2003  Characterizing Southeast Region

114

Workshop on Carbon Sequestration Science - Ocean Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ocean Carbon Ocean Carbon Sequestration Howard Herzog MIT Energy Laboratory May 24, 2001 Ocean Carbon Sequestration Options * The direct injection of a relatively pure CO 2 stream that has been generated, for example, at a power plant or from an industrial process * The enhancement of the net oceanic uptake from the atmosphere, for example, through iron fertilization The DOE Center for Research on Ocean Carbon Sequestration (DOCS) * Established July 1999 * Centered at LBNL and LLNL * Participants S Eric Adams MIT S Jim Barry MBARI S Jim Bishop DOCS Scientific Co-director LBNL S Ken Caldeira DOCS Scientific Co-director LLNL S Sallie Chisholm MIT S Kenneth Coale Moss Landing Marine Laboratory S Russ Davis Scripps Institution of Oceanography S Paul Falkowski Rutgers S Howard Herzog MIT S Gerard Nihous Pacific International Center for High Technology Research

115

Organized Research Unit (ORU) on Carbon Capture and Sequestration: Meeting the Needs of the Energy Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organized Research Unit (ORU) on Carbon Capture and Sequestration: Meeting the Needs of the Energy of an Organized Research Unit (ORU) on Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS). The purpose of this effort Frontier Research Center proposal: "Integrated Science of Geological Carbon Sequestration" to BES office

Zhou, Chongwu

116

EA-1835: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

35: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) 35: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II Michigan Basin Project in Chester Township, Michigan EA-1835: Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Phase II Michigan Basin Project in Chester Township, Michigan Summary NOTE: This EA has been cancelled. This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal to provide approximately $65.5 million in financial assistance in a cost-sharing arrangement with the project proponent, MRCSP. MRCSP's proposed project would use CO2 captured from an existing natural gas processing plant in Chester Township, pipe it approximately 1 mile to an injection well, and inject it into a deep saline aquifer for geologic sequestration. This project would demonstrate the geologic sequestration of 1,000,000 metric

117

Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective A report prepared for East of England #12;Low Carbon Innovation Centre Report for EEDA Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective 20/04/2009 ii Biochar and Carbon Sequestration: A Regional Perspective A report prepared for East

Everest, Graham R

118

Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect Second edition Rattan Lal & Ronald F. Follett. Printed in the United States of America. #12;181 Soil Carbon Sequestration and the Greenhouse Effect, 2nd

Archer, Steven R.

119

THE COMPARATIVE VALUE OF BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE COMPARATIVE VALUE OF BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION BRUCE A. MCCARL, BRIAN C. MURRAY, AND UWE A. SCHNEIDER A. Abstract Carbon sequestration via forests and agricultural soils saturates over time to sequestration because of (1) an ecosystems limited ability to take up carbon which we will call saturation

McCarl, Bruce A.

120

THE COMPARATIVE VALUE OF BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE COMPARATIVE VALUE OF BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 sequestration and between 1 and 49 percent for forest based carbon sequestration. Value adjustments 18 19 20 21 22 BRUCE A. MCCARL, BRIAN C. MURRAY, AND UWE A. SCHNEIDER Abstract Carbon sequestered via

McCarl, Bruce A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Mineral sequestration of CO2 by aqueous carbonation of1 coal combustion fly-ash2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Mineral sequestration of CO2 by aqueous carbonation of1 coal combustion fly-ash2 3 G. Montes that could possibly4 contribute to reducing carbon dioxide emissions is the in-situ mineral sequestration (long term5 geological storage) or the ex-situ mineral sequestration (controlled industrial reactors

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

122

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed several more tasks during the period of April 1, 2005-September 30, 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. While Phase 2 planning is well under way, the content of this report focuses exclusively on Phase 1 objectives completed during this reporting period. Progress during this period was focused in the three areas: geological carbon storage capacity in New Mexico, terrestrial sequestration capacity for the project area, and the Integrated Assessment Model efforts. The geologic storage capacity of New Mexico was analyzed and Blanco Mesaverde (which extends into Colorado) and Basin Dakota Pools were chosen as top two choices for the further analysis for CO{sub 2} sequestration in the system dynamics model preliminary analysis. Terrestrial sequestration capacity analysis showed that the four states analyzed thus far (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico and Utah) have relatively limited potential to sequester carbon in terrestrial systems, mainly due to the aridity of these areas, but the large land area offered could make up for the limited capacity per hectare. Best opportunities were thought to be in eastern Colorado/New Mexico. The Integrated Assessment team expanded the initial test case model to include all New Mexico sinks and sources in a new, revised prototype model in 2005. The allocation mechanism, or ''String of Pearls'' concept, utilizes potential pipeline routes as the links between all combinations of the source to various sinks. This technique lays the groundwork for future, additional ''String of Pearls'' analyses throughout the SW Partnership and other regions as well.

Brian McPherson

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

WEST COAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership is one of seven partnerships which have been established by the US Department of Energy (DOE) to evaluate carbon dioxide capture, transport and sequestration (CT&S) technologies best suited for different regions of the country. The West Coast Region comprises Arizona, California, Nevada, Oregon, Washington, and the North Slope of Alaska. Led by the California Energy Commission, the West Coast Partnership is a consortium of over thirty five organizations, including state natural resource and environmental protection agencies; national labs and universities; private companies working on CO{sub 2} capture, transportation, and storage technologies; utilities; oil and gas companies; nonprofit organizations; and policy/governance coordinating organizations. In an eighteen month Phase I project, the Partnership will evaluate both terrestrial and geologic sequestration options. Work will focus on five major objectives: (1) Collect data to characterize major CO{sub 2} point sources, the transportation options, and the terrestrial and geologic sinks in the region, and compile and organize this data via a geographic information system (GIS) database; (2) Address key issues affecting deployment of CT&S technologies, including storage site permitting and monitoring, injection regulations, and health and environmental risks (3) Conduct public outreach and maintain an open dialogue with stakeholders in CT&S technologies through public meetings, joint research, and education work (4) Integrate and analyze data and information from the above tasks in order to develop supply curves and cost effective, environmentally acceptable sequestration options, both near- and long-term (5) Identify appropriate terrestrial and geologic demonstration projects consistent with the options defined above, and create action plans for their safe and effective implementation A kickoff meeting for the West Coast Partnership was held on Sept 30-Oct.1. Contracts were then put into place with twelve organizations which will carry out the technical work required to meet Partnership objectives.

Larry Myer; Terry Surles; Kelly Birkinshaw

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southwest Partnership on Carbon Sequestration completed its Phase I program in December 2005. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership Phase I project was to evaluate and demonstrate the means for achieving an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. Many other goals were accomplished on the way to this objective, including (1) analysis of CO{sub 2} storage options in the region, including characterization of storage capacities and transportation options, (2) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} sources, (3) analysis and summary of CO{sub 2} separation and capture technologies employed in the region, (4) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region, (5) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, and (6) assessing and initiating public knowledge and acceptance of possible sequestration approaches. Results of the Southwest Partnership's Phase I evaluation suggested that the most convenient and practical ''first opportunities'' for sequestration would lie along existing CO{sub 2} pipelines in the region. Action plans for six Phase II validation tests in the region were developed, with a portfolio that includes four geologic pilot tests distributed among Utah, New Mexico, and Texas. The Partnership will also conduct a regional terrestrial sequestration pilot program focusing on improved terrestrial MMV methods and reporting approaches specific for the Southwest region. The sixth and final validation test consists of a local-scale terrestrial pilot involving restoration of riparian lands for sequestration purposes. The validation test will use desalinated waters produced from one of the geologic pilot tests. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, five major electric utility companies, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs, and the Western Governors Association. This group is continuing its work in the Phase II Validation Program, slated to conclude in 2009.

Brian McPherson

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Carbon Capture & Sequestration Technologies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute CARBON CAPTURE & SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES J. Edmonds, J.J. Dooley, and S.H. Kim Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Battelle Memorial Institute THE ROADMAP * Greenhouse gas emissions may not control themselves. * Climate policy may happen.--There are smart and dumb ways to proceed. The smart ways involve getting both the policy and the technology right--the GTSP. * There are no silver bullets--Expanding the set of options to include carbon capture and sequestration can help limit the cost of any ceiling on CO 2 concentrations. * Managing greenhouse emissions means managing carbon. * Carbon can be captured, transported, and sequestered in many ways.

126

Weyburn Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Weyburn Carbon DioxiDe SequeStration Weyburn Carbon DioxiDe SequeStration ProjeCt Background Since September 2000, carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) has been transported from the Dakota Gasification Plant in North Dakota through a 320-km pipeline and injected into the Weyburn oilfield in Saskatchewan, Canada. The CO 2 has given the Weyburn field, discovered 50 years ago, a new life: 155 million gross barrels of incremental oil are slated to be recovered by 2035 and the field is projected to be able to store 30 million tonnes of CO 2 over 30 years. CO 2 injection began in October of 2005 at the adjacent Midale oilfield, and an additional 45-60 million barrels of oil are expected to be recovered during 30 years of continued operation. A significant monitoring project associated with the Weyburn and Midale commercial

127

Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Carbon Sequestration via Mineral Carbonation: Overview and Assessment 14 March 2002 Howard Herzog overview and assessment of carbon sequestration by mineral carbonation (referred to as "mineral sequestration R&D. The first is that carbonates have a lower energy state than CO2. Therefore, at least

128

Trading Water for Carbon with Biological Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Trading Water for Carbon with Biological Carbon Sequestration Robert B. Jackson,1 * Esteban G. Farley,1 David C. le Maitre,5 Bruce A. McCarl,6 Brian C. Murray7 Carbon sequestration strategies plantations feature prominently among tools for carbon sequestration (1­8). Plantations typi- cally combine

Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

129

Carbon Sequestration 101  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Perspectives on Carbon Capture and Storage Perspectives on Carbon Capture and Storage - Directions, Challenges, and Opportunities Thomas J. Feeley, III National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Capture and Storage November 13-15, 2007 Austin, Texas C Capture & Storage, Austin, TX Nov. 13-15, 2007 U.S. Fossil Fuel Reserves / Production Ratio 250+ Year Supply at Current Demand Levels ! 258 11.7 9.7 0 100 200 300 Coal Oil Natural Gas Anthracite & Bituminous Sub- Bituminous & Lignite Sources: BP Statistical Review, June 2004, - for coal reserves data - World Energy Council; EIA, Advance Summary U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Reserves, 2003 Annual Report, September 22, 2004 - for oil and gas reserves data. C Capture & Storage, Austin, TX Nov. 13-15, 2007 80 120 160 200 240 1970 1975 1980

130

Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Vegetation succession and carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland in northwest Florida: Evidence from carbon isotopes Yonghoon Choi and Yang Wang Department of Geological Sciences, Florida State. Measurements of stable carbon isotopic ratios as well as carbon (C), nitrogen (N), and phosphorus (P) contents

Wang, Yang

131

Carbon Sequestration 101  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Field Efforts Field Efforts Sequestering CO 2 in Geologic Formations SPE 2003 Eastern Section Meeting of AAPG September 6 - 10, 2003 Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania Scott M. Klara - National Energy Technology Laboratory What's All The Fuss About? CO 2 Concentrations On The Rise (~280 ppm to 370 ppm over last 100 years) Temperature Change from Present ( o C) CO 2 Concentration (ppmv) 200 150 50 350 300 250 200 100 0 ∆T atm (Vostok) CO 2 (Vostok) 2 0 -2 -4 Time Before Present (kyr) CO 2 & CH 4 - The Primary GHG Contributors Methane 9% Nitrous Oxide 5% HFCs, PFCs, SF 6 2% CO 2 from Energy 81% Other CO 2 3% "EIA Emissions of Greenhouse Gases in the U.S.: 2000" United States Greenhouse Gas Emissions (Equivalent Global Warming Basis) All Fossil Fuels & Energy Sectors Contribute CO 2 Emissions Industry 32% Industry 32% Commercial

132

carbon sequestration via direct injection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION Howard J. Herzog, Ken Caldeira, and Eric Adams INTRODUCTION The build-up of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) and other greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere has caused concern about possible global climate change. As a result, international negotiations have produced the Framework Convention on Climate Change (FCCC), completed during the 1992 Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro. The treaty, which the United States has ratified, calls for the "stabilization of greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere at a level that would prevent dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system." The primary greenhouse gas is CO 2 , which is estimated to contribute to over two-thirds of any climate change. The primary source of CO

133

Carbon sequestration monitoring with acoustic double-difference waveform inversion: A case study on SACROC walkaway VSP data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological carbon sequestration involves large-scale injection of carbon dioxide into underground geologic formations and is considered as a potential approach for mitigating global warming. Changes in reservoir properties ...

Yang, Di

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Optimize carbon dioxide sequestration, enhance oil recovery January 8, 2014 Los Alamos simulation to optimize carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration and enhance oil recovery (CO2-EOR) based on known production. Due to carbon capture and storage technology advances, prolonged high oil prices

135

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership's (SECARB) Phase I program focused on promoting the development of a framework and infrastructure necessary for the validation and commercial deployment of carbon sequestration technologies. The SECARB program, and its subsequent phases, directly support the Global Climate Change Initiative's goal of reducing greenhouse gas intensity by 18 percent by the year 2012. Work during the project's two-year period was conducted within a ''Task Responsibility Matrix''. The SECARB team was successful in accomplishing its tasks to define the geographic boundaries of the region; characterize the region; identify and address issues for technology deployment; develop public involvement and education mechanisms; identify the most promising capture, sequestration, and transport options; and prepare action plans for implementation and technology validation activity. Milestones accomplished during Phase I of the project are listed below: (1) Completed preliminary identification of geographic boundaries for the study (FY04, Quarter 1); (2) Completed initial inventory of major sources and sinks for the region (FY04, Quarter 2); (3) Completed initial development of plans for GIS (FY04, Quarter 3); (4) Completed preliminary action plan and assessment for overcoming public perception issues (FY04, Quarter 4); (5) Assessed safety, regulatory and permitting issues (FY05, Quarter 1); (6) Finalized inventory of major sources/sinks and refined GIS algorithms (FY05, Quarter 2); (7) Refined public involvement and education mechanisms in support of technology development options (FY05, Quarter 3); and (8) Identified the most promising capture, sequestration and transport options and prepared action plans (FY05, Quarter 4).

Kenneth J. Nemeth

2006-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

136

CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN COAL: CHARACTERIZATION OF MATRIX DEFORMATION, SORPTION CAPACITY AND DYNAMIC PERMEABILITY AT IN-SITU STRESS CONDITIONS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Sequestration of anthropogenic carbon dioxide in geological formation is one of the climate change mitigation options. The successful application of this technology is dependent on… (more)

Pone, Jean Denis

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

#12;Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems Personnel. Blaine Metting #12;vii Abstract The Center for Research on Enhancing Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial needed to evaluate the feasibility of environmentally sound strategies for enhancing carbon sequestration

138

CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION CARBON SEQUESTRATION THROUGH CHANGES IN LAND USE IN OREGON: COSTS, and J. Kadyszewski (Winrock International). 2007. Carbon Sequestration Through Changes in Land Use Curves, and Pilot Actions for Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration in Oregon. Report to Winrock

139

Peatland geoengineering: an alternative approach to terrestrial carbon sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...alternative approach to terrestrial carbon sequestration Christopher Freeman Nathalie...studies suggest that peatland carbon sequestration is due to the inhibitory...peatland geoengineering|carbon sequestration|phenolic compounds|inhibition...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Convective stability of carbon sequestration in anisotropic porous media  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Convective stability of carbon sequestration in anisotropic porous media...media|stability theory|carbon sequestration| 1. Introduction The world's...processes occurring during carbon dioxide sequestration in underground saline aquifers...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Promotion of ecosystem carbon sequestration by invasive predators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ecology Promotion of ecosystem carbon sequestration by invasive predators David...determinants of ecosystem C sequestration. carbon|island ecology|rats...of nitrogen deposition on carbon sequestration in European forests and forest...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

NETL: Carbon Storage - Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing SECARB efforts can be found on their website. The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), managed by the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB), represents a 13-State region, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, and Virginia, and portions of Kentucky and West Virginia. SECARB is comprised of over 100 participants representing Federal and State governments, industry, academia, and non-profit organizations. Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region The primary goal of SECARB is to develop the necessary framework and

143

Energy Department Awards $66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon 66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project Energy Department Awards $66.7 Million for Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Project December 18, 2007 - 4:58pm Addthis Regional Partner to Demonstrate Safe and Permanent Storage of One Million Tons of CO2 at Illinois Site WASHINGTON, DC - Following closely on the heels of three recent awards through the Department of Energy's (DOE) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program, DOE today awarded $66.7 million to the Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC) for the Department's fourth large-scale carbon sequestration project. The Partnership led by the Illinois State Geological Survey will conduct large volume tests in the Illinois Basin to demonstrate the ability of a geologic formation to

144

SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION THE UNITED  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 2 SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration The Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) is investigating the CO 2 storage potential of the abundant oil and gas reservoirs, unmineable coal, and saline formations within the southwestern United States. In 2010, field-scale pilot injection tests were completed, paving the way for larger scale commercial projects, including an EOR project in Texas using an anthropogenic source of CO 2 . SWP draws on the experience of professionals within the fields of geology, engineering, economics, public policy, public outreach, and education. Stakeholders in SWP projects include private industry,

145

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHIP THE UNITED S T A T E S 2012 ATLAS CARBON UTILIZATION AND STORAGE Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership The Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB), managed by the Southern States Energy Board, represents a 13-state region, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, eastern Texas, and Virginia and portions of Kentucky and West Virginia. SECARB comprises more than 100 participants representing Federal and state governments, industry, academia, and nonprofit organizations. The primary goal of SECARB is to develop the necessary framework and infrastructure to conduct field tests of carbon storage technologies and to

146

Carbon sequestration research and development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Predictions of global energy use in the next century suggest a continued increase in carbon emissions and rising concentrations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in the atmosphere unless major changes are made in the way we produce and use energy--in particular, how we manage carbon. For example, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) predicts in its 1995 ''business as usual'' energy scenario that future global emissions of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere will increase from 7.4 billion tonnes of carbon (GtC) per year in 1997 to approximately 26 GtC/year by 2100. IPCC also projects a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration by the middle of next century and growing rates of increase beyond. Although the effects of increased CO{sub 2} levels on global climate are uncertain, many scientists agree that a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations could have a variety of serious environmental consequences. The goal of this report is to identify key areas for research and development (R&D) that could lead to an understanding of the potential for future use of carbon sequestration as a major tool for managing carbon emissions. Under the leadership of DOE, researchers from universities, industry, other government agencies, and DOE national laboratories were brought together to develop the technical basis for conceiving a science and technology road map. That effort has resulted in this report, which develops much of the information needed for the road map.

Reichle, Dave; Houghton, John; Kane, Bob; Ekmann, Jim; and others

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

DOE Awards $126.6 Million for Two More Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

$126.6 Million for Two More Large-Scale Carbon $126.6 Million for Two More Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects DOE Awards $126.6 Million for Two More Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects May 6, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis Projects in California and Ohio Join Four Others in Effort to Drastically Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced awards of more than $126.6 million to the West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) and the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) for the Department's fifth and sixth large-scale carbon sequestration projects. These industry partnerships, which are part of DOE's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership, will conduct large volume tests in California and Ohio to demonstrate the ability of a geologic

148

Soil: Carbon Sequestration in Agricultural Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Soil carbon sequestration can contribute to greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation by removing CO2 from the atmosphere and at the same time improving soil health and sustainability. This article outlines the basic principles and controlling mechanisms involved in soil carbon sequestration and reviews how improved agricultural practices impact soil carbon stocks, based on data from long-term field experiments and other sources. It concludes with a section outlining challenges and opportunities for implementation of GHG mitigation strategies involving soil carbon sequestration, summarizing key science and policy-related issues.

K. Paustian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

NETL: Carbon Storage - Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BSCSP BSCSP Carbon Storage Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing BSCSP efforts can be found on their website. The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP) is led by Montana State University-Bozeman and represents a coalition of more than 60 organizations including universities, national laboratories, private companies, state agencies, Native American tribes, and international collaborators. The partners are engaged in several aspects of BSCSP projects and contribute to the efforts to deploy carbon storage projects in the BSCSP region. The BSCSP region encompasses Montana, Wyoming, Idaho, South Dakota, and eastern Washington and Oregon. BSCSP Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region

150

DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration DOE Manual Studies Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration January 18, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - There is considerable opportunity and growing technical sophistication to make terrestrial carbon sequestration both practical and effective, according to the latest carbon capture and storage (CCS) "best practices" manual issued by the U.S. Department of Energy. Best Practices for Terrestrial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide details the most suitable operational approaches and techniques for terrestrial sequestration, a carbon dioxide (CO2) mitigation strategy capable of removing CO2 already in the air. Consequently, terrestrial sequestration, which uses photosynthesis - part of the natural carbon cycle - to create

151

ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION EFFORTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ISSUES IN EVALUATING CARBON SEQUESTRATION AND ATTRIBUTING CARBON CREDITS TO GRASSLAND RESTORATION examines biological carbon sequestration using a grassland restoration as a model system. Chapter 1 for biological carbon sequestration. In this analysis, we found that significantly greater soil carbon

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

152

Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide in Coal with Enhanced Coalbed Methane RecoveryA Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide in Coal with Enhanced Coalbed Methane RecoveryA Review† ... Other geologic formations, such as depleted petroleum reservoirs, deep saline aquifers and others have received considerable attention as sites for sequestering CO2. ...

Curt M. White; Duane H. Smith; Kenneth L. Jones; Angela L. Goodman; Sinisha A. Jikich; Robert B. LaCount; Stephen B. DuBose; Ekrem Ozdemir; Badie I. Morsi; Karl T. Schroeder

2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

153

Carbon sequestration monitoring with acoustic double-difference waveform inversion: A case study on SACROC walkaway VSP data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon sequestration monitoring with acoustic double-difference waveform inversion: A case study National Laboratory SUMMARY Geological carbon sequestration involves large-scale injection of carbon is crucial for ensuring safe and reliable carbon storage (Bickle et al., 2007). Conventional analysis of time

Malcolm, Alison

154

Assessing leakage detectability at geologic CO2 sequestration sites using the probabilistic collocation method  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for reducing greenhouse gas emission. A primary goal of geologic carbon sequestration is to ensure, tested, monitored, funded, and closed [2]. Recently, the US Department of Energy releases best practice manuals on risk analysis and management activities related to CO2 storage projects [3,4]. Anothe

Lu, Zhiming

155

Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Validation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

26507 304-285-4133 dawn.deel@netl.doe.gov Darrell Paul Project Manager Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Project Battelle 505 King Avenue Columbus, OH 43201 614-424-5890...

156

Modeling the Sequestration of CO2 in Deep Geological Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Sequestration of CO the Sequestration of CO 2 in Deep Geological Formations K. Prasad Saripalli, B. Peter McGrail, and Mark D. White Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 corresponding author Prasad Saripalli Senior Research Scientist Pacific Northwest National Laboratory 1313 Sigma V Complex (K6-81) Richland, WA 99352 ph: (509) 376-1667 fax: (509) 376-5368 prasad.saripalli@pnl.gov 2 Modeling the Sequestration of CO 2 in Deep Geological Formations K. Prasad Saripalli, B. Peter McGrail, and Mark D. White Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington 99352 Modeling the injection of CO 2 and its sequestration will require simulations of a multi- well injection system in a large reservoir field. However, modeling at the injection well

157

Sequestration of CO2 by Concrete Carbonation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sequestration of CO2 by Concrete Carbonation ... Carbonation of reinforced concrete is one of the causes of corrosion, but it is also a way to sequester CO2. ... This work attempts to advance the knowledge of the carbon footprint of cement. ...

Isabel Galan; Carmen Andrade; Pedro Mora; Miguel A. Sanjuan

2010-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

158

Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin February 17, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon sequestration technologies nationwide, has begun drilling the injection well for their large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute

159

Shallow Carbon Sequestration Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The potential for carbon sequestration at relatively shallow depths was investigated at four power plant sites in Missouri. Exploratory boreholes were cored through the Davis Shale confining layer into the St. Francois aquifer (Lamotte Sandstone and Bonneterre Formation). Precambrian basement contact ranged from 654.4 meters at the John Twitty Energy Center in Southwest Missouri to over 1100 meters near the Sioux Power Plant in St. Charles County. Investigations at the John Twitty Energy Center included 3D seismic reflection surveys, downhole geophysical logging and pressure testing, and laboratory analysis of rock core and water samples. Plans to perform injectivity tests at the John Twitty Energy Center, using food grade CO{sub 2}, had to be abandoned when the isolated aquifer was found to have very low dissolved solids content. Investigations at the Sioux Plant and Thomas Hill Energy Center in Randolph County found suitably saline conditions in the St. Francois. A fourth borehole in Platte County was discontinued before reaching the aquifer. Laboratory analyses of rock core and water samples indicate that the St. Charles and Randolph County sites could have storage potentials worthy of further study. The report suggests additional Missouri areas for further investigation as well.

Pendergrass, Gary; Fraley, David; Alter, William; Bodenhamer, Steven

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

160

Carbon Sequestration and the Restoration of Land Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration, the conversion of greenhouse gas CO2...toorganic matter, offers a powerful tool with which to combat climate change. The enlargement of carbon sinks stored in soil and biota is...2. Carbon sequestration

Andres Arnalds

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

NETL: News Release - Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

20, 2010 20, 2010 Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now Accepting Applications Program Provides Hands-On CCS Experience for Students, Early Career Professionals Washington, D.C. - Students and early career professionals can gain hands-on experience in areas related to carbon capture and storage (CCS) by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) program. MORE INFO Link to the RECS Web site for more information and to apply The initiative, supported by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is currently accepting applications for RECS 2010, scheduled for July 18-28 in Albuquerque, N.M., and the deadline to apply is May 15. An intensive science-based program, RECS 2010 will combine classroom instruction with field activities at a geologic storage test site and

162

Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now Accepting Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2010 Now Accepting 2010 Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2010 Now Accepting Applications April 20, 2010 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - Students and early career professionals can gain hands-on experience in areas related to carbon capture and storage (CCS) by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) program. The initiative, supported by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE), is currently accepting applications for RECS 2010, scheduled for July 18-28 in Albuquerque, N.M., and the deadline to apply is May 15. An intensive science-based program, RECS 2010 will combine classroom instruction with field activities at a geologic storage test site and visits to a power plant and coal mine. Topics cover the range of CCS

163

Carbonation: An Efficient and Economical Process for CO2 Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbonation: An Efficient and Economical Process for CO2 Sequestration Tarun R Naik1 and Rakesh sequestration. Most of the studies related to the carbonation are limited to its effects on corrosion. The possibility of using carbonation process as a direct means for carbon dioxide sequestration is yet

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

164

Perspectives on Carbon Capture and Sequestration in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Community acceptance of carbon capture and sequestrationand realities of carbon capture and storage; www.eenews.net/Howard. What Future for Carbon Capture and Sequestration?

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Comparison of three options for geologic sequestration of CO2 - a case study for California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Options for sequestration of CO{sub 2} are best viewed in light of the regional distribution of CO{sub 2} sources and potential sequestration sites. This study examines the distribution of carbon emissions from fossil fuel power plants in California and their proximity to three types of reservoirs that may be suitable for sequestration: (1) active or depleted oil fields, (2) active or depleted gas fields, and (3) brine formations. This paper also presents a preliminary assessment of the feasibility of sequestering CO{sub 2} generated from large fossil-fuel fired power plants in California and discusses the comparative advantages of three different types of reservoirs for this purpose. Based on a volumetric analysis of sequestration capacity and current CO{sub 2} emission rates from oil/gas fired power plants, this analysis suggests that oil reservoirs, gas fields and brine formations can all contribute significantly to sequestration in California. Together they could offer the opportunity to meet both short and long term needs. In the near term, oil and gas reservoirs are the most promising because the trapping structures have already stood the test of time and opportunities for offsetting the cost of sequestration with revenues from enhanced oil and gas production. In the long term, if the trapping mechanisms are adequately understood and deemed adequate, brine formations may provide an even larger capacity for geologic sequestration over much of California.

Benson, S.M.

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP ON CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southwest Partnership Region includes six whole states, including Arizona, Colorado, Kansas, New Mexico, Oklahoma, and Utah, roughly one-third of Texas, and significant portions of adjacent states. The Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. The main objective of the Southwest Partnership project is to achieve an 18% reduction in carbon intensity by 2012. The Partnership made great progress in this first year. Action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region are almost finished, including both technical and non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. All partners in the Partnership are taking an active role in evaluating and ranking optimum sites and technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. We are identifying potential gaps in all aspects of potential sequestration deployment issues.

Brian McPherson; Rick Allis; Barry Biediger; Joel Brown; Jim Cappa; George Guthrie; Richard Hughes; Eugene Kim; Robert Lee; Dennis Leppin; Charles Mankin; Orman Paananen; Rajesh Pawar; Tarla Peterson; Steve Rauzi; Jerry Stuth; Genevieve Young

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Carbon Sequestration Initiative CSI | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sequestration Initiative CSI Sequestration Initiative CSI Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Sequestration Initiative (CSI) Place Cambridge, Massachusetts Zip MA 02139-4307 Sector Carbon Product Massachusetts based consortium which was formed in 2000 to investigate carbon capture and storage technologies. Coordinates 43.003745°, -89.017499° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.003745,"lon":-89.017499,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

168

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Background: The U.S. DOE's Sequestration Program began with a small appropriation of $1M in 1997 and has grown to be the largest most comprehensive CCS R&D program in the world. The U.S. DOE's sequestration program has supported a number of projects implementing CO2 injection in the United States and other countries including, Canada, Algeria, Norway, Australia, and Germany. The program has also been supporting a number of complementary R&D projects investigating the science of storage, simulation, risk assessment, and monitoring the fate of the injected CO2 in the subsurface.

169

Carbon sequestration in forest vegetation of Beijing at sublot level  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Based on forest inventory data (FID) at sublot level, we estimated the carbon sequestration in forest vegetation of Beijing, China in 2009. In this study, the carbon sequestration in forest vegetation at sublot l...

Yu Xiao; Kai An; Gaodi Xie; Chunxia Lu; Biao Zhang

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Carbon sequestration and stoichiometry of motile and nonmotile ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration and stoichiometry of motile and nonmotile green algae. Striebel, Maren, Silvia Bartholmé, Rebekka Zernecke, Christina Steinlein, Florian

171

Environmental Enterprise: Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Gasification Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Environmental Enterprise: Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Gasification Process Gasification Process First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 16, 2001 May 16, 2001 Jeff Seabright Jeff Seabright Texaco Inc. Texaco Inc. Presentation Highlights Presentation Highlights * * Texaco and climate change Texaco and climate change * * Introduction to gasification Introduction to gasification * * Environmental benefits of gasification Environmental benefits of gasification * * CO CO 2 2 capture & sequestration capture & sequestration * * Challenges going forward Challenges going forward Texaco's Climate Change Policy Texaco's Climate Change Policy * * Know enough to take action now Know enough to take action now

172

Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimation of Parameters in Carbon Sequestration Models from Net Ecosystem Exchange Data Luther in the context of a deterministic com- partmental carbon sequestration system. Sensitivity and approximation usefulness in the estimation of parameters within a compartmental carbon sequestration model. Previously we

White, Luther

173

Economic Modeling of Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Economic Modeling of Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies Jim McFarland (jrm1@mit.edu; +1 explores the economics of carbon capture and sequestration technologies as applied to electric generating of the world economy, is used to model two of the most promising carbon capture and sequestration (CCS

174

Historical forest baselines reveal potential for continued carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historical forest baselines reveal potential for continued carbon sequestration Jeanine M-based studies suggest that land-use history is a more important driver of carbon sequestration in these systems agricultural lands are being promoted as important avenues for future carbon sequestration (8). But the degree

Mladenoff, David

175

DEVELOPING A SET OF REGULATORY ANALOGS FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DEVELOPING A SET OF REGULATORY ANALOGS FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION D.M. Reiner1 , H.J. Herzog2 1 Judge Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139, USA, email: hjherzog@mit.edu ABSTRACT Carbon capture and sequestration variables critical for determining the success of carbon sequestration as a viable climate policy option

176

Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration: Economic Issues and Research Needs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration: Economic Issues and Research Needs Draft paper Bruce A Mc............................................................................................................. 5 2 Why Consider Promoting Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration?...................... 6 2 Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration....... 11 3.1 What is the cost of GHGE offsets arising from large

McCarl, Bruce A.

177

A SEARCH FOR REGULATORY ANALOGS TO CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A SEARCH FOR REGULATORY ANALOGS TO CARBON SEQUESTRATION D.M. Reiner and H.J. Herzog1 1 Laboratory for Energy and the Environment, M.I.T., Cambridge, MA. 02139, USA ABSTRACT Carbon capture and sequestration for determining the success of carbon sequestration as a viable climate policy option. INTRODUCTION To date

178

Accelerated Carbonation of Brucite in Mine Tailings for Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric CO2 is sequestered within ultramafic mine tailings via carbonation of Mg-bearing minerals. ... If carbonation of bulk tailings were accelerated, large mines may have the capacity to sequester millions of tonnes of CO2 annually, offsetting mine emissions. ... A Greenhouse-Scale Photosynthetic Microbial Bioreactor for Carbon Sequestration in Magnesium Carbonate Minerals ...

Anna L. Harrison; Ian M. Power; Gregory M. Dipple

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

179

Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee (Nebraska) Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee (Nebraska) Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Climate Policies Provider Nebraska Carbon Sequestration Advisory Committee Under this statute, the Director of Natural Resources will document and quantify carbon sequestration and greenhouse emissions reductions

180

NETL: News Release - Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

February 17, 2005 February 17, 2005 Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Program Adds Canadian Provinces Will Develop, Deploy and Validate Carbon Sequestration Options WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that the Provinces of Alberta and British Columbia have joined Saskatchewan and Manitoba as Canadian partners in the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, the centerpiece of North American efforts to validate and deploy carbon sequestration technologies. The program, a network of federal and state agencies, as well as private sector entities, will determine the most suitable technologies, regulations, and infrastructure for future carbon capture, storage, and sequestration in different areas of the country. MORE INFO

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

China Needs Forest Management Rather Than Reforestation for Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the last decade, both the U.S. and China implemented forestry carbon sequestration programs to reduce the carbon print. ...

Guanglei Gao; Guodong Ding; Haiyan Wang; Yintong Zang; Wenjun Liang

2011-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

182

Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration Phase II  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southwest Regional Partnership (SWP) on Carbon Sequestration designed and deployed a medium-scale field pilot test of geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in the Aneth oil field. Greater Aneth oil field, Utah's largest oil producer, was discovered in 1956 and has produced over 455 million barrels of oil (72 million m3). Located in the Paradox Basin of southeastern Utah, Greater Aneth is a stratigraphic trap producing from the Pennsylvanian Paradox Formation. Because it represents an archetype oil field of the western U.S., Greater Aneth was selected as one of three geologic pilots to demonstrate combined enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and CO2 sequestration under the auspices of the SWP on Carbon Sequestration, sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy. The pilot demonstration focuced on the western portion of the Aneth Unit as this area of the field was converted from waterflood production to CO2 EOR starting in late 2007. The Aneth Unit is in the northwestern part of the field and has produced 149 million barrels (24 million m3) of the estimated 450 million barrels (71.5 million m3) of the original oil in place - a 33% recovery rate. The large amount of remaining oil makes the Aneth Unit ideal to demonstrate both CO2 storage capacity and EOR by CO2 flooding. This report summarizes the geologic characterization research, the various field monitoring tests, and the development of a geologic model and numerical simulations conducted for the Aneth demonstration project. The Utah Geological Survey (UGS), with contributions from other Partners, evaluated how the surface and subsurface geology of the Aneth Unit demonstration site will affect sequestration operations and engineering strategies. The UGS-research for the project are summarized in Chapters 1 through 7, and includes (1) mapping the surface geology including stratigraphy, faulting, fractures, and deformation bands, (2) describing the local Jurassic and Cretaceous stratigraphy, (3) mapping the Desert Creek zone reservoir, Gothic seal, and overlying aquifers, (4) characterizing the depositional environments and diagenetic events that produced significant reservoir heterogeneity, (5) describing the geochemical, petrographic, and geomechanical properties of the seal to determine the CO2 or hydrocarbon column it could support, and (6) evaluating the production history to compare primary production from vertical and horizontal wells, and the effects of waterflood and wateralternating- gas flood programs. The field monitoring demonstrations were conducted by various Partners including New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, University of Utah, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Japan, Los Alamos National Laboratory and Cambridge Geosciences. The monitoring tests are summarized in Chapters 8 through 12, and includes (1) interwell tracer studies during water- and CO2-flood operations to characterize tracer behavoirs in anticipation of CO2-sequestration applications, (2) CO2 soil flux monitoring to measure background levels and variance and assess the sensitivity levels for CO2 surface monitoring, (3) testing the continuous monitoring of self potential as a means to detect pressure anomalies and electrochemical reaction due to CO2 injection, (4) conducting time-lapse vertical seismic profiling to image change near a CO2 injection well, and (5) monitoring microseismicity using a downhole string of seismic receivers to detect fracture slip and deformation associated with stress changes. Finally, the geologic modeling and numerical simulation study was conducted by researcher at the University of Utah. Chapter 13 summarizes their efforts which focused on developing a site-specific geologic model for Aneth to better understand and design CO2 storage specifically tailored to oil reservoirs.

James Rutledge

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

DOE's Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian Provinces |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian Provinces DOE's Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian Provinces February 16, 2005 - 10:14am Addthis Will Develop, Deploy, and Validate Carbon Sequestration Options WASHINGTON, DC -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that the Provinces of Alberta and British Columbia have joined Saskatchewan and Manitoba as Canadian partners in the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program, the centerpiece of North American efforts to validate and deploy carbon sequestration technologies. The program, a network of federal and state agencies, as well as private sector entities, will determine the most suitable technologies, regulations, and infrastructure for future carbon capture, storage, and sequestration in different areas of

184

DOE's Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian Provinces |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DOE's Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian DOE's Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian Provinces DOE's Carbon Sequestration Partnership Program Adds Canadian Provinces February 16, 2005 - 10:14am Addthis Will Develop, Deploy, and Validate Carbon Sequestration Options WASHINGTON, DC -- The Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that the Provinces of Alberta and British Columbia have joined Saskatchewan and Manitoba as Canadian partners in the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program, the centerpiece of North American efforts to validate and deploy carbon sequestration technologies. The program, a network of federal and state agencies, as well as private sector entities, will determine the most suitable technologies, regulations, and infrastructure for future carbon capture, storage, and sequestration in different areas of

185

NETL: News Release - Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7, 2009 7, 2009 Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates Drilling of CO2 Injection Well in Illinois Basin Large-Scale Test to Inject One Million Metric Tonnes of Carbon Dioxide into Saline Formation Washington, DC-The Midwest Geological Sequestration Consortium (MGSC), one of seven regional partnerships created by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to advance carbon sequestration technologies nationwide, has begun drilling the injection well for their large-scale carbon dioxide (CO2) injection test in Decatur, Illinois. The test is part of the development phase of the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships program, an Office of Fossil Energy initiative launched in 2003 to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing gases that can contribute to global climate change.

186

Estimation of Carbon Credits in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Activities  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Credits in Carbon Credits in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Activities K. Thomas Klasson and Brian H. Davison Oak Ridge National Laboratory * Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-6226 Presentation First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 Washington, DC "The submitted manuscript has been authored by a contractor of the U.S. Government under contract No. DE-AC05-00OR22725. Accordingly, the U.S. Government retains a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U.S. Government purposes." * Managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC05-00OR22725 1 Estimation of Carbon Credits in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Activities

187

NETL: ARRA Regional Carbon Sequestration Training Centers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ARRA Regional Carbon Sequestration Training Centers ARRA Regional Carbon Sequestration Training Centers ARRA Logo Projects in this area are funded, in whole or in part, with funds appropriated by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) and will train personnel in the implementation of carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology. While CCS technologies offer great potential for reducing CO2 emissions and mitigating potential climate change, deploying these technologies will require a significantly expanded workforce trained in the various specialties that are currently underrepresented in the United States. Education and training activities undertaken in this area are developing a future generation of geologists, scientists, and engineers that will provide the human capital and skills required for implementing CCS technologies.

188

SOUTHWEST REGIONAL PARTNERSHIP FOR CARBON SEQUESTRATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Southwest Partnership Region includes five states (Arizona, Colorado, New Mexico, Oklahoma, Utah) and contiguous areas from three adjacent states (west Texas, south Wyoming, and west Kansas). This energy-rich region exhibits some of the largest growth rates in the nation, and it contains two major CO{sub 2} pipeline networks that presently tap natural subsurface CO{sub 2} reservoirs for enhanced oil recovery at a rate of 30 million tons per year. The ten largest coal-fired power plants in the region produce 50% (140 million tons CO{sub 2}/y) of the total CO{sub 2} from power-plant fossil fuel combustion, with power plant emissions close to half the total CO{sub 2} emissions. The Southwest Regional Partnership comprises a large, diverse group of expert organizations and individuals specializing in carbon sequestration science and engineering, as well as public policy and outreach. These partners include 21 state government agencies and universities, the five major electric utility industries, seven oil, gas and coal companies, three federal agencies, the Navajo Nation, several NGOs including the Western Governors Association, and data sharing agreements with four other surrounding states. The Partnership is developing action plans for possible Phase II carbon sequestration pilot tests in the region, as well as the non-technical aspects necessary for developing and carrying out these pilot tests. The establishment of a website network to facilitate data storage and information sharing, decision-making, and future management of carbon sequestration in the region is a priority. The Southwest Partnership's approach includes (1) dissemination of existing regulatory/permitting requirements, (2) assessing and initiating public acceptance of possible sequestration approaches, and (3) evaluation and ranking of the most appropriate sequestration technologies for capture and storage of CO{sub 2} in the Southwest Region. The Partnership will also identify potential gaps in monitoring and verification approaches needed to validate long-term storage efforts.

Brian McPherson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Integrating Steel Production with Mineral Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of the project were (i) to develop a combination iron oxide production and carbon sequestration plant that will use serpentine ores as the source of iron and the extraction tailings as the storage element for CO2 disposal, (ii) the identification of locations within the US where this process may be implemented and (iii) to create a standardized process to characterize the serpentine deposits in terms of carbon disposal capacity and iron and steel production capacity. The first objective was not accomplished. The research failed to identify a technique to accelerate direct aqueous mineral carbonation, the limiting step in the integration of steel production and carbon sequestration. Objective (ii) was accomplished. It was found that the sequestration potential of the ultramafic resource surfaces in the US and Puerto Rico is approximately 4,647 Gt of CO2 or over 500 years of current US production of CO2. Lastly, a computer model was developed to investigate the impact of various system parameters (recoveries and efficiencies and capacities of different system components) and serpentinite quality as well as incorporation of CO2 from sources outside the steel industry.

Klaus Lackner; Paul Doby; Tuncel Yegulalp; Samuel Krevor; Christopher Graves

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Validation Phase  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies, electric utilities,

191

West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Validation Phase  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies,

192

NETL: The Carbon Sequestration Newsletter: July 2001  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

President Bush announces eight new carbon sequestration R&D awards On July 13th, President George Bush delivered an address on a "scientifically sound and effective global effort to reduce the buildup of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere." As a part of that speech the President announced recent R&D awards made by the DOE's Carbon Sequestration R&D Program. He highlighted two projects, one led by the Nature Conservancy and another by an international consortium of major energy companies. Click here for a copy of the President's remarks. The other winning proposals were led by Alstom Power, Praxair, Consol, Dakota Gasification, Advanced Resources International, and Yolo County, CA. Overall, industry is offering 40% cost share to the efforts. For a more detailed description of the DOE awards, click here.

193

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration November 6-7, 2001 Lexington, Kentucky Robert Addington AEI Incorporated 2000 Ashland Drive Ashland, KY 41101 Phone: 606-928-3433 Email: crystalj@aeiresources.com Jim Amonette MSIN K8-96 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 Phone: 509-3765565 Email: jim.amonette@pnl.gov Patrick Angel Area Office Manager U.S. Department of Interior Office of Surface Mining P.O. Box 1048 London, KY 40741 Phone: 606-878-6440 Email: pangel@osmre.gov Hugh Archer Commissioner Kentucky Dept of Natural Resources 663 Teton Trail Frankfort, KY 40601 Phone: 502-564-2184 Email: hugh.archer@mail.state.ky.us Victor Badaker Mining Engineering Dept. University of Kentucky MML Bldg. Lexington, KY 40546 Phone: 859-257-3818

194

Conceptual Design of a Fossil Hydrogen Infrastructure with Capture and Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Case Study in Ohio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ANNUAL CONFERENCE ON CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION DOE/energy systems with carbon capture and sequestration. Insources. Fossil H 2 with carbon capture and sequestration (

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Optimal Design of a Fossil Fuel-Based Hydrogen Infrastructure with Carbon Capture and Sequestration: Case Study in Ohio  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Infrastructure with Carbon Capture and Sequestration: CaseINFRASTRUCTURE WITH CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION: CASEhydrogen production with carbon capture and sequestration,

Johnson, Nils; Yang, Christopher; Ni, Jason; Johnson, Joshua; Lin, Zhenhong; Ogden, Joan M

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Carbon Sequestration in Organic Farming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Organic farming has been developed as a new mode of farming vs. conventional farming. Evidence showed that organic farming management can well maintain the soil carbon up to 2–3 times higher in organic matter ...

Raymond Liu; Jianming M. Xu; C. Edward Clapp

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts); and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan M. Capalbo

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Phase I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership, led by Montana State University, is comprised of research institutions, public entities and private sectors organizations, and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes and the Nez Perce Tribe. Efforts under this Partnership in Phase I are organized into four areas: (1) Evaluation of sources and carbon sequestration sinks that will be used to determine the location of pilot demonstrations in Phase II; (2) Development of GIS-based reporting framework that links with national networks; (3) Design of an integrated suite of monitoring, measuring, and verification technologies, market-based opportunities for carbon management, and an economic/risk assessment framework (referred to below as the Advanced Concepts component of the Phase I efforts); and (4) Initiation of a comprehensive education and outreach program. As a result of the Phase I activities, the groundwork is in place to provide an assessment of storage capabilities for CO{sub 2} utilizing the resources found in the Partnership region (both geological and terrestrial sinks), that complements the ongoing DOE research agenda in Carbon Sequestration. The geology of the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Region is favorable for the potential sequestration of enormous volume of CO{sub 2}. The United States Geological Survey (USGS 1995) identified 10 geologic provinces and 111 plays in the region. These provinces and plays include both sedimentary rock types characteristic of oil, gas, and coal productions as well as large areas of mafic volcanic rocks. Of the 10 provinces and 111 plays, 1 province and 4 plays are located within Idaho. The remaining 9 provinces and 107 plays are dominated by sedimentary rocks and located in the states of Montana and Wyoming. The potential sequestration capacity of the 9 sedimentary provinces within the region ranges from 25,000 to almost 900,000 million metric tons of CO{sub 2}. Overall every sedimentary formation investigated has significant potential to sequester large amounts of CO{sub 2}. Simulations conducted to evaluate mineral trapping potential of mafic volcanic rock formations located in the Idaho province suggest that supercritical CO{sub 2} is converted to solid carbonate mineral within a few hundred years and permanently entombs the carbon. Although MMV for this rock type may be challenging, a carefully chosen combination of geophysical and geochemical techniques should allow assessment of the fate of CO{sub 2} in deep basalt hosted aquifers. Terrestrial carbon sequestration relies on land management practices and technologies to remove atmospheric CO{sub 2} where it is stored in trees, plants, and soil. This indirect sequestration can be implemented today and is on the front line of voluntary, market-based approaches to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. Initial estimates of terrestrial sinks indicate a vast potential for increasing and maintaining soil Carbon (C) on rangelands, and forested, agricultural, and reclaimed lands. Rangelands can store up to an additional 0.05 mt C/ha/yr, while the croplands are on average four times that amount. Estimates of technical potential for soil sequestration within the region in cropland are in the range of 2.0 M mt C/yr over 20 year time horizon. This is equivalent to approximately 7.0 M mt CO{sub 2}e/yr. The forestry sinks are well documented, and the potential in the Big Sky region ranges from 9-15 M mt CO{sub 2} equivalent per year. Value-added benefits include enhanced yields, reduced erosion, and increased wildlife habitat. Thus the terrestrial sinks provide a viable, environmentally beneficial, and relatively low cost sink that is available to sequester C in the current time frame. The Partnership recognizes the critical importance of measurement, monitoring, and verification technologies to support not only carbon trading but all policies and programs that DOE and other agencies may want to pursue in support of GHG mitigation. The efforts in developing and implementing MMV technologies for geological and terrestrial sequestration re

Susan M. Capalbo

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

2005: Future effects of ozone on carbon sequestration and climate change policy using a global  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

production and carbon sequestration. The reduced carbon storage would then require further reductions in

B. Felzer; J. Reilly; J. Melillo; D. Kicklighter; M. Sarofim; C. Wang; R. Prinn; Q. Zhuang

200

New Jersey Joins the Energy Department's Carbon Sequestration Regional  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

New Jersey Joins the Energy Department's Carbon Sequestration New Jersey Joins the Energy Department's Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership Program New Jersey Joins the Energy Department's Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership Program June 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The State of New Jersey is the newest member of the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program--the centerpiece of national efforts to validate and deploy carbon sequestration technologies. The addition of New Jersey, the 43rd state to join the program, helps strengthen U.S. efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change. New Jersey--along with Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia--is a regional partner and a participant in the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

New Jersey Joins the Energy Department's Carbon Sequestration Regional  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Jersey Joins the Energy Department's Carbon Sequestration Jersey Joins the Energy Department's Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership Program New Jersey Joins the Energy Department's Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership Program June 24, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The State of New Jersey is the newest member of the U.S. Department of Energy's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program--the centerpiece of national efforts to validate and deploy carbon sequestration technologies. The addition of New Jersey, the 43rd state to join the program, helps strengthen U.S. efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and mitigate climate change. New Jersey--along with Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Michigan, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and West Virginia--is a regional partner and a participant in the Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership

202

CO2 Hydrate Composite for Ocean Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO2 Hydrate Composite for Ocean Carbon Sequestration ... Further studies are needed to address hydrate conversion efficiency, scale-up criteria, sequestration longevity, and impact on the ocean biota before in-situ production of sinking CO2 hydrate composite can be applied to oceanic CO2 storage and sequestration. ...

Sangyong Lee; Liyuan Liang; David Riestenberg; Olivia R. West; Costas Tsouris; Eric Adams

2003-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

203

Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Initiatives review meeting. Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A total of 32 papers were presented at the review meeting in sessions entitled: updates on regional characterization activities; CO{sub 2} sequestration with EOR; CO{sub 2} sequestration in saline formations I and II; and terrestrial carbon sequestration field projects. In addition are five introductory papers. These are all available on the website in slide/overview/viewgraph form.

NONE

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Optimal Geological Enviornments for Carbon Dioxide Storage in Saline Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

susan D. Hovorka susan D. Hovorka Principal Investigator University of Texas at Austin Bureau of Economic Geology 10100 Burnet Road, Bldg. 130 P.O. Box X Austin, TX 78713 512-471-4863 susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu Optimal GeOlOGical envirOnments fOr carbOn DiOxiDe stOraGe in saline fOrmatiOns Background For carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) sequestration to be a successful component of the United States emissions reduction strategy, there will have to be a favorable intersection of a number of factors, such as the electricity market, fuel source, power plant design and operation, capture technology, a suitable geologic sequestration site, and a pipeline right-of-way from the plant to the injection site. The concept of CO 2 sequestration in saline water-bearing formations (saline reservoirs), isolated at

205

Mechanical effect of adsorption Carbon sequestration and swelling of coal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical effect of adsorption Carbon sequestration and swelling of coal Laurent BROCHARD on Carbon Capture and Sequestration (2005)) Pressure,psi Time, year Pressure 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 Rate Université Paris-Est. Laboratoire Navier (UMR CNRS 8205). Ecole des Ponts ParisTech CONTEXT - CARBON

Boyer, Edmond

206

Improving Carbon Sequestration | U.S. DOE Office of Science ...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Improving Carbon Sequestration Laboratory Policy (LP) LP Home About Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD)...

207

Optimal forest management for carbon sequestration and biodiversity maintenance.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Managing planted forests for carbon sequestration and biodiversity maintenance has become increasingly important in times of rapid climate change and the loss of biodiversity worldwide.… (more)

Nghiem, Thi Hong Nhung

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Understanding carbon sequestration in north central Montana dryland wheat systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Agricultural management practices that reduce tillage and/or increase crop intensity have been shown to promote soil carbon sequestration in many regions of the Great Plains.… (more)

Feddema, Ryan Patrick.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Carbon Sequestration with Reforestations and Biodiversity-scenic Values  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an optimal control model to analyze reforestations with two different species, including commercial values, carbon sequestration and biodiversity or scenic values. We discuss ... of environmen...

Alejandro Caparrós; Emilio Cerdá; Paola Ovando…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Characterization Efforts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts RCSP Geologic Characterization Efforts The U.S. Department of Energy created a nationwide network of seven Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP) in 2003 to help determine and implement the technology, infrastructure, and regulations most appropriate to promote carbon storage in different regions of the United States and Canada. The RCSP Initiative is being implemented in three phases: (1) Characterization Phase (2003-2005) to collect data on CO2 stationary sources and geologic formations and develop the human capital to support and enable future carbon storage field tests, (2) Validation Phase (2005-2011) to evaluate promising CO2 storage opportunities through a series of small-scale (<1 million metric tons of CO2) field tests, and (3) Development Phase (2008-2018+) that involves the injection of 1 million metric tons or more of CO2 by each RCSP into regionally significant geologic formations. In addition to working toward developing human capital, encouraging stakeholder networking, and enhancing public outreach and education on carbon capture and storage (CCS), the RCSPs are conducting extensive geologic characterization across all three project phases, as well as CO2 stationary source identification and re-evaluation over time.

211

Efficiency of incentives to jointly increase carbon sequestration and species conservation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficiency of incentives to jointly increase carbon sequestration and species conservation the provision of carbon sequestration and species conservation across heterogeneous landscapes. Using data from the Willamette Basin, Oregon, we compare the provision of carbon sequestration and species conservation under

Weiblen, George D

212

Carbon sequestration potential of tropical pasture compared with afforestation in Panama  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon sequestration potential of tropical pasture compared with afforestation in Panama S E B) to estimate the carbon sequestration potential of tropical pasture compared with afforestation; and (3 show the potential for considerable carbon sequestration of tropical afforestation and highlight

Potvin, Catherine

213

DOE Awards First Three Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

First Three Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects First Three Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects DOE Awards First Three Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects October 9, 2007 - 3:14pm Addthis U.S. Projects Total $318 Million and Further President Bush's Initiatives to Advance Clean Energy Technologies to Confront Climate Change WASHINGTON, DC - In a major step forward for demonstrating the promise of clean energy technology, U.S Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell today announced that the Department of Energy (DOE) awarded the first three large-scale carbon sequestration projects in the United States and the largest single set in the world to date. The three projects - Plains Carbon Dioxide Reduction Partnership; Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership; and Southwest Regional Partnership for Carbon

214

Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle Geophysical Monograph Series 183  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

73 Carbon Sequestration and Its Role in the Global Carbon Cycle Geophysical Monograph Series 183. Blaine Metting2 The purpose of this chapter is to review terrestrial biological carbon sequestration Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington, USA. #12;74 TERRESTRIAL BIOLOGICAL CARBON SEqUESTRATION

Pennycook, Steve

215

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Industrial-scale processes are available for separating carbon dioxide from the post-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Industrial-scale processes are available for separating carbon dioxide dioxide separation and sequestration because the lower cost of carbon dioxide separation from for injection of carbon dioxide into oil or gas-bearing formations. An advantage of sequestration involving

216

EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment,  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, 336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania EA-1336: Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's proposal to participate with a group of international organizations in an experiment to evaluate the dispersion and diffusion of liquid carbon dioxide droplets in ocean waters. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD May 4, 2001 EA-1336: Finding of No Significant Impact Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment May 4, 2001 EA-1336: Final Environmental Assessment Ocean Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Field Experiment

217

A Finite Element Model for Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a hydro-mechanical model, followed by stress, deformation, and shear-slip failure analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). The model considers the poroelastic effects by taking into account of the two-way coupling between the geomechanical response and the fluid flow process. Analytical solutions for pressure and deformation fields were derived for a typical geological sequestration scenario in our previous work. A finite element approach is introduced here for numerically solving the hydro-mechanical model with arbitrary boundary conditions. The numerical approach was built on an open-source finite element code Elmer, and results were compared to the analytical solutions. The shear-slip failure analysis was presented based on the numerical results, where the potential failure zone is identified. Information is relevant to the prediction of the maximum sustainable injection rate or pressure. The effects of caprock permeability on the fluid pressure, deformation, stress, and the shear-slip failure zone were also quantitatively studied. It was shown that a larger permeability in caprock and base rock leads to a larger uplift but a smaller shear-slip failure zone.

Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin

2013-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

218

Carbon Sequestration, Soil Conservation, and the Kyoto Protocol: Summary of Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper discusses relationships between soil conservation, carbon sequestration, and the Kyoto Protocol. The Kyoto ... particularly true for soil conservation, where the sequestration of carbon above and below...

Julian Dumanski

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

NETL: Carbon Storage - West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

WESTCARB WESTCARB Carbon Storage West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership MORE INFO Additional information related to ongoing WESTCARB efforts can be found on their website. The West Coast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (WESTCARB) is led by the California Energy Commission and represents a coalition of more than 90 organizations from state and provincial resource management and environmental protection agencies; national laboratories and research institutions; colleges and universities; conservation non-profits; oil and gas companies; power companies; pipeline companies; trade associations; vendors and service firms; and consultants. The partners are engaged in several aspects of WESTCARB projects and contribute to the efforts to deploy carbon storage projects on the west coast of North America. WESTCARB

220

Carbon dioxide sequestration in concrete in different curing environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon dioxide sequestration in concrete in different curing environments Y.-m. Chun, T.R. Naik, USA ABSTRACT: This paper summarizes the results of an investigation on carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration in concrete. Concrete mixtures were not air entrained. Concrete mixtures were made containing

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Cost Assessment of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost Assessment of CO2 Sequestration by Mineral Carbonation Frank E. Yeboah Tuncel M. Yegulalp Harmohindar Singh Research Associate Professor Professor Center for Energy Research... them carbon dioxide (CO 2 ). This paper assesses the cost of sequestering CO 2 produced by a ZEC power plant using solid sequestration process. INTRODUCTION CO 2 is produced when electrical energy is generated using conventional fossil...

Yeboah, F. E.; Yegulalp, T. M.; Singh, H.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

NETL: Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships in Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration A "Hands-On" Workshop for the Appalachian Coal & Electric Utilities Industries Table of Contents Disclaimer General Conference Information Papers and Presentations Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

223

Perspectives on Carbon Capture and Sequestration in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2958.2001.tb00775.x. (55) DOE/NETL carbon dioxide capturein the United States; in DOE/NETL-2010/1420; National Energyhttp:// www.nrdc.org.asp (129) NETL: Carbon Sequestration;

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Offsetting China's CO2 Emissions by Soil Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fossil fuel emissions of carbon (C) in China in 2000 was ... % or more of the antecedent soil organic carbon (SOC) pool.Some of the depleted ... . A crude estimated potential of soil C sequestration in China is 1...

R. Lal

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Biomass carbon sequestration by planted forests in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The planted forest area and carbon sequestration have increased significantly in China, because of ... based volume-to-biomass method to estimate the carbon storage by planted forests in China in ... inventories....

Xinliang Xu; Kerang Li

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Carbon Sequestration Kinetic and Storage Capacity of Ultramafic Mining Waste  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mineral carbonation of ultramafic rocks provides an environmentally safe and permanent solution for CO2 sequestration. In order to assess the carbonation potential of ultramafic waste material produced by industrial processing, we designed a laboratory-...

Julie Pronost; Georges Beaudoin; Joniel Tremblay; Faïçal Larachi; Josée Duchesne; Réjean Hébert; Marc Constantin

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

227

Received 28 Apr 2013 | Accepted 9 Sep 2013 | Published 15 Oct 2013 Earthworms facilitate carbon sequestration through  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

carbon sequestration through unequal amplification of carbon stabilization compared with mineralization carbon would entirely reflect the earthworms' contribution to net carbon sequestration. We show how two widespread earthworm invaders affect net carbon sequestration through impacts on the balance of carbon

Neher, Deborah A.

228

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Concrete Using Vacuum-Carbonation Alain Azar, Prof. Yixin Shao  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Concrete Using Vacuum-Carbonation Alain Azar, Prof. Yixin Shao promising carbon uptake results and is a viable option for carbonation curing. Carbon sequestration increase in Carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions over the past five decades, specific ways to reduce

Barthelat, Francois

229

An Alternative Mechanism for Accelerated Carbon Sequestration in Concrete  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increased rate of carbon dioxide sequestration (carbonation) is desired in many primary and secondary life applications of concrete in order to make the life cycle of concrete structures more carbon neutral. Most carbonation rate studies have focused on concrete exposed to air under various conditions. An alternative mechanism for accelerated carbon sequestration in concrete was investigated in this research based on the pH change of waters in contact with pervious concrete which have been submerged in carbonate laden waters. The results indicate that the concrete exposed to high levels of carbonate species in water may carbonate faster than when exposed to ambient air, and that the rate is higher with higher concentrations. Validation of increased carbon dioxide sequestration was also performed via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). It is theorized that the proposed alternative mechanism reduces a limiting rate effect of carbon dioxide dissolution in water in the micro pores of the concrete.

Haselbach, Liv M.; Thomle, Jonathan N.

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award August 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- A film about carbon sequestration produced with support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has received a 2009 Gold Aurora Award in the documentary category for nature/environment. Titled Out of the Air - Into the Soil: Land Practices That Reduce Atmospheric Carbon Levels, the documentary discusses the effects that proper landscape management can have on carbon absorption. Documentaries such as this are an important tool in educating the public on steps being taken to mitigate climate change. Co-produced by Prairie Public Broadcasting, Fargo, N.D., and the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, which is led by the University of North

231

Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award Carbon Sequestration Documentary Wins Coveted Aurora Award August 26, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- A film about carbon sequestration produced with support from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has received a 2009 Gold Aurora Award in the documentary category for nature/environment. Titled Out of the Air - Into the Soil: Land Practices That Reduce Atmospheric Carbon Levels, the documentary discusses the effects that proper landscape management can have on carbon absorption. Documentaries such as this are an important tool in educating the public on steps being taken to mitigate climate change. Co-produced by Prairie Public Broadcasting, Fargo, N.D., and the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, which is led by the University of North

232

DOE Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Geologic Carbon  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Geologic Carbon Sequestration DOE Releases Report on Techniques to Ensure Safe, Effective Geologic Carbon Sequestration March 17, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC -- The Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has created a comprehensive new document that examines existing and emerging techniques to monitor, verify, and account for carbon dioxide (CO2) stored in geologic formations. The report, titled Monitoring, Verification, and Accounting of CO2 Stored in Deep Geologic Formations, should prove to be an invaluable tool in reducing greenhouse gas emissions to the atmosphere through geologic sequestration. The report was prepared by NETL with input from the seven Regional Carbon

233

Experimental Geochemical Studies Relevant to Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geochemical Studies Relevant to Geochemical Studies Relevant to Carbon Sequestration James G. Blencoe (blencoejg@ornl.gov; 865-574-7041) David R. Cole (coledr@ornl.gov; 865-574-5473) Juske Horita (horitaj@ornl.gov; 865-576-2750) Geochemistry Group Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Building 4500-S Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6110 Gerilynn R. Moline (molinegr@ornl.gov; 865-576-5134) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Building 1505 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6038 Introduction Evidence is mounting that rising levels of atmospheric CO 2 will have profound effects on future global climates (1-2) . Consequently, many experts agree that technologies are needed to slow, and ultimately stop, further buildup (3-5) . One of the strategies proposed to achieve this aim

234

Southwest Regional Partnership for Carbon Sequestration--Validation Phase  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Southwest Regional Partnership for Southwest Regional Partnership for Carbon Sequestration-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected seven partnerships, through its Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (RCSP) initiative, to determine the best approaches for capturing and permanently storing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), a greenhouse gas (GHG) which can contribute to global climate change. The RCSPs are made up of state and local agencies, coal companies, oil and gas companies, electric utilities,

235

Permanence Discounting for Land-Based Carbon Sequestration Man-Keun Kim  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Permanence Discounting for Land-Based Carbon Sequestration By Man-Keun Kim Post Doctoral Fellow Discounting for Land-Based Carbon Sequestration 1. Introduction Land-based soil carbon sequestration has been explored the potential of land-based carbon sequestration strategies in the US such as afforestation

McCarl, Bruce A.

236

NETL: News Release - Critical Carbon Sequestration Assessment Begins:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

September 12, 2006 September 12, 2006 Critical Carbon Sequestration Assessment Begins: Midwest Partnership Looks at Appalachian Basin for Safe Storage Sites Seismic Surveys to Determine Viability of Rock Formations for CO2 Storage WASHINGTON, DC - Tapping into rock formations at sites thousands of feet deep, a government-industry team is using seismic testing to help determine whether those sites can serve as reservoirs to safely store carbon dioxide (CO2), a major greenhouse gas. MORE INFO WATCH: NETL Project Manager Charlie Byrer discuss this important project Learn more about DOE's Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnerships Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership web site The U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory is sponsoring the tests in a program to develop carbon sequestration

237

Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation April 20, 2010 - 3:45pm Addthis Statement of Dr. James Markowsky, Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation, S. 1856, S. 1134, and other Draft Legislative Text. Thank you Mr. Chairman and members of the Committee. I appreciate this opportunity to meet with you this morning to discuss carbon capture and storage (CCS) legislation before the Committee. While this hearing is focused specifically on S. 1856, a bill to amend the Energy Policy Act of 2005 to clarify policies regarding ownership of pore space, introduced by Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY); S.1134, the Responsible Use

238

Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2013 Now Accepting Applications  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2013 Now Accepting Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2013 Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration 2013 Now Accepting Applications March 12, 2013 - 1:43pm Addthis Washington, DC - Graduate students and early career professionals can gain hands-on field research experience in areas related to carbon capture and storage (CCS) by participating in the Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) program. The initiative, supported by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy (FE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), is currently accepting applications for RECS 2013, scheduled for June 2-12, in Birmingham, AL. The deadline to apply is April 20. An intensive science and field-based program, RECS 2013 will combine background briefings with group exercises and field activities at an

239

Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation Discussion on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation April 20, 2010 - 3:45pm Addthis Statement of Dr. James Markowsky, Assistant Secretary for Fossil Energy before the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources on Carbon Capture and Sequestration Legislation, S. 1856, S. 1134, and other Draft Legislative Text. Thank you Mr. Chairman and members of the Committee. I appreciate this opportunity to meet with you this morning to discuss carbon capture and storage (CCS) legislation before the Committee. While this hearing is focused specifically on S. 1856, a bill to amend the Energy Policy Act of 2005 to clarify policies regarding ownership of pore space, introduced by Sen. John Barrasso (R-WY); S.1134, the Responsible Use

240

Monitoring Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Using Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT): Sensitivity Studies  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Monitoring Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Using Electrical Resistance Monitoring Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Using Electrical Resistance Tomography (ERT): Sensitivity Studies Robin L. Newmark (newmark@llnl.gov, 925-423-3644) Abelardo L. Ramirez (ramirez3@llnl.gov; 925-422-6909) William D. Daily (daily1@llnl.gov; 925-422-8623) Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory P.O. Box 808 Livermore, Ca. 94550 Abstract If geologic formations are used to sequester carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), monitoring the CO 2 injection will be required to confirm the performance of the reservoir system, assess leaks and flow paths, and understand the geophysical and geochemical interactions between the CO 2 and the geologic minerals and fluids. Electrical methods are well suited for monitoring processes involving fluids, as electrical properties are sensitive to the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

242

EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III:  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase 6: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana EA-1886: Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership - Phase III: Large Volume CO2 Injection-Site Characterization, Well Drilling, and Infrastructure Development, Injection, MVA, and Site Closure, Kevin Dome, Toole County, Montana SUMMARY This EA will evaluate the environmental impacts of a proposal for the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Regional Partnership to demonstrate the viability and safety of CO2 storage in a regionally significant subsurface formation in Toole County, Montana and to promote the commercialization of future

243

Southwest Regional Partnership for Carbon Sequestration--Validation...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Socorro, NM 87801-4796 575-835-5403 reid@prrc.nmt.edu Southwest Regional Partnership for Carbon Sequestration-Validation Phase Background The U.S. Department of Energy Regional...

244

Estimating Carbon Sequestration Rates on a Regional Scale  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two regional case studies on carbon (C) sequestration rate for the forested land of Sweden...?1 year?1. With just two dominant tree species, a comparison was made. In humus layers, Scots pine stands sequestered C...

Björn Berg; Charles McClaugherty

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Perspectives on Carbon Capture and Sequestration in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

save the next generation of coal with carbon sequestration.29) California: No to “old” coal power; Casper Star Tribune:Concise guide to Wyoming coal; www.wma-minelife.com/coal/

Wong-Parodi, Gabrielle

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Near Surface Leakage Monitoring for the Verification and Accounting of Geologic Carbon Sequestration Using a Field Ready {sup 14}C Isotopic Analyzer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results for the development of a field ready multi-isotopic analyzer for {sup 12}CO{sub 2}, {sup 13}CO{sub 2} and {sup 14}CO{sub 2} and applications for carbon capture and storage (CCS) containment performance are described. A design goal of the field platform was to provide isotopic data with a high data rate, a standardized reference baseline and acceptable precision (e.g., ~ ±50 per mil D{sup 14}CO{sub 2}) for detection and quantification of fossil-fuel CO{sub 2} CCS leakage scenarios. The instrument platform was not designed to replace high precision accelerator mass spectrometry. An additional goal was to combine project scale isotopic data and associated fluxes with unique financial instruments linking CCS containment performance to a publicly traded security providing project revenue to stakeholders. While the primary goals of the project were attained additional work is needed for the instrument platform and deployment within a full scale CCS site that was not available during the project timeframe.

Marino, Bruno

2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

247

Efficient parallel simulation of CO2 geologic sequestration insaline aquifers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An efficient parallel simulator for large-scale, long-termCO2 geologic sequestration in saline aquifers has been developed. Theparallel simulator is a three-dimensional, fully implicit model thatsolves large, sparse linear systems arising from discretization of thepartial differential equations for mass and energy balance in porous andfractured media. The simulator is based on the ECO2N module of the TOUGH2code and inherits all the process capabilities of the single-CPU TOUGH2code, including a comprehensive description of the thermodynamics andthermophysical properties of H2O-NaCl- CO2 mixtures, modeling singleand/or two-phase isothermal or non-isothermal flow processes, two-phasemixtures, fluid phases appearing or disappearing, as well as saltprecipitation or dissolution. The new parallel simulator uses MPI forparallel implementation, the METIS software package for simulation domainpartitioning, and the iterative parallel linear solver package Aztec forsolving linear equations by multiple processors. In addition, theparallel simulator has been implemented with an efficient communicationscheme. Test examples show that a linear or super-linear speedup can beobtained on Linux clusters as well as on supercomputers. Because of thesignificant improvement in both simulation time and memory requirement,the new simulator provides a powerful tool for tackling larger scale andmore complex problems than can be solved by single-CPU codes. Ahigh-resolution simulation example is presented that models buoyantconvection, induced by a small increase in brine density caused bydissolution of CO2.

Zhang, Keni; Doughty, Christine; Wu, Yu-Shu; Pruess, Karsten

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Workshop on Carbon Sequestration Science - Modeling and Integrated Assessment  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Modeling and Integrated Modeling and Integrated Assessment Howard Herzog MIT Energy Laboratory May 24, 2001 Economic Assessments * Engineering analysis of CO 2 separation and capture * Economic modeling/ integrated assessment of carbon capture and sequestration * Comparison on equal basis of the major sequestration options Economic Modeling Motivation * When might carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) become competitive? * What is its potential scale? * Which technologies look most promising? . . . . And when? * How to see the potential in a general market context? Detailed Reference *Sean Biggs Thesis: S Biggs, S. D., "Sequestering Carbon from Power Plants: The Jury is Still Out," M.I.T. Masters Thesis, (2000). S http://sequestration.mit.edu/pdf/SeanBiggs.pdf What Determines Competitiveness?

249

Peer Reviewed: What Future for Carbon Capture and Sequestration?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Peer Reviewed: What Future for Carbon Capture and Sequestration? ... A New Porous Material to Enhance the Kinetics of Clathrate Process: Application to Precombustion Carbon Dioxide Capture ... A New Porous Material to Enhance the Kinetics of Clathrate Process: Application to Precombustion Carbon Dioxide Capture ...

Howard J. Herzog

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Aqueous Carbonation of Natural Brucite: Relevance to CO2 Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Aqueous Carbonation of Natural Brucite: Relevance to CO2 Sequestration ... Products and reaction kinetics of natural brucite carbonation are studied at room temperature and moderate pCO2. ... Carbonation of natural brucite in H2O and diluted HCl is investigated at room temperature and moderate pCO2 to explore the products’ mineralogy and reaction kinetics. ...

Liang Zhao; Liqin Sang; Jun Chen; Junfeng Ji; H. Henry Teng

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

251

Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada Third Carbon Sequestration Atlas Estimates Up to 5,700 Years of CO2 Storage Potential in U.S. and Portions of Canada December 1, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - There could be as much as 5,700 years of carbon dioxide (CO2) storage potential available in geologic formations in the United States and portions of Canada, according to the latest edition of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Atlas (Atlas III). The updated preliminary estimate, based on current emission rates, documents 1,800 billion to more than 20,000 billion metric tons of CO2 storage potential in saline formations, oil and gas reservoirs, and unmineable coal areas. This suggests the availability of approximately

252

Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Blundell and Fraser Armstrong Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage Sam...Nottingham NG12 5GG, UK Carbon dioxide capture and geological storage is a...80-90%. It involves the capture of carbon dioxide at a large industrial...

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

NETL: News Release - Terrestial Carbon Sequestration Test Underway at  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Terrestial Carbon Sequestration Test Underway at Reclaimed Mine Site Terrestial Carbon Sequestration Test Underway at Reclaimed Mine Site DOE, TVA, EPRI Team to Use Coal Products to Enhance Nature's "Biological CO2 Scrubber" at Test Site in Kentucky DRAKESBORO, KY - The U.S. Department of Energy has joined forces with the Tennessee Valley Authority and the Electric Power Research Institute to demonstrate what might be termed a "grassroots" approach to sequestering carbon dioxide. The new project will use coal combustion byproducts to enhance the storage of carbon in vegetation and soils. - Photo - TVA's Paradise Power Plant - The new terrestrial carbon sequestration project will be sited on reclaimed mine land next to the Paradise Fossil Plant, TVA's second largest power plant. A surface mine reclamation project at the 2,558-megawatt TVA-owned Paradise

254

NETL: Carbon Storage - Geologic Storage  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geologic Storage Geologic Storage Carbon Storage Geologic Storage Focus Area Geologiccarbon dioxide (CO2) storage involves the injection of supercritical CO2 into deep geologic formations (injection zones) overlain by competent sealing formations and geologic traps that will prevent the CO2 from escaping. Current research and field studies are focused on developing better understanding 11 major types of geologic storage reservoir classes, each having their own unique opportunities and challenges. Understanding these different storage classes provides insight into how the systems influence fluids flow within these systems today, and how CO2 in geologic storage would be anticipated to flow in the future. The different storage formation classes include: deltaic, coal/shale, fluvial, alluvial, strandplain, turbidite, eolian, lacustrine, clastic shelf, carbonate shallow shelf, and reef. Basaltic interflow zones are also being considered as potential reservoirs. These storage reservoirs contain fluids that may include natural gas, oil, or saline water; any of which may impact CO2 storage differently. The following summarizes the potential for storage and the challenges related to CO2 storage capability for fluids that may be present in more conventional clastic and carbonate reservoirs (saline water, and oil and gas), as well as unconventional reservoirs (unmineable coal seams, organic-rich shales, and basalts):

255

Carbon Trading Protocols for Geologic Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monitoring, Measurement and Verification (MMV) techniquesMMV: Measurement, Monitoring, and Verification SD WA: Safe

Hoversten, Shanna

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

GEOLOGIC CARBON SEQUESTRATION STRATEGIES FOR CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in this report; nor does any party represent that the uses of this information will not infringe upon privately to extend our thanks to the authors of various WESTCARB studies that we used, including Cameron Downey of Oil and Gas and Geothermal Resources in the Department of Conservation for his contributions

257

Cyberinfrastructure for collaborative geologic carbon sequestration research:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the area, as evidenced by the location of numerous nearby refineries and power plants. Ongoing University of Wyoming CCS research...WyoSakai fit the initial project need to create both an operable and proof-of-concept site for collaboration among the...

Jeffrey D. Hamerlinck; Teal B. Wyckoff; James R. Oakleaf; Philip L. Polzer

258

Microbially induced magnesium carbonation reactions as a strategy for carbon sequestration in ultramafic mine tailings.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration has increased due to anthropogenic fossil fuel combustion, causing higher global temperatures and other negative environmental effects. CO2 sequestration… (more)

McCutcheon, Jenine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Carbon Dioxide Sequestration (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dioxide Sequestration (West Virginia) Dioxide Sequestration (West Virginia) Carbon Dioxide Sequestration (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Environmental Regulations Fees Safety and Operational Guidelines Siting and Permitting The purpose of this law is to: Establish a legal and regulatory framework for the permitting of carbon dioxide sequestration operations; Designate a state agency responsible for establishing standards and

260

Carbon dioxide sequestration by aqueous mineral carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The dramatic increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide since the Industrial Revolution has caused concerns about global warming. Fossil-fuel-fired power plants contribute approximately one third of the total human-caused emissions of carbon dioxide. Increased efficiency of these power plants will have a large impact on carbon dioxide emissions, but additional measures will be needed to slow or stop the projected increase in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide. By accelerating the naturally occurring carbonation of magnesium silicate minerals it is possible to sequester carbon dioxide in the geologically stable mineral magnesite (MgCO3). The carbonation of two classes of magnesium silicate minerals, olivine (Mg2SiO4) and serpentine (Mg3Si2O5(OH)4), was investigated in an aqueous process. The slow natural geologic process that converts both of these minerals to magnesite can be accelerated by increasing the surface area, increasing the activity of carbon dioxide in the solution, introducing imperfections into the crystal lattice by high-energy attrition grinding, and in the case of serpentine, by thermally activating the mineral by removing the chemically bound water. The effect of temperature is complex because it affects both the solubility of carbon dioxide and the rate of mineral dissolution in opposing fashions. Thus an optimum temperature for carbonation of olivine is approximately 185 degrees C and 155 degrees C for serpentine. This paper will elucidate the interaction of these variables and use kinetic studies to propose a process for the sequestration of the carbon dioxide.

Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Dahlin, David C.; O'Connor, William K.; Penner, Larry R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs among land-use  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forest cover, carbon sequestration, and wildlife habitat: policy review and modeling of tradeoffs and services, including timber production, carbon sequestration and storage, scenic amenities, and wildlife habitat. International efforts to mitigate climate change through forest carbon sequestration

Rissman, Adena

262

Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Name Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership Address 2327 University Way, 3rd Floor Place Bozeman, Montana Zip 59715 Region Pacific Northwest Area Phone number 406-994-3755 Notes One of the US DOE's seven regional carbon sequestration partnerships. Coordinates 45.6565752°, -111.041813° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.6565752,"lon":-111.041813,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

263

Version 3 Bioscience1 Enhancement of Carbon Sequestration in U.S. Soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Version 3 Bioscience1 Enhancement of Carbon Sequestration in U.S. Soils W.M. Post, R.C. Izaurralde and retain soil carbon can lead to specific manipulations for enhancement of soil C sequestration for an integrated evaluation of soil carbon sequestration methods are presented. Keywords: soil carbon, greenhouse

McCarl, Bruce A.

264

First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Washington, DC, May 14-17, 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration Washington, DC, May 14-17, 2001 Caldeira, K for Research on Ocean Carbon Sequestration (DOCS) *Climate and Carbon Cycle Modeling Group, Lawrence Livermore carbon sequestration strategy. Therefore, we want to understand the effectiveness of oceanic injection

265

Carbon Sequestration May Have Negative Impacts on Ecosystem Health  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon Sequestration May Have Negative Impacts on Ecosystem Health ... Yin, R.; Sedjo, R.; Liu, P.The potential and challenges of sequestering carbon and generating other services in China’s forest ecosystems Environ. ... A discussion of whether climate change in China can be mitigated by expanding its forest area by 40 million ha to sequester C (CO2 emissions). ...

Yafeng Wang; Shixiong Cao

2011-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

266

Spatially-explicit impacts of carbon capture and sequestration on water supply and demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annual Conference on Carbon Capture and Sequestration, MayEleventh Annual Carbon Capture, Utilization & Sequestrationplants with and without carbon capture. Presentation at 2009

Sathre, Roger

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Forestry-based Carbon Sequestration Projects in Africa: Potential benefits  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Forestry-based Carbon Sequestration Projects in Africa: Potential benefits Forestry-based Carbon Sequestration Projects in Africa: Potential benefits and challenges Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Forestry-based Carbon Sequestration Projects in Africa: Potential benefits and challenges Agency/Company /Organization: Natural Resources Forum Sector: Land Focus Area: Forestry Topics: Implementation, GHG inventory, Resource assessment Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learned/best practices, Case studies/examples Website: www.worldagroforestry.org/downloads/publications/PDFs/JA08145.PDF UN Region: "Sub-Saharan Africa" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean, Central America, South America, Northern America, Central Asia, Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Western Asia, Eastern Europe, Northern Europe, Southern Europe, Western Europe, Australia and New Zealand, Melanesia, Micronesia, Polynesia, Latin America and the Caribbean) for this property.

268

GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential benefits for reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the highly industrialized Carboniferous coal basins of North America and Europe and for enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Hence, enhanced coalbed methane recovery operations provide a basis for a market-based environmental solution in which the cost of sequestration is offset by the production and sale of natural gas. The Black Warrior foreland basin of west-central Alabama contains the only mature coalbed methane production fairway in eastern North America, and data from this basin provide an excellent basis for quantifying the carbon sequestration potential of coal and for identifying the geologic screening criteria required to select sites for the demonstration and commercialization of carbon sequestration technology. Coalbed methane reservoirs in the upper Pottsville Formation of the Black Warrior basin are extremely heterogeneous, and this heterogeneity must be considered to screen areas for the application of CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery technology. Major screening factors include stratigraphy, geologic structure, geothermics, hydrogeology, coal quality, sorption capacity, technology, and infrastructure. Applying the screening model to the Black Warrior basin indicates that geologic structure, water chemistry, and the distribution of coal mines and reserves are the principal determinants of where CO{sub 2} can be sequestered. By comparison, coal thickness, temperature-pressure conditions, and coal quality are the key determinants of sequestration capacity and unswept coalbed methane resources. Results of this investigation indicate that the potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery in the Black Warrior basin is substantial and can result in significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions while increasing natural gas reserves. Coal-fired power plants serving the Black Warrior basin in Alabama emit approximately 31 MMst (2.4 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} annually. The total sequestration capacity of the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway at 350 psi is about 189 MMst (14.9 Tcf), which is equivalent to 6.1 years of greenhouse gas emissions from the coal-fired power plants. Applying the geologic screening model indicates that significant parts of the coalbed methane fairway are not accessible because of fault zones, coal mines, coal reserves, and formation water with TDS content less than 3,000 mg/L. Excluding these areas leaves a sequestration potential of 60 MMst (4.7 Tcf), which is equivalent to 1.9 years of emissions. Therefore, if about10 percent of the flue gas stream from nearby power plants is dedicated to enhanced coalbed methane recovery, a meaningful reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions can be realized for nearly two decades. If the fresh-water restriction were removed for the purposes of CO{sub 2} sequestration, an additional 10 MMst (0.9 Tcf) of CO{sub 2} could feasibly be sequestered. The amount of unswept coalbed methane in the fairway is estimated to be 1.49 Tcf at a pressure of 50 psi. Applying the screening model results in an accessible unswept gas resource of 0.44 Tcf. Removal of the fresh-water restriction would elevate this number to 0.57 Tcf. If a recovery factor of 80 percent can be realized, then enhanced recovery activities can result in an 18 percent expansion of coalbed methane reserves in the Black Warrior basin.

Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

CO2-H2O mixtures in the geological sequestration of CO2. II ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sequestration (e.g., Garcia, 2003; Pruess et al., 2004; Xu et al.,. 2004) deal with ...... Cramer S. D. (1982) The solubility of methane, carbon dioxide and oxygen in

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Open Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration Ocean Iron Fertilization for Scientific Study and Carbon Sequestration K. Coale coale@mlml.calstate.edu (831) 632-4400 Moss Landing Marine Laboratories 8272 Moss Landing Road Moss Landing, California 95039 USA Abstract The trace element iron has been recently shown to play a critical role in nutrient utilization, phytoplankton growth and therefore the uptake of carbon dioxide from the surface waters of the global ocean. Carbon fixation in the surface waters, via phytoplankton growth, shifts the ocean/atmosphere exchange equilibrium for carbon dioxide. As a result, levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide (a greenhouse gas) and iron flux to the oceans have been linked to climate change (glacial to interglacial transitions). These recent findings have led some to suggest that large scale

271

2000): Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

matter dynamics that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil

W. M. Post; K. C. Kwon

272

GEOLOGIC SCREENING CRITERIA FOR SEQUESTRATION OF CO2 IN COAL: QUANTIFYING POTENTIAL OF THE BLACK WARRIOR COALBED METHANE FAIRWAY, ALABAMA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sequestration of CO{sub 2} in coal has potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions from coal-fired power plants while enhancing coalbed methane recovery. Data from more than 4,000 coalbed methane wells in the Black Warrior basin of Alabama provide an opportunity to quantify the carbon sequestration potential of coal and to develop a geologic screening model for the application of carbon sequestration technology. This report summarizes stratigraphy and sedimentation, structural geology, geothermics, hydrology, coal quality, gas capacity, and production characteristics of coal in the Black Warrior coalbed methane fairway and the implications of geology for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Coal in the Black Warrior basin is distributed among several fluvial-deltaic coal zones in the Lower Pennsylvanian Pottsville Formation. Most coal zones contain one to three coal beds that are significant targets for coalbed methane production and carbon sequestration, and net coal thickness generally increases southeastward. Pottsville strata have effectively no matrix permeability to water, so virtually all flow is through natural fractures. Faults and folds influence the abundance and openness of fractures and, hence, the performance of coalbed methane wells. Water chemistry in the Pottsville Formation ranges from fresh to saline, and zones with TDS content lower than 10,000 mg/L can be classified as USDW. An aquifer exemption facilitating enhanced recovery in USDW can be obtained where TDS content is higher than 3,000 mg/L. Carbon dioxide becomes a supercritical fluid above a temperature of 88 F and a pressure of 1,074 psi. Reservoir temperature exceeds 88 F in much of the study area. Hydrostatic pressure gradients range from normal to extremely underpressured. A large area of underpressure is developed around closely spaced longwall coal mines, and areas of natural underpressure are distributed among the coalbed methane fields. The mobility and reactivity of supercritical CO{sub 2} in coal-bearing strata is unknown, and potential exists for supercritical conditions to develop below a depth of 2,480 feet following abandonment of the coalbed methane fields. High-pressure adsorption isotherms confirm that coal sorbs approximately twice as much CO{sub 2} as CH{sub 4} and approximately four times as much CO{sub 2} as N{sub 2}. Analysis of isotherm data reveals that the sorption performance of each gas can vary by a factor of two depending on rank and ash content. Gas content data exhibit extreme vertical and lateral variability that is the product of a complex burial history involving an early phase of thermogenic gas generation and an ongoing stage of late biogenic gas generation. Production characteristics of coalbed methane wells are helpful for identifying areas that are candidates for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Many geologic and engineering factors, including well construction, well spacing, and regional structure influence well performance. Close fault spacing limits areas where five-spot patterns may be developed for enhanced gas recovery, but large structural panels lacking normal faults are in several gas fields and can be given priority as areas to demonstrate and commercialize carbon sequestration technology in coalbed methane reservoirs.

Jack C. Pashin; Richard E. Carroll; Richard H. Groshong, Jr.; Dorothy E. Raymond; Marcella McIntyre; J. Wayne Payton

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Assessing Carbon and Nitrogen Partition in Kharif Crops for Their Carbon Sequestration Potential  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A pot culture experiment was conducted to identify carbon sequestration potential among the crops such as maize, ... millet, finger millet and rice through estimating carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) partition ... C:N...

S. K. Kushwah; M. L. Dotaniya; A. K. Upadhyay…

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Uncertainty Discounting for Land-Based Carbon Sequestration Man-Keun Kim  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Uncertainty Discounting for Land-Based Carbon Sequestration By Man-Keun Kim Post Doctoral Fellow Discounting for Land-Based Carbon Sequestration Abstract The effect of various stochastic factors like weather% to 10% for the East Texas region. #12;3 Uncertainty Discounting for Land-Based Carbon Sequestration 1

McCarl, Bruce A.

275

Nonlinear root-derived carbon sequestration across a gradient of nitrogen and phosphorous deposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nonlinear root-derived carbon sequestration across a gradient of nitrogen and phosphorous sequestration of plant-carbon (C) inputs to soil may mitigate rising atmo- spheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations and related climate change but how this sequestration will respond to anthropogenic nitrogen (N

Fierer, Noah

276

DRAFT, November 2, 1998 Carbon Sequestration via Tree Planting on Agricultural Lands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 DRAFT, November 2, 1998 Carbon Sequestration via Tree Planting on Agricultural Lands: An Economic affect program cost and net carbon sequestration. The focus on the provisions of tree planting agreements the cost and net carbon gains under a sequestration program. We will also investigate design aspects

McCarl, Bruce A.

277

Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration A.V. Palumbo1*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Issues with the Use of Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration A.V. Palumbo1* , L. S. Fisher1 , J of the potential for carbon sequestration in degraded mine lands, we have found that based on laboratory and field and its influence on carbon sequestration. Also, addition of fly ash to soil, while generally considered

Tiquia-Arashiro, Sonia M.

278

Evaluating carbon sequestration efficiency in an ocean circulation model by adjoint sensitivity analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating carbon sequestration efficiency in an ocean circulation model by adjoint sensitivity the application of the adjoint method to develop three-dimensional maps of carbon sequestration efficiency. Sequestration efficiency (the percentage of carbon injected at a continuous point source that remains

Follows, Mick

279

19.1 Introduction Carbon sequestration programs on land and in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 19 19.1 Introduction Carbon sequestration programs on land and in the oceans are gaining sequestration programs emphasize storing carbon in soil organic matter in agri- cultural fields,in woody sequestration and management include the feasibil- ity and permanence of the carbon sequestered, the scale

Jackson, Robert B.

280

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stan D. Wullschleger://csite.eds.ornl.gov PROJECT DESCRIPTION The Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) project conducts research of switchgrass growing in the field. #12;Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) tion of inputs

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration: A case study in Duke Forest with inversion of terrestrial carbon (C) sequestration is critical for the success of any policies geared toward stabilizing. Ellsworth, A. Finzi, J. Lichter, and W. H. Schlesinger, Sustainability of terrestrial carbon sequestration

DeLucia, Evan H.

282

Carbon Capture and Sequestration: how much does this uncertain option affect near-term policy choices?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Capture and Sequestration: how much does this uncertain option affect near-term policy Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) as a key option to avoid costly emission reduction. While Carbon Capture and Sequestration (CCS) technologies are receiving increasing atten- tion, mainly

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

283

What is the optimal heather moorland management regime for carbon sequestration?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What is the optimal heather moorland management regime for carbon sequestration? Supervisors: Prof, the Muirburn Code has no evidence base with regard to carbon sequestration. Given the increased concern use moorland carbon sequestration to offset emissions, it is essential that the most appropriate land

Guo, Zaoyang

284

Back to Exploration 2008 CSPG CSEG CWLS Convention 1 A Computational Model of Catalyzed Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

explores the feasibility of catalysis-based carbon sequestration by efficiently and accurately modeling that this method can be scaled to accurately predict the efficacy of such systems for carbon sequestration to help find the most cost effective methods possible. Most carbon sequestration methods are capture

Spiteri, Raymond J.

285

Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Change Biology (2000) 6, 317­328 Soil Carbon Sequestration and Land-Use Change: Processes in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We review literature, and indicates the relative importance of some factors that influence the rates of organic carbon sequestration

Post, Wilfred M.

286

Evaluating the options for carbon sequestration Clair Gough and Simon Shackley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Evaluating the options for carbon sequestration Clair Gough and Simon Shackley Tyndall Centre for carbon sequestration Tyndall Centre Technical Report No. 2 November 2002 This is the final report from Tyndall research project IT1.22 (Carbon sequestration: a pilot stage multi-criteria evaluation

Watson, Andrew

287

Carbon storage and sequestration by trees in urban and community areas of the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon storage and sequestration by trees in urban and community areas of the United States David J forestry Tree cover Forest inventory a b s t r a c t Carbon storage and sequestration by urban trees to determine total urban forest carbon storage and annual sequestration by state and nationally. Urban whole

288

Carbon dioxide sequestration: how much and when? Klaus Keller & David McInerney & David F. Bradford  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon dioxide sequestration: how much and when? Klaus Keller & David McInerney & David F. Bradford + Business Media B.V. 2008 Abstract Carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration has been proposed as a key component fossil fuel requirement of CO2 sequestration, and the growth rate of carbon taxes. In this analytical

Keller, Klaus

289

On-Farm Carbon Sequestration Can Farmers Employ it to Make Some Money?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On-Farm Carbon Sequestration Can Farmers Employ it to Make Some Money? Tanveer A. Butt and Bruce A to the reduction in GHG emissions through what is known as carbon sequestration, which has gained attention mitigation policy, the comparative potential of carbon sequestration as a GHG mitigation alternative

McCarl, Bruce A.

290

Pathways to Adoption of Carbon Capture and Sequestration in India: Technologies and Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pathways to Adoption of Carbon Capture and Sequestration in India: Technologies and Policies, Technology and Policy Program #12;2 #12;Pathways to Carbon Capture and Sequestration in India: Technologies to control India's emissions will have to be a global priority. Carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) can

291

Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil carbon sequestration and land-use change: processes and potential W . M . P O S T * and K . C that may result in enhanced soil carbon sequestration with changes in land-use and soil management. We carbon accumulation. This data summary provides a guide to approximate rates of SOC sequestration

292

Silvia Solano's interest in carbon sequestration was first sparked on a six-month internship  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Silvia Solano's interest in carbon sequestration was first sparked on a six-month internship experiments combining EOR with carbon sequestration. "I thought this was a win-win solution," she said. "You of a research team conduct- ing a large-scale test of carbon sequestration. "I knew I wanted to learn more about

Yang, Zong-Liang

293

CARBON SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION Howard J. Herzog, Ken Caldeira, and Eric Adams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CARBON SEQUESTRATION VIA DIRECT INJECTION Howard J. Herzog, Ken Caldeira, and Eric Adams and sequestration. Carbon sequestration is often associated with the planting of trees. As they mature, the trees INTRODUCTION The build-up of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other greenhouse gases in the Earth's atmosphere has

294

Pre-site Characterization Risk Analysis for Commercial-Scale Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pre-site Characterization Risk Analysis for Commercial-Scale Carbon Sequestration Zhenxue Dai a probability framework to evaluate subsurface risks associated with commercial-scale carbon sequestration to the atmosphere.1-3 The Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership (BSCSP) is one of seven partnerships tasked

Lu, Zhiming

295

Properties of Mutants of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 Lacking Inorganic Carbon Sequestration Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Properties of Mutants of Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803 Lacking Inorganic Carbon SequestrationA is the only active inorganic carbon sequestration system showed low activity of HCO3 ­ uptake and grew under the significance of carbon sequestration in dissipating excess light energy. Keywords: CO2 and HCO3 � uptake -- CO2

Roegner, Matthias

296

Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils impacts of carbon sequestration on net greenhouse gas emissions from agricultural soils in China, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 23, GB1007, doi:10.1029/2008GB003180. 1. Introduction [2] Carbon (C) sequestration has

297

An XFEM Model for Carbon Sequestration Journal: International Journal for Numerical Methods in Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PeerReview Only An XFEM Model for Carbon Sequestration Journal: International Journal for Numerical method, Carbon Sequestration, Multiphase flow, XFEM, Multifield systems, Petrov-Galerkin httpScience (www.interscience.wiley.com). DOI: 10.1002/nme An XFEM Model for Carbon Sequestration Chris Ladubec

Gracie, Robert

298

ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ECONOMIC MODELING OF THE GLOBAL ADOPTION OF CARBON CAPTURE AND SEQUESTRATION TECHNOLOGIES J. R. Mc of carbon capture and sequestration technologies as applied to electric generating plants. The MIT Emissions, is used to model carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies based on a natural gas combined cycle

299

OCEAN CARBON SEQUESTRATION: A CASE STUDY IN PUBLIC AND INSTITUTIONAL PERCEPTIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCEAN CARBON SEQUESTRATION: A CASE STUDY IN PUBLIC AND INSTITUTIONAL PERCEPTIONS M. A. de and institutional perceptions for future carbon sequestration projects. INTRODUCTION The United States Department scrutiny. DOE, NEDO and NRC agreed to an initial field experiment on ocean carbon sequestration via direct

300

TOUGH+CO2: A multiphase fluid-flow simulator for CO2 geologic sequestration in saline aquifers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TOUGH+CO"2 is a new simulator for modeling of CO"2 geologic sequestration in saline aquifers. It is a member of TOUGH+, the successor to the TOUGH2 family of codes for multicomponent, multiphase fluid and heat flow simulation. The code accounts for heat ... Keywords: CO2 geologic sequestration, Modeling, Multiphase flow, Parallel computing, Saline aquifer, TOUGH+, TOUGH2

Keni Zhang; George Moridis; Karsten Pruess

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Microbial Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide and Subsequent Conversion to Methane  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide and Subsequent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide and Subsequent conversion to Methane By Nirupam Pal Associate Professor California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo, CA 93401 Email : npal@calpoly.edu Phone : (805) 756-1355 INTRODUCTION The rising level of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere has been of growing concern in recent years. The increasing levels of carbon dioxide, the most dominant component of greenhouse gases, contribute to global warming and changing global weather patterns which could potentially lead to catastrophic events that could threaten life in every form on this planet. The level of carbon dioxide in the worlds atmosphere has increased from about 280 ppm in 1850 to the current level of approximately 350 ppm. There are several natural sources and sinks of

302

A Finite-Element Model for Simulation of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Herein, we present a coupled thermal-hydro-mechanical model for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide followed by the stress, deformation, and shear-slip failure analysis. This fully coupled model considers the geomechanical response, fluid flow, and thermal transport relevant to geological sequestration. Both analytical solutions and numerical approach via finite element model are introduced for solving the thermal-hydro-mechanical model. Analytical solutions for pressure, temperature, deformation, and stress field were obtained for a simplified typical geological sequestration scenario. The finite element model is more general and can be used for arbitrary geometry. It was built on an open-source finite element code, Elmer, and was designed to simulate the entire period of CO2 injection (up to decades) both stably and accurately—even for large time steps. The shear-slip failure analysis was implemented based on the numerical results from the finite element model. The analysis reveals the potential failure zone caused by the fluid injection and thermal effect. From the simulation results, the thermal effect is shown to enhance well injectivity, especially at the early time of the injection. However, it also causes some side effects, such as the appearance of a small failure zone in the caprock. The coupled thermal-hydro-mechanical model improves prediction of displacement, stress distribution, and potential failure zone compared to the model that neglects non-isothermal effects, especially in an area with high geothermal gradient.

Bao, Jie; Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Nanobiocatalysts for Carbon Capture, Sequestration and Valorisation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The approaches being pursued for carbon management includes: (i) increased efficiency of ... energy conversion, (ii) usage of low-carbon or carbon-free energy sources, and (iii) capturing and sequestering anthrop...

Sadhana Rayalu; Renu Yadav; Snehal Wanjari; Chandan Prabhu…

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EFRC Carbon Capture and EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC EFRC Carbon Capture and Sequestration Activities at NERSC Why it Matters: Carbon dioxide (CO2) gas is considered to be present in only trace proportions in our atmosphere but it has a leading role in the cast of greenhouse gases, with a thermal radiative effect nearly three times as large as the next biggest contributor. Energy related processes are the biggest sources of atmospheric CO2, especially the burning of fossil fuels and the production of hydrogen from methane. Since both human-caused CO2 concentrations and global average temperatures have been increasing steadily since the mid-20th century it could very well be that our energy future depends on our ability to effectively remove CO2

305

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN NATURAL AND CREATED WETLANDS.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Wetland ecosystems are significant carbon sinks. Their high productivity and presence of water gives them the ability to efficiently sequester carbon in the soil,… (more)

Bernal, Blanca

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A Feasibility Study of Non-Seismic Geophysical Methods forMonitoring Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of their wide application within the petroleumindustry it is natural to consider geophysical techniques for monitoringof CO2 movement within hydrocarbon reservoirs, whether the CO2 isintroduced for enhanced oil/gas recovery or for geologic sequestration.Among the available approaches to monitoring, seismic methods are by farthe most highly developed and applied. Due to cost considerations, lessexpensive techniques have recently been considered. In this article, therelative merits of gravity and electromagnetic (EM) methods as monitoringtools for geological CO2 sequestration are examined for two syntheticmodeling scenarios. The first scenario represents combined CO2 enhancedoil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in a producing oil field, theSchrader Bluff field on the north slope of Alaska, USA. The secondscenario is a simplified model of a brine formation at a depth of 1,900m.

Gasperikova, Erika; Hoversten, G. Michael

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the Methodology for the Methodology for Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory Carbon Storage Program September 2010 Summary of the Methodology for Development of Geologic Storage Estimates for Carbon Dioxide 2 Authors: U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/ Strategic Center for Coal/Office of Coal and Power R&D John Litynski U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/ Strategic Center for Coal/Office of Coal and Power R&D/Sequestration Division Dawn Deel Traci Rodosta U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/ Office of Research and Development George Guthrie U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory/

308

Post-Combustion Carbon Capture Research | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

is located directly above potential geologic sequestration sites according to the Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada. This includes almost 150...

309

Effects of Biochar and Basalt Additions on Carbon Sequestration and Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases in Soils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effects of Biochar and Basalt Additions on Carbon Sequestration and Fluxes of Greenhouse Gases Emissions--Carbon Dioxide Emissions--Sequestration and Storage--Biochar--Basalt--Organic Fertilizers, this investigation focuses on the range of potential of different soil additives to enhance sequestration and storage

Vallino, Joseph J.

310

Development and Deployment of a Compact Eye-Safe Scanning Differential absorption Lidar (DIAL) for Spatial Mapping of Carbon Dioxide for Monitoring/Verification/Accounting at Geologic Sequestration Sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A scanning differential absorption lidar (DIAL) instrument for monitoring carbon dioxide has been developed. The laser transmitter uses two tunable discrete mode laser diodes (DMLD) operating in the continuous wave (cw) mode with one locked to the online absorption wavelength and the other operating at the offline wavelength. Two in-line fiber optic switches are used to switch between online and offline operation. After the fiber optic switch, an acousto- optic modulator (AOM) is used to generate a pulse train used to injection seed an erbium doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) to produce eye-safe laser pulses with maximum pulse energies of 66 {micro}J, a pulse repetition frequency of 15 kHz, and an operating wavelength of 1.571 {micro}m. The DIAL receiver uses a 28 cm diameter Schmidt-Cassegrain telescope to collect that backscattered light, which is then monitored using a photo-multiplier tube (PMT) module operating in the photon counting mode. The DIAL instrument has been operated from a laboratory environment on the campus of Montana State University, at the Zero Emission Research Technology (ZERT) field site located in the agricultural research area on the western end of the Montana State University campus, and at the Big Sky Carbon Sequestration Partnership site located in north-central Montana. DIAL data has been collected and profiles have been validated using a co-located Licor LI-820 Gas Analyzer point sensor.

Repasky, Kevin

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

Environmental Enterprise: Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Power Gasification Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration using Texaco Gasification Process Jeff Seabright Arthur Lee Richard Weissman, PhD. Texaco Inc. White Plains, New York Presented at: First National Conference on Carbon Sequestration May 14-17, 2001 Washington D.C. ABSTRACT Coal Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) is a commercially proven clean coal technology that offers significant environmental and economic benefits today, including decreased air and solids emissions. It also offers the potential to capture and sequester carbon dioxide. Coal IGCC provides electric utilities strategic options in meeting today's growing demand for energy products (electricity, fuel, chemicals) while protecting public health and the environment and providing a pathway to zero emissions coal-based power generation.

312

Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration Training Program Now Accepting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Training Program Now Training Program Now Accepting Applications Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration Training Program Now Accepting Applications March 26, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. - A Department of Energy (DOE) program that helps graduate students and early career professionals gain hands-on field research experience in areas related to carbon capture, utilization and storage (CCUS) is accepting applications until April 15. The Research Experience in Carbon Sequestration (RECS) initiative is supported by DOE's Office of Fossil Energy and its National Energy Technology Laboratory. A collaboration between EnTech Strategies, Southern Company and SECARB-Ed, RECS 2012 isscheduled for June 3-13, in Birmingham, AL. An intensive science and field-based program, RECS 2012 will combine

313

Carbon sequestration in depleted oil shale deposits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method and apparatus are described for sequestering carbon dioxide underground by mineralizing the carbon dioxide with coinjected fluids and minerals remaining from the extraction shale oil. In one embodiment, the oil shale of an illite-rich oil shale is heated to pyrolyze the shale underground, and carbon dioxide is provided to the remaining depleted oil shale while at an elevated temperature. Conditions are sufficient to mineralize the carbon dioxide.

Burnham, Alan K; Carroll, Susan A

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

314

Probabilistic evaluation of shallow groundwater resources at a hypothetical carbon sequestration site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration in geologic reservoirs is an important approach for mitigating greenhouse gases emissions to the atmosphere. This study first develops an integrated Monte Carlo method for simulating CO2 and brine leakage from carbon sequestration and subsequent geochemical interactions in shallow aquifers. Then, we estimate probability distributions of five risk proxies related to the likelihood and volume of changes in pH, total dissolved solids, and trace concentrations of lead, arsenic, and cadmium for two possible consequence thresholds. The results indicate that shallow groundwater resources may degrade locally around leakage points by reduced pH and increased total dissolved solids (TDS). The volumes of pH and TDS plumes are most sensitive to aquifer porosity, permeability, and CO2 and brine leakage rates. The estimated plume size of pH change is the largest, while that of cadmium is the smallest among the risk proxies. Plume volume distributions of arsenic and lead are similar to those of TDS. The scientific results from this study provide substantial insight for understanding risks of deep fluids leaking into shallow aquifers, determining the area of review, and designing monitoring networks at carbon sequestration sites.

Dai, Zhenxue; Keating, Elizabeth; Bacon, Diana H.; Viswanathan, Hari; Stauffer, Philip; Jordan, Amy B.; Pawar, Rajesh

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

315

NETL: Carbon Storage Technology R&D  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Technology Areas Geologic Storage, Simulation, and Risk Assessment Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships Initiative NATCARB Monitoring, Verification, Accounting,...

316

Underground reconnaissance and environmental monitoring related to geologic CO2 sequestration studies at the DUSEL Facility, Homestake Mine, South Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground field reconnaissance was carried out in the Deep Underground Science and Engineering Laboratory (DUSEL) to identify potential locations for the planned geologic carbon sequestration experimental facility known as DUSEL CO{sub 2}. In addition, instrumentation for continuous environmental monitoring of temperature, pressure, and relative humidity was installed at various locations within the Homestake mine. The motivation for this work is the need to locate and design the DUSEL CO{sub 2} facility currently being planned to host CO{sub 2} and water flow and reaction experiments in long column pressure vessels over large vertical length scales. Review of existing geologic data and reconnaissance underground revealed numerous potential locations for vertical experimental flow columns, with limitations of existing vertical boreholes arising from limited vertical extent, poor continuity between drifts, and small diameter. Results from environmental monitoring over 46 days reveal spatial and temporal variations related to ventilation, weather, and ongoing dewatering of the mine.

Dobson, Patrick F.; Salve, Rohit

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

317

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Oil Fields: A study of viscous and buoyancy forces  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sequestration in Oil Fields: A Sequestration in Oil Fields: A study of viscous and buoyancy forces Grant S. Bromhal, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880, gbromhal@netl.doe.gov, M. Ferer, Department of Physics, West Virginia University, and Duane H. Smith, U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Underground injection of carbon dioxide for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) is a common practice in the oil and gas industry and has often been cited as a proven method of sequestering CO 2 (US DOE, 1999). Of all sequestration methods, this is probably the best understood, as carbon dioxide has been used in the oil industry for many years. Additionally, most oil fields have been relatively well characterized geologically, and

318

In Situ Infrared Spectroscopic Study of Brucite Carbonation in...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbonation in Dry to Water-Saturated Supercritical Carbon Dioxide. Abstract: In geologic carbon sequestration, while part of the injected carbon dioxide will dissolve into host...

319

Application of Cutting-Edge 3D Seismic Attribute Technology to the Assessment of Geological Reservoirs for CO2 Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this project were to develop innovative 3D seismic attribute technologies and workflows to assess the structural integrity and heterogeneity of subsurface reservoirs with potential for CO{sub 2} sequestration. Our specific objectives were to apply advanced seismic attributes to aide in quantifying reservoir properies and lateral continuity of CO{sub 2} sequestration targets. Our study area is the Dickman field in Ness County, Kansas, a type locality for the geology that will be encountered for CO{sub 2} sequestration projects from northern Oklahoma across the U.S. midcontent to Indiana and beyond. Since its discovery in 1962, the Dickman Field has produced about 1.7 million barrels of oil from porous Mississippian carbonates with a small structural closure at about 4400 ft drilling depth. Project data includes 3.3 square miles of 3D seismic data, 142 wells, with log, some core, and oil/water production data available. Only two wells penetrate the deep saline aquifer. Geological and seismic data were integrated to create a geological property model and a flow simulation grid. We systematically tested over a dozen seismic attributes, finding that curvature, SPICE, and ANT were particularly useful for mapping discontinuities in the data that likely indicated fracture trends. Our simulation results in the deep saline aquifer indicate two effective ways of reducing free CO{sub 2}: (a) injecting CO{sub 2} with brine water, and (b) horizontal well injection. A tuned combination of these methods can reduce the amount of free CO{sub 2} in the aquifer from over 50% to less than 10%.

Christopher Liner; Jianjun Zeng; Po Geng Heather King Jintan Li; Jennifer Califf; John Seales

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

Soil organic carbon sequestration potential of cropland in China Zhangcai Qin,1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Soil organic carbon sequestration potential of cropland in China Zhangcai Qin,1,2 Yao Huang,1), Soil organic carbon sequestration potential of cropland in China, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 27, doi:10 carbon (SOC) in cropland is of great importance to the global carbon (C) balance and to agricultural

Pittendrigh, Barry

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements Yonghoon Choi1. Wang (2004), Dynamics of carbon sequestration in a coastal wetland using radiocarbon measurements carbon cycle. However, the dynamics of carbon (C) cycling in coastal wetlands and its response to sea

Wang, Yang

322

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN ARABLE SOILS IS LIKELY TO INCREASE NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS, OFFSETTING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN ARABLE SOILS IS LIKELY TO INCREASE NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS, OFFSETTING in strategies for climate protection. 1. Introduction Carbon sequestration has been highlighted recently concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmo- sphere include sequestering carbon (C) in soils

323

Glaciation, aridification, and carbon sequestration in the Permo-Carboniferous: The isotopic record from low latitudes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Glaciation, aridification, and carbon sequestration in the Permo-Carboniferous: The isotopic record and carbon sequestration in the Late Paleozoic, we have compiled new and published oxygen and carbon isotopic Carboniferous Stable isotopes Carbon cycling Brachiopods To evaluate the isotopic record of climate change

Grossman, Ethan L.

324

Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interaction effects of climate and land use/land cover change on soil organic carbon sequestration carbon sequestration Climate change Soil carbon change Historically, Florida soils stored the largest in Florida (FL) have acted as a sink for carbon (C) over the last 40 years. · Climate interacting with land

Grunwald, Sabine

325

NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NATCARB)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a brief summary of the milestone for Quarter 1 of 2006 of the NATional CARBon Sequestration Database and Geographic Information System (NATCARB) This milestone assigns consistent symbology to the ''National CO{sub 2} Facilities'' GIS layer on the NATCARB website. As a default, CO{sub 2} sources provided by the Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships and the National Group are now all one symbol type. In addition for sinks such as oil and gas fields where data is drawn from multiple partnerships, the symbology is given a single color. All these modifications are accomplished as the layer is passed through the national portal (www.natcarb.org). This documentation is sent to National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) as a Topical Report and will be included in the next Annual Report.

Timothy R. Carr

2006-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

326

Native Plants for Optimizing Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Lands  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Native Plants for Optimizing Carbon Sequestration in Native Plants for Optimizing Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Lands Pat J. Unkefer (punkefer@lanl.gov; 505-665-2554) Biosciences Division (B-S1), Mail Stop E529 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 Michael H. Ebinger (mhe@lanl.gov; 505-667-3147) Environmental Dynamics and Spatial Analysis Group (EES-10), Mail Stop J495 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 David D. Breshears (daveb@lanl.gov; 505-665-2803) Environmental Dynamics and Spatial Analysis Group (EES-10), Mail Stop J495 Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 Thomas J. Knight (tknight@usm.maine.edu; 207-780-4577) Biological Sciences Department, 96 Falmouth Ave. University of Southern Maine Portland, ME 04103 Christopher L. Kitts (ckitts@calpoly.edu; 805-756-2949)

327

2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada: Third  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada: Third 2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada: Third Edition Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: 2010 Carbon Sequestration Atlas of the United States and Canada: Third Edition Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Potentials & Scenarios Website: www.netl.doe.gov/technologies/carbon_seq/refshelf/atlasIII/2010atlasII Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/2010-carbon-sequestration-atlas-unite Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Public-Private Partnerships This atlas updates the carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration potential for the United States and Canada, and it provides updated information on field activities of the regional carbon sequestration partnerships (RCSPs). In

328

Workshop on Carbon Sequestration Science -- Economics  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Economics Economics Howard Herzog MIT Energy Laboratory May 22, 2001 Cost Components * Capture S Separation S Compression * Sequestration S Transport S Injection Approach * Extract cost data from literature studies S Includes capture and compression S Excludes transportation and injection * Adjust cost data to common economic basis * Construct composite cost model * Conduct sensitivity analyses and other studies with the composite cost model Methodology for Analysis of Economic Studies 7210 Btu/kWh 2884 x 10 6 Btu/hr CO 2 to atmosphere 270 tonnes/hr (0.674 kg/kWh) 400 MW a) Reference Plant (No Capture) 9173 Btu/kWh 2884 x 10 6 Btu/hr 2 CO to atmosphere 28 tonnes/hr (0.088 kg/kWh) 314 MW 242 tonnes/hr (0.769 kg/kWh) b) Capture Plant CO 2 captured CO 2 Captured vs. CO 2 Avoided 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 Reference Plant Capture Plant

329

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership U.S Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships: Sharing Knowledge from Two Field Tests  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partnership Presented to: Carbon Storage Program Infrastructure Annual Review Meeting November 15, 2011 Presented by: Gerald R. Hill, Ph.D. Senior Technical Advisor Southern States Energy Board Acknowledgements  This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory.  Cost share and research support provided by SECARB/SSEB Carbon Management Partners.  CO 2 Capture Unit funded separately by Southern Company and partners. 2 Presentation Outline  Overview  Characterization Studies  Early Test - Cranfield, MS  Anthropogenic Test - Citronelle, AL - Capture Unit Status - Pipeline Status - Injection Well Status 3 SECARB Characterization: CO 2 Sources & Saline Reservoirs

330

Southwestern Regional Partnership For Carbon Sequestration (Phase 2) Pump Canyon CO2- ECBM/Sequestration Demonstration, San Juan Basin, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Within the Southwest Regional Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP), three demonstrations of geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration are being performed -- one in an oilfield (the SACROC Unit in the Permian basin of west Texas), one in a deep, unmineable coalbed (the Pump Canyon site in the San Juan basin of northern New Mexico), and one in a deep, saline reservoir (underlying the Aneth oilfield in the Paradox basin of southeast Utah). The Pump Canyon CO{sub 2}-enhanced coalbed methane (CO{sub 2}/ECBM) sequestration demonstration project plans to demonstrate the effectiveness of CO{sub 2} sequestration in deep, unmineable coal seams via a small-scale geologic sequestration project. The site is located in San Juan County, northern New Mexico, just within the limits of the high-permeability fairway of prolific coalbed methane production. The study area for the SWP project consists of 31 coalbed methane production wells located in a nine section area. CO{sub 2} was injected continuously for a year and different monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) techniques were implemented to track the CO{sub 2} movement inside and outside the reservoir. Some of the MVA methods include continuous measurement of injection volumes, pressures and temperatures within the injection well, coalbed methane production rates, pressures and gas compositions collected at the offset production wells, and tracers in the injected CO{sub 2}. In addition, time-lapse vertical seismic profiling (VSP), surface tiltmeter arrays, a series of shallow monitoring wells with a regular fluid sampling program, surface measurements of soil composition, CO{sub 2} fluxes, and tracers were used to help in tracking the injected CO{sub 2}. Finally, a detailed reservoir model was constructed to help reproduce and understand the behavior of the reservoir under production and injection operation. This report summarizes the different phases of the project, from permitting through site closure, and gives the results of the different MVA techniques.

Advanced Resources International

2010-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

331

Southeast Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (SECARB)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work during the first six months of the project mainly concentrated on contracts execution and collection of data to characterize the region and input of that data into the geographical information system (GIS) system. Data was collected for source characterization, transportation options and terrestrial options. In addition, discussions were held to determine the extent of the geologic information that would be needed for the project. In addition, activities associated with the regulatory, permitting and safety issues were completed. Outreach activities are in the formative stages.

Kathryn A. Baskin

2004-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

Semi-analytical Solution for Multiphase Fluid Flow Applied to CO 2 Sequestration in Geologic Porous Media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The increasing concentration of CO_(2) has been linked to global warming and changes in climate. Geologic sequestration of CO_(2) in deep saline aquifers is a proposed greenhouse gas mitigation technology with potential to significantly reduce...

Mohamed, Ahmed Mohamed Anwar Sayed

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

The Physical and Chemical Mechanisms Responsible for Carbon Sequestration in Soil Microaggregates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Physical and Chemical Mechanisms Responsible for Carbon Sequestration in Soil Microaggregates aggregate formation and stability have profound implications to understanding and enhancing C sequestration in soil. Soil microaggregates are particularly crucial to long-term sequestration because they protect C

McCarthy, John F.

334

The impact of co-occurring tree and grassland species on carbon sequestration and potential biofuel production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impact of co-occurring tree and grassland species on carbon sequestration and potential biofuel for terrestrial carbon sequestration and potential biofuel production. For P. strobus, above- ground plant carbon harvest for biofuel would result in no net carbon sequestration as declines in soil carbon offset plant

Weiblen, George D

335

Carbon Sequestration Potential of Extensive Green Roofs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two studies were conducted with the objective of quantifying the carbon storage potential of extensive green roofs. The first was performed on eight roofs in Michigan and four roofs in Maryland, ranging from 1 to 6 years in age. All 12 green roofs were ...

Kristin L. Getter; D. Bradley Rowe; G. Philip Robertson; Bert M. Cregg; Jeffrey A. Andresen

2009-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

336

Global Change Biology (1996)2,169-182 Measurements of carbon sequestration by long-term  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Change Biology (1996)2,169-182 Measurements of carbon sequestration by long-term eddy. The integrated carbon sequestration in 1994 was 2.1 t C ha-l y-l with a 90% confidence interval due to sampling an overall uncertainty on the annual carbon sequestration in 1994 of --0.3to +0.8 t C ha-l y-l. Keywords

Rose, Michael R.

337

Community perceptions of carbon sequestration: insights from California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Over the last decade, many energy experts have supported carbon sequestration as a viable technological response to climate change. Given the potential importance of sequestration in US energy policy, what might explain the views of communities that may be directly impacted by the siting of this technology? To answer this question, we conducted focus groups in two communities who were potentially pilot project sites for California's DOE-funded West Coast Regional Partnership (WESTCARB). We find that communities want a voice in defining the risks to be mitigated as well as the justice of the procedures by which the technology is implemented. We argue that a community's sense of empowerment is key to understanding its range of carbon sequestration opinions, where 'empowerment' includes the ability to mitigate community-defined risks of the technology. This sense of empowerment protects the community against the downside risk of government or corporate neglect, a risk that is rarely identified in risk assessments but that should be factored into assessment and communication strategies.

Gabrielle Wong-Parodi; Isha Ray

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Conceptual Design of Optimized Fossil Energy Systems with Capture and Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Fossil Hydrogen Energy Systems with Carbon Capture andThe Implications Of New Carbon Capture And SequestrationW H SAMMIS WILLOW ISLAND TOTAL Carbon capture In the plant

Ogden, Joan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Carbon sequestration in peatland: patterns and mechanisms of response to climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon sequestration in peatland: patterns and mechanisms of response to climate change L I S A R., 2000; Turunen et al., 2002; Kremenetski et al., 2003). Rates of carbon (C) sequestration (i.e., uptake in the climatic water budget is crucial to predicting potential feedbacks on the global carbon (C) cycle. To gain

340

Oxygen production and carbon sequestration in an upwelling coastal Burke Hales,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen production and carbon sequestration in an upwelling coastal margin Burke Hales,1 Lee Karp), Oxygen production and carbon sequestration in an upwelling coastal margin, Global Biogeochem. Cycles, 20 of particulate organic carbon (POC) and dissolved O2 during the upwelling season off the Oregon coast. Oxygen

Pierce, Stephen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The Effect of Land Use and Its Management Practices on Plant Nutrient Availability and Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on soil degradation on both physical and chemical property of soil as well as on soil carbon sequestration availability and soil carbon sequestration in Bezawit Sub- Watershed, near Bahir Dar, Ethiopia. More The Effect of Land Use and Its Management Practices on Plant Nutrient Availability and Carbon

Walter, M.Todd

342

Pre-site Characterization Risk Analysis for Commercial-Scale Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pre-site Characterization Risk Analysis for Commercial-Scale Carbon Sequestration ... ‡ Schlumberger Carbon Services, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, United States ... This study develops a probability framework to evaluate subsurface risks associated with commercial-scale carbon sequestration in the Kevin Dome, Montana. ...

Zhenxue Dai; Philip H. Stauffer; J. William Carey; Richard S. Middleton; Zhiming Lu; John F. Jacobs; Ken Hnottavange-Telleen; Lee H. Spangler

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

343

Potential Urban Forest Carbon Sequestration and Storage Capacities in Burnside Industrial Park, Nova Scotia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Urban and industrial settings represent potential areas for increased carbon (C) sequestration and storage through intensified tree growth. Consisting of an estimated 1270 ha of… (more)

Walsh, Alison

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

CO2 displacement mechanisms: phase equilibria effects and carbon dioxide sequestration studies.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Supercritical carbon dioxide is injected into underground formations to enhance oil recovery and for subsurface sequestration to minimize the impact of CO2 emissions due to… (more)

Pasala, Sangeetha M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Three essays on private landowners' response to incentives for carbon sequestration through forest management and afforestation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This dissertation consists of three essays on private landowners' response to incentives for carbon sequestration in forests. The first essay examines private landowner response to… (more)

Kim, Taeyoung

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Forest Optimal Rotation and Land Expectation Values under Carbon Sequestration and Radiation Budget.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??International efforts strife to mitigate negative externalities caused by man released greenhouse gasses. Attributing an economical value to forest carbon sequestration might represent is an… (more)

Wei, Hui-Chun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

CARBON SEQUESTRATION RESULTING FROM BOTTOMLAND HARDWOOD AFFORESTATION IN THE LOWER MISSISSIPPI ALLUVIAL VALLEY (LMAV).  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The objective of this study was to examine some mechanisms of bottomland hardwood afforestation and their impacts on above- and belowground carbon sequestration. Six combinations… (more)

Nero, Bertrand Festus

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Impact of carbon dioxide sequestration in depleted gas-condensate reservoirs.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Depleted gas-condensate reservoirs are becoming important targets for carbon dioxide sequestration. Since depleted below the dew point, retrograde condensate has been deposited in the pore… (more)

Ramharack, Richard M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

NETL: News Release - Critical Carbon Sequestration Assessment Begins:  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2, 2006 2, 2006 DOE Project Injects 700 Tons of Carbon Dioxide Into Texas Sandstone Formation Researchers to Determine the Ability of Brine Formations to Sequester Greenhouse Gas WASHINGTON, DC - When scientists recently pumped 700 metric tons of the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) a mile underground as a follow-up to a 2004 effort, they initiated a series of tests to determine the feasibility of storing the CO2 in brine formations, a major step forward in the U.S. Department of Energy's carbon sequestration program. MORE INFO Read the University of Texas at Austin press release 11.19.04 Techline : Frio Formation Test Well Injected with Carbon Dioxide The Frio Brine project, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and managed by DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory, is designed to

350

NERSC Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nanocontrol of CO2 Nanocontrol of CO2 Visualization and Analysis for Nanoscale Control of Geologic Carbon Dioxide Goals * Collect experimental 2D-3D imaging data in order to investigate fluid-fluid and fluid-rock interactions; * Provide algorithms for better understanding of processes governing fluid-fluid and fluid-rock systems, related to geologic sequestration of CO2; * Develop image processing methods for analyzing experimental data and comparing it to simulations; * Detect/reconstruct material interfaces, quantify contact angles, derive contact angle distribution, etc. Impact * Unveil knowledge required for developing technology to store CO2 safely in deep surface rock formations, thus reducing amount of CO2 in atmosphere; More Personnel * CRD: Wes Bethel, Dani Ushizima, Gunther Weber (SciDAC-e award)

351

Carbon for Farmers: Assessing the Potential for Soil Carbon Sequestration in the Old Peanut Basin of Senegal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration in soil organic matter of degraded Sahelian ... could play a significant role in the global carbon (C) uptake through terrestrial sinks while,...in situ soil and biomass carbon

Petra Tschakert

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Carbon Sequestration in Turfgrass: An Eco-Friendly Benefit of Your Lawn Dale Bremer, Kansas State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Carbon Sequestration in Turfgrass: An Eco-Friendly Benefit of Your Lawn Dale Bremer, Kansas State read this have no doubt heard of carbon sequestration and may even be well versed on the topic. Others't the slightest clue about carbon sequestration and others may not even care. After all, what does carbon

353

R E V I E W Liana Impacts on Carbon Cycling, Storage and Sequestration in Tropical Forests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

R E V I E W Liana Impacts on Carbon Cycling, Storage and Sequestration in Tropical Forests Geertje for carbon storage and sequestration. Lianas reduce tree growth, survival, and leaf productivity; however liana carbon stocks are unlikely to compensate for liana-induced losses in net carbon sequestration

Schnitzer, Stefan

354

Reducing risk in basin scale sequestration: A Bayesian model selection framework for improving detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geological CO[subscript 2] sequestration is a key technology for mitigating atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations while providing low carbon energy. Deployment of sequestration at scales necessary for a material ...

Seto, C.J.

355

Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Potential for a Market-Based Environmental Solution in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Coalbed Methane Recovery Through Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide: Potential for a Market-Based Environmental Solution in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama Jack C. Pashin (jpashin@gsa.state.al.us; 205-349-2852) Geological Survey of Alabama P.O. Box 869999 Tuscaloosa, AL 35486 Richard H. Groshong, Jr. (rgroshon@wgs.geo.ua.edu; 205-348-1882) Deparment of Geology University of Alabama Tuscaloosa, AL 35487 Richard E. Carroll (rcarroll@gsa.state.al.us; 205-349-2852) Geological Survey of Alabama P.O. Box 869999 Tuscaloosa, AL 35486 Abstract Sequestration of CO 2 in coal is a market-based environmental solution with potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions while increasing coalbed methane recovery. Producing coalbed methane through injection of CO 2 is also more efficient than current techniques requiring

356

CO₂ Sequestration Project at NERSC  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Carbon Sequestration Carbon Sequestration 2011-01-31-Sequestration1.jpg Why it Matters: Underground carbon sequestration is a technique in which one of the primary greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide (CO2), is removed from the atmosphere by injecting it into subsurface salt acquifers. This is a key potential global warming mitigation strategy. Key Challenges: A variety of geochemical processes can affect the mechanism of CO2 dissolution and the volume of CO2 that can be stored - the key result determining whether the strategy is effective or not. Simulation is the only way to study the detailed effects of geological flow, gravitational instability, rock heterogeneity, and brine salinity. These multicomponent, multiphase simulations must be carried out at high

357

Carbon sequestration via wood harvest and storage: An assessment of its harvest potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

this way on half of the world's forested land, or on a smaller area but with higher harvest intensity. WeCarbon sequestration via wood harvest and storage: An assessment of its harvest potential Ning Zeng Abstract A carbon sequestration strategy has recently been proposed in which a forest is actively managed

Zeng, Ning

358

Carbon Sequestration as a Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy: A Comparative  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 Conference Proceedings 3 Conference Proceedings NETL-sponsored Symposia at the AAAS Annual Meeting February, 2003 Table of Contents Disclaimer Papers and Presentations Carbon Sequestration as a Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategy: A Comparative Assessment of Options Climate Change Mitigation Strategy: Technical Challenges for Carbon Sequestration Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government or any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the United States Government or any agency thereof.

359

Influence of Rock Types on Seismic Monitoring of CO2 Sequestration in Carbonate Reservoirs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) techniques such as high pressure CO2 injection may normally be required to recover oil in place in carbonate reservoirs. This study addresses how different rock types can influence the seismic monitoring of CO2 sequestration in carbonates. This research...

Mammadova, Elnara

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

360

Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abundant and Stable Char Residues in Soils: Implications for Soil Fertility and Carbon Sequestration ... Large-scale soil application of biochar may enhance soil fertility, increasing crop production for the growing human population, while also sequestering atmospheric carbon. ...

J.-D. Mao; R. L. Johnson; J. Lehmann; D. C. Olk; E. G. Neves; M. L. Thompson; K. Schmidt-Rohr

2012-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Soil Carbon Sequestration and the CDM: Opportunities and Challenges for Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper examines soil carbon sequestration in developing countries in sub-Saharan Africa ... that could increase agricultural productivity and sequester soil carbon. During the first five-year commitment perio...

Lasse Ringius

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash Utilization of Biomineralization Processes with Fly Ash for Carbon Sequestration Y. Roh (rohy@ornl.gov; 865-576-9931) T. J. Phelps (phelpstj1@ornl.gov; 865-574-7290) Environmental Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory*, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6036 A. D. McMillan (mcmillanad@ornl.gov; 865-241-4554) R. J. Lauf (laufrj@ornl.gov; 865-574-5176) Metal and Ceramics Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6085 *Oak Ridge National Laboratory, managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Introduction The Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Information Administration estimates atmospheric greenhouse gas releases may exceed 8 billion metric tons by the year 2010 heightening its international environmental concern. Carbon dioxide will dominate the

363

New demands, new supplies : a national look at the water balance of carbon dioxide capture and sequestration.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns over rising concentrations of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere have resulted in serious consideration of policies aimed at reduction of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. If large scale abatement efforts are undertaken, one critical tool will be geologic sequestration of CO2 captured from large point sources, specifically coal and natural gas fired power plants. Current CO2 capture technologies exact a substantial energy penalty on the source power plant, which must be offset with make-up power. Water demands increase at the source plant due to added cooling loads. In addition, new water demand is created by water requirements associated with generation of the make-up power. At the sequestration site however, saline water may be extracted to manage CO2 plum migration and pressure build up in the geologic formation. Thus, while CO2 capture creates new water demands, CO2 sequestration has the potential to create new supplies. Some or all of the added demand may be offset by treatment and use of the saline waters extracted from geologic formations during CO2 sequestration. Sandia National Laboratories, with guidance and support from the National Energy Technology Laboratory, is creating a model to evaluate the potential for a combined approach to saline formations, as a sink for CO2 and a source for saline waters that can be treated and beneficially reused to serve power plant water demands. This presentation will focus on the magnitude of added U.S. power plant water demand under different CO2 emissions reduction scenarios, and the portion of added demand that might be offset by saline waters extracted during the CO2 sequestration process.

Krumhansl, James Lee; McNemar, Andrea (National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Morgantown, WV); Kobos, Peter Holmes; Roach, Jesse Dillon; Klise, Geoffrey Taylor

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

What can ecological science tell us about opportunities for carbon sequestration on arid rangelands in the United States?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What can ecological science tell us about opportunities for carbon sequestration on arid rangelands). It is now commonplace to use the rationale of increasing carbon sequestration to argue for changes interest in carbon sequestration on rangelands is largely driven by their extent, while the interest

Sayre, Nathan

365

Book (All chapters are peer-reviewed) Kumar, B. M. and Nair, P. K. R. (eds). Carbon Sequestration in Agroforestry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Book (All chapters are peer-reviewed) Kumar, B. M. and Nair, P. K. R. (eds). Carbon Sequestration. K. R., Nair, V. D., Kumar, B. M., and Showalter, J. M. 2010. Carbon sequestration in agroforestry Publications on Carbon Sequestration in Agroforestry Systems 2008 ­ 2011 (Contact: pknair@ufl.edu) #12;cacao

Hill, Jeffrey E.

366

New Recovery Act Funding Boosts Industrial Carbon Capture and...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

large volumes of CO2 in geologic formations; provide support to augment the National Carbon Sequestration (NATCARB) database through support of state geologic surveys and...

367

Carbon Sequestration - A Natural Resource Management and Research & Development Agency Point of View  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

-- -- A Natural Resource Management and Research & Development Agency Point of View Jim Reaves Staff Director USDA Forest Service R&D Vegetation Management and Protection Research Forests and carbon management § The USDA Forest Service is a research and resource management agency § Carbon is the foundation of forest productivity and sustainability § Carbon sequestration is an additional outcome of good forest management and utilization Forests and carbon sequestration n Forests and forest products are important CO 2 sinks n Carbon sinks offer a potentially significant low-cost opportunity to address carbon sequestration n Feedstocks for bioenergy production provide both clean energy and fossil fuel offsets Trends in forest and agriculture carbon sequestration -342 -12 -7

368

Recovery Act: Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsion for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxid  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide-Water Carbon Dioxide-Water Emulsion for Enhanced Oil Recovery and Permanent Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Background The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) distributed a portion of American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) funds to advance technologies for chemical conversion of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) captured from industrial sources. The focus of the research projects is permanent sequestration of CO 2 through mineralization or development

369

Readout of Secretary Chu Meetings on Carbon Capture and Sequestration and  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Chu Meetings on Carbon Capture and Chu Meetings on Carbon Capture and Sequestration and State Grid Readout of Secretary Chu Meetings on Carbon Capture and Sequestration and State Grid July 16, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis BEIJING, CHINA - Additional readouts from Secretary Chu's meetings in China are below, courtesy of Dan Leistikow, Public Affairs Director, U.S. Department of Energy. Secretary Chu and his delegation met Thursday morning with Cao Peixi, Chairman of the Huaneng Group to discuss an innovative carbon capture and sequestration project underway at the company's power plant in Tianjin. This is China's first large-scale integrated carbon capture and sequestration project in China. It relies on post-combustion carbon capture, using solvents to capture the CO2 from power station flue gases

370

Implementations of a Flexible Framework for Managing Geologic Sequestration Modeling Projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerical simulation is a standard practice used to support designing, operating, and monitoring CO2 injection projects. Although a variety of computational tools have been developed that support the numerical simulation process, many are single-purpose or platform specific and have a prescribed workflow that may or may not be suitable for a particular project. We are developing an open-source, flexible framework named Velo that provides a knowledge management infrastructure and tools to support modeling and simulation for various types of projects in a number of scientific domains. The Geologic Sequestration Software Suite (GS3) is a version of this framework with features and tools specifically tailored for geologic sequestration studies. Because of its general nature, GS3 is being employed in a variety of ways on projects with differing goals. GS3 is being used to support the Sim-SEQ international model comparison study, by providing a collaborative framework for the modeling teams and providing tools for model comparison. Another customized deployment of GS3 has been made to support the permit application process. In this case, GS3 is being used to manage data in support of conceptual model development and provide documentation and provenance for numerical simulations. An additional customized deployment of GS3 is being created for use by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (US-EPA) to aid in the CO2 injection permit application review process in one of its regions. These use cases demonstrate GS3’s flexibility, utility, and broad applicability

White, Signe K.; Gosink, Luke J.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; Black, Gary D.; Purohit, Sumit; Bacon, Diana H.; Hou, Zhangshuan; Lin, Guang; Gorton, Ian; Bonneville, Alain

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

371

Ocean Sequestration of Crop Residue Carbon: Recycling Fossil Fuel Carbon Back to Deep Sediments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

burial of crop residues in the deep ocean (hereafter, CROPS: Crop Residue Oceanic Permanent Sequestration). ... As long as fuels exist with higher energy yield-to-carbon content (E/C) ratios than biomass, it will always be more energy efficient and less carbon polluting to sequester the biomass in the deep oceans, and use those fuels with higher E/C ratios for power generation, rather than to burn biomass for power generation. ...

Stuart E. Strand; Gregory Benford

2009-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

372

Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mine Soils of Ohio  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Technology Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4132 Heino.Beckert@netl.doe.gov Rattan Lal Principal Investigator Ohio State University School of Natural Resources 2021 Coffey Road Columbus, OH 43210 614-292-9069 lal1@osu.edu Carbon SequeStration in reClaimed mine SoilS of ohio Background Prior to 1972, surface coal mining in Ohio was performed by removing the soil and rock above the coal deposit (known as overburden) during mining operations. Because specific reclamation guidelines did not exist at the time, the overburden was not replaced and the mined site was simply planted to grass or trees, without performing grading or reclamation. After 1972, the Ohio Mineland Reclamation Act mandated that mined sites be graded to restore their original topography and

373

Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership--Validation Phase  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Program Technology Program Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-1345 traci.rodosta@netl.doe.gov William Aljoe Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6569 william.aljoe@netl.doe.gov Leslie L. Schmidt Business Contact Montana State University-Bozeman 309 Montana Hall Bozeman, MT 59717-2470 406-994-2381 lschmidt@montana.edu Lee Spangler Technical Contact Montana State University-Bozeman P.O. Box 172460 Bozeman, MT 59717-2470 406-994-4399 spangler@montana.edu PARTNERS Battelle Pacific Northwest Division Center for Advanced Energy Studies Cimarex Energy Columbia University, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Crow Tribe Big Sky Regional Carbon Sequestration

374

Carbon Sequestration, Media Background Briefing, June 16, 2003  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Media Background Briefing June 16, 2003 National Energy Technology Laboratory Office of Fossil Energy Scott Klara Carbon Sequestration Product Manager The Fossil Energy Situation Fossil Fuels World's Dominant Energy Source United States 99 QBtu/yr; 85% Fossil Energy World 382 Quads/yr; 86% Fossil Energy Word Data from EIA96. Does not include non-grid-connected biomass. U.S. Data from Table 2 of EIA REA 97 & AEO 2002 Table A2 0.9% Coal 25% Coal 25% Oil 39% Gas 22% Nuclear 6% 7% 7% Coal 22% Gas 24% Nuclear 8% Oil 38% 4% Hydro Solar, Wind, Geo Biomass 3% 0.6% World - 1999 12.8 Trillion kWh - 63% Fossil Energy United States - 1999 3.2 Trillion kWh - 69% Fossil Energy Source: EIA International Energy Outlook 2001 Edison Electric Institute 2001 Renewables Oil Fossil Fuels World's Dominant Electricity Source

375

A Greenhouse-Scale Photosynthetic Microbial Bioreactor for Carbon Sequestration in Magnesium Carbonate Minerals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A Greenhouse-Scale Photosynthetic Microbial Bioreactor for Carbon Sequestration in Magnesium Carbonate Minerals ... The bioreactor was located in a greenhouse which maintained a minimum air temperature of 18 °C and received at least 14 h of light/day through combined natural and artificial lighting. ... We provide a detailed account of the natural process of carbon trapping and storage as it occurs at Clinton Creek and Cassiar, including mineralogy, modes of occurrence, methods of formation for carbonate alteration, light stable isotope geochem., and radiocarbon anal. ...

Jenine McCutcheon; Ian M. Power; Anna L. Harrison; Gregory M. Dipple; Gordon Southam

2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

376

Recovery Act: Site Characterization of Promising Geologic Formations...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Geologic Formations for CO2 Storage A Report on the The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Carbon Sequestration Program within the Office of Fossil Energy's (FE's) Coal Program...

377

EA-1846: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration of Steam  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

46: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration 46: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration of Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production, Port Arthur, Texas EA-1846: Demonstration of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration of Steam Methane Reforming Process Gas Used for Large-Scale Hydrogen Production, Port Arthur, Texas Overview DOE completed a final environmental assessment (EA) for a project under Area I of the Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration from Industrial Sources and Innovative Concepts for Beneficial CO2 Use . Based on the analyses in the EA DOE determined that its proposed action - awarding a grant to Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. to design and demonstrate a state-of-the-art system to concentrate carbon dioxide (CO,) from two steam

378

HigHligHts NETL News Release, "Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates CO  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates CO Carbon Sequestration Partner Initiates CO 2 Injection into Michigan Basin." The Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP), one of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnerships (RCSP), has commenced a two-month field test that will inject up to 10,000 metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) into a saline formation some 3,200 to 3,500 feet below the Earth's surface. The Core Energy-owned, Antrim gas field location advantageously provides the project with a DTE Energy-owned gas processing plant that supplies the CO 2 ; an eight-mile CO 2 pipeline previously used for enhanced oil

379

Potential for Advanced Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies in a Climate Constrained World  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This study assesses the potential of advanced power plant carbon capture and sequestration technologies for the stabilization of atmospheric CO2 concentration. Although the current cost of power plant carbon capture and sequestration technology is high, the availability of advanced carbon capture and sequestration technologies could have a significant role in reducing the impact of climate change. Mitigating carbon emissions while continuing to utilize fossil fuels for electricity generation limits drastic changes to the global energy system. The ability to use abundant and cheap fossil fuels without contributing to climate change prevents large reductions in energy consumption and the substitution to more expensive sources of energy. Our analysis shows that significant cost savings could be achieved in stabilizing the atmospheric concentration of CO2 with advanced carbon capture and sequestration technologies over the next century. iii iv Executive Summary

Sh Kim

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Understanding Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System R. Dahowski (bob.dahowski@battelle.org; 509-372-4574) J. Dooley (dooleyj@battelle.org; 202-646-7810) D. Brown (daryl.brown@pnl.gov; 509-372-4366) Battelle/Pacific Northwest National Laboratory P.O. Box 999 Richland, WA 99352 A. Mizoguchi (akiyoshi.mizoguchi@jp.mitsubishicorp.com; 81-3-3210-7211) M. Shiozaki (mai.shiozaki@jp.mitsubishicorp.com; 81-3-3210-9543) 6-3 Marunouchi 2-Chome Chiyoda-ku Mitsubishi Corporation Tokyo 100-8086 Japan Introduction Addressing the threat posed by climate change represents one of the most pressing challenges facing humanity. It is also a challenge that will ultimately require profound changes in the way

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Ocean Sciences 2006 An Estimate of Carbon Sequestration via Antarctic Intermediate Water Formation in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Sciences 2006 An Estimate of Carbon Sequestration via Antarctic Intermediate Water Formation traditional deep water formation via entrainment of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse-active species collected for oxygen, total carbon, alkalinity, nutrients, and CFCs. The alkalinity and total carbon data

Talley, Lynne D.

382

Atmosphere-crust coupling and carbon sequestration on the young Mars Professor Martin R. Lee1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Atmosphere-crust coupling and carbon sequestration on the young Mars Professor Martin R. Lee1 *, Dr the idea that CO2 was `scrubbed' by precipitation of carbonate minerals within the planet's crust - a reaction termed `carbonation'. This project will seek evidence for carbonation by analysis of martian

Guo, Zaoyang

383

Experimental and Computational Studies of Fluid Flow Phenomena in Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine and Oil Fields  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDIES OF FLUID EXPERIMENTAL AND COMPUTATIONAL STUDIES OF FLUID FLOW PHENOMENA IN CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION IN BRINE AND OIL FIELDS Chuang Ji ( chuang.ji@netl.doe.gov ) National Energy Technology Laboratory Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 BOX 5725 Clarkson University Potsdam, NY 13699 Goodarz Ahmadi ( ahmadi@clarkson.edu ) BOX 5725 Clarkson University Potsdam, NY 13699 Duane H. Smith ( duane.smith@netl.doe.gov ) National Energy Technology Laboratory Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 2 INTRODUCTION Sequestration of CO 2 by injection into deep geological formations is a method to reduce CO 2 emissions into the atmosphere. However, when CO 2 is injected underground, it forms fingers extending into the rock pores saturated with brine or petroleum. This flow

384

A Feasibility Study of Non-Seismic Geophysical Methods for Monitoring Geologic CO2 Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO 2 enhanced oil recovery (EOR) and sequestration in athe measurement configuration. EOR/sequestration projects inshow that a CO 2 –based EOR could increase oil recovery by

Gasperikova, Erika; Hoversten, G. Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Micro-and nano-environments of carbon sequestration: Multi-element STXMNEXAFS spectromicroscopy assessment of microbial carbon and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Micro- and nano-environments of carbon sequestration: Multi-element STXM­NEXAFS spectromicroscopy- and nano-C sequestration environments, and conduct submicron-level investigation of the compositional chem demonstrated the existence of spatially distinct seemingly terminal micro- and nano-C repository zones, where

Lehmann, Johannes

386

Geologic Sequestration Software Suite (GS3): a collaborative approach to the management of geological GHG storage projects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geologic storage projects associated with large anthropogenic sources of greenhouse gases (GHG) will have lifecycles that may easily span a century, involve several numerical simulation cycles, and have distinct modeling teams. The process used for numerical simulation of the fate of GHG in the subsurface follows a generally consistent sequence of steps that often are replicated by scientists and engineers around the world. Site data is gathered, assembled, interpreted, and assimilated into conceptualizations of a solid-earth model; assumptions are made about the processes to be modeled; a computational domain is specified and spatially discretized; driving forces and initial conditions are defined; the conceptual models, computational domain, and driving forces are translated into input files; simulations are executed; and results are analyzed. Then, during and after the GHG injection, a continuous monitoring of the reservoir is done and models are updated with the newly collected data. Typically the working files generated during all these steps are maintained on workstations with local backups and archived once the project has concluded along with any modeling notes and records. We are proposing a new concept for supporting the management of full-scale GHG storage projects where collaboration, flexibility, accountability and long-term access will be essential features: the Geologic Sequestration Software Suite, GS3.

Bonneville, Alain; Black, Gary D.; Gorton, Ian; Hui, Peter SY; Murphy, Ellyn M.; Murray, Christopher J.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Schuchardt, Karen L.; Sivaramakrishnan, Chandrika; White, Mark D.; Williams, Mark D.; Wurstner, Signe K.

2011-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

387

Understanding Carbon Sequestration Options in the United States: Capabilities of a Carbon Management Geographic Information System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While one can discuss various sequestration options at a national or global level, the actual carbon management approach is highly site specific. In response to the need for a better understanding of carbon management options, Battelle in collaboration with Mitsubishi Corporation, has developed a state-of-the-art Geographic Information System (GIS) focused on carbon capture and sequestration opportunities in the United States. The GIS system contains information (e.g., fuel type, location, vintage, ownership, rated capacity) on all fossil-fired generation capacity in the Untied States with a rated capacity of at least 100 MW. There are also data on other CO2 sources (i.e., natural domes, gas processing plants, etc.) and associated pipelines currently serving enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects. Data on current and prospective CO2 EOR projects include location, operator, reservoir and oil characteristics, production, and CO2 source. The system also contains information on priority deep saline aquifers and coal bed methane basins with potential for sequestering CO2. The GIS application not only enables data storage, flexible map making, and visualization capabilities, but also facilitates the spatial analyses required to solve complex linking of CO2 sources with appropriate and cost-effective sinks. A variety of screening criteria (spatial, geophysical, and economic) can be employed to identify sources and sinks most likely amenable to deployment of carbon capture and sequestration systems. The system is easily updateable, allowing it to stay on the leading edge of capture and sequestration technology as well as the ever-changing business landscape. Our paper and presentation will describe the development of this GIS and demonstrate its uses for carbon management analysis.

Dahowski, Robert T.; Dooley, James J.; Brown, Daryl R.; Mizoguchi, Akiyoshi; Shiozaki, Mai

2001-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

388

Carbon sequestration effects of shrublands in Three-North Shelterbelt Forest region, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three-North Shelterbelt Forest (TSF) program, is one of six key forestry programs and has a 73-year construction period, from 1978 to 2050. Quantitative analysis of the carbon sequestration of shrubs in this regi...

Wenhui Liu; Jiaojun Zhu; Quanquan Jia; Xiao Zheng…

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Carbon dioxide sequestration in petrochemical industries with the aim of reduction in greenhouse gas emissions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mitigation of greenhouse gas emissions to acceptable levels is arguably the greatest...2 increase in the atmosphere. Carbon dioxide sequestration that consists of separation, transportation and...2..., is one...

Maryam Takht Ravanchi; Saeed Sahebdelfar…

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Sequestration by Adsorption on Activated Carbon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Activated Carbon (AC) materials was selected as suitable adsorbent for the carbon dioxide (CO2) capture and a numerical analysis was carried out to study the rate of adsorption of the gas on ACs. A one dimensional mathematical model was proposed based on the Dubinin's Theory of Volume Filling of Micropores, and analyzed along with the unsteady heat transfer. A parametric analysis was carried out to study the effect of various crucial parameters like radius of bed, cooling fluid temperature, initial bed temperature and heat transfer coefficient on the adsorption amount. The results show that lower bed radius was ideal for obtaining high amount of CO2 adsorbed assuming constant packing density. Also, a high heat transfer coefficient up to 100 Wm-2K-1 and low cooling fluid temperature of 283 K was necessary for speeding up the process. High initial bed temperature also supports greater adsorption amount under the same conditions.

Reema Saxena; Vinod Kumar Singh; E. Anil Kumar

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration from Flue Gas Using an In-Duct Scrubber Coupled with Alkaline Clay Mineralization  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Innovative Carbon Dioxide Sequestration from Flue Gas Using an In-Duct Scrubber Coupled with Alkaline Clay Mineralization Background The United States Department of Energy (DOE) is leading an effort to find novel approaches to reduce carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from industrial sources. The Industrial Carbon Capture and Sequestration (ICCS) program is funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) to encourage development of processes that

392

Carbon Capture and Storage Poster | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Carbon Capture and Storage - In Depth (poster) More Documents & Publications Geologic Carbon Dioxide Storage Field Projects Supported by DOE's Sequestration Program Training...

393

An Intercomparison Study of Simulation Models for Geologic Sequestration of CO2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Intercomparison Study of Simulation Models Intercomparison Study of Simulation Models for Geologic Sequestration of CO2 Karsten Pruess (K_Pruess@lbl.gov; 510/486-6732) Chin-Fu Tsang (CFTsang@lbl.gov; 510/486-5782) Earth Sciences Division, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Rd., MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720, U.S.A. David H.-S. Law (Law@arc.ab.ca; 780/450-5034) Alberta Research Council 250 Karl Clark Rd., Edmonton, Alberta T6N 1E4, Canada Curtis M. Oldenburg (CMOldenburg@lbl.gov; 510/486-7419) Earth Sciences Division, E.O. Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory One Cyclotron Rd., MS 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720, U.S.A. ABSTRACT Mathematical models and numerical simulation tools will play an important role in evaluating the feasibility of CO2 storage in subsurface reservoirs, such as brine aquifers,

394

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

396

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. For the Devonian shale, average total organic carbon is 3.71 percent (as received) and mean random vitrinite reflectance is 1.16. Measured adsorption isotherm data range from 37.5 to 2,077.6 standard cubic feet of CO{sub 2} per ton (scf/ton) of shale. At 500 psia, adsorption capacity of the Lower Huron Member of the shale is 72 scf/ton. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. The black shales of Kentucky could be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, and their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Summary Report on CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration & Water Resources Workshop  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) jointly hosted a workshop on “CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration and Water Resources” in Berkeley, June 1–2, 2011. The focus of the workshop was to evaluate R&D needs related to geological storage of CO{sub 2} and potential impacts on water resources. The objectives were to assess the current status of R&D, to identify key knowledge gaps, and to define specific research areas with relevance to EPA’s mission. About 70 experts from EPA, the DOE National Laboratories, industry, and academia came to Berkeley for two days of intensive discussions. Participants were split into four breakout session groups organized around the following themes: Water Quality and Impact Assessment/Risk Prediction; Modeling and Mapping of Area of Potential Impact; Monitoring and Mitigation; Wells as Leakage Pathways. In each breakout group, participants identified and addressed several key science issues. All groups developed lists of specific research needs; some groups prioritized them, others developed short-term vs. long-term recommendations for research directions. Several crosscutting issues came up. Most participants agreed that the risk of CO{sub 2} leakage from sequestration sites that are properly selected and monitored is expected to be low. However, it also became clear that more work needs to be done to be able to predict and detect potential environmental impacts of CO{sub 2} storage in cases where the storage formation may not provide for perfect containment and leakage of CO{sub 2}–brine might occur.

Varadharajan, C.; Birkholzer, J.; Kraemer, S.; Porse, S.; Carroll, S.; Wilkin, R.; Maxwell, R.; Bachu, S.; Havorka, S.; Daley, T.; Digiulio, D.; Carey, W.; Strasizar, B.; Huerta, N.; Gasda, S.; Crow, W.

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

398

Carbon sequestration in leaky reservoirs Alain Jean-Marie, INRIA and UMR LIRMM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon sequestration in leaky reservoirs Alain Jean-Marie, INRIA and UMR LIRMM Michel Moreaux, February 2, 2011 Abstract We propose in this paper a model of optimal Carbon Capture and Storage in which the reservoir of sequestered carbon is leaky, and pollution eventually is released into the atmosphere. We

Boyer, Edmond

399

Economic Evaluation of Leading Technology Options for Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Economic Evaluation of Leading Technology Options for Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide by Jérémy, which releases nearly six billion tons of carbon per year into the atmosphere. These fuels will continue development. Since power plants are the largest point sources of CO2 emissions, capturing the carbon dioxide

400

2009 Carb Sequestration Workshop Presentations for Download (zipped) 1. Click on Title to go to presentations and download.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laboratory Geochemical Tools for Monitoring Geologic Carbon Sequestration, (David Cole, ORNL) Andre Duguid-surface carbon sequestration T.S. Ramakrishnan (Jim Johnson, speaker) Schlumberger Capacity and Injectivity2009 Carb Sequestration Workshop Presentations for Download (zipped) 1. Click on Title to go

Daniels, Jeffrey J.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Cost of Carbon Dioxide Capture and Storage in Geologic Formations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CosT of Carbon DioxiDe CapTure CosT of Carbon DioxiDe CapTure anD sTorage in geologiC formaTions The sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic formations is a viable option for achieving deep reductions in greenhouse gas emissions without hindering economic prosperity. Due to the abundance of fossil fuels in the United States and around the globe as compared to other energy sources, there is strong interest in geologic sequestration, but cost is a key issue. The volume of CO 2 emitted from power plants and other energy systems is enormous compared to other emissions of concern. For example, a pulverized coal (PC) boiler operating on Illinois #6 coal (2.5 percent sulfur) may generate 0.03 pounds of sulfur dioxide per kilowatt hour (kWh) and emit CO 2 at a rate of 1.7 pounds per kWh.

402

The Urgent Need for Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Klaus S. Lackner, Darryl P. Butt, Reed Jensen and Hans Ziock  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The Urgent Need for Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Klaus S. Lackner, Darryl P. Butt, Reed Jensen in this field. This memo explains why the development of a viable sequestration technology is a long term stra- tegic goal of utmost importance and why sequestration provides a goal worthy of the attention

403

Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper published in the August, 2005 issue of Canadian Journal of Forest Research, scientists  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genetic Analysis in Populus Reveals Potential to Enhance Soil Carbon Sequestration In a paper carbon sequestration by an estimated 0.35Gt carbon/year. This represents ca. 4% of global carbon in terrestrial ecosystems. This work is supported by research funded through the Carbon Sequestration Program

404

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

CO{sub 2} emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels have been linked to global climate change. Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, sequestration strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky than in central Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to methane storage in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject of current research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores were selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. Methane and carbon dioxide adsorption analyses are being performed to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, sidewall core samples are being acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their potential CO{sub 2} uptake, and the resulting displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) are being investigated for possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements. Initial estimates indicate a sequestration capacity of 5.3 billion tons CO{sub 2} in the Lower Huron Member of the Ohio shale in parts of eastern Kentucky and as much as 28 billion tons total in the deeper and thicker portions of the Devonian shales in Kentucky. Should the black shales of Kentucky prove to be a viable geologic sink for CO{sub 2}, their extensive occurrence in Paleozoic basins across North America would make them an attractive regional target for economic CO{sub 2} storage and enhanced natural gas production.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

405

Development of experimental methods for intermediate scale testing of deep geologic CO2 sequestration trapping processes at ambient laboratory conditions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) is a potential strategy to reduce CO2 emissions into the atmosphere. Deep geological formations provide a viable storage site for… (more)

Vargas-Johnson, Javier

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Estimation of net carbon sequestration potential of citrus under different management systems using the life cycle approach.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??A study was conducted to determine the net carbon sequestration potential of citrus to mitigate climate change. Perennial crops such as citrus have the potential… (more)

Bwalya, jackson Mwamba

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Estimating Potential Carbon Sequestration in Conservation Reserve Program (Crp) Tracts in the Central High Plains of the United States.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The main goal of this research is to examine long term trends in carbon sequestration in Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) tracts in the Central High… (more)

Dung, Elisha Jasper

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and gas, have caused a substantial increase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil-caused CO2 emissions and to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. 2.0 What is carbon sequestration? The term "carbon sequestration" is used to describe both natural and deliberate CARBON,INGIGATONSPERYEAR 1.5 Fossil

409

Carbon sequestration and biodiversity of re-growing miombo woodlands in Mozambique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon sequestration and biodiversity of re-growing miombo woodlands in Mozambique M. Williams a in tropical woodlands is being used to sequester carbon (C), alleviate poverty and protect biodiversity, among and soil C stocks and biodiversity on an area of miombo woodland in Mozambique, and how C stocks

410

CO2 sequestration | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CO2 sequestration CO2 sequestration Leads No leads are available at this time. Low-Temperature Carbon Monoxide Oxidation Catalysed by Regenerable Atomically Dispersed Palladium on...

411

A Perspective on the Potential Role of Geologic Options in a National Carbon Management Strategy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Perspective On The Potential Role Of Geologic Options Perspective On The Potential Role Of Geologic Options In A National Carbon Management Strategy David A. Beecy (David.Beecy@hq.doe.gov; 301-903-2787) U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Environmental Systems 19901 Germantown Rd., FE-23, Building GTN Germantown, MD 20874 Vello A. Kuuskraa (vkuuskraa@adv-res.com; 703-528-8420) Advanced Resources International, Inc. 1110 N. Glebe, Suite 600 Arlington, VA 22201 Charles Schmidt (Charles.Schmidt@netl.doe.gov; 412-386-6090) U.S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technical Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road Pittsburgh, PA 15236 Abstract. Carbon sequestration is the critical "third-option" for addressing greenhouse gas emissions, along with increased energy efficiency and expanded use of low-carbon fuels.

412

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

subcritical and supercritical con?gurations, respectively Environmental Management (2010) 45:651–661 Fig. 5 Water

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sh aquaculture, and algae biodiesel production; (2) developscould improve joint feasibility: 2.2.4. Algae biodieselproduction Algae biodiesel is an emerging technology, and

Breunig, H.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycle  analysis  of  algae  biodiesel."   International  aquaculture,   algae  biodiesel  production,  road  de-­?Algae  Biodiesel  ..  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

T. , Jr. , Hydrology of the Jasper Aquifer in the SoutheastSands which contains the Jasper aquifer. Catahoula/Frio andof the CF. Aquifers The Jasper Aquifer lies approximately

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Management (2010) 45:651–661 ‘‘capture penalty’’ of increased waterEnvironmental Management (2010) 45:651–661 DOI 10.1007/s00267-010-9434-1 FORUM WaterEnvironmental Management (2010) 45:651–661 Fig. 5 Water

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

brine  management  or   extracted  water  management  infrastructure  or  where  nearby  fresh  water  resources  need  to  be   carefully  monitored  for  later  contamination.  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

algae  biodiesel  competitive  against  plant  biodiesels  or  fossil  fuels  Algae  Production  for  Biodiesel   In  2007,  the  US  Renewable  Fuel  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compression operations (DOE-NETL 2007c). Injection of CO 2for N. America alone (DOE-NETL 2008). Depleted oil and gas ?resources (e.g. , DOE-NETL 2008; CEC 2007). Ideally,

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

storage’’. Based on studies of EOR applied to the six majoris accessible using current EOR processes; an additional 41next generation’’ CO 2 -EOR meth- ods (e.g. , Ferguson and

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geologic carbon sequestration" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012.   DiPippo,  R. ,  “Geothermal  Energy:  Electricity  Utilization  of  Geothermal  Energy."   Energies  2010,  cost  of  using  geothermal  energy  was  calculated  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Direct utilization of geothermal energy. Energies, 1443–EOR) systems; and geothermal energy production. Variousthis paper are: (1) geothermal energy, (2) desalination, (3)

Breunig, H.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Certification Framework Based on Effective Trapping for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and are discussed below. Acceptable risks from CO 2 or brineor decide that the risk was acceptable and CO 2 could bewhether the leakage risk is acceptable. If the CLR is above

Oldenburg, Curtis M.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using  geothermal  energy  for  district  heating  onsite  District  Heating Greenhouse  Heating Aquaculture  Pond  Heating Geothermal  geothermal   heat  could  be  capture  for  onsite  district  heating  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Water Challenges for Geologic Carbon Capture and Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

represents natural gas combined cycle, PC Sub and PC Superintegrated gasi?cation combined cycle (IGCC) plants withand natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) with amine capture (

Newmark, Robin L.; Friedmann, Samuel J.; Carroll, Susan A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of  water  use  at  combined-­?cycle  power  plants. ”  Gasification  Combined  Cycle Known  Geothermal  Energy  integrated  gasification  combined   cycle  (IGCC)  CFPP,  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metal recovery from reverse osmosis concentrate. Journal ofnanofil- tration and reverse osmosis membranes. Journal ofrecovery [%] Assumed cost reverse osmosis [$/m 3 permeate

Breunig, H.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

18   2.3.2  Reverse  Osmosis  46   4.2.1  Reverse  Osmosis  Relative  Humidity Reverse  Osmosis SERC  Reliability  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Regional evaluation of brine management for geologic carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Gas Exploration and Production Waste: Availability, Options, and Costs.gases, carcinogenic production contaminants, and unpredictable production rates greatly increase the cost and

Breunig, H.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Assessment of Brine Management for Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and  Land   Cost  of  Geothermal  Energy  Systems   The  in-­?use-­?phase  costs  of  geothermal  energy  capture,  the  cost  and  water  demand  of   geothermal  energy.  

Breunig, Hanna M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Genetic and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications for Terrestrial Ecosystems  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications and Molecular Controls on Carbon Sequestration - Implications for Terrestrial Ecosystems G.A. Tuskan (tuskanga@ornl.gov; 865-576-8141) S.D. Wullschleger (wullschlegsd@ornl.gov; 865-574-7839) A.W. King (kingaw@ornl.gov; 865-576-3436) T.J. Tschaplinski (tschaplinstj@ornl.gov; 865-574-4597) L.E. Gunter (gunterle@ornl.gov; 865-574-4020) A.M. Silletti (sillettia@ornl.gov; 865-574-5397) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6422 M. Davis (Mark_Davis@nrel.gov; 303-384-6140) National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401-3322 Introduction Carbon sequestration in terrestrial vegetation and soils is a poorly understood process, but ultimately represents a summation of biological activities including the initial incorporation of

432

2014 Carbon Storage | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Leetaru, Illinois State Geological Survey Michigan Basin Field Project Midwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership (MRCSP) Neeraj Gupta and Darrell Paul - Battelle, Panel:...

433

Discrete Fracture Network Models for Risk Assessment of Carbon Sequestration in Coal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A software package called DFNModeler has been developed to assess the potential risks associated with carbon sequestration in coal. Natural fractures provide the principal conduits for fluid flow in coal-bearing strata, and these fractures present the most tangible risks for the leakage of injected carbon dioxide. The objectives of this study were to develop discrete fracture network (DFN) modeling tools for risk assessment and to use these tools to assess risks in the Black Warrior Basin of Alabama, where coal-bearing strata have high potential for carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. DFNModeler provides a user-friendly interface for the construction, visualization, and analysis of DFN models. DFNModeler employs an OpenGL graphics engine that enables real-time manipulation of DFN models. Analytical capabilities in DFNModeler include display of structural and hydrologic parameters, compartmentalization analysis, and fluid pathways analysis. DFN models can be exported to third-party software packages for flow modeling. DFN models were constructed to simulate fracturing in coal-bearing strata of the upper Pottsville Formation in the Black Warrior Basin. Outcrops and wireline cores were used to characterize fracture systems, which include joint systems, cleat systems, and fault-related shear fractures. DFN models were constructed to simulate jointing, cleating, faulting, and hydraulic fracturing. Analysis of DFN models indicates that strata-bound jointing compartmentalizes the Pottsville hydrologic system and helps protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. Analysis of fault zones, however, suggests that faulting can facilitate cross-formational flow. For this reason, faults should be avoided when siting injection wells. DFN-based flow models constructed in TOUGH2 indicate that fracture aperture and connectivity are critical variables affecting the leakage of injected CO{sub 2} from coal. Highly transmissive joints near an injection well have potential to divert a large percentage of an injected CO{sub 2} stream away from a target coal seam. However, the strata-bound nature of Pottsville fracture systems is a natural factor that mitigates the risk of long-range leakage and surface seepage. Flow models indicate that cross-formational flow in strata-bound joint networks is low and is dissipated by about an order of magnitude at each successive bedding contact. These models help confirm that strata-bound joint networks are self-compartmentalizing and that the thick successions of interbedded shale and sandstone separating the Pottsville coal zones are confining units that protect shallow aquifers from injection operations at reservoir depth. DFN models are powerful tools for the simulation and analysis of fracture networks and can play an important role in the assessment of risks associated with carbon sequestration and enhanced coalbed methane recovery. Importantly, the stochastic nature DFN models dictates that they cannot be used to precisely reproduce reservoir conditions in a specific field area. Rather, these models are most useful for simulating the fundamental geometric and statistical properties of fracture networks. Because the specifics of fracture architecture in a given area can be uncertain, multiple realizations of DFN models and DFN-based flow models can help define variability that may be encountered during field operations. Using this type of approach, modelers can inform the risk assessment process by characterizing the types and variability of fracture architecture that may exist in geologic carbon sinks containing natural fractures.

Jack Pashin; Guohai Jin; Chunmiao Zheng; Song Chen; Marcella McIntyre

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

GEOC R Lee Penn Sunday, March 25, 2012 12 -Biogeochemical transformation of Fe-and Mn-along a redox gradient: Implications for carbon sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a redox gradient: Implications for carbon sequestration within the Christina River Basin Critical Zone States Organic carbon (C)-mineral complexation mechanism is crucial in C sequestration. It is a function

Sparks, Donald L.

435

Supply of carbon sequestration and biodiversity services from Australia's agricultural land under global change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Global agroecosystems can contribute to both climate change mitigation and biodiversity conservation, and market mechanisms provide a highly prospective means of achieving these outcomes. However, the ability of markets to motivate the supply of carbon sequestration and biodiversity services from agricultural land is uncertain, especially given the future changes in environmental, economic, and social drivers. We quantified the potential supply of these services from the intensive agricultural land of Australia from 2013 to 2050 under four global outlooks in response to a carbon price and biodiversity payment scheme. Each global outlook specified emissions pathways, climate, food demand, energy price, and carbon price modeled using the Global Integrated Assessment Model (GIAM). Using a simplified version of the Land Use Trade-Offs (LUTO) model, economic returns to agriculture, carbon plantings, and environmental plantings were calculated each year. The supply of carbon sequestration and biodiversity services was then quantified given potential land use change under each global outlook, and the sensitivity of the results to key parameters was assessed. We found that carbon supply curves were similar across global outlooks. Sharp increases in carbon sequestration supply occurred at carbon prices exceeding 50 $ tCO2?1 in 2015 and exceeding 65 $ tCO2?1 in 2050. Based on GIAM-modeled carbon prices, little carbon sequestration was expected at 2015 under any global outlook. However, at 2050 expected carbon supply under each outlook differed markedly, ranging from 0 to 189 MtCO2 yr?1. Biodiversity services of 3.32% of the maximum may be achieved in 2050 for a 1 $B investment under median scenario settings. We conclude that a carbon market can motivate supply of substantial carbon sequestration but only modest amounts of biodiversity services from agricultural land. A complementary biodiversity payment can synergistically increase the supply of biodiversity services but will not provide much additional carbon sequestration. The results were sensitive to global drivers, especially the carbon price, and the domestic drivers of adoption hurdle rate and agricultural productivity. The results can inform the design of an effective national policy and institutional portfolio addressing the dual objectives of climate change and biodiversity conservation that is robust to future uncertainty in both national and global drivers.

B.A. Bryan; M. Nolan; T.D. Harwood; J.D. Connor; J. Navarro-Garcia; D. King; D.M. Summers; D. Newth; Y. Cai; N. Grigg; I. Harman; N.D. Crossman; M.J. Grundy; J.J. Finnigan; S. Ferrier; K.J. Williams; K.A. Wilson; E.A. Law; S. Hatfield-Dodds

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Physical Constraints on Geologic CO2 Sequestration in Low-Volume Basalt Formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Deep basalt formations within large igneous provinces have been proposed as target reservoirs for carbon capture and sequestration on the basis of favorable CO2-water-rock reaction kinetics that suggest carbonate mineralization rates on the order of 102–103 d. Although these results are encouraging, there exists much uncertainty surrounding the influence of fracture-controlled reservoir heterogeneity on commercial-scale CO2 injections in basalt formations. This work investigates the physical response of a low-volume basalt reservoir to commercial-scale CO2 injections using a Monte Carlo numerical modeling experiment such that model variability is solely a function of spatially distributed reservoir heterogeneity. Fifty equally probable reservoirs are simulated using properties inferred from the deep eastern Snake River Plain aquifer in southeast Idaho, and CO2 injections are modeled within each reservoir for 20 yr at a constant mass rate of 21.6 kg s–1. Results from this work suggest that (1) formation injectivity is generally favorable, although injection pressures in excess of the fracture gradient were observed in 4% of the simulations; (2) for an extensional stress regime (as exists within the eastern Snake River Plain), shear failure is theoretically possible for optimally oriented fractures if Sh is less than or equal to 0.70SV; and (3) low-volume basalt reservoirs exhibit sufficient CO2 confinement potential over a 20 yr injection program to accommodate mineral trapping rates suggested in the literature.

Ryan M. Pollyea; Jerry P. Fairley; Robert K. Podgorney; Travis L. McLing

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Pathways and Mechanisms of OceanTracer Transport: Implications for Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This funding enabled the following published manuscripts in which we have developed models of direct relevance to ocean carbon sequestration and of the oceanic iron cycle, its connection to the global carbon cycle, and the sensitivity of atmospheric carbon dioxide to the external source of iron. As part of this process we have developed the adjoint of the MIT ocean biogeochemistry model which has enabled us to perform rigorous and efficient sensitivity studies.

Marshall, John; Follows, MIchael

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

438

Carbon sequestration and greenhouse gas emissions in urban turf  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

D. C. Lal, R. (2004), Carbon emission from farm operations,facts: Average carbon dioxide emissions resulting fromcalculation of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions from fuel

Townsend-Small, Amy; Czimczik, Claudia I

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

150 G. Marland et al. / Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 Strategies to mitigate anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce to create a system of credits and debits wherein emission or sequestration of carbon in the biosphere; Carbon sequestration; Land use change; Land surface change; Surface energy balance 1. Introduction Human

Niyogi, Dev

440

Investigating Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Recovery from a Billion Barrel Oil Field, Weyburn, Saskatchewan: the Geoscience Framework (IEA Weyburn CO2 Monitoring Project)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Sequestration Potential of Carbonate Rocks during Tertiary Recovery from a Billion Barrel Oil Field, Weyburn, Saskatchewan: the Geoscience Framework (IEA Weyburn CO 2 Monitoring and Storage Project) G. Burrowes (Geoffrey_Burrowes@pancanadian.ca; 403-290-2796) PanCanadian Resources 150 - 9 th Avenue S.W., P.O. Box 2850 Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2P 2S5 C. Gilboy (cgilboy@sem.gov.sk.ca; 306-787-2573) Petroleum Geology Branch, Saskatchewan Energy and Mines 201 Dewdney Avenue East Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada S4N 4G3 Introduction In Western Canada the application of CO 2 injection for enhanced, 'tertiary' oil recovery is a relatively recent addition to the arsenal available to reservoir engineers. The first successful application of CO 2 as a miscible fluid in Western Canada began in 1984 at Joffre Field, a

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441

A Clearer Picture of Carbon Sequestration: Simulations Shed Light on Fate  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Clearer Picture of Clearer Picture of Carbon Sequestration Clearer Picture of Carbon Sequestration Simulations Shed Light on Fate of Sequestered CO₂ January 31, 2011 | Tags: Chemistry, Earth Sciences, Energy Technologies, Franklin Contact: Margie Wylie, mwylie@lbl.gov, +1 510 486 7421 2011-01-31-Sequestration5.JPG Fossil fuel-fired power plants, such as this coal-fired one, are major sources of CO2 emissions, the main culprit in manmade climate change. Despite progress in clean energy, Americans will continue to rely on fossil fuels for years to come. In fact, coal-, oil- and natural gas-fired power plants will generate 69 percent of U.S. electricity as late as 2035, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration. Such sobering projections have sparked a wide range of proposals for

442

Carbon sequestration potential of green roofs using mixed-sewage-sludge substrate in Chengdu World Modern Garden City  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Green roofs which use sewage sludge to sequestrate urban carbon dioxide may represent a potential opportunity to evaluate carbon sequestration benefits for the urban development under increasing global climate change. In this study, green roofs composed of 6 small green segments with two different substrates, mixed-sewage-sludge substrate (MSSS, volume ratio of sewage sludge and local-natural soil 1:1), and local-natural soil (LNS), three different substrate depths (20 cm, 25 cm and 30 cm), and three types of native plants (Ligustrum vicaryi, Neottia auriculata, and Liriope spicata) in Chengdu City were established to determine carbon sequestration from July 2012 to July 2013 through assessment of the carbon storage and sequestration. Results show that the average carbon storage of MSSS and LNS on green roofs was respectively 13.15 kg C m?2 and 8.58 kg C m?2, and the average carbon sequestration followed the order of LNS (3.89 kg C m?2 yr?1) > MSSS (3.81 kg C m?2 yr?1). Thus MSSS could be considered as a potential material for carbon sequestration. The carbon storage and carbon sequestration by native plants on the green roofs followed the order of L. vicaryi > L. spicata > N. auriculata. The whole green roof had a mean carbon storage of 18.28 kg C m?2 and average carbon sequestration of 6.47 kg C m?2 yr?1 in the combined biomass and substrate organic matter. The best green roof configuration was L. vicaryi together with MSSS substrate, with a middle-high level of carbon sequestration. It will be feasible and worthwhile to scale-up the adaptable green roof configurations in Chengdu World Modern Garden City.

Hongbing Luo; Xiaoling Liu; Bruce C. Anderson; Ke Zhang; Xiaoting Li; Bo Huang; Mei Li; You Mo; Liangqian Fan; Qiong Shen; Fenghui Chen; Mingshu Jiang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast for Geological Sequestration of CO2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Evaluation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation, Upper Texas Gulf Coast for Geological Sequestration of CO 2 S. D. Hovorka (susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-4863) Bureau of Economic Geology, P.O. Box X, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713 C. Doughty (CADoughty@lbl.gov; 510-486-6453 ) Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 90-1116, Berkeley, CA 94720 P. R. Knox (paul.knox@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-7313), Bureau of Economic Geology, P.O. Box X, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78713 C. T. Green (ctgreen@ucdavis.edu; 510-495-2461) University of California, Hydrologic Sciences, One Shields Ave., Davis, CA 95616 K. Pruess(K_Pruess@lbl.gov; 510-486-6732) Lawrence Berkeley National Lab, 1 Cyclotron Road Mailstop 90-1116,

444

The carbon-sequestration potential of municipal wastewater treatment Diego Rosso *, Michael K. Stenstrom  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and humanitarian benefits of proper sanitation. Ã? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Biogas; Carbon by 2025. Biomass sequestration and biogas conversion energy recovery are the two main strategies worldwide, and 400 million (14%) did not have access to ``improved'' sanitation (WHO/UNICEF, 2000), which

Detwiler, Russell

445

EIS-0366: Implementation of the Office of Fossil Energy's Carbon Sequestration Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announces its intent to prepare a Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (PEIS) to assess the potential environmental impacts from the Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Carbon Sequestration Program, which is being implemented by the Office of Fossil Energy.

446

Predictable and efficient carbon sequestration in the North Pacific Ocean supported by symbiotic nitrogen fixation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...new particle production and consumption. Under steady state...of plankton production and consumption in the upper ocean . Prog Oceanogr...and crews of the research vessel (R/V) Moana...wintertime particle fluxes and fuels more efficient carbon sequestration...

David M. Karl; Matthew J. Church; John E. Dore; Ricardo M. Letelier; Claire Mahaffey

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Differing methods of accounting ocean carbon sequestration efficiency Kevin Mueller and Long Cao  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

further storage of CO2 in the ocean. Our review of the literature indicates inconsistency in whether is appropriate for evaluating how much CO2 storage should be attributed to an ocean storage project. INDEX TERMS properties of seawater; KEYWORDS: carbon cycle, ocean sequestration, ISAM Citation: Mueller, K., L. Cao, K

Jain, Atul K.

448

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

449

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

450

ANALYSIS OF DEVONIAN BLACK SHALES IN KENTUCKY FOR POTENTIAL CARBON DIOXIDE SEQUESTRATION AND ENHANCED NATURAL GAS PRODUCTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Proposed carbon management technologies include geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. A possible, but untested, strategy is to inject CO{sub 2} into organic-rich shales of Devonian age. Devonian black shales underlie approximately two-thirds of Kentucky and are generally thicker and deeper in the Illinois and Appalachian Basin portions of Kentucky. The Devonian black shales serve as both the source and trap for large quantities of natural gas; total gas in place for the shales in Kentucky is estimated to be between 63 and 112 trillion cubic feet. Most of this natural gas is adsorbed on clay and kerogen surfaces, analogous to the way methane is stored in coal beds. In coals, it has been demonstrated that CO{sub 2} is preferentially adsorbed, displacing methane at a ratio of two to one. Black shales may similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}. If black shales similarly desorb methane in the presence of CO{sub 2}, the shales may be an excellent sink for CO{sub 2} with the added benefit of serving to enhance natural gas production. The concept that black, organic-rich Devonian shales could serve as a significant geologic sink for CO{sub 2} is the subject this research. To accomplish this investigation, drill cuttings and cores will be selected from the Kentucky Geological Survey Well Sample and Core Library. CO{sub 2} adsorption analyses will be performed in order to determine the gas-storage potential of the shale and to identify shale facies with the most sequestration potential. In addition, new drill cuttings and sidewall core samples will be acquired to investigate specific black-shale facies, their uptake of CO{sub 2}, and the resultant displacement of methane. Advanced logging techniques (elemental capture spectroscopy) will be used to investigate possible correlations between adsorption capacity and geophysical log measurements.

Brandon C. Nuttall

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

451

A pre-publication version of Carbon Trends in U.S. forestlands: a context for the role of soils in forest carbon sequestration. The Potential of U.S. Forest Soils to Sequester Carbon. Chapter 3  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in forest carbon sequestration. The Potential of U.S. Forest Soils to Sequester Carbon. Chapter 3 in: Kimble-45. Carbon Trends in U.S. Forestlands: A Context for the Role of Soils in Forest Carbon Sequestration Linda SA pre-publication version of Carbon Trends in U.S. forestlands: a context for the role of soils

452

Improving Carbon Sequestration | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Improving Carbon Improving Carbon Sequestration Laboratory Policy and Evaluation (LPE) LPE Home Staff M&O Contracts SC Laboratory Appraisal Process Laboratory Planning Process Work for Others in the Office of Science Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) DOE's Philosophy on LDRD Frequently Asked Questions Success Stories Brochures Additional Information LDRD Program Contacts Technology Transfer DOE National Laboratories Contact Information Laboratory Policy and Evaluation U.S. Department of Energy SC-32/Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5447 F: (202) 586-3119 Success Stories Improving Carbon Sequestration Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page PNNL employs microfluidics system to investigate sequestering carbon

453

CO2 Sequestration by Direct Gas?Solid Carbonation of Air Pollution Control (APC) Residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

CO2 Sequestration by Direct Gas?Solid Carbonation of Air Pollution Control (APC) Residues ... Furthermore, because fossil fuels are projected to be a dominant energy resource in the 21st century,1 technologies for sequestering emissions from fossil fuel combustion in a safe and definitive manner are being developed and implemented. ... According to these authors, the solution containing free calcium could then be used in a carbonation process for capturing CO2 directly from air. ...

Renato Baciocchi; Alessandra Polettini; Raffaella Pomi; Valentina Prigiobbe; Viktoria Nikulshina Von Zedwitz; Aldo Steinfeld

2006-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

454

Feasibility of Geophysical Monitoring of Carbon-Sequestrated Deep Saline Aquifers  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Customer Service: 1-800-553-7681 Customer Service: 1-800-553-7681 Projec t Fac ts Carbon Sequestration ContaCtS Sean Plasynski Sequestration Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4867 sean.plasynski@netl.doe.gov William W. Aljoe Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-6569 william.aljoe@netl.doe.gov Subhashis Mallick

455

Geoscience Perspectives in Carbon Sequestration - Educational Training and Research Through Classroom, Field, and Laboratory Investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most effective mechanism to limit CO{sub 2} release from underground Geologic Carbon Sequestration (GCS) sites over multi-century time scales will be to convert the CO{sub 2} into solid carbonate minerals. This report describes the results from four independent research investigations on carbonate mineralization: 1) Colloidal calcite particles forming in Maramec Spring, Missouri, provide a natural analog to evaluate reactions that may occur in a leaking GCS site. The calcite crystals form as a result of physiochemical changes that occur as the spring water rises from a depth of more than 190'?. The resultant pressure decrease induces a loss of CO{sub 2} from the water, rise in pH, lowering of the solubility of Ca{sup 2+} and CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}, and calcite precipitation. Equilibrium modelling of the spring water resulted in a calculated undersaturated state with respect to calcite. The discontinuity between the observed occurrence of calcite and the model result predicting undersaturated conditions can be explained if bicarbonate ions (HCO{sub 3}{sup -}) are directly involved in precipitation process rather than just carbonate ions (CO{sub 3}{sup 2-}). 2) Sedimentary rocks in the Oronto Group of the Midcontinent Rift (MCR) system contain an abundance of labile Ca-, Mg-, and Fe-silicate minerals that will neutralize carbonic acid and provide alkaline earth ions for carbonate mineralization. One of the challenges in using MCR rocks for GCS results from their low porosity and permeability. Oronto Group samples were reacted with both CO{sub 2}-saturated deionized water at 90°C, and a mildly acidic leachant solution in flow-through core-flooding reactor vessels at room temperature. Resulting leachate solutions often exceeded the saturation limit for calcite. Carbonate crystals were also detected in as little as six days of reaction with Oronto Group rocks at 90oC, as well as experiments with forsterite-olivine and augite, both being common minerals this sequence. The Oronto Group samples have poor reservoir rock characteristics, none ever exceeded a permeability value of 2.0 mD even after extensive dissolution of calcite cement during the experiments. The overlying Bayfield Group – Jacobsville Formation sandstones averaged 13.4 ± 4.3% porosity and a single sample tested by core-flooding revealed a permeability of ~340 mD. The high porosity-permeability characteristics of these sandstones will allow them to be used for GCS as a continuous aquifer unit with the overlying Mt. Simon Formation. 3) Anaerobic sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) can enhance the conversion rate of CO{sub 2} into solid minerals and thereby improve long-term storage. SRB accelerated carbonate mineralization reactions between pCO{sub 2} values of 0.0059 and 14.7 psi. Hydrogen, lactate and formate served as suitable electron donors for SRB metabolism. The use of a {sup 13}CO{sub 2} spiked gas source also produced carbonate minerals with ~53% of the carbon being derived from the gas phase. The sulfate reducing activity of the microbial community was limited, however, at 20 psi pCO{sub 2} and carbonate mineralization did not occur. Inhibition of bacterial metabolism may have resulted from the acidic conditions or CO{sub 2} toxicity. 4) Microbialite communities forming in the high turbidity and hypersaline water of Storrs’ Lake, San Salvador Island, The Bahamas, were investigated for their distribution, mineralogy and microbial diversity. Molecular analysis of the organic mats on the microbialites indicate only a trace amount of cyanobacteria, while anaerobic and photosynthetic non-sulfur bacteria of the phyla Chloroflexi and purple sulfur bacteria of class Gammaproteobacteria were abundant.

Wronkiewicz, David; Paul, Varum; Abousif, Alsedik; Ryback, Kyle

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

Comparison of methods for geologic storage of carbon dioxide in saline formations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Preliminary estimates of CO{sub 2} storage potential in geologic formations provide critical information related to Carbon Capture, Utilization, and Storage (CCUS) technologies to mitigate CO{sub 2} emissions. Currently multiple methods to estimate CO{sub 2} storage and multiple storage estimates for saline formations have been published, leading to potential uncertainty when comparing estimates from different studies. In this work, carbon dioxide storage estimates are compared by applying several commonly used methods to general saline formation data sets to assess the impact that the choice of method has on the results. Specifically, six CO{sub 2} storage methods were applied to thirteen saline formation data sets which were based on formations across the United States with adaptations to provide the geologic inputs required by each method. Methods applied include those by (1) international efforts – the Carbon Sequestration Leadership Forum (Bachu et al., 2007); (2) United States government agencies – U.S. Department of Energy – National Energy Technology Laboratory (US-DOE-NETL, 2012) and United States Geological Survey (Brennan et al., 2010); and (3) the peer-reviewed scientific community – Szulczewski et al. (2012) and Zhou et al. (2008). A statistical analysis of the estimates generated by multiple methods revealed that assessments of CO{sub 2} storage potential made at the prospective level were often statistically indistinguishable from each other, implying that the differences in methodologies are small with respect to the uncertainties in the geologic properties of storage rock in the absence of detailed site-specific characterization.

Goodman, Angela L. [U.S. DOE; Bromhal, Grant S. [U.S. DOE; Strazisar, Brian [U.S. DOE; Rodosta, Traci D. [U.S. DOE; Guthrie, William J. [U.S. DOE; Allen, Douglas E. [ORISE; Guthrie, George D. [U.S. DOE

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestration and Land Use Emissions Using Detailed Model Results and Observations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report outlines the progress on the development and application of Integrated Assessment Modeling of Carbon Sequestrations and Land Use Emissions supported by the DOE Office of Biological and Environmental Research (OBER), U.S. Department of Energy, Grant No. DOE-DE-FG02-01ER63069. The overall objective of this collaborative project between the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was to unite the latest advances in carbon cycle research with scientifically based models and policy-related integrated assessment tools that incorporate computationally efficient representations of the latest knowledge concerning science and emission trajectories, and their policy implications. As part of this research we accomplished the following tasks that we originally proposed: (1) In coordination with LLNL and ORNL, we enhanced the Integrated Science Assessment Model's (ISAM) parametric representation of the ocean and terrestrial carbon cycles that better represent spatial and seasonal variations, which are important to study the mechanisms that influence carbon sequestration in the ocean and terrestrial ecosystems; (2) Using the MiniCAM modeling capability, we revised the SRES (IPCC Special Report on Emission Scenarios; IPCC, 2000) land use emission scenarios; and (3) On the application front, the enhanced version of ISAM modeling capability is applied to understand how short- and long-term natural carbon fluxes, carbon sequestration, and human emissions contribute to the net global emissions (concentrations) trajectories required to reach various concentration (emission) targets. Under this grant, 21 research publications were produced. In addition, this grant supported a number of graduate and undergraduate students whose fundamental research was to learn a disciplinary field in climate change (e.g., ecological dynamics and ocean circulations) and then complete research on how this field could be linked to the other factors we need to consider in its dynamics (e.g., land use, ocean and terrestrial carbon sequestration and climate change).

Dr. Atul Jain

2005-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

458

Enhancing Carbon Sequestration and Reclamation of Degraded Lands with Coal-Combustion and Biomass-Pyrolysis Products  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

contacts contacts Sean Plasynski Sequestration Technology Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-4867 sean.plasynski@netl.doe.gov Heino Beckert Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 3610 Collins Ferry Road P.O. Box 880 MS C04 Morgantown, WV 26507 304-285-4132 heino.beckert@netl.doe.gov 04/2008 Carbon Sequestration Enhancing carbon SEquEStration and rEclamation of dEgradEd landS with coal-combuStion and biomaSS-PyrolySiS ProductS Background Terrestrial sequestration of carbon can occur by three mechanisms, all of which first require "capture" or fixation of atmospheric carbon by photosynthesis into plant tissues. If captured by herbaceous plants, much of the carbon is quickly

459

Comprehensive, Quantitative Risk Assessment of CO{sub 2} Geologic Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Quantitative Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (QFMEA) was developed to conduct comprehensive, quantitative risk assessments on CO{sub 2} capture, transportation, and sequestration or use in deep saline aquifers, enhanced oil recovery operations, or enhanced coal bed methane operations. The model identifies and characterizes potential risks; identifies the likely failure modes, causes, effects and methods of detection; lists possible risk prevention and risk mitigation steps; estimates potential damage recovery costs, mitigation costs and costs savings resulting from mitigation; and ranks (prioritizes) risks according to the probability of failure, the severity of failure, the difficulty of early failure detection and the potential for fatalities. The QFMEA model generates the necessary information needed for effective project risk management. Diverse project information can be integrated into a concise, common format that allows comprehensive, quantitative analysis, by a cross-functional team of experts, to determine: What can possibly go wrong? How much will damage recovery cost? How can it be prevented or mitigated? What is the cost savings or benefit of prevention or mitigation? Which risks should be given highest priority for resolution? The QFMEA model can be tailored to specific projects and is applicable to new projects as well as mature projects. The model can be revised and updated as new information comes available. It accepts input from multiple sources, such as literature searches, site characterization, field data, computer simulations, analogues, process influence diagrams, probability density functions, financial analysis models, cost factors, and heuristic best practices manuals, and converts the information into a standardized format in an Excel spreadsheet. Process influence diagrams, geologic models, financial models, cost factors and an insurance schedule were developed to support the QFMEA model. Comprehensive, quantitative risk assessments were conducted on three (3) sites using the QFMEA model: (1) SACROC Northern Platform CO{sub 2}-EOR Site in the Permian Basin, Scurry County, TX, (2) Pump Canyon CO{sub 2}-ECBM Site in the San Juan Basin, San Juan County, NM, and (3) Farnsworth Unit CO{sub 2}-EOR Site in the Anadarko Basin, Ochiltree County, TX. The sites were sufficiently different from each other to test the robustness of the QFMEA model.

Lepinski, James

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

460

Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Tillage and Crop Rotation Tillage and Crop Rotation Soil Organic Carbon Sequestration by Tillage and Crop Rotation: A Global Data Analysis DOI: 10.3334/CDIAC/tcm.002 PDF file Full text Soil Science Society of America Journal 66:1930-1946 (2002) CSITE image Tristram O. West and Wilfred M. Post DOE Center for Carbon Sequestration in Terrestrial Ecosystems (CSiTE) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6290 U.S.A. Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Program Abstract Global map Changes in agricultural management can potentially increase the accumulation rate of soil organic carbon (SOC), thereby sequestering CO2 from the atmosphere. This study was conducted to quantify potential soil

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461

Role of Enhanced Oil Recovery in Carbon Sequestration, The Weyburn Monitoring Project, a case study  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Enhanced Oil Recovery in Carbon Sequestration Enhanced Oil Recovery in Carbon Sequestration The Weyburn Monitoring Project, a case study K. Brown (ken_brown@pcp.ca), PanCanadian Petroleum Limited) 150 - 9 th Avenue S.W., P.O. Box 2850, Calgary, Alberta T2P 2S5 W. Jazrawi (Waleed_Jazrawi@pancanadian.ca) Petroleum Technology Research Centre 6 Research Drive, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 7J7 R. Moberg (Moberg@src.sk.ca) Petroleum Technology Research Centre 6 Research Drive, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 7J7 M. Wilson (Mwilson@sem.gov.sk.ca) Petroleum Technology Research Centre 6 Research Drive, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 7J7 Abstract: Injection of CO 2 into a carbonate oil reservoir in southeastern Saskatchewan, Canada, began on September 22, 2000. Prior to the start of injection, substantial baseline data were obtained from the field. This baseline data include extensive seismic work

462

Carbon Sequestration and Turnover in Semiarid Savannas and Dry Forest  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Data on carbon and biomass budgets under different land use in tropical savannas and some dry forests are reviewed. Global data show wide ranges of biomass carbon stocks (20-150 Mg C ha-1), net primary product...

H. Tiessen; C. Feller; E.V.S.B. Sampaio; P. Garin

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Ecological Carbon Sequestration in the Oceans and Climate Change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The biological carbon pump helps regulate the partitioning of carbon dioxide between the atmosphere and the ocean and is expected to play a fundamental role in future climate change.

Richard Sanders; Stephanie Henson

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Carbon sequestration in reclaimed manganese mine land at Gumgaon, India  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Carbon emission is supposed to be the strongest factor for global warming. Removing atmospheric carbon and storing it in the terrestrial biosphere is one of the cost-effective options, to compensate greenhouse...

Asha A. Juwarkar; K. L. Mehrotraa; Rajani Nair…

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Carbon Sequestration Rates in Organic Layers of Soils Under the Grey Poplar (Populus x canescens) Stands Impacted by Heavy Metal Pollution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

To describe carbon sequestration processes in organic layers of forest soils ... limit-value method was used to estimate C sequestration rate in poplar litters. A two-year ... using the ignition method. Input of ...

Agnieszka Medy?ska-Juraszek; Leszek Kuchar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation for Geologic Sequestration of CO2  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Capacity Investigation of Brine-Bearing Sands of the Frio Formation for Geologic Sequestration of CO 2 Christine Doughty (cadoughty@lbl.gov; 510-486-6453) Karsten Pruess (k_pruess@lbl.gov; 510-486-6732) Sally M. Benson (smbenson@lbl.gov; 510-486-5875) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1 Cyclotron Rd, MS 90-1116 Berkeley, CA 94720 Susan D. Hovorka (susan.hovorka@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-4863) Paul R. Knox (paul.knox@beg.utexas.edu; 512-471-7313) Bureau of Economic Geology P.O. Box X, The University of Texas Austin, TX 78713 Christopher T. Green (ctgreen@ucdavis.edu; 530-752-1372) University of California, Hydrologic Sciences 1 Shields Ave. Davis, CA 95616 Abstract The capacity of fluvial brine-bearing formations to sequester CO 2 is investigated using numerical simulations of CO

467

Industrial CO2 Removal: CO2 Capture from Ambient Air and Geological Sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This abstract and its accompanying presentation will provide an overview of two distinct industrial processes for removing carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere as a means of addressing anthropogenic climate change. The first of these is carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) coupled with large scale biomass production (hereafter referred to as bioCCS). The second is CO2 capture from ambient air via industrial systems (hereafter referred to as direct air capture (DAC)). In both systems, the captured CO2 would be injected into deep geologic formations so as to isolate it from the atmosphere. The technical literature is clear that both of these technologies are technically feasible as of today (IPCC, 2005; Keith, 2009; Lackner, 2009; Luckow et al., 2010; Ranjan and Herzog, 2011). What is uncertain is the relative cost of these industrial ambient-air CO2 removal systems when compared to other emissions mitigation measures, the ultimate timing and scale of their deployment, and the resolution of potential site specific constraints that would impact their ultimate commercial deployment.

Dooley, James J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

468

The Carbon Sequestration in Moso Bamboo Plantation and Its Spatial Variation in Anji County of Southeastern China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Forest ecosystems play an important role in sequestering carbon in their biomass and soils. In order to estimate the C sequestration in moso bamboo plantations which is a ... China, this study investigated the ab...

Keli L. Zhao; Weijun J. Fu; Peikun K. Jiang…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Assessment of carbon sequestration and timber production of Scots pine across Scotland using the process-based model 3-PGN   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

detailed eco-physiological interpretation of the environmental factors affecting Scots pine growth and it provided an assessment of carbon sequestration under the scenario of sustainable, normal production and its effects from the environment. Finally...

Xenakis, Georgios

2007-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

470

Carbon sequestration and riparian zones: Assessing the impacts of changing regulatory practices in Southern Brazil  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Despite the consensus that riparian zones are important for the conservation of biological diversity and many other ecosystem services, there are no consistent regulations for how, or if, riparian areas should be used and the size of buffer zones required. Recently, controversial revisions to the Forest Code in Brazil have been implemented which include a reduction in the width of protected riparian buffer zones required along rivers. In order to model the impact of legislative changes on ecosystem services, we used the integrated valuation of environmental services and tradeoffs (InVEST) tool to assess a 30,000 ha watershed in southern Brazil and carbon sequestration as an indicator for ecosystem services. The results demonstrate that the adoption of improved agriculture practices, development of secondary forests and especially the conversion of land into more restrictive types of land-use has a significant and positive impact on the levels of carbon sequestered. On the other hand, the easing of riparian zone requirements shows an important potential loss in carbon sequestration. More importantly, reducing the size of the buffer zone might result in land-conversion into agriculture or pasture, impacting both carbon sequestration and other ecosystem services. However, the easing of restrictions on riparian areas under the revised Forest Code might be overshadowed by changes to Legal Forest Reserve provisions which could have a much greater impact on carbon sequestration. Despite the restrictions imposed by various pieces of legislation, the loss of ecosystem services due to a reduction in the protected riparian area, as well as possible land conversion due to changes in Legal Forest Reserves, are possible unless efforts involving narrowing the gap between research and policy, effective law enforcement, and implementing attractive payment for ecosystem services programs, are put in place. We believe that introducing incentives to farmers to maintain the protection of riparian areas by implementing agroforestry systems, such as erva-mate (Ilex paraguariensis), would be beneficial socioeconomically and ecologically and should be integrated into the Forest Code.

Marilice C. Garrastazú; Sabina D. Mendonça; Teçá T. Horokoski; Denise J. Cardoso; Maria A.D. Rosot; Evelyn R. Nimmo; André E.B. Lacerda

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

The economics of carbon sequestration in western Oregon forests.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study considered regional forest policies for sequestering carbon in existing forests in western Oregon. A model of log markets in western Oregon was employed… (more)

Im, Eun Ho

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Portfolio analysis of carbon sequestration technologies and barriers to adoption.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The effective targeting of investment funds and research efforts to reduce industrial carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions, while preserving access to fossil fuel energy resources, requires… (more)

Young-Lorenz, Jillian D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Carbon Sequestration on Utah Rangelands: A Landowner Perspective.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Rangelands have significant potential to sequester carbon and contribute to the mitigation of climate change. This research aimed at better understanding the beliefs, attitudes,… (more)

Cook, Seth

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Carbon dioxide sequestration underground laser based detection system.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Carbon dioxide (CO 2) is a known greenhouse gas. Due to the burning of fossil fuels by industrial and power plants the atmospheric concentration of… (more)

Barr, Jamie Lynn.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

numerical methodology to model and monitor co2 sequestration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CO2 sequestration is a means of mitigating the greenhouse effect [1]. Geologic sequestration involves injecting CO2 into a target geologic formation at depths ...

santos,,,

476

Low Cost Open-Path Instrument for Monitoring Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide at Sequestration Sites  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Low Cost open-path Instrument for Low Cost open-path Instrument for monItorIng atmospherIC Carbon DIoxIDe at sequestratIon sItes Background Growing concern over the effect on global climate of the buildup of greenhouse gases (GHG), particularly carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), in the atmosphere may lead to the curtailment of CO 2 emissions. One potential course of action by industry to reduce GHG emissions is the subsurface disposal of CO 2 . An important requirement of such disposal is verification that the injected gases remain in place and do not leak to the surface. Perhaps the most direct evidence of a successful sequestration project is the lack of a detectable CO 2 concentration above the background level in the air near the ground. Although measurement of CO 2 concentration can be performed, it is

477

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields Pore-Level Modeling of Carbon Dioxide Sequestration in Brine Fields M. Ferer, (mferer@wvu.edu) Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506-6315, Grant S. Bromhal, (bromhal@netl.doe.gov) US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880; and Duane H. Smith, (dsmith@netl.doe.gov) US DOE, National Energy Technology Laboratory, Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 & Department of Physics, West Virginia University. Underground