Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters Abstract The alkali carbonates, Na, K, and Li, are relatively soluble at all temperatures and generally precipitate only where there is extreme evapora- tion. In contrast, the alkaline earth carbonates. Ca. Ht, Sr, and Ba, are moderately to sparingly soluble and commonly precipitate in bydrothecmal systems. Calcite is by far the most abundant and important carbonate found

2

Geochemical interpretation of Kings Mountain, North Carolina, orientation area  

SciTech Connect

An orientation study has been made of uranium occurrences in the area of Kings Mountain, North Carolina. This is one of the orientation studies of known uranium occurrences that are being conducted in several geologic provinces and under various climatic (weathering) conditions to provide the technical basis for design and interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance programs. The Kings Mountain area was chosen for study primarily because of the reported presence of high-uranium monazite. This 750-mi/sup 2/ area is in the deeply weathered southern Appalachian Piedmont and spans portions of the Inner Piedmont, Kings Mountain, and Charlotte geologic belts. Uranium concentration maps for ground and surface water samples clearly outline the outcrop area of the Cherryville Quartz Monzonite with highs up to 10 ppb uranium near the reported uraninite. Several surface water samples appear to be anomalous because of trace industrial contamination. Uranium concentration maps for -100 to +200 mesh stream sediments indicate the area of monazite abundance. Several samples with >100 ppM uranium content appear to be high in uranium-rich resistate minerals. When the uranium content of sediment samples is ratioed to the sum of Hf, Dy, and Th, the anomaly pattern shifts to coincide with uranium highs in ground and surface water samples. False anomalies from concentrations of monazite (Ce,ThPO/sub 4/), xenotime (Y,DyPO/sub 4/), and zircon (Zr,HfSiO/sub 4/) in stream sediment samples can thus be eliminated. Residual anomalies should be related to unusual uranium enrichment of these common minerals or to the presence of an uncommon uranium-rich mineral. Tantalum, beryllium, and tin in stream sediments correspond to high concentrations of uranium in stream and ground water but not to uranium in sediments. In an initial reconnaissance, several media should be sampled, and it is essential to correct uranium in sediments for the sample mineralogy.

Price, V.; Ferguson, R.B.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Geochemical and Isotopic Interpretations of Groundwater Flow in the Oasis Valley Flow System, Southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the findings of a geochemical investigation of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley groundwater flow system in southwestern Nevada. It is intended to provide geochemical data and interpretations in support of flow and contaminant transport modeling for the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units.

J.M. Thomas; F.C. Benedict, Jr.; T.P. Rose; R.L. Hershey; J.B. Paces; Z.E. Peterman; I.M. Farnham; K.H. Johannesson; A.K. Singh; K.J. Stetzenbach; G.B. Hudson; J.M. Kenneally; G.F. Eaton; D.K. Smith

2003-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

4

Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Details Activities (14) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Ground water sampling, desorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and a radiometric geophysical survey was conducted in conjunction with geological mapping at three geothermal prospects in northern Nevada. Orientation sample lines from 610 m (2000 ft.) to 4575 m (15,000 ft.) in length were surveyed at right angles to known and suspected faults. Scintillometer readings (gamma radiation - total counts / second) were also

5

History of Geochemical Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Sources of geochemical modeling software...www.telusplanet.net/public/geogams/index SOLVEQ/CHILLER Mark H. Reed Department of Geological

6

Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Related Techniques Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Data Analysis Geothermometry Gas Geothermometry Isotope Geothermometry Liquid Geothermometry Cation Geothermometers Multicomponent Geothermometers Silica Geothermometers Thermal Ion Dispersion

7

Geochemical Data Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Data Analysis Geochemical Data Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Data Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Data Analysis: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geochemical_Data_Analysis&oldid=594157" Categories: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Techniques

8

Category:Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geochemical Techniques page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geochemical Techniques Add.png Add a new Geochemical Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. G [×] Geochemical Data Analysis‎ 3 pages Pages in category "Geochemical Techniques" This category contains only the following page. G Geochemical Data Analysis Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Geochemical_Techniques&oldid=689823"

9

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: Nevada | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Geochemical Interpretation CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 04272010 Location(s): Dixie Valley, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field...

10

Proceedings of the workshop on geochemical modeling  

SciTech Connect

The following collection of papers was presented at a workshop on geochemical modeling that was sponsored by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The LLNL Waste Management Program sponsored this conference based on their belief that geochemical modeling is particularly important to the radioactive waste disposal project because of the need to predict the consequences of long-term water-rock interactions at the proposed repository site. The papers included in this volume represent a subset of the papers presented at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference and cover a broad spectrum of detail and breadth in a subject that reflects the diverse research interests of the conference participants. These papers provide an insightful look into the current status of geochemical modeling and illustrate how various geochemical modeling codes have been applied to problems of geochemical interest. The emphasis of these papers includes traditional geochemical modeling studies of individual geochemical systems, the mathematical and theoretical development and refinement of new modeling capabilities, and enhancements of data bases on which the computations are based. The papers in this proceedings volume have been organized into the following four areas: Geochemical Model Development, Hydrothermal and Geothermal Systems, Sedimentary and Low Temperature Environments, and Data Base Development. The participants of this symposium and a complete list of the talks presented are listed in the appendices.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

A geochemical expert system prototype using object-oriented knowledge representation and a production rule system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: MINEQL, artificial intelligence, expert systems, geochemical expert system, geochemical modeling, geochemistry

Forrest M. Hoffman; Vijay S. Tripathi

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto revisited  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the exploitation of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field continues, there is increasing evidence that the hydrogeologic model developed by Halfman et al. (1984, 1986) presents the basic features controlling the movement of geothermal fluids in the system. At the present time the total installed capacity at Cerro Prieto is 620 MWe requiring the production of more than 10,500 tonnes/hr of a brine-steam mixture. This significant rate of fluid production has resulted in changes in reservoir thermodynamic conditions and in the chemistry of the produced fluids. After reviewing the hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto, some of the changes observed in the field due to its exploitation are discussed and interpreted on the basis of the model. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Lippmann, M.J.; Halfman, S.E.; Truesdell, A.H.; Manon M., A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Geochemical Enhancement Of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoirs: An Integrated Field And Geochemical Approach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geochemical effects of injecting fluids into geothermal reservoirs are poorly understood and may be significantly underestimated. Decreased performance of injection wells has been observed in several geothermal fields after only a few years of service, but the reasons for these declines has not been established. This study had three primary objectives: 1) determine the cause(s) of the loss of injectivity; 2) utilize these observations to constrain numerical models of water-rock interactions; and 3) develop injection strategies for mitigating and reversing the potential effects of these interactions. In this study rock samples from original and redrilled injection wells at Coso and the Salton Sea geothermal fields, CA, were used to characterize the mineral and geochemical changes that occurred as a result of injection. The study documented the presence of mineral scales and at both fields in the reservoir rocks adjacent to the injection wells. At the Salton Sea, the scales consist of alternating layers of fluorite and barite, accompanied by minor anhydrite, amorphous silica and copper arsenic sulfides. Amorphous silica and traces of calcite were deposited at Coso. The formation of silica scale at Coso provides an example of the effects of untreated (unacidified) injectate on the reservoir rocks. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry were used to characterize the scale deposits. The silica scale in the reservoir rocks at Coso was initially deposited as spheres of opal-A 1-2 micrometers in diameter. As the deposits matured, the spheres coalesced to form larger spheres up to 10 micrometer in diameter. Further maturation and infilling of the spaces between spheres resulted in the formation of plates and sheets that substantially reduce the original porosity and permeability of the fractures. Peripheral to the silica deposits, fluid inclusions with high water/gas ratios provide a subtle record of interactions between the injectate and reservoir rocks. In contrast, fluid inclusions trapped prior to injection are relatively gas rich. These results suggest that the rocks undergo extensive microfracturing during injection and that the composition of the fluid inclusions will be biased toward the youngest event. Interactions between the reservoir rocks and injectate were modeled using the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT. Changes in fluid pH, fracture porosity, fracture permeability, fluid temperature, and mineral abundances were monitored. The simulations predict that amorphous silica will precipitate primarily within a few meters of the injection well and that mineral deposition will lead to rapid declines in fracture porosity and permeability, consistent with field observations. In support of Enhanced Geothermal System development, petrologic studies of Coso well 46A-19RD were conducted to determine the regions that are most likely to fail when stimulated. These studies indicate that the most intensely brecciated and altered rocks in the zone targeted for stimulation (below 10,000 ft (3048 m)) occur between 11,200 and 11,350 ft (3414 and 3459 m). This zone is interpreted as a shear zone that initially juxtaposed quartz diorite against granodiorite. Strong pervasive alteration and veining within the brecciated quartz diorite and granodiorite suggest this shear zone was permeable in the past. This zone of weakness was subsequently exploited by a granophyre dike whose top occurs at 11,350 ft (3459 m). The dike is unaltered. We anticipate, based on analysis of the well samples that failure during stimulation will most likely occur on this shear zone.

Joseph N. Moore

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

14

Geochemical exploration for uranium in the Red Desert, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Geochemical exploration techniques for uranium were performed at a known deposit, the ENQ uranium deposit, which is in arkosic sandstones of the Battle Spring Formation in the Red Desert of Wyoming. Regional gross-gamma aerial data did not indicate the most favorable terrain for follow-up surveys, but instead the radionuclide distribution mapped radioactive mudstones. The /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratio and total uranium concentration in ground water were successful downflow indicators of the ENQ deposit. Helium concentration increased downflow in the ground water flowing from the deposit, while Cu, Pb, and Ba decreased. Radon emanometric techniques generally produced data that coincided with the equivalent uranium concentrations at shallow depth. Helium content in soil was interpreted to reflect local lithology and gaseous migration. Multielement geochemical analyses on soils were effective in delineating the general vicinity of the orebody. Factor analysis was used to recognize three lithologic subgroups. Leachable uranium in soils was the best indicator of subsurface mineralization for the entire subregional area. Equivalent uranium, as determined from the gamma-spectral borehole logs, revealed a consistent dispersion pattern within the host sand of the Battle Spring Formation, whereas gross gamma logs could not detect the subtle gradients in radioelement content. Halo models developed to explain the distribution of helium, radon, radioelements, and trace elements demonstrate uranium itself as the most mobile indicator. Radon and helium appear to reflect local generation from radium accumulations. Vertical leakage due to hydraulic flow against an impermeable barrier is interpreted to be the major secondary redistribution process responsible for the measureable surface signals.

Pacer, J.C.; Bramlett, L.; Moll, S.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Modeling teleological interpretation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper presents a model of teleological interpretation of statutory legal rules as well as an example of the genuine law case, which has been modeled with use of established methodology. Keywords: argumentation, reasoning, teleological interpretation

Tomasz Zurek, Micha? Araszkiewicz

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Data Acquisition Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Acquisition Inversion Interpretation Discussion Virgin River DCIP Report Justin Granek1 1 Report #12;Data Acquisition Inversion Interpretation Discussion Outline 1 Data Acquisition Location Survey Specications 2 Inversion Data Errors DCIP2D DCIP3D 3 Interpretation Correlations Snowbird Tectonic

Oldenburg, Douglas W.

17

Complementation in abstract interpretation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reduced product of abstract domains is a rather well-known operation for domain composition in abstract interpretation. In this article, we study its inverse operation, introducing a notion of domain complementation in abstract interpretation. Complementation ... Keywords: abstract domain, abstract interpretation, closure operator, complementation, functional and logic programming, program analysis

Agostino Cortesi; Gilberto Fil; Francesco Ranzato; Roberto Giacobazzi; Catuscia Palamidessi

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

NUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mining and milling of uranium ore. Nonetheless, the use of leaching fluids to mine uranium contaminatesNUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical Issues in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In-Situ Leach Mining Facilities Manuscript Completed: December 2006 Date

19

Geochemical engineering problem identification and program description. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Geochemical Engineering Program has as its goal the improvement of geochemical fluid management techniques. This document presents the strategy and status of the Geochemical Engineering Program. The magnitude and scope of geochemical-related problems constraining geothermal industry productivity are described. The goals and objectives of the DGE Geochemical Engineering Program are defined. The rationale and strategy of the program are described. The structure, priorities, funding, and management of specific elements within the program are delineated, and the status of the overall program is presented.

Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Data Interpretation Fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Unable to make Q ? K comparison Page 7. JM Butler Data Interpretation Fundamentals ... Doctrine or Dogma (why?) A fundamental law of ...

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Experimental Geochemical Studies Relevant to Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geochemical Studies Relevant to Geochemical Studies Relevant to Carbon Sequestration James G. Blencoe (blencoejg@ornl.gov; 865-574-7041) David R. Cole (coledr@ornl.gov; 865-574-5473) Juske Horita (horitaj@ornl.gov; 865-576-2750) Geochemistry Group Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Building 4500-S Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6110 Gerilynn R. Moline (molinegr@ornl.gov; 865-576-5134) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Building 1505 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6038 Introduction Evidence is mounting that rising levels of atmospheric CO 2 will have profound effects on future global climates (1-2) . Consequently, many experts agree that technologies are needed to slow, and ultimately stop, further buildup (3-5) . One of the strategies proposed to achieve this aim

22

Category:Geochemical Data Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Geochemical Data Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geochemical Data Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geochemical Data Analysis Add.png Add a new Geochemical Data Analysis Technique Pages in category "Geochemical Data Analysis" The following 3 pages are in this category, out of 3 total. G Geothermometry T Thermal Ion Dispersion Thermochronometry Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Geochemical_Data_Analysis&oldid=689825"

23

Fermilab - Prairie Interpretive Trail  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prairie Interpretive Trail In some areas of the Midwest, among them Fermilab, efforts have begun to retrieve some of the awesome beauty of the native tallgrass prairies, as well as...

24

Making abstract interpretations complete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Completeness is an ideal, although uncommon, feature of abstract interpretations, formalizing the intuition that, relatively to the properties encoded by the underlying abstract domains, there is no loss of information accumulated in abstract computations. ...

Roberto Giacobazzi; Francesco Ranzato; Francesca Scozzari

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Abstract Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs...

26

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Temporal...

27

DNA-based methods of geochemical prospecting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention relates to methods for performing surveys of the genetic diversity of a population. The invention also relates to methods for performing genetic analyses of a population. The invention further relates to methods for the creation of databases comprising the survey information and the databases created by these methods. The invention also relates to methods for analyzing the information to correlate the presence of nucleic acid markers with desired parameters in a sample. These methods have application in the fields of geochemical exploration, agriculture, bioremediation, environmental analysis, clinical microbiology, forensic science and medicine.

Ashby, Matthew (Mill Valley, CA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

28

GEOCHEMICAL CONTROLS ON NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used in the Earth Sciences as a means of obtaining information about the molecular-scale environment of fluids in porous geological materials. Laboratory experiments were conducted to advance our fundamental understanding of the link between the NMR response and the geochemical properties of geological materials. In the first part of this research project, we studied the impact of both the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of the pore space and the surface relaxivity on the NMR response of fluids in sand-clay mixtures. This study highlighted the way in which these two parameters control our ability to use NMR measurements to detect and quantify fluid saturation in multiphase saturated systems. The second part of the project was designed to explore the way in which the mineralogic form of iron, as opposed to simply the concentration of iron, affects the surface relaxation rate and, more generally, the NMR response of porous materials. We found that the magnitude of the surface relaxation rate was different for the various iron-oxide minerals because of changes in both the surface-area-to-volume ratio of the pore space, and the surface relaxivity. Of particular significance from this study was the finding of an anomalously large surface relaxivity of magnetite compared to that of the other iron minerals. Differences in the NMR response of iron minerals were seen in column experiments during the reaction of ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand with aqueous Fe(II) solutions to form goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite; indicating the potential use of NMR as a means of monitoring geochemical reactions. The final part of the research project investigated the impact of heterogeneity, at the pore-scale, on the NMR response. This work highlighted the way in which the geochemistry, by controlling the surface relaxivity, has a significant impact on the link between NMR data and the microgeometry of the pore space.

Rosemary Knight

2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

29

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado

30

Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Abstract There are 1000 thermal springs in Nevada for which a location is known, but for which there are no available temperature (or chemical) measurements. Although many of these sites are within known geothermal areas and are located near springs for which temperature and/or geochemical data are available for one of the springs, many of these sites are not so located and require evaluation before the geothermal potential of the area can be assessed. In order to begin filling in data gaps, water sampling commenced in 2002 when over 70 analyses were obtained from springs with previously

31

A Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal System, Danakil Depression, Eritrea Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal System, Danakil Depression, Eritrea Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermalsystem underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea Alid is avery late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widelyover an area of ~10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an activehydrothermal system underlies much of that part of

32

Molecular geomicrobiology: genes and geochemical cycling Jennifer Macalady 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frontiers Molecular geomicrobiology: genes and geochemical cycling Jennifer Macalady 1 , Jillian F occurs. Yet, the field of molecular geomicrobiology remains in its infancy. In the foreseeable future, merging of modern biogeochemistry with molecularly resolved ecological studies will inspire

Macalady, Jenn

33

Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Factor and canonical correlation analysis of geochemical data from eight fossil fumaroles suggest that six major factors controlled the formation and evolution of fumarolic encrustations on the 1912 ash-flow sheet in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS). The six-factor solution model explains a large proportion (low of 74% for Ni to high of 99% for Si) of the individual element data variance. Although the primary fumarolic

34

Trace metal speciation in saline waters affected by geothermal brines. Final technical report. [GEOCHEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The computer program GEOCHEM was developed and applied to calculate the speciation of trace elements, such as Li, B, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, and As, in mixtures of geothermal brines with soil waters. A typical speciation calculation involved the simultaneous consideration of about 350 inorganic and organic complexes and about 80 possible solid phases that could form among the macro- and microconstituents in the mixtures. The four geothermal brines chosen for study were from the East Mesa, Heber, and Salton Sea KGRA's. Two examples of East Mesa brine were employed in order to illustrate the effect of brine variability within a given KGRA. The soil waters chosen for study were the Holtville, Rosita, and Vint soil solutions and the Vail 4 drain water. These waters were mixed with the four brines to produce 1%, 5%, and 10% brine combinations. The combinations then were analyzed with the help of GEOCHEM and were interpreted in the context of two proposed general contamination scenarios. The results of the speciation calculations pointed to the great importance, in brine, of sulfide as a precipitating agent for trace metals and of borate as a trace metal-complexing ligand. In general, precipitation and/or exchange adsorption in soil were found to reduce the levels of trace metals well below harmful concentrations. The principal exceptions were Li and B, which did not precipitate and which were at or very hear harmful levels in the soil water-brine mixtures.

Sposito, G.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Improve MWD data interpretation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports that measurement-while-drilling (MWD) technology is being used today in a broad range of real-time drilling applications. In its infancy, MWD was limited to providing directional survey and steering information. Today, the addition of formation sensors (resistivity, gamma) and drilling efficiency sensors (WOB, torque) has made MWD a much more useful drilling decision tool. In the process, the desirability of combining downhole MWD data with powerful analytical software and interpretive techniques has been recognized by both operators and service companies. However, the usual form in which MWD and wellsite analytical capabilities are combined leaves much to be desired. The most common approach is to incorporate MWD with large-scale computerized mud logging (CML) systems. Essentially, MWD decoding and display equipment is added to existing full-blown CML surface units.

Santley, D.J.; Ardrey, W.E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

spanish/english interpretation (SEI)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the courts, in state agencies, and in the medical evaluation system of workers compensation. 2011/2012 SF as a Spanish/English interpreter in the courts, in state agencies, and in the medical evaluation system Interpreter examinations are mandated for employment in courts and state agencies. Once an interpreter passes

37

Geological, geochemical, and operational summary, aurora well, OCS Y-0943-1, Beaufort Sea, Alaska. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Aurora well is located just off the coast of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The well was spudded November 2, 1987, in 68 ft of water and plugged and abandoned 286 days later on August 30, 1988, after drilling to a total depth (TD) of 18,325 ft below the Kelly Bushing (RKB). The report presents our interpretations of the geologic and geochemical information collected from the Aurora well. Additionally, a significant section of the report is devoted to the operational aspects of drilling the Aurora well.

Paul, L.E.; Choromanski, D.R.; Turner, R.F.; Flett, T.O.; Paul, L.E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Hg contents of soils in geothermal areas in the western U.S. were measured and a three-fold distribution was observed: peak, aureole and background. Peak values (up to several 100 ppm Hg) occur in fumaroles of vapour-dominated systems, around hot springs, and in zones overlying steeply dipping, hot-water aquifers. Aureoic values (up to several 100 ppb Hg) are found in zones surrounding the peak areas and delineate areas with shallow geothermal convection. Background values vary between 7 and 40 ppb

39

A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Results of exploration drilling combined with results of geologic, geophysical, and hydrogeochemical investigations have been used to construct a geochemical model of the Platanares geothermal system, Honduras. Three coreholes were drilled, two of which produced fluids from fractured Miocene andesite and altered Cretaceous to Eocene conglomerate at

40

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fumarole discharges (95-560°C) collected from the dacite dome inside Mount St. Helens crater show temporal changes in their isotopic and chemical compositions. A ΔD vs. Δ18O plot shows that condensed waters from the gases are mixtures of meteoric and magmatic components, but that the apparent magmatic end-member in 1994 was depleted by about 7‰ in ΔD relative to the apparent end-member in 1980. Based on ΔD modeling, approximately 63% of shallow, post-1980 magma has yet to degas.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Eastern California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Eastern California Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Banded, epithermal quartz-adularia veins have produced about 1.5 million ounces of gold and 7 million ounces of silver from the Bodie mining district, eastern California. The veins cut dacitic lava flows, pyroclastic rocks and intrusions. Sinter boulders occur in a graben structure at the top of Bodie Bluff and fragments of sinter and mineralized quartz veins occur in hydrothermal breccias nearby. Explosive venting evidently was part of the evolution of the ore-forming geothermal systems which, at one time,

42

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute Fluxes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute Fluxes Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We present and analyze a chemical dataset that includes the concentrations and fluxes of HCO3-, SO42-, Cl-, and F- in the major rivers draining Yellowstone National Park (YNP) for the 2002-2004 water years (1 October 2001 - 30 September 2004). The total (molar) flux in all rivers decreases in the following order, HCO3- > Cl- > SO42- > F-, but each river is characterized by a distinct chemical composition, implying large-scale

43

A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Sierra La Primavera, a late Pleistocene rhyolitic caldera complex in Jalisco, Mexico, contains fumaroles and large-discharge 65°C hot springs that are associated with faults related to caldera collapse and to later magma insurgence. The nearly-neutral, sodium bicarbonate, hot springs occur at low elevations at the margins of the complex, whereas the water-rich fumaroles are high and central. The Comision Federal de Electricidad de Mexico (CFE) has recently drilled two deep holes at the

44

Distribution and Geochemical Evolution of Fluoride in Groundwater of Taiyuan Basin, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogeochemistry data were utilized to understand origin, distribution, and geochemical evolution of the high-fluoride groundwater in Taiyuan basin, China. In the study area, the spatial distribution of the high fluoride groundwater are strictly controlled ... Keywords: fluoride, geochemical mechanism

Xiangquan Li; Xinwei Hou; Zhichao Zhou; Lingxia Liu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Crustal melting in the Himalayan orogen : field, geochemical and geochronological studies in the Everest region, Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combination of field studies and geochemical techniques were used to investigate the timing and processes involved in leucogranite generation in the Everest region of the Himalayan orogen. Geochemical investigations ...

Viskupic, Karen M. (Karen Marie), 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This program will combine detailed gravity, high resolution aeromagnetic, and LIDAR data, all of which will be combined for structural modeling, with hyperspectral data, which will identify and map specific minerals and mineral assemblages that may point to upflow zones. The collection of these surveys and analyses of the merged data and model will be used to site deeper slim holes. Slim holes will be flow tested to determine whether or not Ormat can move forward with developing this resource. An innovative combination of geophysical and geochemical tools will significantly reduce risk in exploring this area, and the results will help to evaluate the value of these tools independently and in combination when exploring for blind resources where structure, permeability, and temperature are the most pressing questions. The slim holes will allow testing of models and validation of methods, and the surveys within the wellbores will be used to revise the models and site production wells if their drilling is warranted.

47

Synthesis of organic geochemical data from the Eastern Gas Shales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over 2400 core and cuttings samples of Upper Devonian shales from wells in the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins have been characterized by organic geochemical methods to provide a basis for accelerating the exploitation of this unconventional, gas-rich resource. This work was part of a program initiated to provide industry with criteria for locating the best areas for future drilling and for the development of stimulation methods that will make recovery of the resource economically attractive. The geochemical assessment shows that the shale, in much of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins is source rock that is capable of generating enormous quantities of gas. In some areas the shales are also capable of generating large quantities of oil as well. The limiting factors preventing these sources from realizing most of their potential are their very low permeabilities and the paucity of potential reservoir rocks. This geochemical data synthesis gives direction to future selection of sites for stimulation research projects in the Appalachian Basin by pinpointing those areas where the greatest volumes of gas are contained in the shale matrix. Another accomplishment of the geochemical data synthesis is a new estimate of the total resource of the Appalachian Basin. The new estimate of 2500 TCF is 25 percent greater than the highest previous estimates. This gives greater incentive to government and industry to continue the search for improved stimulation methods, as well as for improved methods for locating the sites where those improved stimulation methods can be most effectively applied.

Zielinski, R. E.; McIver, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model for uranium  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Geochemical Modeling and Nuclide/Rock/Groundwater Interactions Studies Program, a study was conducted to partially validate the WATEQ4 aqueous speciation-solubility geochemical model for uranium. The solubility controls determined with the WATEQ4 geochemical model were in excellent agreement with those laboratory studies in which the solids schoepite (UO/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2/ . H/sub 2/O), UO/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2/, and rutherfordine ((UO/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) were identified as actual solubility controls for uranium. The results of modeling solution analyses from laboratory studies of uranyl phosphate solids, however, identified possible errors in the characterization of solids in the original solubility experiments. As part of this study, significant deficiencies in the WATEQ4 thermodynamic data base for uranium solutes and solids were corrected. Revisions included recalculation of selected uranium reactions. Additionally, thermodynamic data for the hydroxyl complexes of U(VI), including anionic (VI) species, were evaluated (to the extent permitted by the available data). Vanadium reactions were also added to the thermodynamic data base because uranium-vanadium solids can exist in natural ground-water systems. This study is only a partial validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model because the available laboratory solubility studies do not cover the range of solid phases, alkaline pH values, and concentrations of inorganic complexing ligands needed to evaluate the potential solubility of uranium in ground waters associated with various proposed nuclear waste repositories. Further validation of this or other geochemical models for uranium will require careful determinations of uraninite solubility over the pH range of 7 to 10 under highly reducing conditions and of uranyl hydroxide and phosphate solubilities over the pH range of 7 to 10 under oxygenated conditions.

Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.; Deutsch, W.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

The Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we demonstrate how the interpretation of quantum mechanics due to Land\\'e resolves the Schr\\"odinger cat paradox and disposes of the problem of wave function collapse.

H. V. Mweene

2004-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

50

Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The results to date of chemical modeling of the Raft River KGRA are presented. Earlier work indicated a northwest-southeast anomaly in the contours. Modeling techniques applied to more complete data allowed further definition of the anomaly. Models described in this report show the source of various minerals in the geothermal water. There appears to be a regional heat source that gives rise to uniform conductive heat flow in the region, but convective flow is concentrated near the upwelling in the Crook well

51

Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The objective of this ongoing project is the development of a representative geochemical database for a comprehensive range of elemental and isotopic parameters (i.e., beyond the typical data suite) for a range of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Development of this database is one of the first steps in understanding the nature of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Of particular importance in the Great Basin is utilizing

52

Version 4.00 of the MINTEQ geochemical code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MINTEQ code is a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate solution equilibria for geochemical applications. Included in the MINTEQ code are formulations for ionic speciation, ion exchange, adsorption, solubility, redox, gas-phase equilibria, and the dissolution of finite amounts of specified solids. Since the initial development of the MINTEQ geochemical code, a number of undocumented versions of the source code and data files have come into use at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report documents these changes, describes source code modifications made for the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) program, and provides comprehensive listings of the data files. A version number of 4.00 has been assigned to the MINTEQ source code and the individual data files described in this report.

Eary, L.E.; Jenne, E.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Version 4. 00 of the MINTEQ geochemical code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MINTEQ code is a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate solution equilibria for geochemical applications. Included in the MINTEQ code are formulations for ionic speciation, ion exchange, adsorption, solubility, redox, gas-phase equilibria, and the dissolution of finite amounts of specified solids. Since the initial development of the MINTEQ geochemical code, a number of undocumented versions of the source code and data files have come into use at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report documents these changes, describes source code modifications made for the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) program, and provides comprehensive listings of the data files. A version number of 4.00 has been assigned to the MINTEQ source code and the individual data files described in this report.

Eary, L.E.; Jenne, E.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Sequence-based abstract interpretation of Prolog  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract interpretation is a general methodology for systematic development of program analyses. An abstract interpretation framework is centered around a parametrized non-standard semantics that can be instantiated by various domains to approximate ... Keywords: Prolog, abstract interpretation, static analysis

Baudouin Le Charlier; Sabina Rossi; Pascal Van Hentenryck

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Interpreting Remote Sensing NOx Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interpreting Remote Sensing NOx Measurements Robert Slott, Consultant, Donald Stedman and Saj tailpipe emissions (HC, CO, NOx) are changing with time hUse remote sensing hMeasurements in at least 4 of the year at each location hUniform QC/QA and data reporting Paper # 2001-01-3640 #12;Remote Sensing

Denver, University of

56

Formal interpreters for diagram notations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The article proposes an approach for defining extensible and flexible formal interpreters for diagram notations with significant dynamic semantics. More precisely, it addresses semi-formal diagram notations that have precisely-defined syntax, but informally ... Keywords: Semi-formal notations, graph transformation, high-level Petri nets, semantics

Luciano Baresi; Mauro Pezz

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Spatial interpretations of preposition "at"  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current keyword- and substring matches-based retrieval methods most search engines rely on to answer spatial queries ignore the more specific interpretations of spatial relations. Moreover, the use of the general preposition "at" in natural language ... Keywords: natural language processing, spatial reasoning and analysis, uncertainty, user-generated spatial content

Maria Vasardani; Stephan Winter; Kai-Florian Richter; Lesley Stirling; Daniela Richter

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Abstract N/A Author Donald Thomas Published Journal US Geological Survey Professional Paper 1350, 1987 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Citation Donald Thomas. 1987. A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone. US Geological Survey Professional Paper 1350. (!) . Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_geochemical_model_of_the_Kilauea_east_rift_zone&oldid=682589" Categories: Missing Required Information References Uncited References Geothermal References

59

Microsoft Word - Interpretive Guidance FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2, 2011 June 2, 2011 INTERPRETIVE GUIDANCE ON THE REQUIREMENTS OF 10 C.F.R. § 205.322 This guidance is intended to clarify the Department of Energy (DOE)'s interpretation of 10 C.F.R. § 205.322, which sets forth the contents of an application for a Presidential permit issued by DOE under Executive Order (E.O.) 10485, as amended by E.O. 12038. Anyone seeking to construct, operate, maintain, or connect an electric transmission facility crossing the borders of the United States must first obtain a Presidential permit. Section 205.322 requires that an application for a Presidential permit provide, among other things: a) "Information regarding the applicant" (e.g., name, contact information, foreign government ownership or contractual relationships);

60

Tracers and Tracer Interpretation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Tracers and Tracer Interpretation 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Date Creek Basin, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

Results of the Date Creek Basin detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are reported for 239 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Based on stream sediment geochemical data, significant concentrations of uranium are restricted to the Anderson Mine area. The 84th percentile concentrations of U-FL, U-NT, and U-FL/U-NT combined with low thorium/U-NT values reflect increased mobility and enrichment of uranium in the carbonate host rocks of that area. Elements characteristically associated with the uranium mineralization include lithium and arsenic. No well defined diffusion halos suggesting outliers of similar uranium mineralization were observed from the stream sediment data in other areas of the Date Creek Basin. Significant concentrations of U-FL or U-NT found outside the mine area are generally coincident with low U-FL/U-NT values and high concentrations of zirconium, titanium, and phosphorus. This suggests that the uranium is related to a resistate mineral assemblage derived from surrounding crystalline igneous and metamorphic rocks.

Butz, T.R.; Tieman, D.J.; Grimes, J.G.; Bard, C.S.; Helgerson, R.N.; Pritz, P.M.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Testing geochemical modeling codes using New Zealand hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of selected portions of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will: (1) ensure that we are providing adequately for all significant processes occurring in natural systems; (2) determine the adequacy of the mathematical descriptions of the processes; (3) check the adequacy and completeness of thermodynamic data as a function of temperature for solids, aqueous species and gases; and (4) determine the sensitivity of model results to the manner in which the problem is conceptualized by the user and then translated into constraints in the code input. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions. The kinetics of silica precipitation in EQ6 will be tested using field data from silica-lined drain channels carrying hot water away from the Wairakei borefield.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Modules based on the geochemical model PHREEQC for use in scripting and programming languages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geochemical model PHREEQC is capable of simulating a wide range of equilibrium reactions between water and minerals, ion exchangers, surface complexes, solid solutions, and gases. It also has a general kinetic formulation that allows modeling of ... Keywords: C, C++, COM, Component object model, Fortran, Geochemical modeling, PHREEQC, Reactive-transport modeling

Scott R. Charlton; David L. Parkhurst

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Scatterometer Data Interpretation: Measurement Space and Inversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geophysical interpretation of the radar measurements from the ERS-1 scatterometer, called ?0, is considered. An important tool in the interpretation of the data is the visualization of the triplets of radar backscatter in measurement space. ...

Ad Stoffelen; David Anderson

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Quantum Theory Event-Probability Interpretation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article the propagation of pointlike event probabilities in space is considered. New interpretation of Quantum Theory is formulated.

Quznetsov, Gunn [Chelyabinsk State University, Chelyabinsk, Ural (Russian Federation)

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

66

Interpreting the C-metric  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The basic properties of the C-metric are well known. It describes a pair of causally separated black holes which accelerate in opposite directions under the action of forces represented by conical singularities. However, these properties can be demonstrated much more transparently by making use of recently developed coordinate systems for which the metric functions have a simple factor structure. These enable us to obtain explicit Kruskal-Szekeres-type extensions through the horizons and construct two-dimensional conformal Penrose diagrams. We then combine these into a three-dimensional picture which illustrates the global causal structure of the space-time outside the black hole horizons. Using both the weak field limit and some invariant quantities, we give a direct physical interpretation of the parameters which appear in the new form of the metric. For completeness, relations to other familiar coordinate systems are also discussed.

J. B. Griffiths; P. Krtous; J. Podolsky

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Comparison of Two Interpretations of Josephson Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper puts forward an interpretation of the Josephson effect based on the Alternative Theory of Superconductivity (ATS). A comparison of ATS- and BCS-based interpretations is provided. It is demonstrated that the ATS-based interpretation, unlike that based on BCS theory, does not require a revision of fundamentals of quantum physics.

I. M. Yurin

2008-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

68

Holocene deposition in Northwest Providence Channel, Bahamas: a geochemical approach  

SciTech Connect

The origins and depositional history of Holocene sediment in Northwest Providence Channel, Bahamas (NWPC) have been determined using geochemical measurements coupled with textural data, petrographic examination, and scanning electron microscopy. Most of the channel is 200 to 2000 m deep, and nearly 100% of the sediment is calcium carbonate. Shallow water platform sources contribute 75-90% of the Holocene sediment in NWPC. Bank derived sand is most abundant near the platforms (nearly 100%) and is concentrically distributed around a central area of abundant non-platform sand. Bank-derived mud (<62 ..mu..m) accounts for more than 80% of the mud fraction in NWPC. The coarse silt (62-16 ..mu..m), fine silt (16-4 ..mu..m) and clay (< 4 ..mu..m) fractions from LLB (Bight of Abaco) are geochemically distinct from the mud fractions of Great Bahama Bank (GBB). Their distributions in NWPC demonstrate that both platforms are significant sediment contributors to NWPC. The observed sediment distribution clearly indicates that significant off bank transport occurs. With regard to sediment transport, no windward or leeward effects are observed in Holocene sediment deposition. Gravity flow processes are not significant to Holocene deposition. 80% of the present sedimentation rate results from the banktop flooding and confirms that 75%-90% of the Holocene sediment is derived from platform sources. The C-14 dated Holocene sediment layer is approximately 50 cm thick, and its transition with the Pleistocene occurs over a vertical interval of less than 20 cm as a result of mixing by benthonic organisms. This Holocene sediment layer should remain intact to permanently record this banktop episode, and should have a different diagenetic future from the underlying stable (calcite-rich) sediment.

Boardman, M.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

QUALITATIVE INTERPRETATION OF GALAXY SPECTRA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe a simple step-by-step guide to qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra. Rather than an alternative to existing automated tools, it is put forward as an instrument for quick-look analysis and for gaining physical insight when interpreting the outputs provided by automated tools. Though the recipe is for general application, it was developed for understanding the nature of the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based (ASK) template spectra. They resulted from the classification of all the galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7, thus being a comprehensive representation of the galaxy spectra in the local universe. Using the recipe, we give a description of the properties of the gas and the stars that characterize the ASK classes, from those corresponding to passively evolving galaxies, to H II galaxies undergoing a galaxy-wide starburst. The qualitative analysis is found to be in excellent agreement with quantitative analyses of the same spectra. We compare the mean ages of the stellar populations with those inferred using the code STARLIGHT. We also examine the estimated gas-phase metallicity with the metallicities obtained using electron-temperature-based methods. A number of byproducts follow from the analysis. There is a tight correlation between the age of the stellar population and the metallicity of the gas, which is stronger than the correlations between galaxy mass and stellar age, and galaxy mass and gas metallicity. The galaxy spectra are known to follow a one-dimensional sequence, and we identify the luminosity-weighted mean stellar age as the affine parameter that describes the sequence. All ASK classes happen to have a significant fraction of old stars, although spectrum-wise they are outshined by the youngest populations. Old stars are metal-rich or metal-poor depending on whether they reside in passive galaxies or in star-forming galaxies.

Sanchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Cid Fernandes, R., E-mail: jos@iac.es, E-mail: abml@iac.es, E-mail: rjt@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: eterlevi@inaoep.mx, E-mail: cid@astro.ufsc.br [Departamento de Fisica-CFM, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, P.O. Box 476, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

70

An investigation of the effect of pore scale flow on average geochemical reaction rates using direct numerical simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scale-dependence of geochemical reaction rates hinders their use in continuum scale models intended for the interpretation and prediction of chemical fate and transport in subsurface environments such as those considered for geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Processes that take place at the pore scale, especially those involving mass transport limitations to reactive surfaces, may contribute to the discrepancy commonly observed between laboratory-determined and continuum-scale or field rates. Here, the dependence of mineral dissolution rates on the pore structure of the porous media is investigated by means of pore scale modeling of flow and multicomponent reactive transport. The pore scale model is comprised of high performance simulation tools and algorithms for incompressible flow and conservative transport combined with a general-purpose multicomponent geochemical reaction code. The model performs direct numerical simulation of reactive transport based on an operator-splitting approach to coupling transport and reactions. The approach is validated with a Poiseuille flow single-pore experiment and verified with an equivalent 1D continuum-scale model of a capillary tube packed with calcite spheres. Using the case of calcite dissolution as an example, the high resolution model is used to demonstrate that non-uniformity in the flow field at the pore scale has the effect of decreasing the overall reactivity of the system, even when systems with identical reactive surface area are considered. The effect becomes more pronounced as the heterogeneity of the reactive grain packing increases, particularly where the flow slows sufficiently such that the solution approaches equilibrium locally and the average rate becomes transport-limited.

Rafa, S. Molins; Trebotich, D.; Steefel, C. I.; Shen, C.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Geothermal exploration assessment and interpretation, Upper Klamah Lake Area, Klamath Basin, Oregon  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Data from public and private sources on the Klamath Basin geothermal resource are reviewed, synthesized, and reinterpreted. In this, the second and final phase of the work, geological, remote sensing, geochemical, temperature gradient, gravity, aeromagnetic, and electrical resistivity data sets are examined. These data were derived from surveys concentrated on the east and west shores of Upper Klamath Lake. The geological, remote sensing, and potential field data suggest a few northeast-trending discontinuities, which cross the regional north-westerly strike. The near-surface distribution of warm water appears to be related to the intersections of these lineaments and northwest-trending faults. The groundwater geochemical data are reviewed and the various reservoir temperature estimates compared. Particular attention is given to specific electrical conductivities of waters as an interpretational aid to the subsurface resistivity results. A clear trend emerges in the Klamath Falls/Olene Gap area; hotter waters are associated with higher specific conductivities. In the Nuss Lake/Stukel Mountain area the opposite trend prevails, although the relationship is somewhat equivocal.

Stark, M.; Goldstein, N.E.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Abstract This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales,rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples fromwhich the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. Thesedata provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermalenergy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in thisregion. Authors Los Alamos National Laboratory and NM Published

73

Geochemical heterogeneity in the Hawaiian plume : constraints from Hawaiian volcanoes and Emperor seamounts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 6000-km long, age-progressive linear Hawaii-Emperor Chain is one of the best defined hotspot tracks. This hotspot track plays an important role in the plume hypothesis. In this research, geochemical data on the ...

Huang, Shichun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Migratory patterns of American shad (Alosa sapidissima) revealed by natural geochemical tags in otoliths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical signatures in the otoliths of diadromous fishes may allow for retrospective analyses of natal origins. In an assessment of river-specific signatures in American shad (Alosa sapidissima), an anadromous clupeid ...

Walther, Benjamin (Benjamin Dwaine)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The dynamics of oceanic transform faults : constraints from geophysical, geochemical, and geodynamical modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Segmentation and crustal accretion at oceanic transform fault systems are investigated through a combination of geophysical data analysis and geodynamical and geochemical modeling. Chapter 1 examines the effect of fault ...

Gregg, Patricia Michelle Marie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Aeromagnetic Survey And Interpretation, Ascention Island, South...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

potential of the island, is described. The aeromagnetic map represents a basic data set useful for the interpretation of subsurface geology. An in situ magnetic...

77

Nuclear Safety Technical Positions/Interpretations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(OPI) responsible for the development, interpretation, and revision of a number of DOE directives. Technical Positions to directives issued by Nuclear and Facility Safety...

78

Working with Interpreters | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

with Interpreters Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing Institutional Research...

79

Reservoir simulation and geochemical study of Cerro Prieto I wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combined reservoir simulation and geochemical data analysis are used to investigate the effects of recharge and other reservoir processes occurring in the western part of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field (i.e., Cerro Prieto I area). Enthalpy-based temperatures and bottomhole temperatures are calculated based on simplified models of the system, considering different reservoir boundary conditions and zones of contrasting initial temperatures and reservoir properties. By matching the computed trends with geothermometer-based temperature and enthalpy histories of producing wells, the main processes active in the western area of Cerro Prieto are identified. This part of the geothermal system is strongly influenced by nearby groundwater aquifers; cooler waters readily recharge the reservoirs. In response to exploitation, the natural influx of cold water into the shallower alpha reservoir is mainly from the west and down Fault L, while the recharge to the deeper beta reservoir in this part of the field, seems to be only lateral, from the west and possibly south. 11 refs., 12 figs.

Lippmann, M.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Truesdell, A.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The biomarker guide: Interpreting molecular fossils in petroleum and ancient sediments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a handbook for biomarkers and their application to hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation. The authors aimed this book at a diverse audience, such as students, exploration geologists with a geochemical background, and experts in the field. This is a clear and well written text aimed at the hydrocarbon industry. It is so tightly organized and detailed that it is not an easy read for the novice, though it is a very fine reference book. For those in the field of biomarkers or those who need to refer to a particular compound or process for analyzing biomarkers or have a need for a short description of that process or compound, this book will be useful. The text is broken down into 4 chapters: (1) introduction to biological markers, (2) description of the fundamentals of biomarker separation analysis, (3) guidelines for interpretation, and (4) discussion of problem areas and further work.

Peters, K.E.; Moldowan, J.M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Probability in modal interpretations of quantum mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probability in modal interpretations of quantum mechanics Dennis Dieks Institute for the History interpretations have the ambition to construe quantum mechanics as an ob- jective, man-independent description of physical reality. Their second leading idea is probabilism: quantum mechanics does not completely fix

Seevinck, Michiel

82

Interpretation of drill cuttings from geothermal wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Problems in interpreting drill cuttings, as opposed to drill cores, and methods to solve these problems are outlined. The following are covered: identification of lithology; recognition of faults and fractures; interpretation of hydrothermal alteration; geochemistry; sample collection; sample preparple examination; and sample storage. (MHR)

Hulen, J.B.; Sibbett, B.S.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Improving abstract interpretations by combining domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article considers static analysis based on abstract interpretation of logic programs over combined domains. It is known that analyses over combined domains provide more information potentially than obtained by the independent analyses. However, ... Keywords: abstract interpretation, logic programming, program analysis

Michael Codish; Anne Mulkers; Maurice Bruynooghe; Maria Garca de la Banda; Manuel Hermenegildo

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY  

SciTech Connect

From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

85

Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

Wilson, T.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Working with Interpreters | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Working with Interpreters | National Nuclear Security Administration Working with Interpreters | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Working with Interpreters Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and

87

Climate Change in California: Trends, Interpretation, Simulations...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in California: Trends, Interpretation, Simulations and Impacts Speaker(s): Philip B. Duffy Date: May 19, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 This talk will discuss some of my recent...

88

General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical Removal...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Word - Part 850 Interpretation to be posted on GC Website with date 8 16 2012 More Documents & Publications Audit Report: IG-0783 Audit Report: IG-0737 Audit Report: IG-0726...

89

Improving abstract interpretations by combining domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we consider static analyses based on abstract interpretation of logic programs over combined domains. It is known that analyses over combined domains potentially provide more information than obtainable by performing the independent abstract ...

M. Codish; A. Mulkers; M. Bruynooghe; M. Garca de la Banda; M. Hermenegildo

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"The Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs" is the entry-level subject in Computer Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. It is required of all students at MIT who major in Electrical ...

Abelson, Harold

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Abstract Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area has resulted in the development of distinctive trace element signatures. Geochemical analysis of soil sample, shallow temperature gradient drill hole cuttings and deep drill hole cutting provides a three dimensional perspective of trace element distributions within the system. Distributions of As, Hg and Li provide the clearest expression of hydrothermal activity. Comparison of these distribution

92

A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In The Geothermal Field Of Milos Island (Greece) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In The Geothermal Field Of Milos Island (Greece) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents a study of hydrothermal alteration on Milos island, Greece. Examination of cores and cuttings from the two drill sites, obtained from a depth of about 1100 m in Milos geothermal field, showed that the hydrothermal minerals occurring in the rock include: K-feldspar, albite, chlorite, talc, diopside, epidote, muscovite, tremolite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, alunite, anhydrite, gypsum, calcite, and opaque minerals.

93

Trace metal speciation in saline waters affected by geothermal brines. [GEOCHEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the chemical equilibrium computer program GEOCHEM, which has been developed to calculate trace element speciation in soil, irrigation, drainage, or Salton Sea waters affected by geothermal brine. GEOCHEM is applied to irrigation water-brine mixtures and to Salton Sea water-brine mixtures in order to compute the chemical speciation of the elements Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn, along with the oxyanions of As and B. The results suggest that the computer simulation can have an important effect on a program for managing brine spills. Appendices include published papers on related research.

Sposito, G.; Page, A.L.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Geochemical Journal, Vol. 39, pp. 383 to 389, 2005 *Corresponding author (e-mail: ytakaha@hiroshima-u.ac.jp)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

383 Geochemical Journal, Vol. 39, pp. 383 to 389, 2005 *Corresponding author (e-mail: ytakaha@hiroshima,3 1 Department of Earth & Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739 for Multiple Isotope Research for Astro-and Geochemical Evolution (MIRAGE), Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima

95

GeoSys.Chem: Estimate of reservoir fluid characteristics as first step in geochemical modeling of geothermal systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer code GeoSys.Chem for the calculation of deep geothermal reservoir fluid characteristics from the measured physical-chemical parameters of separated water and condensed vapor samples obtained from drilled wells is presented. It was written ... Keywords: GeoChem, GeoSys.Chem, Geochemical modeling, Los Azufres, VB.NET

Mahendra P. Verma

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Sampling and Interpretation of Drill Cuttings from Geothermal Wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Drill cuttings from geothermal and mineral exploration boreholes, by contrast with those from most petroleum wells, commonly are derived highly fractured and faulted, hydrothermally altered igneous and metamorphic rock sequences, and are likely to be severely contaminated. Characterization of a subsurface resource from cuttings thus requires not only especially careful sample collection, preparation, storage and examination, but also a thorough knowledge of drilling technology, local geology and the full range of potential borehole contaminants. Accurate identification of lithology from cuttings is critical for recognition and correlation of rock types likely to selectively host the desired commodity. However, many of the rocks encountered in geothermal and mineral exploration boreholes (such as gneisses and granitic rocks) can resemble one another closely as cuttings even though dissimilar in outcrop or core. In such cases, the actual rock type(s) in a cuttings sample generally can be determined by comparison with simulated cuttings of representative surface rocks, and with various geophysical and other well logs. Many other clues in cuttings, such as diagnostic metamorphic mineralogy, or sedimentary rounding and sorting, may help identify subsurface lithologies. Faults and fractures commonly are the dominant physical controls on geothermal and mineral resources. Faults occasionally can be recognized directly in cuttings by the presence of slickensiding, gouge, or other crushed material. More commonly, however, the ''gouge'' observed in cuttings actually is pseudo-gouge created beneath a bit during drilling. Since most faults and all fractures produce no direct evidence apparent in cuttings, they are best recognized indirectly, either by commonly associated hydrothermal alteration, or by responses on appropriate geophysical well logs. Hydrothermal alteration, useful for locating and defining a geothermal or mineral resource, is far more difficult to recognize and interpret in cuttings than in core or outcrop. Alteration textures and paragenetic relationships can be obscured or obliterated as cuttings are produced. Less resistant alteration (and rock-forming) minerals can be disaggregated during drilling and lost from cuttings during sampling or washing. Relict and contemporary alteration can be indistinguishable, and a wide variety of borehole contaminants can closely resemble natural alteration products encountered during drilling. These contaminants also can produce confusing geochemical signatures.

Hulen, Jeffrey B.; Sibbett, Bruce S.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Interpretation in Quantum Physics as Hidden Curriculum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prior research has demonstrated how the realist perspectives of classical physics students can translate into specific beliefs about quantum phenomena when taking an introductory modern physics course. Student beliefs regarding the interpretation of quantum mechanics often vary by context, and are most often in alignment with instructional goals in topic areas where instructors are explicit in promoting a particular perspective. Moreover, students are more likely to maintain realist perspectives in topic areas where instructors are less explicit in addressing interpretive themes, thereby making such issues part of a hidden curriculum. We discuss various approaches to addressing student perspectives and interpretive themes in a modern physics course, and explore the associated impacts on student thinking.

Charles Baily; Noah D. Finkelstein

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

98

Interpretation in Quantum Physics as Hidden Curriculum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prior research has demonstrated how the realist perspectives of classical physics students can translate into specific beliefs about quantum phenomena when taking an introductory modern physics course. Student beliefs regarding the interpretation of quantum mechanics often vary by context, and are most often in alignment with instructional goals in topic areas where instructors are explicit in promoting a particular perspective. Moreover, students are more likely to maintain realist perspectives in topic areas where instructors are less explicit in addressing interpretive themes, thereby making such issues part of a hidden curriculum. We discuss various approaches to addressing student perspectives and interpretive themes in a modern physics course, and explore the associated impacts on student thinking.

Baily, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Geophysics III. Geologic interpretation of seismic data  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on geologic interpretation of seismic data interpretation. Each of the 21 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Geothermal well log interpretation midterm report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Reservoir types are defined according to fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, and salinity and fluid chemistry. Improvements are needed in lithology and porosity definition, fracture detection, and thermal evaluation for more accurate interpretation. Further efforts are directed toward improving diagnostic techniques for relating rock characteristics and log response, developing petrophysical models for geothermal systems, and developing thermal evaluation techniques. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated only on hydrothermal geothermal reservoirs. Other geothermal reservoirs (hot dry rock, geopressured, etc.) are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Chemie der Erde 65 (2005) 4778 Geochemical and isotopic characteristics and evolution of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemie der Erde 65 (2005) 47­78 Geochemical and isotopic characteristics and evolution) and Pichowiak (1994). ARTICLE IN PRESS W. Kramer et al. / Chemie der Erde 65 (2005) 47­7848 #12;These east (Oficina Viz Fm.) on a wide front to the west (Caleta Ligate Fm.). W. Kramer et al. / Chemie der

Siebel, Wolfgang

102

Modeling of concentrated aqueous solutions: Efficient implementation of Pitzer equations in geochemical and reactive transport models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling concentrated solutions demands the use of ion-interaction models such as Pitzer equations, which involve a large number of operations. Implementation of these models in large reactive transport simulations significantly increases the computation ... Keywords: Concentrated solutions, Evaporation of seawater, Geochemical modeling, HMW model, Invariant points, Object-oriented programming, Pitzer, Reactive transport modeling

S. A. Bea; J. Carrera; C. Ayora; F. Batlle

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Geochemical Implications of Gas Leakage Associated with Geologic CO2 Storage - A Qualitative Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is considered the major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of CO2. Different schools of thought exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. We reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of overlying potable aquifers. Results from experimental and modeling studies point to the potential for both beneficial (e.g. contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g. contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion into potable groundwater. However, there are significant discrepancies between studies particularly concerning, what contaminants are of concern and the geochemical processes involved. These discrepancies reflected the lack of a consensus on CO2-induced changes in subsurface geochemical processes and subsequent effects on groundwater chemistry. The development of consistent experimental protocols and the identification of pertinent factors driving CO2-induced geochemical changes in the subsurface were identified as key research needs. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why a standardization of experimental protocols and the consideration of experimental factors such as gas leakage rates, redox status and the influence of co-transported gases are pertinent. The role of analog studies, reactions occurring in the vadose zone, and the influence of organic contaminants are also discussed.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Lee, Gie Hyeon; Amonette, James E.; Brown, Christopher F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Geochemical constraints on the Palaeocene^ Miocene evolution of eastern Azerbaijan, with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical constraints on the Palaeocene^ Miocene evolution of eastern AzerbaijanEarth and Environmental Sciences, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington,TX, USA zAzerbaijan NationalAcademy of Sciences Geology Institute ^ 29 A. H. Javid Pr., Baku, Azerbaijan ABSTRACT Fine-grained Palaeogene

Johnson, Cari

105

Soil geochemical survey over concealed kimberlites in the Attawapiskat area in northern Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lengths of 562 m over the Whiskey kimberlite and 740 m over the Yankee kimberlite pipe. B-horizon soil of the kimberlite pipes. Ammonium acetate leach at pH 5 (AA5) dissolves most of these carbonates, and shows geochemical characteristics of kimberlites in com- parison with peridotites, oceanic basalts (MORB

106

Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin Natural Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaboration Introduction The Wheeler River Property, host of Denison Mine's Phoenix uranium depositCo Mo Ni UU Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit is the most efficient analytical method to detect these anomalies. Athabasca Basin Figure 1: Denison Mine

107

Z .Chemical Geology 145 1998 153159 z /Geochemical Earth Reference Model GERM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z .Chemical Geology 145 1998 153­159 z /Geochemical Earth Reference Model GERM : description on a chemical characterization of the Earth, its major reservoirs, and the fluxes between them. The Z .GERM chemical Z . Z .reservoirs of the present-day Earth, from core to atmosphere; 2 present-day fluxes between

Mcdonough, William F.

108

Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL a reservoir for shale-gas and oil. We examined organic-rich black shale, known as Macasty shale, of Upper SHALE-GAS AND OIL in THE SUBSURFACE OF ANTICOSTI ISLAND, CANADA Key Words: Provenance, Anticosti Island

109

Geochemical modeling of the nuclear-waste repository system. A status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the geochemical modeling task is to develop an understanding of the waste-repository geochemical system and provide a valuable tool for estimating future states of that system. There currently exists a variety of computer codes which can be used in geochemical modeling studies. Some available codes contain the framework for simulating a natural chemical system and estimating, within limits, the response of that system to environmental changes. By data-base enhancement and code development, this modeling technique can be even more usefully applied to a nuclear-waste repository. In particular, thermodynamic data on elements not presently in the data base but identified as being of particular hazard in the waste-repository system, need to be incorporated into the code to estimate the near-field as well as the far-field reactions during a hypothetical breach. A reaction-path-simulation code, which estimates the products of specific rock/water reactions, has been tested using basalt and ground water. Results show that the mass-transfer capabilities of the code will be useful in chemical-evolution studies and scenario analyses. The purpose of this report is to explain the status of geochemical modeling as it currently applies to the chemical system of a hypothetical nuclear-waste repository in basalt and to present the plan proposed for further developmet and application.

Deutsch, W.J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Oak Ridge Geochemical Reconnaissance Program. [For National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge reconnaissance program is responsible for the geochemical survey in a 12-state area covering Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. The program concept is outlined and the planning and organization of the program is discussed. (JSR)

Arendt, J.W.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Structural interpretation of the Coso geothermal field. Summary...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

interpretation of the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, October 1986-August 1987 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Structural interpretation...

112

Interpretation of strange hadron production at LHC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend the SHM analysis of hadron production results showing here consistency with the increased experimental data set, stability of the fit with regard to inclusion of finite resonance widths and 2-star hyperon resonances. We present new results on strangeness yield as a function of centrality and present their interpretation in terms of QGP inspired model of strangeness abundance in the hadronizing fireball.

Michal Petr?; Jean Letessier; Vojt?ch Petr?ek; Johann Rafelski

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

113

Tracer Test Interpretation Methods for Reservior Properties  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this project is to develop tools that can be used to interpret tracer tests and obtain estimates of reservoir and operational parameters. These tools (mostly in the form of spreadsheet applications) can be used to optimize geothermal resource management.

Shook, George Michael

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Denotational abstract interpretation of logic programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Logic-programming languages are based on a principle of separation logic and control.. This means that they can be given simple model-theoretic semantics without regard to any particular execution mechanism (or proof procedure, ... Keywords: Boolean functions, abstract interpretation, dataflow analysis, global analysis, groundness analysis

Kim Marriott; Harald Sndergaard; Neil D. Jones

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

Mani, Devleena, E-mail: devleenatiwari@ngri.res.in [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India); Kumar, T. Satish [Oil India Limited (India); Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V. [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

NREL: PVWatts - How to Interpret PVWatts Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interpret PVWatts(tm) Results Interpret PVWatts(tm) Results The monthly and yearly energy production estimates are modeled using the selected photovoltaic (PV) system parameters and weather data that are typical or representative of long-term averages. For reference or comparison with local information, the solar radiation values modeled for the PV array are included in the performance results. Because weather patterns vary from year to year, the values in the tables are better indicators of long-term performance than of performance for a particular month or year. PV performance is largely proportional to the solar radiation received, which may vary from the long-term average by 30% monthly and 10% yearly. Solar radiation variance for a specific location can be evaluated by examining the tables in the Solar Radiation Data Manual

117

Automatic Interpretation of Human Head Movements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a complete face tracking system that interprets human head movements in real time. The system combines motion analysis with reliable and efficient object recognition strategies. It classifies head movements as "yes" (nodding head), "no" (shaking head) or "nothing" (still head). The system's skill allows contactless man-machine interaction, thus giving access to a number of new applications. 1 Introduction As industrialization proceeds, the importance of interactions between man and machine increases rapidly. Information flow from machine to man has become comfortable and direct in recent years due to tremendous progresses in computer graphics. Information flow from man to machine, on the other hand, is still on a low level. It is restricted to moving mice, pressing buttons, and typing character sequences on a keyboard. Automatic interpretation of gestures and facial expressions could reduce this imbalance and is therefore of central interrest for current and futu...

Bichsel Pentland; M. Bichsel; A. P. Pentland

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Physical Interpretations of Nilpotent Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nilpotent quantum mechanics provides a powerful method of making efficient calculations. More importantly, however, it provides insights into a number of fundamental physical problems through its use of a dual vector space and its explicit construction of vacuum. Physical interpretation of the nilpotent formalism is discussed with respect to boson and baryon structures, the mass-gap problem, zitterbewgung, Berry phase, renormalization, and related issues.

Peter Rowlands

2010-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

119

Regional interpretation of Kansas aeromagnetic data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The aeromagnetic mapping techniques used in a regional aeromagnetic survey of the state are documented and a qualitative regional interpretation of the magnetic basement is presented. Geothermal gradients measured and data from oil well records indicate that geothermal resources in Kansas are of a low-grade nature. However, considerable variation in the gradient is noted statewide within the upper 500 meters of the sedimentary section; this suggests the feasibility of using groundwater for space heating by means of heat pumps.

Yarger, H.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Intelligent Collection Environment for an Interpretation System  

SciTech Connect

An Intelligent Collection Environment for a data interpretation system is described. The environment accepts two inputs: A data model and a number between 0.0 and 1.0. The data model is as simple as a single word or as complex as a multi-level/multidimensional model. The number between 0.0 and 1.0 is a control knob to indicate the user's desire to allow loose matching of the data (things are ambiguous and unknown) versus strict matching of the data (things are precise and known). The environment produces a set of possible interpretations, a set of requirements to further strengthen or to differentiate a particular subset of the possible interpretation from the others, a set of inconsistencies, and a logic map that graphically shows the lines of reasoning used to derive the above output. The environment is comprised of a knowledge editor, model explorer, expertise server, and the World Wide Web. The Knowledge Editor is used by a subject matter expert to define Linguistic Types, Term Sets, detailed explanations, and dynamically created URI's, and to create rule bases using a straight forward hyper matrix representation. The Model Explorer allows rapid construction and browsing of multi-level models. A multi-level model is a model whose elements may also be models themselves. The Expertise Server is an inference engine used to interpret the data submitted. It incorporates a semantic network knowledge representation, an assumption based truth maintenance system, and a fuzzy logic calculus. It can be extended by employing any classifier (e.g. statistical/neural networks) of complex data types. The World Wide Web is an unstructured data space accessed by the URI's supplied as part of the output of the environment. By recognizing the input data model as a query, the environment serves as a deductive search engine. Applications include (but are not limited to) interpretation of geophysical phenomena, a navigation aid for very large web sites, monitoring of computer or sensor networks, customer support, trouble shooting, and searching complex digital libraries (e.g. genome libraries).

Maurer, W J

2001-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Field-based tests of geochemical modeling codes using New Zealand hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will determine how the codes can be used to predict the chemical and mineralogical response of the environment to nuclear waste emplacement. Field-based exercises allow us to test the models on time scales unattainable in the laboratory. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei and Kawerau geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Geochemical Aspects of the Carbonation of Magnesium Silicates in an Aqueous Medium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF THE CARBONATION OF MAGNESIUM GEOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF THE CARBONATION OF MAGNESIUM SILICATES IN AN AQUEOUS MEDIUM George D. Guthrie, Jr. (gguthrie@lanl.gov 505-665-6340) J. William Carey (bcarey@lanl.gov 505-667-5540) Deborah Bergfeld (debberrg@lanl.gov 505-667-1812) Darrin Byler (dbyler@lanl.gov 505-665-9562) Steve Chipera (chipera@lanl.gov 505-667-1110) Hans-Joachim Ziock (ziock@lanl.gov 505-667-7265) Hydrology, Geochemistry, & Geology Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 Klaus Lackner (ksl@lanl.gov 505-667-5694) Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM and Columbia University, New York, NY KEYWORDS: CO 2 sequestration, magnesium silicate, mineral carbonation INTRODUCTION The volume of carbon dioxide associated with the use of fossil fuels to produce

123

Origin of geochemical heterogeneity in the mantle : constraints from volcanism associated with Hawaiian and Kerguelen mantle plumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lavas derived from long-lived mantle plumes provide important information of mantle compositions and the processes that created the geochemical heterogeneity within the mantle. Kerguelen and Hawaii are two long-lived mantle ...

Xu, Guangping

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Evaluation of selected geochemical anomalies in Colorado and the Southeastern US. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study demonstrates the utility of HSSR geochemical data from stream sediment in exploration for uranium. In the southeastern US, four uraniferous occurrences and associated radiometric anomalies were identified in areas where uranium mineralization has not been previously reported. At two localities, assays of about .01% have been obtained from saprolite. There is some evidence which suggests that uranium may have been leached at these localities and that higher grades of U are likely at depth.

Carpenter, R H

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Proceedings of the second workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop was held to review the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring and scientific drilling in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and techonic processes. Data from a 2400-ft deep core hole completed in June 1986 were presented at the 1986 workshop and participants discussed the need and rationale for siting locations for future scientific drilling in the caldera.

Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A. (eds.)

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Geophysics II. Tools for seismic interpretation  

SciTech Connect

During the past two decades, the technology of geophysics has exploded. At the same time, the petroleum industry has been forced to look for more and more subtle traps in more and more difficult terrain. The choice of papers in this geophysics reprint volume reflects this evolution. The papers were chosen to help geologists, not geophysicists, enhance their knowledge of geophysics. Math-intensive papers were excluded because those papers are relatively esoteric and have limited applicability for most geologists. This volume concentrates on tools for seismic data interpretation. Each of the 25 papers were abstracted and indexed for the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Data Base.

Beaumont, E.A.; Foster, N.H. (comps.)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Ocean Skeletal Structures Hypotheses and Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss hypotheses on formation of ocean skeletal structures. These structures entered the ocean together with atmospheric precipitation and were assembled from fragments of skeletal structures present in clouds. We base interpretation of this phenomenon on surface tension forces between fundamental tubular blocks of the investigated structures that may also occur beneath the ocean surface. A capillary model is presented to explain formation of a network of interacting tubes. Data about the nature of ocean skeletal structures can be instrumental in modeling many processes associated with physics of the ocean.

Rantsev-Kartinov, V A

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Ocean Skeletal Structures Hypotheses and Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we discuss hypotheses on formation of ocean skeletal structures. These structures entered the ocean together with atmospheric precipitation and were assembled from fragments of skeletal structures present in clouds. We base interpretation of this phenomenon on surface tension forces between fundamental tubular blocks of the investigated structures that may also occur beneath the ocean surface. A capillary model is presented to explain formation of a network of interacting tubes. Data about the nature of ocean skeletal structures can be instrumental in modeling many processes associated with physics of the ocean.

V. A. Rantsev-Kartinov; C. G. Parigger

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

129

Geothermal well log interpretation. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is presented on the following tasks: review of the state-of-the-art, classification of geothermal reservoir types, data acquisition, problem definition and directions for solution, and refinement of existing interpretation techniques and development of new ones. Computerized literature searches were conducted. The classification system defines five major characteristics which will qualify a potential reservoir. A catalog lists well logs currently available for study. Rock and fluid parameters needed for reservoir studies are listed. A list of matrix characteristics for rocks and minerals is given. (MHR)

Not Available

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Thermodynamic Data for Geochemical Modeling of Carbonate Reactions Associated with CO2 Sequestration Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Permanent storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deep geologic formations is being considered as a means to reduce the concentration of atmospheric CO2 and thus its contribution to global climate change. To ensure safe and effective geologic sequestration, numerous studies have been completed of the extent to which the CO2 migrates within geologic formations and what physical and geochemical changes occur in these formations when CO2 is injected. Sophisticated, computerized reservoir simulations are used as part of field site and laboratory CO2 sequestration studies. These simulations use coupled multiphase flow-reactive chemical transport models and/or standalone (i.e., no coupled fluid transport) geochemical models to calculate gas solubility, aqueous complexation, reduction/oxidation (redox), and/or mineral solubility reactions related to CO2 injection and sequestration. Thermodynamic data are critical inputs to modeling geochemical processes. The adequacy of thermodynamic data for carbonate compounds has been identified as an important data requirement for the successful application of these geochemical reaction models to CO2 sequestration. A review of thermodynamic data for CO2 gas and carbonate aqueous species and minerals present in published data compilations and databases used in geochemical reaction models was therefore completed. Published studies that describe mineralogical analyses from CO2 sequestration field and natural analogue sites and laboratory studies were also reviewed to identify specific carbonate minerals that are important to CO2 sequestration reactions and therefore require thermodynamic data. The results of the literature review indicated that an extensive thermodynamic database exists for CO2 and CH4 gases, carbonate aqueous species, and carbonate minerals. Values of ?fG298 and/or log Kr,298 are available for essentially all of these compounds. However, log Kr,T or heat capacity values at temperatures above 298 K exist for less than approximately one-third of these compounds. Because the temperatures of host formations that will be used for CO2 injection and sequestration will be at temperatures in the range of 50C to 100C or greater, the lack of high temperature thermodynamic values for key carbonate compounds especially minerals, will impact the accuracy of some modeling calculations.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; McGrail, B. Peter

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

131

Geochemical Data Package for Performance Assessment Calculations Related to the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site disposes of certain types of radioactive waste within subsurface-engineered facilities. One of the tools used to establish the capacity of a given site to safely store radioactive waste (i.e., that a site does not exceed its Waste Acceptance Criteria) is the Performance Assessment (PA). The objective of this document is to provide the geochemical values for the PA calculations. This work is being conducted as part of the on-going maintenance program that permits the PA to periodically update existing calculations when new data becomes available. Because application of values without full understanding of their original purpose may lead to misuse, this document also provides the geochemical conceptual model, approach used for selecting the values, the justification for selecting data, and the assumptions made to assure that the conceptual and numerical geochemical models are reasonably conservative (i.e., reflect conditions that will tend to predict the maximum risk to the hypothetical recipient). The geochemical parameters describe transport processes for 38 elements (>90 radioisotopes) potentially occurring within eight disposal units (Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Low Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (ILV) Vaults, TRU-Pad-1, Naval Reactor Waste Pads, Components-in-Grout Trenches, and Saltstone Facility). This work builds upon well-documented work from previous PA calculations (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). The new geochemical concepts introduced in this data package are: (1) In the past, solubility products were used only in a few conditions (element existing in a specific environmental setting). This has been expanded to >100 conditions. (2) Radionuclide chemistry in cementitious environments is described through the use of both the Kd and apparent solubility concentration limit. Furthermore, the solid phase is assumed to age during the assessment period (thousands of years), resulting in three main types of controlling solid phases, each possessing a unique set of radionuclide sorption parameters (Kd and solubility concentration limit). (3) A large amount of recent site-specific sorption research has been conducted since the last PA (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). These new data have replaced previous Kd values derived from literature values, thus reducing uncertainty and improving accuracy. Finally, because this document will be used by future PA calculations and external acceptance of the document will eventually be required, this document was extensively reviewed. The review process, including the internal review, site review, and external review process is described.

Kaplan, D

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

132

Interpretation and its Others (with R.A.W. Rhodes)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organizations, London: Sage. Wendt, A. (1999) Social Theoryas in for example Gerring 1999, Wendt 1999). An interpretive

Bevir, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

DNA Analyst Training on Mixture Interpretation Webcast Now ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... webcast to participants across the country. ... threshold affect data analysis, interpretation, conclusions ... Please note that certificates of participation ...

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

134

Technology: Machine and its interpretation in architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this study is to develop a comprehensive theory for the relationship between architecture and technology and to examine the interpretation of technology when it is applied to architecture. In architecture, 'art and craft' and 'doing and saying (presentation)' are closely interwoven. It is sensitive to the external environment in nature, and its boundary has been actively changed. The nineteenth century brought the sudden alteration of culture with the collaboration between science and its applied means or knowledge - "technology". Subsequently, in the twentieth century, the new culture has transformed our normal life style and we can perceive the development of civilization sensuously. The machine as a product of industrial civilization and the symbol of technology has generated new meanings and tradition in tune with this historical trend. Therefore, this study will center on the concept 'technology', which is one of the conspicuous factors in the formation of modern architecture, and it will investigate the relationship between technology and architecture.

Kim, Ju Hong

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Interpreted C , Object Oriented Tcl, What next?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tcl[1] is an interpreted high level language suitable for scripts, small scale systems, prototypes and embedding in larger applications. C++ is a powerful compiled language that provides support for object oriented programming and is suitable for building large complex systems. But what if you could move from C++ to Tcl and back again with the ease of an object reference and a dynamically bound function? This paper describes an extension to Tcl, or an extension to C++ depending on your perspective, that makes it possible to: O use object oriented programming concepts in Tcl O inherit from C++ classes (with dynamic binding of methods) in Tcl O instantiate C++ classes from Tcl O invoke methods upon C++ objects from Tcl O delete C++ objects from Tcl O pass Tcl objects to C++ for method invocation and deletion. The name of this extension (Tcl++ was rejected) is Object Tcl. 1 Introduction Tcl was originally designed to be embedded in larger applications, implemented ...

Dean Sheehan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Generalised Kundt waves and their physical interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the complete family of space-times with a non-expanding, shear-free, twist-free, geodesic principal null congruence (Kundt waves) that are of algebraic type III and for which the cosmological constant ($\\Lambda_c$) is non-zero. The possible presence of an aligned pure radiation field is also assumed. These space-times generalise the known vacuum solutions of type N with arbitrary $\\Lambda_c$ and type III with $\\Lambda_c=0$. It is shown that there are two, one and three distinct classes of solutions when $\\Lambda_c$ is respectively zero, positive and negative. The wave surfaces are plane, spherical or hyperboloidal in Minkowski, de Sitter or anti-de Sitter backgrounds respectively, and the structure of the family of wave surfaces in the background space-time is described. The weak singularities which occur in these space-times are interpreted in terms of envelopes of the wave surfaces.

J. B. Griffiths; P. Docherty; J. Podolsky

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

137

How to interpret black hole entropy?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a possibility that the entropy of a Schwarzschild black hole has two different interpretations: The black hole entropy can be understood either as an outcome of a huge degeneracy in the mass eigenstates of the hole, or as a consequence of the fact that the interior region of black hole spacetime is separated from the exterior region by a horizon. In the latter case, no degeneracy in the mass eigenstates needs to be assumed. Our investigation is based on calculations performed with Lorentzian partition functions obtained for a whole maximally extended Schwarzschild spacetime, and for its right-hand-side exterior region. To check the correctness of our analysis we reproduce, in the leading order approximation, the Bekenstein--Hawking entropy of the Schwarzschild black hole.

J. Makela; P. Repo

1998-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

138

Improving abstract interpretations by combining domains  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article considers static analysis based on abstract interpretation of logic programs over combined domains. It is known that analyses over combined domains provide more information potentially than obtained by the independent analyses. However, the construction of a combined analysis often requires redefining the basic operations for the combined domain. A practical ap-proach to maintain precision in combined analyses of logic programs which reuses the individual analyses and does not redefine the basic operations is illustrated, The advantages of the approach are that (1) proofs of correctness for the new domains are not required and (2) implementations can be reused. The approach is demonstrated by showing that a combined sharing analysis constructed from old proposals compares well with other new proposals suggested in recent

Michael Codish; Anne Mulkers; Maurice Bruynooghe; Maria Garcia De La Banda; Manuel Hermenegildo

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Spinless Quantum Field Theory and Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum field theory is mostly known as the most advanced and well-developed theory in physics, which combines quantum mechanics and special relativity consistently. In this work, we study the spinless quantum field theory, namely the Klein-Gordon equation, and we find that there exists a Dirac form of this equation which predicts the existence of spinless fermion. For its understanding, we start from the interpretation of quantum field based on the concept of quantum scope, we also extract new meanings of wave-particle duality and quantum statistics. The existence of spinless fermion is consistent with spin-statistics theorem and also supersymmetry, and it leads to several new kinds of interactions among elementary particles. Our work contributes to the study of spinless quantum field theory and could have implications for the case of higher spin.

Dong-Sheng Wang

2013-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

140

Semantic image interpretation of gamma ray profiles in petroleum exploration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the S-Chart framework, an approach for semantic image interpretation of line charts; and the InteliStrata system, an application for semantic interpretation of gamma ray profiles. The S-Chart framework is structured as a set of knowledge ... Keywords: Gamma ray well log, Ontology, Semantic image interpretation, Stratigraphy, Symbol grounding problem, Visual knowledge

Sandro Rama Fiorini; Mara Abel; Claiton M. S. Scherer

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Meta-interpretation of recursive list-processing programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presented Is an implemented program understanding system called CAN. CAN relies on a meta-interpretation process which brings to light two new concepts concerning meta-interpretation of recursive programs: vicious circles and constructive induction. ... Keywords: conceptual representations, constructive induction, meta-interpretation, program understanding, propagation, unification, vicious circle

Daniel Goossens

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Data for the geochemical investigation of UMTRAP designated site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the geochemical data and the methods of data collection from the former tailings site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. Data are from a one-time sampling of waters and solid material from the background, the area adjacent to the site, and the site. Selected solid samples are water extracted to remove easily soluble salts and acid extracted to remove carbonates and hydroxides. The waters, extracts, and solid samples were analyzed for selected major and trace elements. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Markos, G.; Bush, K.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

144

Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project was to bridge the gap between our knowledge of small-scale geochemical reaction rates and reaction rates meaningful for modeling transport at core scales. The working hypothesis was that reaction rates, determined from laboratory measurements based upon reactions typically conducted in well mixed batch reactors using pulverized reactive media may be significantly changed in in situ porous media flow due to rock microstructure heterogeneity. Specifically we hypothesized that, generally, reactive mineral surfaces are not uniformly accessible to reactive fluids due to the random deposition of mineral grains and to the variation in flow rates within a pore network. Expected bulk reaction rates would therefore have to be correctly up-scaled to reflect such heterogeneity. The specific objective was to develop a computational tool that integrates existing measurement capabilities with pore-scale network models of fluid flow and reactive transport. The existing measurement capabilities to be integrated consisted of (a) pore space morphology, (b) rock mineralogy, and (c) geochemical reaction rates. The objective was accomplished by: (1) characterizing sedimentary sandstone rock morphology using X-ray computed microtomography, (2) mapping rock mineralogy using back-scattered electron microscopy (BSE), X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and CMT, (3) characterizing pore-accessible reactive mineral surface area, and (4) creating network models to model acidic CO{sub 2} saturated brine injection into the sandstone rock samples.

Lindquist, W Brent

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

145

Phosphor Thermometry Signal Analysis and Interpretation  

SciTech Connect

Since the last International Temperature Symposium, phosphor thermometry has continued to mature with considerable attention given to combustion and turbine engine applications. More recently the utility to problems on the micro- and nano-scales has appreciated, particularly in regard to biological and biomedical situations. The method is therefore used for a wide range of situations. Signal interpretation is important and experience teaches that without sufficient care phosphor signals can be misleading. In order to advance the method, signal analysis investigations should prove fruitful. The specific aspect addressed here is the question of waveform sampling. A simple phenomenological approach is described that explores how the number of points digitized per waveform affects the measurement repeatability and accuracy. This is demonstrated for single shot signals and the average of 512 sequential waveforms. A bright temperature-independent luminescence signal from YVO4:Eu is sampled every 800 ps for a highly sampled condition and every 8 microseconds for a low sampled condition. When the average of 512 waveforms are compared for the two sampling conditions, they differ by only 0.4%. For the highly sampled case, a noisy single shot waveform compared to the averaged waveform differed by 1.8%. Future efforts on this subject will address intermediate and lower sampling rates. Also, variable window techniques should be explored that are especially important for non-log-linear signals. Investigations, such as this, give the developer the requisite information for designing analysis systems appropriate for the intended application in terms of precision, accuracy, and response time.

Allison, Stephen W [ORNL; Gillies, George T. [University of Virginia

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

The role of interpreters in high performance computing  

SciTech Connect

Compiled code is fast, interpreted code is slow. There is not much we can do about it, and it's the reason why interpreters use in high performance computing is usually restricted to job submission. We show where interpreters make sense even in the context of analysis code, and what aspects have to be taken into account to make this combination a success.

Naumann, Axel; /CERN; Canal, Philippe; /Fermilab

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid...

148

Interpretations of Space-Time Spectral Energy Equations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interpretations are given of two different formulations of space-time spectral energy equations derived by Kao (1968) and Hayashi (1980).

Yoshikazu Hayashi

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL INTERPRETATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

General Counsel is responding to a request to provide an interpretation concerning a DOE Nuclear Safety Requirement: the application of DOE Technical Standard 1027-92, Hazard...

150

Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal wells at Coso, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article:...

151

Chemical analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Chemical analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from the CGEH No. 1...

152

Remote Sensing- Principles And Interpretation | Open Energy Informatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Reference Material: Remote Sensing- Principles And Interpretation Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0)...

153

The Particle Adventure | How do we interpret our data? | Measuring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerators and particle detectors - How do we interpret our data? - Measuring charge and momentum One important function of the detector is to measure a particle's charge and...

154

The Particle Adventure | How do we interpret our data? | Modern...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerators and particle detectors - How do we interpret our data? - Modern detectors Modern detectors consist of many different pieces of equipment which test for different...

155

3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field, Indonesia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: 3-D...

156

Interpretation of self-potential measurements during injection...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

self-potential measurements during injection tests at Raft River, Idaho. Final report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Interpretation of...

157

Geological, geochemical, and geophysical survey of the geothermal resources at Hot Springs Bay Valley, Akutan Island, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An extensive survey was conducted of the geothermal resource potential of Hot Springs Bay Valley on Akutan Island. A topographic base map was constructed, geologic mapping, geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted, and the thermal waters and fumarolic gases were analyzed for major and minor element species and stable isotope composition. (ACR)

Motyka, R.J.; Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Swanson, S.E.; Romick, J.D.; Moorman, M.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Witte, W.; Petzinger, B.; Allely, R.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Geochemical Data on Waters, gases, scales, and rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales, rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples from which the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. These data provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermal energy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in this region.

Goff, Fraser; Bergfeld, Deborah; Janik, C.J.; et al

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Geochemical records in the South China Sea: implications for East Asian summer monsoon evolution over the last 20 Ma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical records in the South China Sea: implications for East Asian summer monsoon evolution past changes in the East Asian summer monsoon over the last 20 Ma using samples from Ocean Drilling and combined review suggests that the long-term evolution of the East Asian summer monsoon is similar

Clift, Peter

160

VOLTINT: A Matlab-based program for semi-automated processing of geochemical data acquired by voltammetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent progress has resulted in the development of advanced techniques to acquire geochemical information in situ in aquatic systems. Among these techniques, voltammetry has generated significant interest for its ability to detect several important redox-sensitive ... Keywords: Data processing, Geochemistry, Integration, Matlab, Software, Voltammetry

Gwendolyn Bristow; Martial Taillefert

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera: proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop reviewed the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and tectonic processes. Workshop participants discussed the need to instrument sites for continuous measurements of several parameters and to obtain additional hydrologic and chemical information from intermediate and deep drill holes. In addition to seismic and deformation monitoring, programs are currently in progress to monitor changes in the discharge characteristics of hot springs, fumaroles, and soil gases, as well as pressures and temperatures in wells. Some hydrochemical parameters are measured continuously, others are measured monthly or at longer intervals. This report summarizes the information presented at the hydrologic monitoring workshop, following the workshop agenda which was divided into four sessions: (1) overview of the hydrothermal system; (2) monitoring springs, fumaroles, and wells; (3) monitoring gas emissions; and (4) conclusions and recommendations.

Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The Emergence and Interpretation of Probability in Bohmian Mechanics1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Emergence and Interpretation of Probability in Bohmian Mechanics1 The Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics is capable of illustrating, by itself, virtually every philosophical and foundational comes in many forms, both stochastic and deterministic. The other reason is that quantum mechanics

Callender, Craig

163

Experimental evaluation of a generic abstract interpretation algorithm for PROLOG  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract interpretation of PROLOG programs has attracted many researchers in recent years, partly because of the potential for optimization in PROLOG compilers and partly because of the declarative nature of logic programming languages that make them ... Keywords: PROLOG, abstract interpretation, fixpoint algorithm

Baudouin Le Charlier; Pascal Van Hentenryck

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Edgemont, South Dakota; Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Results of the Edgemont detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 109 groundwater and 419 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are given. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Groundwaters containing greater than or equal to 7.35 ppB uranium are present in scattered clusters throughout the area sampled. Most of these groundwaters are from wells drilled where the Inyan Kara Group is exposed at the surface. The exceptions are a group of samples in the northwestern part of the area sampled and south of the Dewey Terrace. These groundwaters are also produced from the Inyan Kara Group where it is overlain by the Graneros Group and alluvium. The high uranium groundwaters along and to the south of the terrace are characterized by high molybdenum, uranium/specific conductance, and uranium/sulfate values. Many of the groundwaters sampled along the outcrop of the Inyan Kara Group are near uranium mines. Groundwaters have high amounts of uranium and molybdenum. Samples taken downdip are sulfide waters with low values of uranium and high values of arsenic, molybdenum, selenium, and vanadium. Stream sediments containing greater than or equal to 5.50 ppM soluble uranium are concentrated in basins draining the Graneros and Inyan Kara Groups. These values are associated with high values for arsenic, selenium, and vanadium in samples from both groups. Anomalous values for these elements in the Graneros Group may be caused by bentonite beds contained in the rock units. As shown on the geochemical distribution plot, high uranium values that are located in the Inyan Kara Group are almost exclusively draining open-pit uranium mines.

Butz, T.R.; Dean, N.E.; Bard, C.S.; Helgerson, R.N.; Grimes, J.G.; Pritz, P.M.

1980-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

166

DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG GRAPHS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG GRAPHS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This is the fourth paper in a series on developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) as a logging tool for geothermal bore holes. Here we address methods of displaying analyses and plotting gas ratios used for data interpretation on mudlog plots. The goal is to develop a rapid method of data display and interpretation for the up to 10,000 analyses returned by a geothermal well FIS analysis. Author(s): Norman, D.I.; Dilley, L.M.; McCulloch, J. Published: PROCEEDINGS, Thirtieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir

167

Aeromagnetic Survey And Interpretation, Ascention Island, South Atlantic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

And Interpretation, Ascention Island, South Atlantic And Interpretation, Ascention Island, South Atlantic Ocean Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Aeromagnetic Survey And Interpretation, Ascention Island, South Atlantic Ocean Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A detailed aeromagnetic survey of Ascension Island, which was completed in February and March of 1983 as part of an evaluation of the geothermal potential of the island, is described. The aeromagnetic map represents a basic data set useful for the interpretation of subsurface geology. An in situ magnetic susceptibility survey was also carried out to assist in understanding the magnetic properties of Ascension rocks and to aid in the interpretation of the aeromagnetic data. The aeromagnetic survey

168

Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretation Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretation of Thermal Infrared Satellite Images Used in Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretation of Thermal Infrared Satellite Images Used in Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Examples of nighttime temperature inversions are shown in thermal infrared satellite images collected over the Coso geothermal field in eastern California. Temperature-elevation plots show the normal trend of temperature decrease with elevation, on which temperature inversions appear superimposed as opposite trends. Such inversions are common and they should

169

Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Geochemical data package for the Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment (ILAW PA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method of disposing of the portion that is classified as low-activity waste is to vitrify the liquid/slurry and place the solid product in near-surface, shallow-land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the porewater of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assists LMHC in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the disposal facility, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) and the thermodynamic solubility product (K{sub sp}), respectively. In this data package, the authors approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. In future geochemical data packages, they will determine whether a more rigorous measure of solubility is necessary or warranted based on the dose predictions emanating from the ILAW 2001 PA and reviewers' comments. The K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the ILAW system. In addition to the best-estimate K{sub d}s, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. They assume that K{sub d} values are log normally distributed over the cited ranges. Currently, they do not give estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, they supply different values for both the K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the ILAW system and supply time-varying K{sub d}s for the concrete zone, should the final repository design include concrete vaults or cement amendments to buffer the system pH.

DI Kaplan; RJ Serne

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

171

DOE Withdraws Interpretive Rule and Provides Enforcement Guidance on  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interpretive Rule and Provides Enforcement Guidance Interpretive Rule and Provides Enforcement Guidance on Showerheads DOE Withdraws Interpretive Rule and Provides Enforcement Guidance on Showerheads March 4, 2011 - 5:27pm Addthis The Department has withdrawn as unwarranted the draft interpretative rule setting out the Department's views on the definition of a "showerhead" for purposes of the water conservation standard enacted by Congress in 1992. To provide certainty going forward, however, the Department today provides a brief enforcement guidance, which balances the Department's obligation to enforce the congressional standard with its determination to avoid needless economic dislocation. The guidance, available here, explains how the Department intends to enforce the 1992 law and provides manufacturers a

172

Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: An electromagnetic (EM) controlled source survey was conducted in the Raft River Valley, near Malta, Idaho. The purpose of the survey was: to field test U.S. Geological Survey extra-low-frequency (ELF) equipment using a grounded wire source and receiver loop configuration (which is designed to measure the vertical magnetic field (Hz) at the loop center for various frequencies); to present an example of the EM sounding data and interpretations using a previously developed inversion program; and (3) to

173

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper focuses on the interpretation of the additional wells (4 bore holes) and comparison to the previous wells. Preliminary correlation between wells is also presented. Analyses from multiple boreholes show fluid stratigraphy that correlates from well to well. The wells include large producers, small to moderate producers, problem producers, injectors, and non producers Author(s): Dilley, L.M.; Newman, D.L. ; McCulloch, J.; Wiggett, G. Published: Geothermal Resource Council Transactions 2005, 1/1/2005

174

An Interpretation of Sudden Warmings In Terms of Potential vorticity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple and concise interpretation of stratospheric sudden warmings is offered in terms Of the transient changes in the potential vorticity pattern. The warming is viewed as a manifestation of the reversal of the mean (zonally averaged) relative ...

H. C. Davies

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Filters and Approximate Confidence Intervals for Interpreting Rainfall Anomaly indices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rainfall anomaly index (RAI) has been widely used to study variations over time in Sahelian rainfall. Its interpretation is often complicated by excessive missing data and changes in station network, both of which prevent a precise ...

L. Brring; M. Hulme

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

APS Tcl/Tk library and interpreter extensions  

SciTech Connect

This document serves as a User`s Manual and Reference for the library of Tcl and Tk procedures produced by the Operations Analysis Group. Also covered are compiled interpreter extensions.

Saunders, C.; Borland, M.

1995-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

177

Interpreting Conductivity Microstructure: Estimating the Temperature Variance Dissipation Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple model of the conductivity gradient spectrum is developed and used to interpret oceanic conductivity microstructure observations. A principal goal is to estimate the correction factor E for inferring the temperature variance dissipation ...

Libe Washburn; Timothy F. Duda; David C. Jacobs

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Interpreting Meteorological Satellite Images Using a Color-Composite Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An image-display technique is described that simultaneously combines three meteorological satellite images into a color-image product. The technique reveals many features of meteorological interest. It is frequently noted that interpretations of ...

Robert P. d'Entremont; Larry W. Thomason

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The Particle Adventure | How do we interpret our data? | Quiz...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accelerators and particle detectors - How do we interpret our data? - Quiz - Particle tracks These next 6 event pictures are from a modern detector and show some of the possible...

180

DOE interpretations Guide to OSH standards. Update to the Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reflecting Secretary O`Leary`s focus on occupational safety and health, the Office of Occupational Safety is pleased to provide you with the latest update to the DOE Interpretations Guide to OSH Standards. This Guide was developed in cooperation with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which continued its support during this last revision by facilitating access to the interpretations found on the OSHA Computerized Information System (OCIS). This March 31, 1994 update contains 123 formal interpretation letters written OSHA. As a result of the unique requests received by the 1-800 Response Line, this update also contains 38 interpretations developed by DOE. This new occupational safety and health information adds still more important guidance to the four volume reference set that you presently have in your possession.

Not Available

1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Interpretation of Simulated Global Warming Using a Simple Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple energy balance model with two parameters, an effective heat capacity and an effective climate sensitivity, is used to interpret six GCM simulations of greenhouse gasinduced global warming. By allowing the parameters to vary in time, the ...

I. G. Watterson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Precise goal-independent abstract interpretation of constraint logic programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a goal-independent abstract interpretation framework for constraint logic programs, and prove the sufficiency of a set of conditions for abstract domains to ensure that the analysis will never lose precision. Along the way, we formally define ...

Peter Schachte

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Reading Through a Plan: A Visual Theory of Plan Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Problem: Planners may read plans often, but the profession continues to view the interpretation of plan content as something that is either too obvious or too unimportant to require explicit discussion. Plans are seldom ...

Ryan, Brent D.

184

Property Checking Driven Abstract Interpretation-Based Static Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Concrete semantics used for abstract interpretation analyses are generally expressed as fixpoints. Checking a property on this kind of semantics can be done by intersecting the fixpoint with a specification related to the property. In this paper, we ...

Damien Mass

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Regional Characteristics for Interpreting Inverted Echo Sounder (IES) Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in round-trip acoustc travel time (?) measured between a bottom moored inverted echo sounder and the sea surface can be interpreted as changes in dynamic height (D) with suitable calibration information. The ?, D, and isotherm and ...

Zachariah R. Hallock

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Toward Automated Interpretation of Satellite Imagery for Navy Shipboard Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Navy has plans to develop an automated system to analyze satellite imagery aboard its ships at sea. Lack of time for training, in combination with frequent personnel rotations, precludes the building of extensive imagery interpretation ...

James E. Peak; Paul M. Tag

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Alternative Interpretations for Microstructure Patches in the Thermocline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two interpretations of microstructure patches measured in the main thermocline of the North Pacific by Gregg (1980) are questioned. He concludes that the observed microstructure is not fossil-temperature turbulence and that the observed Cox ...

Carl H. Gibson

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Externalizing and Interpreting Autonomic Arousal in People Diagnosed with Autism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

through a home-based study, a lab-based study, and a school-based study in order to facilitate social) for assisting the interpretations of individuals' arousal states. First, the home-based study is a participant

189

Physical Interpretation of Results from the HIPLEX-1 Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The general characteristics of the clouds that were included in the HIPLEX-1 experiment are reviewed, and the results for the response variables are interpreted in light of other measurements from the instrumented aircraft. In most seeded clouds, ...

William A. Cooper; R. Paul Lawson

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

DOE interpretations Guide to OSH standards. Update to the Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reflecting Secretary O`Leary`s focus on occupational safety and health, the Office of Occupational Safety is pleased to provide you with the latest update to the DOE Interpretations Guide to OSH Standards. This Guide was developed in cooperation with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which continued its support during this last revision by facilitating access to the interpretations found on the OSHA Computerized Information System (OCIS). This March 31, 1994 update contains 123 formal interpretation letters written by OSHA. As a result of the unique requests received by the 1-800 Response Line, this update also contains 38 interpretations developed by DOE. This new occupational safety and health information adds still more important guidance to the four volume reference set that you presently have in your possession.

Not Available

1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

191

An Interpretable Stroke Prediction Model using Rules and Bayesian Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We aim to produce predictive models that are not only accurate, but are also interpretable to human experts. Our models are decision lists, which consist of a series of if...then... statements (for example, if high blood ...

Letham, Benjamin

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

192

Enhanced Interpretation of Electromagnetic Signature Analysis for Large Machines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project developed and applied frequency domain models to enhance interpretation of electromagnetic signature analysis (EMSA) for large electrical generators. The project's rationale was to provide a prediction of the native frequency response of the winding calculated from machine dimensions and design data so that the positions of the resonances would be known a priore. This procedure allowed augmentation of an EMSA spectrum at the characteristic resonant frequencies of the machine in the interpret...

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

193

Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Topical Report CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380 Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2011 Oil & Natural Gas Technology Office of Fossil Energy Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah Topical Report Reporting Period: October 31, 2009 through March 31, 2011 Authors: Lauren P. Birgenheier, Energy and Geoscience Insitute, University of Utah

194

Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical aspects of site-specific studies of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource of southern Louisiana. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report consists of four sections dealing with progress in evaluating geologic, geochemical, and geophysical aspects of geopressured-geothermal energy resources in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual sections. (ACR)

Pilger, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the InSalah CO2 Storage Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the In Salah CO 2 Storage Project Background Safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs is critical to geologic sequestration. The In Salah Project (joint venture of British Petroleum (BP), Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro) has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 billion cubic feet per year (bcfy) natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian

196

The application of PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, to aid in the management of a wastewater treatment wetland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past decade, constructed wetlands have become popular for treating coal-generated acid mine drainage and leachate from coal-ash disposal areas. The goal of the wetland manager is to design a system in which the pH is neutralized, toxic metals are removed, and wetland discharge meets or exceeds discharge standards for water quality. This is typically accomplished by using a combination of wetlands, ponds, and limestone drains. The treatment capability of a constructed wetland is based on relationships among dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, and metal speciation. The aim of this research was to determine if PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, could be used in wetland management and design. The wetland site chosen for this study was at a Texas Municipal Power Agency (TMPA) plant located in Grimes County, Texas and was created to treat leachate from a solid waste disposal area where coal ash and SO? scrubber sludge was deposited. The leachate contains significant concentrations of sulfate, chloride, total dissolved solids (TDS), arsenic, and selenium. Using PHREEQCi, geochemical speciation models were created to study the interrelationships between critical chemical components at the TMPA site in order to establish an optimum set of conditions to improve treatment capability and to avoid wetland failure. The results of the geochemical speciation modeling indicated a challenging situation for a wetland manager because different species precipitate under contrasting environments. In order to apply the geochemical speciation results to the design of the TMPA site, two conditions must be recognized. First, metal removal is best accomplished by generating alkaline and oxidative conditions to promote metal-oxide precipitation. Second, sulfate can be controlled under reducing environments where it is converted to sulfide and metal sulfides precipitate. Chlorides are very soluble and no viable conclusions as to the most appropriate removal method could be postulated. TDS has an ambiguous composition and could not be modeled using PHREEQCi.

Mitzman, Stephanie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Geochemical Fingerprinting of Coltan Ores by Machine Learning on Uneven Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two modern machine learning techniques, Linear Programming Boosting (LPBoost) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs), are introduced and applied to a geochemical dataset of niobium-tantalum ('coltan') ores from Central Africa to demonstrate how such information may be used to distinguish ore provenance, i.e., place of origin. The compositional data used include uni- and multivariate outliers and elemental distributions are not described by parametric frequency distribution functions. The 'soft margin' techniques of LPBoost and SVMs can be applied to such data. Optimization of their learning parameters results in an average accuracy of up to c. 92%, if spot measurements are assessed to estimate the provenance of ore samples originating from two geographically defined source areas. A parameterized performance measure, together with common methods for its optimization, was evaluated to account for the presence of uneven datasets. Optimization of the classification function threshold improves the performance, as class importance is shifted towards one of those classes. For this dataset, the average performance of the SVMs is significantly better compared to that of LPBoost.

Savu-Krohn, Christian, E-mail: christian.savu-krohn@unileoben.ac.at; Rantitsch, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.rantitsch@unileoben.ac.at [Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Department of Applied Geosciences and Geophysics (Austria); Auer, Peter, E-mail: auer@unileoben.ac.at [Chair for Information Technology, Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria); Melcher, Frank, E-mail: frank.melcher@bgr.de; Graupner, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.graupner@bgr.de [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (Germany)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

198

Geochemical and physical properties of soils and shallow sediments at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A program to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of the unimpacted soils and shallow sediments at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been completed. The maximum, minimum, median, standard deviation, and mean values for metals, radionuclides, inorganic anions, organic compounds, and agricultural indicator parameters are summarized for six soil series that were identified as representative of the 29 soil series at SRS. The soils from unimpacted areas of SRS are typical of soils found in moderately aggressive weathering environments, including the southeastern United States. Appendix 8 organic compounds were detected in all samples. Since these constituents are not generally present in soil, this portion of the investigation was intended to assess possible laboratory artifacts. An additional objective of the SRS Soil Study was to determine if the composition of the split spoon sampler biased chemical analysis of the soils. Twenty-five duplicate samples were analyzed for a number of metals, radiological and agricultural parameters, and organics by two laboratories currently contracted with to analyze samples during waste site characterization. In all cases, the absolute values of the average differences are relatively small compared to the overall variability in the population. 31 refs., 14 figs., 48 tabs.

Looney, B.B.; Eddy, C.A.; Ramdeen, M.; Pickett, J. (Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)); Rogers, V. (Soil Conservation Service, Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Site Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)); Scott, M.T.; Shirley, P.A. (Sirrine Environmental Consultants, Greenville, SC (USA))

1990-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Changes in Bacterial And Archaeal Community Structure And Functional Diversity Along a Geochemically Variable Soil Profile  

SciTech Connect

Spatial heterogeneity in physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils allows for the proliferation of diverse microbial communities. Factors influencing the structuring of microbial communities, including availability of nutrients and water, pH, and soil texture, can vary considerably with soil depth and within soil aggregates. Here we investigated changes in the microbial and functional communities within soil aggregates obtained along a soil profile spanning the surface, vadose zone, and saturated soil environments. The composition and diversity of microbial communities and specific functional groups involved in key pathways in the geochemical cycling of nitrogen, Fe, and sulfur were characterized using a coupled approach involving cultivation-independent analysis of both 16S rRNA (bacterial and archaeal) and functional genes (amoA and dsrAB) as well as cultivation-based analysis of Fe(III)-reducing organisms. Here we found that the microbial communities and putative ammonia-oxidizing and Fe(III)-reducing communities varied greatly along the soil profile, likely reflecting differences in carbon availability, water content, and pH. In particular, the Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA sequences are largely unique to each horizon, sharing a distribution and diversity similar to those of the putative (amoA-based) ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community. Anaerobic microenvironments within soil aggregates also appear to allow for both anaerobic- and aerobic-based metabolisms, further highlighting the complexity and spatial heterogeneity impacting microbial community structure and metabolic potential within soils.

Hansel, C.M.; Fendorf, S.; Jardine, P.M.; Francis, C.A.

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

200

Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A discussion of the geology and the wellfield development at Raft River is presented. The geothermal resource is located in a downdropped and downwarped basin bordered on east, west, and south by mountain ranges that vary in both stratigraphy and structure. It is inferred that the geothermal resource occurs where hydrothermal water rises at the intersection of and along the Narrows Zone and the Bridge Fault. Three exploration wells, two development wells, and two injection wells were drilled. The basic strategy of field development was to drill deep production wells on the faulted

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal wells at Coso, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal wells at Coso, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Wellhead and downhole water samples were collected and analyzed from a 114.3-m well at Coso Hot Springs (Coso No. 1) and a 1477-m well (CGEH No. 1) 3.2 km to the west. The same chloride concentration is present in hot waters entering both wells (about 2350 mg/kg), indicating that a hot-water-dominated geothermal system is present. The maximum measured temperatures are 142 degrees C in the Coso No. 1 well and 195 degrees C in the CGEH No. 1 well. Cation and sulfate isotope geothermometers indicate

202

Chemical analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from the CGEH No. 1 geothermal well at Coso, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Chemical analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from the CGEH No. 1 geothermal well at Coso, California Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: The chloride-rich water obtained in 1967 from the shallow (114.3 m) Coso Hot Springs well No. 1 comes from a deep aquifer with a temperature at least as high as about 240 C and possibly higher than 275 C. Similar, but slightly diluted and cooled chloride-rich water enters the 1477-meter deep CGEH No. 1 well drilled in 1977 about 3.2 km to the west of the 1967 well. From the data in hand the Coso geothermal system appears to be a hot

203

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL INTERPRETATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTERPRETATION INTERPRETATION REGARDING THE APPLICATION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARD 1027-92, HAZARD CATEGORIZATION AND ACCIDENT ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH DOE ORDER 5480.23, NUCLEAR SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORTS, UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF 10 C.F.R. § 830.202(b)(3) In accordance with 10 C.F.R § 820.51, the Department of Energy (DOE) Acting General Counsel is responding to a request to provide an interpretation concerning a DOE Nuclear Safety Requirement: the application of DOE Technical Standard 1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports (hereafter "TS 1027" or "Standard"), under the provisions of 10 C.F.R. § 830.202(b)(3). Specifically, the Acting General Counsel was asked:

204

Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be directly used only to evaluate porous medium compressibility if porosity is known. Moreover, since specific storage S/sub s/ quantifies a drained behavior of the porous medium, one cannot

205

DOE interpretations Guide to OSH standards. Update to the Guide  

SciTech Connect

Reflecting Secretary O`Leary`s focus on occupational safety and health, the Office of Occupational Safety is pleased to provide you with the latest update to the DOE Interpretations Guide to OSH Standards. This Guide was developed in cooperation with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which continued it`s support during this last revision by facilitating access to the interpretations found on the OSHA Computerized Information System (OCIS). This March 31, 1994 update contains 123 formal in letter written by OSHA. As a result of the unique requests received by the 1-800 Response Line, this update also contains 38 interpretations developed by DOE. This new occupational safety and health information adds still more important guidance to the four volume reference set that you presently have in your possession.

Not Available

1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Compile-time Derivation of Variable Dependency Using Abstract Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional schemes for abstract interpretation-based global analysis of logic programs generally focus on obtaining procedure argument mode and type information. Variable sharing information is often given only the attention needed to preserve the correctness of the analysis. However, such sharing information can be very useful. In particular, it can be used for predicting runtime goal independence, which can eliminate costly run-time checks in and-parallel execution. In this paper, a new algorithm for doing abstract interpretation in logic programs is described which concentrates on inferring the dependencies of the terms bound to program variables with increased precision and at all points in the execution of the program, rather than just at a procedure level. Algorithms are presented for computing abstract entry and success substitutions which extensively domain independent fixpoint algorithm is presented and described in detail. The algorithms are illustrated with examples. Finally, results from an implementation of the abstract interpreter are presented. 1

K. Muthukumar; M. Hermenegildo

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Computational Intelligence for Deepwater Reservoir Depositional Environments Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Predicting oil recovery efficiency of a deepwater reservoir is a challenging task. One approach to characterize a deepwater reservoir and to predict its producibility is by analyzing its depositional information. This research proposes a deposition-based stratigraphic interpretation framework for deepwater reservoir characterization. In this framework, one critical task is the identification and labeling of the stratigraphic components in the reservoir, according to their depositional environments. This interpretation process is labor intensive and can produce different results depending on the stratigrapher who performs the analysis. To relieve stratigrapher's workload and to produce more consistent results, we have developed a novel methodology to automate this process using various computational intelligence techniques. Using a well log data set, we demonstrate that the developed methodology and the designed workflow can produce finite state transducer models that interpret deepwater reservoir depositional...

Yu, Tina; Clark, Julian; Sullivan, Morgan; 10.1016/j.jngse.2011.07.014

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data Abstract Geothermal reinjection is an important part of sustainable management of geothermal resources. Reinjection started out as a method of waste-water disposal, but is now also being used to counteract pressure draw-down and to extract more thermal energy from reservoir rocks. The possible cooling of production wells, or thermal breakthrough, is one of the main disadvantages associated with injection. To minimize this danger while maintaining the benefit from reinjection requires careful testing and research. Tracer testing, which is used to study flow-paths and quantify fluid-flow in hydrological systems, is probably the most important tool for

209

Mineralogic Interpretation Of Hymap Hyperspectral Data, Dixie Valley,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineralogic Interpretation Of Hymap Hyperspectral Data, Dixie Valley, Mineralogic Interpretation Of Hymap Hyperspectral Data, Dixie Valley, Nevada, USA-Initial Results Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Mineralogic Interpretation Of Hymap Hyperspectral Data, Dixie Valley, Nevada, USA-Initial Results Abstract A collaborative effort among U. S. Department of Energy sponsored remote sensing specialists and industry recently culminated in the acquisition of hyperspectral data over a new exploration target in Dixie Valley, Nevada, U. S. A. Related research at the Energy & Geoscience Institute is currently focused on mineralogy mapping at the outcrop level. This will be extended to piedmont and valley fill soils to detect soil mineral anomalies that may be related to buried structures and sinters. Spectral mineral end-members

210

Interpret your results | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interpret your results Interpret your results Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager The new ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager How Portfolio Manager helps you save The benchmarking starter kit Identify your property type Enter data into Portfolio Manager The data quality checker How Portfolio Manager calculates metrics

211

Geochemical Data Package for the 2005 Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is designing and assessing the performance of an integrated disposal facility (IDF) to receive low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW), and failed or decommissioned melters. The CH2M HILL project to assess the performance of this disposal facility is the Hanford IDF Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of the Hanford IDF PA activity is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the vadose zone to groundwater where contaminants may be re-introduced to receptors via drinking water wells or mixing in the Columbia River. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists CH2M HILL in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the IDF, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (Kd) and the thermodynamic solubility product (Ksp), respectively. In this data package, we approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. The Kd values and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the IDF system. In addition to the best-estimate Kd values, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. The data package does not list estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, the data package does provide different values for both the Kd values and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the IDF system and does supply time-varying Kd values for the cement solidified waste. The Kd values and solution concentration limits presented for each contaminant were previously presented in a report prepared by Kaplan and Serne (2000) for the 2001 ILAW PA, and have been updated to include applicable data from investigations completed since the issuance of that report and improvements in our understanding of the geochemistry specific to Hanford. A discussion is also included of the evolution of the Kd values recommended from the original 1999 ILAW PA through the 2001 ILAW and 2003 Supplement PAs to the current values to be used for the 2005 IDF PA for the key contaminants of concern: Cr(VI), nitrate, 129I, 79Se, 99Tc, and U(VI). This discussion provides the rationale for why certain Kd have changed with time.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Kaplan, D I.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

Geochemical engineering design tools for uranium in situ recovery : the HYDROGEOCHEM codes.  

SciTech Connect

Geochemical Engineering Design (GED) is based on applications of the principles and various computer models that describe the biogeochemistry and physics of removal of contaminants from water by adsorption, precipitation and filtration. It can be used to optimize or evaluate the efficiency of all phases of in situ recovery (ISR). The primary tools of GED are reactive transport models; this talk describes the potential application of the HYDROGEOCHEM family of codes to ISR. The codes can describe a complete suite of equilibrium or kinetic aqueous complexation, adsorption-desorption, precipitation-dissolution, redox, and acid-base reactions in variably saturated media with density-dependent fluid flow. Applications to ISR are illustrated with simulations of (1) the effectiveness of a reactive barrier to prevent off-site uranium migration and (2) evaluation of the effect of sorption hysteresis on natural attenuation. In the first example, it can be seen that the apparent effectiveness of the barrier depends on monitoring location and that it changes over time. This is due to changes in pH, saturation of sorption sites, as well as the geometry of the flow field. The second simulation shows how sorption hysteresis leads to observable attenuation of a uranium contamination plume. Different sorption mechanisms including fast (or reversible), slow, and irreversible sorption were simulated. The migration of the dissolved and total uranium plumes for the different cases are compared and the simulations show that when 50-100% of the sites have slow desorption rates, the center of mass of the dissolved uranium plume begins to move upstream. This would correspond to the case in which the plume boundaries begin to shrink as required for demonstration of natural attenuation.

Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Li, Ming-Hsu (National Central University, Jhongli City, Taiwan); Yeh, Gour-Tsyh (University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Keeping up appearances: interpretation of tangible artifact design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and interaction of physical game artifacts is becoming increasingly important for the design of digital tabletop games. In this paper a study is described investigating the differences in interpretations of realistic and abstract game artifacts ... Keywords: digital tabletop games, interaction design, semiotics, tangible interaction

Marigo Heijboer; Elise van den Hoven

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Semantic interpretation of noun compounds using verbal and other paraphrases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the problem of semantic interpretation of noun compounds such as bee honey, malaria mosquito, apple cake, and stem cell. In particular, we explore the potential of using predicates that make explicit the hidden relation ... Keywords: Lexical semantics, Web as a corpus, machine translation, multiword expressions, noun compounds, paraphrases

Preslav I. Nakov; Marti A. Hearst

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Methodological Review: Computer-interpretable clinical guidelines: A methodological review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) aim to improve the quality of care, reduce unjustified practice variations and reduce healthcare costs. In order for them to be effective, clinical guidelines need to be integrated with the care flow and provide patient-specific ... Keywords: Clinical practice guidelines, Computer-interpretable clinical guidelines, Decision-support systems, Knowledge representation

Mor Peleg

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Objective Inde...niteness Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Objective Inde...niteness Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics David Ellerman University of California at Riverside Draft (not for quotation) May 28, 2013 Abstract Quantum mechanics (QM models indef- inite elements that become more de...nite as distinctions are made. If quantum mechanics

Wüthrich, Christian

217

On the Faithful Interpretation of Pure Wave Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Faithful Interpretation of Pure Wave Mechanics Jeffrey A. Barrett ABSTRACT Given Hugh-state formulation of pure wave mechanics arguably qualifies as an empirically acceptable physical theory resolution to both the determinate record and the probability problems encountered by pure wave mechanics

Barrett, Jeffrey A.

218

ON THE FAITHFUL INTERPRETATION OF PURE WAVE MECHANICS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON THE FAITHFUL INTERPRETATION OF PURE WAVE MECHANICS JEFFREY A. BARRETT In the long version of his Ph.D. thesis, Hugh Everett III developed pure wave mechanics as a way of solving the quantum measurement problem faced by the standard von Neumann-Dirac collapse formulation of quantum mechanics.1 Pure

Wüthrich, Christian

219

Modeling brine-rock interactions in an enhanced geothermal system deep fractured reservoir at Soultz-Sous-Forets (France): a joint approach using two geochemical codes: frachem and toughreact  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

150 p. Bchler, D. , Durst, P. , Evans, K. , Hopkirk, R. ,in Mineralogy, 29: 259-308. Durst, P. , (2002). Geochemical1999. Rabemanana, V. , Durst, P. , Bchler, D. , Vuataz,

Andre, Laurent; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Vuataz, Francois-D.; Pruess, Karsten.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the plume. If the multiple lines of evidence support the occurrence of cometabolism and the potential for the process to contribute to temporal and spatial attenuation of TCE in PGDP groundwater, then a follow-up enzyme probe microcosm study to better estimate biological degradation rate(s) is warranted.

Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

2008-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geochemical Characterization of Chromate Contamination in the 100 Area Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major objectives of the proposed study were to: 1.) determine the leaching characteristics of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated sediments collected from 100 Area spill sites; 2.) elucidate possible Cr(VI) mineral and/or chemical associations that may be responsible for Cr(VI) retention in the Hanford Site 100 Areas through the use of i.) macroscopic leaching studies and ii.) microscale characterization of contaminated sediments; and 3.) provide information to construct a conceptual model of Cr(VI) geochemistry in the Hanford 100 Area vadose zone. In addressing these objectives, additional benefits accrued were: (1) a fuller understanding of Cr(VI) entrained in the vadose zone that will that can be utilized in modeling potential Cr(VI) source terms, and (2) accelerating the Columbia River 100 Area corridor cleanup by providing valuable information to develop remedial action based on a fundamental understanding of Cr(VI) vadose zone geochemistry. A series of macroscopic column experiments were conducted with contaminated and uncontaminated sediments to study Cr(VI) desorption patterns in aged and freshly contaminated sediments, evaluate the transport characteristics of dichromate liquid retrieved from old pipelines of the 100 Area; and estimate the effect of strongly reducing liquid on the reduction and transport of Cr(VI). Column experiments used the with the column studies. Cr(VI) is found as ubiquitous coatings on sediment grain surfaces. Small, higher concentration, chromium sites are associated with secondary clay mineral inclusions, with occasional barium chromate minerals, and reduced to Cr(III) in association with iron oxides that are most likely magnetite primary minerals. Within the restricted access domains of sediment matrix, ferrous iron could also diffuse from in situ, high-surface-area minerals to cause the reductive immobilization of chromate. This process may be favored at microscale geochemical zones where ferrous iron could be supplied. Once nucleated, micrometer-scale precipitates are favored as growing locales for further accumulation, causing the formation of discrete zones of Cr(III).

Dresel, P. Evan; Qafoku, Nikolla; McKinley, James P.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Liu, Chongxuan; Ilton, Eugene S.; Phillips, J. L.

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

222

Final Report: Molecular Basis for Microbial Adhesion and Geochemical Surface Reactions: A Study Across Scales  

SciTech Connect

Computational chemistry was used to help provide a molecular level description of the interactions of Gram-negative microbial membranes with subsurface materials. The goal is to develop a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in microbial metal binding, microbial attachment to mineral surfaces, and, eventually, oxidation/reduction reactions (electron transfer) that can occur at these surfaces and are mediated by the bacterial exterior surface. The project focused on the interaction of the outer microbial membrane, which is dominated by an exterior lipopolysaccharide (LPS) portion, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with the mineral goethite and with solvated ions in the environment. This was originally a collaborative project with T.P. Straatsma and B. Lowery of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The University of Alabama effort used electronic structure calculations to predict the molecular behavior of ions in solution and the behavior of the sugars which form a critical part of the LPS. The interactions of the sugars with metal ions are expected to dominate much of the microscopic structure and transport phenomena in the LPS. This work, in combination with the molecular dynamics simulations of Straatsma and the experimental electrochemistry and microscopy measurements of Lowry, both at PNNL, is providing new insights into the detailed molecular behavior of these membranes in geochemical environments. The effort at The University of Alabama has three components: solvation energies and structures of ions in solution, prediction of the acidity of the critical groups in the sugars in the LPS, and binding of metal ions to the sugar anions. An important aspect of the structure of the LPS membrane as well as ion transport in the LPS is the ability of the sugar side groups such as the carboxylic acids and the phosphates to bind positively charged ions. We are studying the acidity of the acidic side groups in order to better understand the ability of these groups to bind metal ions. We need to understand the solvation properties of the metal ions in solution and their ability to bind not only to the sugars but to proteins and to other anions. Our goal is then to be able to predict the ability of the side groups to bind metal ions. One result from the earlier molecular dynamics simulations is the exclusion of water from the inner hydrophobic part of the membrane. We thus need to investigate the binding of the cations in media with different dielectric constants.

Dixon, David Adams [The University of Alabama

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

223

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Measurement and Interpretation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement and Interpretation of Seismic Velocities and Attenuation in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Measurement and Interpretation of Seismic Velocities and Attenuation in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FE0009963 Goal The primary project objectives are to relate seismic and acoustic velocities and attenuations to hydrate saturation and texture. The information collected will be a unique dataset in that seismic attenuation will be acquired within the seismic frequency band. The raw data, when combined with other measurements (e.g., complex resistivity, micro-focus x-ray computed tomography, etc.), will enable researchers to understand not only the interaction between mineral surfaces and gas hydrates, but also how the hydrate formation method affects the hydrate-sediment system in terms of elastic properties. An over-arching goal of this research is to calibrate geophysical

224

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Interpreting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interpreting Results Interpreting Results Sample Results from JEDI. Download a text-version (MS Excel 44 KB) The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models estimate the number of jobs and economic impacts associated with power generation, fuel production, and other projects. Economic activity in input-output models is typically assessed in three categories. NREL's JEDI models classify the first category of results-on-site labor and professional services results-as dollars spent on labor from companies engaged in development and on-site construction and operation of power generation and transmission. These results include labor only-no materials. Companies or businesses that fall into this category of results include project developers, environmental and permitting consultants, road builders, concrete-pouring

225

Interpretive Themes in Quantum Physics: Curriculum Development and Outcomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A common learning goal for modern physics instructors is for students to recognize a difference between the experimental uncertainty of classical physics and the fundamental uncertainty of quantum mechanics. Our prior work has shown that student perspectives on the physical interpretation of quantum mechanics can be characterized, and are differentially influenced by the myriad ways instructors approach interpretive themes in their introductory courses. We report how a transformed modern physics curriculum (recently implemented at the University of Colorado) has positively impacted student perspectives on quantum physics, by making questions of classical and quantum reality a central theme of the course, but also by making the beliefs of students (and not just those of scientists) an explicit topic of discussion.

Charles Baily; Noah D. Finkelstein

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

226

Interpretive Themes in Quantum Physics: Curriculum Development and Outcomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A common learning goal for modern physics instructors is for students to recognize a difference between the experimental uncertainty of classical physics and the fundamental uncertainty of quantum mechanics. Our prior work has shown that student perspectives on the physical interpretation of quantum mechanics can be characterized, and are differentially influenced by the myriad ways instructors approach interpretive themes in their introductory courses. We report how a transformed modern physics curriculum (recently implemented at the University of Colorado) has positively impacted student perspectives on quantum physics, by making questions of classical and quantum reality a central theme of the course, but also by making the beliefs of students (and not just those of scientists) an explicit topic of discussion.

Baily, Charles

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Determination of variable dependence information through abstract interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional schemes for abstract interpretation-based global analysis of logic programs generally focus on obtaining procedure argument mode and type information. Variable sharing information is often given only the attention needed to preserve the correctness of the analysis. However, such sharing information can be very useful. In particular, it can be used for predicting run-time goal independence, which can eliminate costly run-time checks in interpretation in logic programs is described which infers the dependencies of the terms bound to program variables with increased precision and at all points in the execution of the program, rather than just at a procedure level. Algorithms are presented for computing abstract entry and success substitutions which extensively keep track of variable aliasing and term dependence information. The algorithms are illustrated with examples. 1

K. Muthukumar; M. Hermenegildo

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Structural interpretation of the Coso geothermal field. Summary report,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, October 1986-August 1987 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Structural interpretation of the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, October 1986-August 1987 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field, located east of the Sierra Nevada at the northern edge of the high Mojave Desert in Southern California, is an excellent example of a structurally controlled geothermal resource. Author(s): Austin, C.F.; Moore, J.L. Published: Publisher Unknown, 9/1/1987 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1987) Coso Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Structural_interpretation_of_the_Coso_geothermal_field._Summary_report,_October_1986-August_1987&oldid=473519"

229

ON THE INTERPRETATION OF SUPERNOVA LIGHT ECHO PROFILES AND SPECTRA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The light echo (LE) systems of historical supernovae in the Milky Way and local group galaxies provide an unprecedented opportunity to reveal the effects of asymmetry on observables, particularly optical spectra. Scattering dust at different locations on the LE ellipsoid witnesses the supernova from different perspectives, and the light consequently scattered toward Earth preserves the shape of line profile variations introduced by asymmetries in the supernova photosphere. However, the interpretation of supernova LE spectra to date has not involved a detailed consideration of the effects of outburst duration and geometrical scattering modifications due to finite scattering dust filament dimension, inclination, and image point-spread function and spectrograph slit width. In this paper, we explore the implications of these factors and present a framework for future-resolved supernova LE spectra interpretation, and test it against Cas A and SN 1987A LE spectra. We conclude that the full modeling of the dimensions and orientation of the scattering dust using the observed LEs at two or more epochs is critical for the correct interpretation of LE spectra. Indeed, without doing so one might falsely conclude that differences exist when none are actually present.

Rest, A.; Narayan, G. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Sinnott, B.; Welch, D. L. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, L8S 4M1 (Canada); R. J. Foley; Mandel, K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Huber, M. E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, 3400 North Charles Street, MD 21218 (United States); Blondin, S., E-mail: arest@stsci.edu [Centre de Physique des Particules de Marseille (CPPM), Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, 163 avenue de Luminy, 13288 Marseille Cedex 9 (France)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

Fisher, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Development and Application of a Paleomagnetic/Geochemical Method for Constraining the Timing of Burial Diagenetic and Fluid  

SciTech Connect

Studies of diagenesis caused by fluid migration or other events are commonly hindered by a lack of temporal control. Our results to date demonstrate that a paleomagnetic/geochemical approach can be used to date fluid migration as well as burial diagenetic events. Our principal working hypothesis is that burial diagenetic processes (e.g., maturation of organic-rich sediments and clay diagenesis) and the migration of fluids can trigger the authigenesis of magnetic mineral phases. The ages of these events can be constrained by comparing chemical remanent magnetizations (CRMs) to independently established Apparent Polar Wander Paths. While geochemical (e.g. stable isotope and organic analyses) and petrographic studies provide important clues for establishing these relationships, the ultimate test of this hypothesis requires the application of independent dating methods to verify the paleomagnetic ages. Towards this end, we have used K-Ar dating of illitization as an alternative method for constraining the ages of magnetic mineral phases in our field areas.

Elmore, Richard D.; Engel, Michael H.

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

232

Multielement geochemical exploration data for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area, Beaver and Millard counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multielement geochemical exploration data have been acquired for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). This was accomplished by analysis of both whole rock and +3.3 specific gravity concentrate samples from cuttings composites collected from shallow rotary drill holes. Areal distributions are reported for arsenic, mercury, lead and zinc. These are elements indicated by previous studies to be broadly zoned around thermal centers in geothermal systems and thus to be useful for selecting and prioritizing drilling targets. Results from this work suggest that reservoir temperature and/or reservoir to surface permeability, and thus possibly overall potential for a geothermal resource, increase northward beneath the approximately 18 square mile area containing shallow drill holes, possibly to beyond the northern limits of the area. The data provide a basis for development of three principal target models for the geothermal system but do not permit prioritization of these models. It is recommended that geochemical, geological, and temperature gradient surveys be expanded northward from the present survey area to more fully define the area which appears to have the best resource potential and to aid prioritization of the target models.

Bamford, R.W.; Christensen, O.D.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37 17'N, 32 16.3'W, depth 1600-1750 m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36 13'N, 33 54.1'W, depth 2270-2330 m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

Flores, Gilberto E [Portland State University; Campbell, James H [ORNL; Kirshtein, Julie D [United States Geological Survey, Reston, VA; Meneghin, Jennifer [Portland State University; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Steinberg, Joshua [Oregon Episcopal School, Portland, OR; Seewald, Jeffrey S [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Tivey, Margaret Kingston [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Voytek, Mary A [United States Geological Survey & National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise [Portland State University; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Salt effects on stable isotope partitioning and their geochemical implications for geothermal brines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has long been recognized that dissolved salts in water can change oxygen and hydrogen isotope partitioning between water and other phases (i.e., vapor, minerals) due to the hydration of ions upon the dissolution of salts in water. However, their effects have not been well determined at elevated temperatures. We are currently conducting a series of hydrothermal experiments of the system brine-vapor or minerals to 350{degrees}C, in order to determine precisely the effects of dissolved salts abundant in brines on isotope partitioning at temperatures encountered in geothermal systems. The so-called ``isotope salt effect`` has important implications for the interpretation and modeling of isotopic data of brines and rocks obtained from geothermal fields. We will show how to use our new results of isotopic partitioning to help better evaluate energy resources of many geothermal fields.

Horita, J.; Cole, D.R.; Wesolowski, D.J.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Geochemical Characterization of Chromate Contamination in the 100 Area Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The major objectives of the proposed study were to: 1.) determine the leaching characteristics of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated sediments collected from 100 Area spill sites; 2.) elucidate possible Cr(VI) mineral and/or chemical associations that may be responsible for Cr(VI) retention in the Hanford Site 100 Areas through the use of i.) macroscopic leaching studies and ii.) microscale characterization of contaminated sediments; and 3.) provide information to construct a conceptual model of Cr(VI) geochemistry in the Hanford 100 Area vadose zone. In addressing these objectives, additional benefits accrued were: (1) a fuller understanding of Cr(VI) entrained in the vadose zone that will that can be utilized in modeling potential Cr(VI) source terms, and (2) accelerating the Columbia River 100 Area corridor cleanup by providing valuable information to develop remedial action based on a fundamental understanding of Cr(VI) vadose zone geochemistry. A series of macroscopic column experiments were conducted with contaminated and uncontaminated sediments to study Cr(VI) desorption patterns in aged and freshly contaminated sediments, evaluate the transport characteristics of dichromate liquid retrieved from old pipelines of the 100 Area; and estimate the effect of strongly reducing liquid on the reduction and transport of Cr(VI). Column experiments used the < 2 mm fraction of the sediment samples and simulated Hanford groundwater solution. Periodic stop-flow events were applied to evaluate the change in elemental concentration during time periods of no flow and greater fluid residence time. The results were fit using a two-site, one dimensional reactive transport model. Sediments were characterized for the spatial and mineralogical associations of the contamination using an array of microscale techniques such as XRD, SEM, EDS, XPS, XMP, and XANES. The following are important conclusions and implications. Results from column experiments indicated that most of contaminant Cr travels fast through the sediments and appears as Cr(VI) in the effluents. The significance of this for groundwater concentrations would, however, depend on the mass flux of recharge to the water table. adsorption of Cr(VI) to sediments from spiked Cr(VI) solution is low; calculated retardation coefficients are close to one. Calcium polysulfide solutions readily reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in column experiments. However a significant amount of the Cr(VI) was mobilized ahead of the polysulfide solution front. This has significant implications for in-situ reductive remediation techniques. The experiments suggest that it would be difficult to design a remedial measure using infiltration of liquid phase reductants without increasing transport of Cr(VI) toward the water table. The microscopic characterization results are consistent with the column studies. Cr(VI) is found as ubiquitous coatings on sediment grain surfaces. Small, higher concentration, chromium sites are associated with secondary clay mineral inclusions, with occasional barium chromate minerals, and reduced to Cr(III) in association with iron oxides that are most likely magnetite primary minerals. Within the restricted access domains of sediment matrix, ferrous iron could also diffuse from in situ, high-surface-area minerals to cause the reductive immobilization of chromate. This process may be favored at microscale geochemical zones where ferrous iron could be supplied. Once nucleated, micrometer-scale precipitates are favored as growing locales for further accumulation, causing the formation of discrete zones of Cr(III).

Dresel, P. Evan; Qafoku, Nikolla; McKinley, James P.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Liu, Chongxuan; Ilton, Eugene S.; Phillips, J. L.

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

236

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: The Role of Injection-Induced Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at In Salah CO2 Storage Project: Status ReportQuarter end, June 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The In Salah Gas Project (ISG), a joint venture (JV) of BP, Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro, has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 bcfy natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian Central Sahara, and (2) successful minimization of the associated environmental footprint by capture and subsurface isolation of the excess CO{sub 2} extracted from production streams and subsurface isolation in the Krechba sandstone reservoir. The In Salah project provides an opportunity to study key physical and chemical processes in operational deployment of geological carbon sequestration. The objectives of the research are to study two components relevant to storage effectiveness and operational success at In Salah: Reactive chemistry of the brine-CO{sub 2}-reservoir-caprock-wellbore system, and the geomechanical effects of large-scale injection on crustal deformation and fault leakage hazards. Results from this work will enhance predictive capability of field performance, provide a new basis for interpretation of geophysical monitoring at In Salah, and provide additional information relevant to the creation of geological sequestration standards. The Joint Industry Partners (JIP: BP, StatoilHydro, Sonatrach) and LLNL will share data and results to achieve the objectives of the proposed work. The objective of the work performed at LLNL is to integrate LLNL core strengths in geochemistry and geomechanics to better understand and predict the fate of injected CO{sub 2} in the field. The mechanical, chemical and transport properties of the reservoir-caprock system are coupled. We are using LLNL-developed quantitative tools to assess the potential for CO{sub 2} migration/leakage caused by injection-induced deformation. The geomechanical work is focused upon fault activation, fluid induced fracturing of the caprock and permeability field evolution of the fractured reservoir. These results will be used in concert with reactive transport calculations to predict the ultimate fate of the CO{sub 2}. We will integrate laboratory and reactive transport modeling to assess CO{sub 2} plume migration and partitioning between different trapping mechanisms. Geochemical reactive transport modeling will be used to address multiphase flow (supercritical CO{sub 2} and water), CO{sub 2} dissolution, mineral sequestration, and porosity/permeability changes. The reactive transport portion of the work ultimately couples with geomechanical modeling. In particular, the distribution of the pressure perturbation induced by injection drives the geomechanical response. Subsequently, the geochemical work determines if water-rock interactions eventually enhance or suppress fractures. A key focus of this work is to establish the site specific interactions of geomechanics, reactive flow and transport. This involves building and refining models of the reservoir and overburden. The models will undergo continual refinement in response to data collected in the field and experiments performed at LLNL and elsewhere. This project commenced in FY08, with DOE funding starting in April, FY08. We have successfully initiated a cross-disciplinary study of the In Salah CO{sub 2} sequestration project and have met all FY08 and FY09 Q1, Q2 and Q3 milestones. During the reporting period, we continued to acquire and process data from the JIP to import into our own geomechanical and geochemical computational tools. The lab testing program continued using both locally formulated cements and field samples from Krechba. The geomechanical studies indicate that pore fluid pressures induced by injection will lead to significant permeability enhancement of the combination of fracture network and fault network within the reservoir in the vicinity of the injectors. We continued reactive transport calculations for CO{sub 2} rich fluids flowing through fractures. These calculations demonstrate that although porosity and permeability changes are expected in response to CO{sub 2} injection they are not anticipated to have a significant effect upon transport properties within the reservoir or c

Morris, J P; McNab, W W; Carroll, S K; Hao, Y; Foxall, W; Wagoner, J L

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

Semiclassical Interpretation of the Mass Asymmetry in Nuclear Fission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We give a semiclassical interpretation of the mass asymmetry in the fission of heavy nuclei. Using only a few classical periodic orbits and a cavity model for the nuclear mean field, we reproduce the onset of left-right asymmetric shapes at the fission isomer minimum and the correct topology of the deformation energy surface in the region of the outer fission barrier. We point at the correspondence of the single-particle quantum states responsible for the asymmetry with the leading classical orbits, both lying in similar equatorial planes perpendicular to the symmetry axis of the system.

M. Brack; S. M. Reimann; M. Sieber

1997-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

Interpreting a conformally flat pure radiation space-time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A physical interpretation is presented of the general class of conformally flat pure radiation metrics that has recently been identified by Edgar and Ludwig. It is shown that, at least in the weak field limit, successive wave surfaces can be represented as null (half) hyperplanes rolled around a two-dimensional null cone. In the impulsive limit, the solution reduces to a pp-wave whose direction of propagation depends on retarded time. In the general case, there is a coordinate singularity which corresponds to an envelope of the wave surfaces. The global structure is discussed and a possible vacuum extension through the envelope is proposed.

J. B. Griffiths; J. Podolsky

1998-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

239

Geochemical and hydrodynamic controls on arsenic and trace metal cycling in a seasonally stratified US sub-tropical reservoir  

SciTech Connect

The phase distribution of trace metals and oxyanions was investigated within a South Texas watershed hosting a high density of surface uranium mine pits and tailings. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the potential impact of these old uranium mining sites on the watershed with particular emphasis on spatial and temporal changes in water quality of a reservoir that serves as the major source of freshwater to a population of {approx} 350,000 people in the region. A livestock pond, bordered by uranium mine tailings, was used as a model case-study site to evaluate the cycling of uranium mine-derived oxyanions under changing redox conditions. Although the pond showed seasonal thermal and chemical stratification, geochemical cycling of metals was limited to Co and Pb, which seemed to be mostly associated with redox cycling of Mn mineral phases, and U, which suggested reductive precipitation in the ponds hypolimnion. Uranium levels, however, were too low to support strong inputs from th e tailings into the water column of the pond. The strong relations observed between particulate Cr, Cs, V and Fe suggest that these metals are associated with a stable particulate phase (probably allochthonous aluminosilicates) enriched in unreactive iron. This observation is supported by a parallel relationship in sediments collected across a broad range of sediment depositional processed (and histories) in the basin. Arsenic, though selectively enriched in the ponds water column, remained stable and mostly in solution throughout the depth of the profile and showed no sign of geochemical cycling or interaction with Fe-rich particles. We found no evidence of anthropogenic impacts of U mines beyond the purely local scale. Arsenic does decrease in concentration downstream of uranium mining sites but its presence within the Nueces drainage basin is related to interactions between surface and ground waters with uranium-rich geological formations rather than long-scale transport of contaminants downstream of the U mine pits and tailings. As in Lyssy pond, arsenic (and other oxyanions) in Lake Corpus Christi's water column are not affected by the abundant presence of Fe-rich particles but instead behave conservatively throughout the entire period of study. A quantitative mass balance model, constructed using monthly hydrological data for the reservoir, provides quantitative evidence of seasonal evaporative concentration of as in surface waters demonstrating the predominance of hydrodynamic constraints, over geochemical ones, on the cycling of this metal in selected aquatic systems.

Brandenberger, Jill M.; Louchouarn, Patrick; Herbert, Bruce; Tissot, Philippe

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

TOUGHREACT-A simulation program for non-isothermal multiphase reactive geochemical transport in variably saturated geologic media: Applications to geothermal injectivity and CO2 geological sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase ... Keywords: CO2 geologic sequestration, Clay swelling, Geochemical transport, Hydrothermal systems, Injectivity enhancement, Mineral scaling, Mineral trapping, Reactive fluid flow, Saline aquifer, TOUGHREACT

Tianfu Xu; Eric Sonnenthal; Nicolas Spycher; Karsten Pruess

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The global geochemical cycles of iron and calcium: using novel isotope systems to understand weathering, global mass budgets, natural reaction rates, and paleoclimate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the sedimentary column, and diagenetic alteration of Ca isotope signals over geologic time scales. The overallThe global geochemical cycles of iron and calcium: using novel isotope systems to understand of Doctor of Philosophy in Geology in the GRADUATE DIVISION of the UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY

Fantle, Matthew

242

New Cosmological Model and Its Implications on Observational Data Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paradigm of \\Lambda CDM cosmology works impressively well and with the concept of inflation it explains the universe after the time of decoupling. However there are still a few concerns; after much effort there is no detection of dark matter and there are significant problems in the theoretical description of dark energy. We will consider a variant of the cosmological spherical shell model, within FRW formalism and will compare it with the standard \\Lambda CDM model. We will show that our new topological model satisfies cosmological principles and is consistent with all observable data, but that it may require new interpretation for some data. Considered will be constraints imposed on the model, as for instance the range for the size and allowed thickness of the shell, by the supernovae luminosity distance and CMB data. In this model propagation of the light is confined along the shell, which has as a consequence that observed CMB originated from one point or a limited space region. It allows to interpret the uniformity of the CMB without inflation scenario. In addition this removes any constraints on the uniformity of the universe at the early stage and opens a possibility that the universe was not uniform and that creation of galaxies and large structures is due to the inhomogeneities that originated in the Big Bang.

B. Vlahovic

2013-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

243

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site gravity survey and interpretation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A portion of the WIPP site has been extensively surveyed with high-precision gravity. The main survey (in T22S, R31E) covered a rectangular area 2 by 4-1/3 mi encompassing all of WIPP site Zone II and part of the disturbed zone to the north of the site. Stations were at 293-ft intervals along 13 north-south lines 880 ft apart. The data are considered accurate to within a few hundredths of a milligal. Long-wavelength gravity anomalies correlate well with seismic time structures on horizons below the Castile Formation. Both the gravity anomalies and the seismic time structures are interpreted as resulting from related density and velocity variations within the Ochoan Series. Shorter wavelength negative gravity anomalies are interpreted as resulting from bulk density alteration in the vicinity of karst conduits. The WIPP gravity survey was unable to resolve low-amplitude, long-wavelength anomalies that should result from the geologic structures within the disturbed zone. It did indicate the degree and character of karst development within the surveyed area.

Barrows, L.J.; Fett, J.D.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive geochemical Transport in Variable Saturated Geologic Media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport and chemical reactions can be used for the assessment of mineral alteration in hydrothermal systems, waste disposal sites, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. A comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator, TOUGHREACT, has been developed. A wide range of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. The program can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The model can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can proceed either subject to local equilibrium or kinetic conditions. Changes in porosity and permeability due to mineral dissolution and precipitation can be considered. Linear adsorption and decay can be included. For the purpose of future extensions, surface complexation by double layer model is coded in the program. Xu and Pruess (1998) developed a first version of a non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport model, TOUGHREACT, by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). Xu, Pruess, and their colleagues have applied the program to a variety of problems such as: (1) supergene copper enrichment (Xu et al, 2001), (2) caprock mineral alteration in a hydrothermal system (Xu and Pruess, 2001a), and (3) mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline aquifers (Xu et al, 2003b and 2004a). For modeling the coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes during heater tests at proposed nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain (Nevada), Sonnenthal and Spycher (2000) and Spycher et al. (2003) enhanced TOUGHREACT on (1) high temperature geochemistry, (2) mineral reactive surface area calculations, and (3) porosity and permeability changes due to mineral alteration. On the other hand, Pruess et al. (1999) updated the TOUGH2 simulator to TOUGH2 V2. The present version of TOUGHREACT was developed by introducing the work of Sonnenthal and Spycher (2000) to the original work of Xu and Pruess (1998), and by replacing TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991) by TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al, 1999). The TOUGHREACT program makes use of ''self-documenting'' features. It is distributed with a number of input data files for sample problems. Besides providing benchmarks for proper code installation, these can serve as self-teaching tutorial in the use of TOUGHREACT, and they provide templates to help jump-start new applications. The fluid and heat flow part of TOUGHREACT is derived from TOUGH2 V2, so in addition to the current manual, users must have manual of the TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT provides the following different TOUGH2 fluid property or ''EOS'' (equation-of-state) modules: (1) EOS1 for water, or two waters with typical applications to hydrothermal problems, (2) EOS2 for multiphase mixtures of water and CO{sub 2} also with typical applications to hydrothermal problems, (3) EOS3 for multiphase mixtures of water and air with typical applications to vadose zone and nuclear waste disposal problems, (4) EOS4 that has the same capabilities as EOS3 but with vapor pressure lowering effects due to capillary pressure, (5) EOS9 for single phase water (Richards. equation) with typical applications to ambient reactive geochemical transport problems, (6) ECO2 for multiphase mixtures of water, CO{sub 2} and NaCl with typical applications to CO{sub 2} disposal in deep brine aquifers.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

245

Data Package of Samples Collected for Hydrogeologic and Geochemical Characterization: 300 Area RI/FS Sediment Cores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a data package for sediment samples received from the 300 FF 5 OU. This report was prepared for CHPRC. Between August 16, 2010 and April 25, 2011 sediment samples were received from 300-FF-5 for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

Lindberg, Michael J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Williams, Benjamin D.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Three-Dimensional Interpretation of a Class of Simple Line-Drawings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We provide a theory of the three-dimensional interpretation of a class of line-drawings called p-images, which are interpreted by the human vision system as parallelepipeds ("boxes"). Despite their simplicity, p-images ...

Marill, Thomas

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Structural interpretation of Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Structural interpretation of Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal field, located east of the Sierra Nevada at the northern edge of the high Mojave Desert in southern California, is an excellent example of a structurally controlled geothermal resource. The geothermal system appears to be associated with at least one dominant north-south-trending feature which extends several miles through the east-central portion of the Coso volcanic field. Wells drilled along this feature have encountered production from distinct fractures in crystalline basement rocks. The identified producing fractures occur in zones which

248

Interpretation of self-potential measurements during injection tests at  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

self-potential measurements during injection tests at self-potential measurements during injection tests at Raft River, Idaho. Final report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Interpretation of self-potential measurements during injection tests at Raft River, Idaho. Final report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Self-potential measurements before and during injection tests at Raft River KGRA, Idaho indicate a small negative change. The magnitude of the change (5 to 10 mV) is near the noise level (5 mV) but they extend over a fairly broad area. The presence of a cathodic protection system clouds the issue of the validity of the changes, however the form of the observed changes cannot be explained by any simple change in the current strength of the protection system. Furthermore, similar changes are observed for two

249

Los Alamos technologies help scientists detect, record & interpret  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March » March » 'Monster' burst of gamma rays Los Alamos technologies help scientists detect, record & interpret 'monster' burst of gamma rays The burst was detected by NASA's Swift satellite. March 21, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office

250

Predicting the Pipeline Behavior of Superscalar Processors by Abstract Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interpretation Jorn Schneider , Reinhard Wilhelm Christian Ferdinand Universitat des Saarlandes AbsInt Angewandte Informatik GmbH Fachbereich Informatik Universitat des Saarlandes Postfach 15 11 50 Starterzentrum { Gebaude 45 D-66041 Saarbrucken, Germany D-66123 Saarbrucken, Germany js@cs.uni-sb.de, wilhelm@cs.uni-sb.de ferdinand@AbsInt.de Abstract For real time systems not only the logical function is important but also the timing behavior, e. g. hard real time systems must react inside their deadlines. To guarantee this it is necessary to know upper bounds for the worst case execution times (WCETs). The accuracy of the prediction of WCETs depends strongly on the ability to model the features of the target processor.

Schneider; Reinhard Wilhelm; Christian Ferdin; Universitat Des Saarl; Es Absint Angew; Te Informatik Gmbh

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Interpreting the New Brookhaven g_mu - 2 Result  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The latest g_mu - 2 measurement by Brookhaven confirms the earlier measurement with twice the precision. However, interpretation of the result requires specific assumptions regarding the errors in the hadronic light by light (LbL) correction and in the hadronic vacuum polarization correction. Under the assumption that the analysis on LbL correction of Knecht and Nyffeler and the revised analysis of Hayakawa and Kinoshita are valid the new BNL result implies a deviation between experiment and the standard model of 1.6 sigma -2.6 sigma depending on the estimate of the hadronic vacuum polarization correction. We revisit the g_mu - 2 constraint for mSUGRA and its implications for the direct detection of sparticles at colliders and for the search for supersymmetric dark matter in view of the new evaluation.

Utpal Chattopadhyay; Pran Nath

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Geologic interpretation of space shuttle radar images of Indonesia  

SciTech Connect

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) space shuttle mission in November 1981 acquired images of parts of the earth with a synthetic aperture radar system at a wavelength of 23.5 cm (9.3 in.) and spatial resolution of 38 m (125 ft). This report describes the geologic interpretation of 1:250,000-scale images of Irian Jaya and eastern Kalimantan, Indonesia, where the all-weather capability of radar penetrates the persistent cloud cover. The inclined look direction of radar enhances subtle topographic features that may be the expression of geologic structures. On the Indonesian images, the following terrain categories are recognizable for geologic mapping: carbonate, clastic, volcanic, alluvial and coastal, melange, and metamorphic, as well as undifferentiated bedrock. Regional and local geologic structures are well expressed on the images.

Sabing, F.F.

1983-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Interpretation of parabolic arcs in pulsar secondary spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pulsar dynamic spectra sometimes show organised interference patterns; these patterns have been shown to have power spectra which often take the form of parabolic arcs, or sequences of inverted parabolic arclets whose apexes themselves follow a parabolic locus. Here we consider the interpretation of these arc and arclet features. We give a statistical formulation for the appearance of the power spectra, based on the stationary phase approximation to the Fresnel-Kirchoff integral. We present a simple analytic result for the power-spectrum expected in the case of highly elongated images, and a single-integral analytic formulation appropriate to the case of axisymmetric images. Our results are illustrated in both the ensemble-average and snapshot regimes. Highly anisotropic scattering appears to be an important ingredient in the formation of the observed arclets.

Mark Walker; Don Melrose; Dan Stinebring; Chengmin Zhang

2004-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

254

Interpretation of Geoelectric Structure at Hululais Prospect Area, South Sumatra  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Schlumberger resistivity surveys were conducted in 1993 as part of a combined geological, geophysical and geological program to investigate a geothermal prospect in the Hululais area, Southern Sumatra. These resistivity data resolved the upper conductive layer and were interpreted to define the shallow extent of a possible geothermal system. A follow-up magnetotelluric (MT) survey was carried out to probe deeper than the dc resistivity survey results achieved. However, the resistive sub-stratum below the conductive layer was still poorly resolved. Possible reasons for this include a preferential channeling of the telluric current within the thick shallow very conductive layer, thus limiting the penetration depth of the magnetotelluric signals and poor resolution due to high noise levels caused by significant rain and sferics.

Mulyadi

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Novel Gas Isotope Interpretation Tools to Optimize Gas Shale  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Report to Final Report to Report Number 08122.15.Final Novel Gas Isotope Interpretation Tools to Optimize Gas Shale Production Contract: 08122-15 Principal Investigator: William A. Goddard, III Title: Director, Materials and Process Simulation Center California Institute of Technology Wag@wag.caltech.edu Co-PIs: Yongchun Tang, Ph.D. Title: Director, Power Environmental Energy Research Institute Other Author(s) Sheng Wu, Ph.D Andrew Deev, Ph.D Qisheng Ma, Ph.D Gao Li, Ph.D. June 5, 2013 2 LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by California Institute of Technology as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of

256

Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

at right angles to known and suspected faults. Scintillometer readings (gamma radiation - total counts second) were also recorded at each soil sample station. At the...

257

A new look at 3D seismic interpretation  

SciTech Connect

New ways are being developed to quickly extract and more thoroughly analyze the information contained in the 3D seismic data. These interpretation techniques were used to evaluate a 3D survey at Fortescue field (Gippsland basin, Australia) before starting a 13-well infill drilling program in 1994. Oil was discovered in the top of the LaTrobe (TOL) group at Fortescue field. Following appraisal drilling and platform installation, production started in 1983. To mitigate recent production decline and develop remaining reserves, a 13-well infill drilling program was proposed in 1993. Fortescue field is a west-southwest dipping monocline with oil trapped stratigraphically beneath an erosional unconformity in 13 separate elastic reservoirs. The reservoirs dip approximately 2{degree} more steeply than the overlying erosional truncation surface, causing older sections to progressively subcrop in an easterly direction. The 13 proposed infill wells relied completely or partially on oil being trapped structurally updip from existing completions. To effectively capture these reserves, wells were targeted to intersect reservoirs along the low-angle sand truncation face. The ability to identify and map the top and base reservoir edges along the subcrop surface was critical for well success. The goal of this study was to quickly and accurately identify nine reservoir subcrop edges, determine the remaining reserves updip from existing completions, and identify the geological risk associated with each proposed well.

Vinson, T.E.; Standley, P.; Jager, G.; Kidd, G.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Geochemical Characterization Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank (SST) farms at the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical information available for the vadose zone beneath the SST farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF).

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Krupka, Kenneth M.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

259

Water information bulletin No. 30: geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part 11. Geological, hydrological, geochemical and geophysical investigations of the Nampa-Caldwell and adjacent areas, southwestern Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The area under study included approximately 925 sq km (357 sq mi) of the Nampa-Caldwell portion of Canyon County, an area within the central portion of the western Snake River Plain immediately west of Boise, Idaho. Geologic mapping, hydrologic, geochemical, geophysical, including detailed gravity and aeromagnetic surveys, were run to acquire needed data. In addition, existing magnetotelluric and reflection seismic data were purchased and reinterpreted in light of newly acquired data.

Mitchell, J.C. (ed.)

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Final Report: Improved Site Characterization And Storage Prediction Through Stochastic Inversion Of Time-Lapse Geophysical And Geochemical Data  

SciTech Connect

During the last months of this project, our project activities have concentrated on four areas: (1) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir bulk/shear moduli and density; the need for this inversion was not anticipated in the original scope of work, (2) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir porosity and permeability, (3) complete the software needed to perform geochemical inversions and (4) use the software to perform stochastic inversion of aqueous chemistry data to deduce mineral volume fractions. This report builds on work described in progress reports previously submitted (Ramirez et al., 2009, 2010, 2011 - reports fulfilled the requirements of deliverables D1-D4) and fulfills deliverable D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product. The main challenge with our stochastic inversion approach is its large computational expense, even for single reservoir patterns. We dedicated a significant level of effort to improve computational efficiency but inversions involving multiple patterns were still intractable by project's end. As a result, we were unable to fulfill Deliverable D6: Field-based multi-pattern simulations work product.

Ramirez, A; Mcnab, W; Hao, Y; White, D; Johnson, J

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

INTERPRETATION REGARDING EXEMPTION RELIEF UNDER 10 C.F.R. PART...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RELIEF, AND NON-COMPLIANT 'DOCUMENTED SAFETY ANALYSES' SUBJECT TO 10 C.F.R. PART 830, NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT, SUBPART B, SAFETY BASIS REQUIREMENTS INTERPRETATION REGARDING...

262

The Influence of Thematic Graphics in the Interpretation of Narrative Text.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACT THE INFLUENCE OF THEMATIC GRAPHICS IN THE INTERPRETATION OF NARRATIVE TEXT by Chad C. Mortensen Master of Arts in Psychology Psychological Science Option California (more)

Mortensen, Chad C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Progress Report, December 2010: Improved Site Characterization And Storage Prediction Through Stochastic Inversion Of Time-Lapse Geophysical And Geochemical Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last project six months, our project activities have concentrated on three areas: (1) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir permeability, (2) development of the geochemical inversion strategy and implementation of associated software, and (3) completing the software implementation of TProGS and the geostatistical analysis that provides the information needed when using the software to produce realizations of the Midale reservoir. The report partially the following deliverables: D2: Model development: MCMC tool (synthetic fluid chemistry data); deliverable completed. D4: Model development/verification: MCMC tool (TProGS, field seismic/chemistry data) work product; deliverable requirements partially fulfilled. D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product; deliverable requirements partially fulfilled. When completed, our completed stochastic inversion tool will explicitly integrate reactive transport modeling, facies-based geostatistical methods, and a novel stochastic inversion technique to optimize agreement between observed and predicted storage performance. Such optimization will be accomplished through stepwise refinement of: (1) the reservoir model - principally its permeability magnitude and heterogeneity - and (2) geochemical parameters - primarily key mineral volume fractions and kinetic data. We anticipate that these refinements will facilitate significantly improved history matching and forward modeling of CO{sub 2} storage. Our tool uses the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methodology. Deliverable D1, previously submitted as a report titled ''Development of a Stochastic Inversion Tool To Optimize Agreement Between The Observed And Predicted Seismic Response To CO{sub 2} Injection/Migration in the Weyburn-Midale Project'' (Ramirez et al., 2009), described the stochastic inversion approach that will identify reservoir models that optimize agreement between the observed and predicted seismic response. The software that implements this approach has been completed, tested, and used to process seismic data from pattern 16. A previously submitted report titled ''Model verification: synthetic single pattern simulations using seismic reflection data'', Ramirez et al. 2010, partially fulfilled deliverable D3 by summarizing verification activities that evaluate the performance of the seismic software and its ability to recover reservoir model permeabilities using synthetic seismic reflection data. A future progress report will similarly describe summarizing verification activities of the geochemical inversion software, thereby completing deliverable D3. This document includes a chapter that shows and discusses permeability models produced by seismic inversion that used seismic data from pattern 16 in Phase 1A. It partially fulfills deliverable D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product. The D5 work product is supposed to summarize the results of applying NUFT/MCMC to refine the reservoir model and geochemical parameters by optimizing observation/prediction agreement for the seismic/geochemical response to CO{sub 2} injection/migration within a single pattern of Phase 1A/1B. A future progress report will show inversion results for the same pattern using geochemical data, thereby completing deliverable D5. This document also contains a chapter that fulfills deliverable D2: Model development: MCMC tool (synthetic fluid chemistry data). The chapter will summarize model development activities required to facilitate application of NUFT/MCMC to optimize agreement between the observed and predicted geochemical response to CO{sub 2} injection/migration. Lastly, this document also contains a chapter that partially fulfills deliverable D4: Model development/verification: MCMC tool (TProGS, field seismic/chemistry data) work product. This work product is supposed to summarize model development activities required for (1) application of TProGS to Weyburn, (2) use of TProGS within the MCMC tool, and (3) application of the MCMC tool to address field seismic and g

Ramirez, A; Mcnab, W; Carle, S; Hao, Y; White, D; Johnson, J

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

264

'Talk about Conflict': Understanding Interpretive Repertoires in Community Mediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While many studies investigate the mediation styles enacted during conflict resolution, relatively few of them discuss the communicative processes through which discursive structures are reproduced. This dissertation is a case study illustrating how the duality of structure operates. The purpose of this dissertation is (a) to reveal the discursive resources that community mediators use, (b) to demonstrate how mediators assemble their discursive resources to form a community of practice, and (c) to explore power relations between attorneys and mediators. To understand these issues, I conducted an ethnographic study at a community mediation center employing 25 volunteer mediators. Over 330 hours of participant observations and 41 interviews were completed. Results demonstrated that mediators relied on four interpretive repertoires during mediation: Cultural Competence, Volunteer Pride, Parenting Norms, and Business Professional(ism). They used these repertoires to navigate the tenuous and emotional mediation process. The repertoires provided the mediators with a degree of discursive flexibility in constructing and controlling the immediate situation, and the repertoires were enacted to serve multiple purposes. Further, the extemporaneous engagement of issues, emotions, and discursive resources was an essential skill that was cultivated only over time and with practice. Results also showed that the mediators assembled various repertoires in a number of ways including informal conversations, co-mediations, conference attendance, and organizational meetings. Analysis suggested that the institutional knowledge and discourses provided through formal learning was of secondary importance to developing personal repertoires by mediating as often as possible. In addition, because of the organizing practices of the mediators and the ad hoc nature of the organization, the organizational form of the mediation center was a community of practice. Finally, results found that the power struggles between attorneys and mediators centered on trying to define the mediation situation using different discursive resources. Establishing control of the environment and working the process were the two main goals of mediators, and the more they took ownership of these goals the more often the conflicts settled. This dissertation suggests that taking control of the mediation process is the first step to empowering the participants and achieving a workable mediated settlement.

Schaefer, Zach A.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

InvenTcl: Making Open Inventor Interpretive with Tcl/[incr Tcl] Sidney Fels, Silvio Esser, Armin Bruderlin, Kenji Mase  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

InvenTcl: Making Open Inventor Interpretive with Tcl/[incr Tcl] Sidney Fels, Silvio Esser, Armin/compile/debug iteration cycle. In this sketch, we introduce InvenTcl which is an interpretive version of Open Inventor. Our interpretive version of Open Inventor uses the interpretive language Tcl, (Tool Command Language

Fels, Sidney S.

266

CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

267

A toolkit for groundwater mean residence time interpretation with gaseous tracers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical Excel-based toolkit called Gas-Tracer-Interpretation (GTI) was developed for determining mean residence time (MRT) of groundwater samples and for validating conceptual model assumptions. This novel data interpretation toolkit improves data ... Keywords: Environmental tracer, Environmental tracers concentrations in water, Groundwater dating, Lumped-parameter modeling, Water age

Pablo Fernando Dvila, Christoph Klls, Markus Weiler

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

NOTE: Special Admission Waiver for Administrative Hearing Interpreters, Judicial Council approved for CIMCE credit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

skills necessary for service in the courts, in state agencies, and in the medical evaluation system/English interpreter in the courts, in state agencies, and in the medical evaluation system of workers' compensation are mandated for employment in courts and state agencies. Once an interpreter passes the California Court

269

A general framework for semantics-based bottom-up abstract interpretation of logic programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The theory of abstract interpretation provides a formal framework to develop advanced dataflow analysis tools. The idea is to define a nonstandard semantics which is able to compute, in finite time, an approximated model of the program. In this paper, ... Keywords: abstract interpretation, logic programming, program analysis

Roberto Barbuti; Roberto Giacobazzi; Giorgio Levi

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

INTERPRETIVE GUIDANCE ON THE REQUIREMENTS OF 10 C.F.R. § 205.322 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTERPRETIVE GUIDANCE ON THE REQUIREMENTS OF 10 C.F.R. § 205.322 INTERPRETIVE GUIDANCE ON THE REQUIREMENTS OF 10 C.F.R. § 205.322 INTERPRETIVE GUIDANCE ON THE REQUIREMENTS OF 10 C.F.R. § 205.322 This guidance is intended to clarify the Department of Energy (DOE)'s interpretation of 10 C.F.R. § 205.322, which sets forth the contents of an application for a Presidential permit issued by DOE under Executive Order (E.O.) 10485, as amended by E.O. 12038. Anyone seeking to construct, operate, maintain, or connect an electric transmission facility crossing the borders of the United States must first obtain a Presidential permit. INTERPRETIVE GUIDANCE ON THE REQUIREMENTS OF 10 C.F.R. § 205.322 More Documents & Publications Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass: Comments from Conservation Law Foundation, Appalachian Mountain Club, and

271

Geochemical Processes Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energys (DOEs) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical process information available for the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tank farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility. Two companion reports to this one were recently published which discuss the geology of the farms (Reidel and Chamness 2007) and groundwater flow and contamination beneath the farms (Horton 2007).

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Zachara, John M.; Dresel, P. Evan; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

272

Geochemical engineering reference manual  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following topics are included in this manual: physical and chemical properties of geothermal brine and steam, scale and solids control, processing spent brine for reinjection, control of noncondensable gas emissions, and goethermal mineral recovery. (MHR)

Owen, L.B.; Michels, D.E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Evaluation and combined geophysical interpretations of NURE and related geoscience data in the Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidido, and Emory Peak quadrangles, Texas. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report (two volumes) is the culmination of a two-year study of the six Trans-Pecos Texas quadrangles (Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidio, and Emory Park) surveyed as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Volume I contains a discussion of the aeromagnetic, gravity and geochemical data, their processing, and their analysis. The geologic history and setting of the Trans-Pecos are discussed along with the uranium potential of the region. Uranium anomalies and occurrences characteristic of numerous different NURE classes are present in the study area, and information is presented on 33 drill holes into these targets. Volume II is a folio of maps reduced to a scale of 1:500,000. Geologic maps for each of the six quadrangles are included and the geophysical maps have been prepared to be overlays for the goelogic maps. In addition to the geologic maps, residual aeromagnetic anomaly, complete Bouguer gravity anomaly, flight line index, gravity station index, and anomaly interpretative maps were prepared for each quadrangle. A large suite of digitally processed maps of gravity and aeromagnetic data were prepared and are included in Volume II.

Keller, G.R.; Hinze, W.J.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Goodell, P.C.; Roy, R.F.; Pingitore, N.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Progress in evaluation of radionuclide geochemical information developed by DOE high-level nuclear waste repository site projects: report for January-March 1985. Volume 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Geochemical information relevant to the retention of radionuclides by the Hanford Site (in basalt) and the Yucca Mountain site (in tuff), candidate high-level nuclear waste geologic repositories being developed by US Department of Energy (DOE) projects, is being evaluated by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). Our evaluation of the sorption of technetium by basalt/groundwater systems was essentially completed this quarter and the results summarized; we conclude that the experimental methodology and results reported by the DOE for the Hanford Site have not conclusively established that significant retardation of technetium migration may be provided by phases present in the basalts of the Hanford Site. We have shown that sodium boltwoodite is the saturating uranium solid phase in two basalt/groundwater systems. Because thermodynamic data are not available for sodium boltwoodite, calculated solubilities for uranium are erroneous in these systems. Results of radionuclide solubility/speciation calculations, published by the DOE for the Yucca Mountain site, were evaluated this quarter under our geochemical modeling task. We express concerns relative to the inherent limitations of such calculations. Samples of Yucca Mountain tuff and J-13 well water were received for use in our planned radionuclide sorption/solubility experiments. These Yucca Mountain materials will be used to evaluate radionuclide sorption and apparent concentration limit values published by the Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) project. 40 refs., 5 figs., 16 tabs.

Kelmers, A.D.; Seeley, F.G.; Arnold, W.D.; Blencoe, J.G.; Meyer, R.E.; Jacobs, G.K.; Whatley, S.K.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field, 3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field, Indonesia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: 3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field, Indonesia Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Three-dimensional (3-D) interpretation was carried out for the magnetotelluric (MT) data obtained in a geothermal area in Indonesia. The inversion scheme was based on the linearized leastsquares method with smoothness regularization. In addition to the subsurface resistivity structure, static shifts were also included as unknown parameters in the inversion. Forward modeling was by the finite difference scheme. The sensitivity matrix was computed once for a homogeneous half space and used

276

Blue Star Memorial By-Way Dedication: Weldon Spring Interpretive Center |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blue Star Memorial By-Way Dedication: Weldon Spring Interpretive Blue Star Memorial By-Way Dedication: Weldon Spring Interpretive Center Blue Star Memorial By-Way Dedication: Weldon Spring Interpretive Center July 12, 2013 - 1:04pm Addthis Since 2003, the Lewis and Clark Garden Club (LCGC) of St. Charles County, Missouri, has held their monthly meetings in the Weldon Spring Interpretive Center (WSIC). The LCGC has 22 active members and takes care of 2 garden beds at the WSIC Native Plant Educational Garden under the site's Adopt-A-Garden program. In 2010 the LCGC contacted the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), seeking approval to install a Blue Star Memorial By-Way Marker as a tribute to the nation's armed forces (see bottom of page for a history of the Blue Star Memorials). A 2,300-pound pink mica memorial marker was placed

277

THE OBJECTIVE INDEFINITENESS INTERPRETATION OF QUANTUM MECHANICS: Partition logic, logical information theory, and quantum mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THE OBJECTIVE INDEFINITENESS INTERPRETATION OF QUANTUM MECHANICS: Partition logic, logical information theory, and quantum mechanics David Ellerman University of California at Riverside www ago that quantum mechanics was not compatible with Boolean logic, then the natural thing to do would

Wüthrich, Christian

278

Analysis of an esoteric interpretation of a threshold in beta decay  

SciTech Connect

A threshold associated with a small mixing of a heavy neutrino in beta decay cannot be interpreted as due to the production of a fictitious neutral scalar in conjunction with a light neutrino.

Karl, G.; Novikov, V.; Simpson, J.J. (Department of Physics, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, N1G 2W1 (Canada))

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Theoretical Interpretation of Atmospheric Wavenumber Spectra of Wind and Temperature Observed by Commercial Aircraft During GASP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper contains a theoretical interpretation of the wavenumber spectra of wind and temperature obtained from an analysis of data from over 6900 flights during the Global Atmospheric Sampling Program. The spectra cover scales ranging from 3 km ...

K. S. Gage; G. D. Nastrom

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Towards an interpretative integrative framework to conceptualise social processes in large information systems implementations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops a new interpretative framework to study large information systems implementations. This framework is used to make explicit the various links between the implementation process, the wider organisation and external context. This framework ...

A.J. Salazar Alvarez

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Interpretation of the Autocovariances and Cross-Covariance from a Polarization Diversity Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory is presented for interpretation of the autocovariances and cross-covariance derivable from coherent polarization diversity radars. At zero lag time these quantities yield the main received power, the depolarization ratio, the cross-...

James I. Metcalf

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Interpretation of the Effect of Mountains on Synoptic-Scale Baroclinic Waves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Linear and nonlinear simulations of idealized baroclinic waves interacting with topography are examined in the context of quasigeostrophy. The purpose is to provide a simple conceptual interpretation of the transients resulting from this ...

Christopher A. Davis; Mark T. Stoelinga

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

A New Interpretation of the Beta Term in the Vorticity Equation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ? term, usually defined as the northward gradient of the vertical planetary vorticity, is here defined and interpreted as the northward planetary vorticity. The ? term in the vorticity equation, relative to a rotating reference frame, is put ...

lvaro Videz

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

INTERPRETATION REGARDING THE APPLICATION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARD 1027-92,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTERPRETATION REGARDING THE APPLICATION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARD INTERPRETATION REGARDING THE APPLICATION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARD 1027-92, HAZARD CATEGORIZATION AND ACCIDENT ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH DOE ORDER 5480.23, NUCLEAR SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORTS, UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF 10 C.F.R. § 830.202(b)(3). INTERPRETATION REGARDING THE APPLICATION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARD 1027-92, HAZARD CATEGORIZATION AND ACCIDENT ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH DOE ORDER 5480.23, NUCLEAR SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORTS, UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF 10 C.F.R. § 830.202(b)(3). The following document is the Department of Energy Office of General Counsel interpretation regarding the application of DOE Technical Standard 1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, under

285

Assessing 1D Atmospheric Solar Radiative Transfer Models: Interpretation and Handling of Unresolved Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this study is to assess the performance of 1D solar radiative transfer codes that are used currently both for research and in weather and climate models. Emphasis is on interpretation and handling of unresolved clouds. ...

H. W. Barker; G. L. Stephens; P. T. Partain; J. W. Bergman; B. Bonnel; K. Campana; E. E. Clothiaux; S. Clough; S. Cusack; J. Delamere; J. Edwards; K. F. Evans; Y. Fouquart; S. Freidenreich; V. Galin; Y. Hou; S. Kato; J. Li; E. Mlawer; J.-J. Morcrette; W. O'Hirok; P. Risnen; V. Ramaswamy; B. Ritter; E. Rozanov; M. Schlesinger; K. Shibata; P. Sporyshev; Z. Sun; M. Wendisch; N. Wood; F. Yang

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Interpreting the Neutron's Electric Form Factor: Rest Frame Charge Distribution or Foldy Term?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The neutron's electric form factor contains vital information on nucleon structure, but its interpretation within many models has been obscured by relativistic effects. I demonstrate that, to leading order in the relativistic expansion of a constituent quark model, the Foldy term cancels exactly against a contribution to the Dirac form factor F_1 to leave intact the naive interpretation of G^n_E as arising from the neutron's rest frame charge distribution.

Nathan Isgur

1998-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

287

MIXTURE INTERPRETATION:  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... run protocol (ie different injections times) be analyzed separately Different color channels behave differently if possible, determine ATs for each ...

2011-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

288

Mixture Interpretation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... JM Butler Houston DNA Training Workshop ... Redman (Access database entry, shipping) Dave Duewer ... FMBIO Mac data) Kermit Channel & Mary ...

2007-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

289

Pre-test geological and geochemical evaluation of the Caprock, St. Peter Sandstone and formation fluids, Yakley Field, Pike County, Illinois  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of these studies is to ensure long-term stable containment of air in the underground reservoirs used in conjunction with compressed air energy storage (CAES) plants. The specific objective is to develop stability criteria and engineering guidelines for designing CAES reservoirs in each of the three major reservoir types, including aquifers, salt cavities, and mined hard rock caverns. This document characterizes the geologic nature of porous media constituents native to the aquifer field test site near Pittsfield, Illinois. The geologic samples were subjected to geochemical evaluations to determine anticipated responses to cyclic air injection, heating and moisture - conditions typical of an operating CAES reservoir. This report documents the procedures used and results obtained from these analyses.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Geothermal investigations in Idaho. Part IV. Isotopic and geochemical analyses of water from the Bruneau-Grand View and Weiser areas, southwest Idaho  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Variations of deuterium and oxygen-18 concentrations in thermal ground waters and local nonthermal springs have been used to aid in describing the source of recharge in the Bruneau-Grand View and Weiser areas, southwest Idaho. Isotope and geochemical data for the Bruneau-Grand View area suggest that recharge to the area may not be entirely from sources within the local surface-drainage area, but possibly from the areas of higher altitude of the Bruneau River drainage to the southeast; or that the hot water that wells and springs are discharging is water that was recharged at a time when the regional climate was much colder than the present climate. Recharge to the Weiser area is probably from areas of higher altitude to the north and northeast of the local drainage area. However, ''local'' precipitation does influence both the chemical and isotopic compositions of the waters in each area.

Rightmire, C.T.; Young, H.W.; Whitehead, R.L.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Microsoft Word - Part 850 Interpretation to be posted on GC Website with date 8 16 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL INTERPRETATION REGARDING MEDICAL REMOVAL PROTECTION BENEFITS PURSUANT TO 10 CFR PART 850, CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM The Department of Energy (DOE) General Counsel has been asked to provide a legal interpretation of the regulations regarding medical removal protection benefits under 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program. 1 This interpretation addresses the questions below. 1. Who decides whether a worker should be removed temporarily or permanently from exposure to beryllium under 10 CFR Part 850? The decision as to whether a worker should be temporarily or permanently removed from exposure to beryllium is made by the Site Occupational Medical Director (SOMD).

292

Interpretation of pre- and post-fracturing well tests in a geothermal reservoir  

SciTech Connect

Pre- and post-fracturing well tests in TG-2 well drilled next to the Matsukawa field are interpreted for evaluating effects of a massive hydraulic fracturing treatment. The interpreted data include multiple-step rate tests, a two-step rate test, and falloff tests. Pressure behaviors of massive hydraulic fracturing are matched by a simulator of dynamic fracture option. Fracture parting pressures can be evaluated from the multiple-step rate test data. The multiple-step rates during the massive hydraulic fracturing treatment show that multiple fractures have been induced in sequence. Although the pre-fracturing falloff tests are too short, fracture propagation can be evaluated qualitatively from the falloff data. Interpretation of the falloff test immediately after the MHF suggests that extensive fractures have been created by the MHF, which is verified by simulation. The post-fracturing falloff tests show that the fractures created by the MHF have closed to a great degree.

Arihara, Norio; Fukagawa, Hiroshi; Hyodo, Masami; Abbaszadeh, Maghsood

1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

293

Elucidating geochemical response of shallow heterogeneous aquifers to CO2 leakage using high-performance computing: Implications for monitoring of CO2 sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Predicting and quantifying impacts of potential carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into shallow aquifers that overlie geologic CO2 storage formations is an important part of developing reliable carbon storage techniques. Leakage of CO2 through fractures, faults or faulty wellbores can reduce groundwater pH, inducing geochemical reactions that release solutes into the groundwater and pose a risk of degrading groundwater quality. In order to help quantify this risk, predictions of metal concentrations are needed during geologic storage of CO2. Here, we present regional-scale reactive transport simulations, at relatively fine-scale, of CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers run on the PFLOTRAN platform using high-performance computing. Multiple realizations of heterogeneous permeability distributions were generated using standard geostatistical methods. Increased statistical anisotropy of the permeability field resulted in more lateral and vertical spreading of the plume of impacted water, leading to increased Pb2+ (lead) concentrations and lower pH at a well down gradient of the CO2 leak. Pb2+ concentrations were higher in simulations where calcite was the source of Pb2+ compared to galena. The low solubility of galena effectively buffered the Pb2+ concentrations as galena reached saturation under reducing conditions along the flow path. In all cases, Pb2+ concentrations remained below the maximum contaminant level set by the EPA. Results from this study, compared to natural variability observed in aquifers, suggest that bicarbonate (HCO3) concentrations may be a better geochemical indicator of a CO2 leak under the conditions simulated here.

Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Siirila, Erica R.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL INTERPRETATION REGARDING EXEMPTION RELIEF PURSUANT TO  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTERPRETATION REGARDING EXEMPTION RELIEF PURSUANT TO 10 C.F.R. PART 820, PROCEDURAL RULES FOR DOE NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES, SUBPART E, EXEMPTION RELIEF, AND NON-COMPLIANT "DOCUMENTED SAFETY ANALYSES" SUBJECT TO 10 C.F.R. PART 830, NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT, SUBPART B, SAFETY BASIS REQUIREMENTS Subpart D to 10 C.F.R Part 820 provides that the Department of Energy's (DOE) General Counsel (GC) shall be responsible for interpreting the DOE Nuclear Safety Requirements. Pursuant to that authority, the GC here responds to two questions received regarding contractor compliance with safety basis requirements: 1. Does 10 C.F.R. Part 820, Procedural Rules for DOE Nuclear Activities, allow

295

TSL: A System for Generating Abstract Interpreters and its Application to Machine-Code Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the design and implementation of a system, called TSL (for Transformer Specification Language), that provides a systematic solution to the problem of creating retargetable tools for analyzing machine code. TSL ... Keywords: Abstract interpretation, dataflow analysis, dynamic analysis, machine-code analysis, static analysis, symbolic analysis

Junghee Lim; Thomas Reps

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

InvenTcl: Interpretive 3D graphics using Open Inventor and Tcl/[incr Tcl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

InvenTcl: Interpretive 3D graphics using Open Inventor and Tcl/[incr Tcl] Sidney Fels, Silvio Esser development consists of a program/compile/debug iteration cy- cle. This paper introduces InvenTcl which is an in- terpretive version of Open Inventor using Tcl/Tk [4] and [incr Tcl] [3]. The advantages of InvenTcl

British Columbia, University of

297

InvenTcl: Interpretive 3D graphics using Open Inventor and Tcl/[incr Tcl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

InvenTcl: Interpretive 3D graphics using Open Inventor and Tcl/[incr Tcl] Sidney Fels, Silvio Esser development consists of a program/compile/debug iteration cy­ cle. This paper introduces InvenTcl which is an in­ terpretive version of Open Inventor using Tcl/Tk [4] and [incr Tcl] [3]. The advantages of InvenTcl

Fels, Sidney S.

298

Rough Sets in the Interpretation of Statistical Tests Outcomes for Genes Under Hypothetical Balancing Selection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detection of natural selection at the molecular level is one of the crucial problems in contemporary population genetics. There exists a number of statistical tests designed for it, however, the interpretation of the outcomes is often obscure, because ... Keywords: ATM, BLM, RECQL, WRN, natural selection, neutrality tests, rough sets

Krzysztof Cyran

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Interpretation of elastic electron-deuteron scattering at large momentum transfer  

SciTech Connect

The meson-exchange-current contribution to the deuteron electromagnetic form factors is interpreted from a quark-interchange point of view. Introducing nucleon structure suggested by the quark model, the calculation of Chemtob, Moniz, and Rho is shown to be in qualitative agreement with recent experimental data. (AIP)

Woloshyn, R.M.

1976-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

300

Interpretation of coordinations, compound generation, and result fusion for query variants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate interpreting coordinations (e.g. word sequences connected with coordinating conjunctions such as "and" and "or") as logical disjunctions of terms to generate a set of disjunctionfree query variants for information retrieval (IR) queries. ... Keywords: compounds, query structure, query variants, result set fusion

Johannes Leveling

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Constructions of dynamic geometry: A study of the interpretative flexibility of educational software in classroom practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The idea of 'interpretative flexibility' underpins new approaches to studying technological artefacts and curricular resources in use. This paper opens by reviewing - in this light - the evolving design of dynamic geometry, its pioneering use within ... Keywords: Applications in subject areas, Curriculum materials, Dynamic geometry, Educational software, Pedagogical issues, School mathematics, Secondary education, Teacher thinking, Teaching practices, Technology integration

Kenneth Ruthven; Sara Hennessy; Rosemary Deaney

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Raman and IR spectra of butane: Anharmonic calculations and interpretation of room temperature spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Raman and IR spectra of butane: Anharmonic calculations and interpretation of room temperature-principles anharmonic calculations are carried out for the IR and Raman spectra of the CAH stretch- ing bands in butane.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction n-Butane is of great importance in several disciplines

Potma, Eric Olaf

303

VAMPIRE microarray suite: a web-based platform for the interpretation of gene expression data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the increased computational load. Since all of these transactions are stored in the VAMPIRE database, no dataVAMPIRE microarray suite: a web-based platform for the interpretation of gene expression data of analysis, collectively known as variance-modeled posterior inference with regional exponentials (VAMPIRE

304

A novel cognitive interpretation of breast cancer thermography with complementary learning fuzzy neural memory structure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Early detection of breast cancer is the key to improve survival rate. Thermogram is a promising front-line screening tool as it is able to warn women of breast cancer up to 10 years in advance. However, analysis and interpretation of thermogram are heavily ... Keywords: Breast cancer diagnosis, Complementary learning, FALCON-AART, Fuzzy adaptive learning control network fuzzy neural network, Thermogram

T. Z. Tan; C. Quek; G. S. Ng; E. Y. K. Ng

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Physical interpretation of gauge invariant perturbations of spherically symmetric space-times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By calculating the Newman-Penrose Weyl tensor components of a perturbed spherically symmetric space-time with respect to invariantly defined classes of null tetrads, we give a physical interpretation, in terms of gravitational radiation, of odd parity gauge invariant metric perturbations. We point out how these gauge invariants may be used in setting boundary and/or initial conditions in perturbation theory.

Brien C. Nolan

2004-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

306

Aging discrepancies of white spruce affect the interpretation of static age structure in boreal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOTE Aging discrepancies of white spruce affect the interpretation of static age structure. Our objectives were to determine whether ground-level ring counts underestimate root collar age of understory P. glauca and whether aging errors increase with stand age. Trees were collected from one to nine

Macdonald, Ellen

307

Interval analysis of microcontroller code using abstract interpretation of hardware and software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Static analysis is often performed on source code where intervals -- possibly the most widely used numeric abstract domain -- have successfully been used as a program abstraction for decades. Binary code on microcontroller platforms, however, is different ... Keywords: abstract interpretation, binary code, embedded systems, interval analysis, static analysis

Jrg Brauer; Thomas Noll; Bastian Schlich

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Hydraulic testing of Salado Formation evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: Second interpretive report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure-pulse, constant-pressure flow, and pressure-buildup tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Transmissivities have been interpreted from six sequences of tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within 15 m of the WIPP underground excavations.

Beauheim, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, R.M.; Dale, T.F.; Fort, M.D.; Stensrud, W.A. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical Removal Protection Benefits Pursuant to 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following document is the Office of the General Counsel (GC) interpretation regarding Medical Removal Protection Benefits Pursuant to 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program.

310

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport, and chemical reactions can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. TOUGHREACT has been developed as a comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator to investigate these and other problems. A number of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. TOUGHREACT can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The code can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can take place subject to either local equilibrium or kinetic controls, with coupling to changes in porosity and permeability and capillary pressure in unsaturated systems. Chemical components can also be treated by linear adsorption and radioactive decay. The first version of the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT was developed (Xu and Pruess, 1998) by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). TOUGHREACT was further enhanced with the addition of (1) treatment of mineral-water-gas reactive-transport under boiling conditions, (2) an improved HKF activity model for aqueous species, (3) gas species diffusion coefficients calculated as a function of pressure, temperature, and molecular properties, (4) mineral reactive surface area formulations for fractured and porous media, and (5) porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure changes owing to mineral precipitation/dissolution (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2000, 2001; Spycher et al., 2003a). Subsequently, TOUGH2 V2 was released with additional EOS modules and features (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT includes all of the previous extensions to the original version, along with the replacement of the original TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991) by TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). TOUGHREACT has been applied to a wide variety of problems, some of which are included as examples, such as: (1) Supergene copper enrichment (Xu et al., 2001); (2) Mineral alteration in hydrothermal systems (Xu and Pruess, 2001a; Xu et al., 2004b; Dobson et al., 2004); (3) Mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline aquifers (Xu et al., 2003b and 2004a); (4) Coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes in boiling unsaturated tuff for the proposed nuclear waste emplacement site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2001; Sonnenthal and Spycher, 2000; Spycher et al., 2003a, b; Xu et al., 2001); (5) Modeling of mineral precipitation/dissolution in plug-flow and fracture-flow experiments under boiling conditions (Dobson et al., 2003); (6) Calcite precipitation in the vadose zone as a function of net infiltration (Xu et al., 2003); and (7) Stable isotope fractionation in unsaturated zone pore water and vapor (Singleton et al., 2004). The TOUGHREACT program makes use of 'self-documenting' features. It is distributed with a number of input data files for sample problems. Besides providing benchmarks for proper code installation, these can serve as a self-teaching tutorial in the use of TOUGHREACT, and they provide templates to help jump-start new applications. The fluid and heat flow part of TOUGHREACT is derived from TOUGH2 V2, so in addition to the current manual, users must have the manual of the TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT provides the following TOUGH2 fluid property or 'EOS' (equation-of-state) modules: (1) EOS1 for

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

311

Interpretation of warm prestress-induced fracture toughness based on crack-tip constraint  

SciTech Connect

This study explores the possibility of using J-Q-related crack-tip constraint concepts to provide a basis for both the interpretation of warm prestress (WPS)-induced fracture toughness and their transferability to structural applications. A finite-element boundary-layer formulation based on small-scale yielding (SSY), remote mode I K-dominant assumptions is adopted. Effects of WPS-induced crack-tip constraint are quantified in terms of deviation in either the opening-mode or the mean stress component of the WPS crack-tip fields relative to the reference K-dominant SSY state associated with monotonic-loading conditions. Over the range of WPS load-paths considered the WPS-induced crack-tip constraint closely resembles a spatially varying hydrostatic stress field. Interpretation and transferability of WPS fracture toughness under SSY conditions are specified in terms of the unload and reload ratio.

Shum, D.K.M.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Drill-hole data, drill-site geology, and geochemical data from the study of Precambrian uraniferous conglomerates of the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of southeastern Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

This volume is presented as a companion to Volume 1: The Geology and Uranium Potential of Precambrian Conglomerates in the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre of Southeastern Wyoming; and to Volume 3: Uranium Assessment for Precambrian Pebble Conglomerates in Southeastern Wyoming. Volume 1 summarized the geologic setting and geologic and geochemical characteristics of uranium-bearing conglomerates in Precambrian metasedimentary rocks of southeastern Wyoming. Volume 3 is a geostatistical resource estimate of U and Th in quartz-pebble conglomerates. This volume contains supporting geochemical data, lithologic logs from 48 drill holes in Precambrian rocks of the Medicine Bow Mountains and Sierra Madre, and drill site geologic maps and cross-sections from most of the holes.

Karlstrom, K.E.; Houston, R.S.; Schmidt, T.G.; Inlow, D.; Flurkey, A.J.; Kratochvil, A.L.; Coolidge, C.M.; Sever, C.K.; Quimby, W.F.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Factor demand linkages and the business cycle: Interpreting aggregate fluctuations as sectoral fluctuations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stylized fact that need to be addressed by any theory of the business cycle. Whether the comovement between sectors and the aggregate business cycle originates from aggregate shocks or sectoral shocks ampli?ed by sectoral interactions, or a combination... Factor demand linkages and the business cycle: interpreting aggregate ?uctuations as sectoral ?uctuations. Sean Holly Ivan Petrella Faculty of Economics and Centre for International Macroeconomics and Finance (CIMF), University of Cambridge...

Petrella, I; Holly, Sean

314

Application Guide for Selecting, Applying and Interpreting Transformer On-Line Diagnostics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update presents the latest developments in a multiyear effort to complete the report Application Guide for Emerging Condition Monitoring Techniques for Transformers. Although the guide is useful in its present state, future work will continue to add material to it to flesh out all the areas it covers.The purpose of the application guide is to provide practical assistance to utility industry on the selection, application, and interpretation of emerging techniques ...

2013-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

315

Decision Theory is a Red Herring for the Many Worlds Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There have been many attempts over the years to derive the Born Rule from the wave equation since Everett's Many Worlds Interpretation was proposed; however, none of these have been satisfactory as shown when critics pointed out loopholes and unsupported assumptions. In this paper the case is made that the currently fashionable decision-theoretic approach founded by David Deutsch and explicated by David Wallace is likewise unsatisfactory. A more fundamental computationalist approach is advocated.

Jacques Mallah

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

316

Decision Theory is a Red Herring for the Many Worlds Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There have been many attempts over the years to derive the Born Rule from the wave equation since Everett's Many Worlds Interpretation was proposed; however, none of these have been satisfactory as shown when critics pointed out loopholes and unsupported assumptions. In this paper the case is made that the currently fashionable decision-theoretic approach founded by David Deutsch and explicated by David Wallace is likewise unsatisfactory. A more fundamental computationalist approach is advocated.

Mallah, Jacques

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

A Geometric Interpretation of the ?-{y} Genus on Hyper-Kahler Manifolds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The group SL(2) acts on the space of cohomology groups of any hyper-Kahler manifold X. The \\chi_{y} genus of a hyper-Kahler X is shown to have a geometric interpretation as the super trace of an element of SL(2). As a by product one learns that the generalized Casson invariant for a mapping torus is essentially the \\chi_{y} genus.

George Thompson

1999-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

318

An abductive expert system for interpretation of real-time data  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes DINT, a data interpretation expert system which can provide an explanation of the real-time operating state of a substation to its operators. DINT is based on a generalized version of the set covering model for diagnostic problem solving. This abductive reasoning model is an object-based, frame-like knowledge representation paradigm. Test cases illustrate the application of the model to the real-time operation of a substation.

Dabbaghchi, I.; Gursky, R.J. (American Electric Power Service Corp., Columbus, OH (United States))

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

An abstract interpretation scheme for groundness, freeness, and sharing analysis of logic programs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Static global analyses based on abstract interpretation have been used to derive properties of programs. The analyses differ in the expressiveness of the abstract domains and the precision and efficiency of domain operations. We extend an abstract domain defined by Jacobs and Langen and present new abstract domain operations to derive freeness, groundness, and sharing of variables in logic programs. Analysis of non-trivial programs shows that our method is more precise and more efficient than previous proposals.

Renganathan Sundararajan; John S. Conery

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

James Reeves

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

InvenTcl: Making Open Inventor Interpretive with Tcl/[incr Tcl  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

le scene graph is created interpretively: SoSeparator >root>separatorl SoMaterial >root>separatorl>materiall SoCube > >root>separatorl>myCube This series of commands adds an SoSeparator node separator1 to the root node, an So- Material node to separatorl and an SoCube node to separatorl. Notice, that we use the '>' notation to specify parent/child relationships. This is consistent with how the most common toolkit used with Tcl, Tk [4], works. There are four main technical problems to overcome to make Open Inventor interpretive: 1. accessing Open Inventor's object functions and the object's public methods and vari- ables from the Tcl interpreter, 2. Open Inventor event management within Tcl/Tk, 3. binding Open Inventor objects to Tcl procedures and interaction modes, 4. synchronization of Open Inventor and Tcl processing. A utility called Itcl++[2] is used to convert Open Inventor object's methods into [incr Tcl] classes. Event management is done using a handler callback mechan

Sidney Fels; Silvio Esser; Armin Bruderlin; Kenji Mase

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Benefit/cost analysis for research in geothermal log interpretation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Well log interpretation, the process of inferring subsurface geology from geophysical measurements made in boreholes, is the most versatile and direct means available of assessing important physical and structural reservoir properties. Historically, well logging has been developed primarily for use in oil and gas wells, and its application in a different environment such as a geothermal reservoir creates complex problems. Present geothermal development is severely hindered by lack of data. Adaptation of well logging techniques holds the promise of reducing development costs, encouraging investment, and assisting regulatory permitting. Such benefits will translate directly into lower power costs and an increased domestic energy supply. A significant acceleration of geothermal power-on-line is possible plus cost reductions through reduction of drilling failure rate, reduction of average well cost, earlier recognition of bad wells, reduced flow testing, and savings due to provision of better data for regulatory decisions. Net undiscounted benefits in 1979 dollars from improving logging and interpretation in geothermal areas can exceed half a billion dollars in slightly more than a decade, about 300 million of this should be regarded as the potential benefit of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory Geothermal Log Interpretation Program or similar research.

Rigby, F.A.; Reardon, P.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

Cole, R.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Geochemical and Isotopic Evaluation of Groundwater Movement in Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the results of a comprehensive geochemical evaluation of the groundwater flow system in the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU). The main objectives of this study are to identify probable pathways for groundwater flow within the study area and to develop constraints on groundwater transit times between selected data collection sites. This work provides an independent means of testing and verifying predictive flow models being developed for this CAU using finite element methods. The Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU constitutes the largest of six underground test areas on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) specified for remedial action in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. A total of 747 underground nuclear detonations were conducted in this CAU. Approximately 23 percent of these detonations were conducted below or near the water table, resulting in groundwater contamination in the vicinity and possibly downgradient of these underground test locations. Therefore, a rigorous evaluation of the groundwater flow system in this CAU is necessary to assess potential long-term risks to the public water supply at downgradient locations.

Farnham, Irene

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

EQ3NR, a computer program for geochemical aqueous speciation-solubility calculations: Theoretical manual, user`s guide, and related documentation (Version 7.0); Part 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EQ3NR is an aqueous solution speciation-solubility modeling code. It is part of the EQ3/6 software package for geochemical modeling. It computes the thermodynamic state of an aqueous solution by determining the distribution of chemical species, including simple ions, ion pairs, and complexes, using standard state thermodynamic data and various equations which describe the thermodynamic activity coefficients of these species. The input to the code describes the aqueous solution in terms of analytical data, including total (analytical) concentrations of dissolved components and such other parameters as the pH, pHCl, Eh, pe, and oxygen fugacity. The input may also include a desired electrical balancing adjustment and various constraints which impose equilibrium with special pure minerals, solid solution end-member components (of specified mole fractions), and gases (of specified fugacities). The code evaluates the degree of disequilibrium in terms of the saturation index (SI = 1og Q/K) and the thermodynamic affinity (A = {minus}2.303 RT log Q/K) for various reactions, such as mineral dissolution or oxidation-reduction in the aqueous solution itself. Individual values of Eh, pe, oxygen fugacity, and Ah (redox affinity) are computed for aqueous redox couples. Equilibrium fugacities are computed for gas species. The code is highly flexible in dealing with various parameters as either model inputs or outputs. The user can specify modification or substitution of equilibrium constants at run time by using options on the input file.

Wolery, T.J.

1992-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

326

Development of an Experimental Data Base and Theories for Prediction of Thermodynamic Properties of Aqueous Electrolytes and Nonelectrolytes of Geochemical Significance at Supercritical Temperatures and Pressures.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to combine new experimental measurements on heat capacities, volumes, and association constants of key compounds with theoretical equations of state and with first principles quantum mechanical calculations to generate predictions of thermodynamic data. The resulting thermodynamic data allow quantitative models of geochemical processes at high temperatures and pressures. Research funded by a DOE grant to Prof. Robert Wood at the University of Delaware involved the development of new theoretical equations of state for aqueous solutions of electrolytes and non-electrolytes, methods to estimate thermodynamic data not available from experiments, collection of data on model compounds through experiments and predictions of properties using ab initio quantum mechanics. During the last three and a half years, with support from our DOE grant, 16 papers have been accepted or published, and 3 more are in preparation. Results of this research have been reported in numerous invited and contributed presentations at national and international meetings. For this report, we will briefly comment on the highlights of the last 3 and a half years and give a complete list of papers published, accepted, or submitted during these years.

Wood, Robert H.

2005-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

327

Interpreting Horizontal Well Flow Profiles and Optimizing Well Performance by Downhole Temperature and Pressure Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Horizontal well temperature and pressure distributions can be measured by production logging or downhole permanent sensors, such as fiber optic distributed temperature sensors (DTS). Correct interpretation of temperature and pressure data can be used to obtain downhole flow conditions, which is key information to control and optimize horizontal well production. However, the fluid flow in the reservoir is often multiphase and complex, which makes temperature and pressure interpretation very difficult. In addition, the continuous measurement provides transient temperature behavior which increases the complexity of the problem. To interpret these measured data correctly, a comprehensive model is required. In this study, an interpretation model is developed to predict flow profile of a horizontal well from downhole temperature and pressure measurement. The model consists of a wellbore model and a reservoir model. The reservoir model can handle transient, multiphase flow and it includes a flow model and a thermal model. The calculation of the reservoir flow model is based on the streamline simulation and the calculation of reservoir thermal model is based on the finite difference method. The reservoir thermal model includes thermal expansion and viscous dissipation heating which can reflect small temperature changes caused by pressure difference. We combine the reservoir model with a horizontal well flow and temperature model as the forward model. Based on this forward model, by making the forward calculated temperature and pressure match the observed data, we can inverse temperature and pressure data to downhole flow rate profiles. Two commonly used inversion methods, Levenberg- Marquardt method and Marcov chain Monte Carlo method, are discussed in the study. Field applications illustrate the feasibility of using this model to interpret the field measured data and assist production optimization. The reservoir model also reveals the relationship between temperature behavior and reservoir permeability characteristic. The measured temperature information can help us to characterize a reservoir when the reservoir modeling is done only with limited information. The transient temperature information can be used in horizontal well optimization by controlling the flow rate until favorite temperature distribution is achieved. With temperature feedback and inflow control valves (ICVs), we developed a procedure of using DTS data to optimize horizontal well performance. The synthetic examples show that this method is useful at a certain level of temperature resolution and data noise.

Li, Zhuoyi

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Data-collection instrumentation and interpretation for geopressured aquifer well tests  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Wells of Opportunity program funded by the Department of Energy, sought to determine the amount of natural gas and thermal energy entrained in geopressured, geothermal aquifers of the Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast fairways. This determination was made by bringing representative wells onto production for periods long enough to ascertain such characteristics as temperature, gas/brine ratio, reservoir boundaries and permeabilities. During testing, amounts of produced gas and brine were carefully monitored through a computer controlled instrumentation station, which provided reliable and precise indications of the amounts of recoverable gas being produced from the reservoir. A data collection system was designed to be integrated into the surface test equipment to provide real-time control and data compilation during the well tests. Strip chart records provided real-time control information during the test. All pressures, both differential pressures, brine and gas temperatures, and sand detector signals were displayed, and the physical records were maintained for interpretation of well performance. The data collection system coupled with the interpretation software permitted gas/brine ratio to be determined with accuracy of five percent for values as low as 0.02 MCF/STB. In addition, graphical representation of well performance, brine flow rates, gas production, pressure histories, etc., could be made as the test progressed. Data system reliability was very high. Downtime was minimal even under relatively harsh environmental conditions for electronic equipment. This data collection system, while designed initially for geopressured aquifers, is adaptable to the automated collection of scientific and engineering information for the interpretation of well tests of other petroleum resources.

Rose, R.E.; Doherty, M.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Lighting studies: interpreting lighting styles from traditional media in computer-generated imagery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to determine whether lighting styles from traditional media can be effectively interpreted in computer-generated scenes. Five paintings and a film still were carefully analyzed for their lighting styles, and scenes following these styles were recreated using the computer. Other factors, such as modeling and texturing, were simplified so that the focus of the research rested on lighting alone. By comparing the lighting in scenes with neutral and monochromatic texturing and in more abstract scenes bearing little resemblance to the original paintings, it is possible to see how lighting can serve to further the main story intent and mood of a scene.

Hong, Cindy Christine

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Deep Atomic Binding (DAB) Approach in Interpretation of Fission Products Behavior in Terrestrial and Water Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

A large number of studies and models were established to explain the fission products (FP) behavior within terrestrial and water ecosystems, but a number of behaviors were non understandable, which always attributed to unknown reasons. According to DAB hypothesis, almost all fission products behaviors in terrestrial and water ecosystems could be interpreted in a wide coincidence. The gab between former models predictions, and field behavior of fission products after accidents like Chernobyl have been explained. DAB represents a tool to reduce radio-phobia as well as radiation protection expenses. (author)

Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali M.S. [Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Amman 11814 (Jordan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

INTERPRETATION OF AIRBORNE ELECTROMAGNETIC AND MAGNETIC DATA IN THE 600 AREA  

SciTech Connect

As part of the 200-PO-1 Phase I geophysical surveys, Fugro Airborne Surveys was contracted to collect airborne electromagnetic (EM) and magnetic surveys of the Hanford Site 600 Area. Two helicopter survey systems were used with the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} time domain portion flown between June 19th and June 20th, 2008, and the RESOLVE{reg_sign} frequency domain portion was flown from June 29th to July 1st, 2008. Magnetic data were acquired contemporaneously with the electromagnetic surveys using a total-field cesium vapor magnetometer. Approximately 925 line kilometers (km) were flown using the HeliGEOTEM{reg_sign} II system and 412 line kilometers were flown using the RESOLVE{reg_sign} system. The HeliGEOTEM system has an effective penetration of roughly 250 meters into the ground and the RESOLVE system has an effective penetration of roughly 60 meters. Acquisition parameters and preliminary results are provided in SGW-39674, Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Report, 200-PO-1 Groundwater Operable Unit, 600 Area, Hanford Site. Airborne data are interpreted in this report in an attempt to identify areas of likely preferential groundwater flow within the aquifer system based on the presence of paleochannels or fault zones. The premise for the interpretation is that coarser-grained intervals have filled in scour channels created by episodic catastrophic flood events during the late Pleistocene. The interpretation strategy used the magnetic field anomaly data and existing bedrock maps to identify likely fault or lineament zones. Combined analysis of the magnetic, 60-Hz noise monitor, and flight-altitude (radar) data were used to identify zones where EM response is more likely due to cultural interference and or bedrock structures. Cross-sectional and map view presentations of the EM data were used to identify more electrically resistive zones that likely correlate with coarser-grained intervals. The resulting interpretation identifies one major northwest-southeast trending preferential flowpath with several minor units running along a similar trend. This presumed path of preferential flow is compared with the tritium concentration levels observed for the 600 Area. Analysis of the magnetic field data shows the location of potential bedrock faults and lineaments which may influence the horizontal and vertical flow of water. Faults lying within, or in the vicinity of preferential groundwater flow paths may allow flow into or out of the otherwise confined basalt layers.

CUMMINS GD

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

332

Second-Order, Dissipative T\\^atonnement: Economic Interpretation and 2-Point Limit Cycles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper proposes an alternative to the classical price-adjustment mechanism (called "t\\^atonnement" after Walras) that is second-order in time. The proposed mechanism, an analogue to the damped harmonic oscillator, provides a dynamic equilibration process that depends only on local information. The discrete-time form of the model can result in two-step limit cycles, but as the distance covered by the cycle depends on the size of the damping, the proposed mechanism can lead to both highly unstable and relatively stable behaviour, as observed in real economies. We suggest an economic interpretation for the process.

Kemp-Benedict, Eric

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Tracers and Tracer Testing: Design, Implementation, Tracer Selection, and Interpretation Methods  

SciTech Connect

Conducting a successful tracer test requires adhering to a set of steps. The steps include identifying appropriate and achievable test goals, identifying tracers with the appropriate properties, and implementing the test as designed. When these steps are taken correctly, a host of tracer test analysis methods are available to the practitioner. This report discusses the individual steps required for a successful tracer test and presents methods for analysis. The report is an overview of tracer technology; the Suggested Reading section offers references to the specifics of test design and interpretation.

G. Michael Shook; Shannon L.; Allan Wylie

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Photogeologic Interpretation of the Baltazor-McGee Geothermal Prospects, Humboldt County, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

GeothermEx, Inc. was asked by Earth Power Corporation in October 1977 to perform a photogeologic study of the Baltazor and McGee geothermal prospects, northern Humboldt County, Nevada and southern Harney County, Oregon (figure 1), as a means of evaluating the geothermal reservoir and heat source at these prospects. Work began in October and was completed in December 1977. It included a brief field reconnaissance, to clarify particular points. This report summarizes findings and offers interpretations of structural features, stratigraphy, recent tectonic events, and subsurface conditions.

Gardner, Murray C.; Koenig, James B.

1978-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Alteration of As-bearing Phases in a Small Watershed Located on a High Grade Arsenic-geochemical Anomaly (French Massif Central)  

SciTech Connect

At a watershed scale, sediments and soil weathering exerts a control on solid and dissolved transport of trace elements in surface waters and it can be considered as a source of pollution. The studied subwatershed (1.5 km{sup 2}) was located on an As-geochemical anomaly. The studied soil profile showed a significant decrease of As content from 1500 mg kg{sup -1} in the 135-165 cm deepest soil layer to 385 mg kg{sup -1} in the upper 0-5 cm soil layer. Directly in the stream, suspended matter and the <63 {micro}m fraction of bed sediments had As concentrations greater than 400 mg kg{sup -1}. In all these solid fractions, the main representative As-bearing phases were determined at two different observation scales: bulk analyses using X-ray absorption structure spectroscopy (XAS) and microanalyses using scanning electron microscope (SEM) and associated electron probe microanalyses (EPMA), as well as micro-Raman spectroscopy and synchrotron-based micro-scanning X-ray diffraction ({micro}SXRD) characterization. Three main As-bearing phases were identified: (i) arsenates (mostly pharmacosiderite), the most concentrated phases As in both the coherent weathered bedrock and the 135-165 cm soil layer but not observed in the river solid fraction, (ii) Fe-oxyhydroxides with in situ As content up to 15.4 wt.% in the deepest soil layer, and (iii) aluminosilicates, the least concentrated As carriers. The mineralogical evolution of As-bearing phases in the soil profile, coupled with the decrease of bulk As content, may be related to pedogenesis processes, suggesting an evolution of arsenates into As-rich Fe-oxyhydroxides. Therefore, weathering and mineralogical evolution of these As-rich phases may release As to surface waters.

A Bossy; C Grosbois; S Beauchemin; A Courtin-Nomade; W Hendershot; H Bril

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis (GC 160/161) and Petronius (VK 786) fields is estimated to include 17%-28%, 31%-51%, 31%-49% bacterial methane, respectively. Geochemical assessment of the reservoir gas in the fields show that the gas may be the product of thermal cracking of Upper Jurassic crude oil before final migration to the reservoirs. The gas from three different fields is of similar thermal maturity levels. In contrast to oil in reservoirs in the fields, which shows biodegradation effects, the C1-C5 reservoir gas is unaltered by biodegradation. Late gas migration may have occurred at or near present burial depth and flushed the reservoir system of previously biodegraded hydrocarbon gas to include any previous bacterial methane. Molecular and isotopic properties of reservoir gas and oil suggest that bacterial methane mixed with thermogenic hydrocarbon gas before entering the reservoirs. Thus the source of the bacterial methane is logically deeper than the present depth (>~4 km) and temperatures of the reservoirs. High sedimentation rate and low geothermal gradient may offer conditions favorable for generation and preservation of bacterial methane in deep subsurface petroleum system of the Gulf slope. Bacterial methane dispersed across the large drainage areas of the deep subsurface petroleum system may have been swept by migrating fluids at >4 km, and then charged both vents (GC 185, GC 233 and GC 286) at the seafloor and reservoirs in the deep subsurface. The volume of bacterial methane from geologically significant depth in rapidly subsiding basins may be underestimated.

Ozgul, Ercin

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Application of oil-field well log interpretation techniques to the Cerro Prieto Geothermal Field  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An example is presented of the application of oil-field techniques to the Cerro Prieto Field, Mexico. The lithology in this field (sand-shale lithology) is relatively similar to oil-field systems. The study was undertaken as a part of the first series of case studies supported by the Geothermal Log Interpretation Program (GLIP) of the US Department of Energy. The suites of logs for individual wells were far from complete. This was partly because of adverse borehole conditions but mostly because of unavailability of high-temperature tools. The most complete set of logs was a combination of Dual Induction Laterolog, Compensated Formation Density Gamma Ray, Compensated Neutron Log, and Saraband. Temperature data about the wells were sketchy, and the logs had been run under pre-cooled mud condition. A system of interpretation consisting of a combination of graphic and numerical studies was used to study the logs. From graphical studies, evidence of hydrothermal alteration may be established from the trend analysis of SP (self potential) and ILD (deep induction log). Furthermore, the cross plot techniques using data from density and neutron logs may help in establishing compaction as well as rock density profile with depth. In the numerical method, R/sub wa/ values from three different resistivity logs were computed and brought into agreement. From this approach, values of formation temperature and mud filtrate resistivity effective at the time of logging were established.

Ershaghi, I.; Phillips, L.B.; Dougherty, E.L.; Handy, L.L.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Interpretation of the Tadpole VV29 Merging Galaxy System using Hydro-Gravitational Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hubble Space Telescope (HST/ACS) images of the galaxy merger Tadpole are interpreted using the hydro-gravitational theory of Gibson 1996-2000 (HGT) that predicts galaxy masses within about 100 kpc are dominated by dark halos of planetary mass primordial-fog-particles (PFPs) in dark proto-globular-star-clusters (PGCs). According to our interpretation, stars and young-globular-clusters (YGCs) appear out of the dark as merging galaxy components VV29cdef move through the baryonic-dark-matter halo of the larger galaxy VV29a creating luminous star-wakes. Frozen PFP planets are evaporated by radiation and tidal forces of the intruders. Friction from the gas accelerates an accretional cascade of PFPs to form larger planets, stars and YGCs of the filamentary galaxy VV29b. Star-wakes show that galaxy VV29c, identified as a blue dwarf by radio telescope observations of gas density and velocity (Briggs et al. 2001), with companions VV29def entered the dark halo of the larger VV29a galaxy at a radius 130 kpc and then spiraled in on different tracks toward frictional capture by the VV29a core. A previously dark dwarf galaxy is identified from a Keck spectrographic study showing a VV29c star-wake dense cluster of YGCs aligned to 1 degree in a close straight row (Tran et al. 2003).

Carl H. Gibson; Rudolph E. Schild

2002-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

339

Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low ( 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Interpretation of a Short-Term Anomaly in the Gravitational Microlensing Event MOA-2012-BLG-486  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A planetary microlensing signal is generally characterized by a short-term perturbation to the standard single lensing light curve. A subset of binary-source events can produce perturbations that mimic planetary signals, thereby introducing an ambiguity between the planetary and binary-source interpretations. In this paper, we present analysis of the microlensing event MOA-2012-BLG-486, for which the light curve exhibits a short-lived perturbation. Routine modeling not considering data taken in different passbands yields a best-fit planetary model that is slightly preferred over the best-fit binary-source model. However, when allowed for a change in the color during the perturbation, we find that the binary-source model yields a significantly better fit and thus the degeneracy is clearly resolved. This event not only signifies the importance of considering various interpretations of short-term anomalies, but also demonstrates the importance of multi-band data for checking the possibility of false-positive pla...

Hwang, K -H; Bond, I A; Sumi, T; Han, C; Gaudi, B S; Gould, A; Bozza, V; Beaulieu, J -P; Tsapras, Y; Abe, F; Bennett, D P; Botzler, C S; Chote, P; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Fukunaga, D; Harris, P; Itow, Y; Koshimoto, N; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Muraki, Y; Namba, S; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Sweatman, W L; Suzuki, D; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yamai, N; Yock, P C M; Yonehara, A; de Almeida, L Andrade; DePoy, D L; Dong, Subo; Jablonski, F; Jung, Y K; Kavka, A; Lee, C -U; Park, H; Pogge, R W; Shin, I -G; Yee, J C; Albrow, M D; Bachelet, E; Batista, V; Brillant, S; Caldwell, J A R; Cassan, A; Cole, A; Corrales, E; Coutures, Ch; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Fouqu, P; Greenhill, J; Jrgensen, U G; Kane, S R; Kubas, D; Marquette, J -B; Martin, R; Meintjes, P; Menzies, J; Pollard, K R; Williams, A; Wouters, D; Bramich, D M; Dominik, M; Horne, K; Browne, P; Hundertmark, M; Ipatov, S; Kains, N; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Street, R A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Communities of interpretation: reading the body in the novels of Elizabeth Gaskell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

metaphorizes social misunderstanding and the misunderstandings between readers and authors through the issue of reading the body. Also, it will it will discuss the ways she uses the language of the body to equalize the minority factions in her contemporary society. Finally, it will present Gaskell's model of understanding through personal contact, and show how she depends on physical sight to weaken prejudice and create sympathy. It will accomplish this by focusing on Gaskell's fourth novel, North and South. This novel contains all of the communities of interpretation that appear in Gaskell's novels. Each group appears in other novels, as well, and I will draw on those other occurrences to aid and clarify my argument. Also, North and South provides the one character in all of Gaskell's novels who is most successful at reading and interpreting the body across all community boundaries. Margaret Hale comes into contact with characters from all of the groups, and she learns to understand them all. Thus, she is the most complete and successful model of sympathy Gaskell offers in her novels.

McWilliams, Amy Elizabeth

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Geothermal exploration assessment and interpretation, Klamath Basin, Oregon: Swan Lake and Klamath Hills area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A synthesis and preliminary interpretation of predominantly geophysical information relating to the Klamath Basin geothermal resource is presented. The Swan Lake Valley area, northeast of Klamath Falls, and the Klamath Hills area, south of Klamath Falls, are discussed in detail. Available geophysical data, including gravity, magnetic, electrical resistivity, microearthquake, roving dipole resistivity, audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) and magnetotelluric (MT) data sets, are examined and reinterpreted for these areas. One- and two-dimensional modeling techniques are applied, and general agreement among overlapping data sets is achieved. The MT method appears well suited to this type of exploration, although interpretation is difficult in the complex geology. Roving dipole and AMT are useful in reconnaissance, while gravity and magnetics help in defining structure. For the Swan Lake Valley the data suggest buried electrically conductive zones beneath Meadow Lake Valley and Swan Lake, connected by a conductive layer at 1 kilometer depth. In the Klamath Hills area, the data suggest a conductive zone centered near the northwestern tip of Stukel Mountain, associated with a concealed northeast-trending cross-fault. Another conductive zone appears near some producing hot wells at the southwestern edge of the Klamath Hills. These conductive zones may represent geothermal reservoirs. Follow-up work is recommended for each target area.

Stark, M.; Goldstein, N.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Hege, H.; Wilt, M.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Geothermal resource exploration assessment and data interpretation, Klamath Basin, Oregon: Swan Lake and Klamath Hills area  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A synthesis and preliminary interpretation of predominantly geophysical information relating to the Klamath Basin geothermal resource is presented. The Swan Lake Valley area, northeast of Klamath Falls, and the Klamath Hills area, south of Klamath Falls, are discussed in detail. Available geophysical data, including gravity, magnetic, electrical resistivity, microseismic, roving dipole resistivity, audio-magnetotelluric (AMT) and magnetotelluric (MT) data sets, are examined and reinterpreted for these areas. One- and two-dimensional modeling techniques are applied, and general agreement among overlapping data sets is achieved. The MT method appears well suited to this type of exploration, although interpretation is difficult in the complex geology. Roving dipole and AMT are useful in reconnaissance, while gravity and magnetics help in defining structure. For the Swan Lake Valley the data suggest buried electrically conductive zones beneath Meadow Lake Valley and Swan Lake, connected by a conductive layer at 1 kilometer depth. In the Klamath Hills area, the data suggest a conductive zone centered near the northwestern tip of Stukel Mountain, associated with a concealed northeast-trending cross-fault. Another conductive zone appears near some producing hot wells at the southwestern edge of the Klamath Hills. These conductive zones may represent geothermal reservoirs. Specific types of follow-up work are recommended for each target area.

Stark, M.; Goldstein, N.; Wollenberg, H.; Strisower, B.; Hege, M.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Interpretation of the Helix Planetary Nebula using Hydro-Gravitational-Dynamics: Planets and Dark Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hubble Space Telescope images of the Helix Planetary Nebula are interpreted using the hydro-gravitational-dynamics theory (HGD) of Gibson 1996-2006. HGD claims that baryonic-dark-matter (BDM) dominates the halo masses of galaxies (Schild 1996) as Jovian (Primordial-fog-particle [PFP]) Planets (JPPs) in proto-globular-star-cluster (PGC) clumps for all galaxy halo diameters bounded by stars. From HGD, supernova Ia (SNe Ia) events always occur in planetary nebulae (PNe) within PGCs. The dying central star of a PNe slowly accretes JPP mass to grow the white-dwarf to instability. Plasma jets, winds and radiation driven by contraction and spin-up of the carbon star evaporate JPPs revealing its Oort accretional cavity. SNe Ia events may thus be obscured or not obscured by radiation-inflated JPP atmospheres producing systematic SNe Ia distance errors, so the otherwise mysterious ``dark energy'' concept is unnecessary. HST/ACS and WFPC2 Helix images show >7,000 cometary globules and SST/IRAC images show >20,000-40,000, here interpreted as gas-dust cocoons of JPPs evaporated by the spin powered radiation of the PNe central white-dwarf. Observed JPP masses fossilizes the primordial density existing when the plasma universe fragmented into proto-superclusters, proto-clusters, and proto-galaxies. Pulsar scintillation spectra support the postulated multi-planet atmospheres.

Carl H. Gibson; Rudolph E. Schild

2007-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

345

Atmospheric Dispersion of Wheat Rust Spores: A New Theoretical Framework to Interpret Field Data and Estimate Downwind Dispersion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Theoretical predictions for dispersion of heavy particles above an area source are used to formulate a new framework to interpret measurements of spore concentration above an infected field. Experimental measurements of mean spore concentration ...

Marcelo Chamecki; Nicholas S. Dufault; Scott A. Isard

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

A new approach for interpreting a pressure transient test after a massive acidizing treatment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interpreting a pressure transient test from an acidized well in the framework of the thin skin concept is not straightforward for several reasons. First, the effect of stimulation cannot be considered to be localized in an infinitesimal region near the wellbore. Second, even if an equivalent skin factor can be defined, it will not be constant during the transient period. Third, the negative skin factor does not allow for a rigorous solution of the transient problem in the presence of wellbore storage, and hence, type curves can be generated only using "equivalent" fractured well models. In this paper we introduce a theoretically rigorous approach for the case when the effect of stimulation or damage can be represented using a power-law model to represent the reservoir permeability (as a function of the radial distance from the well). The well-reservoir system is described using three parameters-the areal average permeability, the power-law exponent (positive for damaged and negative for stimulated wells) and the wellbore storage coefficient. To our knowledge, this is the first time this problem has been addressed in the technical literature. The model is solved rigorously in the Laplace domain. We used numerical inversion of the Laplace domain solution to generate type curves. Two sets of type curves are presented for interpreting pressure transient tests from nonstimulated wells and stimulated (acidized) wells. From a practical point of view- however, the newly developed type curve for nonstimulated wells do not provide any substantial advantages over the existing methods, and in fact, this case is simply a reproduction of the Bourdet, et al. type curve for an infinite-acting homogenous reservoir. On the other hand, our new type curve for a stimulated well differs from any previous results discussed in the literature and constitutes the substantive contribution of this work. Data analyses verify that the new generated type curves can be implemented as a new interpretation methodology-particularly for the stimulated well case. An apparent disadvantage of the new type curves is that the drainage radius is a component of the type curve "family parameter," and hence, the concept of an "infinite-acting" reservoir is not applicable. Ideally, practicing engineers need to have a good understanding of the drainage area to obtain a realistic value of the power-law exponent (of the permeability profile). The proposed methodology may be particularly attractive for the evaluation of nontraditional "reservoir stimulation" treatments (e.g., high-rate water fracturing without proppant), where the geometric containment of the stimulation effect is not known.

Mursal

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Theoretical Model and Interpretation of Dense Plasma X-Ray Thomson Scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors present analytical expressions for the dynamic structure factor, or form factor S(k,{omega}), which is the quantity describing the inelastic x-ray cross section from a dense plasma or a simple liquid. The results, based on the random phase approximation (RPA) for the treatment on the charged particle coupling, can be applied to describe scattering from either weakly coupled classical plasmas or degenerate electron liquids. The form factor correctly reproduces the Compton energy downshift and the usual Fermi-Dirac electron velocity distribution for S(k,{omega}) in the case of a cold degenerate plasma. the usual concept of scattering parameter is also reinterpreted for the degenerate case in order to include the effect of the Thomas-Fermi screening. The results shown in this work can be applied to interpreting x-ray scattering in warm dense plasmas occurring in inertial confinement fusion experiments or inside the interior of planets.

Gregori, G; Landen, O; Hicks, D; Pasley, J; Collins, G; Celliers, P; Bastea, M; Glenzer, S

2002-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

348

The June 2012 transit of Venus. Framework for interpretation of observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground based observers have on 5/6th June 2012 the last opportunity of the century to watch the passage of Venus across the solar disk from Earth. Venus transits have traditionally provided unique insight into the Venus atmosphere through the refraction halo that appears at the planet outer terminator near ingress/egress. Much more recently, Venus transits have attracted renewed interest because the technique of transits is being successfully applied to the characterization of extrasolar planet atmospheres. The current work investigates theoretically the interaction of sunlight and the Venus atmosphere through the full range of transit phases, as observed from Earth and from a remote distance. Our model predictions quantify the relevant atmospheric phenomena, thereby assisting the observers of the event in the interpretation of measurements and the extrapolation to the exoplanet case. Our approach relies on the numerical integration of the radiative transfer equation, and includes refraction, multiple scatter...

Muoz, A Garca

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Radar imagery interpretation to provide information about several geothermal sites in the Philippines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Republic of the Philippines is intensely interested in the identification, development, and conservation of natural resources. In keeping with this, the Government of the Philippines has recently completed a nation-wide sedimentary basin evaluation program to assess hydrocarbon potential and assist in future exploration activities. This program of collection and interpretation of the radar imagery was designed to augment and complement the existing data base. The primary objective of the project was to further the goals of international energy development by aiding the Republic of the Philippines in the assessment of potential geothermal and petroleum prospects within the areas imaged. Secondary goals were to assist the Republic of the Philippines in utilizing state-of-the-art radar remote sensing technology for resource exploration, and to train key Philippines scientists in the use of imaging radar data. 7 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

Not Available

1988-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

350

Executive summary: Radar imagery interpretation to assess the hydrocarbon potential of four sites in the Phillipines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Republic of the Philippines is intensely interested in the identification, development, and conservation of natural resources. In keeping with this, the Government of the Philippines has recently completed a nationwide sedimentary basin evaluation program to assess hydrocarbon potential and assist in future exploration activities. This program of collection and interpretation of the radar imagery was designed to augment and complement the existing data base. The primary objective of the project was to further the goals of international energy development by aiding the Republic of the Philippines in the assessment of potential petroleum and geothermal prospects within the areas imaged. Secondary goals were to assist the Republic of the Philippines in utilizing state-of-the-art radar remote sensing technology for resource exploration, and to train key Philippines scientists in the use of imaging radar data. 9 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1988-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

351

The Spectrum of the Millisecond Pulsar J0218+4232 - Theoretical Interpretations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We interpret the unique high-energy spectrum of the millisecond pulsar PSR J0218+4232 within polar cap scenarios. We show that the spectral data from BeppoSAX (Mineo et al.2000) and EGRET (Kuiper et al 2000) impose very restrictive limitations on possible radiation mechanisms, energy spectrum of radiating charges as well as viewing geometry. Theoretical spectra are able to reproduce the data, however, this can be achieved provided very special -- unusual within the conventional polar cap picture -- conditions are satisfied. Those include off-beam viewing geometry along with one of the following alternatives: 1) strong acceleration of secondary pairs; 2) broad energy distribution of primary electrons extending down to $10^5$ MeV; 3) high-altitude synchrotron emission.

J. Dyks; B. Rudak

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

352

Search and seizure law; practical advice and interpretation for nuclear protective force persons  

SciTech Connect

Recent Supreme Court decisions, which interpret the 200-year-old Fourth Amendment of the US Constitution, are used to provide a brief overview of some search and seizure subjects important to management and officers responsible for physical protection of nuclear facilities. The overview is framed in practical terms in order to make the comments applicable to the everyday activity of nuclear-protective-force persons. The Supreme Court has described several exceptions where searches and seizures (arrests) are permitted without a warrant, despite the Fourth Amendment which states that warrants are always required. The seven exceptions briefly discussed are search incidents to a lawful arrest, the automobile-search exception, the suitcase or container exception, the hot-pursuit or emergency exception, the stop-and-frisk exception, the plain-view exception, and consent to be searched.

Cadwell, J.J.

1983-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

353

A fast algorithm for three-dimensional interpretations ofsingle-well electromagnetic data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An efficient inversion algorithm has been developed forthree-dimensional (3D) interpretations for single-hole electromagnetic(EM) logging data based on a modified extended Born approximation (MEBA)scheme. The single-hole data was collected at an oil field undergoing CO2injection in southern California using a tool, Geo-BILT, developed byElectromagnetic Instruments, Inc (EMI). The tool is equipped with amulti-component source, and an array of multi-component receivers atdifferent separations. The inversion result provides a reasonableelectrical conductivity image to a distance of 10 m from the well, andillustrates several zones with lateral conductivity variations that couldnot be resolved with traditional induction logging tools. The computercost of the inversion processes can be further reduced using a trivialmulti-grid methodology.

Tseng, Hung-Wen; Lee, Ki Ha

2004-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

354

Radar imagery interpretation to assess the hydrocarbon potential of four sites in the Philippines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Republic of the Philippines is intensely interested in the identification, development, and conservation of natural resources. In keeping with this, the Government of the Philippines has recently completed a nationwide sedimentary basin evaluation program to assess hydrocarbon potential and assist in future exploration activities. This program of collection and interpretation of the radar imagery was designed to augment and complement the existing data base. The primary objective of the project was to further the goals of international energy development by aiding the Republic of the Philippines in the assessment of potential petroleum and geothermal prospects within the areas imaged. Secondary goals were to assist the Republic of the Philippines in utilizing state-of-the-art radar remote sensing technology for resource exploration, and to train key Philippines scientists in the use of imaging radar data. 29 refs., 30 figs., 14 tabs.

Not Available

1988-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

355

Interpreting the visual and cinematic style of Japanese anime using three-dimensional computer graphics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Due to the international popularity of Japanese anime and its recognition as a cinematic art form, creative professionals in the animation industry are impressed with not only the complexity and artistic fluidity of the animation style but also the variety of narrative themes. As an acceptable alternative to live action films, Japanese directors and animators have more liberty with narrative themes and explicit imagery in anime than their western counterparts, and anime is attracting a variety of audiences ranging from young children to adults. As a stylistic form of animation with a distinct line art style, anime is traditionally produced by hand. With the development of non-photorealistic rendering techniques such as toon shading, three-dimensional computer graphics are used in anime production, though with limited application. This thesis attempts to interpret the visual and cinematic style of anime entirely within a three-dimensional digital environment through character design, modeling, character animation, cinematography, and non-photorealistic rendering.

Mistry, Pradeep Champaklal

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Information and The Brukner-Zeilinger Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics: A Critical Investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Brukner and Zeilinger's interpretation of quantum mechanics, information is introduced as the most fundamental notion and the finiteness of information is considered as an essential feature of quantum systems. They also define a new measure of information which is inherently different from the Shannon information and try to show that the latter is not useful in defining the information content in a quantum object. Here, we show that there are serious problems in their approach which make their efforts unsatisfactory. The finiteness of information does not explain how objective results appear in experiments and what an instantaneous change in the so-called information vector (or catalog of knowledge) really means during the measurement. On the other hand, Brukner and Zeilinger's definition of a new measure of information may lose its significance, when the spin measurement of an elementary system is treated realistically. Hence, the sum of the individual measures of information may not be a conserved value in real experiments.

Afshin Shafiee; Feryal Safinejad; Farnoush Naqsh

2004-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

357

Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site  

SciTech Connect

This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Interpretation of shallow crustal structure of the Imperial Valley, California, from seismic reflection profiles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eight seismic reflection profiles (285 km total length) from the Imperial Valley, California, were provided to CALCRUST for reprocessing and interpretation. Two profiles were located along the western margin of the valley, five profiles were situated along the eastern margin and one traversed the deepest portion of the basin. These data reveal that the central basin contains a wedge of highly faulted sediments that thins to the east. Most of the faulting is strike-slip but there is evidence for block rotations on the scale of 5 to 10 kilometers within the Brawley Seismic Zone. These lines provide insight into the nature of the east and west edges of the Imperial Valley. The basement at the northwestern margin of the valley, to the north of the Superstition Hills, has been normal-faulted and blocks of basement material have ''calved'' into the trough. A blanket of sediments has been deposited on this margin. To the south of the Superstition Hills and Superstition Mountain, the top of the basement is a detachment surface that dips gently into the basin. This margin is also covered by a thick sequence sediments. The basement of the eastern margin consists of metamorphic rocks of the upper plate of the Chocolate Mountain Thrust system underlain by the Orocopia Schist. These rocks dip to the southeast and extend westward to the Sand Hills Fault but do not appear to cross it. Thus, the Sand Hills Fault is interpreted to be the southern extension of the San Andreas Fault. North of the Sand Hills Fault the East Highline Canal seismicity lineament is associated with a strike-slip fault and is probably linked to the Sand Hills Fault. Six geothermal areas crossed by these lines, in agreement with previous studies of geothermal reservoirs, are associated with ''faded'' zones, Bouguer gravity and heat flow maxima, and with higher seismic velocities than surrounding terranes.

Severson, L.K.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Developing a robust geochemical and reactive transport model to evaluate possible sources of arsenic at the CO2 sequestration natural analog site in Chimayo, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Migration of carbon dioxide (CO2) from deep storage formations into shallow drinking water aquifers is a possible system failure related to geologic CO2 sequestration. A CO2 leak may cause mineral precipitation/ dissolution reactions, changes in aqueous speciation, and alteration of pH and redox conditions leading to potential increases of trace metal concentrations above EPA National Primary Drinking Water Standards. In this study, the Chimayo site (NM) was examined for site-specific impacts of shallow groundwater interacting with CO2 from deep storage formations. Major ion and trace element chemistry for the site have been previously studied. This work focuses on arsenic (As), which is regulated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act and for which some wells in the Chimayo area have concentrations higher than the maximum contaminant level (MCL). Statistical analysis of the existing Chimayo groundwater data indicates that As is strongly correlated with trace metals U and Pb indicating that their source may be from the same deep subsurface water. Batch experiments and materials characterization, such as: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence (#2;-XRF), were used to identify As association with Fe-rich phases, such as clays or oxides, in the Chimayo sediments as the major factor controlling As fate in the subsurface. Batch laboratory experiments with Chimayo sediments and groundwater show that pH decreases as CO2 is introduced into the system and buffered by calcite. The introduction of CO2 causes an immediate increase in As solution concentration, which then decreases over time. A geochemical model was developed to simulate these batch experiments and successfully predicted the pH drop once CO2 was introduced into the experiment. In the model, sorption of As to illite, kaolinite and smectite through surface complexation proved to be the key reactions in simulating the drop in As concentration as a function of time in the batch experiments. Based on modeling, kaolinite precipitation is anticipated to occur during the experiment, which allows for additional sorption sites to form with time resulting in the slow decrease in As concentration. This mechanism can be viewed as trace metal scavenging due to sorption caused secondary mineral precipitation. Since deep geologic transport of these trace metals to the shallow subsurface by brine or CO2 intrusion is critical to assessing environmental impacts, the effective retardation of trace metal transport is an important parameter to estimate and it is dependent on multiple coupled reactions. At the field scale, As mobility is retarded due to the influence of sorption reactions, which can affect environmental performance assessment studies of a sequestration site.

Viswanathana, Hari; Daia, Zhenxue; Lopano, Christina; Keating, Elizabeth; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Scheckelc, Kirk G; Zhengd, Liange; Guthrie, George D.; Pawara, Rajesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Geochemical modeling at Raft River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical analysis of water from three depth regimes at the Raft River KGRA indicate the presence of at least two distinct hydrothermal fluids. One fluid predominates in the fracture system on the west side of the valley, known as the Bridge Fault. This fluid is characterized by low conductivity (2,000 to 3,000 ..mu..s) and 6 to 9 ..mu..g/ml F/sup -/. The second fluid, encountered in the center of the valley, appears to be associated with the Narrows Structure and is characterized by a conductivity of 6,000 to 11,000 ..mu..s and F/sup -/ of 3 to 6 ..mu..g/ml. Contour mapping of conductivity and Cl/sup -//F/sup -/ ratios indicates upwelling of both deep geothermal fluids into the shallow system. This recharge into the intermediate and shallow zones produces high-conductivity water which is used for irrigation. Application of a simple mixing model shows that all the water sampled in intermediate and deep zones can be described by mixtures of two nearly pure fluids. One mechanism, consistent with the known data, is deep upwelling of a highly mineralized fluid which is heated by the basement rock and then penetrates sediment layers through fractures. The second fluid is relatively recent meteoric water conductively heated by the basement rock.

Allen, C.A.; Chaney, R.E.; McAtee, R.E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Effect of the Natural Gas Policy Act of 1978 on administrative interpretation of natural-gas sales contracts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This comment examines the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's (FERC) natural gas regulatory authority and its policies and procedures for the interpretation of natural gas sales contracts and settlement agreements. It concludes that the FERC has prescribed a workable method for the post Natural Gas Policy Act (NGPA) interpretation of area rate clauses. The procedures and guidelines established in the Independent Oil and Gas Association, with the exception of the exclusion of evidence of settlement negotiations, promise to be fair to all parties in litigation over the meaning of area rate clauses. The FERC recognized that the limitations of drafting placed on the natural gas industry by the NGA and FERC regulations may have inhibited the free expression of intent in the words of the contract, thus requiring the use of extrinsic evidence. The FERC's formulation of objective textual standards for the interpretation of area rate clauses, when evidence of the parties' intent is absent or inconclusive, provides administrative law judges with clear guidelines and generally allows contracts to be interpreted in accordance with the parties' intent. The author feels the FERC's exclusion of evidence of settlement negotiations is misguided, however, and should be reconsidered. The negotiation of contracts in the context of settlement proceedings should not be a bar to the admissibility of evidence necessary to interpret an ambiguous contract provision. The FERC's position is not supportable in law or policy and should therefore be reversed.

Veis, B.T.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Seismic reprocessing, interpretation and petroleum prospectivity of the East Cano Rondon Area, Llanos Basin, Colombia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Llanos Basin, in Eastern Colombia, is the major oil-producing province in the country. In recent years, exploration in this basin has been focused towards plays in the Llanos foothills, where proven thrust traps present the possibility of large discoveries. However, the Llanos foreland still remains an attractive exploration target due to lower risk plays linked to proven production mechanisms. One giant field and over 51 smaller fields have been discovered. The basin, with an exploration well density of 1:500 1=2, can hardly be considered mature. Improvements in seismic data processing, sequence stratigraphic analysis and a better understanding of the petroleum systems have led to a renewed interest in the Llanos foreland in an attempt to identify new plays and prospects. An integrated geophysical and geological study was done to evaluate the petroleum prospectivity of the East Cano Rondon Area, located 35-km southwest of the giant Cano Limon Field. The purpose of the project was to reprocess approximately 200 km of mid 1980s seismic, integrate the interpretation of the seismic data with the available well and geologic data, create a sequence stratigraphic framework and describe the hydrocarbon potential of the area. Reprocessing the seismic data gave an improved image of the subsurface from previous processing. The implementations of techniques like refraction statics, pre-stack linear noise attenuation (FK Filter), surface consistent residual statics, dip moveout (DMO), post stack signal enhancement (FK Weighting) and finite difference migration improved the static solutions, signal noise to ratio and imaging of the fault planes. The interpretation of the seismic data led to the dentition of the structural styles, deformation history, paleotopography and identification of seismic facies. The sequence stratigraphic framework was built from the integration of the seismic, well and regional data. 5 transgressive-regressive sequences were identified in the Upper Cretaceous to Early Oligocene rocks. Two prospective areas were identified within the East Cano Rondon Area. One of them is related to the proven play of fault bounded anticlinal structures. Three gelds in the vicinity of the study area have proven reserves in this play. The second prospect is based on a new play that is being proposed. The play involves the stratigraphic pinchout of basal transgressive sands deposited in the topographic lows created by wrench fault tectonics. The two prospects could have up to an estimated 759 MMBO.

Molina, German D

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

CX-001926: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

926: Categorical Exclusion Determination 926: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001926: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geologic, Geophysical, and Geochemical Interpretation CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 04/27/2010 Location(s): Dixie Valley, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office AltaRock Energy, Inc. (AltaRock) would test the hypothesis that the potential for Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) can be characterized, and drilling targets can be identified, through integration of existing and new geosciences data. The project includes both field work and limited laboratory work. Field work would take place in a 5 kilometer X 5 kilometer area in Dixie Valley Nevada. Laboratory work would take place at

364

Structure of the Presidio Bolson area, Texas, interpreted from gravity data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To obtain a better understanding of the structure and tectonism of the region, an integrated geophysical-geological study of the Presidio area, Texas, was undertaken using gravity measurements and deep drilling data. New gravity data were combined with existing data to construct simple Bouguer anomaly maps of the Presidio area, and two-dimensional computer modeling of gravity profiles was used to derive earth models. These data outline the major geologic features of the area that are dominated by the effects of Tertiary block faulting and volcanism. The main feature of interest was the Presidio Graben, which is approximately 1.5 km deep near Ruidosa, Texas. One motivation for this study was the collection of a part of the basic scientific data needed to assess the geothermal potential of the area, and the results obtained support the hypothesis that hot springs associated with the Presidio Graben derive their heat from deep circulation along its boundary faults. However, some gravity anomalies observed could be interpreted as indicating the presence of late Tertiary intrusions that could provide heat for the hot springs.

Mraz, J.R.; Keller, G.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Consistent dark matter interpretation for CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we study the recent excess of low-energy events observed by the CoGeNT Collaboration and the annual modulation reported by the DAMA/LIBRA Collaboration, and discuss whether these signals could both be the result of the same elastically scattering dark matter particle. We find that, without channeling but when taking into account uncertainties in the relevant quenching factors, a dark matter candidate with a mass of approximately 7 GeV and a cross section with nucleons of {sigma}{sub DM-N{approx}}2x10{sup -4} pb (2x10{sup -40} cm{sup 2}) could account for both of these observations. We also comment on the events recently observed in the oxygen band of the CRESST experiment and point out that these could potentially be explained by such a particle. Lastly, we compare the region of parameter space favored by DAMA/LIBRA and CoGeNT to the constraints from XENON10, XENON100, and CDMS (Si) and find that these experiments cannot at this time rule out a dark matter interpretation of these signals.

Hooper, Dan [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Collar, J. I. [Enrico Fermi Institute, KICP and Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States); Hall, Jeter [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States); McKinsey, Dan [Department of Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520 (United States); Kelso, Christopher M. [Department of Physics, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

366

Interpretation of the Helix Planetary Nebula using Hydro-Gravitational Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wide angle Hubble Space Telescope (HST/ACS) images of the Helix Planetary Nebula (NGC 7293) are interpreted using the hydro-gravitational theory (HGT) of Gibson 1996-2000 that predicts the baryonic dark matter and interstellar medium (ISM) consists of Mars-mass primordial-fog-particle (PFP) frozen H-He planets. The new ACS images confirm and extend the O'Dell and Handron 1996 WFPC2 images showing thousands of cometary globules, which we suggest are cocoons of PFP and Jupiter frozen-gas-planets evaporated by powerful beamed radiation from the hot central white dwarf and its companion. The atmosphere mass of the largest cometary globules is ~ 3x10^{25} kg with spacing ~ 10^{14} m, supporting the prediction of HGT that the mass density of the ISM in Galaxy star forming regions should match the large baryonic primordial value at the time of first structure formation (10^{12} s or 30,000 years), with \\rho ~ (3-1)x 10^{-17} kg m^{-3}.

Carl H. Gibson; Rudolph E. Schild

2003-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

367

Computational Thermodynamics for Interpreting Oxidation of Structural Materials in Supercritical Water  

SciTech Connect

Supercritical water-cooled reactor (SCWR) is one of the advanced nuclear reactors being developed to meet the soaring energy demand. The corrosion resistance of structural materials used in SCWR becomes one of the major concerns as the operation conditions being raised up to {approx}600 C and {approx}25 MPa. Oxidation has been observed as the major corrosion behavior. To mitigate the oxidation corrosion, stabilities of metals and oxides need to be understood with respect to environmental temperature and oxygen partial pressure. Computational thermodynamics provides a practical approach to assess phase stabilities of such multi-component multi-variable systems. In this study, calculated phase stability diagrams of alloys and corresponding oxides were used to guide the interpretation of oxidation behaviors of SCW-exposed structural materials. Examples include ferritic-martensitic steel, austenitic steels and Ni-base alloy, e.g., HCM12A (Fe-12Cr), D9 (Fe-15Cr-15Ni), 800H (Fe-21Cr-32Ni), and 690 (Ni-30Cr-10Fe). Calculated results are in good overall consistence with the experimental data.

Tan, Lizhen [ORNL; Yang, Ying [ORNL; Allen, Todd R. [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Busby, Jeremy T [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Interpretation of a seismic refraction profile across the Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah and vicinity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In April 1977, a seismic refraction profile was recorded across the Milford Valley, the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA, and the northern Mineral Mountains in southwestern Utah. Seven shot points were used to provide multiple subsurface seismic refraction coverage along the 30 km east-west profile line. Since an inspection of power spectrums revealed large components of 60 Hz noise on some traces, computer routines were used to low-pass filter all seismograms. Amplitude information was utilized by normalizing all traces that recorded the same blast. Subsurface structural modeling was conducted by means of first arrival P-wave delay-time analysis and ray tracing. Herglotz-Wiechert travel-time inversion was used for the velocity-depth distribution in the Mineral Mountains. The interpretation of the P-wave travel-times suggests that the Milford Valley fill consists of two units with a total thickness of at least 1.8 km. In the vicinity of the Roosevelt KGRA, a thin low velocity alluvial layer covers a basement igneous complex with a velocity of 5.2 km/s. Granite velocities between 3.3 km/s and 4.0 km/s were calculated from the travel-times in the Mineral Mountains.

Gertson, R.C.; Smith, R.B.

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Dynamical interpretation of average fission-fragment kinetic energy systematics and nuclear scission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dynamical interpretation of the well-known systematics for average total kinetic energy of fission fragments over a wide range of the Coulomb parameter (600fission theory--at zero neck radius and at finite neck radius--have been applied in dynamical calculations. Both have resulted in a fairly good description of the dependence of on the Coulomb parameter. The results of dynamical calculations of within three-dimensional Langevin dynamics show that the mean distance between the centers of mass of nascent fragments at the scission configuration increases linearly with the parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3}. This distance changes approximately from 2.35R{sub 0} for {sup 119}Xe to 2.6R{sub 0} for {sup 256}Fm. In spite of this increase in mean distance between future fragments at scission, the linear dependence of on the parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3} remains approximately valid over a wide range of the Coulomb parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3}.

Nadtochy, P.N. [GSI, Plankstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Omsk State University, Department of Theoretical Physics, Mira Prospect 55-A, RU-644077 Omsk (Russian Federation); Adeev, G.D. [Omsk State University, Department of Theoretical Physics, Mira Prospect 55-A, RU-644077 Omsk (Russian Federation)

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Predictive Fallout Composition Modeling: Improvements and Applications of the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code  

SciTech Connect

This paper outlines several improvements to the Particle Activity Module of the Defense Land Fallout Interpretive Code (DELFIC). The modeling of each phase of the fallout process is discussed within DELFIC to demonstrate the capabilities and limitations with the code for modeling and simulation. Expansion of the DELFIC isotopic library to include actinides and light elements is shown. Several key features of the new library are demonstrated, including compliance with ENDF/B-VII standards, augmentation of hardwired activated soil and actinide decay calculations with exact Bateman calculations, and full physical and chemical fractionation of all material inventories. Improvements to the radionuclide source term are demonstrated, including the ability to specify heterogeneous fission types and the ability to import source terms from irradiation calculations using the Oak Ridge Isotope Generation (ORIGEN) code. Additionally, the dose, kerma, and effective dose conversion factors are revised. Finally, the application of DELFIC for consequence management planning and forensic analysis is presented. For consequence management, DELFIC is shown to provide disaster recovery teams with simulations of real-time events, including the location, composition, time of arrival, activity rates, and dose rates of fallout, accounting for site-specific atmospheric effects. The results from DELFIC are also demonstrated for use by nuclear forensics teams to plan collection routes (including the determination of optimal collection locations), estimate dose rates to collectors, and anticipate the composition of material at collection sites. These capabilities give mission planners the ability to maximize their effectiveness in the field while minimizing risk to their collectors.

Hooper, David A [ORNL; Jodoin, Vincent J [ORNL; Lee, Ronald W [ORNL; Monterial, Mateusz [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Automated method for the systematic interpretation of resonance peaks in spectrum data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for spectral signature interpretation. The method includes the creation of a mathematical model of a system or process. A neural network training set is then developed based upon the mathematical model. The neural network training set is developed by using the mathematical model to generate measurable phenomena of the system or process based upon model input parameter that correspond to the physical condition of the system or process. The neural network training set is then used to adjust internal parameters of a neural network. The physical condition of an actual system or process represented by the mathematical model is then monitored by extracting spectral features from measured spectra of the actual process or system. The spectral features are then input into said neural network to determine the physical condition of the system or process represented by the mathematical. More specifically, the neural network correlates the spectral features (i.e. measurable phenomena) of the actual process or system with the corresponding model input parameters. The model input parameters relate to specific components of the system or process, and, consequently, correspond to the physical condition of the process or system.

Damiano, Brian (Knoxville, TN); Wood, Richard T. (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Automated method for the systematic interpretation of resonance peaks in spectrum data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for spectral signature interpretation. The method includes the creation of a mathematical model of a system or process. A neural network training set is then developed based upon the mathematical model. The neural network training set is developed by using the mathematical model to generate measurable phenomena of the system or process based upon model input parameter that correspond to the physical condition of the system or process. The neural network training set is then used to adjust internal parameters of a neural network. The physical condition of an actual system or process represented by the mathematical model is then monitored by extracting spectral features from measured spectra of the actual process or system. The spectral features are then input into said neural network to determine the physical condition of the system or process represented by the mathematical model. More specifically, the neural network correlates the spectral features (i.e. measurable phenomena) of the actual process or system with the corresponding model input parameters. The model input parameters relate to specific components of the system or process, and, consequently, correspond to the physical condition of the process or system. 1 fig.

Damiano, B.; Wood, R.T.

1997-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

373

LORENTZ-FACTOR-ISOTROPIC-LUMINOSITY/ENERGY CORRELATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND THEIR INTERPRETATION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bulk Lorentz factor of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) ejecta ({Gamma}{sub 0}) is a key parameter to understanding GRB physics. Liang et al. have discovered a correlation between {Gamma}{sub 0} and isotropic {gamma}-ray energy: {Gamma}{sub 0}{proportional_to}E{sup 0.25}{sub {gamma},iso,52}. By including more GRBs with updated data and more methods to derive {Gamma}{sub 0}, we confirm this correlation and obtain {Gamma}{sub 0} {approx_equal} 91E{sup 0.29}{sub {gamma},iso,52}. Evaluating the mean isotropic {gamma}-ray luminosities L{sub {gamma},iso} of the GRBs in the same sample, we discover an even tighter correlation {Gamma}{sub 0} {approx_equal} 249L{sup 0.30}{sub {gamma},iso,52}. We propose an interpretation to this later correlation. Invoking a neutrino-cooled hyperaccretion disk around a stellar mass black hole as the central engine of GRBs, we derive jet luminosity powered by neutrino annihilation and baryon loading from a neutrino-driven wind. Applying beaming correction, we finally derive {Gamma}{sub 0}{proportional_to}L{sup 0.22}{sub {gamma},iso}, which is consistent with the data. This suggests that the central engine of long GRBs is likely a stellar mass black hole surrounded by a hyper-accreting disk.

Lue Jing; Zou Yuanchuan; Lei Weihua; Wu Qingwen; Wang Dingxiong [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang Bing; Lue Houjun [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Box 454002, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4002 (United States); Liang Enwei, E-mail: zouyc@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: leiwh@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China)

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

374

Cooling-Only Prism Analysis of Eleven College Station Homes and Interpretation of Building Physical Parameters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cooling-only PRISM analysis has been performed on eleven new residences in College Station using electricity billing data over an entire year. This study revealed that, provided one corrects for effects such as vacation periods, erroneous utility meter readings and abnormal occupancy patterns during holiday periods, the PRISM approach can accurately model whole-building electricity use (R^2 in the range of 0.92 to 0.99). The physical interpretation of the building parameters determined by PRISM has also been evaluated against continuous measurements of indoor temperature and air-conditioned electricity consumption made during the summer as part of another study. We find that the PRISM estimates for balance point temperature are within a few degrees of actually "measured" values and seem to be unbiased. The PRISM estimates for base-load consumption. on the other hand, are consistently higher by 50% to 100% of the measured base-loads, and factors which may contribute to this bias have also been briefly discussed.

Griffith, L.; Reddy, T. A.; Claridge, D. E.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Developing a robust geochemical and reactive transport model to evaluate possible sources of arsenic at the CO[subscript 2] sequestration natural analog site in Chimayo, New Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Migration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from deep storage formations into shallow drinking water aquifers is a possible system failure related to geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration. A CO{sub 2} leak may cause mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions, changes in aqueous speciation, and alteration of pH and redox conditions leading to potential increases of trace metal concentrations above EPA National Primary Drinking Water Standards. In this study, the Chimayo site (NM) was examined for site-specific impacts of shallow groundwater interacting with CO{sub 2} from deep storage formations. Major ion and trace element chemistry for the site have been previously studied. This work focuses on arsenic (As), which is regulated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act and for which some wells in the Chimayo area have concentrations higher than the maximum contaminant level (MCL). Statistical analysis of the existing Chimayo groundwater data indicates that As is strongly correlated with trace metals U and Pb indicating that their source may be from the same deep subsurface water. Batch experiments and materials characterization, such as: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF), were used to identify As association with Fe-rich phases, such as clays or oxides, in the Chimayo sediments as the major factor controlling As fate in the subsurface. Batch laboratory experiments with Chimayo sediments and groundwater show that pH decreases as CO{sub 2} is introduced into the system and buffered by calcite. The introduction of CO{sub 2} causes an immediate increase in As solution concentration, which then decreases over time. A geochemical model was developed to simulate these batch experiments and successfully predicted the pH drop once CO{sub 2} was introduced into the experiment. In the model, sorption of As to illite, kaolinite and smectite through surface complexation proved to be the key reactions in simulating the drop in As concentration as a function of time in the batch experiments. Based on modeling, kaolinite precipitation is anticipated to occur during the experiment, which allows for additional sorption sites to form with time resulting in the slow decrease in As concentration. This mechanism can be viewed as trace metal 'scavenging' due to sorption caused secondary mineral precipitation. Since deep geologic transport of these trace metals to the shallow subsurface by brine or CO{sub 2} intrusion is critical to assessing environmental impacts, the effective retardation of trace metal transport is an important parameter to estimate and it is dependent on multiple coupled reactions. At the field scale, As mobility is retarded due to the influence of sorption reactions, which can affect environmental performance assessment studies of a sequestration site.

Viswanathan, Hari; Dai, Zhenxue; Lopano, Christina; Keating, Elizabeth; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Zheng, Liange; Gutherie, George D.; Pawar, Rajesh (EPA); (LBNL); (LANL); (NETL)

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

376

BioLattice: A framework for the biological interpretation of microarray gene expression data using concept lattice analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation: A challenge in microarray data analysis is to interpret observed changes in terms of biological properties and relationships. One powerful approach is to make associations of gene expression clusters with biomedical ontologies and/or biological ... Keywords: Clustering, Concept analysis, Concept lattice, DNA microarray, Gene expression

Jihun Kim; Hee-Joon Chung; Yong Jung; Kack-Kyun Kim; Ju Han Kim

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Language, Information and Computation(PACLIC 11)1996, 347-356 Epistemic Model and Three-valued Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-valued Interpretation Hisashi Komatsu Hiroshima City University, School of Information Sciences 151-5 Ozuka, Numata-cho, Asa-minami-ku, Hiroshima 731-31 Japan e-mail: komatsu©cs.hiroshima-cu.ac.jp Abstract In this paper, I

378

Bipole-dipole interpretation with three-dimensional models (including a field study of Las Alturas, New Mexico)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The bipole-dipole responses of three-dimensional (3D) prisms were studied using an integral equation numerical solution. Although response patterns are quite complex, the bipole-dipole method appears to be a useful, efficient means of mapping the areal distribution of resistivity. However, 3D modeling is required for quantitative interpretation. Computer time for our solution varies from negligible for small bodies to 6 minutes on a UNIVAC 1108 for the largest possible body (85 cubes). Bipole-dipole response varies significantly with bipole orientation and position, but simply changing the distance between the bipole and the body does not greatly affect the response. However, the response is complex and interpretation ambiguous if both transmitter electrodes are located directly over a body. Boundaries of shallow bodies are much better resolved than those of deep bodies. Conductive bodies produce false polarization highs that can confuse interpretation. It is difficult to distinguish the effects of depth and resistivity contrast, and, as with all electrical methods, depth extent is difficult to resolve. Interactive interpretation of bipole-dipole field results from a geothermal prospect in New Mexico illustrates the value of the 3D modeling technique.

Hohmann, G.W.; Jiracek, G.R.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Interpretation of Water Chemistry and Stable Isotope Data from a Karst Aquifer According to Flow Regimes Identified through Hydrograph  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

82 Interpretation of Water Chemistry and Stable Isotope Data from a Karst Aquifer According to Flow.S. Geological Survey, 345 Middlefield Rd., MS 434, Menlo Park, CA, 94025 2 Univ. of Minnesota, Dept. of Geology for the identification of four separate flow regimes of the aquifer outflow. Major ion chemistry and stable isotopic

380

Interpreting multicomponent seismic data in the Gulf of Mexico for shallow sedimentary properties: methodology and case history  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OTC 15118 Interpreting multicomponent seismic data in the Gulf of Mexico for shallow sedimentary of multicomponent data analysis for the detection of gas hydrate prospects in the northern Gulf of Mexico. Methane and pressure conditions in the region. In many regions of North America, including the southern Gulf of Mexico

Texas at Austin, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Is the Dark Matter interpretation of the EGRET gamma ray excess compatible with antiproton measurements?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The diffuse galactic EGRET gamma ray data show a clear excess for energies above 1 GeV in comparison with the expectations from conventional galactic models. This excess shows all the features expected from Dark Matter WIMP Annihilation: a)it is present and has the same spectrum in all sky directions, not just in the galactic plane, as expected for WIMP annihilation b) it shows an interesting substructure in the form of a doughnut shaped ring at 14 kpc from the centre of the galaxy, where a ring of stars indicated the probable infall of a dwarf galaxy. From the spectral shape of the excess the WIMP mass is estimated to be between 50 and 100 GeV, while from the intensity the halo profile is reconstructed, which is shown to explain the peculiar change of slope in the rotation curve at about 11 kpc (due to the ring of DM at 14 kpc). Recently it was claimed by Bergstrom et al. that the DM interpretation of the EGRET gamma ray excess is excluded by the antiproton fluxes, since in their propagation model with isotropic diffusion the flux of antiprotons would be far beyond the observed flux. However, the propagation can be largely anisotropic, because of the convection of particles perpendicular to the disc and inhomogeneities in the local environment. It is shown that anisotropic propagation can reduce the antiproton yield by an order of magnitude, while still being consistent with the B/C ratio. Therefore it is hard to use antiprotons to search for {\\it light} DM particles, which yield a similar antiproton spectrum as the background, but the antiprotons are a perfect means to tune the many degenerate parameters in the propagation models.

W. de Boer; I. Gebauer; C. Sander; M. Weber; V. Zhukov

2006-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

382

Seismic interpretation and classification of mud volcanoes of the South Caspian Basin, offshore Azerbaijan.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the nature of mud volcanism, mechanisms of formation, types of eruptions and their relationship to the hydrocarbon systems provides important information about subsurface conditions and geological processes within the South Caspian Basin. A 2D seismic grid in southeastern offshore Azerbaijan is used to define the areal distribution of mud volcanoes and to make a classification of the mud volcanoes based on characteristic seismic features. As a result detailed database for each determined mud volcano is constructed. Analysis of different parameters from this database shows that there is a high concentration of mud volcanoes at the southern part of the study area. It is coincides with the distribution of the subsurface structures within the basin. Mud volcanoes with low relief (several tens of meters) are mainly concentrated in the northeast. Conversely, mud volcanoes with large vertical relief (greater than 200 m) are clustered in the southwest part of the basin. Mud volcano development in the South Caspian Basin is generally linked to faults, which in some instances are detached at the basement level. By using interpreted seismic surfaces it is possible to determine relative time of mud flows from the mud volcanoes. Timing of mud flows reveals to the actual activity of the mud volcanoes and it gives valuable information about possible mechanism of mud volcanism within the South Caspian Basin. Previous studies of the onshore mud volcanoes in Azerbaijan and the results from current work conclude that mud volcano formation within the South Caspian Basin is mainly controlled by tectonic forces and overpressured sediments. Mud volcano activity is not always related to the Maykop organic reach shale succession. It can occur at shallow depths by pressure breakthrough from any stratigraphic zone.

Yusifov, Mehdi Zahid

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

A Comprehensive Statistically-Based Method to Interpret Real-Time Flowing Measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With the recent development of temperature measurement systems, continuous temperature profiles can be obtained with high precision. Small temperature changes can be detected by modern temperature measuring instruments such as fiber optic distributed temperature sensor (DTS) in intelligent completions and will potentially aid the diagnosis of downhole flow conditions. In vertical wells, since elevational geothermal changes make the wellbore temperature sensitive to the amount and the type of fluids produced, temperature logs can be used successfully to diagnose the downhole flow conditions. However, geothermal temperature changes along the wellbore being small for horizontal wells, interpretations of a temperature log become difficult. The primary temperature differences for each phase (oil, water, and gas) are caused by frictional effects. Therefore, in developing a thermal model for horizontal wellbore, subtle temperature changes must be accounted for. In this project, we have rigorously derived governing equations for a producing horizontal wellbore and developed a prediction model of the temperature and pressure by coupling the wellbore and reservoir equations. Also, we applied Ramey's model (1962) to the build section and used an energy balance to infer the temperature profile at the junction. The multilateral wellbore temperature model was applied to a wide range of cases at varying fluid thermal properties, absolute values of temperature and pressure, geothermal gradients, flow rates from each lateral, and the trajectories of each build section. With the prediction models developed, we present inversion studies of synthetic and field examples. These results are essential to identify water or gas entry, to guide flow control devices in intelligent completions, and to decide if reservoir stimulation is needed in particular horizontal sections. This study will complete and validate these inversion studies.

Keita Yoshioka; Pinan Dawkrajai; Analis A. Romero; Ding Zhu; A. D. Hill; Larry W. Lake

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

A Comprehensive Statistically-Based Method to Interpret Real-Time Flowing Measurements  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is motivated by the increasing use of distributed temperature sensors for real-time monitoring of complex wells (horizontal, multilateral and multi-branching wells) to infer the profiles of oil, gas, and water entry. Measured information can be used to interpret flow profiles along the wellbore including junction and build section. In this second project year, we have completed a forward model to predict temperature and pressure profiles in complex wells. As a comprehensive temperature model, we have developed an analytical reservoir flow model which takes into account Joule-Thomson effects in the near well vicinity and multiphase non-isothermal producing wellbore model, and couples those models accounting mass and heat transfer between them. For further inferences such as water coning or gas evaporation, we will need a numerical non-isothermal reservoir simulator, and unlike existing (thermal recovery, geothermal) simulators, it should capture subtle temperature change occurring in a normal production. We will show the results from the analytical coupled model (analytical reservoir solution coupled with numerical multi-segment well model) to infer the anomalous temperature or pressure profiles under various conditions, and the preliminary results from the numerical coupled reservoir model which solves full matrix including wellbore grids. We applied Ramey's model to the build section and used an enthalpy balance to infer the temperature profile at the junction. The multilateral wellbore temperature model was applied to a wide range of cases varying fluid thermal properties, absolute values of temperature and pressure, geothermal gradients, flow rates from each lateral, and the trajectories of each build section.

Pinan Dawkrajai; Keita Yoshioka; Analis A. Romero; Ding Zhu; A.D. Hill; Larry W. Lake

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Groundwater chemistry at the Nevada Test Site: Data and preliminary interpretations  

SciTech Connect

The interpretation of chemical analyses of groundwater collected at and near the Nevada Test Site (NTS) has been vital in developing conceptual models of groundwater flow in the area. These conceptual models are tested using recent chemical data generated by the Desert Research Institute, as well as historic analyses from the US Geological Survey. A total of 81 wells are represented by analyses from 1957 to 1990, with generally excellent agreement between repeat samples from the same location. As identified by previous workers, three hydrochemical facies are represented by the samples: Ca-Mg-HCO{sub 3} water in carbonate rocks or alluvium derived from carbonates, Na-K-HCO{sub 3} water in volcanic rocks and alluvium derived from volcanic rocks, and a mixed fades found in many carbonate and alluvium water samples, and some volcanic waters. There is a general lack of lateral continuity in chemical characteristics along presumed flowpaths within each hydrologic unit (alluvium, carbonate, and volcanic). Though a lack of continuity between basins on the east side of the NTS was expected for water in alluvial and volcanic units due to the absence of interbasin flow, chemical differences observed within individual basins suggest a dominance of vertical over lateral flow. Groundwater in volcanic materials on the east side of Yucca and Frenchman Flats and on the west side of Pahute Mesa and Yucca Mountain has a nearly pure Na-K-HCO{sub 3} signature that reflects contact with primarily volcanic material. Groundwater in volcanic units in the middle of the NTS and on the east side of Pahute Mesa contains a higher proportion of Ca, Mg, Cl, and SO{sub 4} than the other volcanic waters and indicates the contribution of water from the upper carbonate aquifer and/or hydrothermally altered regions.

Chapman, J.B.; Lyles, B.F.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Surface speciation of yttrium and neodymium sorbed on rutile: Interpretations using the change distribution model.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adsorption of Y3+ and Nd3+ onto rutile has been evaluated over a wide range of pH (3 11) and surface loading conditions, as well as at two ionic strengths (0.03 and 0.3 m), and temperatures (25 and 50 C). The experimental results reveal the same adsorption behavior for the two trivalent ions onto the rutile surface, with Nd3+ first adsorbing at slightly lower pH values. The adsorption of both Y3+ and Nd3+ commences at pH values below the pHznpc of rutile. The experimental results were evaluated using a charge distribution (CD) and multisite complexation (MUSIC) model, and Basic Stern layer description of the electric double layer (EDL). The coordination geometry of possible surface complexes were constrained by molecular-level information obtained from X-ray standing wave measurements and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies. X-ray standing wave measurements showed an inner-sphere tetradentate complex for Y3+ adsorption onto the (110) rutile surface (Zhang et al., 2004b). TheMDsimulation studies suggest additional bidentate complexes may form. The CD values for all surface species were calculated based on a bond valence interpretation of the surface complexes identified by X-ray and MD. The calculated CD values were corrected for the effect of dipole orientation of interfacial water. At low pH, the tetradentate complex provided excellent fits to the Y3+ and Nd3+ experimental data. The experimental and surface complexation modeling results show a strong pH dependence, and suggest that the tetradentate surface species hydrolyze with increasing pH. Furthermore, with increased surface loading of Y3+ on rutile the tetradentate binding mode was augmented by a hydrolyzed-bidentate Y3+ surface complex. Collectively, the experimental and surface complexation modeling results demonstrate that solution chemistry and surface loading impacts Y3+ surface speciation. The approach taken of incorporating molecular-scale information into surface complexation models (SCMs) should aid in elucidating a fundamental understating of ion-adsorption reactions.

Ridley, Mora K. [Texas Tech University, Lubbock; Hiemstra, T [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Machesky, Michael L. [Illinois State Water Survey, Champaign, IL; Wesolowski, David J [ORNL; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H. [Wageningen University and Research Centre, The Netherlands

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Integrated model for the natural flow regime in the Cerro Prieto hydrothermal system, B. C. , Mexico, based upon petrological and isotope geochemical criteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Studies of cuttings and core at Cerro Prieto have now been extended to more than 50 boreholes. The aims of this petrological and isotopic work are to determine the shape of the reservoir, its physical properties, and its temperature distribution and flow regime before the steam field was produced. A map showing the first occurrence of hydrothermal epidote shows a dome-shaped top to the steam-producing zone. The hottest of the mapped mineral zones - the biotite vermiculite zone - shows a dome displaced to the northeast relative to the epidote zone. Patterns of mineral zones observed in wells are consistent with patterns of oxygen isotopic ratios in calcite and quartz. Using both criteria all of the boreholes so far studied were classified as belonging to one of four different regimes. These are: (a) the thermal plume of upward flowing water close to boiling, marked by a regular sequence of prograde mineral zones and large isotopic shifts; (b) the discharge system where fluid leaks to the surface, as indicated by the occurrence of only a few low temperature mineral zones, which extend over large depth intervals with little isotope exchange; (c) the horizontal flow zone, in which boreholes penetrate reversals of both mineral zones and isotope shifts with increasing depth; and (d) the recharge zone where cold water is descending. Plotting these four types of boreholes on a map reveals a simple, consistent, pattern. This is interpreted to have been produced by a thermal plume dipping at 45/sup 0/ to the northeast.

Elders, W.A.; Williams, A.E.; Hoagland, J.R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A discussion on the interpretation and characterization of metafilms/metasurfaces: the two-dimensional equivalent of metamaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A metafilm (also referred to as a metasurface) is the surface equivalent of a metamaterial. More precisely, a metafilm is a surface distribution of suitable chosen electrically small scatterers. Metafilms are becoming popular as an alternative to full three-dimensional metamaterials. Unfortunately, many papers in the literature present incorrect interpretations and mischaracterizations of these metafilms. In fact, some of the characterizations presented in the literature result in non-unique parameters for a uniquely defined metafilm. In this paper we discuss an appropriate interpretation and characterization of metafilms and present a correct manner to characterize a metafilm. Additionally, we illustrate the error that results from an incorrect characterization of metafilms. We present various examples to emphasize these points. Finally we present a retrieval approach for determining the uniquely defined quantities (the electric and magnetic susceptibilities of its constituent scatterers) that characterize a metafilm.

O'hara, John F [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Azad, Abul K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Deep Atomic Binding (DAB) Approach in Interpretation of Fission Products Behavior in Human Body, and Health Consequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

According to models used to predict health effects of fission products enter the human body, a large number of fatalities, malignancies, thyroid cancer, born (genetic) defects,...etc.. But the actual data after Chernobyl and TMI accidents, and nuclear detonations in USA and Marshal Islands, were not consistent with these models. According to DAB, these data could be interpreted, and conflicts between former models predictions and actual field data explained. (author)

Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali M.S. [Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Amman 11814 (Jordan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

3D seismic interpretation, reservoir characteristics and petroleum prospects for South Marsh Island OCS Blocks, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The South Marsh OCS Blocks, located approximately 150 miles southwest of New Orleans, Louisiana, contain a 100-million-barrel oil field. In recent years, exploration in this area has focused on plays in Pleistocene salt-related rollover structures with reservoirs of fluvial-deltaic sandstones and proven high oil-producing potential. After more than twenty years of exploration, exploitation and producing, this area remains an attractive target for exploration with its potentially high-quality reservoirs that have not been drilled. The I, K and L reservoirs of the Pleistocene have contributed to the majority of the production of over 100 million barrels of oil and near 200 billion cubic feet of natural gas. More than 90 well penetrations in these sands show great stratigraphic diversity within short distances, making the ability to accurately determine whether sand lenses have been adequately produced or bypassed essential for production opportunities for operators. New 3D seismic processing and interpretation techniques have been applied to interpret 3D seismic data with significantly improved accuracy. This has led to a renewed interest in the South Marsh area in an attempt to identify new plays and prospects. An interactive 3D-seismic interpretation has been carried out for the entire area. The objectives of this study are to conduct 3D seismic interpretation, to build a depositional environment model that encompasses the different sedimentary facies and sequence stratigraphic framework by using the prestack time migrated 3D volume and existing well control, to study rock properties using seismic modeling and well data to explain seismic attribute response, and to study the hydrocarbon potential of the area. Three horizons were mapped from well, seismic, and petrophysical data for the I, K and L formation tops respectively. Structure styles were well-defined by the 3D seismic interpretation. Well correlation has been completed for I, K and L formations throughout the study area. Reservoirs were studied vertically and horizontally. Reservoir types and properties were identified. One prospect related to the proven play of fault-bounded anticline structures was identified within the area. The plays involve the stratigraphic pinch out of basal transgressive sands deposited in the flank of the structure.

Duan, Ling

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

DOE/SC0001389 Final technical report: Investigation of uranium attenuation and release at column and pore scales in response to advective geochemical gradients  

SciTech Connect

Experimental approach Column experiments were devised to investigate the role of changing fluid composition on mobility of uranium through a sequence of geologic media. Fluids and media were chosen to be relevant to the ground water plume emanating from the former S-3 ponds at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFC) site. Synthetic ground waters were pumped upwards at 0.05 mL/minute for 21 days through layers of quartz sand alternating with layers of uncontaminated soil, quartz sand mixed with illite, quartz sand coated with iron oxides, and another soil layer. Increases in pH or concentration of phosphate, bicarbonate, or acetate were imposed on the influent solutions after each 7 pore volumes while uranium (as uranyl) remained constant at 0.1mM. A control column maintained the original synthetic groundwater composition with 0.1mM U. Pore water solutions were extracted to assess U retention and release in relation to the advective ligand or pH gradients. Following the column experiments, subsamples from each layer were characterized using microbeam X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with X-ray fluorescence mapping and compared to sediment core samples from the ORIFC, at SSRL Beam Line 2-3. Results U retention of 55 ?? 67 mg occurred in phosphate >pH >control >acetate >carbonate columns. The mass of U retained in the first-encountered quartz layer in all columns was highest and increased throughout the experiment. The rate of increase in acetate- and bicarbonate-bearing columns declined after ligand concentrations were raised. U also accumulated in the first soil layer; the pH-varied column retained most, followed by the increasing-bicarbonate column. The mass of U retained in the upper layers was far lower. Speciation of U, interpreted from microbeam XANES spectra and XRF maps, varied within and among the columns. Evidence of minor reduction to U(IV) was observed in the first-encountered quartz layer in the phosphate, bicarbonate, and pH columns while only U(VI) was observed in the control and acetate columns. In the soil layer, the acetate and bicarbonate columns both indicate minor reduction to U(IV), but U(VI) predominated in all columns. In the ORIFC soils, U was consistently present as U(VI); sorption appears to be the main mechanism of association for U present with Fe and/or Mn, while U occurring with P appears in discrete particles consistent with a U mineral phase. U in soil locations with no other elemental associations shown by XRF are likely uranium oxide phases.

Savage, Kaye S. [Wofford College; Zhu, Wenyi [Wofford College; Barnett, Mark O. [Auburn University

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

392

Development and anlysis of fast, approximate 3D Algorithms for interpretation of multi-component induction logging data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report addresses the effects of electrical anisotropy on the 3D inversion of single-well induction logging data when anisotropy is not considered. Of concern are possible artifacts that may lead to an incorrect interpretation of the formation about the borehole. Comparison is made of 3D isotropic inversion on a suite of model data, with and without anisotropy, consisting of an infinite layer and layer terminated at the borehole. In both cases, the layer dip (or well deviation) is varied. Inversion of the anisotropic data result in an overestimate of the layer conductivity, and the lateral extent of the layer about the borehole.

David L. Alumbaugh

2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

393

Interpretation of Colloid-Homologue Tracer Test 10-03, Including Comparisons to Test 10-01  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation covers the interpretations of colloid-homologue tracer test 10-03 conducted at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, in 2010. It also provides a comparison of the interpreted test results with those of tracer test 10-01, which was conducted in the same fracture flow system and using the same tracers than test 10-03, but at a higher extraction flow rate. A method of correcting for apparent uranine degradation in test 10-03 is presented. Conclusions are: (1) Uranine degradation occurred in test 10-03, but not in 10-01; (2) Uranine correction based on apparent degradation rate in injection loop in test 11-02 seems reasonable when applied to data from test 10-03; (3) Colloid breakthrough curves quite similar in the two tests with similar recoveries relative to uranine (after correction); and (4) Much slower apparent desorption of homologues in test 10-03 than in 10-01 (any effect of residual homologues from test 10-01 in test 10-03?).

Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

394

Absorptive Capacity and Interpretation Systems Impact when Going Green: an Empirical Study of Ford, Volvo Cars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whether or not it pays to be green or under what circumstances is an important ongoing debate among economic researchers. However, this question, with its rather instrumental rationality, may underestimate another key issue: the ability of companies to create value that can be captured from customers. This paper reports on three companies in the automotive industry developing and launching cars with improved eco-environmental performance and less petrol consumption. The study reveals that, despite being captured in the same technological paradigm, the individual companys mode of environmental interpretation and its aspiration to exploit new technology may be two important explanatory factors in its ability to go green profitably. The study indicates that an enacting mode of environmental interpretation may be superior to a discovering mode, and suggests that for companies having a discovering mode there may be a need to complement existing engineering practice with insights into consumer psychology, and bundling of common good versus private good product attributes. The research upon which this paper is based was conducted using an

Bus Strat Env; Toyota

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Interpretation of long-offset transient electromagnetic data fromMount Merapi, Indonesia, using a three-dimensional optimizationapproach  

SciTech Connect

In the years 1998, 2000, and 2001, long-offset transientelectromagnetic (LOTEM) surveys were carried out at the active volcanoMerapi in Central Java. The measurements investigated the conductivitystructure of the volcanic edifice. Our area of interest, which is belowthe summit and the upper flanks, was investigated using horizontal andvertical magnetic field time derivative data from seventransmitter-receiver setups. Because of topography and athree-dimensional (3-D) underground structure, a 3-D interpretation isused. The method optimizes few parameters of a 3-D model by a stableleast squares joint inversion of the data, providing sufficientresolution capability. Reasonable data fits are achieved with anonhorizontally layered model featuring a very conductive basement belowdepths of 1.5 km. While hydrothermal alteration is also considered, wetentatively explain the high conductivities by aqueous solutions withrelatively high salt contents. A large magma body or a small superficialreservoir below Merapi's central volcanic complex, as discussed by otherauthors, cannot be resolved by the LOTEM data.

Commer, Michael; Helwig, Stefan L.; Hordt, Andreas; Tezkan, Bulent

2004-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

396

THE PHOTOSPHERIC RADIATION MODEL FOR THE PROMPT EMISSION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: INTERPRETING FOUR OBSERVED CORRELATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We show that the empirical E{sub p}-L, {Gamma}-L, E{sub p}-{Gamma}, and {eta}-bar{sub {gamma}}-E{sub p} correlations (where L is the time-averaged luminosity of the prompt emission, E{sub p} is the spectral peak energy, {Gamma} is the bulk Lorentz factor, and {eta}-bar{sub {gamma}} is the emission efficiency of gamma-ray bursts, GRBs) are well consistent with the relations between the analogous parameters predicted in the photospheric radiation model of the prompt emission of GRBs. The time-resolved thermal radiation of GRB 090902B does follow the E{sub p}-L and {Gamma}-L correlations. A reliable interpretation of the four correlations in alternative models is still lacking. These may point toward a photospheric origin of prompt emission of some GRBs.

Fan Yizhong; Wei Daming; Zhang Fuwen [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang Binbin, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: fwzhang@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: bbzhang@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

Translations, Interpretations and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, who suggested 10 years ago, I should write about this material for his Handbooks of Logic in Computer and E. Ravve, Translation Schemes and the Fundamental problem of Database Design, in: Conceptual.A. Makowsky and E. Ravve, Dependency Preserv­ ing Refinements and the Fundamental problem of Database Design

Makowsky, Johann A. "Janos"

398

A historical interpretation of the study of the visible cloud morphology on the planet Jupiter: 1610-1878  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The majority of the literature discussing the perceived physical appearance of Jupiter published prior to 1878 has been examined in order to determine to what extent observations were biased by technical limitations and preconceptions of their day and, in lieu of these, how useful this body of work is in characterizing the behavior of the Jovian upper atmosphere over the last three hundred years. The biographies of the historical observers; their instrumentation, available viewing conditions, and observational techniques; their means of communication with their fellows; and the primary interpretive references available to their libraries have been investigated in order to attempt to explain discrepancies and agreement between what was reported in pre-photographic times and what is presently seen. It has been found that nearly all of the prominent feature-types found on Jupiter today existed during the nineteenth century and, in some cases, earlier. The longevity and frequency of the appearance of features can not be accurately determined from the time before objective surveys of the planet were organized. This is because, during each apparition of Jupiter, nonprofessional part-time observers, working independently chose to use their finite time and resources to follow the progress of specific discoveries on its disk to the exclusion of the rest of the planet.

Hockey, T.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The Discovery and Interpretation of the Cerenkov effect The observance of the Cerenkov effect in 1934 and the subsequent work Pavel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The Discovery and Interpretation of the Cerenkov effect The observance of the Cerenkov effect in 1934 and the subsequent work Pavel Cerenkov performed in order to characterize the electromagnetic of the practical applications for his work, Cerenkov was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1958 along

Wang, Yan Mei

400

Petrographic, Mineralogic, and Geochemical Studies of Hydrocarbon-derived Authigenic Carbonate Rock from Gas Venting, Seepage, Free Gas, and Gas Hydrate Sites in the Gulf of Mexico and offshore India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Authigenic carbonate rock (ACR) is derived from microbial oxidation of methane, biodegradation of crude oil, and oxidation of sedimentary organic matter. The precipitation of ACR was characterized petrographically, mineralogically, and geochemically. ACR collected from the seafloor in the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) and ACR recovered from drilled cores in the Krishna-Godawari (KG) basin offshore India were used. All study sites are associated with hydrocarbon gas venting, seepage, free gas, or gas hydrate. ACR from the GOM is densely cemented and extremely irregular in shape, whereas ACR from offshore India is generally an oval-shaped smooth nodule and also densely cemented. The dominant mineral in ACR is authigenic calcite. ACR contains carbon derived from sedimentary organic carbon oxidation that geologically sequesters much fossil carbon. Bulk carbon and oxygen isotopes of ACR were measured. ACR from the GOM is strongly depleted in 13C with ?13C of ?42.5? and enriched in 18O with ?18O of 4.67?. The ?13C of hydrocarbon is typically more depleted in 13C than in the associated ACR. The reason is that authigenic carbonate cements from hydrocarbon oxidation generally enclose skeletal material characterized by normal marine carbonate. Three groups that represent different hydrocarbon sources to ACR were classified in this study: primary carbon sources to ACR from (1) methane plus biodegraded oil, (2) methane, or (3) biodegraded oil. Wide ranges in ?13C (?49.12 to 14.06?) and ?18O ( 1.27 to 14.06?) were observed in ACR from offshore India. In sediments, the ?13C may be affected by differences in the rate of organic carbon oxidation, which generate varying ?13C with depth during methanogenesis. Based on the wide range in ?13C, ACR from offshore India was classified: (1) ?13C may reflect high rates of organic carbon oxidation, (2) ACR may be derived primarily from methane oxidation, and (3) ?13C may reflect low rates of organic carbon oxidation. ?18O values are heavier than those of normal marine carbonates. The ?18O may be caused by reaction with deep-sourced water that was isotopically heavier than ambient seawater. Some samples may reflect heavy ?18O from gas hydrate decomposition, but it would not cause significant heavy oxygen isotopes.

Jung, Woodong

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Interpretation of brine-permeability tests of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: First interim report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pressure-pulse tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Hydraulic conductivities ranging from about 10{sup {minus}14} to 10{sup {minus}11} m/s (permeabilities of about 10{sup {minus}21} to 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2}) have been interpreted from nine tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within eleven meters of the WIPP underground excavations. Tests of a pure halite layer showed no measurable permeability. Pore pressures in the stratigraphic intervals range from about 0.5 to 9.3 MPa. An anhydrite interbed (Marker Bed 139) appears to be one or more orders of magnitude more permeable than the surrounding halite. Hydraulic conductivities appear to increase, and pore pressures decrease, with increasing proximity to the excavations. These effects are particularly evident within two to three meters of the excavations. Two tests indicated the presence of apparent zero-flow boundaries about two to three meters from the boreholes. The other tests revealed no apparent boundaries within the radii of influence of the tests, which were calculated to range from about four to thirty-five meters from the test holes. The data are insufficient to determine if brine flow through evaporites results from Darcy-like flow driven by pressure gradients within naturally interconnected porosity or from shear deformation around excavations connecting previously isolated pores, thereby providing pathways for fluids at or near lithostatic pressure to be driven towards the low-pressure excavations. Future testing will be performed at greater distances from the excavations to evaluate hydraulic properties and processes beyond the range of excavation effects.

Beauheim, R.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Saulnier, G.J. Jr.; Avis, J.D. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Interpretation of the Spatial Power Spectra of Neutral Hydrogen in the Galaxy and in the Small Magellanic Cloud  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent 21 cm radio observations of H$_I$ regions in the Small Magellanic Cloud, have revealed spatial power spectra of the intensity, which are quite similar in shape to those previously deduced for the Galaxy. The similarity, in spite the differences in the physical parameters between the Galaxy and the SMC, suggests that the shape of the power spectra reflects some underlying mechanism which is not too sensitive to the environmental specifics. In this paper we present an interpretation for the observational power spectra in terms of a large scale turbulence in the interstellar medium, in which the emitting H$_I$ regions are embedded. The turbulence gives rise to density fluctuations which lead to the observed intensity fluctuations, in the H$_I$ regions. The observational power spectra are used to deduce the turbulence spectral function. In the SMC, the turbulence largest eddies are comparable in scale to the SMC itself. This implies that turbulent mixing should have smoothed out any large scale abundance gradients. Indeed, this seems to be the case, observationally. The turbulence is also expected to amplify and shape up the large scale magnetic field. Indeed, the observational data indicate the existence of a large scale disordered field of the strength expected from energy equilibrium with the turbulent velocity field. The large scale turbulence is most probably generated by instabilities in the large scale flows induced by the tidal close encounter with the LMC $ \\sim 2\\times 10^8{\\rm yr}$ ago. The life-time of the largest eddies is $\\sim 4\\times 10^8{\\rm yr}$ so the turbulence had not yet enough time to decay and persists even though the energy source is no longer there.

Itzhak Goldman

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

INTERPRETING ERUPTIVE BEHAVIOR IN NOAA AR 11158 VIA THE REGION'S MAGNETIC ENERGY AND RELATIVE-HELICITY BUDGETS  

SciTech Connect

In previous works, we introduced a nonlinear force-free method that self-consistently calculates the instantaneous budgets of free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity in solar active regions (ARs). Calculation is expedient and practical, using only a single vector magnetogram per computation. We apply this method to a time series of 600 high-cadence vector magnetograms of the eruptive NOAA AR 11158 acquired by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory over a five-day observing interval. Besides testing our method extensively, we use it to interpret the dynamical evolution in the AR, including eruptions. We find that the AR builds large budgets of both free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity, sufficient to power many more eruptions than the ones it gave within the interval of interest. For each of these major eruptions, we find eruption-related decreases and subsequent free-energy and helicity budgets that are consistent with the observed eruption (flare and coronal mass ejection (CME)) sizes. In addition, we find that (1) evolution in the AR is consistent with the recently proposed (free) energy-(relative) helicity diagram of solar ARs, (2) eruption-related decreases occur before the flare and the projected CME-launch times, suggesting that CME progenitors precede flares, and (3) self terms of free energy and relative helicity most likely originate from respective mutual terms, following a progressive mutual-to-self conversion pattern that most likely stems from magnetic reconnection. This results in the non-ideal formation of increasingly helical pre-eruption structures and instigates further research on the triggering of solar eruptions with magnetic helicity firmly placed in the eruption cadre.

Tziotziou, Kostas; Georgoulis, Manolis K. [Research Center for Astronomy and Applied Mathematics (RCAAM) Academy of Athens, 4 Soranou Efesiou Street, Athens, GR-11527 (Greece); Liu Yang [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Geochemical characerization of endmember mantle components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis uses trace elements and radiogenic isotope tracers to define elemental abundances in reservoirs of the Earth's mantle, including EM2 (the Enriched Mantle 2), as seen in the Samoan hotspot track, and DMM (the ...

Workman, Rhea K

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Organic geochemical biosignatures in alkaline Hydrothermal ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 13C content of microbial products are controlled by many factors, including the 13C content of the growth substrate, growth rate, the flux of carbon through various parts of the biochemical network, and the isotopic ...

Bradley, Alexander Smith

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Stream sediment geochemical surveys for uranium  

SciTech Connect

Stream sediment is more universally available than ground and surface waters and comprises the bulk of NURE samples. Orientation studies conducted by the Savannah River Laboratory indicate that several mesh sizes can offer nearly equivalent information. Sediment is normally sieved in the field to pass a 420-micrometer screen (US Std. 40 mesh) and that portion of the dried sediment passing a 149-micrometer screen (US Std. 100 mesh) is recovered for analysis. Sampling densities usually vary with survey objectives and types of deposits anticipated. Principal geologic features that can be portrayed at a scale of 1:250,000, such as major tectonic units, plutons, and pegmatite districts, are readily defined using a sampling density of 1 site per 5 square miles (13 km/sup 2/). More detailed studies designed to define individual deposits require greater sampling density. Analyses for elements known to be associated with uranium in a particular mineral host may be used to estimate the relative proportion of uranium in several forms. For example, uranium may be associated with thorium and cerium in monazite, and with zirconium and hafnium in zircon. Readily leachable uranium may be adsorbed to trapped in oxide coatings on mineral particles. Soluble or mobile uranium may indicate an ore source, whereas uranium in monazite or zircon is not likely to be economically attractive. Various schemes may be used to estimate for form of uranium in a sample. Simple elemental ratios are a useful first approach. Multiple ratios and subtractive formulas empirically designed to account for the presence of particular minerals are more useful. Residuals calculated from computer-derived regression equations or factor scores appear to have the greatest potential for locating uranium anomalies.

Price, V.; Ferguson, R.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Applications of Geochemical Modeling to Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...T.S. Lee, S.K. Lee, and Y.K. Hong, Environmental Geophysics and Geochemistry for Contamination Mapping and Monitoring

408

National Geochemical Survey Database | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

federal data download, atomic absorption analysis, atomic emission spectrometry, geochemistry, lithostratigraphy, neutron activation analysis, soil chemistry, unconsolidated...

409

3-D structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the Guasare-Misoa Interval, VLE 196 Area, Block V, Lamar Field, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, the structure, depositional system, and the seismic stratigraphy of the VLE 196 area, Block V in Lamar Field were interpreted using 3-D seismic data and well logs to characterize structural and depositional settings of the Guasare-Misoa interval. To demonstrate structural settings of the study area 3-D seismic data were interpreted. Three main seismic reflectors, which are the Late Eocene unconformity, Guasare, and La Luna formations, were picked. The most dominant structure in the area is the VLE 400 Fault which was interpreted as a left-lateral strike-slip reverse fault due to its behaviors as a reverse fault in cross sections and as a strike-slip fault in strike sections. The VLE 400 Fault subdivides the VLE 196 area into two main structural blocks, a downthrown block in the western part and the upthrown block in the eastern part of the field where the hydrocarbons were trapped. Several en echelon normal and reverse faults were located along the both sides of the area. The main importance of these faults are that they fractured the La Luna source rock and created migration pathways through the reservoir layers of the Misoa Formation. To interpret depositional system of the Guasare-Misoa interval, tops of the C4 and C5 intervals and associated C4 layers were picked based on well logs and lithofacies maps were prepared. The results of this part of the study show that the sandstones of the Misoa Formation are delta front and fluvial/distributary channel facies of delta system. The net sand thickness map of the C4 interval also exhibits southeast northwest contour patterns reflecting depositional axes in the area. Shaly units of the C4 interval interpreted as potential seals and are of variable thickness and extend. Seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the area shows that the four main seismic facies are dominant which mainly represent the recent sediments, "C" sands of the Misoa Formation, underlying Colon and Mito Juan shales, and basement respectively. Some distributary eroded channel fill structures were also observed within the Misoa Formation, but they were not continuous through the area because of the intensive faulting.

Arzuman, Sadun

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Preliminary Interpretation of a Radionuclide and Colloid Tracer Test in a Granodiorite Shear Zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In February and March 2012, a tracer test involving the injection of a radionuclide-colloid cocktail was conducted in the MI shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, as part of the Colloids Formation and Migration (CFM) project. The colloids were derived from FEBEX bentonite, which is mined in Spain and is being considered as a potential waste package backfill in a Spanish nuclear waste repository. The tracer test, designated test 12-02 (second test in 2012), involved the injection of the tracer cocktail into borehole CFM 06.002i2 and extraction from the Pinkel surface packer at the main access tunnel wall approximately 6.1 m from the injection interval. The test configuration is depicted in Figure 1. This configuration has been used in several conservative tracer tests and two colloid-homologue tracer tests since 2007, and it is will be employed in an upcoming test involving the emplacement of a radionuclide-doped bentonite plug into CFM 06.002i2 to evaluate the swelling and erosion of the bentonite and the transport of bentonite colloids and radionuclides from the source to the extraction point at the tunnel wall. Interpretive analyses of several of the previous tracer tests, from 09-01 through 12-02 were provided in two previous Used Fuel Disposition Program milestone reports (Arnold et al., 2011; Kersting et al., 2012). However, only the data for the conservative tracer Amino-G Acid was previously analyzed from test 12-02 because the other tracer data from this test were not available at the time. This report documents the first attempt to quantitatively analyze the radionuclide and colloid breakthrough curves from CFM test 12-02. This report was originally intended to also include an experimental assessment of colloid-facilitated transport of uranium by bentonite colloids in the Grimsel system, but this assessment was not conducted because it was reported by German collaborators at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) that neither uranium nor neptunium adsorbed appreciably to FEBEX bentonite colloids in Grimsel groundwater (Huber et al., 2011). The Grimsel groundwater has a relatively high pH of {approx}9, so the lack of uranium and neptunium adsorption to clay is not surprising given the tendency for these actinides to form very stable negative or neutrally-charged uranyl- or calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexes at these pH, particularly in a water that is effectively saturated with respect to calcite. It was also observed in testing conducted at LANL earlier in 2012 that uranium did not adsorb measurably to Grimsel granodiorite in a synthetic Grimsel groundwater at pH {approx}8.5 (Kersting et al., 2012). Thus, the planned experimental work was not pursued because all the available information clearly pointed to an expected result that uranium transport would not be facilitated by clay colloids in the Grimsel system.

Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

411

The Multi-Dimensional Hardy Uncertainty Principle and its Interpretation in Terms of the Wigner Distribution; Relation With the Notion of Symplectic Capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We extend Hardy's uncertainty principle for a square integrable function and its Fourier transform to the multidimensional case using a symplectic diagonalization. We use this extension to show that Hardy's uncertainty principle is equivalent to a statement on the Wigner distribution of the function. We give a geometric interpretation of our results in terms of the notion of symplectic capacity of an ellipsoid. Furthermore, we show that Hardy's uncertainty principle is valid for a general Lagrangian frame of the phase space. Finally, we discuss an extension of Hardy's theorem for the Wigner distribution for exponentials with convex exponents.

Maurice de Gosson; Franz Luef

2008-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

412

Seismic interpretation and regional geologic correlation established for offshore Togo, West Africa: a preliminary evaluation of hydrocarbon potential in deep water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Offshore Togo, West Africa provides exciting potential for hydrocarbon exploration. Previous exploration is limited to four wells, drilled prior to 1986 in shallow water. This investigation focuses on a 625 km section of 3100 km of high quality 3-D seismic data acquired by Petroleum Geo-Services Inc. (PGS), Houston, Texas. The study area ranges from approximately 180 m - 2500 m water depth. Research included regional geologic correlation, seismic interpretation, and structural modeling of the major fault systems and unconformities. Proven source and reservoir formations from existing oil and gas fields in neighboring countries are analogous to formations identified on seismic for offshore Togo. Structures suitable for hydrocarbon accumulation were identified on seismic within potentially productive formations. Based on the correlations, seismic interpretation and modeling, four possible exploration prospects were identified. The prospects were ranked according to exploration potential based on structural characteristics and original oil in place (OOIP) calculations. The existence of suitable structures for hydrocarbon accumulation in potentially productive formations makes offshore Togo highly prospective.

Gray, Max Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Uncertainty in Electroweak Symmetry Breaking in Models With High Scale Supersymmetry Breaking and its Impact on Interpretations of Searches For Supersymmetric Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some regions of parameter space of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM) with high scale supersymmetry breaking have extreme sensitivity of electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) to the top quark mass through renormalisation group evolution effects. This leads to uncertainties in the predictions which need to be taken into account in the interpretation of searches for supersymmetric particles in these regions. As an example, we provide estimates of the current uncertainties on the position in parameter space of the region which does not break electroweak symmetry in the constrained MSSM (CMSSM). The position of the boundary of EWSB can vary by up to 2 TeV in m_0 due to the uncertainties coming from the current measurement errors on the top quark mass and from higher order corrections. In this dangerous region, for fixed CMSSM parameters the neutralino lightest supersymmetric particle mass has an associated large uncertainty of order 100%. These uncertainties therefore have a profound effect on the interpretation of LHC supersymmetric particle searches in terms of the CMSSM. We also show how to ameliorate poor convergence of the iterative numerical algorithm that calculates the MSSM spectrum near the boundary of EWSB.

B. C. Allanach; M. A. Parker

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

414

INTERPRETATION REGARDING EXEMPTION RELIEF UNDER 10 C.F.R. PART 820, SUBPART E, EXEMPTION RELIEF, AND NON-COMPLIANT DOCUMENTED SAFETY ANALYSES SUBJECT TO 10 C.F.R. PART 830, NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT, SUBPART B, SAFETY BASIS REQUIREMENTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following document is the Office of General Counsel (GC) interpretation regarding exemption relief pursuant to10 C.F.R. Part 820, Procedural Rules for DOE Nuclear Activities, Subpart E,...

415

Concerning the White Dwarf Cooling Age of M4: A Response to the Paper by De Marchi et al. on "A Different Interpretation of Recent HST Observations"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We respond to the paper by De Marchi, Paresce, Straniero and Moroni (2003) on the white dwarf cooling age of M4. The authors question the data analysis and interpretation that led to the conclusions in Hansen et al. (2002). In their paper, De Marchi et al. are unable to obtain photometry as deep as ours from the same data set and therefore assert that only a lower limit to the white dwarf cooling age for this cluster of approximately 9 Gyr can be obtained. In this short contribution we show that shortcomings in the data analysis and reduction techniques of De Marchi et al. are responsible for their inability to reach the photometry limits that our study reports. In a forthcoming paper in which the complete techniques for age determination with white dwarfs are laid out, we demonstrate that their method of fitting the luminosity function gives a spuriously low white dwarf cooling age.

H. B. Richer; J. Brewer; G. G. Fahlman; J. Kalirai; P. B. Stetson; B. M. S. Hansen; R. M. Rich; R. A. Ibata; B. K. Gibson; M. Shara

2004-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

416

An Object-Oriented Tcl/Tk Binding for Interpreted Control of the NIST Express Toolkit in the NIST STEP Application Protocol Development Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has built numerous software toolkits and applications for manipulating STEP and EXPRESS data. These toolkits are traditionally used as compiled libraries which are linked to other compiled modules. This paper describes a binding allowing the toolkit interfaces to be called from interpreted scripts. This significantly reduces the time required to construct and compile new applications. An X11 extension allows the construction of graphic elements, providing easy creation and integration of existing applications into X graphic user interfaces. We describe how the combination of bindings has been used to construct a STEP Application Protocol Development Environment. Keywords: Tcl; Tk; EXPRESS; Object Oriented; National PDES Testbed; PDES; STEP; APDE; Development Environment Reprinted from Proceedings of the EXPRESS User Group Workshop (EUG `95), Grenoble, France, October 21-22, 1995. An Object-Oriented Tcl/Tk Binding for Interpr...

An Object-oriented; Don Libes; Stephen N. Clark

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

STIP symposium on physical interpretation of solar/interplanetary and cometary intervals. Final report, 1 April-30 September 1987. Abstracts only  

SciTech Connect

The study of travelling interplanetary phenomena has continued over a period of years. The STIP (Study of Travelling Interplanetary Phenomena) Symposium on Physical Interpretation of Solar/Interplanetary and Cometary Intervals was held in Huntsville, Alabama, on May 12-15, 1987, the first of these meetings to be held in the United States. The Symposium's objective was to coordinate and disseminate new science gained from the recent solar-terrestrial and cometary intervals which can be used to better understand the linkage of physical events to the Sun's vagaries (flares, coronal holes, eruptive prominences) from their initial detection to their consequence. Fifty-one presentations were made during the four-day period. Abstracts of these reports are included as Appendix A.

Not Available

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

A NEw Type of Ambiguity in the Planet and Binary Interpretations of Central Perturbations of High-Magnification Gravitational Microlensing Events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High-magnification microlensing events provide an important channel to detect planets. Perturbations near the peak of a high-magnification event can be produced either by a planet or a binary companion. It is known that central perturbations induced by both types of companions can be generally distinguished due to the basically different magnification pattern around caustics. In this paper, we present a case of central perturbations for which it is difficult to distinguish the planetary and binary interpretations. The peak of a lensing light curve affected by this perturbation appears to be blunt and flat. For a planetary case, this perturbation occurs when the source trajectory passes the negative perturbation region behind the back end of an arrowhead-shaped central caustic. For a binary case, a similar perturbation occurs for a source trajectory passing through the negative perturbation region between two cusps of an astroid-shaped caustic. We demonstrate the degeneracy for 2 high-magnification events of O...

Choi, J -Y; Han, C; Udalski, A; Sumi, T; Gould, A; Bozza, V; Dominik, M; Fouqu, P; Horne, K; \\, M; Szyma?ski, K; Kubiak, M; Soszy?ski, I; Pietrzy?ski, G; Poleski, R; Ulaczyk, K; Pietrukowicz, P; Koz?owski, S; Skowron, J; Wyrzykowski, ?; Abe, F; Bennett, D P; Bond, I A; Botzler, C S; Chote, P; Freeman, M; Fukui, A; Furusawa, K; Itow, Y; Kobara, S; Ling, C H; Masuda, K; Matsubara, Y; Miyake, N; Muraki, Y; Ohmori, K; Ohnishi, K; Rattenbury, N J; Saito, To; Sullivan, D J; Suzuki, D; Suzuki, K; Sweatman, W L; Takino, S; Tristram, P J; Wada, K; Yock, P C M; Bramich, D M; Snodgrass, C; Steele, I A; Street, R A; Tsapras, Y; Alsubai, K A; Browne, P; Burgdorf, M J; Novati, S Calchi; Dodds, P; Dreizler, S; Fang, X -S; Grundahl, F; Gu, C -H; Hardis, S; Harpse, K; Hinse, T C; Hornstrup, A; Hundertmark, M; Jessen-Hansen, J; Jrgensen, U G; Kains, N; Kerins, E; Liebig, C; Lund, M; Lunkkvist, M; Mancini, L; Mathiasen, M; Penny, M T; Rahvar, S; Ricci, D; Scarpetta, G; Skottfelt, J; Southworth, J; Surdej, J; Tregloan-Reed, J; Wambsganss, J; Wertz, O; Almeida, L A; Batista, V; Christie, G; DePoy, D L; Dong, Subo; Gaudi, B S; Henderson, C; Jablonski, F; Lee, C -U; McCormick, J; McGregor, D; Moorhouse, D; Natusch, T; Ngan, H; Park, S -Y; Pogge, R W; Tan, T -G; Thornley, G; Yee, J C; Albrow, M D; Bachelet, E; Beaulieu, J -P; Brillant, S; Cassan, A; Cole, A A; Corrales, E; Coutures, C; Dieters, S; Prester, D Dominis; Donatowicz, J; Greenhill, J; Kubas, D; Marquette, J -B; Menzies, J W; Sahu, K C; Zub, M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Calculation and interpretation of crustal shortening along the Central Basin Platform, West Texas: A method to calculate basement motion for modeling input  

SciTech Connect

The analysis carried out in the Chemical Interaction of Rocks and Fluids Basin (CIRFB) model describes the chemical and physical evolution of the entire system. One aspect of this is the deformation of the rocks, and its treatment with a rigorous flow and rheological model. This type of analysis depends on knowing the state of the model domain`s boundaries as functions of time. In the Andrews and Ector County areas of the Central Basin Platform of West Texas, the authors calculate this shortening with a simple interpretation of the basic motion and a restoration of the Ellenburger formation. Despite its simplicity, this calculation reveals two distinct periods of shortening/extension, a relatively uniform directionality to all the deformation, and the localization of deformation effects to the immediate vicinities of the major faults in the area. Conclusions are drawn regarding the appropriate expressions of these boundary conditions in the CIRFB model and possible implications for exploration.

Hoak, T.E. [Science Applications International Corp., Germantown, MD (United States)]|[Kestrel Geoscience, Littleton, CO (United States); Sundberg, K.R. [Phillips Petroleum Co., Bartlesville, OK (United States); Ortoleva, P. [Indiana Univ., Bloomington, IN (United States). Lab. for Computational Geodynamics

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

420

Quantum mechanics needs no interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Probabilistic description of results of measurements and its consequences for understanding quantum mechanics are discussed. It is shown that the basic mathematical structure of quantum mechanics like the probability amplitude, Born rule, probability density current, commutation relations, momentum operator, uncertainty relations, rules for including the scalar and vector potentials and existence of antiparticles can be derived from the definition of the mean values of the space coordinates and time. Equations of motion of quantum mechanics, the Klein-Gordon equation, Schroedinger equation and Dirac equation are obtained from requirement of the relativistic invariance of the theory. Limit case of localized probability densities leads to the Hamilton-Jacobi equation of classical mechanics. Many particle systems are also discussed.

L. Skala; V. Kapsa

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

How HCI interprets the probes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We trace how cultural probes have been adopted and adapted by the HCI community. The flexibility of probes has been central to their uptake, resulting in a proliferation of divergent uses and derivatives. The varying patterns of adaptation of the probes ... Keywords: cultural probes, probes, reflective HCI

Kirsten Boehner; Janet Vertesi; Phoebe Sengers; Paul Dourish

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Interpretation of screen factor measurements  

SciTech Connect

Screen viscometer measurements give different information about polymer molecular weight and molecular weight distribution than intrinsic viscosity or relative viscosity measurements. This study shows that conventional screen viscometers measure elongation flow properties of solutions, and that for flexible polymers such as polyacrylamides, a sharp transition in conformation from a coiled to a stretched state is observed, which occurs at a Deborah number of 0.5. Conventional screen viscometers operate just above this critical Deborah number. Evidence for this transition in polymer conformation comes from measurements on a modified screen viscometer, from extensive work by Durst and Interhal on the sudden pressure jumps during flow of polyacrylamide solutions through porous media, and from polymer kinetic theory modeling of molecular deformation in flow. ll references.

Lim, T.; Uhl, J.T.; Prud'Homme, R.K.

1983-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Interpretations of the JEBAR Term  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In diagnostic calculations of the ocean's circulation, the so-called JEBAR (joint effect of baroclinicity and relief) term may induce a significant depth-average current field, as has been noted in the oceanographic literature. Here we present ...

Gordon Mertz; Daniel G. Wright

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Logical formalization of multimedia interpretation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays, many documents in local repositories as well as in resources on the web are multimedia documents that contain not only textual but also visual and auditory information. Despite this fact, retrieval techniques that relyonlyoninformation fromtextualsourcesare ...

Sofia Espinosa; Atila Kaya; Ralf Mller

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Physical interpretation of interdisciplinary solar/interplanetary observations relevant to the 27-29 June 1980 SMY/STIP event No. 5  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A physical interpretation is presented for a sequence of six well defined interplanetary structures (magnetic clouds) identified in the solar wind and magnetic field measurements of Helios-1 from 29 June-1 July 1980 (location 0.64-0.67 AU, C. Long. approximately 165 degrees, C. Lat. approximately 5.8 degrees). Among the characteristics of these structures were a large northward directed solar wind flow, well defined directional discontinuities of mainly the tangential-type at their beginnings and ends, some increase in proton and very pronounced increases in alpha particle number densities, some times an increase in magnetic field strength, and values of N-alpha/Np typical of the inner solar atmosphere. Results indicate that the structures were ejections from a succession (29-29 June 1980) of Type II producing flares in Hale Region 16923 whose coronograph and X-ray data were determined to constitute a family of transient producing events. Only two interplanetary shocks were found in the relevant Helios-1 data and it is suggested that some of these shocks could have been missed by the spacecraft. This result indicates that the correlation of an observed interplanetary shock wave with a solar Type II burst may not always lead to a unique result.

Mckenna-Lawlor, S.M.P.; Richter, A.K.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

A Narrative Approach to the Philosophical Interpretation of Dreams, Memories, and Reflections of the Unconscious Through the Use of Autoethnography/Biography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of the present study aimed to develop a comprehensive model that measures the autoethnographic/biographic relevance of dreams, memories, and reflections as they relate to understanding the self and others. A dream, memory, and reflection (DMR) ten item questionnaire was constructed using aspects of Freudian, Jungian, and Lacanian Theory of Dream Interpretation. Fifteen dreams, five memories, and five reflections were collected from the participant at the waking episode or during a moment of deep thought. The DMR analysis was used as the prime matter for creating a narrative document that uses autoethnography and autobiography to deliver a philosophical story about the unconscious reality of the participant. The results of the dissertation study produced a ten section narrative document titled The Shadow of Joaquin that portrayed the benchmarks of the life of the participant that led him to the completion of a doctoral degree in curriculum and instruction. At the final section of the narrative document the postmodern philosophical theory of Labor Percolation is proposed by the researcher as a direct result of the DMR analysis.

Rivera Rosado, Antonio

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Analysis and Interpretation of Hard X-ray Emission fromthe Bullet Cluster (1E0657-56), the Most Distant Cluster of Galaxies Observed by the RXTE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evidence for non-thermal activity in clusters of galaxies is well established from radio observations of synchrotron emission by relativistic electrons. New windows in the Extreme Ultraviolet and Hard X-ray ranges have provided for more powerful tools for the investigation of this phenomenon. Detection of hard X-rays in the 20 to 100 keV range have been reported from several clusters of galaxies, notably from Coma and others. Based on these earlier observations we identified the relatively high redshift cluster 1E0657-56 (also known as RX J0658-5557) as a good candidate for hard X-ray observations. This cluster, also known as the bullet cluster, has many other interesting and unusual features, most notably that it is undergoing a merger, clearly visible in the X-ray images. Here we present results from a successful RXTE observations of this cluster. We summarize past observations and their theoretical interpretation which guided us in the selection process. We describe the new observations and present the constraints we can set on the flux and spectrum of the hard X-rays. Finally we discuss the constraints one can set on the characteristics of accelerated electrons which produce the hard X-rays and the radio radiation.

Petrosian, Vahe; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.; Madejski, Greg; /SLAC; Luli, Kevin; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

428

Heavy-quark probes of the quark-gluon plasma and interpretation of recent data taken at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermalization and collective flow of charm (c) and bottom (b) quarks in ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions are evaluated based on elastic parton rescattering in an expanding quark-gluon plasma (QGP). We show that resonant interactions in a strongly interacting QGP (sQGP), as well as parton coalescence, can play an essential role in the interpretation of recent data from the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), and thus illuminate the nature of the sQGP and its hadronization. Our main assumption, motivated by recent findings in lattice quantum chromodynamics, is the existence of D- and B-meson states in the sQGP, providing resonant cross sections for heavy quarks. Pertinent drag and diffusion coefficients are implemented into a relativistic Langevin simulation to compute transverse-momentum spectra and azimuthal asymmetries (v(2)) of b- and c-quarks in Au-Au collisions at RHIC. After hadronization into D- and B-mesons using quark coalescence and fragmentation, associated electron-decay spectra and v(2) are compared to recent RHIC data. Our results suggest a reevaluation of radiative and elastic quark energy-loss mechanisms in the sQGP.

van Hees, H.; Greco, V.; Rapp, Ralf.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Interpretation of Flow Logs from Nevada Test Site Boreholes to Estimate Hydraulic conductivity Using Numerical Simulations Constrained by Single-Well Aquifer Tests  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic conductivities of volcanic and carbonate lithologic units at the Nevada Test Site were estimated from flow logs and aquifer-test data. Borehole flow and drawdown were integrated and interpreted using a radial, axisymmetric flow model, AnalyzeHOLE. This integrated approach is used because complex well completions and heterogeneous aquifers and confining units produce vertical flow in the annular space and aquifers adjacent to the wellbore. AnalyzeHOLE simulates vertical flow, in addition to horizontal flow, which accounts for converging flow toward screen ends and diverging flow toward transmissive intervals. Simulated aquifers and confining units uniformly are subdivided by depth into intervals in which the hydraulic conductivity is estimated with the Parameter ESTimation (PEST) software. Between 50 and 150 hydraulic-conductivity parameters were estimated by minimizing weighted differences between simulated and measured flow and drawdown. Transmissivity estimates from single-well or multiple-well aquifer tests were used to constrain estimates of hydraulic conductivity. The distribution of hydraulic conductivity within each lithology had a minimum variance because estimates were constrained with Tikhonov regularization. AnalyzeHOLE simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates for lithologic units across screened and cased intervals are as much as 100 times less than those estimated using proportional flow-log analyses applied across screened intervals only. Smaller estimates of hydraulic conductivity for individual lithologic units are simulated because sections of the unit behind cased intervals of the wellbore are not assumed to be impermeable, and therefore, can contribute flow to the wellbore. Simulated hydraulic-conductivity estimates vary by more than three orders of magnitude across a lithologic unit, indicating a high degree of heterogeneity in volcanic and carbonate-rock units. The higher water transmitting potential of carbonate-rock units relative to volcanic-rock units is exemplified by the large difference in their estimated maximum hydraulic conductivity; 4,000 and 400 feet per day, respectively. Simulated minimum estimates of hydraulic conductivity are inexact and represent the lower detection limit of the method. Minimum thicknesses of lithologic intervals also were defined for comparing AnalyzeHOLE results to hydraulic properties in regional ground-water flow models.

Garcia, C. Amanda; Halford, Keith J.; Laczniak, Randell J.

2010-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

430

Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

Davis, S.N. (comp.)

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Geochemical Society and the Mineralogical Society of America  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Society and the Mineralogical Society of America Society and the Mineralogical Society of America Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry (2006) Volume 63 Neutron Scattering in Earth Sciences Hans-Rudolf Wenk (Editor) (Click text for link. * Means no presentation available.) Short Course Presentations Chapter 1: Introduction to Neutron Properties and Applications. By John B. Parise *Chapter 2: Neutron Production, Neutron Facilities and Neutron Instrumentation. By Sven C. Vogel and Hans-Georg Priesmeyer Chapter 3: Single-Crystal Neutron Diffraction: Present and Future Applications. By Nancy L. Ross and Christina Hoffman Chapter 4: Neutron Rietveld Refinement. By Robert B. Von Dreele Chapter 5: Application of Neutron Powder-Diffraction to Mineral Structures. By Karsten Knorr and Wulf Depmeier

432

A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1100 and 1560 mgkg after flashing. Neither of the high-temperature wells produced steam in commercial quantities. The well at the western margin of the Sierra produced fluids...

433

Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

factors controlled the formation and evolution of fumarolic encrustations on the 1912 ash-flow sheet in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS). The six-factor solution model...

434

Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

3Geochemistry Published by AGU and the Geochemical Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

identified by a systematic grid of conductive heat flow measure- 15 ments. An array of conductive heat flow, conductive heat flow data indicate a general crossvalley fluid flow, where 18 seawater enters the shallow occurring within faults that surround the fluid discharge sites. These conductive 23 heat flow data

Johnson, H. Paul

437

Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

insights into the possible contributions of geothermal systems to groundwater chemistry and development of mitigation strategies for attendant environmental issues....

438

GEOTECHNICAL/GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COAL PROCESS WASTE STREAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirteen solid wastes, six coals and one unreacted sorbent produced from seven advanced coal utilization processes were characterized for task three of this project. The advanced processes from which samples were obtained included a gas-reburning sorbent injection process, a pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion process, a coal-reburning process, a SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, RO{sub x}, BOX process, an advanced flue desulfurization process, and an advanced coal cleaning process. The waste samples ranged from coarse materials, such as bottom ashes and spent bed materials, to fine materials such as fly ashes and cyclone ashes. Based on the results of the waste characterizations, an analysis of appropriate waste management practices for the advanced process wastes was done. The analysis indicated that using conventional waste management technology should be possible for disposal of all the advanced process wastes studied for task three. However, some wastes did possess properties that could present special problems for conventional waste management systems. Several task three wastes were self-hardening materials and one was self-heating. Self-hardening is caused by cementitious and pozzolanic reactions that occur when water is added to the waste. All of the self-hardening wastes setup slowly (in a matter of hours or days rather than minutes). Thus these wastes can still be handled with conventional management systems if care is taken not to allow them to setup in storage bins or transport vehicles. Waste self-heating is caused by the exothermic hydration of lime when the waste is mixed with conditioning water. If enough lime is present, the temperature of the waste will rise until steam is produced. It is recommended that self-heating wastes be conditioned in a controlled manner so that the heat will be safely dissipated before the material is transported to an ultimate disposal site. Waste utilization is important because an advanced process waste will not require ultimate disposal when it is put to use. Each task three waste was evaluated for utilization potential based on its physical properties, bulk chemical composition, and mineral composition. Only one of the thirteen materials studied might be suitable for use as a pozzolanic concrete additive. However, many wastes appeared to be suitable for other high-volume uses such as blasting grit, fine aggregate for asphalt concrete, road deicer, structural fill material, soil stabilization additives, waste stabilization additives, landfill cover material, and pavement base course construction.

Edwin S. Olson; Charles J. Moretti

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Journal Article Mercury Vapor At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Varekamp & Buseck, 1983) Mercury Vapor At Desert Peak Area...

440

A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

montmorillonite, alunite, anhydrite, gypsum, calcite, and opaque minerals. The chemical composition of the minerals (104 analyses) was determined with Electron Probe...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Organic Geochemical and tectonic evolution of the Midcontinent Rift system  

SciTech Connect

The older assemblages stand in contrast with the ca. 1000 Ma old Hunting Formation, Arctic Canada, which contains what may be the oldest evidence for modem algae - red algal fossils that compare closely with members of the extant family Bangiophyceae (Butterfield et al., 1990). Taken together the Nonesuch, Shaler, Hunting and other assemblages support the hypothesis of a major episode of eukaryotic diversification ca. 1000 Ma ago. Prior to this time, eukaryotic primary producers must have been physiologically primitive (and now extinct) algae whose abundance in ecosystems is poorly constrained by analogies with the present oceans. Cyanobacteria were major primary producers in a wide range of marine environments. After 1000 Ma, diversifying red green and chromophyte algae contributed significantly to primary production in all save microbial mat communities in restricted environments. It bears mention that such mat communities remained significant potential sources of buried organic matter until the end of the Proterozoic, necessitating exploration strategies that differ from those commonly employed for younger rocks (Knoll, in press). As in Phanerozoic basins, petroleum exploration in Proterozoic rocks requires tools for stratigraphic correlation. In Neoproterozoic (<1000 Ma) rocks, biostratigraphy is possible, and it is aided significantly by C and Sr isotopic chemostratigraphy. New data from the Shaler Group contribute to the construction of C and Sr isotopic curves for Neoproterozoic time, making possible much improved chronostratigraphy for this time interval. (Asmerom et al., 1991; Hayes et al., ms. in preparation).