National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for geochemical interpretation cxs

  1. HBH-GEOCHEM-GEOPHY

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003015WKSTN00 Hiereachical Bayesian Model for Combining Geochemical and Geophysical Data for Environmental Applications Software   

  2. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration We have approached the long-standing geochemical question why anhydrous high-Mg carbonate minerals (i.e., magnesite and...

  3. Optimizing parameters for predicting the geochemical behavior...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    parameters for predicting the geochemical behavior and performance of discrete fracture networks in geothermal systems Optimizing parameters for predicting the geochemical...

  4. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical Process Relevant to Carbon Sequestration Teng, H. Henry PI, The George Washington University PI, The George...

  5. The hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto revisited

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lippmann, M.J.; Halfman, S.E.; Truesdell, A.H.; Manon M., A.

    1989-01-01

    As the exploitation of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field continues, there is increasing evidence that the hydrogeologic model developed by Halfman et al. (1984, 1986) presents the basic features controlling the movement of geothermal fluids in the system. At the present time the total installed capacity at Cerro Prieto is 620 MWe requiring the production of more than 10,500 tonnes/hr of a brine-steam mixture. This significant rate of fluid production has resulted in changes in reservoir thermodynamic conditions and in the chemistry of the produced fluids. After reviewing the hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto, some of the changes observed in the field due to its exploitation are discussed and interpreted on the basis of the model. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Geochemical Enhancement Of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoirs: An Integrated Field And Geochemical Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph N. Moore

    2007-12-31

    The geochemical effects of injecting fluids into geothermal reservoirs are poorly understood and may be significantly underestimated. Decreased performance of injection wells has been observed in several geothermal fields after only a few years of service, but the reasons for these declines has not been established. This study had three primary objectives: 1) determine the cause(s) of the loss of injectivity; 2) utilize these observations to constrain numerical models of water-rock interactions; and 3) develop injection strategies for mitigating and reversing the potential effects of these interactions. In this study rock samples from original and redrilled injection wells at Coso and the Salton Sea geothermal fields, CA, were used to characterize the mineral and geochemical changes that occurred as a result of injection. The study documented the presence of mineral scales and at both fields in the reservoir rocks adjacent to the injection wells. At the Salton Sea, the scales consist of alternating layers of fluorite and barite, accompanied by minor anhydrite, amorphous silica and copper arsenic sulfides. Amorphous silica and traces of calcite were deposited at Coso. The formation of silica scale at Coso provides an example of the effects of untreated (unacidified) injectate on the reservoir rocks. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry were used to characterize the scale deposits. The silica scale in the reservoir rocks at Coso was initially deposited as spheres of opal-A 1-2 micrometers in diameter. As the deposits matured, the spheres coalesced to form larger spheres up to 10 micrometer in diameter. Further maturation and infilling of the spaces between spheres resulted in the formation of plates and sheets that substantially reduce the original porosity and permeability of the fractures. Peripheral to the silica deposits, fluid inclusions with high water/gas ratios provide a subtle record of interactions between the injectate and reservoir rocks. In contrast, fluid inclusions trapped prior to injection are relatively gas rich. These results suggest that the rocks undergo extensive microfracturing during injection and that the composition of the fluid inclusions will be biased toward the youngest event. Interactions between the reservoir rocks and injectate were modeled using the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT. Changes in fluid pH, fracture porosity, fracture permeability, fluid temperature, and mineral abundances were monitored. The simulations predict that amorphous silica will precipitate primarily within a few meters of the injection well and that mineral deposition will lead to rapid declines in fracture porosity and permeability, consistent with field observations. In support of Enhanced Geothermal System development, petrologic studies of Coso well 46A-19RD were conducted to determine the regions that are most likely to fail when stimulated. These studies indicate that the most intensely brecciated and altered rocks in the zone targeted for stimulation (below 10,000 ft (3048 m)) occur between 11,200 and 11,350 ft (3414 and 3459 m). This zone is interpreted as a shear zone that initially juxtaposed quartz diorite against granodiorite. Strong pervasive alteration and veining within the brecciated quartz diorite and granodiorite suggest this shear zone was permeable in the past. This zone of weakness was subsequently exploited by a granophyre dike whose top occurs at 11,350 ft (3459 m). The dike is unaltered. We anticipate, based on analysis of the well samples that failure during stimulation will most likely occur on this shear zone.

  7. Virus transport in physically and geochemically heterogeneous subsurface porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ryan, Joe

    Virus transport in physically and geochemically heterogeneous subsurface porous media Subir for virus transport in physically and geochemically heterogeneous subsurface porous media is presented. The model involves solution of the advection­dispersion equation, which additionally considers virus

  8. PHYSICAL, MAGNETIC, SEDIMENTOLOGICAL, GEOCHEMICAL, ISOTOPIC AND MICROPALEONTOLOGICAL FEATURES OF RAPIDLY DEPOSITED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHYSICAL, MAGNETIC, SEDIMENTOLOGICAL, GEOCHEMICAL, ISOTOPIC AND MICROPALEONTOLOGICAL FEATURES Sediments, Québec City. Symposium preceedings: 103-108. ABSTRACT: Sedimentological, geochemical, isotopic

  9. Data Acquisition Interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    Data Acquisition Inversion Interpretation Discussion Virgin River DCIP Report Justin Granek1 1 Report #12;Data Acquisition Inversion Interpretation Discussion Outline 1 Data Acquisition Location Survey Specications 2 Inversion Data Errors DCIP2D DCIP3D 3 Interpretation Correlations Snowbird Tectonic

  10. Monitoring CO2 intrusion and associated geochemical transformations...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Monitoring CO2 intrusion and associated geochemical transformations in a shallow groundwater system using complex electrical methods Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  11. DNA-based methods of geochemical prospecting

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ashby, Matthew (Mill Valley, CA)

    2011-12-06

    The present invention relates to methods for performing surveys of the genetic diversity of a population. The invention also relates to methods for performing genetic analyses of a population. The invention further relates to methods for the creation of databases comprising the survey information and the databases created by these methods. The invention also relates to methods for analyzing the information to correlate the presence of nucleic acid markers with desired parameters in a sample. These methods have application in the fields of geochemical exploration, agriculture, bioremediation, environmental analysis, clinical microbiology, forensic science and medicine.

  12. SIMULATING TRANSPORT AND GEOCHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE THROUGH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    SIMULATING TRANSPORT AND GEOCHEMICAL EVOLUTION OF ACID MINE DRAINAGE THROUGH DISCRETELY FRACTURED Waste Management ABSTRACT A modelling study is performed to assess the evolution of acid mine drainage-geochemical and geo-mechanical models for predicting environmental impacts of acid mine drainage in complex mining

  13. Exploring Frontiers in Kinetics and Mechanisms of Geochemical Processes at the Mineral/Water Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Exploring Frontiers in Kinetics and Mechanisms of Geochemical Processes at the Mineral geochemical processes including surface complexation, mineral transformations, and oxidation

  14. Mechanisms and Geochemical Models of Core Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubie, David C

    2015-01-01

    The formation of the Earth's core is a consequence of planetary accretion and processes in the Earth's interior. The mechanical process of planetary differentiation is likely to occur in large, if not global, magma oceans created by the collisions of planetary embryos. Metal-silicate segregation in magma oceans occurs rapidly and efficiently unlike grain scale percolation according to laboratory experiments and calculations. Geochemical models of the core formation process as planetary accretion proceeds are becoming increasingly realistic. Single stage and continuous core formation models have evolved into multi-stage models that are couple to the output of dynamical models of the giant impact phase of planet formation. The models that are most successful in matching the chemical composition of the Earth's mantle, based on experimentally-derived element partition coefficients, show that the temperature and pressure of metal-silicate equilibration must increase as a function of time and mass accreted and so m...

  15. Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  16. Microbial Physiology and Biosignature Production: Mineralogical, Morphological and Geochemical Examples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeng, Zhirui

    2014-11-21

    promote carbonate precipitation. However, little is known about how iron reducing bacteria induce carbonate formation, and control carbonate composition and morphology. Direct observation and geochemical modeling indicated actively metabolizing cells...

  17. Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

  18. Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hg Anomalies In...

  19. [The Journal of Geology, 2005, volume 113, p. 517533] 2005 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved. 0022-1376/2005/11305-0002$15.00 Geochemical Evaluation of Fenghuoshan Group Lacustrine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, Oxford, Ohio 45056, U.S.A. A B S T R A C T A sedimentologic, petrologic, and geochemical fos- sils. Sedimentologic evidence suggests that carbonate deposition occurred in shallow, relatively of correlation between the two isotopic systems supports the sedimentological interpretation of a shallow

  20. Functional Heads and Interpretation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adger, David

    on interpretation is a subsidiary concern.The argument of the thesis goes as follows: firstly, reference must be made to both an independently projecting functional head Agr and to a level of discourse representation in order to adequately analyse the phenomenon...

  1. Interpretation Intelligent Systems Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Koren

    1 TENS Text Interpretation Intelligent Systems Laboratory University of Wollongong TENS Text and delivering the text data to the user by electrically stimulating the fingers. Intelligent Systems Laboratory ­ University of Wollongong #12;2 The TENS Unit Intelligent Systems Laboratory ­ University of Wollongong

  2. Interpreting Deer Harvest Records. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guynn, Dwight E.

    1984-01-01

    Agricultural Extension Service Zerle L. Carpenter. Director College Station B-1486 People Helping People Interpreting Deer Harvest Records LIB ARY Dwight f. Guynn* JUN 11 1985 Deer harvest records are extremely important to proper deer herd man... to collect from deer harvests are: ages, weights, body conditions and measurements of antler size. The data should be grouped according to age categories and ana lyzed separately for bucks and does . This pub lication describes types of calculations...

  3. Interpretation of extragalactic jets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, M.L.

    1985-01-01

    The nature of extragalatic radio jets is modeled. The basic hypothesis of these models is that extragalatic jets are outflows of matter which can be described within the framework of fluid dynamics and that the outflows are essentially continuous. The discussion is limited to the interpretation of large-scale (i.e., kiloparsec-scale) jets. The central problem is to infer the physical parameters of the jets from observed distributions of total and polarized intensity and angle of polarization as a function of frequency. 60 refs., 6 figs.

  4. Geochemical Modeling of ILAW Lysimeter Water Extracts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2014-12-22

    Geochemical modeling results of water extracts from simulated immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glasses, placed in lysimeters for eight years suggest that the secondary phase reaction network developed using product consistency test (PCT) results at 90°C may need to be modified for field conditions. For sediment samples that had been collected from near the glass samples, the impact of glass corrosion could be readily observed based upon the pH of their water extracts. For unimpacted sediments the pH ranged from 7.88 to 8.11 with an average of 8.04. Sediments that had observable impacts from glass corrosion exhibited elevated pH values (as high as 9.97). For lysimeter sediment samples that appear to have been impacted by glass corrosion to the greatest extent, saturation indices determined for analcime, calcite, and chalcedony in the 1:1 water extracts were near equilibrium and were consistent with the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. Fe(OH)3(s) also appears to be essentially at equilibrium in extracts impacted by glass corrosion, but with a solubility product (log Ksp) that is approximately 2.13 units lower than that used in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The solubilities of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) also appear to be much lower than that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The extent that the solubility of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) were reduced relative to that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C could not be quantified because the concentrations of Ti and Zr in the extracts were below the estimated quantification limit. Gibbsite was consistently highly oversaturated in the extract while dawsonite was at or near equilibrium. This suggests that dawsonite might be a more suitable phase for the secondary phase reaction network than gibbsite under field conditions. This may be due to the availability of carbonate that exists in the Hanford sediments as calcite. A significant source of carbonate was not available in the PCTs and this may account for why this phase did not appear in the PCTs. Sepiolite was consistently highly undersaturated, suggesting that another phase controls the solubility of magnesium. For samples that were most impacted by the effects of glass corrosion, magnesite appears to control glass corrosion. For samples that show less impacts from glass corrosion, clinochlore-7A or saponite-Mg appears to control the magnesium concentrations. For zinc, it appears that zincite is a better candidate than Zn(OH)2-? for controlling zinc concentrations in the extracts; however, in some samples all zinc phases considered were highly oversaturated. As a result the phase that controls zinc concentrations in the lysimeter extracts remains uncertain.

  5. Geochemical Niches of Iron-Oxidizing Acidophiles in Acidic Coal Mine Drainage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burgos, William

    Geochemical Niches of Iron-Oxidizing Acidophiles in Acidic Coal Mine Drainage Daniel S. Jones in acid mine drainage, based on readily accessible geochemical parameters. Acid mine drainage (AMD of sediment communities at two geochemically similar acidic discharges, Upper and Lower Red Eyes in Somerset

  6. 3Geochemistry Published by AGU and the Geochemical Society

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dueker, Ken

    from beneath 3 the eastern Snake River Plain 4 Huaiyu Yuan 5 Department of Earth Science, University­37 km) resides in the Montana Basin and Range province. The eastern Snake River Plain 15 (ESRP) crust for lower crustal outflow from beneath the eastern Snake River Plain, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., 11, XXXXXX

  7. A combined flood surface and geochemical analysis of metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hren, Michael

    A combined flood surface and geochemical analysis of metal fluxes in a historically mined region anthropogenic sediments in a naturally metal-rich region, delin- eating zones of sediments with elevated metal®cally, the distribu- tion of metals in Fisher Creek of the New World Mining District, Montana, suggests the following

  8. Interpretation of Helioseismic Traveltimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burston, Raymond; Birch, Aaron C

    2015-01-01

    Time-distance helioseismology uses cross-covariances of wave motions on the solar surface to determine the travel times of wave packets moving from one surface location to another. We review the methodology to interpret travel-time measurements in terms of small, localized perturbations to a horizontally homogeneous reference solar model. Using the first Born approximation, we derive and compute 3D travel-time sensitivity (Fr\\'echet) kernels for perturbations in sound-speed, density, pressure, and vector flows. While kernels for sound speed and flows had been computed previously, here we extend the calculation to kernels for density and pressure, hence providing a complete description of the effects of solar dynamics and structure on travel times. We treat three thermodynamic quantities as independent and do not assume hydrostatic equilibrium. We present a convenient approach to computing damped Green's functions using a normal-mode summation. The Green's function must be computed on a wavenumber grid that ha...

  9. Argonne Geothermal Geochemical Database v2.0

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Harto, Christopher

    2013-05-22

    A database of geochemical data from potential geothermal sources aggregated from multiple sources as of March 2010. The database contains fields for the location, depth, temperature, pH, total dissolved solids concentration, chemical composition, and date of sampling. A separate tab contains data on non-condensible gas compositions. The database contains records for over 50,000 wells, although many entries are incomplete. Current versions of source documentation are listed in the dataset.

  10. Argonne Geothermal Geochemical Database v2.0

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Harto, Christopher

    A database of geochemical data from potential geothermal sources aggregated from multiple sources as of March 2010. The database contains fields for the location, depth, temperature, pH, total dissolved solids concentration, chemical composition, and date of sampling. A separate tab contains data on non-condensible gas compositions. The database contains records for over 50,000 wells, although many entries are incomplete. Current versions of source documentation are listed in the dataset.

  11. Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1 Citation Details...

  12. Arsenic Mobilization and Sorption in Subsurface Environments: Experimental Studies, Geochemical Modeling, and Remediation Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hafeznezami, Saeedreza

    2015-01-01

    processes of arsenic within Bangladesh sediments. Chemicalrisk and geochemical sources in Bangladesh. EnvironmentMatlab, south-eastern Bangladesh: Insight from experimental

  13. SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Noble, James S.

    1 SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK Originally written 1983 By Daryl D..................................................20 SOIL ACIDITY AND LIMESTONE...............................................27 EXCHANGEABLE MAGNESIUM No. Page No. I. Nitrogen rate adjustments based upon soil texture, organic matter, and time of major

  14. Postgraduate Course / Microbial and Geochemical Oceanography in Upwelling Ecosystems / Henties Bay, March 4 -26, 2014 RGNO -I / kha First African Research Discovery Camp on "Microbial & Geochemical Oceanography in Upwelling Ecosystems", offered by SANUMAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    processes, energy fluxes, microbial, chemical and bioenergetic aspects of coupled N- and SPostgraduate Course / Microbial and Geochemical Oceanography in Upwelling Ecosystems / Henties Bay, March 4 - 26, 2014 RGNO - I / kha First African Research Discovery Camp on "Microbial & Geochemical

  15. Stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Date Creek Basin, Arizona

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Butz, T.R.; Tieman, D.J.; Grimes, J.G.; Bard, C.S.; Helgerson, R.N.; Pritz, P.M.

    1980-06-30

    Results of the Date Creek Basin detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are reported for 239 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Based on stream sediment geochemical data, significant concentrations of uranium are restricted to the Anderson Mine area. The 84th percentile concentrations of U-FL, U-NT, and U-FL/U-NT combined with low thorium/U-NT values reflect increased mobility and enrichment of uranium in the carbonate host rocks of that area. Elements characteristically associated with the uranium mineralization include lithium and arsenic. No well defined diffusion halos suggesting outliers of similar uranium mineralization were observed from the stream sediment data in other areas of the Date Creek Basin. Significant concentrations of U-FL or U-NT found outside the mine area are generally coincident with low U-FL/U-NT values and high concentrations of zirconium, titanium, and phosphorus. This suggests that the uranium is related to a resistate mineral assemblage derived from surrounding crystalline igneous and metamorphic rocks.

  16. PUBLISHED ONLINE: 19 JUNE 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1183 Influence of subsurface biosphere on geochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girguis, Peter R.

    on geochemical fluxes from diffuse hydrothermal fluids Scott D. Wankel1 , Leonid N. Germanovich2 , Marvin D

  17. Geochemical and Geomechanical Effects on Wellbore Cement Fractures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Kabilan, Senthil; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2014-12-31

    Experimental studies were conducted using batch reactors, X-ray microtomograpy (XMT), and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation to determine changes in cement fracture surfaces, fluid flow pathways, and permeability with geochemical and geomechanical processes. Composite Portland cement-basalt caprock core with artificial fractures was prepared and reacted with CO2-saturated groundwater at 50°C and 10 MPa for 3 to 3.5 months under static conditions to understand the geochemical and geomechanical effects on the integrity of wellbores containing defects. Cement-basalt interface samples were subjected to mechanical stress at 2.7 MPa before the CO2 reaction. XMT provided three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of the opening and interconnectionmore »of cement fractures due to mechanical stress. After the CO2 reaction, XMT images revealed that calcium carbonate precipitation occurred extensively within the fractures in the cement matrix, but only partially along fractures located at the cement-basalt interface. The permeability calculated based on CFD simulation was in agreement with the experimentally measured permeability. The experimental results imply that the wellbore cement with fractures is likely to be healed during exposure to CO2-saturated groundwater under static conditions, whereas fractures along the cement-caprock interface are still likely to remain vulnerable to the leakage of CO2. CFD simulation for the flow of different fluids (CO2-saturated brine and supercritical CO2) using a pressure difference of 20 kPa and 200 kPa along ~2 cm-long cement fractures showed that a pressure gradient increase resulted in an increase of CO2 fluids flux by a factor of only ~3-9 because the friction of CO2 fluids on cement fracture surfaces increased with higher flow rate as well. At the same pressure gradient, the simulated flow rate was higher for supercritical CO2 than CO2-saturated brine by a factor of only ~2-3, because the viscosity of supercritical CO2 is much lower than that of CO2-saturated brine. The study suggests that in deep geological reservoirs the geochemical and geomechanical processes have coupled effects on the wellbore cement fracture evolution and fluid flow along the fracture surfaces.« less

  18. Interpreting Remote Sensing NOx Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Interpreting Remote Sensing NOx Measurements Robert Slott, Consultant, Donald Stedman and Saj tailpipe emissions (HC, CO, NOx) are changing with time hUse remote sensing hMeasurements in at least 4 of the year at each location hUniform QC/QA and data reporting Paper # 2001-01-3640 #12;Remote Sensing

  19. DNA Mixture Interpretation & Statistical Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Standards and Technology Gaithersburg, Maryland John M. Butler CIB Forensic Science Center Training Seminar Mixture Workshop This workshop is for analysts, technical reviewers and technical leaders performing) National recommendations of the technical UK DNA working group on mixture interpretation for the NDNAD

  20. Interpretation of Geological Correlation Borings 1, 2, 3 in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site, South Carolina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wyatt, D.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Cumbest, R.J.; Aadland, R.K.; Syms, F.H.; Stephenson, D.E.; Sherrill, J.C.

    1997-06-01

    The Geophysical Correlation Boring (GCB) Program was organized to provide a comprehensive correlation capability between geological core and advanced borehole geophysical data, surface high resolution reflection seismic information and, when available, borehole geochemical and cone penetrometer data. This report provides results and initial geological interpretations of borings one, two, and three (GCB-1, GCB-2, GCB-3) located within the Upper Three Runs Watershed (A/M Area) of the Savannah River Site.

  1. An investigation of the effect of pore scale flow on average geochemical reaction rates using direct numerical simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rafa, S. Molins; Trebotich, D.; Steefel, C. I.; Shen, C.

    2012-02-01

    The scale-dependence of geochemical reaction rates hinders their use in continuum scale models intended for the interpretation and prediction of chemical fate and transport in subsurface environments such as those considered for geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Processes that take place at the pore scale, especially those involving mass transport limitations to reactive surfaces, may contribute to the discrepancy commonly observed between laboratory-determined and continuum-scale or field rates. Here, the dependence of mineral dissolution rates on the pore structure of the porous media is investigated by means of pore scale modeling of flow and multicomponent reactive transport. The pore scale model is comprised of high performance simulation tools and algorithms for incompressible flow and conservative transport combined with a general-purpose multicomponent geochemical reaction code. The model performs direct numerical simulation of reactive transport based on an operator-splitting approach to coupling transport and reactions. The approach is validated with a Poiseuille flow single-pore experiment and verified with an equivalent 1D continuum-scale model of a capillary tube packed with calcite spheres. Using the case of calcite dissolution as an example, the high resolution model is used to demonstrate that non-uniformity in the flow field at the pore scale has the effect of decreasing the overall reactivity of the system, even when systems with identical reactive surface area are considered. The effect becomes more pronounced as the heterogeneity of the reactive grain packing increases, particularly where the flow slows sufficiently such that the solution approaches equilibrium locally and the average rate becomes transport-limited.

  2. Peircean Interpretation of Postmodern Architecture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takahashi, Iwao

    2013-12-11

    Peirce’s semeiotic and logic. I received his intellectual guidance, Peircean Algebraic Logic (PAL) that clarified my theory development of Peircean interpretation of architecture. My knowledge of American Pragmatism was developed by the guidance of Dr... thankful to my wife Brenda Takahashi who supported me during my research. vii NOMENCLATURE CMPL Conceptual Model of Peircean Logic CP Cartesian Product PAL Peircean Algebraic Logic QL Quantificational Logic viii TABLE...

  3. Geochemical Signatures as a Tool for Vermiculite Provenance Determination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karen E. Wright; Carl D. Palmer

    2008-09-01

    Thirty-eight samples of known origin (China, Libby MT, South Africa, South Carolina) and 6 vermiculite product samples of unknown origin were analyzed for major and trace elements, including rare earth elements to determine the feasibility of distinguishing the provenance of the samples based upon a geochemical signature. Probability plots suggest that two of the four groups (Libby, South Carolina) were comprised of two subgroups. Results of hierarchical cluster analysis are highly sensitive to the linkage method chosen. Ward’s method is the most useful for this data and suggests that there are five groups within the data set (South African samples, two subsets of the Libby samples, a subset of the South Carolina samples, and a second subset of the South Carolina samples combined with the China samples). Similar results were obtained using k-cluster analysis. Neither clustering method was able to distinguish samples from China from the South Carolina samples. Discriminant analysis was used on a four-category model comprised of the original four groups and on a six-category model comprised of the five categories identified from the cluster analysis but with the China samples grouped into a sixth category. The discriminant/classification model was able to distinguish all of the groups including the China samples from one another for both the four- and six-category models with 100% of the samples properly classified. The 6 unknown product samples were classified with a probability of consistency of 99%. Both discriminant models were also run with a subset of our analyte set to be consistent with the smaller Gunter et al., (2005) analyte set. Twenty vermiculite samples (nine of known origin and eleven of unknown origin) from their study were classified based on our discriminant models with the reduced set of analytes. Of the twenty samples, Gunter et al. (2005) was able to classify 16 with cluster analysis while our 4-category discriminant analysis model allowed us to classify all twenty. Of the 16 samples Gunter et al. (2005) classified using cluster analysis, all but one sample was assigned the same classification by our 4-category model. Of the nine samples with known origin, all were correctly classified. Similar results were obtained for the six-category model. Comparison of the plots of the canonical roots, the Wilks’ L, and the square Mahalanobis distances suggest the full analyte set provides better discrimination of the groups than the reduced analyte set. The six-category model is more consistent with the results of the probability plots and the cluster analysis. Discriminant analysis of geochemical data from vermiculite ore is a powerful technique for determining the ore’s provenance.

  4. A Geological and Hydro-Geochemical Study of the Animas Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Geological and Hydro-Geochemical Study of the Animas Geothermal Area, Hidalgo County, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  5. The dynamics of oceanic transform faults : constraints from geophysical, geochemical, and geodynamical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gregg, Patricia Michelle Marie

    2008-01-01

    Segmentation and crustal accretion at oceanic transform fault systems are investigated through a combination of geophysical data analysis and geodynamical and geochemical modeling. Chapter 1 examines the effect of fault ...

  6. Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1 Bacon, Diana H. carbon...

  7. Geochemical heterogeneity in the Hawaiian plume : constraints from Hawaiian volcanoes and Emperor seamounts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Shichun

    2005-01-01

    The 6000-km long, age-progressive linear Hawaii-Emperor Chain is one of the best defined hotspot tracks. This hotspot track plays an important role in the plume hypothesis. In this research, geochemical data on the ...

  8. 31 TAC, part 1, chapter 9, rule 9.11 Geophysical and Geochemical...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and geochemical exploration permits in Texas. Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 1999 Legal Citation 31 TAC 9.11 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:...

  9. Migratory patterns of American shad (Alosa sapidissima) revealed by natural geochemical tags in otoliths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walther, Benjamin (Benjamin Dwaine)

    2007-01-01

    Geochemical signatures in the otoliths of diadromous fishes may allow for retrospective analyses of natal origins. In an assessment of river-specific signatures in American shad (Alosa sapidissima), an anadromous clupeid ...

  10. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates Accompanying Acidic CO2-Saturated Brine Flow in Sandstone Aquifers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New York at Stoney Brook, State University of

    1 Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates Accompanying Acidic CO2-Saturated Brine Flow in Sandstone in the pore networks corresponding to three different sandstones. The simulations were used to study up

  11. Geochemical Monitoring Considerations for the FutureGen 2.0 Project

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amonette, James E.; Johnson, Timothy A.; Spencer, Clayton F.; Zhong, Lirong; Szecsody, James E.; Vermeul, Vince R.

    2014-12-31

    Geochemical monitoring is an essential component of a suite of monitoring technologies designed to evaluate CO2 mass balance and detect possible loss of containment at the FutureGen 2.0 geologic sequestration site near Jacksonville, IL. This presentation gives an overview of the potential geochemical approaches and tracer technologies that were considered, and describes the evaluation process by which the most cost-effective and robust of these were selected for implementation

  12. PARSING AND INTERPRETING COMPARATIVES Marmy Rayner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PARSING AND INTERPRETING COMPARATIVES Marmy Rayner SICS Box 1263, S-164 28 KISTA Sweden Amelie interpretation. The current paper is a shortened version of (Rayner & Banks 88) ("the full paper"), which we

  13. Interpretive Approaches to British Government and Politics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bevir, Mark

    2006-01-01

    and actions of many political actors. They can range fromactors. Nonetheless, there is a family of interpretive approaches to political

  14. AERIAL PHOTO INTERPRETATION NATIONAL INVENTORY OF LANDSCAPES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MANUAL FOR AERIAL PHOTO INTERPRETATION IN THE NATIONAL INVENTORY OF LANDSCAPES IN SWEDEN NILS YEAR for aerial photo interpretation 1 www-nils.slu.se SLU, Department of Forest Resource Management and Geomatics. 901 83 Umeå, Sweden #12;NILS ­ manual for aerial photo interpretation 2 Table of contents 1 About NILS

  15. Image structure analysis for seismic interpretation Proefschrift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    Image structure analysis for seismic interpretation Proefschrift ter verkrijging van de graad van . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.1 Traditional interpretation of 3-D seismic data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.2 Improving the efficiency of the interpretation process . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2.1 Structure enhancement for horizon

  16. QUALITATIVE INTERPRETATION OF GALAXY SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez Almeida, J.; Morales-Luis, A. B. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38205 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Terlevich, R.; Terlevich, E. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica, Optica y Electronica, Tonantzintla, Puebla (Mexico); Cid Fernandes, R., E-mail: jos@iac.es, E-mail: abml@iac.es, E-mail: rjt@ast.cam.ac.uk, E-mail: eterlevi@inaoep.mx, E-mail: cid@astro.ufsc.br [Departamento de Fisica-CFM, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, P.O. Box 476, 88040-900 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil)

    2012-09-10

    We describe a simple step-by-step guide to qualitative interpretation of galaxy spectra. Rather than an alternative to existing automated tools, it is put forward as an instrument for quick-look analysis and for gaining physical insight when interpreting the outputs provided by automated tools. Though the recipe is for general application, it was developed for understanding the nature of the Automatic Spectroscopic K-means-based (ASK) template spectra. They resulted from the classification of all the galaxy spectra in the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data release 7, thus being a comprehensive representation of the galaxy spectra in the local universe. Using the recipe, we give a description of the properties of the gas and the stars that characterize the ASK classes, from those corresponding to passively evolving galaxies, to H II galaxies undergoing a galaxy-wide starburst. The qualitative analysis is found to be in excellent agreement with quantitative analyses of the same spectra. We compare the mean ages of the stellar populations with those inferred using the code STARLIGHT. We also examine the estimated gas-phase metallicity with the metallicities obtained using electron-temperature-based methods. A number of byproducts follow from the analysis. There is a tight correlation between the age of the stellar population and the metallicity of the gas, which is stronger than the correlations between galaxy mass and stellar age, and galaxy mass and gas metallicity. The galaxy spectra are known to follow a one-dimensional sequence, and we identify the luminosity-weighted mean stellar age as the affine parameter that describes the sequence. All ASK classes happen to have a significant fraction of old stars, although spectrum-wise they are outshined by the youngest populations. Old stars are metal-rich or metal-poor depending on whether they reside in passive galaxies or in star-forming galaxies.

  17. GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

    2012-05-08

    From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

  18. Geochemical characteristics of bitumens and seeps from Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mpanju, F. ); Philp, P. )

    1991-03-01

    A number of bitumen extracts from prospective source rocks and oil seeps of potential oil-producing areas in Tanzania have been characterized by a variety of geochemical techniques. The data obtained from this study have provided additional insight into the source rock potential of these areas. However, in this paper it is proposed to discuss in detail the results from two of the more unusual samples in this region, namely Wingayongo and Pemba. The Wingayongo bitumens isolated from an exposed Neocomian-aged sandstone, possibly a paleoreservoir, are almost totally devoid of n-alkanes and steranes and dominated by hopane-type biomarkers with the so-called immature {beta}{beta}-stereochemistry at the C{sub 17} and C{sub 21} positions. There is no typical evidence of biodegradation having occurred leading to the proposal of an unusual source material or maturity history for this sample. The Pemba seep samples were also characterized by relatively high concentrations of hopanes with the immature stereochemistry at the C{sub 17} and C{sub 21} positions and a virtual absence of n-alkanes and steranes. The aromatic fractions contained relatively high concentrations of hopanic acids, with the immature stereochemistry at C{sub 17} and C{sub 21} positions and a virtual absence of n-alkanes and steranes. The aromatic fractions contained relatively high concentrations of hopanic acids, with the immature stereochemistry at C{sub 17} and C{sub 21}. On the basis of these data, it is proposed that the seeps in the Pemba region are not true oil seeps. Rather they are formed as a result of extremely high levels of bacterial activity with the bacteria utilizing natural gas in the region as the substrate. The net result is a material referred to in other areas of the world as paraffin dirt whose occurrence results from extensive microbial activity in the region and not directly from seepage of products having a thermal origin.

  19. Natural bacterial communities serve as quantitative geochemical biosensors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Smith, Mark B.; Rocha, Andrea M.; Smillie, Chris S.; Olesen, Scott W.; Paradis, Charles; Wu, Liyou; Campbell, James H.; Fortney, Julian L.; Mehlhorn, Tonia L.; Lowe, Kenneth A.; et al

    2015-05-12

    Biological sensors can be engineered to measure a wide range of environmental conditions. Here we show that statistical analysis of DNA from natural microbial communities can be used to accurately identify environmental contaminants, including uranium and nitrate at a nuclear waste site. In addition to contamination, sequence data from the 16S rRNA gene alone can quantitatively predict a rich catalogue of 26 geochemical features collected from 93 wells with highly differing geochemistry characteristics. We extend this approach to identify sites contaminated with hydrocarbons from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, finding that altered bacterial communities encode a memory of prior contamination,more »even after the contaminants themselves have been fully degraded. We show that the bacterial strains that are most useful for detecting oil and uranium are known to interact with these substrates, indicating that this statistical approach uncovers ecologically meaningful interactions consistent with previous experimental observations. Future efforts should focus on evaluating the geographical generalizability of these associations. Taken as a whole, these results indicate that ubiquitous, natural bacterial communities can be used as in situ environmental sensors that respond to and capture perturbations caused by human impacts. These in situ biosensors rely on environmental selection rather than directed engineering, and so this approach could be rapidly deployed and scaled as sequencing technology continues to become faster, simpler, and less expensive. Here we show that DNA from natural bacterial communities can be used as a quantitative biosensor to accurately distinguish unpolluted sites from those contaminated with uranium, nitrate, or oil. These results indicate that bacterial communities can be used as environmental sensors that respond to and capture perturbations caused by human impacts.« less

  20. The paleoclassical interpretation of quantum theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. Schmelzer

    2015-06-30

    This interpretation establishes a completely classical ontology -- only the classical trajectory in configuration space -- and interprets the wave function as describing incomplete information (in form of a probability flow) about this trajectory. This combines basic ideas of de Broglie-Bohm theory and Nelsonian stochastics about the trajectory with a Bayesian interpretation of the wave function. Various objections are considered and discussed. In particular a regularity principle for the zeros of the wave function allows to meet the Wallstrom objection.

  1. Collapse challenge for interpretations of quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Neumaier

    2005-05-23

    The collapse challenge for interpretations of quantum mechanics is to build from first principles and your preferred interpretation a complete, observer-free quantum model of the described experiment (involving a photon and two screens), together with a formal analysis that completely explains the experimental result. The challenge is explained in detail, and discussed in the light of the Copenhagen interpretation and the decoherence setting.

  2. Investigating Procedural Expression and Interpretation in Videogames

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treanor, Mike

    2013-01-01

    s visual static assets relate to the game’s mechanics tomechanics might be interpreted as metaphors for how the static

  3. General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical Removal...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Regarding Medical Removal Protection Benefits Pursuant to 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical...

  4. DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG GRAPHS Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

  5. Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mani, Devleena; Kumar, T. Satish; Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V.

    2011-03-15

    The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} < 1), indicating a lack of association of iodine with the surficial organic matter and the possibility of interaction between the seeping hydrocarbons and soil iodine. Further, the distribution pattern of iodine compares well with two surface geochemical indicators: the adsorbed light gaseous hydrocarbons (methane through butane) and the propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

  6. An Environment for Empirical Data Interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruegge, Bernd

    An Environment for Empirical Data Interpretation Gudrun J. Klinker Cambridge Research Lab, Digital, such as biomedical imaging, robotics, seismic data analysis, and wood classification. Current visualization systems exploration and interpretation tools which can be adapted to the requirements of different applications

  7. Real World Interpretations of Quantum Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian Kent

    2011-11-03

    I propose a new class of interpretations, {\\it real world interpretations}, of the quantum theory of closed systems. These interpretations postulate a preferred factorization of Hilbert space and preferred projective measurements on one factor. They give a mathematical characterisation of the different possible worlds arising in an evolving closed quantum system, in which each possible world corresponds to a (generally mixed) evolving quantum state. In a realistic model, the states corresponding to different worlds should be expected to tend towards orthogonality as different possible quasiclassical structures emerge or as measurement-like interactions produce different classical outcomes. However, as the worlds have a precise mathematical definition, real world interpretations need no definition of quasiclassicality, measurement, or other concepts whose imprecision is problematic in other interpretational approaches. It is natural to postulate that precisely one world is chosen randomly, using the natural probability distribution, as the world realised in Nature, and that this world's mathematical characterisation is a complete description of reality.

  8. The function of interpretation as perceived by park visitors and interpreters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvy, Valeen Adams

    1977-01-01

    . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 A comparison of perception stat. ement means and visitor/interpreter by reasons for attending programs. 79 81 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Interpretation is a communication process used by resource managers to inform the visitor about a resource.... The availability of regularly scheduled programs provided ample opportunity to study interpretation within the system. The need to study personal contact interpretive programs limited the general availability of programs for study, but adequate numbers were...

  9. A GEOCHEMICAL MODULE FOR "AMDTreat" TO COMPUTE CAUSTIC QUANTITY, EFFLUENT QUALITY, AND SLUDGE VOLUME1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of sludge produced by the treatment, a titration simulation is being developed using the geochemical program The AMDTreat computer program ( . Treatment with caustic chemicals typically is used to increase pH (6 to 8), whereas active manganese removal requires treatment to alkaline pH (~10). The treatment

  10. Capillary geochemistry in non-saturated zone of soils. Water content and geochemical signatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Capillary geochemistry in non-saturated zone of soils. Water content and geochemical signatures change. The volumetric capillary water content of the soil at high suction can be calculated corresponds to a decreasing internal pressure of the water, which modifies its thermodynamic properties

  11. Methane-related authigenic carbonates from the Black Sea: geochemical characterisation and relation to seeping fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    Methane-related authigenic carbonates from the Black Sea: geochemical characterisation and relation of carbon derived from the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM), the oxidation of organic matter and from sea water. Methane is the dominant component among other hydrocarbon gases in these sediments. Its

  12. Z .Chemical Geology 145 1998 153159 z /Geochemical Earth Reference Model GERM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langmuir, Charles H.

    Z .Chemical Geology 145 1998 153­159 z /Geochemical Earth Reference Model GERM : description on a chemical characterization of the Earth, its major reservoirs, and the fluxes between them. The Z .GERM chemical Z . Z .reservoirs of the present-day Earth, from core to atmosphere; 2 present-day fluxes between

  13. Reservoir theory for studying the geochemical evolution of soils Simon Marius Mudd1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mudd, Simon Marius

    Reservoir theory for studying the geochemical evolution of soils Simon Marius Mudd1 and Kyungsoo environment over a fixed amount of time. In natural soils, minerals enter, are mixed within, and leave the soil via erosion and dissolution/leaching over the course of soil formation. The key to correctly

  14. Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hattori, Kéiko H.

    Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL a reservoir for shale-gas and oil. We examined organic-rich black shale, known as Macasty shale, of Upper SHALE-GAS AND OIL in THE SUBSURFACE OF ANTICOSTI ISLAND, CANADA Key Words: Provenance, Anticosti Island

  15. The "calamine" nonsulfide ZnPb deposits of Belgium: Petrographical, mineralogical and geochemical characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boni, Maria

    The "calamine" nonsulfide Zn­Pb deposits of Belgium: Petrographical, mineralogical and geochemical, Germany c Geological Survey of Belgium, 13 Rue Jenner, B-1000 Brussels, Belgium d Geologisch the historical basis for the zinc mining and smelting industry in Europe. The zinc ores were called "calamines

  16. Evolution of the Namaqua-Natal Belt, southern Africa A geochronological and isotope geochemical review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patterson, William P.

    Evolution of the Namaqua-Natal Belt, southern Africa ­ A geochronological and isotope geochemical Available online 10 July 2006 Abstract Juvenile crust formation within the Namaqua-Natal Belt occurred of the Mesoproterozoic evolution of the Namaqua-Natal Belt. Graben formation with associated extrusion of lavas

  17. Technology: Machine and its interpretation in architecture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ju Hong

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a comprehensive theory for the relationship between architecture and technology and to examine the interpretation of technology when it is applied to architecture. In architecture, 'art and craft...

  18. A defense of Deleuze's interpretation of Nietzsche 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stagoll, Clifford Scott

    1995-01-01

    Publication of Gilles Deleuze's interpretative text Nietzsche and Philosophy was accompanied by a resurgence of interest in the work of Friedrich Nietzsche, and its themes were taken up by "New Nietzscheans" such as Foucault and Lyotard...

  19. Generating and interpreting referring expressions in context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Dustin Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Referring expressions with vague and ambiguous modifiers, such as "a quick visit" and "the big meeting," are difficult for computers to interpret because their meanings are defined in part by context. For the hearer to ...

  20. On a realistic interpretation of quantum mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Neumaier

    1999-08-22

    The best mathematical arguments against a realistic interpretation of quantum mechanics - that gives definite but partially unknown values to all observables - are analysed and shown to be based on reasoning that is not compelling. This opens the door for an interpretation that, while respecting the indeterministic nature of quantum mechanics, allows to speak of definite values for all observables at any time that are, however, only partially measurable. The analysis also suggests new ways to test the foundations of quantum theory.

  1. Geochemical evidence for meteoric diagenesis and cryptic surfaces of subaerial exposure in Upper Ordovician peritidal carbonates from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heim, Noel A.

    of subaerial exposure in marine strata. Sequence stratigraphy has provided a useful model for integrating sedi developed. Subaerial exposure, sequence stratigraphy and geochemistry Sequence stratigraphy predicts section previously studied using a sequence stratigraphic approach. Specifically, geochemical results

  2. Origin of geochemical heterogeneity in the mantle : constraints from volcanism associated with Hawaiian and Kerguelen mantle plumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Guangping

    2007-01-01

    Lavas derived from long-lived mantle plumes provide important information of mantle compositions and the processes that created the geochemical heterogeneity within the mantle. Kerguelen and Hawaii are two long-lived mantle ...

  3. Geochemical and isotopic results for groundwater, drainage waters, snowmelt, permafrost, precipitation in Barrow, Alaska (USA) 2012-2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilson, Cathy; Newman, Brent; Heikoop, Jeff

    2012-07-18

    Data include a large suite of analytes (geochemical and isotopic) for samples collected in Barrow, Alaska (2012-2013). Sample types are indicated, and include soil pore waters, drainage waters, snowmelt, precipitation, and permafrost samples.

  4. Geochemical and isotopic results for groundwater, drainage waters, snowmelt, permafrost, precipitation in Barrow, Alaska (USA) 2012-2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wilson, Cathy; Newman, Brent; Heikoop, Jeff

    Data include a large suite of analytes (geochemical and isotopic) for samples collected in Barrow, Alaska (2012-2013). Sample types are indicated, and include soil pore waters, drainage waters, snowmelt, precipitation, and permafrost samples.

  5. TOURGHREACT: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-01-01

    chemical modeling at the Soultz-sous- Forêts HDR reservoir (Geochemical modeling of the Soultz-sous-Forêts Hot Dry Rocken géothermie profonde (Soultz-sous-Forêts, Bas Rhin,

  6. Proceedings of the second workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A. (eds.)

    1986-12-01

    A workshop was held to review the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring and scientific drilling in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and techonic processes. Data from a 2400-ft deep core hole completed in June 1986 were presented at the 1986 workshop and participants discussed the need and rationale for siting locations for future scientific drilling in the caldera.

  7. Interpretation in Quantum Physics as Hidden Curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baily, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Prior research has demonstrated how the realist perspectives of classical physics students can translate into specific beliefs about quantum phenomena when taking an introductory modern physics course. Student beliefs regarding the interpretation of quantum mechanics often vary by context, and are most often in alignment with instructional goals in topic areas where instructors are explicit in promoting a particular perspective. Moreover, students are more likely to maintain realist perspectives in topic areas where instructors are less explicit in addressing interpretive themes, thereby making such issues part of a hidden curriculum. We discuss various approaches to addressing student perspectives and interpretive themes in a modern physics course, and explore the associated impacts on student thinking.

  8. Interpretation in Quantum Physics as Hidden Curriculum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Charles Baily; Noah D. Finkelstein

    2011-08-26

    Prior research has demonstrated how the realist perspectives of classical physics students can translate into specific beliefs about quantum phenomena when taking an introductory modern physics course. Student beliefs regarding the interpretation of quantum mechanics often vary by context, and are most often in alignment with instructional goals in topic areas where instructors are explicit in promoting a particular perspective. Moreover, students are more likely to maintain realist perspectives in topic areas where instructors are less explicit in addressing interpretive themes, thereby making such issues part of a hidden curriculum. We discuss various approaches to addressing student perspectives and interpretive themes in a modern physics course, and explore the associated impacts on student thinking.

  9. Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Interpretation of...

  10. Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar Dynamics...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar Dynamics Observatory data Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Laboratory Study Supporting the Interpretation of Solar...

  11. Interpretation of ageostrophic winds and implications for jet stream maintenance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirosoetisno, Djoko

    Interpretation of ageostrophic winds and implications for jet stream maintenance Article Published Version Blackburn, M. (1985) Interpretation of ageostrophic winds and implications for jet stream

  12. INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT, MONTICELLO, SOUTH CAROLINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2014-01-01

    Letters INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT,12091 INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT,transient data from a hydraulic fracturing experiment have

  13. Thermodynamic Data for Geochemical Modeling of Carbonate Reactions Associated with CO2 Sequestration – Literature Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; McGrail, B. Peter

    2010-09-28

    Permanent storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deep geologic formations is being considered as a means to reduce the concentration of atmospheric CO2 and thus its contribution to global climate change. To ensure safe and effective geologic sequestration, numerous studies have been completed of the extent to which the CO2 migrates within geologic formations and what physical and geochemical changes occur in these formations when CO2 is injected. Sophisticated, computerized reservoir simulations are used as part of field site and laboratory CO2 sequestration studies. These simulations use coupled multiphase flow-reactive chemical transport models and/or standalone (i.e., no coupled fluid transport) geochemical models to calculate gas solubility, aqueous complexation, reduction/oxidation (redox), and/or mineral solubility reactions related to CO2 injection and sequestration. Thermodynamic data are critical inputs to modeling geochemical processes. The adequacy of thermodynamic data for carbonate compounds has been identified as an important data requirement for the successful application of these geochemical reaction models to CO2 sequestration. A review of thermodynamic data for CO2 gas and carbonate aqueous species and minerals present in published data compilations and databases used in geochemical reaction models was therefore completed. Published studies that describe mineralogical analyses from CO2 sequestration field and natural analogue sites and laboratory studies were also reviewed to identify specific carbonate minerals that are important to CO2 sequestration reactions and therefore require thermodynamic data. The results of the literature review indicated that an extensive thermodynamic database exists for CO2 and CH4 gases, carbonate aqueous species, and carbonate minerals. Values of ?fG298° and/or log Kr,298° are available for essentially all of these compounds. However, log Kr,T° or heat capacity values at temperatures above 298 K exist for less than approximately one-third of these compounds. Because the temperatures of host formations that will be used for CO2 injection and sequestration will be at tempera¬tures in the range of 50ºC to 100ºC or greater, the lack of high temperature thermodynamic values for key carbonate compounds especially minerals, will impact the accuracy of some modeling calculations.

  14. Geochemical Data Package for Performance Assessment Calculations Related to the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplan, D

    2006-02-28

    The Savannah River Site disposes of certain types of radioactive waste within subsurface-engineered facilities. One of the tools used to establish the capacity of a given site to safely store radioactive waste (i.e., that a site does not exceed its Waste Acceptance Criteria) is the Performance Assessment (PA). The objective of this document is to provide the geochemical values for the PA calculations. This work is being conducted as part of the on-going maintenance program that permits the PA to periodically update existing calculations when new data becomes available. Because application of values without full understanding of their original purpose may lead to misuse, this document also provides the geochemical conceptual model, approach used for selecting the values, the justification for selecting data, and the assumptions made to assure that the conceptual and numerical geochemical models are reasonably conservative (i.e., reflect conditions that will tend to predict the maximum risk to the hypothetical recipient). The geochemical parameters describe transport processes for 38 elements (>90 radioisotopes) potentially occurring within eight disposal units (Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Low Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (ILV) Vaults, TRU-Pad-1, Naval Reactor Waste Pads, Components-in-Grout Trenches, and Saltstone Facility). This work builds upon well-documented work from previous PA calculations (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). The new geochemical concepts introduced in this data package are: (1) In the past, solubility products were used only in a few conditions (element existing in a specific environmental setting). This has been expanded to >100 conditions. (2) Radionuclide chemistry in cementitious environments is described through the use of both the Kd and apparent solubility concentration limit. Furthermore, the solid phase is assumed to age during the assessment period (thousands of years), resulting in three main types of controlling solid phases, each possessing a unique set of radionuclide sorption parameters (Kd and solubility concentration limit). (3) A large amount of recent site-specific sorption research has been conducted since the last PA (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). These new data have replaced previous Kd values derived from literature values, thus reducing uncertainty and improving accuracy. Finally, because this document will be used by future PA calculations and external acceptance of the document will eventually be required, this document was extensively reviewed. The review process, including the internal review, site review, and external review process is described.

  15. Abstract interpretation from a denotational semantics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, David A.

    (x) if x pos? A: abstractly interpret input domain Int by Sign = {neg, zero, pos, any}: readSign(x) x = succ(x) if (filterNeg(x): x = negate (x)) (filterNonNeg(x): x = succ(x)) fi writeSign(x) where succ (pos) = pos succ (zero) = pos succ

  16. Interpreting Power Anisotropy Measurements in Plasma Turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, C H K; Horbury, T S; Schekochihin, A A

    2009-01-01

    A relationship between power anisotropy and wavevector anisotropy in turbulent fluctuations is derived. This can be used to interpret plasma turbulence measurements, for example in the solar wind. If fluctuations are anisotropic in shape then the ion gyroscale break point in spectra in the directions parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field would not occur at the same frequency, and similarly for the electron gyroscale break point. This is an important consideration when interpreting solar wind observations in terms of anisotropic turbulence theories. Model magnetic field power spectra are presented assuming a cascade of critically balanced Alfven waves in the inertial range and kinetic Alfven waves in the dissipation range. The variation of power anisotropy with scale is compared to existing solar wind measurements and the similarities and differences are discussed.

  17. Physical Interpretations of Nilpotent Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Rowlands

    2010-04-09

    Nilpotent quantum mechanics provides a powerful method of making efficient calculations. More importantly, however, it provides insights into a number of fundamental physical problems through its use of a dual vector space and its explicit construction of vacuum. Physical interpretation of the nilpotent formalism is discussed with respect to boson and baryon structures, the mass-gap problem, zitterbewgung, Berry phase, renormalization, and related issues.

  18. Internal and External Logics of Abstract Interpretations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, David A.

    := succ(x) write(x) Q: Is output pos? A: abstractly interpret Int by Sign = {neg, zero, pos, any, none} pos zero none any neg P(Int) Sign Standard, collecting inter- pretation: f : P(Int) P(Int): isPos: isPos (pos) = pos isPos (neg) = none isPos (any) = pos, etc. succ (pos) = pos succ (zero) = pos succ

  19. Extracting program logics from abstract interpretations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, David A.

    Int(x) if x>0 : x:= pred(x) x:= succ(x) writeInt(x) Q: Is output pos? A: abstractly interpret domain Int by Sign = {neg, zero, pos, any}: readSign(x) if isPos(x): x:= pred (x) x:= succ(x) writeSign(x) where succ (pos) = pos succ (zero) = pos succ (neg) = any succ (any) = any and pred (neg) = neg pred (zero) = neg

  20. GEOCHEMISTRY AND ISOTOPE HYDROLOGY OF GROUNDWATERS IN THE STRIPA GRANITE RESULTS AND PRELIMINARY INTERPRETATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, P.

    2011-01-01

    of geochemical samples. Origin Tailings pond 3 next to SBH-2410- and 360~m level Tailings pond 3 next to SBH-2 Stream (

  1. Remote Raman - laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) geochemical investigation under Venus atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clegg, Sanuel M; Barefield, James E; Humphries, Seth D; Wiens, Roger C; Vaniman, D. T.; Sharma, S. K.; Misra, A. K.; Dyar, M. D.; Smrekar, S. E.

    2010-12-13

    The extreme Venus surface temperatures ({approx}740 K) and atmospheric pressures ({approx}93 atm) create a challenging environment for surface missions. Scientific investigations capable of Venus geochemical observations must be completed within hours of landing before the lander will be overcome by the harsh atmosphere. A combined remote Raman - LIBS (Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy) instrument is capable of accomplishing the geochemical science goals without the risks associated with collecting samples and bringing them into the lander. Wiens et al. and Sharma et al. demonstrated that both analytical techniques can be integrated into a single instrument capable of planetary missions. The focus of this paper is to explore the capability to probe geologic samples with Raman - LIBS and demonstrate quantitative analysis under Venus surface conditions. Raman and LIBS are highly complementary analytical techniques capable of detecting both the mineralogical and geochemical composition of Venus surface materials. These techniques have the potential to profoundly increase our knowledge of the Venus surface composition, which is currently limited to geochemical data from Soviet Venera and VEGA landers that collectively suggest a surface composition that is primarily tholeiitic basaltic with some potentially more evolved compositions and, in some locations, K-rich trachyandesite. These landers were not equipped to probe the surface mineralogy as can be accomplished with Raman spectroscopy. Based on the observed compositional differences and recognizing the imprecise nature of the existing data, 15 samples were chosen to constitute a Venus-analog suite for this study, including five basalts, two each of andesites, dacites, and sulfates, and single samples of a foidite, trachyandesite, rhyolite, and basaltic trachyandesite under Venus conditions. LIBS data reduction involved generating a partial least squares (PLS) model with a subset of the rock powder standards to quantitatively determine the major elemental abundance of the remaining samples. PLS analysis suggests that the major element compositions can be determined with root mean square errors ca. 5% (absolute) for SiO{sub 2}, Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}(total), MgO, and CaO, and ca. 2% or less for TiO{sub 2}, Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, MnO, K{sub 2}O, and Na{sub 2}O. Finally, the Raman experiments have been conducted under supercritical CO{sub 2} involving single-mineral and mixed-mineral samples containing talc, olivine, pyroxenes, feldspars, anhydrite, barite, and siderite. The Raman data have shown that the individual minerals can easily be identified individually or in mixtures.

  2. Evaluation of Groundwater Movement in the Frenchman Flat CAU Using Geochemical and Isotopic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Hershey; J. Thomas; T. Rose; J. Paces; I. Farnham; C. Benedict, Jr.

    2005-03-01

    The principal pathway for radionuclide migration from underground tests in Frenchman Flat, on the Nevada Test Site, to the accessible environment is groundwater flow. Two potential pathways for radionuclide transport via groundwater have been identified from hydrologic data: (1) radionuclide transport downward from the alluvial and volcanic aquifers into the underlying carbonate aquifer; and (2) radionuclide transport laterally to the carbonate aquifer surrounding Frenchman Flat. This report presents an evaluation of geochemical and environmental isotopic data to test these potential pathways and to identify other groundwater flowpaths in, and out of, Frenchman Flat.

  3. Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2012-07-09

    Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

  4. The Working Alliance and the Use of Interpreters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebersole, Judy Lee

    2011-05-31

    This dissertation compared working alliance with and without interpreters and examined factors that may impact the development of the working alliance when an interpreter is used. The setting was a Midwestern public school district where social...

  5. Semantic Interpretation Using KL-ONE 1 Norman K. Sondheimer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    &Webber 80a, Bobrow&Webber 80b] on semantic interpretation using KL-ONE to represent knowledge. The approach

  6. Interactive Seismic Interpretation with Piecewise Global Energy Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interactive Seismic Interpretation with Piecewise Global Energy Minimization Thomas H¨ollt King and horizons. However, seismic interpretation and horizon tracing is a difficult and error-prone task, often starts with creating a model of the subsurface structures, the seismic interpretation. A seismic

  7. Seismic Reflection Interpretation Geology 556/764 Fall 2015

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic Reflection Interpretation Geology 556/764 Fall 2015 This course is for graduate students seismic interpretation. (3 Credit Hours) EWS 201, 1:15 pm - 4:15 pm Tuesday Instructor: Jim Kellogg (7-4501) E-mail: kellogg@sc.edu Goals and Content of Course: Students will learn seismic interpretation

  8. The shadow interpretation versus quantum paradoxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leffler, Warren

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the consequences of denying the "emptiness of paths not taken," EPNT, premise of Bernstein, Greenberger, Horne, and Zeilinger (BGHZ) in their paper titled, Bell theorem without inequalities.[ ] Carrying out the negation of EPNT leads to the concept of a "shadow stream." Streams are essentially particle implementations of the paths in Feynman path-integrals, resulting in a simple and consistent extension of the standard axioms for quantum mechanics. The construct provides elegant resolutions of single- and multi-particle interference paradoxes. Moreover, combining the argument of this paper with that of BGHZ shows that there are just two choices for quantum foundations: interpretations closely similar to the present one or those that harbor instantaneous action at a distance.

  9. Geochemical and isotopic variations in shallow groundwater in areas of the Fayetteville Shale development, north-central Arkansas q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Robert B.

    Geochemical and isotopic variations in shallow groundwater in areas of the Fayetteville Shale of unconventional natural gas reservoirs such as impermeable shale basins through the use of horizontal drilling effects; the possible degradation of water quality in shallow aquifers over- lying producing shale

  10. JlJURNAL OF EXPiRRAllONELSEVIER Journal of Geochemical Exploration 54 ( 1995) 167-l 75

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodnar, Robert J.

    JlJURNAL OF EXPiRRAllONELSEVIER Journal of Geochemical Exploration 54 ( 1995) 167-l 75 Comparison, Australia Received 16November 1994; accepted 18May 1995 Abstract Fluid inclusions in quartz from barren that the sample is from the central portion of the hydrothermal system that hosts 0375-6742/95/$09.50 0 1995

  11. Numerical modeling of time-lapse seismic data from fractured reservoirs including fluid flow and geochemical processes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shekhar, Ravi

    2009-05-15

    and amplitude variation with offset (AVO) results for our example model predicts that CO2 is easier to detect than brine in the fractured reservoirs. The effects of geochemical processes on seismics are simulated by time-lapse modeling for t = 1000 years. My...

  12. Geological, geochemical, and geophysical survey of the geothermal resources at Hot Springs Bay Valley, Akutan Island, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motyka, R.J.; Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Swanson, S.E.; Romick, J.D.; Moorman, M.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Witte, W.; Petzinger, B.; Allely, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    An extensive survey was conducted of the geothermal resource potential of Hot Springs Bay Valley on Akutan Island. A topographic base map was constructed, geologic mapping, geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted, and the thermal waters and fumarolic gases were analyzed for major and minor element species and stable isotope composition. (ACR)

  13. Geochemical evidence for African dust inputs to soils of western Atlantic islands: Barbados, the Bahamas, and Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prospero, Joseph M.

    Geochemical evidence for African dust inputs to soils of western Atlantic islands: Barbados of Barbados, the Florida Keys, and the Bahamas. Potential soil parent materials in this region, external to the carbonate substrate, include volcanic ash from the island of St. Vincent (near Barbados), volcanic ash from

  14. Workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A.

    1984-10-01

    A workshop reviewed the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and tectonic processes. Workshop participants discussed the need to instrument sites for continuous measurements of several parameters and to obtain additional hydrologic and chemical information from intermediate and deep drill holes. In addition to seismic and deformation monitoring, programs are currently in progress to monitor changes in the discharge characteristics of hot springs, fumaroles, and soil gases, as well as pressures and temperatures in wells. Some hydrochemical parameters are measured continuously, others are measured monthly or at longer intervals. This report summarizes the information presented at the hydrologic monitoring workshop, following the workshop agenda which was divided into four sessions: (1) overview of the hydrothermal system; (2) monitoring springs, fumaroles, and wells; (3) monitoring gas emissions; and (4) conclusions and recommendations.

  15. Metagenomes from high-temperature chemotrophic systems reveal geochemical controls on microbial community structure and function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Roberto

    2010-03-01

    The Yellowstone caldera contains the most numerous and diverse geothermal systems on Earth, yielding an extensive array of unique high-temperature environments that host numerous deeply-rooted and understudied Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya. The combination of extreme temperature and chemical conditions encountered in geothermal environments often results in considerably less microbial diversity than other terrestrial habitats and offers a tremendous opportunity for studying the structure and function of indigenous microbial communities and for establishing linkages between putative metabolisms and element cycling. Metagenome sequence (14-15,000 Sanger reads per site) was obtained for five high-temperature (> 65 oC) chemotrophic microbial communities sampled from geothermal springs (or pools) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) that exhibit a wide range in geochemistry including pH, dissolved sulfide, dissolved O2 and ferrous Fe. Metagenome data revealed significant differences in the predominant phyla associated with each of these geochemical environments. Novel members of the Sulfolobales are dominant in low pH environments, while other Crenarchaeota including distantly-related Thermoproteales and Desulfurococcales populations dominate in suboxic sulfidic sediments. Several novel archaeal groups are well represented in an acidic (pH 3) Fe-oxyhydroxide mat, where a higher O2 influx is accompanied with an increase in archaeal diversity. The presence or absence of genes and pathways important in S oxidation-reduction, H2-oxidation, and aerobic respiration (terminal oxidation) provide insight regarding the metabolic strategies of indigenous organisms present in geothermal systems. Multiple-pathway and protein-specific functional analysis of metagenome sequence data corroborated results from phylogenetic analyses and clearly demonstrate major differences in metabolic potential across sites. The distribution of functional genes involved in electron transport is consistent with the hypothesis that geochemical parameters (e.g., pH, sulfide, Fe, O2) control microbial community structure and function in YNP geothermal springs.

  16. Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to Unconfined and Confined Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla; Brown, Christopher F.; Wang, Guohui; Sullivan, E. C.; Lawter, Amanda R.; Harvey, Omar R.; Bowden, Mark

    2013-04-15

    Experimental research work has been conducted and is undergoing at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to address a variety of scientific issues related with the potential leaks of the carbon dioxide (CO2) gas from deep storage reservoirs. The main objectives of this work are as follows: • Develop a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption and redox reactions) in the aquifer sediments. • Identify prevailing environmental conditions that would dictate one geochemical outcome over another. • Gather useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geological carbon sequestration. In this report, we present results from experiments conducted at PNNL to address research issues related to the main objectives of this effort. A series of batch and column experiments and solid phase characterization studies (quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions with a concentrated acid) were conducted with representative rocks and sediments from an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer, i.e., Edwards aquifer in Texas, and a confined aquifer, i.e., the High Plains aquifer in Kansas. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream simulating CO2 gas leaking scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in liquid and effluent samples collected at pre-determined experimental times. Additional research to be conducted during the current fiscal year will further validate these results and will address other important remaining issues. Results from these experimental efforts will provide valuable insights for the development of site-specific, generation III reduced order models. In addition, results will initially serve as input parameters during model calibration runs and, ultimately, will be used to test model predictive capability and competency. The results from these investigations will provide useful information to support site selection, risk assessment, and public education efforts associated with geological, deep subsurface CO2 storage and sequestration.

  17. Quantum Residual Correlation: Interpreting through State Merging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indranil Chakrabarty; Abhishek Deshpande; Sourav Chatterjee

    2015-03-03

    In this brief report we revisit the concept of "quantum dissension", which was introduced as a natural extension of quantum discord for three qubit system. Here we bring in new expression for quantum dissensions and more interestingly we name one such expression as \\textit{residual correlation}. The basic objective behind the introduction of such a quantity is to capture the extra amount of correlation generated by doing measurement in a correlated system from a situation where we do not bring in a correlated system in the measurement process. Apart from this we also present an operational interpretation of this correlation in context of state merging. Remarkably, we find that for three qubit system if one discards relevant prior information, the change in the cost of state merging ( merging the quantum information of two parties into one) is captured by the \\textit{residual correlation}. In addition to that we found that this quantity can be negative for mixed states. This indeed opens up a new dimension in the tripartite scenario where we can observe situations where there is a decrease in the cost of state merging on discarding relevant prior information. We claim that this result establishes a re conceptualization of information processing tasks in tripartite situations where we can use suitable measurement and states to bring down the cost of the protocol.

  18. An alternative interpretation for cosmic ray peaks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Doojin

    2015-01-01

    We propose an alternative mechanism based upon dark matter (DM) interpretation for anomalous peak signatures in cosmic ray measurements, assuming an extended dark sector with two DM species. This is contrasted with previous effort to explain various line-like cosmic-ray excesses in the context of DM models where the relevant DM candidate directly annihilates into Standard Model (SM) particles. The heavier DM is assumed to annihilate to an on-shell intermediate state. As the simplest choice, it decays directly into the lighter DM along with an unstable particle which in turn decays to a pair of SM states corresponding to the interesting cosmic anomaly. We show that a sharp continuum energy peak can be readily generated under the proposed DM scenario, depending on dark sector particle mass spectra. Remarkably, such a peak is robustly identified as half the mass of the unstable particle. Furthermore, other underlying mass parameters are analytically related to the shape of energy spectrum. We apply this idea to ...

  19. INTERPRETATION OF GRAVITY SURVEYS IN GRASS AND BUENA VISTA VALLEYS, NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    resistivity, and seismic interpretations along selectedboth gra- vity and seismic interpretations at several pointsvery well with the seismic interpretation obtained by means

  20. INTERPRETATION OF GRAVITY SURVEYS IN GRASS AND BUENA VISTA VALLEYS, NEVADA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldstein, N.E.

    2011-01-01

    resistivity, and seismic interpretations along selectedboth gra- vity and seismic interpretations at several pointsValley. Gravity and seismic interpretations also give The

  1. Geologic interpretation of gravity and magnetic data in the Salida...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geologic interpretation of gravity and magnetic data in the Salida region, Colorado Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geologic...

  2. Physical Interpretation of the 26 Dimensions of Bosonic String Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank D. Smith Jr

    2002-07-15

    The 26 dimensions of Closed Unoriented Bosonic String Theory are interpreted as the 26 dimensions of the traceless Jordan algebra J3(O)o of 3x3 Octonionic matrices, with each of the 3 Octonionic dimenisons of J3(O)o having the following physical interpretation: 4-dimensional physical spacetime plus 4-dimensional internal symmetry space; 8 first-generation fermion particles; 8 first-generation fermion anti-particles. This interpretation is consistent with interpreting the strings as World Lines of the Worlds of Many-Worlds Quantum Theory and the 26 dimensions as the degrees of freedom of the Worlds of the Many-Worlds.

  3. Sensitivity of the interpretation of the experimental ion thermal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    thermal diffusivity to the determination of the ion conductive heat flux A moments equation formalism for the interpretation of the experimental ion thermal diffusivity from...

  4. Mixture Interpretation Discussion CE User's Group J.M. Butler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    workbook with worked examples · Considering flow charts to aid mixture interpretation · Have discussed of Forensic Genetics · An international organization responsible for

  5. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy Interpretation of New Wells in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Fluid...

  6. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

  7. Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal wells at Coso, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal...

  8. Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Catherine A

    2013-02-28

    Geochemical reactions in deep subsurface environments are complicated by the consolidated nature and mineralogical complexity of sedimentary rocks. Understanding the kinetics of these reactions is critical to our ability to make long-term predictions about subsurface processes such as pH buffering, alteration in rock structure, permeability changes, and formation of secondary precipitates. In this project, we used a combination of experiments and numerical simulation to bridge the gap between our knowledge of these reactions at the lab scale and rates that are meaningful for modeling reactive transport at core scales. The focus is on acid-driven mineral dissolution, which is specifically relevant in the context of CO2-water-rock interactions in geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The project led to major findings in three areas. First, we modeled reactive transport in pore-network systems to investigate scaling effects in geochemical reaction rates. We found significant scaling effects when CO2 concentrations are high and reaction rates are fast. These findings indicate that the increased acidity associated with geological sequestration can generate conditions for which proper scaling tools are yet to be developed. Second, we used mathematical modeling to investigate the extent to which SO2, if co-injected with CO2, would acidify formation brines. We found that there exist realistic conditions in which the impact on brine acidity will be limited due to diffusion rate-limited SO2 dissolution from the CO2 phase, and the subsequent pH shift may also be limited by the lack of availability of oxidants to produce sulfuric acid. Third, for three Viking sandstones (Alberta sedimentary basin, Canada), we employed backscattered electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy to statistically characterize mineral contact with pore space. We determined that for reactive minerals in sedimentary consolidated rocks, abundance alone is not a good predictor of mineral accessible surface area, and should not be used in reactive transport modeling. Our work showed that reaction rates would be overestimated by three to five times.

  9. Geochemical maps showing the distribution and abundance of selected elements in stream-sediment samples, Solomon and Bendeleben 1 degree by 3 degree quadrangles, Seward Peninsula, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, S.C.; King, H.D.; O'Leary, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Geochemical maps showing the distribution and abundance of selected elements in stream-sediment samples, Solomon and Bendeleben 1{degree} by 3{degree} quadrangles, Seward Peninsula, Alaska is presented.

  10. Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical aspects of site-specific studies of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource of southern Louisiana. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilger, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

    1985-01-01

    The report consists of four sections dealing with progress in evaluating geologic, geochemical, and geophysical aspects of geopressured-geothermal energy resources in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual sections. (ACR)

  11. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, Diana H. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Dai, Zhenxue [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Zheng, Liange [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater quality impacts. As part of a system to assess the potential for these impacts a geochemical scaling function has been developed, based on a detailed reactive transport model of CO2 and brine leakage into an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer. Stochastic simulations varying a number of geochemical parameters were used to generate a response surface predicting the volume of aquifer that would be impacted with respect to regulated contaminants. The brine was assumed to contain several trace metals and organic contaminants. Aquifer pH and TDS were influenced by CO2 leakage, while trace metal concentrations were most influenced by the brine concentrations rather than adsorption or desorption on calcite. Organic plume sizes were found to be strongly influenced by biodegradation.

  12. GaMin’11 – an international inter-laboratory comparison for geochemical CO? - saline fluid - mineral interaction experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ostertag-Henning, C.; Risse, A.; Thomas, B.; Rosenbauer, R.; Rochelle, C.; Purser, G.; Kilpatrick, A.; Rosenqvist, J.; Yardley, B.; Karamalidis, A.; et al

    2014-12-31

    Due to the strong interest in geochemical CO?-fluid-rock interaction in the context of geological storage of CO? a growing number of research groups have used a variety of different experimental ways to identify important geochemical dissolution or precipitation reactions and – if possible – quantify the rates and extent of mineral or rock alteration. In this inter-laboratory comparison the gas-fluid-mineral reactions of three samples of rock-forming minerals have been investigated by 11 experimental labs. The reported results point to robust identification of the major processes in the experiments by most groups. The dissolution rates derived from the changes in compositionmore »of the aqueous phase are consistent overall, but the variation could be reduced by using similar corrections for changing parameters in the reaction cells over time. The comparison of experimental setups and procedures as well as of data corrections identified potential improvements for future gas-fluid-rock studies.« less

  13. Improved Geothermometry Through Multivariate Reaction-path Modeling and Evaluation of Geomicrobiological Influences on Geochemical Temperature Indicators: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattson, Earl; Smith, Robert; Fujita, Yoshiko; McLing, Travis; Neupane, Ghanashyam; Palmer, Carl; Reed, David; Thompson, Vicki

    2015-03-01

    The project was aimed at demonstrating that the geothermometric predictions can be improved through the application of multi-element reaction path modeling that accounts for lithologic and tectonic settings, while also accounting for biological influences on geochemical temperature indicators. The limited utilization of chemical signatures by individual traditional geothermometer in the development of reservoir temperature estimates may have been constraining their reliability for evaluation of potential geothermal resources. This project, however, was intended to build a geothermometry tool which can integrate multi-component reaction path modeling with process-optimization capability that can be applied to dilute, low-temperature water samples to consistently predict reservoir temperature within ±30 °C. The project was also intended to evaluate the extent to which microbiological processes can modulate the geochemical signals in some thermal waters and influence the geothermometric predictions.

  14. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and Organic Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Limestone Aquifer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bacon, Diana H.; Dai, Zhenxue; Zheng, Liange

    2014-12-31

    An important risk at CO2 storage sites is the potential for groundwater quality impacts. As part of a system to assess the potential for these impacts a geochemical scaling function has been developed, based on a detailed reactive transport model of CO2 and brine leakage into an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer. Stochastic simulations varying a number of geochemical parameters were used to generate a response surface predicting the volume of aquifer that would be impacted with respect to regulated contaminants. The brine was assumed to contain several trace metals and organic contaminants. Aquifer pH and TDS were influenced by CO2more »leakage, while trace metal concentrations were most influenced by the brine concentrations rather than adsorption or desorption on calcite. Organic plume sizes were found to be strongly influenced by biodegradation.« less

  15. GaMin’11 – an international inter-laboratory comparison for geochemical CO? - saline fluid - mineral interaction experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ostertag-Henning, C. [Federal Inst. for Geosciences and Natural Resesources (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Risse, A. [Federal Inst. for Geosciences and Natural Resesources (BGR), Hannover (Germany); Thomas, B. [United States Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rosenbauer, R. [United States Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Rochelle, C. [British Geological Survey, Nottinghamshire (United Kingdom); Purser, G. [British Geological Survey, Nottinghamshire (United Kingdom); Kilpatrick, A. [British Geological Survey, Nottinghamshire (United Kingdom); Rosenqvist, J. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom); Yardley, B. [Univ. of Leeds (United Kingdom); Karamalidis, A. [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Griffith, C. [National Energy Technology Lab., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hedges, S. [National Energy Technology Lab., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Dilmore, R. [National Energy Technology Lab., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Goodman, A. [National Energy Technology Lab., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Black, J. [Univ. of Melbourne, (Austrialia); Haese, R. [Univ. of Melbourne, (Austrialia); Deusner, C. [hGEOMAR Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research, Kiel (Germany); Bigalke, N. [hGEOMAR Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research, Kiel (Germany); Haeckel, M. [hGEOMAR Helmholtz Center for Ocean Research, Kiel (Germany); Fischer, S. [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam (Germany); Liebscher, A. [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam (Germany); Icenhower, J. P. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Daval, D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Saldi, G. D. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Knauss, K. G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Schmidt, M. [Martin Luther Univ., Halle (Germany); Mito, S. [Research Inst. of Innovative Tech. for the Earth (RITE), Kyoto (Japan); Sorai, M. [National Inst. of Advanced Science and Tech. (AIST) Tsukuba (Japan); Truche, L. [GeoRessources, Universite de Lorraine, Nancy (France)

    2014-12-31

    Due to the strong interest in geochemical CO?-fluid-rock interaction in the context of geological storage of CO? a growing number of research groups have used a variety of different experimental ways to identify important geochemical dissolution or precipitation reactions and – if possible – quantify the rates and extent of mineral or rock alteration. In this inter-laboratory comparison the gas-fluid-mineral reactions of three samples of rock-forming minerals have been investigated by 11 experimental labs. The reported results point to robust identification of the major processes in the experiments by most groups. The dissolution rates derived from the changes in composition of the aqueous phase are consistent overall, but the variation could be reduced by using similar corrections for changing parameters in the reaction cells over time. The comparison of experimental setups and procedures as well as of data corrections identified potential improvements for future gas-fluid-rock studies.

  16. GaMin’11 – an International Inter-laboratory Comparison for Geochemical CO2 - Saline Fluid - Mineral Interaction Experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ostertag-Henning, C.; Risse, A.; Thomas, B.; Rosenbauer, R.; Rochelle, C.; Purser, G.; Kilpatrick,; Rosenqvist, J.; Yardley, B.; Karamalidis, A.; et al

    2014-01-01

    Due to the strong interest in geochemical CO2-fluid-rock interaction in the context of geological storage of CO2 a growing number of research groups have used a variety of different experimental ways to identify important geochemical dissolution or precipitation reactions and – if possible – quantify the rates and extent of mineral or rock alteration. In this inter-laboratory comparison the gas-fluid-mineral reactions of three samples of rock-forming minerals have been investigated by 11 experimental labs. The reported results point to robust identification of the major processes in the experiments by most groups. The dissolution rates derived from the changes in compositionmore »of the aqueous phase are consistent overall, but the variation could be reduced by using similar corrections for changing parameters in the reaction cells over time. The comparison of experimental setups and procedures as well as of data corrections identified potential improvements for future gas-fluid-rock studies.« less

  17. Microbial distributions detected by an oligonucleotide microarray across geochemical zones associated with methane in marine sediments from the Ulleung Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, Brandon R.; Graw, Michael; Brodie, Eoin L.; Bahk, Jang-Jun; Kim, Sung-Han; Hyun, Jung-Ho; Kim, Ji-Hoon; Torres, Marta; Colwell, Frederick S.

    2013-11-01

    The biogeochemical processes that occur in marine sediments on continental margins are complex; however, from one perspective they can be considered with respect to three geochemical zones based on the presence and form of methane: sulfate–methane transition (SMTZ), gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and free gas zone (FGZ). These geochemical zones may harbor distinct microbial communities that are important in biogeochemical carbon cycles. The objective of this study was to describe the microbial communities in sediments from the SMTZ, GHSZ, and FGZ using molecular ecology methods (i.e. PhyloChip microarray analysis and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP)) and examining the results in the context of non-biological parameters in the sediments. Non-metric multidimensional scaling and multi-response permutation procedures were used to determine whether microbial community compositions were significantly different in the three geochemical zones and to correlate samples with abiotic characteristics of the sediments. This analysis indicated that microbial communities from all three zones were distinct from one another and that variables such as sulfate concentration, hydrate saturation of the nearest gas hydrate layer, and depth (or unmeasured variables associated with depth e.g. temperature, pressure) were correlated to differences between the three zones. The archaeal anaerobic methanotrophs typically attributed to performing anaerobic oxidation of methane were not detected in the SMTZ; however, the marine benthic group-B, which is often found in SMTZ, was detected. Within the GHSZ, samples that were typically closer to layers that contained higher hydrate saturation had indicator sequences related to Vibrio-type taxa. These results suggest that the biogeographic patterns of microbial communities in marine sediments are distinct based on geochemical zones defined by methane.

  18. CX-012479: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Assessing the Geochemical Response of CO2 Disposal in Flood Basalt Reservoirs CX(s) Applied: B3.6Date: 41862 Location(s): IllinoisOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  19. CX-012481: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Assessing the Geochemical Response of CO2 Disposal in Flood Basalt Reservoirs CX(s) Applied: B3.1, B3.6Date: 41862 Location(s): CaliforniaOffices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  20. A hydrogeological and geochemical model of the high-temperature geothermal system of Amatitlan, Guatemala

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lima, E.; Fujino, T. [West Japan Engineering Consultants, Inc., Fukuoka (Japan); McNitt, J.R.; Klein, C.W. [GeothermEx, Inc., Richmond, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Geological, geophysical and geochemical data from deep and shallow wells indicate the presence of a large geothermal system fed by upflow beneath Volcan de Pacaya, with source temperatures {ge} 330{degrees}C and chloride contents on the order of 2,500 mg/l. A considerable contribution of magmatic water is suggested by chemical and isotopic data, provided that water-rock interactions have substantially neutralized the acidity of the magmatic component. The areal extent of the upflow zone is unknown, and can only be delimited by further drilling to the south and southeast of deep well AMF-2, which encounters the two-phase upflow zone. Outflow is directed to the north, towards Lago de Amatitlan. The outflow path is long (more than 7 km), and lateral cooling occurs both via conduction and dilution with cool groundwater. Vertical cooling is also indicated by temperature reversals of up to 60{degrees}C beneath the outflow tongue, attributed to a regional underflow of cool groundwater. Outflow paths do not appear to be controlled by geologic structures or aquifers; instead, the hot water appears to {open_quotes}float{close_quotes} on top of the gently sloping unconfined groundwater table. These aspects of the geothermal system were used to develop the numerical model of the Amatitlan geothermal system, which is the subject of a separate paper.

  1. The time course of discourse priming in the interpretation of conceptual combinations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sappington, Randy Earl

    2006-10-30

    that express an interpretation that is more consistent with the interpreter?s existing knowledge of the constituent concepts are more strongly activated and, thus, lead people to a default interpretation for the phrase. To test relations, Gagn? and her...

  2. 3-D Interpretation of Sewer Circular Structures Marina Kolesnik,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolesnik, Marina

    3-D Interpretation of Sewer Circular Structures Marina Kolesnik, Institute for Autonomous interpretation of images taken in a sewer by a robot-inspector is presented. Modern sewers made of concrete sections. These pipe ends and joints provide regular marks on the sewer images and can be used for their 3

  3. HOMOGENEOUS 1-BASED STRUCTURES AND INTERPRETABILITY IN RANDOM STRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Djordjevic, Vera

    HOMOGENEOUS 1-BASED STRUCTURES AND INTERPRETABILITY IN RANDOM STRUCTURES VERA KOPONEN Abstract. Let -structure which is homogeneous, simple and 1- based. The rst main result says that if M is, in addition, primitive, then it is strongly interpretable in a random structure. The second main result, which

  4. Expressive Visualization and Rapid Interpretation of Seismic Volumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Expressive Visualization and Rapid Interpretation of Seismic Volumes Daniel Patel Thesis, Christopher Giertsen, John Thurmond, Eduard Gr¨oller The Seismic Analyzer: Interpreting and Illustrating 2D of Seismic Data Published in: Vision, Modelling and Visualization (VMV) 2007 Authors: Daniel Patel

  5. A posteriori soundness for non-deterministic abstract interpretations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Might, Matt

    . In abstract interpretation, speed and precision are a function of the abstract allocation policy. By abstract://www.ccs.neu.edu/~pete/ Abstract. An abstract interpretation's resource-allocation policy (e.g., one heap summary node per allocation site) largely determines both its speed and precision. Historically, context has driven allocation

  6. The Emergence and Interpretation of Probability in Bohmian Mechanics1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callender, Craig

    The Emergence and Interpretation of Probability in Bohmian Mechanics1 The Bohm interpretation of quantum mechanics is capable of illustrating, by itself, virtually every philosophical and foundational comes in many forms, both stochastic and deterministic. The other reason is that quantum mechanics

  7. ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 121 Interpreting Pictures of Polyhedral Scenes*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackworth, Alan K.

    ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE 121 Interpreting Pictures of Polyhedral Scenes* A. K. Mackworth Laboratory of predetermined interpretations of particular categories of picture junctions and corners. 1. Introduction One way to capture the meaning of pictures is to investigate the relationship between two domains: the picture

  8. Automated analysis and interpretation of long-term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maher, Robert C.

    Automated analysis and interpretation of long-term soundscape audio recordings Robert C. Maher Electrical and Computer Engineering Montana State University - Bozeman #12;Outline · Introduction · Long · Interpretation and presentation is difficult due to extreme length of the data · What is needed: ­ Automated

  9. Interpretation of storage field well casing surface potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabkowski, J.

    1987-01-01

    The shape of a well casing-to-soil potential gradient surface profile is influenced by many variables. Hence, the interpretation of such field data can be difficult. The paper illustrates how such factors as layered ground resistivity, polarization potential variations with depth, and external interference affect the profiles and, therefore, the interpretation of field data.

  10. Geochemical Data Package for the 2005 Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Kaplan, D I.

    2004-09-30

    CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is designing and assessing the performance of an integrated disposal facility (IDF) to receive low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW), and failed or decommissioned melters. The CH2M HILL project to assess the performance of this disposal facility is the Hanford IDF Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of the Hanford IDF PA activity is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the vadose zone to groundwater where contaminants may be re-introduced to receptors via drinking water wells or mixing in the Columbia River. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists CH2M HILL in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the IDF, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (Kd) and the thermodynamic solubility product (Ksp), respectively. In this data package, we approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. The Kd values and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the IDF system. In addition to the best-estimate Kd values, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. The data package does not list estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, the data package does provide different values for both the Kd values and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the IDF system and does supply time-varying Kd values for the cement solidified waste. The Kd values and solution concentration limits presented for each contaminant were previously presented in a report prepared by Kaplan and Serne (2000) for the 2001 ILAW PA, and have been updated to include applicable data from investigations completed since the issuance of that report and improvements in our understanding of the geochemistry specific to Hanford. A discussion is also included of the evolution of the Kd values recommended from the original 1999 ILAW PA through the 2001 ILAW and 2003 Supplement PAs to the current values to be used for the 2005 IDF PA for the key contaminants of concern: Cr(VI), nitrate, 129I, 79Se, 99Tc, and U(VI). This discussion provides the rationale for why certain Kd have changed with time.

  11. Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

  12. Geochemical engineering design tools for uranium in situ recovery : the HYDROGEOCHEM codes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Li, Ming-Hsu; Yeh, Gour-Tsyh

    2010-11-01

    Geochemical Engineering Design (GED) is based on applications of the principles and various computer models that describe the biogeochemistry and physics of removal of contaminants from water by adsorption, precipitation and filtration. It can be used to optimize or evaluate the efficiency of all phases of in situ recovery (ISR). The primary tools of GED are reactive transport models; this talk describes the potential application of the HYDROGEOCHEM family of codes to ISR. The codes can describe a complete suite of equilibrium or kinetic aqueous complexation, adsorption-desorption, precipitation-dissolution, redox, and acid-base reactions in variably saturated media with density-dependent fluid flow. Applications to ISR are illustrated with simulations of (1) the effectiveness of a reactive barrier to prevent off-site uranium migration and (2) evaluation of the effect of sorption hysteresis on natural attenuation. In the first example, it can be seen that the apparent effectiveness of the barrier depends on monitoring location and that it changes over time. This is due to changes in pH, saturation of sorption sites, as well as the geometry of the flow field. The second simulation shows how sorption hysteresis leads to observable attenuation of a uranium contamination plume. Different sorption mechanisms including fast (or reversible), slow, and irreversible sorption were simulated. The migration of the dissolved and total uranium plumes for the different cases are compared and the simulations show that when 50-100% of the sites have slow desorption rates, the center of mass of the dissolved uranium plume begins to move upstream. This would correspond to the case in which the plume boundaries begin to shrink as required for demonstration of natural attenuation.

  13. Characterizing Microbial Community and Geochemical Dynamics at Hydrothermal Vents Using Osmotically Driven Continuous Fluid Samplers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robidart, Julie C.; Callister, Stephen J.; Song, Peng F.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wheat, Charles G.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-05-07

    Microbes play a key role in mediating all aquatic biogeochemical cycles, and ongoing efforts are aimed at better understanding the relationships between microbial phylogenetic and physiological diversity, and habitat physical and chemical characteristics. Establishing such relationships is facilitated by sampling and studying microbiology and geochemistry at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales, to access information on the past and current environmental state that contributes to observed microbial abundances and activities. A modest number of sampling systems exist to date, few of which can be used in remote, harsh environments such as hydrothermal vents, where the ephemeral nature of venting underscores the necessity for higher resolution sampling. We have developed a robust, continuous fluid sampling system for co-registered microbial and biogeochemical analyses. The osmosis-powered bio-osmosampling system (BOSS) use no electricity, collects fluids with daily resolution or better, can be deployed in harsh, inaccessible environments and can sample fluids continuously for up to five years. Here we present a series of tests to examine DNA, RNA and protein stability over time, as well as material compatability, via lab experiments. We also conducted two field deployments at deep-sea hydrothermal vents to assess changes in microbial diversity and protein expression as a function of the physico-chemical environment. Our data reveal significant changes in microbial community composition co-occurring with relatively modest changes in the geochemistry. These data additionally provide new insights into the distribution of an enigmatic sulfur oxidizing symbiont in its free-living state. Data from the second deployment reveal differences in the representation of peptides over time, underscoring the utility of the BOSS in meta-proteomic studies. In concert, these data demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, and illustrate the value of using this method to study microbial and geochemical phenomena.

  14. Geochemical information for sites contaminated with low-level radioactive wastes. III. Weldon Spring Storage Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seeley, F.G.; Kelmers, A.D.

    1985-02-01

    The Weldon Spring Storage Site (WSSS), which includes both the chemical site and the quarry, became radioactively contaminated as the result of wastes that were being stored from operations to recover uranium from pitchblende ores in the 1940s and 1950s. The US Department of Energy (DOE) is considering various remedial action options for the WSSS. This report describes the results of geochemical investigations carried out at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to support these activities and to help quantify various remedial action options. Soil and groundwater samples were characterized, and uranium and radium sorption ratios were measured in site soil/groundwater systems by batch contact methodology. Soil samples from various locations around the raffinate pits were found to contain major amounts of silica, along with illite as the primary clay constituent. Particle sizes of the five soil samples were variable (50% distribution point ranging from 12 to 81 ..mu..m); the surface areas varied from 13 to 62 m/sup 2//g. Elemental analysis of the samples showed them to be typical of sandy clay and silty clay soils. Groundwater samples included solution from Pit 3 and well water from Well D. Anion analyses showed significant concentrations of sulfate and nitrate (>350 and >7000 mg/L, respectively) in the solution from Pit 3. These anions were also present in the well water, but in lower concentrations. Uranium sorption ratios for four of the soil samples contacted with the solution from Pit 3 were moderate to high (approx. 300 to approx. 1000 mL/g). The fifth sample had a ratio of only 12 mL/g. Radium sorption ratios for the five samples were moderate to high (approx. 600 to approx. 1000 mL/g). These values indicate that soil at the WSSS may show favorable retardation of uranium and radium in the groundwater. 13 references, 13 figures, 10 tables.

  15. Geochemical Evidence of the Seasonality, Affinity and Pigmenation of Solenopora jurassica

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Barden, Holly E.; Behnsen, Julia; Bergmann, Uwe; Leng, Melanie J.; Manning, Phillip L.; Withers, Philip J.; Wogelius, Roy A.; van Dongen, Bart E.; Silva, Lucas C. R.

    2015-09-14

    Solenopora jurassica is a fossil calcareous alga that functioned as an important reef-building organism during the Palaeozoic. It is of significant palaeobiological interest due to its distinctive but poorly understood pink and white banding. Though widely accepted as an alga there is still debate over its taxonomic affinity, with recent work arguing that it should be reclassified as a chaetetid sponge. The banding is thought to be seasonal, but there is no conclusive evidence for this. Other recent work has, however demonstrated the presence of a unique organic boron-containing pink/red pigment in the pink bands of S. jurassica. We presentmore »new geochemical evidence concerning the seasonality and pigmentation of S. jurassica. Seasonal growth cycles are demonstrated by X-ray radiography, which shows differences in calcite density, and by varying ?13C composition of the bands. Temperature variation in the bands is difficult to constrain accurately due to conflicting patterns arising from Mg/Ca molar ratios and ?18O data. Fluctuating chlorine levels indicate increased salinity in the white bands, when combined with the isotope data this suggests more suggestive of marine conditions during formation of the white band and a greater freshwater component (lower chlorinity) during pink band precipitation (?18O). Increased photosynthesis is inferred within the pink bands in comparison to the white, based on ?13C. Pyrolysis Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (Py-GCMS) and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) show the presence of tetramethyl pyrrole, protein moieties and carboxylic acid groups, suggestive of the presence of the red algal pigment phycoerythrin. This is consistent with the pink colour of S. jurassica. As phycoerythrin is only known to occur in algae and cyanobacteria, and no biomarker evidence of bacteria or sponges was detected we conclude S. jurassica is most likely an alga. Pigment analysis may be a reliable classification method for fossil algae.« less

  16. Interpreting noncoding genetic variation in complex traits and human disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellis, Manolis

    Association studies provide genome-wide information about the genetic basis of complex disease, but medical research has focused primarily on protein-coding variants, owing to the difficulty of interpreting noncoding ...

  17. An Analyst's Assistant for the Interpretation of Vehicle Track Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchardt, Gary

    2014-10-08

    This report describes the Analyst's Assistant, a software system for language-interactive, collaborative user-system interpretation of events, specifically targeting vehicle events that can be recognized on the basis of ...

  18. Interpretation of Multiparty Meetings: The AMI and AMIDA Projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renals, Steve; Hain, Thomas; Bourlard, Herve

    2008-01-01

    The AMI and AMIDA projects are collaborative EU projects concerned with the automatic recognition and interpretation of multiparty meetings. This paper provides an overview of the advances we have made in these projects ...

  19. Recognition and interpretation of meetings: The AMI and AMIDA projects 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renals, Steve; Hain, Thomas; Bourlard, Herve

    2007-01-01

    The AMI and AMIDA projects are concerned with the recognition and interpretation of multiparty meetings. Within these projects we have: developed an infrastructure for recording meetings using multiple microphones and ...

  20. Interpretation and aggregation of marks in classroom learning partner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Kenneth D

    2008-01-01

    This thesis explores the mark understanding problem in the context of a Tablet-PC-based classroom interaction system. It presents a novel method for interpreting digital ink strokes on background images, and aggregating ...

  1. DOE interpretations Guide to OSH standards. Update to the Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-31

    Reflecting Secretary O`Leary`s focus on occupational safety and health, the Office of Occupational Safety is pleased to provide you with the latest update to the DOE Interpretations Guide to OSH Standards. This Guide was developed in cooperation with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which continued its support during this last revision by facilitating access to the interpretations found on the OSHA Computerized Information System (OCIS). This March 31, 1994 update contains 123 formal interpretation letters written by OSHA. As a result of the unique requests received by the 1-800 Response Line, this update also contains 38 interpretations developed by DOE. This new occupational safety and health information adds still more important guidance to the four volume reference set that you presently have in your possession.

  2. DOE interpretations Guide to OSH standards. Update to the Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-31

    Reflecting Secretary O`Leary`s focus on occupational safety and health, the Office of Occupational Safety is pleased to provide you with the latest update to the DOE Interpretations Guide to OSH Standards. This Guide was developed in cooperation with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which continued its support during this last revision by facilitating access to the interpretations found on the OSHA Computerized Information System (OCIS). This March 31, 1994 update contains 123 formal interpretation letters written OSHA. As a result of the unique requests received by the 1-800 Response Line, this update also contains 38 interpretations developed by DOE. This new occupational safety and health information adds still more important guidance to the four volume reference set that you presently have in your possession.

  3. Interpretation of searches for supersymmetry with simplified models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apyan, Aram

    The results of searches for supersymmetry by the CMS experiment are interpreted in the framework of simplified models. The results are based on data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.73 to 4.98??fb[superscript ...

  4. Chemical analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chemical analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from the CGEH No. 1 geothermal well at Coso, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  5. Automating Elementary Interpretations Harald Zankl, Sarah Winkler, and Aart Middeldorp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Middeldorp, Aart

    -base elementary interpretation function (FBI) of depth 0 is a linear function f(x) = 1 i n xifi + f0 and an FBI) is an FBI of depth d, and b 2 is a fixed natural number. We use the abbreviations f(x) = 1 i n xifi + f0 and ^f(x) = 1 i n xi ^fi + ^f0. An FBI algebra has N 1 as carrier and FBIs as interpretation functions

  6. The Last First Contact: An Eco-Cultural Interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cushman, Gregory T.

    2007-01-01

    KU ScholarWorks | http://kuscholarworks.ku.edu The Last First Contact: An Eco-Cultural Interpretation 2007 by Gregory T. Cushman This work has been made available by the University of Kansas Libraries’ Office of Scholarly Communication...): 304-307. Special forum on environmental films. Available at http://www.jstor.org/stable/25473075 The Last First Contact: An Eco-Cultural Interpretation by Gregory T. Cushman In 1336, a group of indigenous farmers and herders watched as an Iberian...

  7. The Montevideo Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics: a short review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodolfo Gambini; Jorge Pullin

    2015-02-11

    The Montevideo interpretation of quantum mechanics, which consists in supplementing environmental decoherence with fundamental limitations in measurement stemming from gravity, has been described in several publications. However, some of them appeared before the full picture provided by the interpretation was developed. As such it can be difficult to get a good understanding via the published literature. Here we summarize it in a self contained brief presentation including all its principal elements.

  8. Gravity interpretation of the northern Overthrust Belt, Idaho and Wyoming 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silver, Wendy Ilene

    1979-01-01

    GRAVITY INTERPRETATION OF THE NORTHERN OVERTHRUST BELT, IDAHO AND 'vlYOMING A Thesis by IJENDY ILENE SILVER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the deoree of MASTER... OF SCIFNCE December 1979 Major Subject: Geology GRAVITY INTERPRETATION OF THE NORTHERN OVERTHRUST lIELT, . IDAHO AND NYOMING A Thesis by NENDY ILEI'lE 5!, LVER Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee (Hea o epartment (i~1embe...

  9. ENZYME ACTIVITY PROBE AND GEOCHEMICAL ASSESSMENT FOR POTENTIAL AEROBIC COMETABOLISM OF TRICHLOROETHENE IN GROUNDWATER OF THE NORTHWEST PLUME, PADUCAH GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT, KENTUCKY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, B; M. Hope Lee, M; S. K. Hampson, S

    2008-06-27

    The overarching objective of the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) enzyme activity probe (EAP) effort is to determine if aerobic cometabolism is contributing to the attenuation of trichloroethene (TCE) and other chlorinated solvents in the contaminated groundwater beneath PGDP. The site-specific objective for the EAP assessment is to identify if key metabolic pathways are present and expressed in the microbial community--namely the pathways that are responsible for degradation of methane and aromatic (e.g. toluene, benzene, phenol) substrates. The enzymes produced to degrade methane and aromatic compounds also break down TCE through a process known as cometabolism. EAPs directly measure if methane and/or aromatic enzyme production pathways are operating and, for the aromatic pathways, provide an estimate of the number of active organisms in the sampled groundwater. This study in the groundwater plumes at PGDP is a major part of a larger scientific effort being conducted by Interstate Technology and Regulatory Council (ITRC), U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environmental Management (EM), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and North Wind Inc. in which EAPs are being applied to contaminated groundwater from diverse hydrogeologic and plume settings throughout the U.S. to help standardize their application as well as their interpretation. While EAP data provide key information to support the site specific objective for PGDP, several additional lines of evidence are being evaluated to increase confidence in the determination of the occurrence of biodegradation and the rate and sustainability of aerobic cometabolism. These complementary efforts include: (1) Examination of plume flowpaths and comparison of TCE behavior to 'conservative' tracers in the plume (e.g., {sup 99}Tc); (2) Evaluation of geochemical conditions throughout the plume; and (3) Evaluation of stable isotopes in the contaminants and their daughter products throughout the plume. If the multiple lines of evidence support the occurrence of cometabolism and the potential for the process to contribute to temporal and spatial attenuation of TCE in PGDP groundwater, then a follow-up enzyme probe microcosm study to better estimate biological degradation rate(s) is warranted.

  10. Structural Analysis for Gold Mineralization Using Remote Sensing and Geochemical Techniques in a GIS Environment: Island of Lesvos, Hellas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rokos, D. Argialas, D. Mavrantza, R. St Seymour, K.; Vamvoukakis, C.; Kouli, M.; Lamera, S.; Paraskevas, H.; Karfakis, I.; Denes, G

    2000-12-15

    Exploration for epithermal Au has been active lately in the Aegean Sea of the eastern Mediterranean Basin, both in the islands of the Quaternary arc and in those of the back-arc region. The purpose of this study was the structural mapping and analysis for a preliminary investigation of possible epithermal gold mineralization, using remotely sensed data and techniques, structural and field data, and geochemical information, for a specific area on the Island of Lesvos. Therefore, Landsat-TM and SPOT-Pan satellite images and the Digital Elevation Model (DEM) of the study area were processed digitally using spatial filtering techniques for the enhancement and recognition of the geologically significant lineaments, as well as algebraic operations with band ratios and Principal Component Analysis (PCA), for the identification of alteration zones. Statistical rose diagrams and a SCHMIDT projection Stereo Net were generated from the lineament maps and the collected field data (dip and strike measurements of faults, joints, and veins), respectively. The derived lineament map and the band ratio images were manipulated in a GIS environment, in order to study the relation of the tectonic pattern to both the alteration zoning and the geomorphology of the volcanic field of the study area. Target areas of high interest for possible mineralization also were specified using geochemical techniques, such as X-Ray Diffraction (XRD) analysis, trace-element, and fluid-inclusion analysis. Finally, preliminary conclusions were derived about possible mineralization, the type (high or low sulfidation), and the extent of mineralization, by combining the structural information with geochemical information.

  11. GIS Regional Spatial Data from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy: Geochemical, Geodesic, Geologic, Geophysical, Geothermal, and Groundwater Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The center also makes its collections of spatial data available for direct download to the public. Data are in Lambert Conformable Conic Projection.

  12. Geochemical Impacts of Leaking CO2 from Subsurface Storage Reservoirs to an Unconfined Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Guohui; Qafoku, Nikolla; Lawter, Amanda R.; Bowden, Mark E.; Harvey, Omar; Sullivan, E. C.; Brown, Christopher F.

    2015-07-15

    A series of batch and column experiments combined with solid phase characterization studies (i.e., quantitative x-ray diffraction and wet chemical extractions) were conducted to address a variety of scientific issues and evaluate the impacts of the potential leakage of carbon dioxide (CO2) from deep subsurface storage reservoirs. The main objective was to gain an understanding of how CO2 gas influences: 1) the aqueous phase pH; and 2) mobilization of major, minor, and trace elements from minerals present in an aquifer overlying potential CO2 sequestration subsurface repositories. Rocks and slightly weathered rocks representative of an unconfined, oxidizing carbonate aquifer within the continental US, i.e., the Edwards aquifer in Texas, were used in these studies. These materials were exposed to a CO2 gas stream or were leached with a CO2-saturated influent solution to simulate different CO2 gas leakage scenarios, and changes in aqueous phase pH and chemical composition were measured in the liquid samples collected at pre-determined experimental times (batch experiments) or continuously (column experiments). The results from the strong acid extraction tests confirmed that in addition to the usual elements present in most soils, rocks, and sediments, the Edward aquifer samples contain As, Cd, Pb, Cu, and occasionally Zn, which may potentially be mobilized from the solid to the aqueous phase during or after exposure to CO2. The results from the batch and column experiments confirmed the release of major chemical elements into the contacting aqueous phase (such as Ca, Mg, Ba, Sr, Si, Na, and K); the mobilization and possible rapid immobilization of minor elements (such as Fe, Al, and Mn), which are able to form highly reactive secondary phases; and sporadic mobilization of only low concentrations of trace elements (such as As, Cd, Pb, Cu, Zn, Mo, etc.). The results from this experimental research effort will help in developing a systematic understanding of how CO2 leakage is likely to influence pertinent geochemical processes (e.g., dissolution/precipitation, sorption/desorption) in the aquifer sediments and will support site selection, risk assessment, policy-making, and public education efforts associated with geologic carbon sequestration.

  13. Final Report: Molecular Basis for Microbial Adhesion and Geochemical Surface Reactions: A Study Across Scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, David Adams

    2013-06-27

    Computational chemistry was used to help provide a molecular level description of the interactions of Gram-negative microbial membranes with subsurface materials. The goal is to develop a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in microbial metal binding, microbial attachment to mineral surfaces, and, eventually, oxidation/reduction reactions (electron transfer) that can occur at these surfaces and are mediated by the bacterial exterior surface. The project focused on the interaction of the outer microbial membrane, which is dominated by an exterior lipopolysaccharide (LPS) portion, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with the mineral goethite and with solvated ions in the environment. This was originally a collaborative project with T.P. Straatsma and B. Lowery of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The University of Alabama effort used electronic structure calculations to predict the molecular behavior of ions in solution and the behavior of the sugars which form a critical part of the LPS. The interactions of the sugars with metal ions are expected to dominate much of the microscopic structure and transport phenomena in the LPS. This work, in combination with the molecular dynamics simulations of Straatsma and the experimental electrochemistry and microscopy measurements of Lowry, both at PNNL, is providing new insights into the detailed molecular behavior of these membranes in geochemical environments. The effort at The University of Alabama has three components: solvation energies and structures of ions in solution, prediction of the acidity of the critical groups in the sugars in the LPS, and binding of metal ions to the sugar anions. An important aspect of the structure of the LPS membrane as well as ion transport in the LPS is the ability of the sugar side groups such as the carboxylic acids and the phosphates to bind positively charged ions. We are studying the acidity of the acidic side groups in order to better understand the ability of these groups to bind metal ions. We need to understand the solvation properties of the metal ions in solution and their ability to bind not only to the sugars but to proteins and to other anions. Our goal is then to be able to predict the ability of the side groups to bind metal ions. One result from the earlier molecular dynamics simulations is the exclusion of water from the inner hydrophobic part of the membrane. We thus need to investigate the binding of the cations in media with different dielectric constants.

  14. GEOCHEMICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF CO?-BRINE-ROCK INTERACTIONS OF THE KNOX GROUP IN THE ILLINOIS BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoksoulian, Lois; Berger, Peter; Freiburg, Jared; Butler, Shane; Leetaru, Hannes

    2014-09-30

    Increased output of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide (CO?), into the atmosphere from anthropogenic sources is of great concern. A potential technology to reduce CO? emissions is geologic carbon sequestration. This technology is currently being evaluated in the United States and throughout the world. The geology of the Illinois Basin exhibits outstanding potential as a carbon sequestration target, as demonstrated by the ongoing Illinois Basin – Decatur Project that is using the Mt. Simon Sandstone reservoir and Eau Claire Shale seal system to store and contain 1 million tonnes of CO?. The Knox Group-Maquoketa Shale reservoir and seal system, located stratigraphically above the Mt. Simon Sandstone-Eau Claire Shale reservoir and seal system, has little economic value as a resource for fossil fuels or as a potable water source, making it ideal as a potential carbon sequestration target. In order for a reservoir-seal system to be effective, it must be able to contain the injected CO? without the potential for the release of harmful contaminants liberated by the reaction between CO?-formation fluids and reservoir and seal rocks. This study examines portions of the Knox Group (Potosi Dolomite, Gunter Sandstone, New Richmond Sandstone) and St. Peter Sandstone, and Maquoketa Shale from various locations around the Illinois Basin. A total of 14 rock and fluid samples were exposed to simulated sequestration conditions (9101–9860 kPa [1320–1430 psi] and 32°–42°C [90°– 108°F]) for varying amounts of time (6 hours to 4 months). Knox Group reservoir rocks exhibited dissolution of dolomite in the presence of CO? as indicated by petrographic examination, X-ray diffraction analysis, and fluid chemistry analysis. These reactions equilibrated rapidly, and geochemical modeling confirmed that these reactions reached equilibrium within the time frames of the experiments. Pre-reaction sample mineralogy and postreaction fluid geochemistry from this study suggests only limited potential for the release of United States Environmental Protection Agency regulated inorganic contaminants into potable water sources. Short-term core flood experiments further verify that the carbonate reactions occurring in Knox Group reservoir samples reach equilibrium rapidly. The core flood experiments also lend insight to pressure changes that may occur during CO? injection. The Maquoketa Shale experiments reveal that this rock is initially chemically reactive when in contact with CO? and brine. However, due to the conservative nature of silicate and clay reaction kinetics and the rapid equilibration of carbonate reactions that occur in the shale, these reactions would not present a significant risk to the competency of the shale as an effective seal rock.

  15. A "Lorentz-Poincare"-Type Interpretation of Relativistic Gravitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan; Broekaert

    2005-10-05

    The nature of 'time', 'space' and 'reality' are to large extent dependent on our interpretation of Special (SRT) and General Relativity Theory (GRT). In SRT essentially two distinct interpretations exist; the "geometrical" interpretation by Einstein based on the Principle of Relativity and the Invariance of the velocity of light and, the "physical" Lorentz-Poincar\\'e interpretation with underpinning by rod contractions, clock slowing and light synchronization, see e.g. (Bohm 1965, Bell 1987). It can be questioned whether the "Lorentz-Poincar\\'e"-interpretation of SRT can be continued into GRT. We have shown that till first Post-Newtonian order this is indeed possible (Broekaert 2004). This requires the introduction of gravitationally modified Lorentz transformations, with an intrinsical spatially-variable speed of light $c(r)$, a scalar scaling field $\\Phi$ and induced velocity field $w$. Still the invariance of the locally observed velocity of light is maintained (Broekaert 2005). The Hamiltonian description of particles and photons recovers the 1-PN approximation of GRT. At present we show the model does obey the Weak Equivalence Principle from a fixed perspective, and that the implied acceleration transformations are equivalent with those of GRT.

  16. Application of geochemical techniques to deduce the reservoir performance of the Palinpinon Geothermal Field, Philippines - an update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramos-Candelaria, M.N.; Garcia, S.E.; Hermoso, D.Z.

    1997-12-31

    Regular monitoring of various geochemical parameters in the water and vapor phases of the production wells at the Palinpinon I and II sectors of the Southern Negros Geothermal Field have been useful in the identification of the dominant reservoir processes occurring related to the present exploitation strategy. Observed geochemical and physical changes in the output of production wells have dictated production and injection strategies adopted to maximize production to meet the steam requirements of the power plant. Correlation of both physical and chemical data have identified the following reservoir processes: (1) Injection breakthrough via the Ticala Fault of the highly mineralized (Cl {approximately}8,000-10,500 mg/kg), isotopically enriched ({delta}{sup 18}O = -3.00{per_thousand}, {delta}{sup 2} H = -39{per_thousand}), and gas depleted brine for wells in the SW and central Puhagan. Injection breakthrough is also occurring in Palinpinon II and has resulted in temperature drops of 5-10{degrees}C.2. Pressure drawdown enhanced boiling in the liquid reservoir with steam separation of 220-240{degrees}C, feeding wells tapping the natural steam zone. However, enhanced drawdown has induced the entry of shallow acid steam condensate fluids in some wells (e.g. OK-7, PN-29D, PN-18D), which if not arrested could reduce production.

  17. Computational Intelligence for Deepwater Reservoir Depositional Environments Interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Tina; Clark, Julian; Sullivan, Morgan; 10.1016/j.jngse.2011.07.014

    2013-01-01

    Predicting oil recovery efficiency of a deepwater reservoir is a challenging task. One approach to characterize a deepwater reservoir and to predict its producibility is by analyzing its depositional information. This research proposes a deposition-based stratigraphic interpretation framework for deepwater reservoir characterization. In this framework, one critical task is the identification and labeling of the stratigraphic components in the reservoir, according to their depositional environments. This interpretation process is labor intensive and can produce different results depending on the stratigrapher who performs the analysis. To relieve stratigrapher's workload and to produce more consistent results, we have developed a novel methodology to automate this process using various computational intelligence techniques. Using a well log data set, we demonstrate that the developed methodology and the designed workflow can produce finite state transducer models that interpret deepwater reservoir depositional...

  18. The oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity and attenuation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asthenosphere Seismic attenuation Seismic velocity Anelasticity Partial melt Combined interpretation of seismicThe oceanic and cratonic upper mantle: Clues from joint interpretation of global velocity anelastic dispersion (Karato and Jung, 1998; Karato, 2003). A unique interpretation of seismological models

  19. Linear Regression Sample Proportions Interpretation of the Confidence Interval Interval Estimation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watkins, Joseph C.

    Linear Regression Sample Proportions Interpretation of the Confidence Interval Topic 16 Interval Estimation Additional Topics 1 / 9 #12;Linear Regression Sample Proportions Interpretation of the Confidence Interval Outline Linear Regression Sample Proportions Interpretation of the Confidence Interval 2 / 9 #12

  20. Reading Tea Leaves: How Humans Interpret Topic Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd-Graber, Jordan

    Reading Tea Leaves: How Humans Interpret Topic Models Jonathan Chang Jordan Boyd-Graber Sean, Blei Reading Tea Leaves #12;Topic Models in a Nutshell From an input corpus words to topics Forget Red Light, Green Light: A 2-Tone L.E.D. to Simplify Screens Corpus Chang, Boyd-Graber, Wang, Gerrish

  1. Interpretation of snow properties from imaging spectrometry Jeff Dozier a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Interpretation of snow properties from imaging spectrometry Jeff Dozier a, , Robert O. Green b in revised form 11 June 2007 Accepted 27 July 2007 Available online xxxx Keywords: Snow Remote sensing Imaging spectrometry Snow is among the most "colorful" materials in nature, but most of the variability

  2. THEORETICAL INTERPRETATION OF FETCH LIMITED WINDDRIVEN SEA OBSERVATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakharov, Vladimir

    is characterized by a constant (in space and time) offshore wind at a normal angle to the straight coastline. Under article. At larger values of the wind fetch, appropriate for open ocean conditions when the advectionTHEORETICAL INTERPRETATION OF FETCH LIMITED WIND­DRIVEN SEA OBSERVATIONS V.E. Zakharov Department

  3. An object-oriented, abductive interpreter for aircraft flight control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economides, Gregory Theo

    1993-01-01

    Hypotheses . . . . . Compound Decision: The Extension. . Abductive Decision: Conflicting Evidence IMPLEMENTATION OF THE INTERPRETER Architecture General Structure Page . . . 1 . . . . I . . . . 2 . . . 4 . . . . 5 . . . . 6 . . . . 8 8... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56 . . . . . . . . . . . . . , . . 62 o. . . . . . . . . , . . . . 63 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 70 1. Top-Level Architecture 2. Second-Level Architecture 3. An Object House 4, Two Types of Inheritance...

  4. The identification and biogeochemical interpretation of fossil magnetotactic bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirschvink, Joseph L.

    The identification and biogeochemical interpretation of fossil magnetotactic bacteria Robert E. Available online 14 August 2007. Abstract Magnetotactic bacteria, which most commonly live within the oxic, specifically magnetite or greigite. The crystals cause the bacteria to orient themselves passively with respect

  5. Smart Photo Selection: Interpret Gaze as Personal Interest Tina Walber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Staab, Steffen

    Smart Photo Selection: Interpret Gaze as Personal Interest Tina Walber WeST Institute University staab@uni-koblenz.de ABSTRACT Manually selecting subsets of photos from large collections in order to present them to friends or colleagues or to print them as photo books can be a tedious task. Today, fully

  6. PHYSICAL THEORY AND ITS INTERPRETATION THE WESTERN ONTARIO SERIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baigrie, Brian S.

    PHYSICAL THEORY AND ITS INTERPRETATION #12;THE WESTERN ONTARIO SERIES IN PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE, AND RELATED FIELDS Managing Editor WILLIAM DEMOPOULOS Department of Philosophy, University of Western Ontario1980­1997 ROBERT E. BUTTS Late, Department of Philosophy, University of Western Ontario, Canada

  7. Une interpretation cohomologique de la condition de Radon-Cavalieri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D'Agnolo, Andrea

    Une interpr´etation cohomologique de la condition de Radon-Cavalieri Andrea D'Agnolo R les D-modules `a l'´etude de la transform´ee de Radon affine r´eelle. Classiquement, on obtient la est diff´erente, et montre comment cette condition, li´ee `a la transform´ee de Radon projective

  8. Design and the Interpretation of Psychological Research Psychology 530

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hopfinger, Joseph B.

    Design and the Interpretation of Psychological Research Psychology 530 A.T. Panter General Description This course covers both theory and applied methods in psychological research, and in particular psychological research (both one's own research and the research of others). Prerequisites There are two

  9. Interpreting and Executing Recipes with a Cooking Robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tellex, Stefanie

    Interpreting and Executing Recipes with a Cooking Robot Mario Bollini, Stefanie Tellex, Tyler in the home, and a robotic chef capable of following arbitrary recipes would have many applications in both, and the ordered nature of recipes. We envision a robotic chef, the BakeBot, which can collect recipes online

  10. Guide for interpreting reports from inspections/ investigations of indoor mold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levetin, Estelle

    Guide for interpreting reports from inspections/ investigations of indoor mold Editor: W. Elliott of indoor environments for mold growth increased dramatically in the past decade. Allergists can now for mold growth and robust enough to reliably detect mold growth. There is no standard method

  11. Natural Language Access to Data Bases" Interpreting Update Requests 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natural Language Access to Data Bases" Interpreting Update Requests 1 James Davidson and S. Jerrold of the domain, which may be a considerable simplification of the actual underlying data base structure. Updates to the underlying data base. Update requests may be impossible (cannot be performed in any way), ambiguous (can

  12. Focusing for Interpretation of Pronouns I Candace L. Sidner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Focusing for Interpretation of Pronouns I Candace L. Sidner Bolt Beranek and Newman Inc. 50 Moulton The research reported in this paper was supported in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency under Laboratory of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Support for the laboratory's artificial intelligence

  13. Delayed Afterglow Onset Interpreted as Baryon-Poor Viewing Angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Eichler

    2005-03-24

    We have suggested previously that baryons in GRB fireballs infiltrate from the surrounding walls that collimate the fireball. The efficiency $\\epsilon_b$ for generating blast energy can then be angle dependent. Delayed onset of afterglow can be interpreted as being due to a baryon-poor viewing angle.

  14. Abstract Interpretation with Alien Expressions and Heap Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leino, K. Rustan M.

    Abstract Interpretation with Alien Expressions and Heap Structures Bor-Yuh Evan Chang0, and K constraint mentions other, alien, function or relation symbols, it is ignored (that is, it is very coarsely over-approximated) by the abstract domain. Rather than building in special treatment of such alien

  15. Abstract Interpretation with Alien Expressions and Heap Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan

    Abstract Interpretation with Alien Expressions and Heap Structures Bor-Yuh Evan Chang1, and K function and relation symbols. If a given constraint mentions other, alien, function or relation symbols in special treatment of such alien symbols in each ab- stract domain, we propose a coordinating congruence

  16. Abstract Interpretation with Alien Expressions and Heap Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Bor-Yuh Evan

    Abstract Interpretation with Alien Expressions and Heap Structures Bor­Yuh Evan Chang 1, # and K supported function and relation symbols. If a given constraint mentions other, alien, function or relation than building in special treatment of such alien symbols in each ab­ stract domain, we propose

  17. Abstract Interpretation of Reactive Systems DENNIS DAMS and ROB GERTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grumberg, Orna

    Abstract Interpretation of Reactive Systems DENNIS DAMS and ROB GERTH Eindhoven University, formal methods, model checking, mu-calculus, reactive systems Correspondenceaddress: D. Dams, Dept;112 Dennis Dams et al. 1. INTRODUCTION In the model-checking approach Queille and Sifakis 1982 Clarke et al

  18. Abstract Interpretation of Reactive Systems DENNIS DAMS and ROB GERTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dams, Dennis

    Abstract Interpretation of Reactive Systems DENNIS DAMS and ROB GERTH Eindhoven University, formal methods, model checking, mu­calculus, reactive systems Correspondence address: D. Dams, Dept; 112 \\Delta Dennis Dams et al. 1. INTRODUCTION In the model­checking approach [Queille and Sifakis 1982

  19. Interpreting measurements of physical systems Kenneth D. Forbus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    of monitoring, operating, analyzing, debugging, and designing complex physical systems. A person operating a nuclear power plant or propulsion plant must constantly read and interpret gauges to maintain an understanding of what is happening and take corrective action, if necessary. Designing a new system requires

  20. The imprint of methane seepage on the geochemical record and early diagenetic processes in cold-water coral mounds on Pen Duick Escarpment, Gulf of Cadiz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    The imprint of methane seepage on the geochemical record and early diagenetic processes in cold Keywords: cold-water corals cold-water coral mounds sulfur isotopes sulfate-methane transition zone examined. The influence of ascending methane-rich fluids from underlying sediment strata delineated two

  1. Data Package of Samples Collected for Hydrogeologic and Geochemical Characterization: 300 Area RI/FS Sediment Cores

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, Michael J.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Lanigan, David C.; Williams, Benjamin D.

    2011-05-01

    This is a data package for sediment samples received from the 300 FF 5 OU. This report was prepared for CHPRC. Between August 16, 2010 and April 25, 2011 sediment samples were received from 300-FF-5 for geochemical studies. The analyses for this project were performed at the 331 building located in the 300 Area of the Hanford Site. The analyses were performed according to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) approved procedures and/or nationally recognized test procedures. The data sets include the sample identification numbers, analytical results, estimated quantification limits (EQL), and quality control data. The preparatory and analytical quality control requirements, calibration requirements, acceptance criteria, and failure actions are defined in the on-line QA plan 'Conducting Analytical Work in Support of Regulatory Programs' (CAW). This QA plan implements the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD) for PNNL.

  2. TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive geochemical Transport in Variable Saturated Geologic Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-05-24

    Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport and chemical reactions can be used for the assessment of mineral alteration in hydrothermal systems, waste disposal sites, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. A comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator, TOUGHREACT, has been developed. A wide range of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. The program can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The model can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can proceed either subject to local equilibrium or kinetic conditions. Changes in porosity and permeability due to mineral dissolution and precipitation can be considered. Linear adsorption and decay can be included. For the purpose of future extensions, surface complexation by double layer model is coded in the program. Xu and Pruess (1998) developed a first version of a non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport model, TOUGHREACT, by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). Xu, Pruess, and their colleagues have applied the program to a variety of problems such as: (1) supergene copper enrichment (Xu et al, 2001), (2) caprock mineral alteration in a hydrothermal system (Xu and Pruess, 2001a), and (3) mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline aquifers (Xu et al, 2003b and 2004a). For modeling the coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes during heater tests at proposed nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain (Nevada), Sonnenthal and Spycher (2000) and Spycher et al. (2003) enhanced TOUGHREACT on (1) high temperature geochemistry, (2) mineral reactive surface area calculations, and (3) porosity and permeability changes due to mineral alteration. On the other hand, Pruess et al. (1999) updated the TOUGH2 simulator to TOUGH2 V2. The present version of TOUGHREACT was developed by introducing the work of Sonnenthal and Spycher (2000) to the original work of Xu and Pruess (1998), and by replacing TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991) by TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al, 1999). The TOUGHREACT program makes use of ''self-documenting'' features. It is distributed with a number of input data files for sample problems. Besides providing benchmarks for proper code installation, these can serve as self-teaching tutorial in the use of TOUGHREACT, and they provide templates to help jump-start new applications. The fluid and heat flow part of TOUGHREACT is derived from TOUGH2 V2, so in addition to the current manual, users must have manual of the TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT provides the following different TOUGH2 fluid property or ''EOS'' (equation-of-state) modules: (1) EOS1 for water, or two waters with typical applications to hydrothermal problems, (2) EOS2 for multiphase mixtures of water and CO{sub 2} also with typical applications to hydrothermal problems, (3) EOS3 for multiphase mixtures of water and air with typical applications to vadose zone and nuclear waste disposal problems, (4) EOS4 that has the same capabilities as EOS3 but with vapor pressure lowering effects due to capillary pressure, (5) EOS9 for single phase water (Richards. equation) with typical applications to ambient reactive geochemical transport problems, (6) ECO2 for multiphase mixtures of water, CO{sub 2} and NaCl with typical applications to CO{sub 2} disposal in deep brine aquifers.

  3. Actualistic and Geochemical Modeling of Reservoir Rock, CO2 and Formation Fluid Interaction, Citronelle Oil Field, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weislogel, Amy

    2014-01-31

    This report includes description of the Citronelle field study area and the work carried out in the project to characterize the geology and composition of reservoir rock material and to collect an analyze the geochemical composition of produced fluid waters from the Citronelle field. Reservoir rock samples collected from well bore core were made into thin-sections and assessed for textural properties, including pore types and porosity distribution. Compositional framework grain modal data were collected via point-counting, and grain and cement mineralogy was assessed using SEM-EDS. Geochemistry of fluid samples is described and modeled using PHREEQC. Composition of rock and produced fluids were used as inputs for TOUGHREACT reactive transport modeling, which determined the rock-fluid system was in disequilibrium.

  4. A Problem in the Interpretation of Tokamak Langmuir Probes when a Fast Electron Component is present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Problem in the Interpretation of Tokamak Langmuir Probes when a Fast Electron Component is present

  5. An algebraic interpretation of the multivariate $q$-Krawtchouk polynomials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent X. Genest; Sarah Post; Luc Vinet

    2015-08-31

    The multivariate quantum $q$-Krawtchouk polynomials are shown to arise as matrix elements of "$q$-rotations" acting on the state vectors of many $q$-oscillators. The focus is put on the two-variable case. The algebraic interpretation is used to derive the main properties of the polynomials: orthogonality, duality, structure relations, difference equations and recurrence relations. The extension to an arbitrary number of variables is presented

  6. Interpretations of Quantum Theory in the Light of Modern Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Castagnino; Sebastian Fortin; Roberto Laura; Daniel Sudarsky

    2014-12-24

    The difficult issues related to the interpretation of quantum mechanics and, in particular, the "measurement problem" are revisited using as motivation the process of generation of structure from quantum fluctuations in inflationary cosmology. The unessential mathematical complexity of the particular problem is bypassed, facilitating the discussion of the conceptual issues, by considering, within the paradigm set up by the cosmological problem, another problem where symmetry serves as a focal point: a simplified version of Mott's problem.

  7. Petrophysical and Geochemical Properties of Columbia River Flood Basalt: Implications for Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zakharova, Natalia V.; Goldberg, David S.; Sullivan, E. C.; Herron, Michael M.; Grau, Jim A.

    2012-11-02

    Abstract This study presents borehole geophysical data and sidewall core chemistry from the Wallula Pilot Sequestration Project in the Columbia River flood basalt. The wireline logging data were reprocessed, core-calibrated and interpreted in the framework of reservoir and seal characterization for carbon dioxide storage. Particular attention is paid to the capabilities and limitations of borehole spectroscopy for chemical characterization of basalt. Neutron capture spectroscopy logging is shown to provide accurate concentrations for up to 8 major and minor elements but has limited sensitivity to natural alteration in fresh-water basaltic reservoirs. The Wallula borehole intersected 26 flows from 7 members of the Grande Ronde formation. The logging data demonstrate a cyclic pattern of sequential basalt flows with alternating porous flow tops (potential reservoirs) and massive flow interiors (potential caprock). The log-derived apparent porosity is extremely high in the flow tops (20%-45%), and considerably overestimates effective porosity obtained from hydraulic testing. The flow interiors are characterized by low apparent porosity (0-8%) but appear pervasively fractured in borehole images. Electrical resistivity images show diverse volcanic textures and provide an excellent tool for fracture analysis, but neither fracture density nor log-derived porosity uniquely correlate with hydraulic properties of the Grande Ronde formation. While porous flow tops in these deep flood basalts may offer reservoirs with high mineralization rates, long leakage migration paths, and thick sections of caprock for CO2 storage, a more extensive multi- well characterization would be necessary to assess lateral variations and establish sequestration capacity in this reservoir.

  8. Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    mapping structure because of the masking effect of widespread alluvial deposits. At the Salt Wells prospect, the 26 station sample line crosses a previously mapped basinplaya...

  9. Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenariosMarysville MtMedical Area Total Egy PltMercurius Biofuels

  10. A system for interpretation of blast furnace stockrod measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinnelae, J.; Saxen, H. [Aabo Akademi Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1997-12-31

    A system for intelligent monitoring and interpretation of signals from blast furnace stockrods is presented. The system visualizes the measurements and estimates the local burden layer thickness (under the rods) after every dump. Furthermore, it analyzes the burden descent rate to distinguish between slips, hangings, normal descent and peaks, etc., and also combines the stockrod information with findings of temperature measurements from an above-burden probe. The preprocessing of the signals and some features of the system, which is under development, are treated in this paper.

  11. Neural network and area method interpretation of pulsed experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dulla, S.; Picca, P.; Ravetto, P. [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Energetica, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24 - 10129 Torino (Italy); Canepa, S. [Lab of Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour LRS, Paul Scherrer Inst., 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-07-01

    The determination of the subcriticality level is an important issue in accelerator-driven system technology. The area method, originally introduced by N. G. Sjoestrand, is a classical technique to interpret flux measurement for pulsed experiments in order to reconstruct the reactivity value. In recent times other methods have also been developed, to account for spatial and spectral effects, which were not included in the area method, since it is based on the point kinetic model. The artificial neural network approach can be an efficient technique to infer reactivities from pulsed experiments. In the present work, some comparisons between the two methods are carried out and discussed. (authors)

  12. Semiclassical Interpretation of the Mass Asymmetry in Nuclear Fission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Brack; S. M. Reimann; M. Sieber

    1997-05-15

    We give a semiclassical interpretation of the mass asymmetry in the fission of heavy nuclei. Using only a few classical periodic orbits and a cavity model for the nuclear mean field, we reproduce the onset of left-right asymmetric shapes at the fission isomer minimum and the correct topology of the deformation energy surface in the region of the outer fission barrier. We point at the correspondence of the single-particle quantum states responsible for the asymmetry with the leading classical orbits, both lying in similar equatorial planes perpendicular to the symmetry axis of the system.

  13. Interpretation of the Tadpole VV29 Merging Galaxy System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, C H; Gibson, Carl H.; Schild, Rudolph E.

    2002-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope images of the galaxy merger Tadpole are interpreted using the hydro-gravitational theory of Gibson 1996-2000 that predicts galaxy masses should be dominated by dark halos of primordial-fog-particles (PFPs) in dark proto-globular-star-clusters (PGCs), a cosmology supported by the quasar microlensing observations and interpretation of Schild (1996) that his quasar lens galaxy mass must be dominated by ``rogue planets ... likely to be the missing mass''. As the smaller merging galaxy components VV29cdef move through the dark halo of galaxy VV29a, star and young globular cluster formation is triggered forming the long luminous star-wake VV29b. Frozen PFP planets are evaporated by radiation and tidal forces of the intruders. Friction from the gas accelerates the accretional cascade of PFPs to form larger planets and ultimately stars. Weak turbulence permits small-mass stars to form. Strong turbulence causes the formation of large-mass stars. Star-wakes show that the blue dwarf galaxy VV29c (...

  14. Isotopic and geochemical tracers for U(VI) reduction and U mobility at an in situ recovery U mine

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Basu, Anirban; Brown, Shaun T.; Christensen, John N.; DePaolo, Donald J.; Reimus, Paul W.; Heikoop, Jeffrey M.; Woldegabriel, Giday; Simmons, Ardyth M.; House, Brian M.; Hartmann, Matt; et al

    2015-05-19

    In situ recovery (ISR) uranium (U) mining mobilizes U in its oxidized hexavalent form (U(VI)) by oxidative dissolution of U from the roll-front U deposits. Post-mining natural attenuation of residual U(VI) at ISR mines is a potential remediation strategy. Detection and monitoring of naturally occurring reducing subsurface environments are important for successful implementation of this remediation scheme. We used the isotopic tracers ²³?U/²³?U (?²³?U), ²³?U/²³?U activity ratio, and ³?S/³²S (?³?S), and geochemical measurements of U ore and groundwater collected from 32 wells located within, upgradient, and downgradient of a roll-front U deposit to detect U(VI) reduction and U mobility atmore »an ISR mining site at Rosita, TX, USA. The ?²³?U in Rosita groundwater varies from 0.61‰ to -2.49‰, with a trend toward lower ?²³?U in downgradient wells. The concurrent decrease in U(VI) concentration and ?²³?U with an ? of 0.48‰ ± 0.08‰ is indicative of naturally occurring reducing environments conducive to U(VI) reduction. Additionally, characteristic ²³?U/²³?U activity ratio and ?³?S values may also be used to trace the mobility of the ore zone groundwater after mining has ended. These results support the use of U isotope-based detection of natural attenuation of U(VI) at Rosita and other similar ISR mining sites.« less

  15. Solid phase evolution in the Biosphere 2 hillslope experiment as predicted by modeling of hydrologic and geochemical fluxes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dontsova, K.; Steefel, C.I.; Desilets, S.; Thompson, A.; Chorover, J.

    2009-07-15

    A reactive transport geochemical modeling study was conducted to help predict the mineral transformations occurring over a ten year time-scale that are expected to impact soil hydraulic properties in the Biosphere 2 (B2) synthetic hillslope experiment. The modeling sought to predict the rate and extent of weathering of a granular basalt (selected for hillslope construction) as a function of climatic drivers, and to assess the feedback effects of such weathering processes on the hydraulic properties of the hillslope. Flow vectors were imported from HYDRUS into a reactive transport code, CrunchFlow2007, which was then used to model mineral weathering coupled to reactive solute transport. Associated particle size evolution was translated into changes in saturated hydraulic conductivity using Rosetta software. We found that flow characteristics, including velocity and saturation, strongly influenced the predicted extent of incongruent mineral weathering and neo-phase precipitation on the hillslope. Results were also highly sensitive to specific surface areas of the soil media, consistent with surface reaction controls on dissolution. Effects of fluid flow on weathering resulted in significant differences in the prediction of soil particle size distributions, which should feedback to alter hillslope hydraulic conductivities.

  16. Final Report: Improved Site Characterization And Storage Prediction Through Stochastic Inversion Of Time-Lapse Geophysical And Geochemical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, A; Mcnab, W; Hao, Y; White, D; Johnson, J

    2011-04-14

    During the last months of this project, our project activities have concentrated on four areas: (1) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir bulk/shear moduli and density; the need for this inversion was not anticipated in the original scope of work, (2) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir porosity and permeability, (3) complete the software needed to perform geochemical inversions and (4) use the software to perform stochastic inversion of aqueous chemistry data to deduce mineral volume fractions. This report builds on work described in progress reports previously submitted (Ramirez et al., 2009, 2010, 2011 - reports fulfilled the requirements of deliverables D1-D4) and fulfills deliverable D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product. The main challenge with our stochastic inversion approach is its large computational expense, even for single reservoir patterns. We dedicated a significant level of effort to improve computational efficiency but inversions involving multiple patterns were still intractable by project's end. As a result, we were unable to fulfill Deliverable D6: Field-based multi-pattern simulations work product.

  17. Francis Bacon and the 'Interpretation of Nature' in the Late Renaissance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serjeantson, Richard

    2014-10-27

    The “interpretation of nature” (interpretatio naturae) is the leading idea in Francis Bacon’s (1561–1626) natural philosophy. But by contrast with his ideas about method, induction, or experiment, the significance of the “interpretation of nature...

  18. Elemental Teleology and an Interpretation of the Rainfall Example in Physics 2.8 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kinlaw, Caleb

    2008-01-01

    This paper proposes an interpretation of the rainfall example in which Aristotle does not himself think that crop growth is the final cause of rain. The grounds for this interpretation will be an ‘elemental teleology’ ...

  19. SPECTRAL DECOMPOSITION APPLIED TO TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC INTERPRETATION AT RULISON FIELD,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPECTRAL DECOMPOSITION APPLIED TO TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC INTERPRETATION AT RULISON FIELD, GARFIELD focuses on the application of this technique to time-lapse seismic interpretation using nine-component 4D-lapse interpretation through a cross equalization process. I analyzed two time-lapse pairs of seismic surveys: 2003

  20. Revised 1/19/06 Reflection Seismic Data Interpretation -GEY 772/772L Spring 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    Revised 1/19/06 Reflection Seismic Data Interpretation - GEY 772/772L ­ Spring 2006 Room TEC 104 Processing, Yilmaz; and Practical Seismic Interpretation, Badley; A Lab Manual of Seismic Reflection the fundamentals of geologic interpretation of 2D and 3D reflection seismic data. The class provides hands

  1. Stochastic electrodynamics and the interpretation of quantum physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emilio Santos

    2014-10-02

    Arguments are given for the plausibility that quantum mechanics is a stochastic theory and that many quantum phenomena derive from the existence of a real noise consisting of vacuum fluctuations of the fields existing in nature. I revisit stochastic electrodynamics (SED), a theory that studies classical systems of electrically charged particles immersed in a real electromagnetic zeropoint field with spectral density proportional to the cube of the frequency, Planck's constant appearing as the parameter fixing the scale. Asides from briefly reviewing known results, I make a detailed comparison between SED and quantum mechanics which shows that both theories make different predictions in many cases. However SED might be a guide for a stochastic interpretation of quantum mechanics

  2. The Everett-Wheeler interpretation and the open future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony Sudbery

    2010-09-20

    I discuss the meaning of probability in the Everett-Wheeler interpretation of quantum mechanics, together with the problem of defining histories. To resolve these, I propose an understanding of probability arising from a form of temporal logic: the probability of a future-tense proposition is identified with its truth value in a many-valued and context-dependent logic. In short, probability is degree of truth. These ideas appear to be new (though I expect correction on this), but they are natural and intuitive, and relate to traditional naive ideas of time and chance. Indeed, I argue that Everettian quantum mechanics is the only form of scientific theory that truly incorporates the perception that the future is open.

  3. Progress Report, December 2010: Improved Site Characterization And Storage Prediction Through Stochastic Inversion Of Time-Lapse Geophysical And Geochemical Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramirez, A; Mcnab, W; Carle, S; Hao, Y; White, D; Johnson, J

    2010-12-17

    Over the last project six months, our project activities have concentrated on three areas: (1) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir permeability, (2) development of the geochemical inversion strategy and implementation of associated software, and (3) completing the software implementation of TProGS and the geostatistical analysis that provides the information needed when using the software to produce realizations of the Midale reservoir. The report partially the following deliverables: D2: Model development: MCMC tool (synthetic fluid chemistry data); deliverable completed. D4: Model development/verification: MCMC tool (TProGS, field seismic/chemistry data) work product; deliverable requirements partially fulfilled. D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product; deliverable requirements partially fulfilled. When completed, our completed stochastic inversion tool will explicitly integrate reactive transport modeling, facies-based geostatistical methods, and a novel stochastic inversion technique to optimize agreement between observed and predicted storage performance. Such optimization will be accomplished through stepwise refinement of: (1) the reservoir model - principally its permeability magnitude and heterogeneity - and (2) geochemical parameters - primarily key mineral volume fractions and kinetic data. We anticipate that these refinements will facilitate significantly improved history matching and forward modeling of CO{sub 2} storage. Our tool uses the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methodology. Deliverable D1, previously submitted as a report titled ''Development of a Stochastic Inversion Tool To Optimize Agreement Between The Observed And Predicted Seismic Response To CO{sub 2} Injection/Migration in the Weyburn-Midale Project'' (Ramirez et al., 2009), described the stochastic inversion approach that will identify reservoir models that optimize agreement between the observed and predicted seismic response. The software that implements this approach has been completed, tested, and used to process seismic data from pattern 16. A previously submitted report titled ''Model verification: synthetic single pattern simulations using seismic reflection data'', Ramirez et al. 2010, partially fulfilled deliverable D3 by summarizing verification activities that evaluate the performance of the seismic software and its ability to recover reservoir model permeabilities using synthetic seismic reflection data. A future progress report will similarly describe summarizing verification activities of the geochemical inversion software, thereby completing deliverable D3. This document includes a chapter that shows and discusses permeability models produced by seismic inversion that used seismic data from pattern 16 in Phase 1A. It partially fulfills deliverable D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product. The D5 work product is supposed to summarize the results of applying NUFT/MCMC to refine the reservoir model and geochemical parameters by optimizing observation/prediction agreement for the seismic/geochemical response to CO{sub 2} injection/migration within a single pattern of Phase 1A/1B. A future progress report will show inversion results for the same pattern using geochemical data, thereby completing deliverable D5. This document also contains a chapter that fulfills deliverable D2: Model development: MCMC tool (synthetic fluid chemistry data). The chapter will summarize model development activities required to facilitate application of NUFT/MCMC to optimize agreement between the observed and predicted geochemical response to CO{sub 2} injection/migration. Lastly, this document also contains a chapter that partially fulfills deliverable D4: Model development/verification: MCMC tool (TProGS, field seismic/chemistry data) work product. This work product is supposed to summarize model development activities required for (1) application of TProGS to Weyburn, (2) use of TProGS within the MCMC tool, and (3) application of the MCMC tool to address field seismic and g

  4. Dirac-Kähler particle in Riemann spherical space: boson interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Ishkhanyan; O. Florea; E. M. Ovsiyuk; V. M. Red'kov

    2014-11-23

    In the context of the composite boson interpretation, we construct the exact general solution of the Dirac--K\\"ahler equation for the case of the spherical Riemann space of constant positive curvature, for which due to the geometry itself one may expect to have a discrete energy spectrum. In the case of the minimal value of the total angular momentum, $j=0$, the radial equations are reduced to second-order ordinary differential equations, which are straightforwardly solved in terms of the hypergeometric functions. For non-zero values of the total angular momentum, however, the radial equations are reduced to a pair of complicated fourth-order differential equations. Employing the factorization approach, we derive the general solution of these equations involving four independent fundamental solutions written in terms of combinations of the hypergeometric functions. The corresponding discrete energy spectrum is then determined via termination of the involved hypergeometric series, resulting in quasi-polynomial wave-functions. The constructed solutions lead to notable observations when compared with those for the ordinary Dirac particle. The energy spectrum for the Dirac-K\\"ahler particle in spherical space is much more complicated. Its structure substantially differs from that for the Dirac particle since it consists of two paralleled energy level series each of which is twofold degenerate. Besides, none of the two separate series coincides with the series for the Dirac particle. Thus, the Dirac--K\\"ahler field cannot be interpreted as a system of four Dirac fermions. Additional arguments supporting this conclusion are discussed.

  5. CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

    2011-04-11

    An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

  6. Data Qualification Report For: Thermodynamic Data File, DATA0.YMP.R0 For Geochemical Code, EQ3/6 

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.L. Cloke

    2001-10-16

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the adequacy of chemical thermodynamic data provided by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as DataO.ymp.ROA in response to an input request submitted under AP-3.14Q. This request specified that chemical thermodynamic data available in the file, Data0.com.R2, be updated, improved, and augmented for use in geochemical modeling used in Process Model Reports (PMRs) for Engineered Barrier Systems, Waste Form, Waste Package, Unsaturated Zone, and Near Field Environment, as well as for Performance Assessment. The data are qualified in the temperature range 0 to 100 C. Several Data Tracking Numbers (DTNs) associated with Analysis/Model Reports (AMR) addressing various aspects of the post-closure chemical behavior of the waste package and the Engineered Barrier System that rely on EQ316 outputs to which these data are used as input, are Principal Factor affecting. This qualification activity was accomplished in accordance with the AP-SIII.2Q using the Technical Assessment method. A development plan, TDP-EBS-MD-000044, was prepared in accordance with AP-2.13Q and approved by the Responsible Manager. In addition, a Process Control Evaluation was performed in accordance with AP-SV.1Q. The qualification method, selected in accordance with AP-SIII.2Q, was Technical Assessment. The rationale for this approach is that the data in File Data0.com.R2 are considered Handbook data and therefore do not themselves require qualification. Only changes to Data0.com.R2 required qualification. A new file has been produced which contains the database Data0.ymp.R0, which is recommended for qualification as a result of this action. Data0.ymp.R0 will supersede Data0.com.R2 for all Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) activities.

  7. Geochemical information for sites contaminated with low-level radioactive wastes: II. St. Louis Airport Storage Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seeley, F.G.; Kelmers, A.D.

    1985-01-01

    The St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLASS) became radioactively contaminated as a result of wastes that were being stored from operations to recover uranium from pitchblende ores in the 1940s and 1950s. The US Department of Energy is considering various remedial action options for the SLASS under the Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). This report describes the results of geochemical investigations, carried out to support the FUSRAP activities and to aid in quantifying various remedial action options. Soil and groundwater samples from the site were characterized, and sorption ratios for uranium and radium and apparent concentration limit values for uranium were measured in soil/groundwater systems by batch contact methodology. The uranium and radium concentrations in soil samples were significantly above background near the old contaminated surface horizon (now at the 0.3/sup -/ to 0.9/sup -/m depth); the maximum values were 1566 ..mu..g/g and 101 pCi/g, respectively. Below about the 6/sup -/m depth, the concentrations appeared to be typical of those naturally present in soils of this area (3.8 +- 1.2 ..mu..g/g and 3.1 +- 0.6 pCi/g). Uranium sorption ratios showed stratigraphic trends but were generally moderate to high (100 to 1000 L/kg). The sorption isotherm suggested an apparent uranium concentration limit of about 200 mg/L. This relatively high solubility can probably be correlated with the carbonate content of the soil/groundwater systems. The lower sorption ratio values obtained from the sorption isotherm may have resulted from changes in the experimental procedure or the groundwater used. The SLASS appears to exhibit generally favorable behavior for the retardation of uranium solubilized from waste in the site. Parametric tests were conducted to estimate the sensitivity of uranium sorption and solubility to the pH and carbonate content of the system.

  8. Geochemical study of evaporite and clay mineral-oxyhydroxide samples from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brookins, D.G. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (US). Dept. of Geology

    1993-06-01

    Samples of clay minerals, insoluble oxyhydroxides, and their host evaporites from the WIPP site have been studied for their major and minor elements abundances, x-ray diffraction characteristics, K-Ar ages, and Rb-Sr ages. This study was undertaken to determine their overall geochemical characteristics and to investigate possible interactions between evaporates and insoluble constituents. The evaporite host material is water-soluble, having Cl/Br ratios typical of marine evaporites, although the Br content is low. Insoluble material (usually a mixture of clay minerals and oxyhydroxide phases) yields very high Cl/Br ratios, possibly because of Cl from admixed halide minerals. This same material yields K/Rb and Th/U ratios in the normal range for shales; suggesting little, if any, effect of evaporite-induced remobilization of U, K, or Rb in the insoluble material. The rare-earth element (REE) data also show normal REE/chondrite (REE/CHON) distribution patterns, supporting the K/Rb and Th/U data. Clay minerals yield K-Ar dates in the range 365 to 390 Ma and a Rb-Sr isochron age of 428 {+-} 7 Ma. These ages are well in excess of the 220- to 230-Ma formational age of the evaporites, and confirm the detrital origin of the clays. The ages also show that any evaporite or clay mineral reactions that might have occurred at or near the time of sedimentation and diagenesis were not sufficient to reset the K-Ar and Rb-Sr systematics of the clay minerals. Further, x-ray data indicate a normal evaporitic assemblage of clay minerals and Fe-rich oxyhydroxide phases. The clay minerals and other insoluble material appear to be resistant to the destructive effects of their entrapment in the evaporites, which suggests that these insoluble materials would be good getters for any radionuclides (hypothetically) released from the storage of radioactive wastes in the area.

  9. Geochemical Processes Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cantrell, Kirk J.; Zachara, John M.; Dresel, P. Evan; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

    2007-09-28

    This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical process information available for the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tank farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility. Two companion reports to this one were recently published which discuss the geology of the farms (Reidel and Chamness 2007) and groundwater flow and contamination beneath the farms (Horton 2007).

  10. A Comprehensive Mathematical Model for the Correlation of Earthquake Magnitude with Geochemical Measurements. A Case Study: the Nisyros Volcano in Greece

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verros, G. D.; Latsos, T.; Liolios, C.; Anagnostou, K. E. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Technological Educational Institute of Lamia, GR-351 00 Lamia (Greece)

    2009-08-13

    A comprehensive mathematical model for the correlation of geological phenomena such as earthquake magnitude with geochemical measurements is presented in this work. This model is validated against measurements, well established in the literature, of {sup 220}Rn/{sup 222}Rn in the fumarolic gases of the Nisyros Island, Aegean Sea, Greece. It is believed that this model may be further used to develop a generalized methodology for the prediction of geological phenomena such as earthquakes and volcanic eruptions in the vicinity of the Nisyros Island.

  11. Interpretation of simulated global warming using a simple model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watterson, I.G.

    2000-01-01

    A simple energy balance model with two parameters, an effective heat capacity and an effective climate sensitivity, is used to interpret six GCM simulations of greenhouse gas-induced global warming. By allowing the parameters to vary in time, the model can be accurately calibrated for each run. It is found that the sensitivity can be approximated as a constant in each case. However, the effective heat capacity clearly varies, and it is important that the energy equation is formulated appropriately, and thus unlike many such models. For simulations with linear forcing and from a cold start, the capacity is in each case close to that of a homogeneous ocean with depth initially 200 m, but increasing some 4.3 m each year, irrespective of the sensitivity and forcing growth rate. Analytic solutions for t his linear capacity function are derived, and these reproduce the GCM runs well, even for cases where the forcing is stabilized after a century or so. The formation of a subsurface maximum in the mean ocean temperature anomaly is a significant feature of such cases. A simple model for a GCM run with a realistic forcing scenario starting from 1,880 is constructed using component results for forcing segments. Given this, an estimate of the cold start error of a simulation of the warming due to forcing after the present would be given by the negative of the temperature drift of the anomaly due to the past forcing. The simple model can evidently be used to give an indication of likely warming curves, at lest for this range of scenarios and GCM sensitivities.

  12. Models to interpret bedform geometries from cross-bed data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthi, S.M. (Schlumberger-Doll Research, Ridgefield, CT (USA)); Banavar, J.R. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (USA)); Bayer, U. (Kernforschungsanlage Juelich (West Germany))

    1990-03-01

    Semi-elliptical and sinusoidal bedform crestlines were modeled with curvature and sinuosity as parameters. Both bedform crestlines are propagated at various angles of migration over a finite area of deposition. Two computational approaches are used, a statistical random sampling (Monte Carlo) technique over the area of the deposit, and an analytical method based on topology and differential geometry. The resulting foreset azimuth distributions provide a catalogue for a variety of situations. The resulting thickness distributions have a simple shape and can be combined with the azimuth distributions to constrain further the cross-strata geometry. Paleocurrent directions obtained by these models can differ substantially from other methods, especially for obliquely migrating low-curvature bedforms. Interpretation of foreset azimuth data from outcrops and wells can be done either by visual comparison with the catalogued distributions, or by iterative computational fits. Studied examples include eolian cross-strata from the Permian Rotliegendes in the North Sea, fluvial dunes from the Devonian in the Catskills (New York State), the Triassic Schilfsandstein (West Germany) and the Paleozoic-Jurassic of the Western Desert (Egypt), as well as recent tidal dunes from the German coast of the North Sea and tidal cross-strata from the Devonian Koblentquartzit (West Germany). In all cases the semi-elliptical bedform model gave a good fit to the data, suggesting that it may be applicable over a wide range of bedforms. The data from the Western Desert could only be explained by data scatter due to channel sinuosity combining with the scatter attributed to the ellipticity of the bedform crestlines. These models, therefore, may also allow simulations of some hierarchically structured bedforms.

  13. Geochemical indicators of depositional environment and soruce-rock potential for the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group, Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guthrie, J.M.; Pratt, L.M. )

    1994-05-01

    Two depositional cycles are recognized within the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group of the Illinois basin in a core from the New Jersey Zinc 1 Parrish well of Fulton County, Illinois. Organic carbon (C[sub org]), total sulfur, [sup 13]C content of the organic carbon ([delta][sup 13]C[sub org]), hydrogen and oxygen indices (HI and OI) from Rock-Eval pyrolysis and yields of extractable organic matter (EOM) vary through the cycles. Dark-brown to black, laminated shales are present in the lower portion of each cycle and have high values of C[sub org] (1.0-3.0%), HI (500-1000 mg hydrocarbon [HC]/g total organic carbon[TOC]), and EOM (500-2500 ppm), and more negative [delta][sup 13]C[sub org] values ([delta][sup 13]C[sub org] = -30 to -30.5%). Gray to greenish-gray, bioturbated shales are present in the upper portion of each cycle and have low values of C[sub org] (<1.0%), HI (<500 mg HC/g TOC), and EOM (<500 ppm), and more positive [delta][sup 13]C[sub org] values (-28.5 to 29.5%) compared to the laminated shales. Although thermally immature or marginally mature in this core, the laminated shales represent potential source rock s for petroleum because they contain good to excellent quantities of oil-prone organic matter and are more deeply buried in other areas of the basin. Kerogen elemental data and Rock-Eval data suggest that the source of organic matter in the Maquoketa was uniform, with the notable exception of graptolite-rich layers. Distributions of saturated hydrocarbons for Maquoketa samples resemble those derived from amorphous organic matter. Variations in bulk geochemical data and carbon isotopic compositions within the Maquoketa Group indicate substantial reworking and degradation of organic matter associated with bioturbation and oxygenated depositional conditions. 64 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Interpreting Soap Operas and Creating Community: Inside a Computer-Mediated Fan Culture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baym, Nancy K.

    1993-11-01

    document contains the author’s accepted manuscript. For the publisher’s version, see the link in the header of this document.] Interpreting Soap Operas and Creating Community: Inside a Computer–Mediated Fan Culture Nancy K. Baym Visiting.... K. (1993). Interpreting Soap Operas and Creating Community: Inside a Computer-Mediated Fan Culture. Journal of Folklore Research, Vol. 30(2/3), 143-176. Baym, N. K. (1993). Interpreting Soap Operas and Creating Community: Inside a Computer...

  15. Sharing Texas resources: interpretation handbook for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herrick, Tommie L.

    1994-01-01

    Sharing Texas Resources: Interpretation Handbook for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Tommie L. Herrick Nay 1994 Record of Study SHARZNG TEXAS RESOURCES: INTERPRETATION HANDBOOK POR THE TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTMENT A... Department Natural Resources Development SHARING TEXAS RESOURCES: INTERPRETATION HANDBOOK FOR THE TEXAS PARKS AND WILDLIFE DEPARTNENT A Professional Paper by Tommie L. Herrick Approved as to style and content by: Dr. Edward H. Heath (Chairman...

  16. INTERPRETATION REGARDING EXEMPTION RELIEF UNDER 10 C.F.R. PART...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    RELIEF, AND NON-COMPLIANT 'DOCUMENTED SAFETY ANALYSES' SUBJECT TO 10 C.F.R. PART 830, NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT, SUBPART B, SAFETY BASIS REQUIREMENTS INTERPRETATION REGARDING...

  17. WINTERTemplate Geochemical mechanisms of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borissova, Daniela

    (prevention of the CO2 outgassing) #12;07Dissolution of CaCO3 H2CO3 HCO3 - CO3 2- H+ CO3 2- + H+ HCO3 - HCO3 Ca2+ + 2HCO3 - H2O + CO2 )10( 3.8 2 3 2 SPCOCa Kaa Precipitation of CaCO3 CO2 outgassing: 1

  18. Publishing, Interpreting and Negotiating Scholarly Hypertexts: Evolution of an Approach and Toolkit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Publishing, Interpreting and Negotiating Scholarly Hypertexts: Evolution of an Approach and Toolkit Simon Buckingham Shum & Tamara Sumner KMI-TR-57 December, 1997 Submitted for publication [http://kmi.open.ac.uk/kmi-abstracts/kmi-tr-57-abstract.html]. #12;Publishing, Interpreting and Negotiating Scholarly Hypertexts: Evolution

  19. Roadmap: Special Education ASL/English Interpreting Bachelor of Science in Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Scott

    Roadmap: Special Education ­ ASL/English Interpreting ­ Bachelor of Science in Education [EH Catalog Year: 2013-2014 Page 1 of 3 | Last Updated: 17-May-13/JS This roadmap is a recommended semester and domestic diversity requirement #12;Roadmap: Special Education ­ ASL/English Interpreting ­ Bachelor

  20. Down the borehole but outside the box: innovative approaches to wireline log data interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodin, Thomas

    Down the borehole but outside the box: innovative approaches to wireline log data interpretation or more different properties, with depth down a borehole. They are routinely correlated with, and, such as oil and gas, wireline log interpretation is highly developed. In other industries, such as geothermal

  1. Interpretation of seismic anisotropy in terms of mantle flow when melt is present

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminski, Edouard

    Interpretation of seismic anisotropy in terms of mantle flow when melt is present E. Kaminski scale. Citation: Kaminski, E. (2006), Interpretation of seismic anisotropy in terms of mantle flow when of seismic anisotropy to image upper mantle flow is usually based on the assumption that the direction

  2. Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania A. Jardin1, F Interpretation in Dumre Area, Albania -- The challenge of seismic exploration in fold and thrust belt settings compte plus importante des données géologiques. Abstract -- Subsalt Depth Seismic Imaging and Structural

  3. INTEGRATION OF ROCK PHYSICS AND RESERVOIR SIMULATION FOR THE INTERPRETATION OF TIME-LAPSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATION OF ROCK PHYSICS AND RESERVOIR SIMULATION FOR THE INTERPRETATION OF TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC is 15% to 20%, and should be detected in the time-lapse seismic data. Through interpretation of P This thesis research integrates reservoir simulation with time-lapse (4D) seismic monitoring of reservoir

  4. Monitoring of SAGD Process: Seismic Interpretation of Ray+Born Synthetic 4D Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Monitoring of SAGD Process: Seismic Interpretation of Ray+Born Synthetic 4D Data C. Joseph1, G ­ Monitoring of SAGD Process: Seismic Interpretation of Ray+Born Synthetic 4D Data ­ The objective of this study is to evaluate which production information can be deduced from a 4D seismic survey during

  5. The SAL Interpreter for Large-Scale Optimization in Distributed Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    The SAL Interpreter for Large-Scale Optimization in Distributed Control Systems Christopher Bailey sensor-rich control systems interact with spa- tially distributed physical environments. This paper interpretation and control tasks for distributed physical systems. SAL provides a set of powerful, abstract com

  6. An Identity of Chernoff Bounds with an Interpretation in Statistical Physics and Applications in Information Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Merhav, Neri

    An Identity of Chernoff Bounds with an Interpretation in Statistical Physics and Applications in statistical physics, namely, an isothermal equilibrium of a composite system that consists of multiple interpretation. This results in several relationships between information theory and statistical physics, which

  7. Abstract--Eye blinking artifacts present serious problems for electroencephalographic (EEG) interpretation and analysis. In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    interpretation and analysis. I. INTRODUCTION lectroencephalographic (EEG) recordings are usually contaminated) interpretation and analysis. In this study, we apply independent component analysis (ICA) to eye blinking artifact removal from cognitive EEG recordings. Due to the specific design of the experiment, the eye

  8. Interpretation of electron holographic phase images and defocused bright-field images of nanocarbon field emitters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    a corresponding out-of-focus image recorded from a similar wire [2]. These images cannot be interpreted usingInterpretation of electron holographic phase images and defocused bright-field images of nanocarbon field, image simulation Electron holography is well suited to the investigation of electric and magnetic

  9. Automated Interpretation of LIBS Spectra using a Fuzzy Logic Inference Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy J. Hatch; Timothy R. McJunkin; Cynthia Hanson; Jill R. Scott

    2012-02-01

    Automated interpretation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) data is necessary due to the plethora of spectra that can be acquired in a relatively short time. However, traditional chemometric and artificial neural network methods that have been employed are not always transparent to a skilled user. A fuzzy logic approach to data interpretation has now been adapted to LIBS spectral interpretation. A fuzzy logic inference engine (FLIE) was used to differentiate between various copper containing and stainless steel alloys as well as unknowns. Results using FLIE indicate a high degree of confidence in spectral assignment.

  10. Evapotranspiration And Geochemical Controls On Groundwater Plumes At Arid Sites: Toward Innovative Alternate End-States For Uranium Processing And Tailings Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Millings, Margaret R.; Kautsky, Mark

    2014-01-08

    Management of legacy tailings/waste and groundwater contamination are ongoing at the former uranium milling site in Tuba City AZ. The tailings have been consolidated and effectively isolated using an engineered cover system. For the existing groundwater plume, a system of recovery wells extracts contaminated groundwater for treatment using an advanced distillation process. The ten years of pump and treat (P&T) operations have had minimal impact on the contaminant plume – primarily due to geochemical and hydrological limits. A flow net analysis demonstrates that groundwater contamination beneath the former processing site flows in the uppermost portion of the aquifer and exits the groundwater as the plume transits into and beneath a lower terrace in the landscape. The evaluation indicates that contaminated water will not reach Moenkopi Wash, a locally important stream. Instead, shallow groundwater in arid settings such as Tuba City is transferred into the vadose zone and atmosphere via evaporation, transpiration and diffuse seepage. The dissolved constituents are projected to precipitate and accumulate as minerals such as calcite and gypsum in the deep vadose zone (near the capillary fringe), around the roots of phreatophyte plants, and near seeps. The natural hydrologic and geochemical controls common in arid environments such as Tuba City work together to limit the size of the groundwater plume, to naturally attenuate and detoxify groundwater contaminants, and to reduce risks to humans, livestock and the environment. The technical evaluation supports an alternative beneficial reuse (“brownfield”) scenario for Tuba City. This alternative approach would have low risks, similar to the current P&T scenario, but would eliminate the energy and expense associated with the active treatment and convert the former uranium processing site into a resource for future employment of local citizens and ongoing benefit to the Native American Nations.

  11. Elucidating geochemical response of shallow heterogeneous aquifers to CO2 leakage using high-performance computing: Implications for monitoring of CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Navarre-Sitchler, Alexis K.; Maxwell, Reed M.; Siirila, Erica R.; Hammond, Glenn E.; Lichtner, Peter C.

    2013-03-01

    Predicting and quantifying impacts of potential carbon dioxide (CO2) leakage into shallow aquifers that overlie geologic CO2 storage formations is an important part of developing reliable carbon storage techniques. Leakage of CO2 through fractures, faults or faulty wellbores can reduce groundwater pH, inducing geochemical reactions that release solutes into the groundwater and pose a risk of degrading groundwater quality. In order to help quantify this risk, predictions of metal concentrations are needed during geologic storage of CO2. Here, we present regional-scale reactive transport simulations, at relatively fine-scale, of CO2 leakage into shallow aquifers run on the PFLOTRAN platform using high-performance computing. Multiple realizations of heterogeneous permeability distributions were generated using standard geostatistical methods. Increased statistical anisotropy of the permeability field resulted in more lateral and vertical spreading of the plume of impacted water, leading to increased Pb2+ (lead) concentrations and lower pH at a well down gradient of the CO2 leak. Pb2+ concentrations were higher in simulations where calcite was the source of Pb2+ compared to galena. The low solubility of galena effectively buffered the Pb2+ concentrations as galena reached saturation under reducing conditions along the flow path. In all cases, Pb2+ concentrations remained below the maximum contaminant level set by the EPA. Results from this study, compared to natural variability observed in aquifers, suggest that bicarbonate (HCO3) concentrations may be a better geochemical indicator of a CO2 leak under the conditions simulated here.

  12. Lighting studies: interpreting lighting styles from traditional media in computer-generated imagery 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Cindy Christine

    2002-01-01

    The goal of this research is to determine whether lighting styles from traditional media can be effectively interpreted in computer-generated scenes. Five paintings and a film still were carefully analyzed for their lighting styles, and scenes...

  13. Under consideration for publication in J. Functional Programming 1 Embedded Interpreters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Nick

    . If the application is written in a language like Java or C ] , there are also numerous embeddable interpreters available, such as Jython (Hugunin, 1997), Rhino (Mozilla Organisation, n.d.) or JScript.NET (Clinick, 2000

  14. Under consideration for publication in J. Functional Programming 1 Embedded Interpreters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Nick

    . If the application is written in a language like Java or C , there are also numerous embeddable interpreters available, such as Jython (Hugunin, 1997), Rhino (Mozilla Organisation, n.d.) or JScript.NET (Clinick, 2000

  15. Effects of Recreation Participation and Tildenian Interpretation on Tourists’ Environmental Concern 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satchabut, Thitikan

    2013-04-24

    , and interpretation can mitigate effects of consumptive forms of recreation, particularly in terms of worldview environmental concern and environmental behavior. Future research should assess a relationship between recreation specialization and environmental concern...

  16. A Context-Based Approach to Reconciling Data Interpretation Conflicts in Web Services Composition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xitong

    We present a comprehensive classification of data misinterpretation problems and develop an approach to automatic detection and reconciliation of data interpretation conflicts in Web services composition. The approach uses ...

  17. Motorist interpretation of potential transition symbols in a freeway lane control signal array 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wohlschlaeger, Steven D

    1994-01-01

    This thesis documents licensed driver response to, interpretation of, and perceived urgency of response to freeway lane control signals (more s . pacifically to the yellow X and yellow diagonal arrow) when displayed in a scene depicting a three...

  18. General Shape Grammar Interpreter for Intelligent Designs Generations Artificial Intelligence Research Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodríguez, Inmaculada

    General Shape Grammar Interpreter for Intelligent Designs Generations T. Trescak Artificial@maia.ub.es M. Esteva Artificial Intelligence Research Institute Spanish Council for Scientific Research visualization and artificial intelligent technologies have motivated the evolution of traditional computer aided

  19. inSightstheEarthScope newsletter Participants in the EarthScope San Andreas interpretive

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith-Konter, Bridget

    River Plain-Teton region September 9-12 in Jackson, WY. Information and an online application form.earthscope.org/workshops/ fault_slip10). Attend the EarthScope workshop for interpretive professionals in theYellowstone-Snake

  20. A Cultural Interpretation of the South Korean Independent Cinema Movement, 1975-2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Nohchool

    2009-04-14

    A Cultural Interpretation of the South Korean Independent Cinema Movement, 1975-2004 examines the origin and development of the independent cinema movement in South Korea. The independent cinema movement refers to the films, film theories, film...

  1. Complete Abstract Interpretations made Constructive Roberto Giacobazzi? Francesco Ranzato?? Francesca Scozzari?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giacobazzi, Roberto

    Complete Abstract Interpretations made Constructive Roberto Giacobazzi? Francesco Padova, Italy franz@math.unipd.it Abstract.Completeness is a desirable consider he* *re the most general form of completeness, where concrete semantic functions can have

  2. Efficient resolution of security-sensitive values in Android using abstract interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petters, Dmitrij

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis I present a design for an efficient and sound abstract interpretation-based Value Analysis which calculates field values of security-relevant Android API class instances. The analysis is an important component ...

  3. The Interpretation of N+N and V+N Compounds by Spanish Heritage Speakers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Patricia Garza

    2014-09-19

    This study investigates how Spanish heritage language speakers interpret two types of compound constructions in Spanish: head-initial [N+N] N (e.g., obra cumber ‘masterpiece,’ lit. ‘work summit’) and exocentric [V+N] N ...

  4. Priming the interpretation of ambiguous noun-noun compounds in young children 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fialka, Justine K B

    2010-06-30

    Abstract: Investigation into adult language users’ interpretation of ambiguous noun-noun compounds has been considerably explored and documented. However, investigation into the same phenomenon in a population such as young ...

  5. Stratigraphy and Paleodepositional Interpretation of the Lower Nacatoch Formation (Maastrichtian), Robertson County, Texas 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, III, Frank Wayne

    2014-02-03

    were gathered to create cross-sections and maps used to interpret geometries, sediment distribution, grain sizes, fauna, and internal stratigraphy of the lower Nacatoch. In the study area on the northwestern corner of Robertson County, Texas, the lower...

  6. Spin-rotor Interpretation of Identical Bands and Quantized Alignment in Superdeformed A $\\approx$ 190 Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Cizewski; R. Bijker

    1995-06-02

    The ``identical'' bands in superdeformed mercury, thallium, and lead nuclei are interpreted as examples of orbital angular momentum rotors with the weak spin-orbit coupling of pseudo-$SU(3)$ symmetries and supersymmetries.

  7. Seismic reprocessing, interpretation and petroleum prospectivity of the East Cano Rondon Area, Llanos Basin, Colombia 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molina, German D

    1999-01-01

    was to reprocess approximately 200 km of mid 1980s seismic, integrate the interpretation of the seismic data with the available well and geologic data, create a sequence stratigraphic framework and describe the hydrocarbon potential of the area. Reprocessing...

  8. 3D seismic interpretation, reservoir characteristics and petroleum prospects for South Marsh Island OCS Blocks, Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duan, Ling

    2003-01-01

    interpretation has been carried out for the entire area. The objectives of this study are to conduct 3D seismic interpretation, to build a depositional environment model that encompasses the different sedimentary facies and sequence stratigraphic framework...

  9. Be Migration Studies at JET and their Interpretation by an Integrated Model for Plasma Impurity Transport and Wall Composition Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Be Migration Studies at JET and their Interpretation by an Integrated Model for Plasma Impurity Transport and Wall Composition Dynamics

  10. Measurement and Interpretation of Interaction of MeV Energy Protons with Lower Hybrid Waves in JET Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Measurement and Interpretation of Interaction of MeV Energy Protons with Lower Hybrid Waves in JET Plasmas

  11. A knowledge-based approach of seismic interpretation : horizon and dip-fault detection by means of cognitive vision.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A knowledge-based approach of seismic interpretation : horizon and dip-fault detection by means presents preliminary results obtained through a new seismic interpretation methodology based on cognitive building process. The efforts currently made to improve seismic interpretation are mainly focused

  12. CX-010941: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Assessing the Response of Methane Hydrates to Environmental Change at the Svalbard Continental Margin CX(s) Applied: B3.6, Other: Biological & Geochemical Analysis-Lab Date: 09/17/2013 Location(s): Oregon Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  13. TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

    2008-09-29

    Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport, and chemical reactions can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. TOUGHREACT has been developed as a comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator to investigate these and other problems. A number of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. TOUGHREACT can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The code can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can take place subject to either local equilibrium or kinetic controls, with coupling to changes in porosity and permeability and capillary pressure in unsaturated systems. Chemical components can also be treated by linear adsorption and radioactive decay. The first version of the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT was developed (Xu and Pruess, 1998) by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). TOUGHREACT was further enhanced with the addition of (1) treatment of mineral-water-gas reactive-transport under boiling conditions, (2) an improved HKF activity model for aqueous species, (3) gas species diffusion coefficients calculated as a function of pressure, temperature, and molecular properties, (4) mineral reactive surface area formulations for fractured and porous media, and (5) porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure changes owing to mineral precipitation/dissolution (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2000, 2001; Spycher et al., 2003a). Subsequently, TOUGH2 V2 was released with additional EOS modules and features (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT includes all of the previous extensions to the original version, along with the replacement of the original TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991) by TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). TOUGHREACT has been applied to a wide variety of problems, some of which are included as examples, such as: (1) Supergene copper enrichment (Xu et al., 2001); (2) Mineral alteration in hydrothermal systems (Xu and Pruess, 2001a; Xu et al., 2004b; Dobson et al., 2004); (3) Mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline aquifers (Xu et al., 2003b and 2004a); (4) Coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes in boiling unsaturated tuff for the proposed nuclear waste emplacement site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2001; Sonnenthal and Spycher, 2000; Spycher et al., 2003a, b; Xu et al., 2001); (5) Modeling of mineral precipitation/dissolution in plug-flow and fracture-flow experiments under boiling conditions (Dobson et al., 2003); (6) Calcite precipitation in the vadose zone as a function of net infiltration (Xu et al., 2003); and (7) Stable isotope fractionation in unsaturated zone pore water and vapor (Singleton et al., 2004). The TOUGHREACT program makes use of 'self-documenting' features. It is distributed with a number of input data files for sample problems. Besides providing benchmarks for proper code installation, these can serve as a self-teaching tutorial in the use of TOUGHREACT, and they provide templates to help jump-start new applications. The fluid and heat flow part of TOUGHREACT is derived from TOUGH2 V2, so in addition to the current manual, users must have the manual of the TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT provides the following TOUGH2 fluid property or 'EOS' (equation-of-state) modules: (1) EOS1 for

  14. Astronomical Interpretation of the Signs on the Vessel of the Bronze Age (Central Donbass)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vodolazhskaya, Larisa N; Nevsky, Mikhail Yu

    2015-01-01

    The article presents the results of multidisciplinary study carried out with the help of archaeological and astronomical methods. The aim of the study was to analyze and interpret the signs - elements of the composition, incised on the outer side surface of the vessel of the Late Bronze Age, owned to Srubna culture and discovered near the Staropetrovsky village in the northeast of the Donetsk region. The measurements and astronomical calculations revealed that all signs have astronomical meaning. Fourray star has been interpreted as the star Sirius. The sign polyline has been interpreted as an analog of graphic of equation of time in which the testimony of a water clock correspond with average solar time, and the testimony of a sundial - the true solar time. Sign wheel has been interpreted as a complex of lines, reflecting the regularity changing the direction of the shadows from the gnomon at sunset at the equinoxes and solstices. The sign thin polyline has been interpreted as a symbol of change of height of...

  15. VIQI: A New Approach for Visual Interpretation of Deep Web Query Interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boughamoura, Radhouane; Omri, Mohamed Nazih

    2012-01-01

    Deep Web databases contain more than 90% of pertinent information of the Web. Despite their importance, users don't profit of this treasury. Many deep web services are offering competitive services in term of prices, quality of service, and facilities. As the number of services is growing rapidly, users have difficulty to ask many web services in the same time. In this paper, we imagine a system where users have the possibility to formulate one query using one query interface and then the system translates query to the rest of query interfaces. However, interfaces are created by designers in order to be interpreted visually by users, machines can not interpret query from a given interface. We propose a new approach which emulates capacity of interpretation of users and extracts query from deep web query interfaces. Our approach has proved good performances on two standard datasets.

  16. Effect of non-diffusive processes on transport and its interpretation in the tokamak plasma edge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stacey, Weston M. [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)] [Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    An interpretive methodology improved to account for two non-diffusive transport mechanisms—particle pinch and ion orbit loss—was applied to interpret the difference in transport (i) between a discharge with Resonance Magnetic Perturbations and a High confinement mode discharge with otherwise identical operating parameters and (ii) between the Low confinement and High confinement phases of a discharge free of Edge Localized Modes. Differences in particle and energy diffusion coefficients and in the particle pinch were inferred from the experimental data, and the inferred experiment thermal diffusion coefficients were compared with various theoretical predictions. The effect of taking ion orbit loss into account in the interpretation was quantified, and the possible relation of ion orbit loss to the observed transport “edge shortfall” is discussed.

  17. Kara: A System for Visualising and Visual Editing of Interpretations for Answer-Set Programs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kloimüllner, Christian; Pührer, Jörg; Tompits, Hans

    2011-01-01

    In answer-set programming (ASP), the solutions of a problem are encoded in dedicated models, called answer sets, of a logical theory. These answer sets are computed from the program that represents the theory by means of an ASP solver and returned to the user as sets of ground first-order literals. As this type of representation is often cumbersome for the user to interpret, tools like ASPVIZ and IDPDraw were developed that allow for visualising answer sets. The tool Kara, introduced in this paper, follows these approaches, using ASP itself as a language for defining visualisations of interpretations. Unlike existing tools that position graphic primitives according to static coordinates only, Kara allows for more high-level specifications, supporting graph structures, grids, and relative positioning of graphical elements. Moreover, generalising the functionality of previous tools, Kara provides modifiable visualisations such that interpretations can be manipulated by graphically editing their visualisations. ...

  18. The Price of a Dark Matter Annihilation Interpretation of AMS-02 Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vassilis C. Spanos

    2013-12-30

    We discuss challenges to a dark matter annihilation interpretation of the excess positron fraction in the cosmic rays observed by the PAMELA, Fermi-LAT and AMS-02 collaborations. The spectra of positrons from annihilations into the leptonic two-body final states like $\\tau^+ \\tau^-$ or $\\mu^+ \\mu^-$, fit well the AMS-02 data for the positron ratio and the electron flux. Furthermore, we discuss the hadronic annihilation channels $b \\bar{b}$ and $W^+ W^-$. However, this interpretation requires a very large annihilation cross section especially for the hadronic channels, conflicting with the unitarity upper limit, unless the positron flux due to annihilations is boosted by a large factor due to inhomogeneities in the galactic halo. In addition, we present predictions within this interpretation for the positron fraction at higher energies for the antiproton flux, and discuss constraints from $\\gamma$-ray measurements.

  19. A Lorentz-Poincaré type interpretation of the Weak Equivalence Principle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan; Broekaert

    2007-03-22

    The validity of the Weak Equivalence Principle relative to a local inertial frame is detailed in a scalar-vector gravitation model with Lorentz-Poincar\\'e type interpretation. Given the previously established first Post-Newtonian concordance of dynamics with General Relativity, the principle is to this order compatible with GRT. The gravitationally modified Lorentz transformations, on which the observations in physical coordinates depend, are shown to provide a physical interpretation of \\emph{parallel transport}. A development of ``geodesic'' deviation in terms of the present model is given as well.

  20. Spatial resolution and the geologic interpretation of Martian morphology - implications for subsurface volatiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zimbelman, J.R.

    1987-08-01

    Viking Orbiter images of the Acheron Fossae on Mars are presented and analyzed, with an emphasis on the impact of image resolution on the interpretation. High-resolution (less than 10 m/pixel) images reveal small mounds which can be interpreted as aeolian dunes, but these features are not evident on images with resolution of 50 m/pixel or greater. Also reported are the results of a visual inspection of 527 usable high-resolution images: it is found that all of the morphological features identified can arise in the absence of subsurface volatiles. 21 references.

  1. Geochemical and Isotopic Evaluation of Groundwater Movement in Corrective Action Unit 97: Yucca Flat/Climax Mine, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Rev. No.: 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farnham, Irene

    2006-02-01

    This report describes the results of a comprehensive geochemical evaluation of the groundwater flow system in the Yucca Flat/Climax Mine Corrective Action Unit (CAU). The main objectives of this study are to identify probable pathways for groundwater flow within the study area and to develop constraints on groundwater transit times between selected data collection sites. This work provides an independent means of testing and verifying predictive flow models being developed for this CAU using finite element methods. The Yucca Flat/Climax Mine CAU constitutes the largest of six underground test areas on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) specified for remedial action in the ''Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order''. A total of 747 underground nuclear detonations were conducted in this CAU. Approximately 23 percent of these detonations were conducted below or near the water table, resulting in groundwater contamination in the vicinity and possibly downgradient of these underground test locations. Therefore, a rigorous evaluation of the groundwater flow system in this CAU is necessary to assess potential long-term risks to the public water supply at downgradient locations.

  2. EQ3NR, a computer program for geochemical aqueous speciation-solubility calculations: Theoretical manual, user`s guide, and related documentation (Version 7.0); Part 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolery, T.J.

    1992-09-14

    EQ3NR is an aqueous solution speciation-solubility modeling code. It is part of the EQ3/6 software package for geochemical modeling. It computes the thermodynamic state of an aqueous solution by determining the distribution of chemical species, including simple ions, ion pairs, and complexes, using standard state thermodynamic data and various equations which describe the thermodynamic activity coefficients of these species. The input to the code describes the aqueous solution in terms of analytical data, including total (analytical) concentrations of dissolved components and such other parameters as the pH, pHCl, Eh, pe, and oxygen fugacity. The input may also include a desired electrical balancing adjustment and various constraints which impose equilibrium with special pure minerals, solid solution end-member components (of specified mole fractions), and gases (of specified fugacities). The code evaluates the degree of disequilibrium in terms of the saturation index (SI = 1og Q/K) and the thermodynamic affinity (A = {minus}2.303 RT log Q/K) for various reactions, such as mineral dissolution or oxidation-reduction in the aqueous solution itself. Individual values of Eh, pe, oxygen fugacity, and Ah (redox affinity) are computed for aqueous redox couples. Equilibrium fugacities are computed for gas species. The code is highly flexible in dealing with various parameters as either model inputs or outputs. The user can specify modification or substitution of equilibrium constants at run time by using options on the input file.

  3. Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cole, R.D.

    1984-04-01

    Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

  4. Kolstad: EKC Dec 2005 Interpreting Estimated Environmental Kuznets Curves for Greenhouse Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolstad, Charles

    Kolstad: EKC Dec 2005 Interpreting Estimated Environmental Kuznets Curves for Greenhouse Gases to avoid damage from climate change and regulations limiting greenhouse gas emissions at the country level to the Socioeconomic Drivers of Greenhouse Gas Emissions. As the issue was framed (Leifman and Heil, 2005

  5. Interpretation of electron beam induced charging of oxide layers in a transistor studied using electron holography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Interpretation of electron beam induced charging of oxide layers in a transistor studied using in the electron beam direction. The technique offers the prospect of mapping dopant potentials in semiconductors electron beam irradiation in the TEM. Here we attempt to understand the magnitude, location

  6. The Interpretation of Fuzziness Center for Research on Concepts and Cognition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indiana University

    understandable. It is possible to interpret grade of membership, at least in some cases, as the proportion­river = 1=N ile + 0:2=Hudson + 0:7=Danube + 0:4=Rhine + 0:8=Mississippi 2. By being a continuous. A membership function usually maps a continuous numeral variable to a distributed linguistic variable,

  7. An interpretation of size-scale plasticity in geometrically confined systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    An interpretation of size-scale plasticity in geometrically confined systems H. D. Espinosa* , S been identified in both polycrystalline submicron thin films and single crystal micro pillars. The size characteristic dimension. The simulations reveal that two key concepts are at the root of the observed plasticity

  8. Sustainability and its Economic Interpretations John C.V. Pezzey and Michael A. Toman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pezzey, Jack

    1 Chapter 6 Sustainability and its Economic Interpretations by John C.V. Pezzey and Michael A 1987) popularized the concept of sustainability, the idea (if not the precise term) figured prominently is an attempt to determine more precisely under what conditions a sustainable level of per capita consumption

  9. Interpretation of Contracts and the Fragile Base Class Problem Sonal Bhagat, Rushikesh K. Joshi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joshi, Rushikesh K.

    Interpretation of Contracts and the Fragile Base Class Problem Sonal Bhagat, Rushikesh K. Joshi #3, India. Abstract The fragile base class problem arises when the contract between the base class and the derived class is violated by the revision class. This paper focuses on the role of contracts

  10. Raman and IR spectra of butane: Anharmonic calculations and interpretation of room temperature spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potma, Eric Olaf

    Raman and IR spectra of butane: Anharmonic calculations and interpretation of room temperature-principles anharmonic calculations are carried out for the IR and Raman spectra of the CAH stretch- ing bands in butane.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction n-Butane is of great importance in several disciplines

  11. Interpretation of AIRS Data in Thin Cirrus Atmospheres Based on a Fast Radiative Transfer Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    Interpretation of AIRS Data in Thin Cirrus Atmospheres Based on a Fast Radiative Transfer Model of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California B. H. KAHN Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute radiative transfer model has been developed for application to cloudy satellite data assimilation

  12. Seismic interpretation and classification of mud volcanoes of the South Caspian Basin, offshore Azerbaijan. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusifov, Mehdi Zahid

    2005-11-01

    development in the South Caspian Basin is generally linked to faults, which in some instances are detached at the basement level. By using interpreted seismic surfaces it is possible to determine relative time of mud flows from the mud volcanoes. Timing of mud...

  13. J.M. Butler Y-STR Data Interpretation for VA DFS Science Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J.M. Butler ­ Y-STR Data Interpretation for VA DFS Science Advisory Committee August 5, 2008 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech-STRs · SRM 2395 (Human Y Chromosome Standard) ­ http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/strbase/SRM2395.htm variant alleles ­ http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/strbase/STRseq.htm · Supplied ~20% of Yfiler 3561

  14. Interpreting a Fish Food Package Label1 Frank Chapman and Richard Miles2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Jeffrey E.

    FA159 Interpreting a Fish Food Package Label1 Frank Chapman and Richard Miles2 1. This document, and Cosmetic Act, FFDCA). These commodities must also be properly identified and labeled (Nutrition Labeling is to disclose a label or feed tag. The label then serves as an ad- vertising icon and legal document. A food

  15. Physical interpretation of fractional diffusion-wave equation via lossy media obeying frequency power law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Physical interpretation of fractional diffusion-wave equation via lossy media obeying frequency power law W. Chen and S. Holm Simula Research Laboratory, P. O. Box. 134, 1325 Lysaker, Norway (15 March 2003) The fractional diffusion-wave equation (FDWE)1,2 is a recent generalization of diffusion and wave

  16. P-WAVE TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC DATA INTERPRETATION AT RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P-WAVE TIME-LAPSE SEISMIC DATA INTERPRETATION AT RULISON FIELD, PICEANCE BASIN, COLORADO by Donald-lapse seismic surveys, shot by the Reservoir Characterization Project in the fall of 2003 and 2004, at Rulison seismic can monitor tight gas reservoirs, to a limited extent, over a short period of time. Repeat surveys

  17. Language Interpretation and Generation for Football A. Nijholt, R. op den Akker & F. de Jong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    Language Interpretation and Generation for Football Commentary A. Nijholt, R. op den Akker & F. de developed for the textual domain. In MUMIS the extraction technology is applied to the domain of football. In this report we survey a number of research efforts that all deal with football commentary but for which

  18. Interpretations Part 770--page 1 Export Administration Regulations September 28, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernstein, Daniel

    Interpretations Part 770--page 1 Export Administration Regulations September 28, 2001 §770. 1 to part 774 of the EAR) and other provisions of the Export Administration Regulations. §770.2 ITEM) Anti-friction bearings or bearing systems shipped as spares or replacements are classified under Export

  19. SDMOQL: An OQL-based Data Mining Query Language for Map Interpretation Tasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malerba, Donato

    Information System. INGENS (Inductive Geographic Information System) is a prototype GIS which integrates data data mining tasks in INGENS: inducing classification rules and discovering association rules. Only in topographic map interpretation tasks. A prototype of GIS has been built around this application. INGENS

  20. Interpreting a CMS lljjpT Excess With the Golden Cascade of the MSSM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allanach, Ben; Kvellestad, Anders; Raklev, Are

    2015-01-01

    with the lljj/pT excess at the 95% CL. However, the interpretation is in tension with other spar- ticle searches. In particular, the combination of ATLAS searches for jets plus /pT , an ATLAS di-stop search involv- ing two leptons and a CMS four-leptons plus /p...

  1. Complete Abstract Interpretations made Constructive Roberto Giacobazzi ? Francesco Ranzato ?? Francesca Scozzari ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giacobazzi, Roberto

    Complete Abstract Interpretations made Constructive Roberto Giacobazzi ? Francesco Ranzato Belzoni 7, 35131 Padova, Italy franz@math.unipd.it Abstract. Completeness is a desirable, although general form of completeness, where concrete semantic functions can have differ­ ent domains and ranges

  2. Interpretation of clogging effects on the hydraulic behavior of ion treated geotextiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Interpretation of clogging effects on the hydraulic behavior of ion treated geotextiles Lee, K. W, negative ion, filtration, geotextile ABSTRACT: Clogging retention improvement can be increased-ion treatment by using various types of ion- treated geotextiles filters. It was found that the negative ion

  3. Interpretation of Scalar and axial mesons in LHCb from an historical perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. E. Close; A. Kirk

    2015-03-24

    LHCb measurements of $B_{d,s} \\to J/\\psi + X$ are shown to be consistent with historical data on scalar and axial mesons below 2 GeV. This is in contrast to some recent interpretations of these data. Further tests of our hypotheses in other $B_{u,d,s} \\to J/\\psi + X$ decay modes are suggested.

  4. Interpreting wind-driven Southern Ocean variability in a stochastic framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griesel, Alexa

    approximately linearly with increasing wind stress values. A multiplicative stochastic process generates a powerInterpreting wind-driven Southern Ocean variability in a stochastic framework by Philip Sura1,2 and Sarah T. Gille1 ABSTRACT A stochastic model is derived from wind stress and bottom pressure gauge data

  5. A 4D hyperspherical interpretation of q-space A. Pasha Hosseinbor a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Moo K.

    interpretation of q-space by projecting it onto a hypersphere and subsequently modeling the q-space signal via 4D-space indices and numerically estimate the diffusion orientation distribution function (dODF). We also derive displacement during the diffusion time. The EAP can characterize complex neural architecture, such as crossing

  6. A stress interpretation scheme applied to lunar gravity and topography data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A stress interpretation scheme applied to lunar gravity and topography data F. Chambat1 and B to be directly related to the deviatoric stresses without any rheological assumptions. In this approach a new set above the corresponding equipotential surfaces and (2) the stress difference. The method is applied

  7. To support context-based multimodal interpre-tation in conversational systems, we have devel-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abstract To support context-based multimodal interpre- tation in conversational systems, we have on multimodal interfaces (e.g., Bolt, 1980; Cohen el al., 1996; Wahlster, 1991; Zancanaro et al., 1997), we and domain context) to enhance multimodal interpretation. In support of this context-based approach, we have

  8. Choice of reconstructed tissue properties affects interpretation of lung EIT images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Choice of reconstructed tissue properties affects interpretation of lung EIT images Bartlomiej patients. In lung EIT, the EIT inverse problem is commonly linearised and only changes in electrical properties of the lung and artefacts introduced by the linearisation. #12;Choice of reconstructed tissue

  9. Interpretation of North Pacific Variability as a Short and Long Memory Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    for an earlier identification in sign changes than is possible from monitoring climate data alone. It is often of this interest is that possible climate change will occur as an increase in amplitude or a persistent phase Environmental Protection Agency which provides the Center's primary funding. #12;Interpretation of North Pacific

  10. Interpretation of North Pacific Variability as a Short and Long Memory Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    identification in sign changes than is possible from monitoring climate data alone. It is often difficult in interpretation of climatic time series center on two issues. The first is recognizing multidecadal variability climate change will occur as an increase in amplitude or a persistent phase of ongoing large scale

  11. InvenTcl: Interpretive 3D graphics using Open Inventor and Tcl/[incr Tcl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fels, Sidney S.

    InvenTcl: Interpretive 3D graphics using Open Inventor and Tcl/[incr Tcl] Sidney Fels, Silvio Esser­02, JAPAN fels@mic.atr.co.jp +81 774 95 1448 fax: +81 774 95 1408 Abstract Open Inventor is an object oriented 3D graphics toolkit written in C++. Because Open Inventor is written in C++, typical user code

  12. InvenTcl: Interpretive 3D graphics using Open Inventor and Tcl/[incr Tcl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    British Columbia, University of

    InvenTcl: Interpretive 3D graphics using Open Inventor and Tcl/[incr Tcl] Sidney Fels, Silvio Esser-02, JAPAN fels@mic.atr.co.jp +81 774 95 1448 fax: +81 774 95 1408 Abstract Open Inventor is an object oriented 3D graphics toolkit written in C++. Because Open Inventor is written in C++, typical user code

  13. Augmented Geophysical Data Interpretation Through Automated Velocity Picking in Semblance Velocity Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitley, Darrell

    Augmented Geophysical Data Interpretation Through Automated Velocity Picking in Semblance Velocity on the surface. Currently, geophysicists spend hours, days or weeks in front of monitors tracing curves on images of these cor- respond to the bright spots selected by the geophysicist. Next, a combinatorial optimization

  14. Situation-Aware Interpretation, Planning and Execution of User Commands by Autonomous Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebel, Bernhard

    interpretation and planning. (1) a. Please put the dirty plates into the dishwasher. b. Show me the exit, please the following plan: pick-up plate1; pick- up plate2; move-to kitchen; open dishwasher; put plate1 dishwasher; put plate2 dishwasher . If, during execution of this plan, the robot perceives more dirty plates

  15. Book Reviews Semantic Interpretation and the Resolution of Ambiguity Similar discussions apply to parsing. Fifty thousand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Book Reviews Semantic Interpretation and the Resolution of Ambiguity Similar discussions apply, continuing work by Eric Atwell and Geoffrey Sampson at Leeds has greatly improved on this figure, using Theory 6:129-137. Sampson, Geoffrey1986SimulatedAnnealingas a ParsingTech- nique. In Universityof Leeds

  16. The magnetic field and wind confinement of b Cephei: new clues for interpreting the Be phenomenon?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donati, Jean-François

    The magnetic field and wind confinement of b Cephei: new clues for interpreting the Be phenomenon of the weakest detected to date, this magnetic field is strong enough to magnetically confine the wind of b Cep collected by Henrichs et al. and propose for this star a consistent model of the large-scale magnetic field

  17. PALAEOENVIRONMENTAL INTERPRETATION OF THE TRIASSIC SANDSTONES OF SCRABO, COUNTY DOWN, NORTHERN IRELAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benton, Michael

    PALAEOENVIRONMENTAL INTERPRETATION OF THE TRIASSIC SANDSTONES OF SCRABO, COUNTY DOWN, NORTHERN. BUCKMAN,PHILIPS. DOUGHTY,MICHAELJ.BENTON and ANDREWJ.JERAM (Received19 May1997) Abstract The SherwoodSandstone. The sedimentologicaland ichnological data show that these sandstone-dominatedfacies were deposited within a mixed

  18. Interpreting the temperature of water at cold springs and the importance of gravitational potential energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    the temperature of water at cold springs and the importance of gravitational potential energy, Water Resour. ResInterpreting the temperature of water at cold springs and the importance of gravitational potential energy Michael Manga and James W. Kirchner Department of Earth and Planetary Science, University

  19. Aging discrepancies of white spruce affect the interpretation of static age structure in boreal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Macdonald, Ellen

    NOTE Aging discrepancies of white spruce affect the interpretation of static age structure. Our objectives were to determine whether ground-level ring counts underestimate root collar age of understory P. glauca and whether aging errors increase with stand age. Trees were collected from one to nine

  20. Fraunhofer-Center fr Silizium-Photovoltaik CSP INTERPRETATION OF CELL FRACTURE IN PV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    © Fraunhofer-Center für Silizium-Photovoltaik CSP INTERPRETATION OF CELL FRACTURE IN PV MODULES stability of PV modules" #12;© Fraunhofer-Center für Silizium-Photovoltaik CSP Agenda Motivation of busbar (processing) Along busbar (operation wind, snow,...) Cracked cells in a PV Module after

  1. Volumetric Windows: Application to Interpretation of Scientific Data, Shader-based Rendering Method, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borst, Christoph Walter

    Volumetric Windows: Application to Interpretation of Scientific Data, Shader-based Rendering Method for volumetric windows, a 3D analog of the 2D windows metaphor. A set of parameters reflected in both implementation and user menus allows windows to behave like 3D volumetric lenses, clip windows, world

  2. User's Guide of TOUGH2-EGS. A Coupled Geomechanical and Reactive Geochemical Simulator for Fluid and Heat Flow in Enhanced Geothermal Systems Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fakcharoenphol, Perapon; Xiong, Yi; Hu, Litang; Winterfeld, Philip H.; Xu, Tianfu; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2013-05-01

    TOUGH2-EGS is a numerical simulation program coupling geomechanics and chemical reactions for fluid and heat flows in porous media and fractured reservoirs of enhanced geothermal systems. The simulator includes the fully-coupled geomechanical (THM) module, the fully-coupled geochemical (THC) module, and the sequentially coupled reactive geochemistry (THMC) module. The fully-coupled flow-geomechanics model is developed from the linear elastic theory for the thermo-poro-elastic system and is formulated with the mean normal stress as well as pore pressure and temperature. The chemical reaction is sequentially coupled after solution of flow equations, which provides the flow velocity and phase saturation for the solute transport calculation at each time step. In addition, reservoir rock properties, such as porosity and permeability, are subjected to change due to rock deformation and chemical reactions. The relationships between rock properties and geomechanical and chemical effects from poro-elasticity theories and empirical correlations are incorporated into the simulator. This report provides the user with detailed information on both mathematical models and instructions for using TOUGH2-EGS for THM, THC or THMC simulations. The mathematical models include the fluid and heat flow equations, geomechanical equation, reactive geochemistry equations, and discretization methods. Although TOUGH2-EGS has the capability for simulating fluid and heat flows coupled with both geomechanical and chemical effects, it is up to the users to select the specific coupling process, such as THM, THC, or THMC in a simulation. There are several example problems illustrating the applications of this program. These example problems are described in details and their input data are presented. The results demonstrate that this program can be used for field-scale geothermal reservoir simulation with fluid and heat flow, geomechanical effect, and chemical reaction in porous and fractured media.

  3. Mixture Interpretation Principles J.M. Butler February 19, 2008 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech/strbase/training/AAFS2008_MixtureWorkshop.htm 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mixture Interpretation Principles ­ J.M. Butler February 19, 2008 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech to aid interpretation #12;Mixture Interpretation Principles ­ J.M. Butler February 19, 2008 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech... #12;Mixture Interpretation Principles ­ J.M. Butler February 19, 2008 http://www.cstl.nist.gov/biotech

  4. Air pollutant interactions with vegetation: research needs in data acquisition and interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindberg, S.E.; McLauglin, S.B.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of this discussion is to consider problems involved in the acquisition, interpretation, and application of data collected in studies of air pollutant interactions with the terrestrial environment. Emphasis will be placed on a critical evaluation of current deficiencies and future research needs by addressing the following questions: (1) which pollutants are either sufficiently toxic, pervasive, or persistent to warrant the expense of monitoring and effects research; (2) what are the interactions of multiple pollutants during deposition and how do these influence toxicity; (3) how de we collect, report, and interpret deposition and air quality data to ensure its maximum utility in assessment of potential regional environmental effects; (4) what processes do we study, and how are they measured to most efficiently describe the relationship between air quality dose and ultimate impacts on terrestrial ecosystems; and (5) how do we integrate site-specific studies into regional estimates of present and potential environmental degradation (or benefit).

  5. Physical interpretation of point-like interactions of one-dimensional Schrödinger operator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. L. Kulinskii; D. Yu. Panchenko

    2015-03-01

    We consider physical interpretations of non-trivial boundary conditions of self-adjoint extensions for one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger operator of free spinless particle. Despite its model and rather abstract character this question is worth of investigation due to application for one-dimensional nanostructures. The main result is the physical interpretation of peculiar self-adjoint extension with discontinuity of both the probability density and the derivative of the wave function. We show that this case differs very much from other three which were considered before and corresponds to the presence of mass-jump in a sense of works of Ganella et. al., (Journal of Physics A: Mathematical and Theoretical 42, 465207 (2009)) along with the quantized magnetic flux. Real physical system which can be modeled by such boundary conditions is the localized quantazied flux in the Josephson junction of two superconductors with different effective masses of the elementary excitations.

  6. Anisotropic quantum cosmological models: a discrepancy between many-worlds and dBB interpretations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. G. Alvarenga; A. B. Batista; J. C. Fabris; S. V. B. Goncalves

    2002-02-04

    In the isotropic quantum cosmological perfect fluid model, the initial singularity can be avoided, while the classical behaviour is recovered asymptotically. We verify if initial anisotropies can also be suppressed in a quantum version of a classical anisotropic model where gravity is coupled to a perfect fluid. Employing a Bianchi I cosmological model, we obtain a "Schr\\"odinger-like" equation where the matter variables play de role of time. This equation has a hyperbolic signature. It can be explicitly solved and a wave packet is constructed. The expectation value of the scale factor, evaluated in the spirit of the many-worlds interpretation, reveals an isotropic Universe. On the other hand, the bohmian trajectories indicate the existence of anisotropies. This is an example where the Bohm-de Broglie and the many-worlds interpretations are not equivalent. It is argued that this inequivalence is due to the hyperbolic structure of the "Schr\\"odinger-like" equation.

  7. Geological interpretation of Mount Ciremai geothermal system from remote sensing and magneto-teluric analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumintadireja, Prihadi; Irawan, Dasapta E; Irawan, Diky; Fadillah, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    The exploration of geothermal system at Mount Ciremai has been started since the early 1980s and has just been studied carefully since the early 2000s. Previous studies have detected the potential of geothermal system and also the groundwater mechanism feeding the system. This paper will discuss the geothermal exploration based on regional scale surface temperature analysis with Landsat image to have a more detail interpretation of the geological setting and magneto-telluric or MT survey at prospect zones, which identified by the previous method, to have a more exact and in depth local scale structural interpretation. Both methods are directed to pin point appropriate locations for geothermal pilot hole drilling and testing. We used four scenes of Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper or ETM+ data to estimate the surface manifestation of a geothermal system. Temporal analysis of Land Surface Temperature or LST was applied and coupled with field temperature measurement at seven locations. By combining the TTM with ...

  8. Linear vs nonlinear and infinite vs finite: An interpretation of chaos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Protopopescu, V.

    1990-10-01

    An example of a linear infinite-dimensional system is presented that exhibits deterministic chaos and thus challenges the presumably unquestionable connection between chaos and nonlinearity. Via this example, the roles of, and relationships between, linearity, nonlinearity, infinity and finiteness in the occurrence of chaos are investigated. The analysis of these complementary but related aspects leads to: a new interpretation of chaos as the manifestation of incompressible and thus incompressible information and a conjecture about the nonexistence of operationally accessible linear systems.

  9. Interpretation of Array Production Logging Measurements in Horizontal Wells for Flow Profile 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liao, Lulu

    2013-12-12

    .1 Surface production data of Well 1 ...................................................... 21 Table 3.2 Fluid properties of Well 1 ................................................................... 21 Table 3.3 PVT data of Well 1... Emeraude software). The PVT data used in the interpretation is list in Table 3.3. TABLE 3.3 PVT DATA OF WELL 1 Fluid type Condensate with water In separator conditions The salinity 5102.1 ? Gas gravity 0.63 (total dissolved solids in ppm...

  10. Advancing New 3D Seismic Interpretation Methods for Exploration and Development of Fractured Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Reeves

    2005-01-31

    In a study funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and GeoSpectrum, Inc., new P-wave 3D seismic interpretation methods to characterize fractured gas reservoirs are developed. A data driven exploratory approach is used to determine empirical relationships for reservoir properties. Fractures are predicted using seismic lineament mapping through a series of horizon and time slices in the reservoir zone. A seismic lineament is a linear feature seen in a slice through the seismic volume that has negligible vertical offset. We interpret that in regions of high seismic lineament density there is a greater likelihood of fractured reservoir. Seismic AVO attributes are developed to map brittle reservoir rock (low clay) and gas content. Brittle rocks are interpreted to be more fractured when seismic lineaments are present. The most important attribute developed in this study is the gas sensitive phase gradient (a new AVO attribute), as reservoir fractures may provide a plumbing system for both water and gas. Success is obtained when economic gas and oil discoveries are found. In a gas field previously plagued with poor drilling results, four new wells were spotted using the new methodology and recently drilled. The wells have estimated best of 12-months production indicators of 2106, 1652, 941, and 227 MCFGPD. The latter well was drilled in a region of swarming seismic lineaments but has poor gas sensitive phase gradient (AVO) and clay volume attributes. GeoSpectrum advised the unit operators that this location did not appear to have significant Lower Dakota gas before the well was drilled. The other three wells are considered good wells in this part of the basin and among the best wells in the area. These new drilling results have nearly doubled the gas production and the value of the field. The interpretation method is ready for commercialization and gas exploration and development. The new technology is adaptable to conventional lower cost 3D seismic surveys.

  11. How Durable Is It? A Contextualized Interpretation of Fiat in Policy Debate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kearney, Michael W.

    2014-02-01

    How Durable Is It? A Contextualized Interpretation of Fiat in Policy Debate By Michael W. Kearney Michael W. Kearney is a doctoral student in Communication Studies and an assistant debate coach at the University of Kansas. He received a first... references to magic wands, this essay aims to unearth the potential of fiat in policy debate. Thus, the purpose of this essay is to rekindle theoretical discussions by analyzing the meaning of fiat in terms of power and durability. I ultimately argue...

  12. Extraction and Interpretation of gamma N --> Delta Form Factors within a Dynamical Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Julia-Diaz; T. -S. H. Lee; T. Sato; L. C. Smith

    2006-12-15

    Within the dynamical model of Refs. [Phys. Rev. C54, 2660 (1996); C63, 055201 (2001)], we perform an analysis of recent data of pion electroproduction reactions at energies near the Delta(1232) resonance. We discuss possible interpretations of the extracted bare and dressed gamma N --> Delta form factors in terms of relativistic constituent quark models and Lattice QCD calculations. Possible future developments are discussed.

  13. InvenTcl: Making Open Inventor Interpretive with Tcl/[incr Tcl] Sidney Fels, Silvio Esser, Armin Bruderlin, Kenji Mase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fels, Sidney S.

    InvenTcl: Making Open Inventor Interpretive with Tcl/[incr Tcl] Sidney Fels, Silvio Esser, Armin: fels@mic.atr.co.jp Open Inventor is an object oriented 3D graphics toolkit written in C++. Because Open/compile/debug iteration cycle. In this sketch, we introduce InvenTcl which is an interpretive version of Open Inventor

  14. Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: EnergyGateway EditOpenTechniques Jump to: navigation,

  15. Interpretation of cosmological expansion effects on the quantum-classical transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Herzenberg

    2006-06-07

    Recently, what appears to be a fundamental limit associated with the size of an object that separates the quantum behavior characterizing small objects from the classical behavior characterizing large objects has been derived from the Hubble velocity spread in an extended object. This threshold is now examined further and interpreted in terms of diffusion processes in stochastic quantum mechanics. This limiting size that separates quantum behavior from classical behavior is shown to correspond approximately to the diffusion distance of the object over the Hubble time.

  16. Communication: The correct interpretation of surface hopping trajectories: How to calculate electronic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landry, Brian R.; Falk, Martin J.; Subotnik, Joseph E.

    2013-12-07

    In a recent paper, we presented a road map for how Tully's fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) algorithm can be derived, under certain circumstances, from the mixed quantum-classical Liouville equation. In this communication, we now demonstrate how this new interpretation of surface hopping can yield significantly enhanced results for electronic properties in nonadiabatic calculations. Specifically, we calculate diabatic populations for the spin-boson problem using FSSH trajectories. We show that, for some Hamiltonians, without changing the FSSH algorithm at all but rather simply reinterpreting the ensemble of surface hopping trajectories, we recover excellent results and remove any and all ambiguity about the initial condition problem.

  17. The roles of working memory, language proficiency, and training in simultaneous interpretation performance: evidence from Chinese-English bilinguals 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tzou, Yeh-Zu

    2009-05-15

    Simultaneous interpretation is a cognitively demanding task involving concurrent listening and speaking in two languages. Successful performance in this task likely relies on a good working memory, which reflects a person’s ...

  18. Dealing with Interpretation Errors in Tutorial Dialogue Myroslava O. Dzikovska, Charles B. Callaway, Elaine Farrow, Johanna D. Moore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Johanna D.

    mdzikovs,ccallawa,efarrow,jmoore@inf.ed.ac.uk Natalie Steinhauser, Gwendolyn Campbell Naval Air Warfare 3 we de- scribe the design of our system. Section 4 discusses a classification of interpretation

  19. Understanding the faculty experience of teaching using educational technology in the academic capitalism era: an interpretive critical inquiry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demps, Elaine Linell

    2009-05-15

    This interpretive critical inquiry was aimed at coming to understand the experiences of faculty at research universities who teach using educational technology in the present academic capitalism era, and how these experiences ...

  20. Death and Rebirth of the Musical Self: An Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis of Ex-Professional Musicians with Physical Limitations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dickson, Kyle, A

    2012-06-27

    This study phenomenologically explores the experience of losing the ability to play music. Using the method of Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA), 6 interviews with (ex-) professional musicians who had suffered ...

  1. Interpretation of the Helix Planetary Nebula using Hydro-Gravitational-Dynamics: Planets and Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carl H. Gibson; Rudolph E. Schild

    2007-11-02

    Hubble Space Telescope images of the Helix Planetary Nebula are interpreted using the hydro-gravitational-dynamics theory (HGD) of Gibson 1996-2006. HGD claims that baryonic-dark-matter (BDM) dominates the halo masses of galaxies (Schild 1996) as Jovian (Primordial-fog-particle [PFP]) Planets (JPPs) in proto-globular-star-cluster (PGC) clumps for all galaxy halo diameters bounded by stars. From HGD, supernova Ia (SNe Ia) events always occur in planetary nebulae (PNe) within PGCs. The dying central star of a PNe slowly accretes JPP mass to grow the white-dwarf to instability. Plasma jets, winds and radiation driven by contraction and spin-up of the carbon star evaporate JPPs revealing its Oort accretional cavity. SNe Ia events may thus be obscured or not obscured by radiation-inflated JPP atmospheres producing systematic SNe Ia distance errors, so the otherwise mysterious ``dark energy'' concept is unnecessary. HST/ACS and WFPC2 Helix images show >7,000 cometary globules and SST/IRAC images show >20,000-40,000, here interpreted as gas-dust cocoons of JPPs evaporated by the spin powered radiation of the PNe central white-dwarf. Observed JPP masses fossilizes the primordial density existing when the plasma universe fragmented into proto-superclusters, proto-clusters, and proto-galaxies. Pulsar scintillation spectra support the postulated multi-planet atmospheres.

  2. A Non-isothermal Theory for Interpreting Sodium Lines in Transmission Spectra of Exoplanets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heng, Kevin; Lavie, Baptiste; Sing, David K; Ehrenreich, David; Lovis, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We present a theory for interpreting the sodium lines detected in transmission spectra of exoplanetary atmospheres. Previous analyses employed the isothermal approximation and dealt only with the transit radius. By recognising the absorption depth and the transit radius as being independent observables, we develop a theory for jointly interpreting both quantities, which allows us to infer the temperatures and number densities associated with the sodium lines. We are able to treat a non-isothermal situation with a constant temperature gradient. Our novel diagnostics take the form of simple-to-use algebraic formulae and require measurements of the transit radii (and their corresponding absorption depths) at line center and in the line wing for both sodium lines. We apply our diagnostics to the HARPS data of HD 189733b, confirm the upper atmospheric heating reported by Huitson et al. (2012), derive a temperature gradient of $0.4376 \\pm 0.0154$ K km$^{-1}$ and find densities $\\sim 1$ to $10^4$ cm$^{-3}$.

  3. Developing a robust geochemical and reactive transport model to evaluate possible sources of arsenic at the CO[subscript 2] sequestration natural analog site in Chimayo, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Viswanathan, Hari; Dai, Zhenxue; Lopano, Christina; Keating, Elizabeth; Hakala, J. Alexandra; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Zheng, Liange; Gutherie, George D.; Pawar, Rajesh

    2012-10-24

    Migration of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from deep storage formations into shallow drinking water aquifers is a possible system failure related to geologic CO{sub 2} sequestration. A CO{sub 2} leak may cause mineral precipitation/dissolution reactions, changes in aqueous speciation, and alteration of pH and redox conditions leading to potential increases of trace metal concentrations above EPA National Primary Drinking Water Standards. In this study, the Chimayo site (NM) was examined for site-specific impacts of shallow groundwater interacting with CO{sub 2} from deep storage formations. Major ion and trace element chemistry for the site have been previously studied. This work focuses on arsenic (As), which is regulated by the EPA under the Safe Drinking Water Act and for which some wells in the Chimayo area have concentrations higher than the maximum contaminant level (MCL). Statistical analysis of the existing Chimayo groundwater data indicates that As is strongly correlated with trace metals U and Pb indicating that their source may be from the same deep subsurface water. Batch experiments and materials characterization, such as: X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and synchrotron micro X-ray fluorescence ({mu}-XRF), were used to identify As association with Fe-rich phases, such as clays or oxides, in the Chimayo sediments as the major factor controlling As fate in the subsurface. Batch laboratory experiments with Chimayo sediments and groundwater show that pH decreases as CO{sub 2} is introduced into the system and buffered by calcite. The introduction of CO{sub 2} causes an immediate increase in As solution concentration, which then decreases over time. A geochemical model was developed to simulate these batch experiments and successfully predicted the pH drop once CO{sub 2} was introduced into the experiment. In the model, sorption of As to illite, kaolinite and smectite through surface complexation proved to be the key reactions in simulating the drop in As concentration as a function of time in the batch experiments. Based on modeling, kaolinite precipitation is anticipated to occur during the experiment, which allows for additional sorption sites to form with time resulting in the slow decrease in As concentration. This mechanism can be viewed as trace metal 'scavenging' due to sorption caused secondary mineral precipitation. Since deep geologic transport of these trace metals to the shallow subsurface by brine or CO{sub 2} intrusion is critical to assessing environmental impacts, the effective retardation of trace metal transport is an important parameter to estimate and it is dependent on multiple coupled reactions. At the field scale, As mobility is retarded due to the influence of sorption reactions, which can affect environmental performance assessment studies of a sequestration site.

  4. Geophysical Prospecting, 2009, 57, 209224 doi: 10.1111/j.1365-2478.2008.00771.x Laboratory-scale study of field of view and the seismic interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pyrak-Nolte, Laura J.

    -scale study of field of view and the seismic interpretation of fracture specific stiffness Angel Acosta-Colon1, on the interpretation of fracture properties from seismic wave propagation was investigated using an acous- tic lens of the field of view affected the interpretation of the fracture specific stiffness. Many small

  5. Seismic data interpretation using the Hough transform and principal component analysis This article has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text article.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Roland

    Seismic data interpretation using the Hough transform and principal component analysis This article) 61­73 doi:10.1088/1742-2132/8/1/008 Seismic data interpretation using the Hough transform and economical problems. Under such circumstances, seismic interpretation based only on the human

  6. AMS-02 electrons and positrons: astrophysical interpretation and Dark Matter constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattia Di Mauro; Andrea Vittino

    2015-07-30

    We present here a quantitative analysis of the recent AMS-02 data with the purpose of investigating the interplay between astrophysical sources and Dark Matter in their interpretation. First, we show that AMS-02 leptonic measurements are in a remarkably good agreement with the hypothesis that all electrons and positrons are the outcome of primary or secondary astrophysical processes. Then, we add Dark Matter to the picture, in order to establish which are the informations on its annihilation cross section (or lifetime) that can be inferred by fitting AMS-02 data within a scenario in which Dark Matter and astrophysical sources jointly contribute to the different leptonic observables. In particular, by performing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the parameters space of the theory, we attempt at characterizing the significance of a possible Dark Matter contribution to the observed data and we derive robust upper limits on the Dark Matter annihilation/decay rate.

  7. AMS-02 electrons and positrons: astrophysical interpretation and Dark Matter constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Mauro, Mattia

    2015-01-01

    We present here a quantitative analysis of the recent AMS-02 data with the purpose of investigating the interplay between astrophysical sources and Dark Matter in their interpretation. First, we show that AMS-02 leptonic measurements are in a remarkably good agreement with the hypothesis that all electrons and positrons are the outcome of primary or secondary astrophysical processes. Then, we add Dark Matter to the picture, in order to establish which are the informations on its annihilation cross section (or lifetime) that can be inferred by fitting AMS-02 data within a scenario in which Dark Matter and astrophysical sources jointly contribute to the different leptonic observables. In particular, by performing a Markov Chain Monte Carlo sampling of the parameters space of the theory, we attempt at characterizing the significance of a possible Dark Matter contribution to the observed data and we derive robust upper limits on the Dark Matter annihilation/decay rate.

  8. Interpretation of Vector-like Quark Searches: Heavy Gluons in Composite Higgs Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juan Pedro Araque; Nuno Filipe Castro; Jose Santiago

    2015-07-20

    Pair production of new vector-like quarks in pp collisions is considered model independent as it is usually dominated by QCD production. We discuss the interpretation of vector-like quark searches in the case that QCD is not the only relevant production mechanism for the new quarks. In particular we consider the effect of a new massive color octet vector boson with sizeable decay branching ratio into the new quarks. We pay special attention to the sensitivity of the Large Hadron Collider experiments, both in run-1 and early run-2, to differences in the kinematical distributions from the different production mechanisms. We have found that even though there can be significant differences in some kinematical distributions at the parton level, the differences are washed out at the reconstruction level. Thus, the published experimental results can be reinterpreted in models with heavy gluons by simply rescaling the production cross section.

  9. Quantum cosmological solutions: their dependence on the choice of gauge conditions and physical interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. P. Shestakova

    2008-01-30

    In "extended phase space" approach to quantum geometrodynamics numerical solutions to Schrodinger equation corresponding to various choice of gauge conditions are obtained for the simplest isotropic model. The "extended phase space" approach belongs to those appeared in the last decade in which, as a result of fixing a reference frame, the Wheeler - DeWitt static picture of the world is replaced by evolutionary quantum geometrodynamics. Some aspects of this approach were discussed at two previous PIRT meetings. We are interested in the part of the wave function depending on physical degrees of freedom. Three gauge conditions having a clear physical meaning are considered. They are the conformal time gauge, the gauge producing the appearance of Lambda-term in the Einstein equations, and the one covering the two previous cases as asymptotic limits. The interpretation and discussion of the obtained solutions is given.

  10. Quantum Structures of a Model-Universe: An Inconsistency with Everett Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Jeknic-Dugic; M. Dugic; A. Francom

    2013-08-13

    We observe a Quantum Brownian Motion (QBM) Model Universe in conjunction with recently established Entanglement Relativity and Parallel Occurrence of Decoherence. The Parallel Occurrence of Decoherence establishes the simultaneous occurrence of decoherence for two mutually irreducible structures (decomposition into subsystems) of the total QBM model universe. First we find that Everett world branching for one structure excludes branching for the alternate structure and in order to reconcile this situation branching cannot be allowed for either of the structures considered. Second, we observe the non-existence of a third, "emergent structure", that could approximate both structures and also be allowed to branch. Ultimately we find unless world-branching requires additional criteria or conditions, or there is a privileged structure, that we provide a valid model that cannot be properly described by the Everett Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics.

  11. Biasing, Acquisition and Interpretation of a Dense Langmuir Probe Array in NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jaworski, M. A.; Kallman, J.; Kaita, R.; Kugel, H.; LeBlanc, B.; Marsala, R.; Ruzic, D.

    2010-09-22

    A dense array of 99 Langmuir probes has been installed in the lower divertor region of the National Spherical Torus Experiments (NSTX). This array is instrumented with a system of elec- tronics that allows flexibility in the choice of probes to bias as well as the type of measurement (including standard swept, single probe, triple probe and operation as passive floating potential and scrape-off-layer (SOL) current monitors). The use of flush-mounted probes requires careful inter- pretation. The time dependent nature of the SOL makes swept-probe traces difficult to interpret. To overcome these challenges, the single- and triple-Langmuir probe signals are used in comple- mentary fashion to determine the temperature and density at the probe location. A comparison to mid-plane measurements is made. Work is supported by DOE contracts DE-AC02-09CHI1466 and DE-PS02-07ER07-29.

  12. Radar imagery interpretation to assess the hydrocarbon potential of four sites in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-17

    The Republic of the Philippines is intensely interested in the identification, development, and conservation of natural resources. In keeping with this, the Government of the Philippines has recently completed a nationwide sedimentary basin evaluation program to assess hydrocarbon potential and assist in future exploration activities. This program of collection and interpretation of the radar imagery was designed to augment and complement the existing data base. The primary objective of the project was to further the goals of international energy development by aiding the Republic of the Philippines in the assessment of potential petroleum and geothermal prospects within the areas imaged. Secondary goals were to assist the Republic of the Philippines in utilizing state-of-the-art radar remote sensing technology for resource exploration, and to train key Philippines scientists in the use of imaging radar data. 29 refs., 30 figs., 14 tabs.

  13. Executive summary: Radar imagery interpretation to assess the hydrocarbon potential of four sites in the Phillipines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-17

    The Republic of the Philippines is intensely interested in the identification, development, and conservation of natural resources. In keeping with this, the Government of the Philippines has recently completed a nationwide sedimentary basin evaluation program to assess hydrocarbon potential and assist in future exploration activities. This program of collection and interpretation of the radar imagery was designed to augment and complement the existing data base. The primary objective of the project was to further the goals of international energy development by aiding the Republic of the Philippines in the assessment of potential petroleum and geothermal prospects within the areas imaged. Secondary goals were to assist the Republic of the Philippines in utilizing state-of-the-art radar remote sensing technology for resource exploration, and to train key Philippines scientists in the use of imaging radar data. 9 refs., 9 figs., 3 tabs.

  14. Radar imagery interpretation to provide information about several geothermal sites in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-11-17

    The Republic of the Philippines is intensely interested in the identification, development, and conservation of natural resources. In keeping with this, the Government of the Philippines has recently completed a nation-wide sedimentary basin evaluation program to assess hydrocarbon potential and assist in future exploration activities. This program of collection and interpretation of the radar imagery was designed to augment and complement the existing data base. The primary objective of the project was to further the goals of international energy development by aiding the Republic of the Philippines in the assessment of potential geothermal and petroleum prospects within the areas imaged. Secondary goals were to assist the Republic of the Philippines in utilizing state-of-the-art radar remote sensing technology for resource exploration, and to train key Philippines scientists in the use of imaging radar data. 7 refs., 20 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. DIRECT RADIO PROBING AND INTERPRETATION OF THE SUN'S PLASMA DENSITY PROFILE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cairns, I. H.; Lobzin, V. V.; Li, B.; Robinson, P. A.; Warmuth, A.; Mann, G.

    2009-12-01

    The Sun's electron number density profile n{sub e} (r) is vital for solar physics but not well measured or understood within a few solar radii R{sub S} . Here, a new technique extracts n{sub e} (r) directly from coronal type III radio bursts for 40 <= f <= 180 MHz. Unexpectedly, wind-like regions with n{sub e} propor to (r - R{sub S} ){sup -2} are quite common below 2R{sub S} , and coronal type IIIs often have closely linear 1/f - t spectra. The profile n{sub e} propor to (r - R{sub S} ){sup -2} is consistent with the radio data and simulations and is interpreted in terms of conical flow from localized sources (e.g., UV funnels) close to the photosphere. It is consistent with solar wind acceleration occurring for 2 <= r/R{sub S} <= 10.

  16. Interpretation of MINOS data in terms of non-standard neutrino interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopp, Joachim; /Fermilab; Machado, Pedro A.N.; /Sao Paulo U.; Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

    2010-09-01

    The MINOS experiment at Fermilab has recently reported a tension between the oscillation results for neutrinos and anti-neutrinos. We show that this tension, if it persists, can be understood in the framework of non-standard neutrino interactions (NSI). While neutral current NSI (non-standard matter effects) are disfavored by atmospheric neutrinos, a new charged current coupling between tau neutrinos and nucleons can fit the MINOS data without violating other constraints. In particular, we show that loop-level contributions to flavor-violating {tau} decays are sufficiently suppressed. However, conflicts with existing bounds could arise once the effective theory considered here is embedded into a complete renormalizable model. We predict the future sensitivity of the T2K and NOvA experiments to the NSI parameter region favored by the MINOS fit, and show that both experiments are excellent tools to test the NSI interpretation of the MINOS data.

  17. Theoretical and experimental activities on opacities for a good interpretation of seismic stellar probes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turck-Chièze, S; Gilles, D; Thais, F; Bastiani, S; Blancard, C; Busquet, M; Caillaud, T; Cosse, P; Blenski, T; Delahaye, F; Ducret, J E; Faussurier, G; Gilleron, F; Guzik, J; Harris, J W; Kilcrease, D P; Magee, N H; Piau, L; Pain, J C; Poirier, M; Porcherot, Q; Reverdin, C; Silvert, V; Villette, B; Zeippen, C

    2011-01-01

    Opacity calculations are basic ingredients of stellar modelling. They play a crucial role in the interpretation of acoustic modes detected by SoHO, COROT and KEPLER. In this review we present our activities on both theoretical and experimental sides. We show new calculations of opacity spectra and comparisons between eight groups who produce opacity spectra calculations in the domain where experiments are scheduled. Real differences are noticed with real astrophysical consequences when one extends helioseismology to cluster studies of different compositions. Two cases are considered presently: (1) the solar radiative zone and (2) the beta Cephei envelops. We describe how our experiments are performed and new preliminary results on nickel obtained in the campaign 2010 at LULI 2000 at Polytechnique.

  18. Isospin and a possible interpretation of the newly observed X(1576)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo Fengkun [Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918(4), Beijing 100049 (China); CCAST (World Laboratory), P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China); Graduate University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Shen Pengnian [CCAST (World Laboratory), P.O. Box 8730, Beijing 100080 (China); Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 918 (4), Beijing 100049 (China); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 2735 (China); Center of Theoretical Nuclear Physics, National Laboratory of Heavy Ion Accelerator, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2006-11-01

    Recently, the BES Collaboration observed a broad resonant structure X(1576) with a large width being around 800 MeV and assigned its J{sup PC} number to 1{sup --}. We show that the isospin of this resonant structure should be assigned to 1. This state might be a molecule state or a tetraquark state. We study the consequences of a possible K*(892)-{kappa} molecular interpretation. In this scenario, the broad width can easily be understood. Carefully searching this resonant structure in the J/{psi}{yields}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} and J/{psi}{yields}K{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup 0} decays should be important for understanding the structure of X(1567)

  19. Red noise versus planetary interpretations in the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-446

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bachelet, E; Han, C; Greenhill, J; Street, R A; Gould, A

    2015-01-01

    For all exoplanet candidates, the reliability of a claimed detection needs to be assessed through a careful study of systematic errors in the data to minimize the false positives rate. We present a method to investigate such systematics in microlensing datasets using the microlensing event OGLE-2013-BLG-0446 as a case study. The event was observed from multiple sites around the world and its high magnification (A_{max} \\sim 3000) allowed us to investigate the effects of terrestrial and annual parallax. Real-time modeling of the event while it was still ongoing suggested the presence of an extremely low-mass companion (\\sim 3M_\\oplus ) to the lensing star, leading to substantial follow-up coverage of the light curve. We test and compare different models for the light curve and conclude that the data do not favour the planetary interpretation when systematic errors are taken into account.

  20. Interpretation of Scanning Tunneling Quasiparticle Interference and Impurity States in Cuprates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kreisel, A.; Choubey, P.; Berlijn, T.; Ku, W.; Andersen, B. M.; Hirschfeld, P. J.

    2015-05-27

    We apply a recently developed method combining first principles based Wannier functions with solutions to the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equations to the problem of interpreting STM data in cuprate superconductors. We show that the observed images of Zn on the surface of Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 can only be understood by accounting for the tails of the Cu Wannier functions, which include significant weight on apical O sites in neighboring unit cells. This calculation thus puts earlier crude “filter” theories on a microscopic foundation and solves a long standing puzzle. We then study quasiparticle interference (QPI) phenomena induced by out-of-plane weak potential scatterers, andmore »show how patterns long observed in cuprates can be understood in terms of the interference of Wannier functions above the surface. Our results show excellent agreement with experiment and enable a better understanding of novel phenomena in the cuprates via STM imaging.« less

  1. Interpretation of HRTEM images by image simulation: An introduction to theory and practice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Keefe, M.A.

    1994-08-01

    This tutorial describes the use of image simulation as an aid to interpretation of high-resolution transmission electron microscope images. Topics include some image processing as well as image simulation. Image processing is the manipulation of experimental images in order to extract some desired information. Image simulation is the generation of a computed or simulated image from a model structure. It requires a detailed knowledge of the process of image formation in the high-resolution transmission electron microscope. This tutorial concentrates on image simulation, with examples of image processing appearing only as required as illustrations. Because this is an introduction, the theory of image simulation is described, but not explored in depth. The practice of image simulation is covered in sufficient detail to enable the student to understand the functions of the various steps in the computations, and the parameters necessary for their evaluation.

  2. The VIBE Tool of SCALE--Validation, Interpretation, and Bias Estimation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rearden, Bradley T [ORNL] [ORNL; Lefebvre, Robert A [ORNL] [ORNL; Thompson, Adam [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE)] [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE); Rugama, Yolanda [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency] [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency; Soppera, Nicholas [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency] [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency; Bossant, Manuel [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency] [OECD Nuclear Energy Agency

    2009-01-01

    VIBE is a new graphical user interface to identify and interpret sensitivity data from SCALE/TSUNAMI that was distributed with SCALE 6.0. VIBE enables users to group-collapse sensitivity data and then sort and filter the collapsed data to identify important processes in applications or experiments, providing an improved means of preselecting experiments for use in criticality code validation. VIBE also enables users to query DICE, the database of ICSBEP, to gain more information about experiments present in the handbook. Data from VIBE can be exported for criticality code validation studies with other TSUNAMI sensitivity and uncertainty analysis tools. VIBE also supports other sensitivity data distributed by ICSBEP and will be integrated with DICE for the 2009 release of the IHECSBE.

  3. Interpreting scattering wave functions in the presence of energy-dependent interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott Pratt

    2007-11-09

    In scattering theory, the squared relative wave function $|\\phi({\\bf q},{\\bf r})|^2$ is often interpreted as a weight, due to final-state interactions, describing the probability enhancement for emission with asymptotic relative momentum $q$. An equivalence relation also links the integral of the squared wave function over all coordinate space to the density of states. This relation, which plays an important role in understanding two-particle correlation phenomenology, is altered for the case where the potential is energy dependent, as is assumed in various forms of reaction theory. Here, the modification to the equivalence relation is derived, and it is shown that the squared wave function should be augmented by a additional factor if it is to represent the emission enhancement for final-state interactions. Examples with relativistic vector interactions, e.g., the Coulomb interaction, are presented.

  4. Possible Interpretations of IceCube High-Energy Neutrino Events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chee Sheng Fong; Hisakazu Minakata; Boris Panes; Renata Zukanovich Funchal

    2015-03-08

    We discuss possible interpretations of the 37 high energy neutrino events observed by the IceCube experiment in the South Pole. We examine the possibility to explain the observed neutrino spectrum exclusively by the decays of a heavy long-lived particle of mass in the PeV range. We compare this with the standard scenario, namely, a single power-law spectrum related to neutrinos produced by astrophysical sources and a viable hybrid situation where the spectrum is a product of two components: a power-law and the long-lived particle decays. We present a simple extension of the Standard Model that could account for the heavy particle decays that are needed in order to explain the data. We show that the current data equally supports all above scenarios and try to evaluate the exposure needed in order to falsify them in the future.

  5. Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

    2000-08-01

    This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

  6. Loss of sex chromosomes in the hematopoietic disorders: Questions, concerns and data interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slovak, M.L. [City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The significance of sex chromosome aberrations in the hematopoietic disorders has not yet been defined. Interpretive problems stem from (1) the loss of a sex chromosome associated with aging, (2) sex chromosome loss as the sole aberration in leukemia is rare, (3) random -(X or Y) is observed frequently in bone marrow samples, and (4) constitutional sex chromosome anomalies must be ruled out in cancer and follow-up may not be possible. The COH database identified 41 patients (pts) with sex chromosome loss. Loss of a sex chromosome was common in myeloid disorders (21/41). In t(8;21) leukemia (n=10), -(X or Y) was a common secondary karyotypic change. Additionally, -Y was associated with clonal evolution in 2 Ph + CML pts. In 2 elderly pts with myeloid disorders, -(X or Y) was observed in complex karyotypes with dmins; however, in the lymphoproliferative disorders -(X or Y) was noted in elderly pts without apparent pathogenetic significance. Three pts had constitutional sex chromosome aberrations: CML in 45,X; ALL in 47, XXY; and RAEB-IT in mos45,X/46,XX. In the mos45,X/46,XX pt, the leukemic clone was associated with the 45,X line without other karyotypic changes. Non-clonal aberrations were observed in 11 cases; in 3 cases these non-clonal losses were observed in serial samples. In a sex-mismatched BMT case, -(X or Y) in 4 cells was one of the first pathogenetic signs of leukemia relapse. These data suggest (1) interpretation of sex chromosome loss in leukemia must be made with caution and after a baseline sample, (2) non-clonal aberrations should be recorded, and (3) -(X or Y) appears to have pathogenetic significance in the myeloid disorders. Multi-institutional studies are needed to define (1) the incidence of leukemia in pts with constitutional sex chromosome anomalies and (2) the incidence and significance of sex chromosome aberrations as the primary (sole) cytogenetic aberration in leukemia.

  7. A Wave Interpretation of the Compton Effect As a Further Demonstration of the Postulates of de Broglie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ching-Chuan Su

    2006-01-02

    The Compton effect is commonly cited as a demonstration of the particle feature of light, while the wave nature of matter has been proposed by de Broglie and demonstrated by Davisson and Germer with the Bragg diffraction of electron beams. In this investigation, we present an entirely different interpretation of the Compton effect based on the postulates of de Broglie and on an interaction between electromagnetic and matter waves. The speeds of interacting electrons in the Compton scattering are quite fast and its mechanism relies heavily on the mass variation. Thus, based on this wave interpretation, the Compton effect can be viewed as a further demonstration of the postulates of de Broglie for high-speed particles. In addition to the scattered wave, a direct radiation depending on the mass variation is predicted, which provides a means to test the wave interpretation.

  8. Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, February 2011 to January 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Banfield, Jill; Chandler, Darrell P.; Davis, James A.; Hettich, Bob; VerBerkmoes, Nathan; Jaffe, Peter R.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Lipton, Mary; Peacock, Aaron; Williams, Kenneth H.; Yabusaki, Steven B.

    2012-02-15

    The Rifle IFRC continued to make excellent progress during the last 12 months. As noted above, a key field experiment (Best Western) was performed during 2011 as a logical follow-on to the Super 8 field experiment preformed in 2010. In the Super 8 experiment, we successfully combined desorption and bioreduction and deployed a number of novel tracer techniques to enhance our ability to interpret the biogeochemistry of the experiment. In the Best Western experiment, we used the same experimental plot (Plot C) as was used for Super 8. The overarching objective of the Best Western field experiment was to compared the impacts of abiotic vs. biotic increases in alkalinity and to assess the mass of the sorbed pool of U(VI) at Rifle at the field scale. Both of these objectives were met. Preliminary analysis of the data indicate that the underlying biogeochemical data sets were obtained that will support a mechanistic understanding of the underlying processes, including remarkable insight into previously unrecognized microbial processes taking place during acetate amendment of the subsurface for a second time.

  9. The group aspect in the physical interpretation of general relativity theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore Antoci; Dierck-Ekkehard Liebscher

    2009-10-12

    When, at the end of the year 1915, both Einstein and Hilbert arrived at what were named the field equations of general relativity, both of them thought that their fundamental achievement entailed, inter alia, the realisation of a theory of gravitation whose underlying group was the group of general coordinate transformations. This group theoretical property was believed by Einstein to be a relevant one from a physical standpoint, because the general coordinates allowed to introduce reference frames not limited to the inertial reference frames that can be associated with the Minkowski coordinate systems, whose transformation group was perceived to be restricted to the Poincar\\'e group. Two years later, however, Kretschmann published a paper in which the physical relevance of the group theoretical achievement in the general relativity of 1915 was denied. For Kretschmann, since any theory, whatever its physical content, can be rewritten in a generally covariant form, the group of general coordinate transformations is physically irrelevant. This is not the case, however, for the group of the infinitesimal motions that bring the metric field in itself, namely, for the Killing group. This group is physically characteristic of any given spacetime theory, since it accounts for the local invariance properties of the considered manifold, i.e., for its ``relativity postulate''. In the present chapter it is shown what are the consequences for the physical interpretation of some of these solutions whose relativity postulate is of intermediate content, when Kretschmann's standpoint is consistently adhered to.

  10. Integrating 3D seismic curvature and curvature gradient attributes for fracture characterization: Methodologies and interpretational implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao, Dengliang

    2013-03-01

    In 3D seismic interpretation, curvature is a popular attribute that depicts the geometry of seismic reflectors and has been widely used to detect faults in the subsurface; however, it provides only part of the solutions to subsurface structure analysis. This study extends the curvature algorithm to a new curvature gradient algorithm, and integrates both algorithms for fracture detection using a 3D seismic test data set over Teapot Dome (Wyoming). In fractured reservoirs at Teapot Dome known to be formed by tectonic folding and faulting, curvature helps define the crestal portion of the reservoirs that is associated with strong seismic amplitude and high oil productivity. In contrast, curvature gradient helps better define the regional northwest-trending and the cross-regional northeast-trending lineaments that are associated with weak seismic amplitude and low oil productivity. In concert with previous reports from image logs, cores, and outcrops, the current study based on an integrated seismic curvature and curvature gradient analysis suggests that curvature might help define areas of enhanced potential to form tensile fractures, whereas curvature gradient might help define zones of enhanced potential to develop shear fractures. In certain fractured reservoirs such as at Teapot Dome where faulting and fault-related folding contribute dominantly to the formation and evolution of fractures, curvature and curvature gradient attributes can be potentially applied to differentiate fracture mode, to predict fracture intensity and orientation, to detect fracture volume and connectivity, and to model fracture networks.

  11. Quantum Features of Vacuum Flux Impact: An Interpretation of Quantum Phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. L. Herzenberg

    2005-11-25

    Special relativity combined with the stochastic vacuum flux impact model lead to an explicit interpretation of many of the phenomena of elementary quantum mechanics. We examine characteristics of a repetitively impacted submicroscopic particle in conjunction with examination of the ways in which effects associated with the particle's behavior appear in moving frames of reference. As seen from relatively moving frames of reference, the time and location of impacts and recoils automatically exhibit wave behavior. This model leads to free particle waves with frequencies proportional to the energy and wavelengths inversely proportional to the momentum. As seen from relatively moving frames of reference, impacts and their associated recoils can appear to an observer to take place simultaneously at multiple locations in space. For superposed free particle waves corresponding to bidirectional motion, an amplitude that varies sinusoidally with distance results. A governing equation identical in form to the Schroedinger equation is developed that describes the behavior of the impacts and their associated recoils. This approach permits many features of quantum mechanics to be examined within an intuitively visualizable framework.

  12. Dark matter vs. astrophysics in the interpretation of AMS-02 electron and positron data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattia Di Mauro; Fiorenza Donato; Nicolao Fornengo; Andrea Vittino

    2015-07-24

    We perform a detailed quantitative analysis of the recent AMS-02 electron and positron data. We investigate the interplay between the emission from primary astrophysical sources, namely Supernova Remnants and Pulsar Wind Nebulae, and the contribution from a dark matter annihilation or decay signal. Our aim is to assess the information that can be derived on dark matter properties when both dark matter and primary astrophysical sources are assumed to jointly contribute to the leptonic observables measured by the AMS-02 experiment. We investigate both the possibility to set robust constraints on the dark matter annihilation/decay rate and the possibility to look for dark matter signals within realistic models that take into account the full complexity of the astrophysical background. Our results show that AMS-02 data enable to probe efficiently vast regions of the dark matter parameter space and, in some cases, to set constraints on the dark matter annihilation/decay rate that are comparable or even stronger with respect to the ones that can be derived from other indirect detection channels. For dark matter annihilation into muons, the bounds leave room for a possible joint DM+astro interpretation of the data, with a dark matter mass in the 50-80 GeV range (depending on the pulsars modeling) and an annihilation cross section in the range (0.7 {\\div} 3) times the thermal cross section.

  13. Automated method for the systematic interpretation of resonance peaks in spectrum data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Damiano, B.; Wood, R.T.

    1997-04-22

    A method is described for spectral signature interpretation. The method includes the creation of a mathematical model of a system or process. A neural network training set is then developed based upon the mathematical model. The neural network training set is developed by using the mathematical model to generate measurable phenomena of the system or process based upon model input parameter that correspond to the physical condition of the system or process. The neural network training set is then used to adjust internal parameters of a neural network. The physical condition of an actual system or process represented by the mathematical model is then monitored by extracting spectral features from measured spectra of the actual process or system. The spectral features are then input into said neural network to determine the physical condition of the system or process represented by the mathematical model. More specifically, the neural network correlates the spectral features (i.e. measurable phenomena) of the actual process or system with the corresponding model input parameters. The model input parameters relate to specific components of the system or process, and, consequently, correspond to the physical condition of the process or system. 1 fig.

  14. Interpretation of the Helix Planetary Nebula using Hydro-Gravitational-Dynamics: Planets and Dark Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibson, C H; Gibson, Carl H.; Schild, Rudolph E.

    2007-01-01

    Hubble Space Telescope (HST/ACS) images of the Helix Planetary Nebula (NGC 7293) are interpreted using the hydro-gravitational-dynamics theory (HGD) of Gibson 1996-2006. HGD predicts that baryonic-dark-matter (BDM) dominates the mass of galaxies (Schild 1996) as Jovian (promordial-fog-particle, PFP) Planets (JPPs) in proto-globular-star-cluster (PGC) clumps within galaxy halo diameters surrounding its stars. From HGD, supernova Ia (SNe Ia) events normally occur in planetary nebulae (PNe) within PGCs where binary clustering cascades of merging planets produce central binary star systems. As central stars of PNe, binaries exchange mass and accrete JPPs to grow white-dwarfs to $1.44 M_{\\sun}$ instability within ionized (Oort cloud) cavities bounded by evaporating JPPs. SNe Ia events are thus intermittently obscured by radiation-inflated JPP atmospheres producing systematic SNe Ia distance errors, so the otherwise mysterious ``dark energy'' concept is unnecessary. HST/ACS and WFPC2 Helix images show $>7000$ comet...

  15. Automated method for the systematic interpretation of resonance peaks in spectrum data

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Damiano, Brian (Knoxville, TN); Wood, Richard T. (Knoxville, TN)

    1997-01-01

    A method for spectral signature interpretation. The method includes the creation of a mathematical model of a system or process. A neural network training set is then developed based upon the mathematical model. The neural network training set is developed by using the mathematical model to generate measurable phenomena of the system or process based upon model input parameter that correspond to the physical condition of the system or process. The neural network training set is then used to adjust internal parameters of a neural network. The physical condition of an actual system or process represented by the mathematical model is then monitored by extracting spectral features from measured spectra of the actual process or system. The spectral features are then input into said neural network to determine the physical condition of the system or process represented by the mathematical. More specifically, the neural network correlates the spectral features (i.e. measurable phenomena) of the actual process or system with the corresponding model input parameters. The model input parameters relate to specific components of the system or process, and, consequently, correspond to the physical condition of the process or system.

  16. Physical interpretation of fractional diffusion-wave equation via lossy media obeying frequency power law

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. Chen; S. Holm

    2003-03-17

    The fractional diffusion-wave equation (FDWE) is a recent generalization of diffusion and wave equations via time and space fractional derivatives. The equation underlies Levy random walk and fractional Brownian motion and is foremost important in mathematical physics for such multidisciplinary applications as in finance, computational biology, acoustics, just to mention a few. Although the FDWE has been found to reflect anomalous energy dissipations, the physical significance of the equation has not been clearly explained in this regard. Here the attempt is made to interpret the FDWE via a new time-space fractional derivative wave equation which models forequency-dependent dissipations observed in such complex phenomena as acoustic wave propagating through human tissues, sediments, and rock layers. Meanwhile, we find a new bound (inequality (6) further below) on the orders of time and space derivatives of the FDWE, which indicates the so-called sub-diffusion process contradicts the real world frequency power law dissipation. This study also shows that the standard approach, albeit mathematically plausible, is phyiscally inappropriate to derive the normal diffusion equation from the damped wave equation, also known as the Telegrapher's equation.

  17. Using the depth-velocity-size diagram to interpret equilibrium bed configurations in river flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southard, J.B. (Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (USA))

    1990-05-01

    Data from flume studies that report equilibrium bed configuration as well as water temperature, flow depth, flow velocity, and sediment size were used to develop the best approximation to the relationships among the various bed phases (ripples, dunes, lower regime plane bed, upper regime plane bed, and antidunes) in a three-axis graph (depth-velocity-size diagram) with dimensionless measures of mean flow depth, mean flow velocity, and sediment size along the axis. Relationships are shown in a series of depth-velocity and velocity-size sections through the diagram. Boundaries between bed-phase stability fields are drawn as surfaces that minimize, misplacement of data points. A large subset of the data, for which reliable values of bed shear stress are reported, was also used to represent the stability relationships in a graph of dimensionless boundary shear stress against dimensionless sediment size, but with results less useful for fluvial flow interpretation. The diagram covers about one order of magnitude in flow depth. To be useful for river flows, the diagram must be extrapolated in flow depth by about one more order of magnitude, but this is not a serious problem for approximate work. The depth-velocity-size diagram permits prediction of equilibrium bed configuration in river flows when the approximate flow depth and mean flow velocity are known. Because the diagram is essentially dimensionless, the effect of water temperature (via the fluid viscosity) on the bed configuration is easily accounted for by use of the diagram.

  18. LORENTZ-FACTOR-ISOTROPIC-LUMINOSITY/ENERGY CORRELATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND THEIR INTERPRETATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lue Jing; Zou Yuanchuan; Lei Weihua; Wu Qingwen; Wang Dingxiong [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang Bing; Lue Houjun [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Box 454002, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4002 (United States); Liang Enwei, E-mail: zouyc@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: leiwh@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China)

    2012-05-20

    The bulk Lorentz factor of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) ejecta ({Gamma}{sub 0}) is a key parameter to understanding GRB physics. Liang et al. have discovered a correlation between {Gamma}{sub 0} and isotropic {gamma}-ray energy: {Gamma}{sub 0}{proportional_to}E{sup 0.25}{sub {gamma},iso,52}. By including more GRBs with updated data and more methods to derive {Gamma}{sub 0}, we confirm this correlation and obtain {Gamma}{sub 0} {approx_equal} 91E{sup 0.29}{sub {gamma},iso,52}. Evaluating the mean isotropic {gamma}-ray luminosities L{sub {gamma},iso} of the GRBs in the same sample, we discover an even tighter correlation {Gamma}{sub 0} {approx_equal} 249L{sup 0.30}{sub {gamma},iso,52}. We propose an interpretation to this later correlation. Invoking a neutrino-cooled hyperaccretion disk around a stellar mass black hole as the central engine of GRBs, we derive jet luminosity powered by neutrino annihilation and baryon loading from a neutrino-driven wind. Applying beaming correction, we finally derive {Gamma}{sub 0}{proportional_to}L{sup 0.22}{sub {gamma},iso}, which is consistent with the data. This suggests that the central engine of long GRBs is likely a stellar mass black hole surrounded by a hyper-accreting disk.

  19. Dynamical interpretation of average fission-fragment kinetic energy systematics and nuclear scission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nadtochy, P.N. [GSI, Plankstrasse 1, D-64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Omsk State University, Department of Theoretical Physics, Mira Prospect 55-A, RU-644077 Omsk (Russian Federation); Adeev, G.D. [Omsk State University, Department of Theoretical Physics, Mira Prospect 55-A, RU-644077 Omsk (Russian Federation)

    2005-11-01

    A dynamical interpretation of the well-known systematics for average total kinetic energy of fission fragments over a wide range of the Coulomb parameter (600 on the Coulomb parameter. The results of dynamical calculations of within three-dimensional Langevin dynamics show that the mean distance between the centers of mass of nascent fragments at the scission configuration increases linearly with the parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3}. This distance changes approximately from 2.35R{sub 0} for {sup 119}Xe to 2.6R{sub 0} for {sup 256}Fm. In spite of this increase in mean distance between future fragments at scission, the linear dependence of on the parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3} remains approximately valid over a wide range of the Coulomb parameter Z{sup 2}/A{sup 1/3}.

  20. Wisconsinan and Sangamonian climate interpreted from fossil ostracodes and vegetation in south-central Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Curry, B.B. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States)); Forester, R.M. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States)); Zhu, Hong; Baker, R.G. (Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1992-01-01

    The interpretation of paleoclimate during the late Illinoian, Sangamonian, and Wisconsinan Ages in the region of present south-central Illinois has been based on plant macrofossil, pollen, and vertebrate records. The ostracode records identify periods of flow across the basins and perhaps characteristics of groundwater discharge or recharge. Basins with the largest lake-to-catchment-area ratio were most sensitive to changes in effective moisture and hydrochemistry. The Sangamonian included three intervals during which the winters were warmer than those of historical record. These intervals are represented by sediment containing relatively abundant arboreal pollen, notably bald cypress and sweet gum, and the ostracode Heterocypris punctata, which lives in subtropical to tropical lakes and estuaries. H. punctata occurs with other ostracodes that require low salinity; their association indicates that precipitation typically exceeded evaporation and that the basin was affected by throughflow. The Sangamonian ended with two warm, wet episodes that sandwich an interval implying prairie lake conditions. Warmth-loving species are abundantly represented in upper Sangamonian sediments. Such warm, wet episodes are not known to have occurred in the Midcontinent during the Holocene. The top of the Sangamonian in all except the Pittsburgh Basin is capped by a layer of reworked sediment containing fluvial ostracodes and exotic mixtures of pollen, including both spruce and sweet gum but dominated by chenopods. The reworked layer is overlain by Wisconsinan sediment containing abundant pollen of boreal taxa and ostracodes that indicate basin throughflow.

  1. One World, One Reality, and the Everett Relaltive State Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul L. Csonka

    2009-05-06

    We modify the Relative State Interpretation (RSI) of Quantum Mechanics so that it does not imply many worlds and parallel realities. We drop the assumption that probability amplitudes correspond one-to-one with reality: Not all information is contained in amplitudes, and not all amplitudes need be realized. Amplitudes do not "collapse" after a measurement, but evolve continuously, including unrealized ones. After each "event" only one possible outcome is realized. Therefore, if a value is measured, that value is real, all others are not; there is only one reality and one world. Reality content is "quantized" : unity for realized outcomes, zero for all others. It is "conserved": can move along any possible sequence of events, but only one at a time. The modified RSI is is strictly deterministic in the sense that the "global" probability amplitudes of the universe are determined for all times by the laws of physics and the initial conditions. They guide all events. But it is not deterministic in the sense that from the amplitudes one can not predict which outcome actually happens; that represents new information that accumulates as history unfolds. To the extent that information is part of the physical world, the coming into being of the universe is ongoing, even after the Big Bang. All predictions of the two versions agree, except possibly in esoteric, untested cases.

  2. Isoscaling in Light-Ion Induced Reactions and its Statistical Interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. S. Botvina; O. V. Lozhkin; W. Trautmann

    2001-12-14

    Isotopic effects observed in fragmentation reactions induced by protons, deuterons, and alpha particles of incident energies between 660 MeV and 15.3 GeV on 112-Sn and 124-Sn targets are discussed. The exponential scaling of the yield ratios with the third component of the fragment isospin (N-Z)/2 is observed in all reactions, with scaling parameters that depend on the incident energy. Breakup temperatures for these reactions are deduced from double ratios of isotopic yields and tested for their relation with the isoscaling parameters. The quantum statistical (QSM) and the statistical multifragmentation (SMM) models are used for interpreting the results. The observed isoscaling can be understood as a consequence of a statistical origin of the emitted fragments in these reactions. The SMM analysis shows that the exponent describing the isoscaling behavior is proportional to the strength of the symmetry term of the fragment binding energy. Using this result, a symmetry-term coefficient (approximately 22.5 MeV) for fragments at breakup is deduced from the experimental data. This is close to the standard value and supports SMM assumptions for the breakup configuration. An alternative method of determining the symmetry-energy coefficient, by using isotope distribution widths, is also discussed.

  3. Galvanic interpretation of self-potential signals associated withmicrobial sulfate-reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Kenneth H.; Hubbard, Susan S.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2007-05-02

    We have evaluated the usefulness of the self-potential (SP)geophysical method to track the onset and location of microbialsulfate-reduction in saturated sediments during organic carbon amendment.Following stimulation of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) by addition oflactate, anomalous voltages exceeding 600 mV correlated in space and timewith the accumulation of dissolved sulfide. Abiotic experiments in whichthe sulfide concentration at the measurement electrode was systematicallyvaried showed a positive correlation between the magnitude of the SPanomaly and differences in the half-cell potential associated with themeasurement and reference electrodes. Thus, we infer that the SPanomaliesresulted from electrochemical differences that developedbetween sulfide-rich regions and areas having higher oxidation potential.In neither experiment did generation of an SP anomaly require thepresence of an in situ electronic conductor, as is required by othermodels. These findings emphasize the importance of incorporation ofelectrochemical effects at electrode surfaces in interpretation of SPdata from geophysical studies. We conclude that SP measurements provide aminimally invasive means for monitoring stimulated sulfate-reductionwithin saturated sediments.

  4. The physical meaning of the "boost-rotation symmetric" solutions within the general interpretation of Einstein's theory of gravitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Antoci; D. -E. Liebscher; L. Mihich

    2005-08-11

    The answer to the question, what physical meaning should be attributed to the so-called boost-rotation symmetric exact solutions to the field equations of general relativity, is provided within the general interpretation scheme for the ``theories of relativity'', based on group theoretical arguments, and set forth by Erich Kretschmann already in the year 1917.

  5. Curriculum-Based Interpretive Programs FOR 571-501 and 571-588, Stephen F. Austin State University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coble, Theresa G.

    SYLLABUS 1 Curriculum-Based Interpretive Programs FOR 571-501 and 571-588, Stephen F. Austin State, develop, and present an effective curriculum-based program. The course will explore how to incorporate, teaching and learning principles, best practices, and related educational theory into curriculum

  6. Neural network interpretation of LWD data (ODP Leg 170) conrms complete sediment subduction at the Costa Rica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bornholdt, Stefan

    Neural network interpretation of LWD data (ODP Leg 170) con¢rms complete sediment subduction-While-Drill- ing (LWD) geophysical data in terms of lithology using an arti¢cial neural network. In combination of the underthrust section. LWD data are measured during the drilling process at the frontal part of the drill string

  7. Mayne, P.W. (2014). KN2: Interpretation of geotechnical parameters from seismic piezocone tests. Proceedings, 3rd

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayne, Paul W.

    2014-01-01

    Mayne, P.W. (2014). KN2: Interpretation of geotechnical parameters from seismic piezocone tests.2 Seismic piezocone penetration test (SCPTu) Horizontally-oriented geophones within the penetrometer can stratigraphy at this site is evident and substantiates the importance of site investigative practices

  8. Interpreting multicomponent seismic data in the Gulf of Mexico for shallow sedimentary properties: methodology and case history

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    OTC 15118 Interpreting multicomponent seismic data in the Gulf of Mexico for shallow sedimentary a methodology for manually establishing tie points of depth-equivalent surfaces in P-P and P-S seismic data volumes derived from a 4-C ocean bottom seismic survey using seismic attribute volumes viewed in time

  9. Ozone production efficiency and NOx depletion in an urban plume: Interpretation of field observations and implications for evaluating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3 to a wide span of NOx and VOC emission changes. Properly constrained and well-evaluated modelsOzone production efficiency and NOx depletion in an urban plume: Interpretation of field observations and implications for evaluating O3-NOx-VOC sensitivity Rahul A. Zaveri,1 Carl M. Berkowitz,1

  10. A single-substrate model to interpret intra-annual stable isotope signals in tree-ring cellulose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A single-substrate model to interpret intra-annual stable isotope signals in tree-ring cellulose J cellulose (d13 Ccellulose and d18 Ocellulose, respectively) reveal well-defined seasonal variations or oxygen isotope composition of whole wood (or cellulose extracted from wood) to temperature, relative

  11. SEI 03 Microseisms interpreted as coastal reflections of ocean waves generated by storms based on Mexico Array data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    SEI 03 Microseisms interpreted as coastal reflections of ocean waves generated by storms based relative to the stations. Both theories describe microseisms generated in interfering ocean surface waves will call the HR theory, proposes that the microseisms are generated by the ocean waves from the storms

  12. Using Speech Input for Image Interpretation and Annotation \\Lambda Rohini K. Srihari and Zhongfei Zhang and Rajiv Chopra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhongfei "Mark"

    text have been formulated. A control stucture has been designed which efficiently exploits the above interpretation technology. The design and implementation of a system, Show&Tell, a multimedia system for semi language processing and im­ age understanding, is designed to facilitate the work of image analysts (IA

  13. A Comprehensive Statistically-Based Method to Interpret Real-Time Flowing Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keita Yoshioka; Pinan Dawkrajai; Analis A. Romero; Ding Zhu; A. D. Hill; Larry W. Lake

    2007-01-15

    With the recent development of temperature measurement systems, continuous temperature profiles can be obtained with high precision. Small temperature changes can be detected by modern temperature measuring instruments such as fiber optic distributed temperature sensor (DTS) in intelligent completions and will potentially aid the diagnosis of downhole flow conditions. In vertical wells, since elevational geothermal changes make the wellbore temperature sensitive to the amount and the type of fluids produced, temperature logs can be used successfully to diagnose the downhole flow conditions. However, geothermal temperature changes along the wellbore being small for horizontal wells, interpretations of a temperature log become difficult. The primary temperature differences for each phase (oil, water, and gas) are caused by frictional effects. Therefore, in developing a thermal model for horizontal wellbore, subtle temperature changes must be accounted for. In this project, we have rigorously derived governing equations for a producing horizontal wellbore and developed a prediction model of the temperature and pressure by coupling the wellbore and reservoir equations. Also, we applied Ramey's model (1962) to the build section and used an energy balance to infer the temperature profile at the junction. The multilateral wellbore temperature model was applied to a wide range of cases at varying fluid thermal properties, absolute values of temperature and pressure, geothermal gradients, flow rates from each lateral, and the trajectories of each build section. With the prediction models developed, we present inversion studies of synthetic and field examples. These results are essential to identify water or gas entry, to guide flow control devices in intelligent completions, and to decide if reservoir stimulation is needed in particular horizontal sections. This study will complete and validate these inversion studies.

  14. Interpretation of ensembles created by multiple iterative rebuilding of macromolecular models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Grosse-Kunstleve, Ralf W.; Afonine, Pavel V.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Zwart, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Building 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Read, Randy J. [Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 0XY (United Kingdom); Turk, Dusan [Jozef Stefan Institute, Jamova 39, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Hung, Li-Wei [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-05-01

    Heterogeneity in ensembles generated by independent model rebuilding principally reflects the limitations of the data and of the model-building process rather than the diversity of structures in the crystal. Automation of iterative model building, density modification and refinement in macromolecular crystallography has made it feasible to carry out this entire process multiple times. By using different random seeds in the process, a number of different models compatible with experimental data can be created. Sets of models were generated in this way using real data for ten protein structures from the Protein Data Bank and using synthetic data generated at various resolutions. Most of the heterogeneity among models produced in this way is in the side chains and loops on the protein surface. Possible interpretations of the variation among models created by repetitive rebuilding were investigated. Synthetic data were created in which a crystal structure was modelled as the average of a set of ‘perfect’ structures and the range of models obtained by rebuilding a single starting model was examined. The standard deviations of coordinates in models obtained by repetitive rebuilding at high resolution are small, while those obtained for the same synthetic crystal structure at low resolution are large, so that the diversity within a group of models cannot generally be a quantitative reflection of the actual structures in a crystal. Instead, the group of structures obtained by repetitive rebuilding reflects the precision of the models, and the standard deviation of coordinates of these structures is a lower bound estimate of the uncertainty in coordinates of the individual models.

  15. Models to interpret bed-form geometries from cross-bed data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthi, S.M. (Schlumberger-Doll Research, Ridgefield, CT (USA)); Banavar, J.R. (Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park (USA)); Bayer, U. (Institute Erdoel und Organische Chemie, Kernforschungsanlage Juelich (West Germany))

    1990-05-01

    To improve the understanding of the relation of cross-bed azimuth distributions to bed-forms, geometric models were developed for migrating bed forms using a minimum number of parameters. Semielliptical and sinusoidal bed-form crestlines were modeled with curvature and sinuosity as parameters. Both bedform crestlines are propagated at various angles of migration over a finite area of deposition. Two computational approaches are used, a statistical random sampling (Monte Carlo) technique over the area of the deposit, and an analytical method based on topology and differential geometry. The resulting foreset azimuth distributions provide a catalog for a variety of simulations. The resulting thickness distributions have a simple shape and can be combined with the azimuth distributions to further constrain the cross-strata geometry. Paleocurrent directions obtained by these models can differ substantially from other methods, especially for obliquely migrating low-curvature bed forms. Interpretation of foreset azimuth data from outcrops and wells can be done either by visual comparison with the cataloged distributions, or by iterative computational fits. Studied examples include eolian cross-strata from the Permian Rotliegendes in the North Sea, fluvial dunes from the Devonian in the Catskills (New York state), the Triassic Schilfsandstein (Federal Republic of Germany), and the Paleozoic-Jurassic of the Western Desert (Egypt), as well as recent tidal dunes from the German coast of the North Sea and tidal cross-strata from the Devonian Koblentzquartzit (Federal Republic of Germany). In all cases the semi-elliptical bed-form model gave a good fit to the data, suggesting that it may be applicable over a wide range of bed forms. The data from the Western Desert could be explained only by data scatter due to channel sinuosity combined with the scatter attributed to the ellipticity of the bed-form crestlines.

  16. Waste Isolation Pilot Plant simulated RH TRU waste experiments: Data and interpretation pilot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molecke, M.A.; Argueello, G.J.; Beraun, R.

    1993-04-01

    The simulated, i.e., nonradioactive remote-handled transuranic waste (RH TRU) experiments being conducted underground in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were emplaced in mid-1986 and have been in heated test operation since 9/23/86. These experiments involve the in situ, waste package performance testing of eight full-size, reference RH TRU containers emplaced in horizontal, unlined test holes in the rock salt ribs (walls) of WIPP Room T. All of the test containers have internal electrical heaters; four of the test emplacements were filled with bentonite and silica sand backfill materials. We designed test conditions to be ``near-reference`` with respect to anticipated thermal outputs of RH TRU canisters and their geometrical spacing or layout in WIPP repository rooms, with RH TRU waste reference conditions current as of the start date of this test program. We also conducted some thermal overtest evaluations. This paper provides a: detailed test overview; comprehensive data update for the first 5 years of test operations; summary of experiment observations; initial data interpretations; and, several status; experimental objectives -- how these tests support WIPP TRU waste acceptance, performance assessment studies, underground operations, and the overall WIPP mission; and, in situ performance evaluations of RH TRU waste package materials plus design details and options. We provide instrument data and results for in situ waste container and borehole temperatures, pressures exerted on test containers through the backfill materials, and vertical and horizontal borehole-closure measurements and rates. The effects of heat on borehole closure, fracturing, and near-field materials (metals, backfills, rock salt, and intruding brine) interactions were closely monitored and are summarized, as are assorted test observations. Predictive 3-dimensional thermal and structural modeling studies of borehole and room closures and temperature fields were also performed.

  17. A Comprehensive Statistically-Based Method to Interpret Real-Time Flowing Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinan Dawkrajai; Keita Yoshioka; Analis A. Romero; Ding Zhu; A.D. Hill; Larry W. Lake

    2005-10-01

    This project is motivated by the increasing use of distributed temperature sensors for real-time monitoring of complex wells (horizontal, multilateral and multi-branching wells) to infer the profiles of oil, gas, and water entry. Measured information can be used to interpret flow profiles along the wellbore including junction and build section. In this second project year, we have completed a forward model to predict temperature and pressure profiles in complex wells. As a comprehensive temperature model, we have developed an analytical reservoir flow model which takes into account Joule-Thomson effects in the near well vicinity and multiphase non-isothermal producing wellbore model, and couples those models accounting mass and heat transfer between them. For further inferences such as water coning or gas evaporation, we will need a numerical non-isothermal reservoir simulator, and unlike existing (thermal recovery, geothermal) simulators, it should capture subtle temperature change occurring in a normal production. We will show the results from the analytical coupled model (analytical reservoir solution coupled with numerical multi-segment well model) to infer the anomalous temperature or pressure profiles under various conditions, and the preliminary results from the numerical coupled reservoir model which solves full matrix including wellbore grids. We applied Ramey's model to the build section and used an enthalpy balance to infer the temperature profile at the junction. The multilateral wellbore temperature model was applied to a wide range of cases varying fluid thermal properties, absolute values of temperature and pressure, geothermal gradients, flow rates from each lateral, and the trajectories of each build section.

  18. Biothems: Sequence stratigraphic units and their implications for regional tectono-stratigraphic interpretations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, H.R. ); Frye, M.W. ); Couples, G.D. )

    1992-01-01

    Biothems are regional wedge- or lens-shaped bodies of strata that are bounded shelfward or cratonward by paleontologically recognizable unconformities; generally thicken on marine shelves, where they are typically conformable with underlying and overlying biothems; are commonly thinner or represent starved sequences further basinward; and in their most basinward extent, are either bounded by biostratigraphically recognizable unconformities or are conformable with underlying and overlying biothems. As recognized to date, biothems have a logical distribution of faunal and floral components, as well as facies groupings that represent internally consistent and logical sequences of depositional environments. A west-to-east transect within the North American Mississippian System which extends from the Basin and Range Province, across the Transcontinental Arch (TA), into the Anadarko Basin, was constructed to demonstrate the regional distribution and tectono-stratigraphic significance of biothems relative to the axis of the TA. The relationships portrayed on the transect, tied to an understanding of North American Mississippian paleogeography, imply that biothems deposited during relative highstand events on one flank of the TA are time-equivalent to biothems deposited during relative lowstand events on the opposite flank of the TA. This distribution is interpreted to have been controlled by intraplate tectonic events that formed piano key basins along the flanks of the TA. The spatial patterns of these basins are not consistent with published models of basin evolution. A further conclusion is that the lack of coincident, transgressive or regressive Mississippian biothems on either flank of the TA suggests that it is inadvisable to impose the Mississippi Valley-derived eustasy curve on western flank depositional sequences.

  19. DOE/SC0001389 Final technical report: Investigation of uranium attenuation and release at column and pore scales in response to advective geochemical gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, Kaye S.; Zhu, Wenyi; Barnett, Mark O.

    2013-05-13

    Experimental approach Column experiments were devised to investigate the role of changing fluid composition on mobility of uranium through a sequence of geologic media. Fluids and media were chosen to be relevant to the ground water plume emanating from the former S-3 ponds at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFC) site. Synthetic ground waters were pumped upwards at 0.05 mL/minute for 21 days through layers of quartz sand alternating with layers of uncontaminated soil, quartz sand mixed with illite, quartz sand coated with iron oxides, and another soil layer. Increases in pH or concentration of phosphate, bicarbonate, or acetate were imposed on the influent solutions after each 7 pore volumes while uranium (as uranyl) remained constant at 0.1mM. A control column maintained the original synthetic groundwater composition with 0.1mM U. Pore water solutions were extracted to assess U retention and release in relation to the advective ligand or pH gradients. Following the column experiments, subsamples from each layer were characterized using microbeam X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with X-ray fluorescence mapping and compared to sediment core samples from the ORIFC, at SSRL Beam Line 2-3. Results U retention of 55 â?? 67 mg occurred in phosphate >pH >control >acetate >carbonate columns. The mass of U retained in the first-encountered quartz layer in all columns was highest and increased throughout the experiment. The rate of increase in acetate- and bicarbonate-bearing columns declined after ligand concentrations were raised. U also accumulated in the first soil layer; the pH-varied column retained most, followed by the increasing-bicarbonate column. The mass of U retained in the upper layers was far lower. Speciation of U, interpreted from microbeam XANES spectra and XRF maps, varied within and among the columns. Evidence of minor reduction to U(IV) was observed in the first-encountered quartz layer in the phosphate, bicarbonate, and pH columns while only U(VI) was observed in the control and acetate columns. In the soil layer, the acetate and bicarbonate columns both indicate minor reduction to U(IV), but U(VI) predominated in all columns. In the ORIFC soils, U was consistently present as U(VI); sorption appears to be the main mechanism of association for U present with Fe and/or Mn, while U occurring with P appears in discrete particles consistent with a U mineral phase. U in soil locations with no other elemental associations shown by XRF are likely uranium oxide phases.

  20. Dose impact in radiographic lung injury following lung SBRT: Statistical analysis and geometric interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Victoria; Kishan, Amar U.; Cao, Minsong; Low, Daniel; Lee, Percy; Ruan, Dan

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: To demonstrate a new method of evaluating dose response of treatment-induced lung radiographic injury post-SBRT (stereotactic body radiotherapy) treatment and the discovery of bimodal dose behavior within clinically identified injury volumes. Methods: Follow-up CT scans at 3, 6, and 12 months were acquired from 24 patients treated with SBRT for stage-1 primary lung cancers or oligometastic lesions. Injury regions in these scans were propagated to the planning CT coordinates by performing deformable registration of the follow-ups to the planning CTs. A bimodal behavior was repeatedly observed from the probability distribution for dose values within the deformed injury regions. Based on a mixture-Gaussian assumption, an Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm was used to obtain characteristic parameters for such distribution. Geometric analysis was performed to interpret such parameters and infer the critical dose level that is potentially inductive of post-SBRT lung injury. Results: The Gaussian mixture obtained from the EM algorithm closely approximates the empirical dose histogram within the injury volume with good consistency. The average Kullback-Leibler divergence values between the empirical differential dose volume histogram and the EM-obtained Gaussian mixture distribution were calculated to be 0.069, 0.063, and 0.092 for the 3, 6, and 12 month follow-up groups, respectively. The lower Gaussian component was located at approximately 70% prescription dose (35 Gy) for all three follow-up time points. The higher Gaussian component, contributed by the dose received by planning target volume, was located at around 107% of the prescription dose. Geometrical analysis suggests the mean of the lower Gaussian component, located at 35 Gy, as a possible indicator for a critical dose that induces lung injury after SBRT. Conclusions: An innovative and improved method for analyzing the correspondence between lung radiographic injury and SBRT treatment dose has been demonstrated. Bimodal behavior was observed in the dose distribution of lung injury after SBRT. Novel statistical and geometrical analysis has shown that the systematically quantified low-dose peak at approximately 35 Gy, or 70% prescription dose, is a good indication of a critical dose for injury. The determined critical dose of 35 Gy resembles the critical dose volume limit of 30 Gy for ipsilateral bronchus in RTOG 0618 and results from previous studies. The authors seek to further extend this improved analysis method to a larger cohort to better understand the interpatient variation in radiographic lung injury dose response post-SBRT.

  1. Surface speciation of yttrium and neodymium sorbed on rutile: Interpretations using the change distribution model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ridley, Mora K.; Hiemstra, T; Machesky, Michael L.; Wesolowski, David J; Van Riemsdijk, Willem H.

    2012-01-01

    The adsorption of Y3+ and Nd3+ onto rutile has been evaluated over a wide range of pH (3 11) and surface loading conditions, as well as at two ionic strengths (0.03 and 0.3 m), and temperatures (25 and 50 C). The experimental results reveal the same adsorption behavior for the two trivalent ions onto the rutile surface, with Nd3+ first adsorbing at slightly lower pH values. The adsorption of both Y3+ and Nd3+ commences at pH values below the pHznpc of rutile. The experimental results were evaluated using a charge distribution (CD) and multisite complexation (MUSIC) model, and Basic Stern layer description of the electric double layer (EDL). The coordination geometry of possible surface complexes were constrained by molecular-level information obtained from X-ray standing wave measurements and molecular dynamic (MD) simulation studies. X-ray standing wave measurements showed an inner-sphere tetradentate complex for Y3+ adsorption onto the (110) rutile surface (Zhang et al., 2004b). TheMDsimulation studies suggest additional bidentate complexes may form. The CD values for all surface species were calculated based on a bond valence interpretation of the surface complexes identified by X-ray and MD. The calculated CD values were corrected for the effect of dipole orientation of interfacial water. At low pH, the tetradentate complex provided excellent fits to the Y3+ and Nd3+ experimental data. The experimental and surface complexation modeling results show a strong pH dependence, and suggest that the tetradentate surface species hydrolyze with increasing pH. Furthermore, with increased surface loading of Y3+ on rutile the tetradentate binding mode was augmented by a hydrolyzed-bidentate Y3+ surface complex. Collectively, the experimental and surface complexation modeling results demonstrate that solution chemistry and surface loading impacts Y3+ surface speciation. The approach taken of incorporating molecular-scale information into surface complexation models (SCMs) should aid in elucidating a fundamental understating of ion-adsorption reactions.

  2. A discussion on the interpretation and characterization of metafilms/metasurfaces: the two-dimensional equivalent of metamaterials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'hara, John F; Azad, Abul K

    2008-01-01

    A metafilm (also referred to as a metasurface) is the surface equivalent of a metamaterial. More precisely, a metafilm is a surface distribution of suitable chosen electrically small scatterers. Metafilms are becoming popular as an alternative to full three-dimensional metamaterials. Unfortunately, many papers in the literature present incorrect interpretations and mischaracterizations of these metafilms. In fact, some of the characterizations presented in the literature result in non-unique parameters for a uniquely defined metafilm. In this paper we discuss an appropriate interpretation and characterization of metafilms and present a correct manner to characterize a metafilm. Additionally, we illustrate the error that results from an incorrect characterization of metafilms. We present various examples to emphasize these points. Finally we present a retrieval approach for determining the uniquely defined quantities (the electric and magnetic susceptibilities of its constituent scatterers) that characterize a metafilm.

  3. The Moho: Boundary above upper mantle peridotites or lower crustal eclogites? A global review and new interpretations for passive margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Dietmar

    and new interpretations for passive margins Rolf Mjelde a, , Alexey Goncharov b , R. Dietmar Müller c, Building F05, NSW 2006, Australia a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 21 July: Eclogites Moho Wide-angle seismic Passive margins We have performed a global study of 2D crustal scale wide

  4. A CUDA SIMT Interpreter for Genetic Programming W. B. Langdon CREST centre, King's College, London, WC2R 2LS, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    Vidia Tesla T10P. Using sub-machine code GP a sustain peak performance of 212 billion GP operations per second but interpreted code is slower than optimised compiler generated machine code. GPU interpreters typically gain sampling of test cases with a population of a quarter of a million programs a single T10P Tesla is able

  5. The Seismic Analyzer: Interpreting and Illustrating 2D Seismic Data Daniel Patel, Christopher Giertsen, John Thurmond, John Gjelberg, and M. Eduard Groller, Member, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    signs of hydrocarbons is discovered, 3D seismic reflection data is collected and analyzed. If further reservoirs. We improve the search of seismic structures by precalculating the horizon structures and interpreters. Index Terms--Seismic interpretation, Illustrative rendering, Seismic attributes, Top

  6. Inversion-based method for interpretation of logging-while-drilling density measurements acquired in high-angle and horizontal wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    Inversion-based method for interpretation of logging-while-drilling density measurements acquired-based inversion method to improve the petrophysical interpretation of logging-while-drilling density measurements measurements. INTRODUCTION Conventional processing of logging-while-drilling (LWD) den- sity measurements

  7. Quantum Information Biology: from information interpretation of quantum mechanics to applications in molecular biology and cognitive psychology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masanari Asano; Irina Basieva; Andrei Khrennikov; Masanori Ohya; Yoshiharu Tanaka; Ichiro Yamato

    2015-03-09

    We discuss foundational issues of quantum information biology (QIB) -- one of the most successful applications of the quantum formalism outside of physics. QIB provides a multi-scale model of information processing in bio-systems: from proteins and cells to cognitive and social systems. This theory has to be sharply distinguished from "traditional quantum biophysics". The latter is about quantum bio-physical processes, e.g., in cells or brains. QIB models the dynamics of information states of bio-systems. It is based on the quantum-like paradigm: complex bio-systems process information in accordance with the laws of quantum information and probability. This paradigm is supported by plenty of statistical bio-data collected at all scales, from molecular biology and genetics/epigenetics to cognitive psychology and behavioral economics. We argue that the information interpretation of quantum mechanics (its various forms were elaborated by Zeilinger and Brukner, Fuchs and Mermin, and D' Ariano) is the most natural interpretation of QIB. We also point out that QBIsm (Quantum Bayesianism) can serve to find a proper interpretation of bio-quantum probabilities. Biologically QIB is based on two principles: a) adaptivity; b) openness (bio-systems are fundamentally open). These principles are mathematically represented in the framework of a novel formalism -- quantum adaptive dynamics which, in particular, contains the standard theory of open quantum systems as a special case of adaptivity (to environment).

  8. A survey of radiographers' confidence and self-perceived accuracy in frontline image interpretation and their continuing educational preferences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neep, Michael J; Steffens, Tom; Owen, Rebecca; McPhail, Steven M

    2014-06-15

    The provision of a written comment on traumatic abnormalities of the musculoskeletal system detected by radiographers can assist referrers and may improve patient management, but the practice has not been widely adopted outside the United Kingdom. The purpose of this study was to investigate Australian radiographers' perceptions of their readiness for practice in a radiographer commenting system and their educational preferences in relation to two different delivery formats of image interpretation education, intensive and non-intensive. A cross-sectional web-based questionnaire was implemented between August and September 2012. Participants included radiographers with experience working in emergency settings at four Australian metropolitan hospitals. Conventional descriptive statistics, frequency histograms, and thematic analysis were undertaken. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test examined whether a difference in preference ratings between intensive and non-intensive education delivery was evident. The questionnaire was completed by 73 radiographers (68% response rate). Radiographers reported higher confidence and self-perceived accuracy to detect traumatic abnormalities than to describe traumatic abnormalities of the musculoskeletal system. Radiographers frequently reported high desirability ratings for both the intensive and the non-intensive education delivery, no difference in desirability ratings for these two formats was evident (z = 1.66, P = 0.11). Some Australian radiographers perceive they are not ready to practise in a frontline radiographer commenting system. Overall, radiographers indicated mixed preferences for image interpretation education delivered via intensive and non-intensive formats. Further research, preferably randomised trials, investigating the effectiveness of intensive and non-intensive education formats of image interpretation education for radiographers is warranted.

  9. Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Abstract Seismic analysis and geochemical interpretations provide evidence that two separate...

  10. Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  11. 3-D structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the Guasare-Misoa Interval, VLE 196 Area, Block V, Lamar Field, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arzuman, Sadun

    2004-09-30

    In this study, the structure, depositional system, and the seismic stratigraphy of the VLE 196 area, Block V in Lamar Field were interpreted using 3-D seismic data and well logs to characterize structural and depositional settings of the Guasare...

  12. Interpretation of Colloid-Homologue Tracer Test 10-03, Including Comparisons to Test 10-01

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, Paul W.

    2012-06-26

    This presentation covers the interpretations of colloid-homologue tracer test 10-03 conducted at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, in 2010. It also provides a comparison of the interpreted test results with those of tracer test 10-01, which was conducted in the same fracture flow system and using the same tracers than test 10-03, but at a higher extraction flow rate. A method of correcting for apparent uranine degradation in test 10-03 is presented. Conclusions are: (1) Uranine degradation occurred in test 10-03, but not in 10-01; (2) Uranine correction based on apparent degradation rate in injection loop in test 11-02 seems reasonable when applied to data from test 10-03; (3) Colloid breakthrough curves quite similar in the two tests with similar recoveries relative to uranine (after correction); and (4) Much slower apparent desorption of homologues in test 10-03 than in 10-01 (any effect of residual homologues from test 10-01 in test 10-03?).

  13. A tale of tails. Dark matter interpretations of the Fermi GeV excess in light of background model systematics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Calore, Francesca; Cholis, Ilias; McCabe, Christopher; Weniger, Christoph

    2015-03-10

    Several groups have identified an extended excess of gamma rays over the modeled foreground and background emissions towards the Galactic center (GC) based on observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope. This excess emission is compatible in morphology and spectrum with a telltale sign from dark matter (DM) annihilation. Here, we present a critical reassessment of DM interpretations of the GC signal in light of the foreground and background uncertainties that some of us recently outlaid in Calore et al. (2014). We find that a much larger number of DM models fits the gamma-ray data than previously noted. In particular:more »(1) In the case of DM annihilation into b¯b, we find that even large DM masses up to m??74 GeV are allowed at p-value >0.05. (2) Surprisingly, annihilation into nonrelativistic hh gives a good fit to the data. (3) The inverse Compton emission from ?+?– with m? ~ 60–70 GeV can also account for the excess at higher latitudes, |b|>2°, both in its spectrum and morphology. We also present novel constraints on a large number of mixed annihilation channels, including cascade annihilation involving hidden sector mediators. In conclusion, we show that the current limits from dwarf spheroidal observations are not in tension with a DM interpretation when uncertainties on the DM halo profile are accounted for.« less

  14. Remote sensing in marine environment - acquiring, processing, and interpreting GLORIA sidescan sonor images of deep sea floor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, D.W.

    1989-03-01

    The US Geological Survey's remote sensing instrument for regional imaging of the deep sea floor (> 400 m water depth) is the GLORIA (Geologic Long-Range Inclined Asdic) sidescan sonar system, designed and operated by the British Institute of Oceanographic Sciences. A 30-sec sweep rate provides for a swath width of approximately 45 km, depending on water depth. The return signal is digitally recorded as 8 bit data to provide a cross-range pixel dimension of 50 m. Postcruise image processing is carried out by using USGS software. Processing includes precision water-column removal, geometric and radiometric corrections, and contrast enhancement. Mosaicking includes map grid fitting, concatenation, and tone matching. Seismic reflection profiles, acquired along track during the survey, are image correlative and provide a subsurface dimension unique to marine remote sensing. Generally GLORIA image interpretation is based on brightness variations which are largely a function of (1) surface roughness at a scale of approximately 1 m and (2) slope changes of more than about 4/degrees/ over distances of at least 50 m. Broader, low-frequency changes in slope that cannot be detected from the Gloria data can be determined from seismic profiles. Digital files of bathymetry derived from echo-sounder data can be merged with GLORIA image data to create relief models of the sea floor for geomorphic interpretation of regional slope effects.

  15. CX-009278: Categorical Exclusion Determination

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Measurement and Interpretation of Seismic Velocities and Attenuation in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.2, B3.6 Date: 09/07/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

  16. Towards metallic magnetic memory: How to interpret experimental results on magnetic switching induced by spin-polarized currents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bazaliy, Ya. B.; Jones, B. A.; Zhang, S. C.

    2001-06-01

    In the field of magnetic memory the giant magnetoresistance effect provides a convenient way to read out the state of a spin-valve type device by passing a small current through it. It is now debated whether passing a large current through such a device could reliably switch its magnetic state between parallel and antiparallel configurations thus turning a spin valve into a complete read{endash}write memory cell. Experiments with current induced switching were done by several groups, but their interpretation is not straightforward due to complicated interplay between the current-induced torques and those induced by anisotropy. We propose here an experimental setup where an exact solution for the switching behavior can be found in the framework of Slonczweski{close_quote}s approach. Comparison with experiment would be especially interesting since alternative approaches are discussed in the literature. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  17. From ripples to spikes: a hydro-dynamical physical mechanism to interpret femtosecond laser induced self-assembled structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsibidis, George D; Stratakis, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Materials irradiated with multiple femtosecond laser pulses in sub-ablation conditions are observed to develop various types of self-assembled morphologies that range from nano-ripples to periodic micro-grooves and quasi-periodic micro-spikes. Here, we present a physical scenario that couples electrodynamics, describing surface plasmon excitation, with hydrodynamics, describing Marangoni convection, to elucidate this important sub-ablation regime of light matter interaction in which matter is being modified, however, the underlying process is not yet fully understood. The proposed physical mechanism could be generally applicable to practically any conductive material structured by ultrashort laser pulses, therefore it can be useful for the interpretation of further critical aspects of light matter interaction.

  18. THE PHOTOSPHERIC RADIATION MODEL FOR THE PROMPT EMISSION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: INTERPRETING FOUR OBSERVED CORRELATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fan Yizhong; Wei Daming; Zhang Fuwen [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang Binbin, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: fwzhang@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: bbzhang@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2012-08-10

    We show that the empirical E{sub p}-L, {Gamma}-L, E{sub p}-{Gamma}, and {eta}-bar{sub {gamma}}-E{sub p} correlations (where L is the time-averaged luminosity of the prompt emission, E{sub p} is the spectral peak energy, {Gamma} is the bulk Lorentz factor, and {eta}-bar{sub {gamma}} is the emission efficiency of gamma-ray bursts, GRBs) are well consistent with the relations between the analogous parameters predicted in the photospheric radiation model of the prompt emission of GRBs. The time-resolved thermal radiation of GRB 090902B does follow the E{sub p}-L and {Gamma}-L correlations. A reliable interpretation of the four correlations in alternative models is still lacking. These may point toward a photospheric origin of prompt emission of some GRBs.

  19. Natural bacterial communities serve as quantitative geochemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    that respond to and capture perturbations caused by human impacts. less Authors: Smith, Mark B. 1 ; Rocha, Andrea M. 2 ; Smillie, Chris S. 1 ; Olesen, Scott W. 1 ;...

  20. Geochemical, Genetic, and Community Controls on Mercury

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wall, Judy D.

    2014-11-10

    The sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are soil bacteria that share two common characteristics, strict anaerobiosis and the ability to respire sulfate. The metabolic activities of these bacteria play significant roles in the global sulfur cycle, anaerobic degradation of biomass, biological metal corrosion in the environment and, recently, degradation of toxic compounds. The accumulation of evidence suggests these bacteria are also key to the production of the neurotoxin methylmercury in environmental settings. We propose to use our experience with the development of genetics in sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genus Desulfovibrio to create mutations that will eliminate the methylation of mercury, thereby identifying the genes essential for this process. This information may allow the environmental monitoring of the mercury methylation potential to learn the location and quantity of the production this toxin. From these data, more accurate predictive models of mercury cycling can be generated.

  1. Natural bacterial communities serve as quantitative geochemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    approach to identify sites contaminated with hydrocarbons from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, finding that altered bacterial communities encode a memory of prior...

  2. Organic geochemical biosignatures in alkaline Hydrothermal ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Alexander Smith

    2008-01-01

    The 13C content of microbial products are controlled by many factors, including the 13C content of the growth substrate, growth rate, the flux of carbon through various parts of the biochemical network, and the isotopic ...

  3. Natural bacterial communities serve as quantitative geochemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    to accurately identify environmental contaminants, including uranium and nitrate at a nuclear waste site. In addition to contamination, sequence data from the 16S rRNA gene...

  4. Geochemical Data Analysis | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: EnergyGateway EditOpen EnergyNewGenoa,XGeoSyndicate

  5. Geothermal/Geochemical Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:Bore TechnologiesAssessment Insetting

  6. Category:Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMALFacebookGas

  7. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(JournalatBaBartheExpansionSciTechmanagement

  8. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(JournalatBaBartheExpansionSciTechmanagementProcess Relevant to

  9. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing(Journal Article)lasers(JournalatBaBartheExpansionSciTechmanagementProcess Relevant

  10. Interface Induced Carbonate Mineralization: A Fundamental Geochemical

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACT EVALUATION PLANIsProcess Relevant to Carbon Sequestration (Technical

  11. 3-D visualisation and interpretation of seismic attributes extracted from large 3-D seismic datasets: Subregional and prospect evaluation, deepwater Nigeria

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sola, M.; Haakon Nordby, L.; Dailey, D.V.; Duncan, E.A. (BP and Statoil Alliance, Stavanger (Norway))

    1996-01-01

    High resolution 3-D visualization of horizon interpretation and seismic attributes from large 3-D seismic surveys in deepwater Nigeria has greatly enhanced the exploration team's ability to quickly recognize prospective segments of subregional and prospect specific scale areas. Integrated workstation generated structure, isopach and extracted horizon consistent, interval and windowed attributes are particularly useful in illustrating the complex structural and stratigraphical prospectivity of deepwater Nigeria. Large 3-D seismic volumes acquired over 750 square kilometers can be manipulated within the visualization system with attribute tracking capability that allows for real time data interrogation and interpretation. As in classical seismic stratigraphic studies, pattern recognition is fundamental to effective depositions facies interpretation and reservoir model construction. The 3-D perspective enhances the data interpretation through clear representation of relative scale, spatial distribution and magnitude of attributes. In deepwater Nigeria, many prospective traps rely on an interplay between syndepositional structure and slope turbidite depositional systems. Reservoir systems in many prospects appear to be dominated by unconfined to moderately focused slope feeder channel facies. These units have spatially complex facies architecture with feeder channel axes separated by extensive interchannel areas. Structural culminations generally have a history of initial compressional folding with late in extensional collapse and accommodation faulting. The resulting complex trap configurations often have stacked reservoirs over intervals as thick as 1500 meters. Exploration, appraisal and development scenarios in these settings can be optimized by taking full advantage of integrating high resolution 3-D visualization and seismic workstation interpretation.

  12. Interpreting Territory and Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bevir, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Press, 1960). Bulpitt, Territory and Power, p. 57.Bulpitt, Territory and Power, p. 61-62.Bulpitt, Territory and Power, p. 63. Bulpitt, Territory and

  13. Forensic DNA Interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . John M. Butler Experience · University of Virginia/FBI Laboratory (1992-1995) ­ Work performed in Bruce Airport BWI Airport NIST FBI Lab Baltimore, MD Richmond, VA Capitol Beltway (I-495) I-270 I-95 I-95 I-66

  14. Interpreting Accident Statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Joseph Jr.

    Accident statistics have often been used to support the argument that an abnormally small proportion of drivers account for a large proportion of the accidents. This paper compares statistics developed from six-year data ...

  15. Interpreting Territory and Power

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bevir, Mark

    2010-01-01

    resilient. It inspired political actors to remake the worldto hold accountable political actors who embodied, acted on,He implies that political actors have fixed interests that

  16. Abstract Interpretation patrick cousot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cousot, Patrick

    ­specific abstract seman­ tics domain D ] and an abstract seman­ tics S ] 2 L 7! D ] which is designed in­ tuitively seman­ tics S and an approximation ff are cho­ sen, one can derive the best choice for the corresponding of a trace­based seman­ tics by a relational/denotational seman­ tics: ff(P ) def = fhs 0 ; s n i j s 0 s 1

  17. Abstract Interpretation patrick cousot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cousot, Patrick

    -specific abstract seman- tics domain D and an abstract seman- tics S L D which is designed in- tuitively in [Cousot and Cousot 1977, 1979] is constructive in the sense that once the standard seman- tics . An example would be the approximation of a trace-based seman- tics by a relational/denotational seman- tics

  18. Introduction to Interpretation Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) image created with EPG Maker(SPM v3) kindly provided by Steven Myers (CA DOJ) #12;Challenges in Real

  19. SECTION III: INTERPRETATIONS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845* Storage SystemsLight particleNUCLEAR7.0 -

  20. Dose equations for tube current modulation in CT scanning and the interpretation of the associated CTDI{sub vol}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, Robert L. [Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157 (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina 27157 (United States); Boone, John M. [Department of Radiology and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)] [Department of Radiology and Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Sacramento, California 95817 (United States)

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: The scanner-reported CTDI{sub vol} for automatic tube current modulation (TCM) has a different physical meaning from the traditional CTDI{sub vol} at constant mA, resulting in the dichotomy “CTDI{sub vol} of the first and second kinds” for which a physical interpretation is sought in hopes of establishing some commonality between the two.Methods: Rigorous equations are derived to describe the accumulated dose distributions for TCM. A comparison with formulae for scanner-reported CTDI{sub vol} clearly identifies the source of their differences. Graphical dose simulations are also provided for a variety of TCM tube current distributions (including constant mA), all having the same scanner-reported CTDI{sub vol}.Results: These convolution equations and simulations show that the local dose at z depends only weakly on the local tube current i(z) due to the strong influence of scatter from all other locations along z, and that the “local CTDI{sub vol}(z)” does not represent a local dose but rather only a relative i(z) ? mA(z). TCM is a shift-variant technique to which the CTDI-paradigm does not apply and its application to TCM leads to a CTDI{sub vol} of the second kind which lacks relevance.Conclusions: While the traditional CTDI{sub vol} at constant mA conveys useful information (the peak dose at the center of the scan length), CTDI{sub vol} of the second kind conveys no useful information about the associated TCM dose distribution it purportedly represents and its physical interpretation remains elusive. On the other hand, the total energy absorbed E (“integral dose”) as well as its surrogate DLP remain robust between variable i(z) TCM and constant current i{sub 0} techniques, both depending only on the total mAs =t{sub 0}=i{sub 0} t{sub 0} during the beam-on time t{sub 0}.

  1. Practical approach to solvability: Geophysical application using complex decomposition into simple part (solvable) and complex part (interpretable) for seismic imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lau, August

    2010-01-01

    The classical approach to solvability of a mathematical problem is to define a method which includes certain rules of operation or algorithms. Then using the defined method, one can show that some problems are solvable or not solvable or undecidable depending on the particular method. With numerical solutions implemented in a computer, it might be more practical to define solvability of a mathematical problem as a complex decomposition problem. The decomposition breaks the data into a simple part and a complex part. The simple part is the solvable part by the method prescribed in the problem definition. The complex part is the leftover of the simple part. Complex part can be viewed as the "residual" of data or operator. It should be interpreted and not to be discarded as useless. We will give different examples to illustrate the more practical definition of solvability. The complex part is not noise and should not be viewed as useless part of the data. It has its own merit in terms of topological or geologica...

  2. Impact of nucleon matrix element uncertainties on the interpretation of direct and indirect dark matter search results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austri, R. Ruiz de

    2013-11-01

    We study in detail the impact of the current uncertainty in nucleon matrix elements on the sensitivity of direct and indirect experimental techniques for dark matter detection. We perform two scans in the framework of the cMSSM: one using recent values of the pion-sigma term obtained from Lattice QCD, and the other using values derived from experimental measurements. The two choices correspond to extreme values quoted in the literature and reflect the current tension between different ways of obtaining information about the structure of the nucleon. All other inputs in the scans, astrophysical and from particle physics, are kept unchanged. We use two experiments, XENON100 and IceCube, as benchmark cases to illustrate our case. We find that the interpretation of dark matter search results from direct detection experiments is more sensitive to the choice of the central values of the hadronic inputs than the results of indirect search experiments. The allowed regions of cMSSM parameter space after including XENON100 constraints strongly differ depending on the assumptions on the hadronic matrix elements used. On the other hand, the constraining potential of IceCube is almost independent of the choice of these values.

  3. Factors influencing the development and implementation of advanced radiographer practice in Australia – a qualitative study using an interpretative phenomenological approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Page, Barbara A; Bernoth, Maree; Davidson, Rob

    2014-09-15

    The purpose of this study was to explore the factors influencing the implementation or the lack of implementation of advanced practitioner role in Australia. This study uses an interpretative phenomenological approach to explore the in-depth real life issues, which surround the advanced practitioner as a solution to radiologist workforce shortages in Australia. Research participants are radiographers, radiation therapists and health managers registered with the Australian Institute of Radiography (AIR) and holding senior professional and AIR Board positions with knowledge of current advanced practice. In total, seven interviews were conducted revealing education, governance, technical, people issues, change management, government, costs and timing as critical factors influencing advanced practice in Australia. Seven participants in this study perceived an advanced practice role might have major benefits and a positive impact on the immediate and long-term management of patients. Another finding is the greater respect and appreciation of each other's roles and expertise within the multidisciplinary healthcare team. Engagement is required of the critical stakeholders that have been identified as ‘blockers’ (radiologists, health departments) as well as identified allies (e.g. emergency clinicians, supportive radiologists, patient advocacy groups). The research supports that the AIR has a role to play for the professional identity of radiographers and shaping the advanced practice role in Australia.

  4. Outcome 2. The graduates will have the ability to integrate their scientific and engineering knowledge to design and conduct experiment, and interpret and analyze data.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    liberation and separator tests. PNGE 312 Drilling Fluids Analysis Conduct experiments, analyze and interpret data as well as adjusting the properties of drilling fluids. PNGE 432 Design and Analysis of Reservoir of the Reservoir Fluid and Phase Behavior Describe laboratory procedures for flash liberation, differential

  5. Heavy-quark probes of the quark-gluon plasma and interpretation of recent data taken at the BNL Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Hees, H.; Greco, V.; Rapp, Ralf.

    2006-01-01

    strongly interacting QGP (sQGP), as well as parton coalescence, can play an essential role in the interpretation of recent data from the BNL Relativistic Heavy-Ion Collider (RHIC), and thus illuminate the nature of the sQGP and its hadronization. Our main...

  6. INTERPRETING ERUPTIVE BEHAVIOR IN NOAA AR 11158 VIA THE REGION'S MAGNETIC ENERGY AND RELATIVE-HELICITY BUDGETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tziotziou, Kostas; Georgoulis, Manolis K.; Liu Yang

    2013-08-01

    In previous works, we introduced a nonlinear force-free method that self-consistently calculates the instantaneous budgets of free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity in solar active regions (ARs). Calculation is expedient and practical, using only a single vector magnetogram per computation. We apply this method to a time series of 600 high-cadence vector magnetograms of the eruptive NOAA AR 11158 acquired by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory over a five-day observing interval. Besides testing our method extensively, we use it to interpret the dynamical evolution in the AR, including eruptions. We find that the AR builds large budgets of both free magnetic energy and relative magnetic helicity, sufficient to power many more eruptions than the ones it gave within the interval of interest. For each of these major eruptions, we find eruption-related decreases and subsequent free-energy and helicity budgets that are consistent with the observed eruption (flare and coronal mass ejection (CME)) sizes. In addition, we find that (1) evolution in the AR is consistent with the recently proposed (free) energy-(relative) helicity diagram of solar ARs, (2) eruption-related decreases occur before the flare and the projected CME-launch times, suggesting that CME progenitors precede flares, and (3) self terms of free energy and relative helicity most likely originate from respective mutual terms, following a progressive mutual-to-self conversion pattern that most likely stems from magnetic reconnection. This results in the non-ideal formation of increasingly helical pre-eruption structures and instigates further research on the triggering of solar eruptions with magnetic helicity firmly placed in the eruption cadre.

  7. Positive field-cooled dc susceptibility in granular superconductors interpreted through numerical simulations on a simple Josephson-junction-array model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Auletta, C.; Raiconi, G.; De Luca, R.; Pace, S.

    1995-05-01

    We have performed numerical simulations of a field-cooled dc susceptibility experiment carried out for granular superconductors by modeling these systems with a simple Josephson-junction array proposed by the authors. By this analysis the temperature dependence of the positive field-cooled susceptibility at very low values of the applied magnetic field, observed by Braunisch {ital et} {ital al}. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 68, 1908 (1992)] for some ceramic superonductors, has been reproduced and interpreted.

  8. Jonathan Chang, Jordan Boyd-Graber, Chong Wang, Sean Gerrish, and David M. Blei. Reading Tea Leaves: How Humans Interpret Topic Models. Neural Information Processing Systems, 2009, 9 pages.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyd-Graber, Jordan

    Jonathan Chang, Jordan Boyd-Graber, Chong Wang, Sean Gerrish, and David M. Blei. Reading Tea Leaves. @inproceedings{Chang:Boyd-Graber:Wang:Gerrish:Blei-2009, Title = {Reading Tea Leaves: How Humans Interpret Topic}, } 1 #12;Reading Tea Leaves: How Humans Interpret Topic Models Jonathan Chang Facebook 1601

  9. Newsletter of The Geochemical Society 20 The Geochemical News #100, July 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catling, David C.

    water car- bonate platform (4). There is no evidence for rifting or subma- rine volcanism as in the Red.I.F.s of the Campbellrand Platform in South Africa can be traced un- equivocally from deep water to an extensive, shallow

  10. Trajectory-based interpretation of Young's experiment, the Arago-Fresnel laws and the Poisson-Arago spot for photons and massive particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Davidovic; A. S. Sanz; M. Bozic; D. Arsenovic; D. Dimic

    2013-04-02

    We present a trajectory based interpretation for Young's experiment, the Arago-Fresnel laws and the Poisson-Arago spot. This approach is based on the equation of the trajectory associated with the quantum probability current density in the case of massive particles, and the Poynting vector for the electromagnetic field in the case of photons. Both the form and properties of the evaluated photon trajectories are in good agreement with the averaged trajectories of single photons observed recently in Young's experiment by Steinberg's group at the University of Toronto. In the case of the Arago-Fresnel laws for polarized light, the trajectory interpretation presented here differs from those interpretations based on the concept of "which-way" (or "which-slit") information and quantum erasure. More specifically, the observer's information about the slit that photons went through is not relevant to the existence of interference; what is relevant is the form of the electromagnetic energy density and its evolution, which will model consequently the distribution of trajectories and their topology. Finally, we also show that the distributions of end points of a large number of evaluated photon trajectories are in agreement with the distributions measured at the screen behind a circular disc, clearly giving rise to the Poisson-Arago spot.

  11. Preliminary Interpretation of a Radionuclide and Colloid Tracer Test in a Granodiorite Shear Zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reimus, Paul W.

    2012-08-30

    In February and March 2012, a tracer test involving the injection of a radionuclide-colloid cocktail was conducted in the MI shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, as part of the Colloids Formation and Migration (CFM) project. The colloids were derived from FEBEX bentonite, which is mined in Spain and is being considered as a potential waste package backfill in a Spanish nuclear waste repository. The tracer test, designated test 12-02 (second test in 2012), involved the injection of the tracer cocktail into borehole CFM 06.002i2 and extraction from the Pinkel surface packer at the main access tunnel wall approximately 6.1 m from the injection interval. The test configuration is depicted in Figure 1. This configuration has been used in several conservative tracer tests and two colloid-homologue tracer tests since 2007, and it is will be employed in an upcoming test involving the emplacement of a radionuclide-doped bentonite plug into CFM 06.002i2 to evaluate the swelling and erosion of the bentonite and the transport of bentonite colloids and radionuclides from the source to the extraction point at the tunnel wall. Interpretive analyses of several of the previous tracer tests, from 09-01 through 12-02 were provided in two previous Used Fuel Disposition Program milestone reports (Arnold et al., 2011; Kersting et al., 2012). However, only the data for the conservative tracer Amino-G Acid was previously analyzed from test 12-02 because the other tracer data from this test were not available at the time. This report documents the first attempt to quantitatively analyze the radionuclide and colloid breakthrough curves from CFM test 12-02. This report was originally intended to also include an experimental assessment of colloid-facilitated transport of uranium by bentonite colloids in the Grimsel system, but this assessment was not conducted because it was reported by German collaborators at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) that neither uranium nor neptunium adsorbed appreciably to FEBEX bentonite colloids in Grimsel groundwater (Huber et al., 2011). The Grimsel groundwater has a relatively high pH of {approx}9, so the lack of uranium and neptunium adsorption to clay is not surprising given the tendency for these actinides to form very stable negative or neutrally-charged uranyl- or calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexes at these pH, particularly in a water that is effectively saturated with respect to calcite. It was also observed in testing conducted at LANL earlier in 2012 that uranium did not adsorb measurably to Grimsel granodiorite in a synthetic Grimsel groundwater at pH {approx}8.5 (Kersting et al., 2012). Thus, the planned experimental work was not pursued because all the available information clearly pointed to an expected result that uranium transport would not be facilitated by clay colloids in the Grimsel system.

  12. About density functional theory interpretation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirill Koshelev

    2015-05-28

    Two forms of relativistic density functional are derived from Dirac equation. Based on their structure analysis model of split electron is proposed. In this model electric charge and mass of electron behave like two point-like particles. It is shown that two electrons obeying this model cannot occupy the same quantum state. Empirical verification of the model is discussed.

  13. Statutory Interpretation and Constitutional Legislation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feldman, David

    L.Q.R. 498-513. 5 Barak, loc. cit., n. 2 above (references in original). 6 Attorney General (New South Wales) v. Brewery Employees Union of New South Wales (Union Label) (1908) 6 C.L.R. 469, HC of Australia, at 612 per Higgins J.: “it is a...

  14. Interpreted Applications within BOINC Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Thomas

    @cicese.mx 3 Ceta-Ciemat miguel.cardenas@ciemat.es 4 UNED lurdes@lsi.uned.es 5 University of Granada pedro

  15. Picture interpretation and Jungian typology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benson, Derek Paul

    2013-02-22

    , interviewing elementary school children; for Tim Cavell, Ph. D. , 10 hours weeldy. Presentations: Claire F. Collie, Barbara T. Meehan, Timothy A. Cavell, Derek P. Bergeron, Roman Garcia de Alba, Karina Marr. (2000, November). Sttbtypes of Aggressive..., New York: The Anchor Press. 20 Vita Name: Permanent Address: I)ate of Birth: Place of Birth: Derek Bergeron 32755 Adams Drive White Castle, LA 70788 06/01/79 Baton Rouge, LA Education: H. S. Diploma: Catholic High School, May 1997, Honors...

  16. Log interpretation of shaly sandstones 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baker, Joel Foster

    1987-01-01

    and Gas, Arco Oil and Gas, and Sun Oil Companies for their contributions of cores, logs, and other valuable data. Their contributions were an immense help in formulating and supporting the ideas developed in my study. I also wish to express gratitute... from the Reese Oil and Gas Intracoastal Land ?2 well in the Bayou Cholpe field, West Baton Parish, Louisiana, and from the Arco Hankamer 630-1 well in Newton County, Texas. The cores were described and sampled for petrographic analysis. To determine...

  17. Microsoft Word - Interpretive Guidance FINAL

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPAEnergy May2.docTechnicalBARACK OBAMA October 31,June 2, 2011

  18. Back from the Brink with Something for Everyone - The Final Executed Memorandum of Agreement for Interpretation of the East Tennessee Technology Park and the K-25 Building - 13370

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cusick, Lesley T. [Restoration Services, Inc. (United States)] [Restoration Services, Inc. (United States)

    2013-07-01

    When the Environmental Management (EM) Program at the Oak Ridge Office of the Department of Energy (DOE) began its major decontamination and decommissioning (D and D) program activities in the mid-1990's, it was understood that the work to demolish the gaseous diffusion process buildings at the K-25 Site, as it was then known, would be challenging. Nothing of that size and breadth had ever been done within the DOE complex and the job brought about a full menu of unique attributes: radiological contamination with enriched materials entrained in certain areas of the system, a facility that was never designed not to operate but had been shut down since 1964, and a loyal following of individuals and organizations who were committed to the physical preservation of at least some portion of the historic Manhattan Project property. DOE was able to solve and resolve the issues related to nuclear materials management, contamination control, and determining the best way to safely and efficiently deconstruct the massive building. However, for a variety of reasons, resolution of the historic preservation questions - what and how much to preserve, how to preserve it, where to preserve it, how to interpret it, how much to spend on preservation, and by and for whom preservation should occur - remained open to debate for over a decade. After a dozen years, countless meetings, phone calls, discussions and other exchanges, and four National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) [1] Memoranda of Agreement (MOA), a final MOA [2] has been executed. The final executed MOA's measures are robust, creative, substantive, and will be effective. They include a multi-story replica of a portion of the K-25 Building, the dedication of the K-25 Building footprint for preservation purposes, an equipment building to house authentic Manhattan Project and Cold War equipment, a virtual museum, an on-site history center, a grant to preserve a historically-significant Manhattan Project-era hotel in Oak Ridge, and more. The MOA was designed to offer something for everyone. The MOA for the K- 25 Building and interpretation of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP; formerly the K-25 Site) was executed by all of the signatory parties on August 7, 2012 - almost 67 years to-the-day after the 'product' of the K-25 process building became known to more than just a small group of scientists and engineers working on a secret project for the Army Corps of Engineers Manhattan District. (authors)

  19. Image analysis for facility siting: a comparison of low- and high-altitude image interpretability for land use/land cover mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borella, H.M.; Estes, J.E.; Ezra, C.E.; Scepan, J.; Tinney, L.R.

    1982-01-01

    For two test sites in Pennsylvania the interpretability of commercially acquired low-altitude and existing high-altitude aerial photography are documented in terms of time, costs, and accuracy for Anderson Level II land use/land cover mapping. Information extracted from the imagery is to be used in the evaluation process for siting energy facilities. Land use/land cover maps were drawn at 1:24,000 scale using commercially flown color infrared photography obtained from the United States Geological Surveys' EROS Data Center. Detailed accuracy assessment of the maps generated by manual image analysis was accomplished employing a stratified unaligned adequate class representation. Both are-weighted and by-class accuracies were documented and field-verified. A discrepancy map was also drawn to illustrate differences in classifications between the two map scales. Results show that the 1:24,000 scale map set was accurate (99% to 94% area-weighted) than the 1:62,500 scale set, especially when sampled by class (96% to 66%). The 1:24,000 scale maps were also more time-consuming and costly to produce, due mainly to higher image acquisition costs.

  20. NESC VII European project: demonstration of warm pre-stressing effect in biaxial loading conditions - Bending tests on 18MND5 cruciform specimens and their interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacquemoud, C.; Yuritzinn, T.; Marie, S.

    2012-07-01

    In the framework of the NESC VII European project, a large experimental program has been dedicated to characterize the Warm Pre-Stressing (WPS) effect in different testing configurations. One of the CEA (France) contributions to this project is the realization of five point bending tests on large cruciform specimens considering different WPS loading cycles. The five cruciform specimens, sponsored by EDF (France) and IRSN (France), are made of 18MND5 steel. Two of them have been tested on a same LCF (Load-Cool-Fracture) loading cycle and two others on the same LCTF (Load-Cool-Transient-Fracture) loading cycle. The experimental results presented in this paper give a successful demonstration of the WPS effect in biaxial loading conditions either on a LCF or on a LCTF cycle. During the test interpretations, different models have then been tested and compared in order to evaluate their ability to predict the cleavage fracture in the case of different WPS loading cycles. They all provide very conservative predictions whatever loading cycle is concerned. (authors)

  1. Workshop on hydrology of crystalline basement rocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, S.N. (comp.)

    1981-08-01

    This workshop covered the following subjects: measurements in relatively shallow boreholes; measurement and interpretation of data from deep boreholes; hydrologic properties of crystalline rocks as interpreted by geophysics and field geology; rock mechanics related to hydrology of crystalline rocks; the possible contributions of modeling to the understanding of the hydrology of crystalline rocks; and geochemical interpretations of the hydrology of crystalline rocks. (MHR)

  2. Angermeier, P.L. and J.R. Karr. 1986. Applying an index of biotic integrity based on stream-fish communities: Considerations in sampling and interpretation. North American Journal of Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprott, Julien Clinton

    on stream-fish communities: Considerations in sampling and interpretation. North American Journal of Fisheries Bramblett, R.G. and K.D. Fausch. 1991. Variable fish communities and the index of biotic integrity.R. Johnson, A.V. Zale and D.G. Heggem. 2005. Development and evaluation of a fish assemblage index of biotic

  3. INTERPRETING THE KUIPER BELT LUMINOSITY FUNCTION. J. M. Hahn, Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston TX 77058-1113, USA,(hahn@lpi.jsc.nasa.gov), L. Brown, ColgateUniversity, HamiltonNY 13346, USA,(labrown@center.colgate.edu).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, Joseph M.

    INTERPRETING THE KUIPER BELT LUMINOSITY FUNCTION. J. M. Hahn, Lunar and Planetary Institute,(labrown@center.colgate.edu). The Kuiper Belt luminosity function m, which is the number density of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs) observable that increases with distance. Although most treatments of the Kuiper Belt assume a primordial radial distribution

  4. Hydrological and Geochemical Investigations of Selenium Behavior at Kesterson Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zawislanski, P.T.

    2010-01-01

    Ecological Characterization of Kesterson Reservoir. AnnualEcological Characterization of Kesterson Reservoir. Annual

  5. Molecular Organic Geochemical Records of Late Ordovician Biospheric Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrssen, Megan

    2013-01-01

    environments and sequence stratigraphy of Upper Ordovicianenvironments and sequence stratigraphy of Upper OrdovicianC chemostratigraphy and sequence stratigraphy in the United

  6. Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    within the wellbores will be used to revise the models and site production wells if their drilling is warranted. It is hoped that the culmination of this work will be a launching...

  7. Geophysical and geochemical constraints on geoneutrino fluxes from Earth's mantle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ond?ej Šrámek; William F. McDonough; Edwin S. Kite; Vedran Leki?; Steve Dye; Shijie Zhong

    2012-10-18

    Knowledge of the amount and distribution of radiogenic heating in the mantle is crucial for understanding the dynamics of the Earth, including its thermal evolution, the style and planform of mantle convection, and the energetics of the core. Although the flux of heat from the surface of the planet is robustly estimated, the contributions of radiogenic heating and secular cooling remain poorly defined. Constraining the amount of heat-producing elements in the Earth will provide clues to understanding nebula condensation and planetary formation processes in early Solar System. Mantle radioactivity supplies power for mantle convection and plate tectonics, but estimates of mantle radiogenic heat production vary by a factor of more than 20. Recent experimental results demonstrate the potential for direct assessment of mantle radioactivity through observations of geoneutrinos, which are emitted by naturally occurring radionuclides. Predictions of the geoneutrino signal from the mantle exist for several established estimates of mantle composition. Here we present novel analyses, illustrating surface variations of the mantle geoneutrino signal for models of the deep mantle structure, including those based on seismic tomography. These variations have measurable differences for some models, allowing new and meaningful constraints on the dynamics of the planet. An ocean based geoneutrino detector deployed at several strategic locations will be able to discriminate between competing compositional models of the bulk silicate Earth.

  8. Natural Bacterial Communities Serve as Quantitative Geochemical Biosensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Mark Burnham

    Biological sensors can be engineered to measure a wide range of environmental conditions. Here we show that statistical analysis of DNA from natural microbial communities can be used to accurately identify environmental ...

  9. Molecular Organic Geochemical Records of Late Ordovician Biospheric Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrssen, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Hopane transformations through diagenesis, from bi- olipid (hopane transformations during diagenesis and catage- nesis (transformations through diagenesis, from biolipid (bacte-

  10. Ecological and Geochemical Aspects of Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Matthew James

    exploitation of nearby geothermal energy resources. Dixieexploitation of nearby geothermal energy resources. In Napachange (USFWS, 2009), geothermal energy development (BLM,

  11. Developing a robust geochemical and reactive transport model...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    arsenic at the COsubscript 2 sequestration natural analog site in Chimayo, New Mexico Migration of carbon dioxide (COsub 2) from deep storage formations into shallow drinking...

  12. Ecological and Geochemical Aspects of Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Matthew James

    Yellowstone Ecosystem, A. boreas breed predominantly in geothermalYellowstone Ecosystem, A. boreas breed predominantly in geothermalYellowstone Ecosystem, A. boreas breed predominantly in geothermal

  13. Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes, Oregon Innovative Exploration Technologies Maui Hawaii & Glass Buttes,...

  14. Goldschmidt Conference Abstracts 2008A1108 Geochemical characteristics of REE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zreda, Marek

    Institute of Yunnan Province Tested with ICP-MS method, samples include fault tectonites, ore-hosted rocks - strongly depleted Ce ­ enriched Eu and heavy REE means the superposed ore- forming process of biotite-917) and the Major Discipline for KUST (2008). The theoretical basis for ACE, an age calculation engine

  15. Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    breccias nearby. Explosive venting evidently was part of the evolution of the ore-forming geothermal systems which, at one time, must had reached the paleosurface. Previous...

  16. A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    minerals indicates the dilution of the K-, Na-, Cl-rich hydrothermal fluid of the deep reservoir by a Ca-, Mg-rich cold water at a shallower level. Authors Alexandre...

  17. A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hot springs occur at low elevations at the margins of the complex, whereas the water-rich fumaroles are high and central. The Comision Federal de Electricidad de Mexico...

  18. Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis also suggests that it might be more feasible to detect large-scale heating or cooling of the hydrothermal system by tracking changes in gas and steam flux than by...

  19. Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    suggest that Li, followed by As and Hg, are progressively deposited by outward flowing, cooling, thermal fluids. Hg, in contrast to As and Li, is distributed only think the outer...

  20. Molecular Organic Geochemical Records of Late Ordovician Biospheric Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrssen, Megan

    2013-01-01

    methanol (3:1 v/v) to elute saturated hydrocarbons, aromaticmethanol (3:1 v/v) to elute saturated hydrocarbons, aromaticmethanol (3:1 v/v) to elute saturated hydrocarbons, aromatic

  1. Hydrological and Geochemical Investigations of Selenium Behavior at Kesterson Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zawislanski, P.T.

    2010-01-01

    Gas-phase porosities varied between individual aggregates from 0.00 to 0.40, and were maintained relatively constant

  2. Molecular Organic Geochemical Records of Late Ordovician Biospheric Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrssen, Megan

    2013-01-01

    insights into marine microalgae: Annual Review of Genetics,of modern pelagophyte microalgae, occurs in certaindetected in pelagophyte microalgae, including the ”brown

  3. Molecular Organic Geochemical Records of Late Ordovician Biospheric Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrssen, Megan

    2013-01-01

    crocetane in Australian crude oils: Organic Geochemistry, v.source rock derived crude oils through geological time:source rock derived crude oils through geological time:

  4. A Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Robert O. Fournier, Theoderos Tesfai, Wendell A. Duffield, Michael A. Clynne, James G. Smith, Leake Woldegiorgis, Kidane Weldemariam and Gabreab Kahsai Published Journal...

  5. Molecular Organic Geochemical Records of Late Ordovician Biospheric Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrssen, Megan

    2013-01-01

    Katian-age Maquoketa Formation of ix 3.3.2 Biomarkerand Lithology Results for the Maquoketa Formation . . 3.4.4al. , 2012. . . . . . . . . . . . Maquoketa Formation lipid

  6. Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by the chemistry of the ejecta on which the relict encrustations are found. This matrix chemistry factor illustrates that the primary fumarolic minerals surrounding the...

  7. Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

    1992-05-01

    Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

  8. Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

    1992-01-01

    Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

  9. Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    insights into the possible contributions of geothermal systems to groundwater chemistry and development of mitigation strategies for attendant environmental issues....

  10. Geochemical Modeling of the Near-Surface Hydrothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in petrographic studies. Results of this study show that the mineralogy and fluid chemistry observed in the shallow reservoir at Long Valley caldera are formed in an open...

  11. Hydrologic and Geochemical Monitoring in Long Valley Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    causing earthquakes and crustal deformation. Differences since 1982 in fluid chemistry of springs has been minor except at Casa Diablo, where rapid fluctuations in...

  12. Groundwater ecosystem resilience to organic contaminations: microbial and geochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez, Pedro J.

    , Pedro J.J. Alvarez b a State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, Beijing Key Lab of Oil & Gas. * Corresponding author. State Key Laboratory of Heavy Oil Processing, Beijing Key Lab of Oil & Gas Pollution

  13. Coffinitization of Uraninite: SEM/AEM Investigation and Geochemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and hydrothermal environments including those considered as natural analogues of nuclear waste repositories. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and analytical electron...

  14. Molecular Organic Geochemical Records of Late Ordovician Biospheric Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohrssen, Megan

    2013-01-01

    to powdering in a ceramic or zirconia puck mill (SPEX 8510to powdering in a ceramic or zirconia puck mill (SPEX 8510to powdering in a ceramic or zirconia puck mill (SPEX 8510

  15. Viewing paleontology through a geochemical lens: 2 case studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anderson, Brendan Matthew

    2013-08-31

    exceptional preservation of non-biomineralized tissues occurs throughout the Phanerozoic by the creation and analysis of a database of Phanerozoic Konservat-Lagerstatten. Potential controls examined include the influence of marine geochemistry...

  16. Geochemical and sedimentological investigations of Youngest Toba Tuff ashfall deposits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gatti, Emma

    2013-03-12

    sedimentological structures and geometry ...................................................... 90 5.5 Discussion .......................................................................................................................... 91 5.5.1 The local... ..................................................... 97 5.6 Conclusion ......................................................................................................................... 97 CHAPTER 6. DEPOSITIONAL PROCESSES AND SEDIMENTOLOGY OF YTT DEPOSITS IN THE LENGGONG VALLEY, MALAYSIA...

  17. Geochemical detection of carbon dioxide in dilute aquifers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, S; Hao, Y; Aines, R

    2009-03-27

    Carbon storage in deep saline reservoirs has the potential to lower the amount of CO{sub 2} emitted to the atmosphere and to mitigate global warming. Leakage back to the atmosphere through abandoned wells and along faults would reduce the efficiency of carbon storage, possibly leading to health and ecological hazards at the ground surface, and possibly impacting water quality of near-surface dilute aquifers. We use static equilibrium and reactive transport simulations to test the hypothesis that perturbations in water chemistry associated with a CO{sub 2} gas leak into dilute groundwater are important measures for the potential release of CO{sub 2} to the atmosphere. Simulation parameters are constrained by groundwater chemistry, flow, and lithology from the High Plains aquifer. The High Plains aquifer is used to represent a typical sedimentary aquifer overlying a deep CO{sub 2} storage reservoir. Specifically, we address the relationships between CO{sub 2} flux, groundwater flow, detection time and distance. The CO{sub 2} flux ranges from 10{sup 3} to 2 x 10{sup 6} t/yr (0.63 to 1250 t/m{sup 2}/yr) to assess chemical perturbations resulting from relatively small leaks that may compromise long-term storage, water quality, and surface ecology, and larger leaks characteristic of short-term well failure.

  18. Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine, Trace Metal and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Bibtex Format Close 0 pages in this document matching the terms "" Search For Terms: Enter terms in the toolbar above to search the full text of this document for pages...

  19. ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES. I. MOLECULAR CRITERIA FOR HYDROCARBON GENESIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarthy, Eugene D.; Calvin, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    such as propylene and butadiene, have indicated that theseHe demonstrated that butadiene, isoprene and 1,3 pentadieneof cthylcne, propylcne and butadiene arc producecl in this

  20. Hydrological and Geochemical Investigations of Selenium Behavior at Kesterson Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zawislanski, P.T.

    2010-01-01

    on trace metals in soils, sewage sludges, and sludge-treatedproducts from soil and sewage sludge. Science (Washington,