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1

Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters Abstract The alkali carbonates, Na, K, and Li, are relatively soluble at all temperatures and generally precipitate only where there is extreme evapora- tion. In contrast, the alkaline earth carbonates. Ca. Ht, Sr, and Ba, are moderately to sparingly soluble and commonly precipitate in bydrothecmal systems. Calcite is by far the most abundant and important carbonate found

2

Petroleum geochemistry of Lower Indus Basin, Pakistan: I. Geochemical interpretation and origin of crude oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The study focused on the petroleum geochemistry of crude oils produced from Cretaceous reservoirs. Geochemical portrayal of crude oils has been carried out by means of diagnostic biomarker parameters like relative distribution of steranes (C27–C28–C29 ???-20R steranes), C19 and C23 tricyclic terpanes (TT), C24 tetracyclic terpanes (TeT) and hopanes. These parameters suggest that the crude oils contain terrigenous organic matter (OM) mixed with small input of marine OM. The OM of the source rocks was deposited in oxic depositional environment. Maturity parameters, C32 22S/(22S+22R) homohopanes and sterane isomerization ratios [20S/(20S+20R), ???/(???+???) for C29 steranes] indicate that these crude oil are produced from the source rocks at early mature stage to mature stage.

Arif Nazir; Tahira Fazeelat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Details Activities (14) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Ground water sampling, desorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and a radiometric geophysical survey was conducted in conjunction with geological mapping at three geothermal prospects in northern Nevada. Orientation sample lines from 610 m (2000 ft.) to 4575 m (15,000 ft.) in length were surveyed at right angles to known and suspected faults. Scintillometer readings (gamma radiation - total counts / second) were also

4

HBH-GEOCHEM-GEOPHY  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003015WKSTN00 Hiereachical Bayesian Model for Combining Geochemical and Geophysical Data for Environmental Applications Software   

5

Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics of sediment from a naturally reduced zone in a uranium Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics...

6

Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Related Techniques Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Data Analysis Geothermometry Gas Geothermometry Isotope Geothermometry Liquid Geothermometry Cation Geothermometers Multicomponent Geothermometers Silica Geothermometers Thermal Ion Dispersion

7

Geochemical Data Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Data Analysis Geochemical Data Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Data Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Data Analysis: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geochemical_Data_Analysis&oldid=594157" Categories: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Techniques

8

Category:Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geochemical Techniques page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geochemical Techniques Add.png Add a new Geochemical Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. G [×] Geochemical Data Analysis‎ 3 pages Pages in category "Geochemical Techniques" This category contains only the following page. G Geochemical Data Analysis Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Geochemical_Techniques&oldid=689823"

9

Large volume recycling of oceanic lithosphere over short time scales: geochemical constraints from the Caribbean Large  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large volume recycling of oceanic lithosphere over short time scales: geochemical constraints from with derivation from recycled oceanic crust, while the depleted lavas are derived from a highly residual source source mantle could have been 9 500 Ma before CLIP formation and interpreted to reflect the recycling

Graham, David W.

10

Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce...

11

Geothermal/Geochemical Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Chart: GeothermalGeochemical DatabaseInfo GraphicMapChart Author Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published...

12

Transforming Abstract Interpretations by Abstract Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

an instance of the same abstract interpretation frame- work lifted to higher types, i.e. where the objectsTransforming Abstract Interpretations by Abstract Interpretation New Challenges in Language - Verona, Italy (roberto.giacobazzi|isabella.mastroeni)@univr.it Abstract. In this paper we exploit

Giacobazzi, Roberto

13

NUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In-Situ Leach Mining Facilities Manuscript Completed: December 2006 Date associated with uranium mining sites throughout the United States are also included in this report. A tableNUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical Issues in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In

14

Geochemical engineering problem identification and program description. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Geochemical Engineering Program has as its goal the improvement of geochemical fluid management techniques. This document presents the strategy and status of the Geochemical Engineering Program. The magnitude and scope of geochemical-related problems constraining geothermal industry productivity are described. The goals and objectives of the DGE Geochemical Engineering Program are defined. The rationale and strategy of the program are described. The structure, priorities, funding, and management of specific elements within the program are delineated, and the status of the overall program is presented.

Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Data Acquisition Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Data Acquisition Inversion Interpretation Discussion Virgin River DCIP Report Justin Granek1 1 Report #12;Data Acquisition Inversion Interpretation Discussion Outline 1 Data Acquisition Location Survey Specications 2 Inversion Data Errors DCIP2D DCIP3D 3 Interpretation Correlations Snowbird Tectonic

Oldenburg, Douglas W.

16

Experimental Geochemical Studies Relevant to Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geochemical Studies Relevant to Geochemical Studies Relevant to Carbon Sequestration James G. Blencoe (blencoejg@ornl.gov; 865-574-7041) David R. Cole (coledr@ornl.gov; 865-574-5473) Juske Horita (horitaj@ornl.gov; 865-576-2750) Geochemistry Group Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Building 4500-S Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6110 Gerilynn R. Moline (molinegr@ornl.gov; 865-576-5134) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Building 1505 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6038 Introduction Evidence is mounting that rising levels of atmospheric CO 2 will have profound effects on future global climates (1-2) . Consequently, many experts agree that technologies are needed to slow, and ultimately stop, further buildup (3-5) . One of the strategies proposed to achieve this aim

17

Category:Geochemical Data Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Geochemical Data Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geochemical Data Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geochemical Data Analysis Add.png Add a new Geochemical Data Analysis Technique Pages in category "Geochemical Data Analysis" The following 3 pages are in this category, out of 3 total. G Geothermometry T Thermal Ion Dispersion Thermochronometry Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Geochemical_Data_Analysis&oldid=689825"

18

Geochemical and Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment of Vadose Zone Sediments for Uranium Remediation. Geochemical and Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment of Vadose Zone...

19

Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Patrick Walsh Ormat Nevada Inc. Innovative technologies May 19, 2010...

20

Exploring Frontiers in Kinetics and Mechanisms of Geochemical Processes at the Mineral/Water Interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exploring Frontiers in Kinetics and Mechanisms of Geochemical Processes at the Mineral in the Earth's Critical Zone is the kinetics. The timescales for geochemical processes range from milliseconds geochemical processes including surface complexation, mineral transformations, and oxidation

Sparks, Donald L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

A Multitasking Icon Interpreter  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter describes MT Icon, a multitasking Icon interpreter that provides key features of Alamo for the Icon language. MT Icon allows multiple Icon programs to be loaded and run simultaneously ... other than ...

Clinton L. Jeffery

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado

23

Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Abstract There are 1000 thermal springs in Nevada for which a location is known, but for which there are no available temperature (or chemical) measurements. Although many of these sites are within known geothermal areas and are located near springs for which temperature and/or geochemical data are available for one of the springs, many of these sites are not so located and require evaluation before the geothermal potential of the area can be assessed. In order to begin filling in data gaps, water sampling commenced in 2002 when over 70 analyses were obtained from springs with previously

24

Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Factor and canonical correlation analysis of geochemical data from eight fossil fumaroles suggest that six major factors controlled the formation and evolution of fumarolic encrustations on the 1912 ash-flow sheet in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS). The six-factor solution model explains a large proportion (low of 74% for Ni to high of 99% for Si) of the individual element data variance. Although the primary fumarolic

25

A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La...

26

A Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal System, Danakil Depression, Eritrea Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal System, Danakil Depression, Eritrea Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermalsystem underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea Alid is avery late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widelyover an area of ~10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an activehydrothermal system underlies much of that part of

27

Interpreting Deer Harvest Records.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I Texas A&M versity System Agricultural Extension Service Zerle L. Carpenter. Director College Station B-1486 People Helping People Interpreting Deer Harvest Records LIB ARY Dwight f. Guynn* JUN 11 1985 Deer harvest records... are extremely important to proper deer herd man- agement. Because deer are difficult to observe and cannot be handled regularly like livestock, records are one of the few means available to determine deer herd . health, nutrition levels, trends...

Guynn, Dwight E.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Hg contents of soils in geothermal areas in the western U.S. were measured and a three-fold distribution was observed: peak, aureole and background. Peak values (up to several 100 ppm Hg) occur in fumaroles of vapour-dominated systems, around hot springs, and in zones overlying steeply dipping, hot-water aquifers. Aureoic values (up to several 100 ppb Hg) are found in zones surrounding the peak areas and delineate areas with shallow geothermal convection. Background values vary between 7 and 40 ppb

29

A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Results of exploration drilling combined with results of geologic, geophysical, and hydrogeochemical investigations have been used to construct a geochemical model of the Platanares geothermal system, Honduras. Three coreholes were drilled, two of which produced fluids from fractured Miocene andesite and altered Cretaceous to Eocene conglomerate at

30

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fumarole discharges (95-560°C) collected from the dacite dome inside Mount St. Helens crater show temporal changes in their isotopic and chemical compositions. A ΔD vs. Δ18O plot shows that condensed waters from the gases are mixtures of meteoric and magmatic components, but that the apparent magmatic end-member in 1994 was depleted by about 7‰ in ΔD relative to the apparent end-member in 1980. Based on ΔD modeling, approximately 63% of shallow, post-1980 magma has yet to degas.

31

Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Eastern California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Eastern California Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Banded, epithermal quartz-adularia veins have produced about 1.5 million ounces of gold and 7 million ounces of silver from the Bodie mining district, eastern California. The veins cut dacitic lava flows, pyroclastic rocks and intrusions. Sinter boulders occur in a graben structure at the top of Bodie Bluff and fragments of sinter and mineralized quartz veins occur in hydrothermal breccias nearby. Explosive venting evidently was part of the evolution of the ore-forming geothermal systems which, at one time,

32

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute Fluxes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute Fluxes Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We present and analyze a chemical dataset that includes the concentrations and fluxes of HCO3-, SO42-, Cl-, and F- in the major rivers draining Yellowstone National Park (YNP) for the 2002-2004 water years (1 October 2001 - 30 September 2004). The total (molar) flux in all rivers decreases in the following order, HCO3- > Cl- > SO42- > F-, but each river is characterized by a distinct chemical composition, implying large-scale

33

A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Sierra La Primavera, a late Pleistocene rhyolitic caldera complex in Jalisco, Mexico, contains fumaroles and large-discharge 65°C hot springs that are associated with faults related to caldera collapse and to later magma insurgence. The nearly-neutral, sodium bicarbonate, hot springs occur at low elevations at the margins of the complex, whereas the water-rich fumaroles are high and central. The Comision Federal de Electricidad de Mexico (CFE) has recently drilled two deep holes at the

34

Crustal melting in the Himalayan orogen : field, geochemical and geochronological studies in the Everest region, Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combination of field studies and geochemical techniques were used to investigate the timing and processes involved in leucogranite generation in the Everest region of the Himalayan orogen. Geochemical investigations ...

Viskupic, Karen M. (Karen Marie), 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Geochemical Modeling of ILAW Lysimeter Water Extracts  

SciTech Connect

Geochemical modeling results of water extracts from simulated immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glasses, placed in lysimeters for eight years suggest that the secondary phase reaction network developed using product consistency test (PCT) results at 90°C may need to be modified for field conditions. For sediment samples that had been collected from near the glass samples, the impact of glass corrosion could be readily observed based upon the pH of their water extracts. For unimpacted sediments the pH ranged from 7.88 to 8.11 with an average of 8.04. Sediments that had observable impacts from glass corrosion exhibited elevated pH values (as high as 9.97). For lysimeter sediment samples that appear to have been impacted by glass corrosion to the greatest extent, saturation indices determined for analcime, calcite, and chalcedony in the 1:1 water extracts were near equilibrium and were consistent with the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. Fe(OH)3(s) also appears to be essentially at equilibrium in extracts impacted by glass corrosion, but with a solubility product (log Ksp) that is approximately 2.13 units lower than that used in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The solubilities of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) also appear to be much lower than that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The extent that the solubility of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) were reduced relative to that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C could not be quantified because the concentrations of Ti and Zr in the extracts were below the estimated quantification limit. Gibbsite was consistently highly oversaturated in the extract while dawsonite was at or near equilibrium. This suggests that dawsonite might be a more suitable phase for the secondary phase reaction network than gibbsite under field conditions. This may be due to the availability of carbonate that exists in the Hanford sediments as calcite. A significant source of carbonate was not available in the PCTs and this may account for why this phase did not appear in the PCTs. Sepiolite was consistently highly undersaturated, suggesting that another phase controls the solubility of magnesium. For samples that were most impacted by the effects of glass corrosion, magnesite appears to control glass corrosion. For samples that show less impacts from glass corrosion, clinochlore-7A or saponite-Mg appears to control the magnesium concentrations. For zinc, it appears that zincite is a better candidate than Zn(OH)2-? for controlling zinc concentrations in the extracts; however, in some samples all zinc phases considered were highly oversaturated. As a result the phase that controls zinc concentrations in the lysimeter extracts remains uncertain.

Cantrell, Kirk J.

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

36

U.S. Geological Survey National Produced Waters Geochemical Database v2.0 (PROVISIONAL)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. Geological Survey National Produced Waters Geochemical Database v2.0 (PROVISIONAL (USGS) National Produced Waters Geochemical Database v2.0 are provisional and subject to revision Produced Waters Geochemical Database v2.0 should be used with careful consideration of its limitations

Torgersen, Christian

37

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This program will combine detailed gravity, high resolution aeromagnetic, and LIDAR data, all of which will be combined for structural modeling, with hyperspectral data, which will identify and map specific minerals and mineral assemblages that may point to upflow zones. The collection of these surveys and analyses of the merged data and model will be used to site deeper slim holes. Slim holes will be flow tested to determine whether or not Ormat can move forward with developing this resource. An innovative combination of geophysical and geochemical tools will significantly reduce risk in exploring this area, and the results will help to evaluate the value of these tools independently and in combination when exploring for blind resources where structure, permeability, and temperature are the most pressing questions. The slim holes will allow testing of models and validation of methods, and the surveys within the wellbores will be used to revise the models and site production wells if their drilling is warranted.

38

NMR of Layered Silicates in Argonne Coals and Geochemical Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NMR of Layered Silicates in Argonne Coals and Geochemical Implications ... Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 ... High-resolution 27Al and 29Si NMR were employed to characterize layered silicates in the suite of eight Argonne Premium coals. ...

A. R. Thompson; R. E. Botto

2000-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

39

Building Interpreters with Rewriting Strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Interpreters with Rewriting Strategies Eelco Dolstra Eelco Visser www #12;This technical report is a preprint of: E. Dolstra and E. Visser. Building Interpreters with Rewriting Strategies. To appear in M. G. J. van den Brand and R. L¨ammel (editors) Language Descriptions

Utrecht, Universiteit

40

Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The results to date of chemical modeling of the Raft River KGRA are presented. Earlier work indicated a northwest-southeast anomaly in the contours. Modeling techniques applied to more complete data allowed further definition of the anomaly. Models described in this report show the source of various minerals in the geothermal water. There appears to be a regional heat source that gives rise to uniform conductive heat flow in the region, but convective flow is concentrated near the upwelling in the Crook well

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The objective of this ongoing project is the development of a representative geochemical database for a comprehensive range of elemental and isotopic parameters (i.e., beyond the typical data suite) for a range of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Development of this database is one of the first steps in understanding the nature of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Of particular importance in the Great Basin is utilizing

42

Version 4. 00 of the MINTEQ geochemical code  

SciTech Connect

The MINTEQ code is a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate solution equilibria for geochemical applications. Included in the MINTEQ code are formulations for ionic speciation, ion exchange, adsorption, solubility, redox, gas-phase equilibria, and the dissolution of finite amounts of specified solids. Since the initial development of the MINTEQ geochemical code, a number of undocumented versions of the source code and data files have come into use at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report documents these changes, describes source code modifications made for the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) program, and provides comprehensive listings of the data files. A version number of 4.00 has been assigned to the MINTEQ source code and the individual data files described in this report.

Eary, L.E.; Jenne, E.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Version 4.00 of the MINTEQ geochemical code  

SciTech Connect

The MINTEQ code is a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate solution equilibria for geochemical applications. Included in the MINTEQ code are formulations for ionic speciation, ion exchange, adsorption, solubility, redox, gas-phase equilibria, and the dissolution of finite amounts of specified solids. Since the initial development of the MINTEQ geochemical code, a number of undocumented versions of the source code and data files have come into use at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report documents these changes, describes source code modifications made for the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) program, and provides comprehensive listings of the data files. A version number of 4.00 has been assigned to the MINTEQ source code and the individual data files described in this report.

Eary, L.E.; Jenne, E.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Asphaltenes as indicators of the geochemical history of oil  

SciTech Connect

A method of decomposition of native asphaltenes from naphthenic oils is proposed as a source of information on the geochemical history of the oils. It is demonstrated that formation of naphthenic oils occurs in nature through biodegradation of primary paraffinic oils. The relative abundances of structural groups and individual saturated hydrocarbons obtained from the asphaltenes in naphthenic oils is similar to the relative abundance of hydrocarbons in paraffinic oils, which are their genetic precursors. (JMT)

Aref'yev, O.A.; Makushina, V.M.; Petrov, A.A.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Argonne Geothermal Geochemical Database v2.0  

SciTech Connect

A database of geochemical data from potential geothermal sources aggregated from multiple sources as of March 2010. The database contains fields for the location, depth, temperature, pH, total dissolved solids concentration, chemical composition, and date of sampling. A separate tab contains data on non-condensible gas compositions. The database contains records for over 50,000 wells, although many entries are incomplete. Current versions of source documentation are listed in the dataset.

Christopher Harto

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

46

Picture interpretation and Jungian typology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study examines a Jungian picture interpretation schema, which can be used to analyze artistic creations in a therapeutic format. This proposed schema attaches significance to specific areas of a drawing. The upper left of a drawing...

Benson, Derek Paul

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

47

A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Abstract N/A Author Donald Thomas Published Journal US Geological Survey Professional Paper 1350, 1987 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Citation Donald Thomas. 1987. A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone. US Geological Survey Professional Paper 1350. (!) . Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_geochemical_model_of_the_Kilauea_east_rift_zone&oldid=682589" Categories: Missing Required Information References Uncited References Geothermal References

48

Optimizing parameters for predicting the geochemical behavior and performance of discrete fracture networks in geothermal systems  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Optimizing parameters for predicting the geochemical behavior and performance of discrete fracture networks in geothermal systems presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

49

Novel Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical Investigation of Blind Geothermal Resources in Fault-Controlled Dilational Corners  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Novel Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical Investigation of Blind Geothermal Resources in Fault-Controlled Dilational Corners presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

50

Improved Geothermometry Through Multivariate Reaction Path Modeling and Evaluation of Geomicrobiological Influences on Geochemical Temperature Indicators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Improved Geothermometry Through Multivariate Reaction Path Modeling and Evaluation of Geomicrobiological Influences on Geochemical Temperature Indicators presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

51

Advective diffusive/dispersive transport in geochemical processes  

SciTech Connect

Comprehensive understanding of chemical transport in response to fluid flow and diffusion in geologic processes requires thermodynamic and transport properties of a wide variety of aqueous species at the temperature and pressure of interest, as well as mass transfer computer codes that provide simultaneously for fluid flow, diffusion, dispersion, homogeneous chemical reactions, and mineral solubilities. As a result of research carried out with support from DOE in prior years of this grant, considerable progress has been made in developing computer codes to calculate advective-dispersive-diffusional transport at both high and low pressures and temperatures. These codes have become highly sophisticated, but their application to geochemical processes is limited by the availability of thermodynamic and transport data for the major solute species in the aqueous phase. Over the past three years, research has been directed primarily toward characterizing the thermodynamic behavior of concentrated supercritical aqueous electrolyte solutions and predicting the diffusion coefficients of organic species in oil field brines. Related research has been concerned with characterizing the growth rate of hydrothermal alteration zones and assessing the relative importance of aqueous diffusion and heterogeneous reactions at mineral surfaces in geochemical processes. 103 refs., 12 figs.

Helgeson, H.C.

1991-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

52

Surface and Subsurface Geochemical Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Surface and Subsurface Geochemical Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil C. Magnier1, V Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil -- This paper presents a surface and subsurface geochemical survey of the Buracica EOR-CO2 field onshore Brazil. We adopted a methodology coupling the stable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

53

Microsoft Word - Interpretive Guidance FINAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

June 2, 2011 June 2, 2011 INTERPRETIVE GUIDANCE ON THE REQUIREMENTS OF 10 C.F.R. § 205.322 This guidance is intended to clarify the Department of Energy (DOE)'s interpretation of 10 C.F.R. § 205.322, which sets forth the contents of an application for a Presidential permit issued by DOE under Executive Order (E.O.) 10485, as amended by E.O. 12038. Anyone seeking to construct, operate, maintain, or connect an electric transmission facility crossing the borders of the United States must first obtain a Presidential permit. Section 205.322 requires that an application for a Presidential permit provide, among other things: a) "Information regarding the applicant" (e.g., name, contact information, foreign government ownership or contractual relationships);

54

Tracers and Tracer Interpretation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Tracers and Tracer Interpretation 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Tracers and Tracer Interpretation Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026

55

Interpretation of Geological Correlation Borings 1, 2, 3 in the A/M Area of the Savannah River Site, South Carolina  

SciTech Connect

The Geophysical Correlation Boring (GCB) Program was organized to provide a comprehensive correlation capability between geological core and advanced borehole geophysical data, surface high resolution reflection seismic information and, when available, borehole geochemical and cone penetrometer data. This report provides results and initial geological interpretations of borings one, two, and three (GCB-1, GCB-2, GCB-3) located within the Upper Three Runs Watershed (A/M Area) of the Savannah River Site.

Wyatt, D.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Cumbest, R.J.; Aadland, R.K.; Syms, F.H.; Stephenson, D.E.; Sherrill, J.C.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

WATEQ3 geochemical model: thermodynamic data for several additional solids  

SciTech Connect

Geochemical models such as WATEQ3 can be used to model the concentrations of water-soluble pollutants that may result from the disposal of nuclear waste and retorted oil shale. However, for a model to competently deal with these water-soluble pollutants, an adequate thermodynamic data base must be provided that includes elements identified as important in modeling these pollutants. To this end, several minerals and related solid phases were identified that were absent from the thermodynamic data base of WATEQ3. In this study, the thermodynamic data for the identified solids were compiled and selected from several published tabulations of thermodynamic data. For these solids, an accepted Gibbs free energy of formation, ..delta..G/sup 0//sub f,298/, was selected for each solid phase based on the recentness of the tabulated data and on considerations of internal consistency with respect to both the published tabulations and the existing data in WATEQ3. For those solids not included in these published tabulations, Gibbs free energies of formation were calculated from published solubility data (e.g., lepidocrocite), or were estimated (e.g., nontronite) using a free-energy summation method described by Mattigod and Sposito (1978). The accepted or estimated free energies were then combined with internally consistent, ancillary thermodynamic data to calculate equilibrium constants for the hydrolysis reactions of these minerals and related solid phases. Including these values in the WATEQ3 data base increased the competency of this geochemical model in applications associated with the disposal of nuclear waste and retorted oil shale. Additional minerals and related solid phases that need to be added to the solubility submodel will be identified as modeling applications continue in these two programs.

Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

AERIAL PHOTO INTERPRETATION NATIONAL INVENTORY OF LANDSCAPES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MANUAL FOR AERIAL PHOTO INTERPRETATION IN THE NATIONAL INVENTORY OF LANDSCAPES IN SWEDEN NILS YEAR for aerial photo interpretation 1 www-nils.slu.se SLU, Department of Forest Resource Management and Geomatics. 901 83 Umeå, Sweden #12;NILS ­ manual for aerial photo interpretation 2 Table of contents 1 About NILS

58

Comparison of Two Interpretations of Josephson Effect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper puts forward an interpretation of the Josephson effect based on the Alternative Theory of Superconductivity (ATS). A comparison of ATS- and BCS-based interpretations is provided. It is demonstrated that the ATS-based interpretation, unlike that based on BCS theory, does not require a revision of fundamentals of quantum physics.

I. M. Yurin

2008-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

59

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Abstract This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales,rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples fromwhich the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. Thesedata provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermalenergy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in thisregion. Authors Los Alamos National Laboratory and NM Published

60

Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE Geothermal Technologies Peer Review - 2010. The primary objective of this project is to combine a suite of high resolution geophysical and geochemical techniques to reduce exploration risk by characterizing hydrothermal alteration, fault geometries and relationships.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

UPb and geochemical evidence for a Cryogenian magmatic arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U­Pb and geochemical evidence for a Cryogenian magmatic arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia-0349 Oslo, Norway Introduction The High Arctic of Scandinavia and Russia consists of a collage

Svensen, Henrik

62

Geochemical characteristics and formation process of natural gas in Kela 2 gas field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the basis of a large amount of natural gas components and the carbon isotope as well ... as some other analysis data in Kela 2 gas field, the geochemical characteristics, source, origin, and formation process ...

Mengjun Zhao; Shuangfang Lu; Tingdong Wang; Jian Li

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Geochemical characterization of karst groundwater in the cradle of humankind world heritage site, South Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The karst of the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site plays a major role ... model, indicating varying contributions of three identified end members (acid mine drainage, treated sewage ... , geochemical and sp...

M. Holland; K. T. Witthüser

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Do geochemical estimates of sediment focusing pass the sediment test in the equatorial Pacific?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Do geochemical estimates of sediment focusing pass the sediment test in the equatorial Pacific] The paleoceanographic recording fidelity of pelagic sediments is limited by chemical diagenesis and physical mixing (bioturbation and horizontal sediment transport). Diagenesis and bioturbation are relatively well

Kurapov, Alexander

65

Microbiological and Geochemical Heterogeneity in an In Situ Uranium Bioremediation Field Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...VI) bioremediation. FIG. 1. Stratigraphy of borehole logs. Borehole logs collected from the in situ treatment plot installed...geochemical gradients that could be attributed in large part to the manner in which acetate was distributed...

Helen A. Vrionis; Robert T. Anderson; Irene Ortiz-Bernad; Kathleen R. O'Neill; Charles T. Resch; Aaron D. Peacock; Richard Dayvault; David C. White; Philip E. Long; Derek R. Lovley

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Migratory patterns of American shad (Alosa sapidissima) revealed by natural geochemical tags in otoliths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical signatures in the otoliths of diadromous fishes may allow for retrospective analyses of natal origins. In an assessment of river-specific signatures in American shad (Alosa sapidissima), an anadromous clupeid ...

Walther, Benjamin (Benjamin Dwaine)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

A Geological and Hydro-Geochemical Study of the Animas Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydro-Geochemical Study of the Animas Geothermal Area, Hidalgo County, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Geological...

68

Geothermal exploration assessment and interpretation, Upper Klamah Lake Area, Klamath Basin, Oregon  

SciTech Connect

Data from public and private sources on the Klamath Basin geothermal resource are reviewed, synthesized, and reinterpreted. In this, the second and final phase of the work, geological, remote sensing, geochemical, temperature gradient, gravity, aeromagnetic, and electrical resistivity data sets are examined. These data were derived from surveys concentrated on the east and west shores of Upper Klamath Lake. The geological, remote sensing, and potential field data suggest a few northeast-trending discontinuities, which cross the regional north-westerly strike. The near-surface distribution of warm water appears to be related to the intersections of these lineaments and northwest-trending faults. The groundwater geochemical data are reviewed and the various reservoir temperature estimates compared. Particular attention is given to specific electrical conductivities of waters as an interpretational aid to the subsurface resistivity results. A clear trend emerges in the Klamath Falls/Olene Gap area; hotter waters are associated with higher specific conductivities. In the Nuss Lake/Stukel Mountain area the opposite trend prevails, although the relationship is somewhat equivocal.

Stark, M.; Goldstein, N.E.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

The biomarker guide: Interpreting molecular fossils in petroleum and ancient sediments  

SciTech Connect

This is a handbook for biomarkers and their application to hydrocarbon exploration and exploitation. The authors aimed this book at a diverse audience, such as students, exploration geologists with a geochemical background, and experts in the field. This is a clear and well written text aimed at the hydrocarbon industry. It is so tightly organized and detailed that it is not an easy read for the novice, though it is a very fine reference book. For those in the field of biomarkers or those who need to refer to a particular compound or process for analyzing biomarkers or have a need for a short description of that process or compound, this book will be useful. The text is broken down into 4 chapters: (1) introduction to biological markers, (2) description of the fundamentals of biomarker separation analysis, (3) guidelines for interpretation, and (4) discussion of problem areas and further work.

Peters, K.E.; Moldowan, J.M.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine  

SciTech Connect

Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

Wilson, T.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

HYDROGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and GEOCHEMical equilibria in reactive multicomponent systems  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the development of a hydrogeochemical transport model for multicomponent systems. The model is designed for applications to proper hydrological setting, accommodation of complete suite of geochemical equilibrium processes, easy extension to deal with chemical kinetics, and least constraints of computer resources. The hydrological environment to which the model can be applied is the heterogeneous, anisotropic, saturated-unsaturated subsurface media under either transient or steady state flow conditions. The geochemical equilibrium processes included in the model are aqueous complexation, adsorption-desorption, ion exchange, precipitation-dissolution, redox, and acid-base reactions. To achieve the inclusion of the full complement of these geochemical processes, total analytical concentrations of all chemical components are chosen as the primary dependent variables in the hydrological transport equations. Attendant benefits of this choice are to make the extension of the model to deal with kinetics of adsorption-desorption, ion exchange, precipitation-dissolution, and redox relatively easy. To make the negative concentrations during the iteration between the hydrological transport and geochemical equilibrium least likely, an implicit form of transport equations are proposed. To alleviate severe constraints of computer resources in terms of central processing unit (CPU) time and CPU memory, various optional numerical schemes are incorporated in the model. The model consists of a hydrological transport module and geochemical equilibrium module. Both modules were thoroughly tested in code consistency and were found to yield plausible results. The model is verified with ten examples. 79 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Yeh, G.T.; Tripathi, V.S.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Model evaluation of geochemically induced swelling/shrinkage in argillaceous formations for nuclear waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Argillaceous formations are being considered as host rocks for geologic disposal of nuclear waste in a number of countries. One advantage of emplacing nuclear waste in such formations is the potential self-sealing capability of clay due to swelling, which is of particular importance for the sealing and healing of disturbed rock zones (DRZ). It is therefore necessary to understand and be able to predict the changes in swelling properties within clay rock near the waste-emplacement tunnel. In this paper, considering that the clay rock formation is mostly under saturated conditions and the swelling property changes are mostly due to geochemical changes, we propose a modeling method that links a THC simulator with a swelling module that is based on diffuse double layer theory. Simulations were conducted to evaluate the geochemically induced changes in the swelling properties of the clay rock. Our findings are as follows: (1) geochemically induced swelling/shrinkage occurs exclusively in the EBS–clay formation interface, within a few meters from the waste-emplacement tunnels; (2) swelling/shrinkage-induced porosity changes are generally much smaller than those caused by mineral precipitation/dissolution processes; (3) geochemically induced swelling/shrinkage of the host clay rock is affected by variations in the pore water chemistry, exchangeable cations, and smectite abundance. Neglecting any of these three factors might lead to a miscalculation of the geochemically induced swelling pressure.

Liange Zheng; Jonny Rutqvist; Hui-Hai Liu; Jens T. Birkholzer; Eric Sonnenthal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Abstract Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area has resulted in the development of distinctive trace element signatures. Geochemical analysis of soil sample, shallow temperature gradient drill hole cuttings and deep drill hole cutting provides a three dimensional perspective of trace element distributions within the system. Distributions of As, Hg and Li provide the clearest expression of hydrothermal activity. Comparison of these distribution

74

A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In The Geothermal Field Of Milos Island (Greece) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In The Geothermal Field Of Milos Island (Greece) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents a study of hydrothermal alteration on Milos island, Greece. Examination of cores and cuttings from the two drill sites, obtained from a depth of about 1100 m in Milos geothermal field, showed that the hydrothermal minerals occurring in the rock include: K-feldspar, albite, chlorite, talc, diopside, epidote, muscovite, tremolite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, alunite, anhydrite, gypsum, calcite, and opaque minerals.

75

Geochemical studies of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites  

SciTech Connect

The results of source term characterization studies for the commercially operated low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites located in the eastern United States are used to provide an understanding of the importance of hydrological and geochemical factors in controlling the mechanics of leachate formation, evolution of leachate compositions, microbial degradation of organic waste and development of anoxia in the trenches, and the nature and extent of leaching of waste materials. The varying degrees of the intensity of these processes, as determined by the different site characteristics, are clearly reflected in the contrasting leachate geochemistries of Maxey Flats and West Valley trenches, as compared to those of Barnwell and Sheffield trenches. These are important geochemical considerations which not only define LLW source terms but also shed light on the nature and extent of geochemical changes that are likely to occur along a redox gradient outside of the trench environment.

Dayal, R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Clinton, J.H.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting  

SciTech Connect

The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} < 1), indicating a lack of association of iodine with the surficial organic matter and the possibility of interaction between the seeping hydrocarbons and soil iodine. Further, the distribution pattern of iodine compares well with two surface geochemical indicators: the adsorbed light gaseous hydrocarbons (methane through butane) and the propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

Mani, Devleena, E-mail: devleenatiwari@ngri.res.in [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India); Kumar, T. Satish [Oil India Limited (India); Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V. [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Working with Interpreters | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Working with Interpreters | National Nuclear Security Administration Working with Interpreters | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog The National Nuclear Security Administration Working with Interpreters Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Future Science & Technology Programs > Office of Advanced Simulation and Computing and

78

New technology of optimizing heavy oil reservoir management by geochemical means: A case study in block Leng 43, Liaohe Oilfield, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Geochemical methods can be used to optimize heavy oil reservoir management. The distribution of some biomarkers in oils is different with the degree of biodegradation. Geochemical parameters can be used to pre...

Zhao Hongjing; Zhang Chunming; Mei Bowen; S. R. Larter…

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Recreation/Tourism/Interpretation Graduate Schools  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recreation/Tourism/Interpretation Graduate Schools Brigham Young University Provo, Utah 846021001 Program: Youth and Family Recreation http://rmyl.byu.edu/graduate.html California State University, Chico Chico, California 959290150 Program: Recreation Administration and Parks Management http

80

Bernard Williams's Internalism: A New Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There has been significant and continued debate over the nature and truth of Bernard Williams’s internalism. My aim is to resolve much of the dispute over both of those issues by providing a new interpretation of his ...

Baize, Micah J.

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Specifying API Trace Birthmark by Abstract Interpretation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

API trace birthmark is a major class of software birthmarks, where API sequences are defined as software birthmarks to ... , an abstract interpretation-based method for specifying API trace birthmark is proposed ...

Ying Zeng; Fenlin Liu; Jian Chen; Bin Yan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Generating and interpreting referring expressions in context  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Referring expressions with vague and ambiguous modifiers, such as "a quick visit" and "the big meeting," are difficult for computers to interpret because their meanings are defined in part by context. For the hearer to ...

Smith, Dustin Arthur

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

A defense of Deleuze's interpretation of Nietzsche  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Forces The Eternal Return as Ethical Rule The Eternal Return as Selective Ontology COMPLAINTS AGAINST DELEUZE'8 INTERPRETATION A Problematic Account . . Ansell-Pearson on the Moral Imperative Ansell-Pearson on the Definition of Forces Ansell.... ' These post-Deleuzian interpretations typically view Nietzsche's perspectivism as a kind of ontological atomism which stands opposed to the Hegelian dialectic. The Hegelian reconciliation of contradiction at a point of synthesis is considered to be a crass...

Stagoll, Clifford Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

84

The global geochemical cycles of iron and calcium: using novel isotope systems to understand weathering, global mass budgets, natural reaction rates, and paleoclimate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Traditional geochemical proxies utilize variations in the oxygen, carbon, and boron isotopic compositionThe global geochemical cycles of iron and calcium: using novel isotope systems to understand of California, Berkeley Spring 2005 #12;The global geochemical cycles of iron and calcium: using novel isotope

Fantle, Matthew

85

The impact of local geochemical variability on quantifying hillslope soil production and chemical weathering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the physical and chemical processes of soil production and erosion and revisit three granitic study areas on the hillslope-scale physical and chemical soil production and erosion processes. To explain why understandingThe impact of local geochemical variability on quantifying hillslope soil production and chemical

Heimsath, Arjun M.

86

Microscale geochemical gradients in Hanford 300 Area sediment biofilms and influence of uranium  

SciTech Connect

The presence and importance of microenvironments in the subsurface at contaminated sites were suggested by previous geochemical studies. However, no direct quantitative characterization of the geochemical microenvironments had been reported. We quantitatively characterized microscale geochemical gradients (dissolved oxygen (DO), H(2), pH, and redox potential) in Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms. Our results revealed significant differences in geochemical parameters across the sediment biofilm/water interface in the presence and absence of U(VI) under oxic and anoxic conditions. While the pH was relatively constant within the sediment biofilm, the redox potential and the DO and H(2) concentrations were heterogeneous at the microscale (<500-1000 ?m). We found microenvironments with high DO levels (DO hotspots) when the sediment biofilm was exposed to U(VI). On the other hand, we found hotspots (high concentrations) of H(2) under anoxic conditions both in the presence and in the absence of U(VI). The presence of anoxic microenvironments inside the sediment biofilms suggests that U(VI) reduction proceeds under bulk oxic conditions. To test this, we operated our biofilm reactor under air-saturated conditions in the presence of U(VI) and characterized U speciation in the sediment biofilm. U L(III)-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) showed that 80-85% of the U was in the U(IV) valence state.

Nguyen, Hung D.; Cao, Bin; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

22th International Meeting on org. geochem. The fate of organic matter in mangrove sediments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

22th International Meeting on org. geochem. The fate of organic matter in mangrove sediments and the unvegetated sediments, and various vascular plants specific to these swamps. An elemental, pyrolytic sediments characterised by great changes in the redox conditions. Several specific results have already been

Boyer, Edmond

88

Laghi di Monticchio (Southern Italy, Region Basilicata): genesis of sediments--a geochemical study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Laghi di Monticchio (Southern Italy, Region Basilicata): genesis of sediments--a geochemical study and Sediments, Telegrafenberg C328, 14473 Potsdam, Germany (2) Institut des Sciences de la Terre d'Orléans (ISTO Cedex 2, France Abstract The sedimentation record of Lago Grande di Monticchio (LGM) is one of the most

Boyer, Edmond

89

Discrimination of geochemical compositions between the Changjiang and the Huanghe sediments and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Discrimination of geochemical compositions between the Changjiang and the Huanghe sediments and its application for the identi¢cation of sediment source in the Jiangsu coastal plain, China S.Y. Yang a;b;� , C 2002 Abstract Concentrations of 25 elements in the fine-grained fraction ( 6 63 Wm) of bottom sediments

Yang, Shouye

90

Continental Shelf Research 26 (2006) 1524 Geochemical compositions of river and shelf sediments in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Continental Shelf Research 26 (2006) 15­24 Geochemical compositions of river and shelf sediments in the Yellow Sea: Grain-size normalization and sediment provenance D.I. Lima,�, H.S. Jungb , J.Y. Choic , S 14 November 2005 Abstract The geochemistry of sediment samples from Korean and Chinese rivers

Yang, Shouye

91

A GEOCHEMICAL MODULE FOR "AMDTreat" TO COMPUTE CAUSTIC QUANTITY, EFFLUENT QUALITY, AND SLUDGE VOLUME1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1413 A GEOCHEMICAL MODULE FOR "AMDTreat" TO COMPUTE CAUSTIC QUANTITY, EFFLUENT QUALITY, AND SLUDGE with the quantities of chemical added and sludge produced. The pH and metals concentrations do not change linearlyH and the corresponding effluent composition and sludge volume can not be accurately determined without empirical

92

Inferring dispersal and migrations from incomplete geochemical baselines: analysis of population structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 2008). Trace element tags as well as stable iso- topes contained within inert structures, such as fish baseline or reference atlas. Individuals of unknown origin are then assigned to one of the sources in this reference atlas based on their geochemical signature. The identifiability of potential sources is

Shima, Jeff

93

CAN THE GEOCHEMICAL TOPSOIL ATLAS BE USED TO PREDICT TRACE METAL DEFICIENCY IN CATTLE?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CAN THE GEOCHEMICAL TOPSOIL ATLAS BE USED TO PREDICT TRACE METAL DEFICIENCY IN CATTLE? By: Emily courtesy LTSN Bioscience. http://bio.ltsn.ac.uk/imagebank/ Just as trace metals are important to humans to the structural stability of molecules and membranes. For these reasons, incorrect trace metal levels can

Nottingham, University of

94

Organic geochemical evidence for pine tar production in middle Eastern Sweden during the Roman Iron Age  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Organic geochemical evidence for pine tar production in middle Eastern Sweden during the Roman Iron Laboratory, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden b Upplands muse´et, St: Eriks gra¨nd 6, SE-753 10 Uppsala, Sweden Received 21 September 2004; received in revised form 15 June 2005; accepted 21

95

Geochemical Constraints on the Origin of a Shallow Ash Occurrence: in the Mahanadi Basin, offshore India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical Constraints on the Origin of a Shallow Ash Occurrence: in the Mahanadi Basin, offshore sampled in the continental margins offshore India (Fig 1). A volcanic ash layer was recovered below seafloor Surrounding Sediments: Grey sediment in A is a nannofossil and plant debris bearing clay

New Hampshire, University of

96

Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin Natural Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Co Mo Ni UU Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin Natural Resources Canada Geological Survey of Canada with Provincial and Territorial Collaboration Introduction The Wheeler River Property, host of Denison Mine's Phoenix uranium deposit

97

INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT, MONTICELLO, SOUTH CAROLINA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Letters INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT,12091 INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT,transient data from a hydraulic fracturing experiment have

Narasimhan, T.N.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

AIAA 2001-0787 INTERPRETATION OF OPTICAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aircraft and power generation gas turbine engines, together with the extraordinary growth in microproces-wavelength system intended to mimic the response of a practical sensor. The goal was to develop signal interpretation strategies that would allow an optical sensor system to monitor needed properties in liquid

Seitzman, Jerry M.

99

Origin of geochemical heterogeneity in the mantle : constraints from volcanism associated with Hawaiian and Kerguelen mantle plumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lavas derived from long-lived mantle plumes provide important information of mantle compositions and the processes that created the geochemical heterogeneity within the mantle. Kerguelen and Hawaii are two long-lived mantle ...

Xu, Guangping

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Geochemical and isotopic variations in shallow groundwater in areas of the Fayetteville Shale development, north-central Arkansas q  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

similar to the brine in the Fayetteville Shale. Nonetheless, no spatial relationship was found between CH4. The integration of multiple geochemical and isoto- pic proxies shows no direct evidence of contamination

Jackson, Robert B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Geochemical and isotopic results for groundwater, drainage waters, snowmelt, permafrost, precipitation in Barrow, Alaska (USA) 2012-2013  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Data include a large suite of analytes (geochemical and isotopic) for samples collected in Barrow, Alaska (2012-2013). Sample types are indicated, and include soil pore waters, drainage waters, snowmelt, precipitation, and permafrost samples.

Wilson, Cathy; Newman, Brent; Heikoop, Jeff

102

Geochemical Aspects of the Carbonation of Magnesium Silicates in an Aqueous Medium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF THE CARBONATION OF MAGNESIUM GEOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF THE CARBONATION OF MAGNESIUM SILICATES IN AN AQUEOUS MEDIUM George D. Guthrie, Jr. (gguthrie@lanl.gov 505-665-6340) J. William Carey (bcarey@lanl.gov 505-667-5540) Deborah Bergfeld (debberrg@lanl.gov 505-667-1812) Darrin Byler (dbyler@lanl.gov 505-665-9562) Steve Chipera (chipera@lanl.gov 505-667-1110) Hans-Joachim Ziock (ziock@lanl.gov 505-667-7265) Hydrology, Geochemistry, & Geology Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 Klaus Lackner (ksl@lanl.gov 505-667-5694) Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM and Columbia University, New York, NY KEYWORDS: CO 2 sequestration, magnesium silicate, mineral carbonation INTRODUCTION The volume of carbon dioxide associated with the use of fossil fuels to produce

103

Isotope and Ion Selectivity in Reverse Osmosis Desalination: Geochemical Tracers for Man-made Freshwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A systematic measurement of ions and 2H/1H, 7Li/6Li, 11B/10B, 18O/16O, and 87Sr/86Sr isotopes in feed-waters, permeates, and brines from commercial reverse osmosis (RO) desalination plants in Israel (Ashkelon, Eilat, and Nitzana) and Cyprus (Larnaca) reveals distinctive geochemical and isotopic fingerprints of fresh water generated from desalination of seawater (SWRO) and brackish water (BWRO). ... The specific geochemical and isotopic fingerprints of SWRO provide a unique tool for tracing “man-made” fresh water as an emerging recharge component of natural water resources. ... O and H isotopes were determined by dual inlet and continuous flow mass spectrometry following gas–water equilibration (analytical uncertainties ±0.8‰ for ?2H and ±0.1‰ for ?18O). ...

Wolfram Kloppmann; Avner Vengosh; Catherine Guerrot; Romain Millot; Irena Pankratov

2008-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

104

Geochemical factors affecting radionuclide transport through near and far fields at a Low-Level Waste Disposal Site  

SciTech Connect

The concentration of low-level waste (LLW) contaminants in groundwater is determined by the amount of contaminant present in the solid waste, rate of release from the waste and surrounding barriers, and a number of geochemical processes including adsorption, desorption, diffusion, precipitation, and dissolution. To accurately predict radionuclide transport through the subsurface, it is essential that the important geochemical processes affecting radionuclide transport be identified and, perhaps more importantly, accurately quantified and described in a mathematically defensible manner.

Kaplan, D.I.; Seme, R.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Piepkho, M.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany Shale Group (Devonian-Mississippian) in Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Illinois State Geological Survey is conducting geological and geochemical investigations to evaluate the potential of New Albany Group shales as a source of hydrocarbons, particularly natural gas. Geological studies include stratigraphy and structure, mineralogic and petrographic characterization; analyses of physical properties; and development of a computer-based resources evaluation system. Geochemical studies include organic carbon content and trace elements; hydrocarbon content and composition; and adsorption/desorption studies of gas through shales. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each task reported.

Bergstrom, R.E.; Shimp, N.F.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Hydrological and geochemical monitoring for a CO2 sequestration pilot in a brine formation  

SciTech Connect

Hydrological and geochemical monitoring are key components of site characterization and CO2 plume monitoring for a pilot test to inject CO2 into a brine-bearing sand of the fluvial-deltaic Frio formation in the upper Texas Gulf Coast. In situ, injected CO2 forms a supercritical phase that has gas-like properties (low density and viscosity) compared to the surrounding brine, while some CO2 dissolves in the brine. The pilot test employs one injection well and one monitor well, with continuous pressure and flow-rate monitoring in both wells, and continuous surface fluid sampling and periodic down-hole fluid sampling from the monitor well. Pre-injection site-characterization includes pump tests with pressure-transient analysis to estimate single-phase flow properties, establish hydraulic connectivity between the wells, determine appropriate boundary conditions, and analyze ambient phase conditions within the formation. Additionally, a pre-injection tracer test furnishes estimates of kinematic porosity and the geometry of flow paths between injection and monitor wells under single-phase conditions. Pre-injection geochemical sampling provides a baseline for subsequent geochemical monitoring and helps determine the optimal tracers to accompany CO2 injection. During CO2 injection, hydrological monitoring enables estimation of two-phase flow properties and helps track the movement of the injected CO2 plume, while geochemical sampling provides direct evidence of the arrival of CO2 and tracers at the monitor well. Furthermore, CO2-charged water acts as a weak acid, and reacts to some extent with the minerals in the aquifer, producing a distinct chemical signature in the water collected at the monitor well. Comparison of breakthrough curves for the single-phase tracer test and the CO2 (and its accompanying tracers) illuminates two-phase flow processes between the supercritical CO2 and native brine, an area of current uncertainty that must be better understood to effectively sequester CO2 in saline aquifers.

Doughty, Christine; Pruess, Karsten; Benson, Sally M.; Freifeld, Barry M.; Gunter, William D.

2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

107

Oxidation-induced geochemical changes in trench leachates from the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site  

SciTech Connect

A knowledge of extra-trench processes related to oxidation-induced geochemical changes that are likely to occur when iron-rich, anoxic trench waters encounter an oxidizing environment along a redox gradient is essential for modeling radionuclide transport at low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites. The results of laboratory oxidation experiments on several trench leachates from the Maxey Flats site show that, upon oxidation, a series of geochemical changes were initiated that resulted in a drastically different solute geochemistry, involving oxidation of ferrous iron and subsequent precipitation of ferric oxyhydroxide, changes in alkalinity and acidity, a drastic increase in redox potential (Eh), and generally relatively little change in the concentrations of /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 85/Sr in solution. The observations made in this study have important geochemical implications for the modeling of LLW sites in that the source term as an input parameter cannot be assumed to be constant, both spatially and temporally. The acid-generating potential and buffering capacity of an anoxic source term are important geochemical controls that maintain a balance between acidity and alkalinity and largely determine the nature and extent of oxidation-induced geochemical changes likely to occur along a redox gradient. The presence of organic chelating agents can alter the source term geochemistry to such an extent that authigenic ferric oxyhydroxide, which represents a geochemical discontinuity at the redox interface along leachate migration paths, proves to be a relatively ineffective sink for radionuclides.

Dayal, R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Clinton, J.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

NREL: PVWatts - How to Interpret PVWatts Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interpret PVWatts(tm) Results Interpret PVWatts(tm) Results The monthly and yearly energy production estimates are modeled using the selected photovoltaic (PV) system parameters and weather data that are typical or representative of long-term averages. For reference or comparison with local information, the solar radiation values modeled for the PV array are included in the performance results. Because weather patterns vary from year to year, the values in the tables are better indicators of long-term performance than of performance for a particular month or year. PV performance is largely proportional to the solar radiation received, which may vary from the long-term average by 30% monthly and 10% yearly. Solar radiation variance for a specific location can be evaluated by examining the tables in the Solar Radiation Data Manual

109

Geochemical Data Package for Performance Assessment Calculations Related to the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site disposes of certain types of radioactive waste within subsurface-engineered facilities. One of the tools used to establish the capacity of a given site to safely store radioactive waste (i.e., that a site does not exceed its Waste Acceptance Criteria) is the Performance Assessment (PA). The objective of this document is to provide the geochemical values for the PA calculations. This work is being conducted as part of the on-going maintenance program that permits the PA to periodically update existing calculations when new data becomes available. Because application of values without full understanding of their original purpose may lead to misuse, this document also provides the geochemical conceptual model, approach used for selecting the values, the justification for selecting data, and the assumptions made to assure that the conceptual and numerical geochemical models are reasonably conservative (i.e., reflect conditions that will tend to predict the maximum risk to the hypothetical recipient). The geochemical parameters describe transport processes for 38 elements (>90 radioisotopes) potentially occurring within eight disposal units (Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Low Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (ILV) Vaults, TRU-Pad-1, Naval Reactor Waste Pads, Components-in-Grout Trenches, and Saltstone Facility). This work builds upon well-documented work from previous PA calculations (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). The new geochemical concepts introduced in this data package are: (1) In the past, solubility products were used only in a few conditions (element existing in a specific environmental setting). This has been expanded to >100 conditions. (2) Radionuclide chemistry in cementitious environments is described through the use of both the Kd and apparent solubility concentration limit. Furthermore, the solid phase is assumed to age during the assessment period (thousands of years), resulting in three main types of controlling solid phases, each possessing a unique set of radionuclide sorption parameters (Kd and solubility concentration limit). (3) A large amount of recent site-specific sorption research has been conducted since the last PA (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). These new data have replaced previous Kd values derived from literature values, thus reducing uncertainty and improving accuracy. Finally, because this document will be used by future PA calculations and external acceptance of the document will eventually be required, this document was extensively reviewed. The review process, including the internal review, site review, and external review process is described.

Kaplan, D

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

110

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt & Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii & Maui  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

DOE Geothermal Technologies Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objective: To use a combination of traditional geophysical and geochemical tools with exploration suites not typically used in geothermal exploration.

111

Geochemical investigations at Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site. [Shallow land burial  

SciTech Connect

As part of the NRC efforts to develop a data base on source term characteristics for low level wastes, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has produced and analyzed a large amount of data on trench leachate chemistry at existing shallow land burial sites. In this report, we present the results of our investigations at the Maxey Flats, Kentucky disposal site. In particular, data on trench leachate chemistry are reviewed and discussed in terms of mechanisms and processes controlling the composition of trench solutes. Particular emphasis is placed on identifying both intra- and extra-trench factors and processes contributing to source term characteristics, modifications, and uncertainties. BNL research on the Maxey Flats disposal site has provided important information not only on the source term characteristics and the factors contributing to uncertainties in the source term but also some generic insights into such geochemical processes and controls as the mechanics of leachate formation, microbial degradation and development of anoxia, organic complexation and radionuclide mobility, redox inversion and modification of the source term, solubility constraints on solute chemistry, mineral authigenesis, corrosion products and radionuclide scavenging, and the role of organic complexants in geochemical partitioning of radionuclides. A knowledge of such processes and controls affecting the geochemical cycling of radionuclides as well as an understanding of the important factors that contribute to variability and uncertainties in the source term is essential for evaluating the performance of waste package and the site, making valid predictions of release for dose calculations, and for planning site performance monitoring as well as remedial actions. 43 references, 47 figures, 30 tables.

Dayal, R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Clinton, J.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Geochemical evaluation of CO2 injection and containment in a depleted gas field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The short- and long-term geochemical impact of CO2 injection into a depleted gas reservoir (DGR) is investigated using reservoir/geochemical modeling with TOUGH2/TOUGHREACT and 1D kinetic diffusion modeling with PHREEQC (caprock/well-cement). Simulations of CO2 injection into the reservoir predict displacement and buoyancy of post-production CH4, as well as dry-out of the near-well zone. We computed that the areal extent of the CH4/brine dominated zone and the dry-out zone are relatively small compared to the CO2/brine dominated zone after well-closure. For the current DGR model we therefore conclude that it is reasonable to model geochemical reactions in the reservoir without taking into account post-production CH4. Although the CO2 dissolution capacity of the studied DGR is smaller compared to a deep saline aquifer of similar size, the modeling predicts that dissolution and subsequent CO2 mineral trapping proceed faster. Precipitation of dawsonite and magnesite were yet predicted at initial CO2 partial pressure (PCO2) of 9.3 bar, while these minerals were not identified in reservoir samples. This could indicate that their tendency of precipitation is overestimated by the model and hence the database used. This has significant impact on long-term modeled bulk porosity and PCO2. Simulations of CO2 diffusion through the caprock show that mineral reactions significantly retard the total dissolved carbon (TDC) plume. After 10,000 years, 99% of the TDC is present within the first 6.4 m above the reservoir contact. The progression of the TDC plume in the caprock is sensitive to the composition, kinetic rates, and surface area of primary and secondary minerals. Cement alteration modeling shows progressive carbonation of cement phases, resulting in three zones of distinct mineralogy and porosity. The three zones are predominantly characterized by: (i) unaltered cement, (ii) portlandite dissolution, and (iii) calcite precipitation. The simulated thickness of the affected zone is 3.8 cm after 100 years. This distance is sensitive to kinetic rate constants of C–S–H phases, but less sensitive to kinetic rate constant of portlandite. In summary, our applied methodology provides quantitative predictions of the geochemical impact of CO2 on the DGR storage complex. The methodology can be used for screening of potential DGR storage locations and to define criteria for minimal caprock and cement sheet thickness, for assuring short- and long-term integrity of the storage location.

Tim J. Tambach; Mariëlle Koenen; Laura J. Wasch; Frank van Bergen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Evaluation of Groundwater Movement in the Frenchman Flat CAU Using Geochemical and Isotopic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The principal pathway for radionuclide migration from underground tests in Frenchman Flat, on the Nevada Test Site, to the accessible environment is groundwater flow. Two potential pathways for radionuclide transport via groundwater have been identified from hydrologic data: (1) radionuclide transport downward from the alluvial and volcanic aquifers into the underlying carbonate aquifer; and (2) radionuclide transport laterally to the carbonate aquifer surrounding Frenchman Flat. This report presents an evaluation of geochemical and environmental isotopic data to test these potential pathways and to identify other groundwater flowpaths in, and out of, Frenchman Flat.

R. Hershey; J. Thomas; T. Rose; J. Paces; I. Farnham; C. Benedict, Jr.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

John Stuart Mill's Sanction Utilitarianism: A Philosophical and Historical Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation argues for a particular interpretation of John Stuart Mill’s utilitarianism, namely that Mill is best read as a sanction utilitarian. In general, scholars commonly interpret Mill as some type of act or rule utilitarian. In making...

Wright, David

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

115

Interpretive geothermal heat flow map of Colorado | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interpretive geothermal heat flow map of Colorado Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Map: Interpretive geothermal heat flow map of ColoradoInfo...

116

The Working Alliance and the Use of Interpreters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation compared working alliance with and without interpreters and examined factors that may impact the development of the working alliance when an interpreter is used. The setting was a Midwestern public school district where social...

Ebersole, Judy Lee

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

117

Report on workshop A1: Exact solutions and their interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I report on the communications and posters presented on exact solutions and their interpretation at the GRG18 Conference, Sydney.

José M. M. Senovilla

2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

118

Discourse Relations and Default Inferences in Metaphor Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the interpretation of metaphor in discourse. We build on previous work (Agerri, Barnden, Lee, & Wallington, 2007

Barnden, John A.

119

Geochemical Society  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the Ha y-Lacroix Prize rewarded the PhD work of Aur lie Violette and Johan Villeneuve (see Elements, volume 7, number 4...its vibrational spectra Jakub Matusik, Eva Scholtzov , and Daniel Tunega Clay mineralogy of the Zhada sediments: Evidence for...

120

Geochemical handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... FOUR years have elapsed since the pub lication of Part 4 of the Handbook of Geochemistry, the longest gap in the pro duction schedule, which has extended almost ... 1500 pages. The original intention of the editorial board was that Volume 2 of the Handbook would ultimately contain approximately 2000 pages in four instalments, with publication completed several years ...

D.G. Murchison

1979-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Pulsar interpretation for the AMS-02 result  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The AMS-02 Collaboration has just published a high-precision measurement of the cosmic positron fraction e+/(e-+e+), which rises with energy from ?5??GeV to ?350??GeV. The result indicates the existence of primary electron/positron sources to account for the positron excess. In this work, we investigate the possibility that the nearby mature pulsars with ages of O(105)??yr are the primary positron sources. By fitting the data we find that the positrons from a single nearby pulsar, such as Geminga or Monogem, with the spectral index ??2 can interpret the AMS-02 result. We also investigate the possibility that high-energy positrons are generated by multiple known pulsars in the ATNF catalogue. Such a scenario can also fit the AMS-02 data well. Future precise measurements of fine structures in the positron spectrum would be a support to the pulsar scenario.

Peng-Fei Yin; Zhao-Huan Yu; Qiang Yuan; Xiao-Jun Bi

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

122

Interpreting the new Brookhaven g?-2 result  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The latest g?-2 measurement by Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) confirms the earlier measurement with twice the precision. However, interpretation of the result requires specific assumptions regarding the errors in the hadronic light by light (LBL) correction and in the hadronic vacuum polarization correction. Under the assumption that the recent reanlayses of the LBL correction are valid, the new BNL result implies a deviation between experiment and the standard model of 1.6?-2.6? depending on the estimate of the hadronic vacuum polarization correction. We reexamine the g?-2 constraint for minimal supergravity and its implications for the direct detection of sparticles at colliders and for the search for supersymmetric dark matter in view of the new evaluation.

Utpal Chattopadhyay and Pran Nath

2002-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

123

Interpreting Attoclock Measurements of Tunnelling Times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss measurements of time-delays during strong-field ionization of atoms using few-cycle circularly polarized laser pulses -- the attoclock setup. We perform numerical experiments for the benchmark system of the hydrogen atom and analyze them using fully quantum analytical theory with no ad-hoc assumptions or adjustable parameters. Excellent quantitative agreement between theory and ab initio simulations allows us to characterize time-delays measured by the attoclock, demonstrate that these delays are not related to tunnelling delays and are induced entirely by the interaction of the liberated electron with the long-range Coulomb potential of the ionic core. Our analysis gives access to 'ionization times' -- the times when an electron exits the tunnelling barrier created by the combination of the laser field and the core potential, showing that some of the key assumptions used in the semiclassical interpretation of the attoclock experiments do not always agree with the fully quantum analysis.

Torlina, Lisa; Kaushal, Jivesh; Muller, Harm Geert; Ivanov, Igor; Kheifets, Anatoli; Zielinski, Alejandro; Scrinzi, Armin; Ivanov, Misha; Smirnova, Olga

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Interpreting Attoclock Measurements of Tunnelling Times  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss measurements of time-delays during strong-field ionization of atoms using few-cycle circularly polarized laser pulses -- the attoclock setup. We perform numerical experiments for the benchmark system of the hydrogen atom and analyze them using fully quantum analytical theory with no ad-hoc assumptions or adjustable parameters. Excellent quantitative agreement between theory and ab initio simulations allows us to characterize time-delays measured by the attoclock, demonstrate that these delays are not related to tunnelling delays and are induced entirely by the interaction of the liberated electron with the long-range Coulomb potential of the ionic core. Our analysis gives access to 'ionization times' -- the times when an electron exits the tunnelling barrier created by the combination of the laser field and the core potential, showing that some of the key assumptions used in the semiclassical interpretation of the attoclock experiments do not always agree with the fully quantum analysis.

Lisa Torlina; Felipe Morales; Jivesh Kaushal; Harm Geert Muller; Igor Ivanov; Anatoli Kheifets; Alejandro Zielinski; Armin Scrinzi; Misha Ivanov; Olga Smirnova

2014-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

125

Geochemical and geologic factors effecting the formulation of gas hydrate: Task No. 5, Final report  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of our work has been to determine the primary geochemical and geological factors controlling gas hydrate information and occurrence and particularly in the factors responsible for the generation and accumulation of methane in oceanic gas hydrates. In order to understand the interrelation of geochemical/geological factors controlling gas hydrate occurrence, we have undertaken a multicomponent program which has included (1) comparison of available information at sites where gas hydrates have been observed through drilling by the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) on the Blake Outer Ridge and Middle America Trench; (2) regional synthesis of information related to gas hydrate occurrences of the Middle America Trench; (3) development of a model for the occurrence of a massive gas hydrate as DSDP Site 570; (4) a global synthesis of gas hydrate occurrences; and (5) development of a predictive model for gas hydrate occurrence in oceanic sediment. The first three components of this program were treated as part of a 1985 Department of Energy Peer Review. The present report considers the last two components and presents information on the worldwide occurrence of gas hydrates with particular emphasis on the Circum-Pacific and Arctic basins. A model is developed to account for the occurrence of oceanic gas hydrates in which the source of the methane is from microbial processes. 101 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

Kvenvolden, K.A.; Claypool, G.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Gravitational interpretation of the Hitchin equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By referring to theorems of Donaldson and Hitchin, we exhibit a rigorous AdS/CFT-type correspondence between classical 2+1 dimensional vacuum general relativity theory on S x R and SO(3) Hitchin theory (regarded as a classical conformal field theory) on the spacelike past boundary S, a compact, oriented Riemann surface of genus greater than one. Within this framework we can interpret the 2+1 dimensional vacuum Einstein equation as a decoupled ``dual'' version of the 2 dimensional SO(3) Hitchin equations. More precisely, we prove that if over S with a fixed conformal class a real solution of the SO(3) Hitchin equations with induced flat SO(2,1) connection is given, then there exists a certain cohomology class of non-isometric, singular, flat Lorentzian metrics on S x R whose Levi--Civita connections are precisely the lifts of this induced flat connection and the conformal class induced by this cohomology class on S agrees with the fixed one. Conversely, given a singular, flat Lorentzian metric on S x R the restriction of its Levi--Civita connection gives rise to a real solution of the SO(3) Hitchin equations on S with respect to the conformal class induced by the corresponding cohomology class of the Lorentzian metric.

Gabor Etesi

2006-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

127

Evaluating oil quality and monitoring production from heavy oil reservoirs using geochemical methods: Application to the Boscan Field, Venezuela  

SciTech Connect

Many oil fields worldwide contain heavy oil in one or more reservoir units. The low gravity of these oils is most frequently due to biodegradation and/or low maturity. The challenge is to find ways to economically recover this oil. Methods which reduce the operating costs of producing heavy oil add significant value to such projects. Geochemical techniques which use the composition of the reservoir fluids as natural tracers offer cost effective methods to assist with reservoir management. The low viscosity and gravity of heavy oil, combined with frequent high water cuts, low flow rates, and the presence of downhole artificial lift equipment, make many conventional production logging methods difficult to apply. Therefore, monitoring production, especially if the produced oil is commingled from multiple reservoirs, can be difficult. Geochemical methods can be used to identify oil/water contacts, tubing string leaks and to allocate production to individual zones from commingled production. An example of a giant heavy oil field where geochemical methods may be applicable is the Boscan Field in Venezuela. Low maturity oil, averaging 10{degrees} API gravity, is produced from the Eocene Upper and Lower Boscan (Miosa) Sands. Geochemical, stratigraphic and engineering data have helped to better define the controls on oil quality within the field, identified new reservoir compartments and defined unique characteristics of the Upper and Lower Boscan oils. This information can be used to identify existing wells in need of workovers due to mechanical problems and to monitor production from new infill wells.

Kaufman, R.L.; Noguera, V.H.; Bantz, D.M. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum, San Ramon, CA (United States); Rodriguez, R. [Maraven, S.A., Caracas (Venezuela)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Coupled Geochemical and Hydrological Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Radionuclides and Toxic Metals Beneath the Hanford Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of coupled hydrological and geochemical mechanisms that are responsible for the accelerated migration and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in the badose zone beneath the Hanford Tank Farms.

Scott Fendorf; Phil Jardine

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

129

Geochemical Data on Waters, gases, scales, and rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999)  

SciTech Connect

This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales, rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples from which the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. These data provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermal energy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in this region.

Goff, Fraser; Bergfeld, Deborah; Janik, C.J.; et al

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 19 JUNE 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1183 Influence of subsurface biosphere on geochemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

estimate the net flux of methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen from diffuse and focused hydrothermal vents on geochemical fluxes from diffuse hydrothermal fluids Scott D. Wankel1 , Leonid N. Germanovich2 , Marvin D. Girguis1 * Hydrothermal vents along mid-ocean systems host unique, highly productive biological

Girguis, Peter R.

131

Oxygen is a key element for biology and the cycling of geochemical elements, and has shaped the chemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oxygen is a key element for biology and the cycling of geochemical elements, and has shaped the chemical and biological evolution of Earth. The oceans appear to be loosing oxygen due to on-going climate change, with resulting impacts on marine ecosystems and global biogeochemical cycles. As oxygen levels

Handy, Todd C.

132

Workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera: proceedings  

SciTech Connect

A workshop reviewed the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and tectonic processes. Workshop participants discussed the need to instrument sites for continuous measurements of several parameters and to obtain additional hydrologic and chemical information from intermediate and deep drill holes. In addition to seismic and deformation monitoring, programs are currently in progress to monitor changes in the discharge characteristics of hot springs, fumaroles, and soil gases, as well as pressures and temperatures in wells. Some hydrochemical parameters are measured continuously, others are measured monthly or at longer intervals. This report summarizes the information presented at the hydrologic monitoring workshop, following the workshop agenda which was divided into four sessions: (1) overview of the hydrothermal system; (2) monitoring springs, fumaroles, and wells; (3) monitoring gas emissions; and (4) conclusions and recommendations.

Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Environmental isotope and geochemical investigation of groundwater in Big Bend National Park, Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the Panther Junction and Rio Grande Village Areas of Big Bend National Park, Texas. The regional groundwater flow in the Panther Junction area is interpreted to occur in a radially outward direction away from the Chisos Mountain slopes. This interpretation... s Physiographic Setting Panther Junction Area. Rio Grande Village Area. Climate and Vegetation. Previous Work Geology. Hydrogeology 1 3 3 6 6 6 7 8 8 9 GEOLOGY. Regional Geology. Geology of the Panther Junction Geologv of the Rio Grande Village...

Lopez Sepulveda, Hector Javier

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

134

Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site  

SciTech Connect

The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Stochastic Joint Inversion for Integrated Data Interpretation in Geothermal Exploration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Stochastic Joint Inversion for Integrated Data Interpretation in Geothermal Exploration presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

136

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the...

137

A New Interpretation of the Scanning Tunneling Microscope Image...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Graphite. A New Interpretation of the Scanning Tunneling Microscope Image of Graphite. Abstract: In this work, highly-resolved scanning tunneling microscopy images of graphite...

138

Interpretation by Implementation for Understanding a Multiagent Organization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper stresses the importance of focusing on the modeling process of computational models for precisely understanding a complex organization and for solving given problems in the organization. Based on our claim, we proposes a method of interpretation ... Keywords: computer simulation, interpretation by implementation, modeling process, simulation analysis

Keiki Takadama; Takao Terano; Katsunori Shimohara

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Transformation of Meta-Information by Abstract Co-Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transformation of Meta-Information by Abstract Co-Interpretation Raimund Kirner and Peter Puschner based on abstract interpretation to transform meta-information in parallel with the transformation. The construction of a correct transformation function for the meta-information can be quite complicated in case

140

Generating and Interpreting Referring Expressions in Dustin Arthur Smith  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generating and Interpreting Referring Expressions in Context by Dustin Arthur Smith B.S., Wake Referring Expressions in Context by Dustin Arthur Smith Submitted to the Program of Media Arts and Sciences, MIT Media Lab #12;Generating and Interpreting Referring Expressions in Context by Dustin Arthur Smith

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141

DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG GRAPHS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG GRAPHS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This is the fourth paper in a series on developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) as a logging tool for geothermal bore holes. Here we address methods of displaying analyses and plotting gas ratios used for data interpretation on mudlog plots. The goal is to develop a rapid method of data display and interpretation for the up to 10,000 analyses returned by a geothermal well FIS analysis. Author(s): Norman, D.I.; Dilley, L.M.; McCulloch, J. Published: PROCEEDINGS, Thirtieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir

142

Aeromagnetic Survey And Interpretation, Ascention Island, South Atlantic  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

And Interpretation, Ascention Island, South Atlantic And Interpretation, Ascention Island, South Atlantic Ocean Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Aeromagnetic Survey And Interpretation, Ascention Island, South Atlantic Ocean Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: A detailed aeromagnetic survey of Ascension Island, which was completed in February and March of 1983 as part of an evaluation of the geothermal potential of the island, is described. The aeromagnetic map represents a basic data set useful for the interpretation of subsurface geology. An in situ magnetic susceptibility survey was also carried out to assist in understanding the magnetic properties of Ascension rocks and to aid in the interpretation of the aeromagnetic data. The aeromagnetic survey

143

Geochemical data package for the Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment (ILAW PA)  

SciTech Connect

Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method of disposing of the portion that is classified as low-activity waste is to vitrify the liquid/slurry and place the solid product in near-surface, shallow-land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the porewater of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assists LMHC in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the disposal facility, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) and the thermodynamic solubility product (K{sub sp}), respectively. In this data package, the authors approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. In future geochemical data packages, they will determine whether a more rigorous measure of solubility is necessary or warranted based on the dose predictions emanating from the ILAW 2001 PA and reviewers' comments. The K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the ILAW system. In addition to the best-estimate K{sub d}s, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. They assume that K{sub d} values are log normally distributed over the cited ranges. Currently, they do not give estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, they supply different values for both the K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the ILAW system and supply time-varying K{sub d}s for the concrete zone, should the final repository design include concrete vaults or cement amendments to buffer the system pH.

DI Kaplan; RJ Serne

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

144

Burning of coal waste piles from Douro Coalfield (Portugal): Petrological, geochemical and mineralogical characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Douro Coalfield anthracites were exploited for decades (1795–1994). Besides many small mines Douro Coalfield had two principal mining areas (S. Pedro da Cova and Pejão). Coal mining activities cause several impacts on the environment, one of which is the amount of discard or waste which was disposed of all over Douro Coalfield resulting in one of the most significant and severe impacts on the environment. Over 20 waste piles exist in the old mining areas, geographically dispersed, and three of them are presently burning. Their ignition was caused by forest fires during the summer of 2005. Samples from the burning and unburned zones of the waste piles were studied as were the gas from vents and the minerals resulting after combustion. Geochemical processes and mineralogical transformations in the burning coal waste pile were investigated. Microscopic analyses of the samples identified some particular aspects related with combustion: oxidation of pyrite, the presence of iron oxides, organic particles with cracks and rims with lowered (suppressed) Rr, devolatilization vacuoles and some char structures. The occurrence of vitreous (glassy) material as well as Fe–Al spinels in the burning coal waste provide evidences that the combustion temperature could have reached values above 1000 °C. Due to combustion, and as expected, the samples studied reported high ash yields. Samples taken from the burning zones reported an increase of As, Cr, Li, Nb, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr and LREE concentrations and a decrease in Zr and HREE concentrations. Enrichment in Cs, Li and Rb was noted when comparing with the geochemical composition of black shales and world coals composition that is related with the contribution of granitic rocks in the sediments that originated the main lithologies of the Douro Coalfield (carbonaceous shale and lithic arenites). Cluster analyses (R-type and Q-type) were performed to understand the trend between the unburned and burning samples and it seems that some chemical variations are responsible for this separation. Elemental sulphur and salammoniac (ammonium salt) are the coal fire gas minerals neoformed on the surface of piles, near the burning zones. They were identified by different techniques, mainly SEM-EDX, XRD and FTIR. Relatively high concentrations of several aromatic compounds were detected in the gas collected at the studied areas, as well as aliphatic hydrocarbons. The highest concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in gas samples from S. Pedro da Cova waste pile. The exposure to hazardous compounds present in the gas is a serious risk to human health and the environment.

J. Ribeiro; E. Ferreira da Silva; D. Flores

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical aspects of site-specific studies of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource of southern Louisiana. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The report consists of four sections dealing with progress in evaluating geologic, geochemical, and geophysical aspects of geopressured-geothermal energy resources in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual sections. (ACR)

Pilger, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Topical Report CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380 Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2011 Oil & Natural Gas Technology Office of Fossil Energy Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah Topical Report Reporting Period: October 31, 2009 through March 31, 2011 Authors: Lauren P. Birgenheier, Energy and Geoscience Insitute, University of Utah

147

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the InSalah CO2 Storage Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the In Salah CO 2 Storage Project Background Safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs is critical to geologic sequestration. The In Salah Project (joint venture of British Petroleum (BP), Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro) has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 billion cubic feet per year (bcfy) natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian

148

Use of iodine surface geochemical surveys in the Lodgepole and Minnelusa plays, U.S. northern Rockies  

SciTech Connect

The use of surface geochemistry is becoming more prevalent in oil exploration, especially for focusing specific target areas for 2D and 3D seismic surveys. Presented here are two surface geochemical surveys utilizing the iodine method in delineating Upper Minnelusa sands of Permian age in the Powder River basin and Lodgepole Waulsortian-like mounds of Mississippian age in the Williston basin. Iodine is an indirect indicator of a petroleum accumulation at depth. Increases in iodine anomalies are caused by the presence of petroleum seepage in the upper part of the soil section. In the very shallow surface, less than 10 ft, a reaction occurs between hydrocarbons and iodine under sunlight forming inorganic compounds. The source of the iodine is either from minerals in the soil and/or from the atmosphere with ultraviolet light as the initiator of the reaction. Any iodine in the subsurface could not migrate far in the presence of hydrocarbons and due to its large molecular size. The compounds that form in the soil remain solid and are relatively difficult to remove. Any surface geochemical anomaly needs to be followed by seismic in order to provide a specific drilling target. If a surface geochemical survey is properly designed and implemented, when no anomaly is present, then to date regardless of the type of method used the results have been dry holes. If a surface geochemical anomaly is present, the intensity, areal extent, and quality of the anomaly cannot determine the economic viability of the accumulation of depth, but there is a significant increase in the success rate. The best utilization of these methods is to determine areas where there is no possibility of finding petroleum and focusing on areas that do. In the case of the Lodgepole and Minnelusa plays, surface geochemistry allows a low cost approach and helps focus and minimize 2D and 3D survey costs.

Tedesco, S.A.; Bretz, S. [Atoka Geochemical Services Corp., Englewood, CO (United States)

1995-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

149

GEOCHEMICAL APPROACHES TO THE STUDY OF LIFE AND DEATH OF DINOSAURS FROM THE EARLY CRETACEOUS CEDAR MOUNTAIN FORMATION, UTAH  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

., Brown, T., Kirkland, J., and Stantucci, V. (Eds.), Proceedings of the 8th Conference on Fossil Resources, May 19-21, St. George, UT. 7-9. 8 Trueman, C. N., Benton, M.J., and Palmer, M.R. (2003) Geochemical taphonomy and shallow marine vertebrate... Chapter 2. Heterogeneous rare earth element (REE) patterns and concentrations in a fossil bone: implications for the use of REE in vertebrate taphonomy and fossilization history...........................................................................9...

Suarez, Celina Angelica

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

150

Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretation Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretation of Thermal Infrared Satellite Images Used in Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Importance of Elevation and Temperature Inversions for the Interpretation of Thermal Infrared Satellite Images Used in Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Examples of nighttime temperature inversions are shown in thermal infrared satellite images collected over the Coso geothermal field in eastern California. Temperature-elevation plots show the normal trend of temperature decrease with elevation, on which temperature inversions appear superimposed as opposite trends. Such inversions are common and they should

151

The Cosmological Constant Problem and Re-interpretation of Time  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We abandon the interpretation that time is a global parameter in quantum mechanics, replace it by a quantum dynamical variable playing the role of time. This operational re-interpretation of time provides a solution to the cosmological constant problem. The expectation value of the zero-point energy under the new time variable vanishes. The fluctuation of the vacuum energy as the leading contribution to the gravitational effect gives a correct order to the observed "dark energy". The "dark energy" as a mirage is always seen comparable with the matter energy density by an observer using the internal clock time. Conceptual consequences of the re-interpretation of time are also discussed.

M. J. Luo

2013-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Can a wormhole be interpreted as an EPR pair?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, Maldacena and Susskind arXiv:1306.0533 and Jensen and Karch arXiv:1307.1132 argued that a wormhole can be interpreted as an EPR pair. We point out that a convincing justification of such an interpretation would require a quantitative evidence that correlations between two ends of the wormhole are equal to those between the members of the EPR pair. As long as the existing results do not contain such evidence, the interpretation of wormhole as an EPR pair does not seem justified.

Nikolic, H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Geochemical modeling of the near-surface hydrothermal system beneath the southern moat of Long Valley Caldera, California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Geochemical reaction path and mass balance modeling techniques were used to test the hypothesis that an eastwardly flowing plume of thermal water in the southern moat of the Long Valley caldera system reacts with hydrothermally altered intra-caldera tuffs and mixes with non-thermal groundwater. Our conceptual model is based on hypotheses in the literature and published geochemical and petrologic data. Mixing of thermal and non-thermal waters and reaction with wall rock were simulated using the reaction path code EQ3/6. Mass balance calculations were conducted to estimate the extent of water–rock interaction between the intra-caldera tuffs and fluids. A mixing ratio of 82% thermal and 18% non-thermal water reacting with altered tuff minerals closely matches Casa Diablo fluid compositions and minerals observed in petrographic studies. Results of this study show that the mineralogy and fluid chemistry observed in the shallow reservoir at Long Valley caldera are formed in an open system. Further, calcite precipitated in the system serves as a sink for high levels of CO2 generated by the deeper magmatic system. Our study serves as an example that processes acting in a geothermal system can be effectively quantified using geochemical modeling and mass balance calculations.

Regina N. Tempel; Daniel M. Sturmer; Jill Schilling

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

The application of iodine and magnetic susceptibility surface geochemical surveys in the Lodgepole Play, Eastern Williston Basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect

The use of surface geochemistry as a first pass exploration tool is becoming more prevalent in petroleum exploration. This is especially true due to the high cost of 2-D and 3-D surveys in defining small targets such as the Waulsortian mounds of the Lodgepole Formation. Surface geochemical surveys are very effective in pinpointing specific target areas for seismic surveying and thus reducing costs. Presented are examples of surface geochemical surveys utilizing magnetic susceptibility and iodine methods in delineating reservoirs in the Lodgepole, Mission Canyon and Red River formations. The types of surveys presented vary from reconnaissance to detail and examples of how to define a grid will be discussed. Surface geochemical surveys can be very effective when the areal extent of the target(s) and the purpose of the survey are clearly defined prior to implementation. By determining which areas have microseepage and which areas do not, surface geochemistry can be a very effective tool in focusing exploration efforts and maximizing exploration dollars.

Tedesco, S.A. [Atoka Geochemical Services Corp., Englewood, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Trace element geochemical zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah  

SciTech Connect

Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area has resulted in the development of distinctive trace element signatures. Geochemical analysis of soil samples, shallow temperature-gradient drill hole cuttings and deep drill hole cuttings provides a three-dimensional perspective of trace element distributions within the system. Distributions of As, Hg and Li provide the clearest expression of hydrothermal activity. Comparison of these distributions suggests that Li, followed by As and Hg, are progressively deposited by outward flowing, cooling, thermal fluids. Hg, in contrast to As and Li, is distributed only within the outer portions of the thermal system where temperatures are less than about 225/sup 0/C. Heating experiments indicate that extensive Hg remobilization in Roosevelt samples occurs at temperatures as low as 200/sup 0/ to 250/sup 0/C. This suggests that the distribution of Hg largely reflects the present system thermal configuration and that this distribution may be a useful soild geothermometer.

Christensen, O.D.; Moore, J.N.; Capuano, R.M.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Geochemical Fingerprinting of Coltan Ores by Machine Learning on Uneven Datasets  

SciTech Connect

Two modern machine learning techniques, Linear Programming Boosting (LPBoost) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs), are introduced and applied to a geochemical dataset of niobium-tantalum ('coltan') ores from Central Africa to demonstrate how such information may be used to distinguish ore provenance, i.e., place of origin. The compositional data used include uni- and multivariate outliers and elemental distributions are not described by parametric frequency distribution functions. The 'soft margin' techniques of LPBoost and SVMs can be applied to such data. Optimization of their learning parameters results in an average accuracy of up to c. 92%, if spot measurements are assessed to estimate the provenance of ore samples originating from two geographically defined source areas. A parameterized performance measure, together with common methods for its optimization, was evaluated to account for the presence of uneven datasets. Optimization of the classification function threshold improves the performance, as class importance is shifted towards one of those classes. For this dataset, the average performance of the SVMs is significantly better compared to that of LPBoost.

Savu-Krohn, Christian, E-mail: christian.savu-krohn@unileoben.ac.at; Rantitsch, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.rantitsch@unileoben.ac.at [Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Department of Applied Geosciences and Geophysics (Austria); Auer, Peter, E-mail: auer@unileoben.ac.at [Chair for Information Technology, Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria); Melcher, Frank, E-mail: frank.melcher@bgr.de; Graupner, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.graupner@bgr.de [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (Germany)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

158

DOE Withdraws Interpretive Rule and Provides Enforcement Guidance on  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interpretive Rule and Provides Enforcement Guidance Interpretive Rule and Provides Enforcement Guidance on Showerheads DOE Withdraws Interpretive Rule and Provides Enforcement Guidance on Showerheads March 4, 2011 - 5:27pm Addthis The Department has withdrawn as unwarranted the draft interpretative rule setting out the Department's views on the definition of a "showerhead" for purposes of the water conservation standard enacted by Congress in 1992. To provide certainty going forward, however, the Department today provides a brief enforcement guidance, which balances the Department's obligation to enforce the congressional standard with its determination to avoid needless economic dislocation. The guidance, available here, explains how the Department intends to enforce the 1992 law and provides manufacturers a

159

Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Interpretation of electromagnetic soundings in the Raft River geothermal area, Idaho Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: An electromagnetic (EM) controlled source survey was conducted in the Raft River Valley, near Malta, Idaho. The purpose of the survey was: to field test U.S. Geological Survey extra-low-frequency (ELF) equipment using a grounded wire source and receiver loop configuration (which is designed to measure the vertical magnetic field (Hz) at the loop center for various frequencies); to present an example of the EM sounding data and interpretations using a previously developed inversion program; and (3) to

160

A functional interpretation for nonstandard arithmetic Benno van den Berg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A functional interpretation for nonstandard arithmetic Benno van den Berg , Eyvind Briseid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Mathematisch Instituut, Universiteit Utrecht, PO. Box 80010, 3508 TA Utrecht. Email address: B.vandenBerg

van den Berg, Benno

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

INTERPRETATION OF AC IMPEDANCE MEASUREMENTS IN SOLIDS* J. Ross Macdonald  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= INTERPRETATION OF AC IMPEDANCE MEASUREMENTS IN SOLIDS* J. Ross Macdonald Department of Physics Foundation (Grant No. DMR 75-10739). 81 #12;82 PERTINENT PARAMETERS J.R. MACDONALD Figure 1 shows

Macdonald, James Ross

162

DOE interpretations Guide to OSH standards. Update to the Guide  

SciTech Connect

Reflecting Secretary O`Leary`s focus on occupational safety and health, the Office of Occupational Safety is pleased to provide you with the latest update to the DOE Interpretations Guide to OSH Standards. This Guide was developed in cooperation with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which continued its support during this last revision by facilitating access to the interpretations found on the OSHA Computerized Information System (OCIS). This March 31, 1994 update contains 123 formal interpretation letters written by OSHA. As a result of the unique requests received by the 1-800 Response Line, this update also contains 38 interpretations developed by DOE. This new occupational safety and health information adds still more important guidance to the four volume reference set that you presently have in your possession.

Not Available

1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

163

DOE interpretations Guide to OSH standards. Update to the Guide  

SciTech Connect

Reflecting Secretary O`Leary`s focus on occupational safety and health, the Office of Occupational Safety is pleased to provide you with the latest update to the DOE Interpretations Guide to OSH Standards. This Guide was developed in cooperation with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which continued its support during this last revision by facilitating access to the interpretations found on the OSHA Computerized Information System (OCIS). This March 31, 1994 update contains 123 formal interpretation letters written OSHA. As a result of the unique requests received by the 1-800 Response Line, this update also contains 38 interpretations developed by DOE. This new occupational safety and health information adds still more important guidance to the four volume reference set that you presently have in your possession.

Not Available

1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

Bounds Analysis by Abstract Interpretation Xiaolei Qian Allen Goldberg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

representations fo* *r these abstract types. In this work an abstract context, i.e. model, consists * Bounds Analysis by Abstract@csl.sri.com goldberg@kestrel.edu Abstract Abstract interpretation

Goldberg, Allen

165

Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper focuses on the interpretation of the additional wells (4 bore holes) and comparison to the previous wells. Preliminary correlation between wells is also presented. Analyses from multiple boreholes show fluid stratigraphy that correlates from well to well. The wells include large producers, small to moderate producers, problem producers, injectors, and non producers Author(s): Dilley, L.M.; Newman, D.L. ; McCulloch, J.; Wiggett, G. Published: Geothermal Resource Council Transactions 2005, 1/1/2005

166

Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Geoscience interpretations of the Raft River Resource Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A discussion of the geology and the wellfield development at Raft River is presented. The geothermal resource is located in a downdropped and downwarped basin bordered on east, west, and south by mountain ranges that vary in both stratigraphy and structure. It is inferred that the geothermal resource occurs where hydrothermal water rises at the intersection of and along the Narrows Zone and the Bridge Fault. Three exploration wells, two development wells, and two injection wells were drilled. The basic strategy of field development was to drill deep production wells on the faulted

167

Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal wells at Coso, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Interpretation of chemical analyses of waters collected from two geothermal wells at Coso, California Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Wellhead and downhole water samples were collected and analyzed from a 114.3-m well at Coso Hot Springs (Coso No. 1) and a 1477-m well (CGEH No. 1) 3.2 km to the west. The same chloride concentration is present in hot waters entering both wells (about 2350 mg/kg), indicating that a hot-water-dominated geothermal system is present. The maximum measured temperatures are 142 degrees C in the Coso No. 1 well and 195 degrees C in the CGEH No. 1 well. Cation and sulfate isotope geothermometers indicate

168

DOE interpretations Guide to OSH standards. Update to the Guide  

SciTech Connect

Reflecting Secretary O`Leary`s focus on occupational safety and health, the Office of Occupational Safety is pleased to provide you with the latest update to the DOE Interpretations Guide to OSH Standards. This Guide was developed in cooperation with the Occupational Safety and Health Administration, which continued it`s support during this last revision by facilitating access to the interpretations found on the OSHA Computerized Information System (OCIS). This March 31, 1994 update contains 123 formal in letter written by OSHA. As a result of the unique requests received by the 1-800 Response Line, this update also contains 38 interpretations developed by DOE. This new occupational safety and health information adds still more important guidance to the four volume reference set that you presently have in your possession.

Not Available

1994-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

169

Chemical analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from the CGEH No. 1 geothermal well at Coso, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Chemical analyses and preliminary interpretation of waters collected from the CGEH No. 1 geothermal well at Coso, California Details Activities (2) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: The chloride-rich water obtained in 1967 from the shallow (114.3 m) Coso Hot Springs well No. 1 comes from a deep aquifer with a temperature at least as high as about 240 C and possibly higher than 275 C. Similar, but slightly diluted and cooled chloride-rich water enters the 1477-meter deep CGEH No. 1 well drilled in 1977 about 3.2 km to the west of the 1967 well. From the data in hand the Coso geothermal system appears to be a hot

170

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL INTERPRETATION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTERPRETATION INTERPRETATION REGARDING THE APPLICATION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARD 1027-92, HAZARD CATEGORIZATION AND ACCIDENT ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH DOE ORDER 5480.23, NUCLEAR SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORTS, UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF 10 C.F.R. § 830.202(b)(3) In accordance with 10 C.F.R § 820.51, the Department of Energy (DOE) Acting General Counsel is responding to a request to provide an interpretation concerning a DOE Nuclear Safety Requirement: the application of DOE Technical Standard 1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports (hereafter "TS 1027" or "Standard"), under the provisions of 10 C.F.R. § 830.202(b)(3). Specifically, the Acting General Counsel was asked:

171

Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers Details Activities (3) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be directly used only to evaluate porous medium compressibility if porosity is known. Moreover, since specific storage S/sub s/ quantifies a drained behavior of the porous medium, one cannot

172

Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Quantitative interpretation of tracer test data Abstract Geothermal reinjection is an important part of sustainable management of geothermal resources. Reinjection started out as a method of waste-water disposal, but is now also being used to counteract pressure draw-down and to extract more thermal energy from reservoir rocks. The possible cooling of production wells, or thermal breakthrough, is one of the main disadvantages associated with injection. To minimize this danger while maintaining the benefit from reinjection requires careful testing and research. Tracer testing, which is used to study flow-paths and quantify fluid-flow in hydrological systems, is probably the most important tool for

173

Mineralogic Interpretation Of Hymap Hyperspectral Data, Dixie Valley,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineralogic Interpretation Of Hymap Hyperspectral Data, Dixie Valley, Mineralogic Interpretation Of Hymap Hyperspectral Data, Dixie Valley, Nevada, USA-Initial Results Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Mineralogic Interpretation Of Hymap Hyperspectral Data, Dixie Valley, Nevada, USA-Initial Results Abstract A collaborative effort among U. S. Department of Energy sponsored remote sensing specialists and industry recently culminated in the acquisition of hyperspectral data over a new exploration target in Dixie Valley, Nevada, U. S. A. Related research at the Energy & Geoscience Institute is currently focused on mineralogy mapping at the outcrop level. This will be extended to piedmont and valley fill soils to detect soil mineral anomalies that may be related to buried structures and sinters. Spectral mineral end-members

174

GIS Regional Spatial Data from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy: Geochemical, Geodesic, Geologic, Geophysical, Geothermal, and Groundwater Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The center also makes its collections of spatial data available for direct download to the public. Data are in Lambert Conformable Conic Projection.

175

Interpret your results | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interpret your results Interpret your results Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager The new ENERGY STAR Portfolio Manager How Portfolio Manager helps you save The benchmarking starter kit Identify your property type Enter data into Portfolio Manager The data quality checker How Portfolio Manager calculates metrics

176

Final Report: Molecular Basis for Microbial Adhesion and Geochemical Surface Reactions: A Study Across Scales  

SciTech Connect

Computational chemistry was used to help provide a molecular level description of the interactions of Gram-negative microbial membranes with subsurface materials. The goal is to develop a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in microbial metal binding, microbial attachment to mineral surfaces, and, eventually, oxidation/reduction reactions (electron transfer) that can occur at these surfaces and are mediated by the bacterial exterior surface. The project focused on the interaction of the outer microbial membrane, which is dominated by an exterior lipopolysaccharide (LPS) portion, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with the mineral goethite and with solvated ions in the environment. This was originally a collaborative project with T.P. Straatsma and B. Lowery of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The University of Alabama effort used electronic structure calculations to predict the molecular behavior of ions in solution and the behavior of the sugars which form a critical part of the LPS. The interactions of the sugars with metal ions are expected to dominate much of the microscopic structure and transport phenomena in the LPS. This work, in combination with the molecular dynamics simulations of Straatsma and the experimental electrochemistry and microscopy measurements of Lowry, both at PNNL, is providing new insights into the detailed molecular behavior of these membranes in geochemical environments. The effort at The University of Alabama has three components: solvation energies and structures of ions in solution, prediction of the acidity of the critical groups in the sugars in the LPS, and binding of metal ions to the sugar anions. An important aspect of the structure of the LPS membrane as well as ion transport in the LPS is the ability of the sugar side groups such as the carboxylic acids and the phosphates to bind positively charged ions. We are studying the acidity of the acidic side groups in order to better understand the ability of these groups to bind metal ions. We need to understand the solvation properties of the metal ions in solution and their ability to bind not only to the sugars but to proteins and to other anions. Our goal is then to be able to predict the ability of the side groups to bind metal ions. One result from the earlier molecular dynamics simulations is the exclusion of water from the inner hydrophobic part of the membrane. We thus need to investigate the binding of the cations in media with different dielectric constants.

Dixon, David Adams [The University of Alabama

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

177

Student Interpretations of Equations Related to the First Law of Thermodynamics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Student Interpretations of Equations Related to the First Law of Thermodynamics ... Student interpretation or assignment of meaning to equations representing thermodynamic quantities has received less attention. ...

Linda C. Hadfield; Carl E. Wieman

2010-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

178

Educational Technology Improves ECG Interpretation of Acute Myocardial Infarction among Medical Students and Emergency Medicine Residents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technology Improves ECG Interpretation Education. AAMCheartdisease. 2. Ripa, MS. The ECG as decision support inEducational Technology Improves ECG Interpretation of Acute

Pourmand, Ali; Tanski, Mary; Davis, Steven; Shokoohi, Hamid; Lucas, Raymond; Zaver, Fareen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Monitoring and interpreting the ocean uptake of atmospheric CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...interpreting the ocean uptake of atmospheric CO2 Andrew J. Watson 1 * Nicolas Metzl 2 Ute...important sink for anthropogenically produced CO2, and on time scales longer than a century they will be the main repository for the CO2 that humans are emitting. Our knowledge...

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Interpreting Performance Data Across Intuitive Domains Martin Schulz1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National LaboratoryInterpreting Performance Data Across Intuitive Domains Martin Schulz1 , Joshua A. Levine2 , Peer, USA 2 Scientific Computing and Imaging Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT {schulzm

Utah, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

On the relation between Interpreted Systems and Kripke Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems, a sim- pli ed notion of Interpreted Systems, as semantic structures for reasoning about knowledge62]) and later used in Distributed Computing Theory by Halpern and Moses ( HF85]) and others proposed by Fagin, Halpern, Moses and Vardi HF85] to model distributed systems. The growing interest

Ryan, Mark

182

Abstract Interpretation with Alien Expressions and Heap Structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Interpretation with Alien Expressions and Heap Structures Bor-Yuh Evan Chang0, and K constraint mentions other, alien, function or relation symbols, it is ignored (that is, it is very coarsely over-approximated) by the abstract domain. Rather than building in special treatment of such alien

Leino, K. Rustan M.

183

Static Analysis and Verification of Aerospace Software by Abstract Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

synchronous control/command software in open loop. Recent advances consider imperfectly synchronous, parallelStatic Analysis and Verification of Aerospace Software by Abstract Interpretation Julien Bertrane ´Ecole normale sup´erieure, Paris Patrick Cousot, Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, NYU, New

Miné, Antoine

184

Smart Photo Selection: Interpret Gaze as Personal Interest Tina Walber  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Smart Photo Selection: Interpret Gaze as Personal Interest Tina Walber WeST Institute University staab@uni-koblenz.de ABSTRACT Manually selecting subsets of photos from large collections in order to present them to friends or colleagues or to print them as photo books can be a tedious task. Today, fully

Staab, Steffen

185

A probabilistic interpretation of the Macdonald polynomials Persi Diaconis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A probabilistic interpretation of the Macdonald polynomials Persi Diaconis Departments of Melbourne Abstract The two-parameter Macdonald polynomials are a central object of algebraic com- binatorics of the Macdonald polynomials when expanded in the power sum polynomials. The Markov chain has stationary

Ram, Arun

186

Interpreting the performance of HPF/Fortran 90D  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we present a novel interpretive approach for accurate and cost-effective performance prediction in a high performance computing environment, and describe the design of a source-driven HPF/Fortran 90D performance prediction framework based ... Keywords: HPF/Fortran 90D application development, performance prediction, system & application characterization

Manish Parashar; Salim Hariri; Tomasz Haupt; Geoffrey C. Fox

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

A MATHEMATICAL DREAM AND ITS INTERPRETATION Michael Harris  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A MATHEMATICAL DREAM AND ITS INTERPRETATION Michael Harris UFR de Math´ematiques Universit´e Paris Universitaire de France. Typeset by AMS-TEX 1 #12;2 MICHAEL HARRIS scheduled as the final chapter of a book

Harris, Michael - Institut de Mathématiques de Jussieu, Université Paris 7

188

30 Years of Abstract Interpretation Thomas Jaudon Ball  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

minute talk I gave at the 30 Years of Abstract Interpretation Workshop in San Francisco, California, USA comprised a statement of principles rather than a constitution with legal effect. Just think about it: over history); a peanut farmer from Georgia became the 39th President of the United States; Gary Gilmore

Ball, Thomas

189

Interpretation of Shape-Related Iconic Gestures in Virtual Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interpretation of Shape-Related Iconic Gestures in Virtual Environments Timo Sowa and Ipke focused main- ly on deictic and emblematic gestures. Iconics, viewed as iconic signs in the sense idea towards a computational model of gesture semantics for iconic gestures. Based on an empirical

Wachsmut, Ipke

190

Colloque ARCo'09 Enacting computer icons. The dynamics of interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colloque ARCo'09 Enacting computer icons. The dynamics of interpretation between forms and diagrams. ABSTRACT. The transposition of icons and interfaces in a plurality of devices and software questions simple icons used to send an email on an iPhone leads us to investigate C. S. Peirce's conception

Boyer, Edmond

191

Relational Interpretations of Neighborhood Operators Rough Set Approximation Operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Relational Interpretations of Neighborhood Operators and Rough Set Approximation Operators Y.Y. Yao and rough set approximations using the more familiar notion of binary relations. A special class of neigh sets, partitions, coverings. 1 INTRODUCTION The theory of rough sets is motivated by practical needs

Yao, Yiyu

192

Using Fuzzy Policies to Improve Context Interpretation in Adaptive Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

}@ifi.uio.no Romain Rouvoy Inria Lille-Nord Europe University of Lille, France romain.rouvoy@lifl.fr ABSTRACT engine to perform rate control for media streaming applications. The evaluation results show the benefits, and inherently suitable for diverging interpretations. For example, media streaming applications may need

Eliassen, Frank

193

Exact solutions and their interpretation - session A1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the oral contributions and give a list of posters presented in the session A1 "Exact solutions and their interpretation" at the 20th International Conference on General Relativity and Gravitation (GR 20) in Warsaw, July 7-13, 2013.

Ji?í Bi?ák; Jacek Tafel

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

194

Development and Application of a Paleomagnetic/Geochemical Method for Constraining the Timing of Burial Diagenetic and Fluid  

SciTech Connect

Studies of diagenesis caused by fluid migration or other events are commonly hindered by a lack of temporal control. Our results to date demonstrate that a paleomagnetic/geochemical approach can be used to date fluid migration as well as burial diagenetic events. Our principal working hypothesis is that burial diagenetic processes (e.g., maturation of organic-rich sediments and clay diagenesis) and the migration of fluids can trigger the authigenesis of magnetic mineral phases. The ages of these events can be constrained by comparing chemical remanent magnetizations (CRMs) to independently established Apparent Polar Wander Paths. While geochemical (e.g. stable isotope and organic analyses) and petrographic studies provide important clues for establishing these relationships, the ultimate test of this hypothesis requires the application of independent dating methods to verify the paleomagnetic ages. Towards this end, we have used K-Ar dating of illitization as an alternative method for constraining the ages of magnetic mineral phases in our field areas.

Elmore, Richard D.; Engel, Michael H.

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

195

INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 2: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Geochemical Influences on the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Subsurface at the INEEL  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes previous descriptions of geochemical system conceptual models for the vadose zone and groundwater zone (aquifer) beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The primary focus is on groundwater because contaminants derived from wastes disposed at INEEL are present in groundwater, groundwater provides a pathway for potential migration to receptors, and because geochemical characteristics in and processes in the aquifer can substantially affect the movement, attenuation, and toxicity of contaminants. The secondary emphasis is perched water bodies in the vadose zone. Perched water eventually reaches the regional groundwater system, and thus processes that affect contaminants in the perched water bodies are important relative to the migration of contaminants into groundwater. Similarly, processes that affect solutes during transport from nearsurface disposal facilities downward through the vadose zone to the aquifer are relevant. Sediments in the vadose zone can affect both water and solute transport by restricting the downward migration of water sufficiently that a perched water body forms, and by retarding solute migration via ion exchange. Geochemical conceptual models have been prepared by a variety of researchers for different purposes. They have been published in documents prepared by INEEL contractors, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), academic researchers, and others. The documents themselves are INEEL and USGS reports, and articles in technical journals. The documents reviewed were selected from citation lists generated by searching the INEEL Technical Library, the INEEL Environmental Restoration Optical Imaging System, and the ISI Web of Science databases. The citation lists were generated using the keywords ground water, groundwater, chemistry, geochemistry, contaminant, INEL, INEEL, and Idaho. In addition, a list of USGS documents that pertain to the INEEL was obtained and manually searched. The documents that appeared to be the most pertinent were selected from further review. These documents are tabulated in the citation list. This report summarizes existing geochemical conceptual models, but does not attempt to generate a new conceptual model or select the ''right'' model. This document is organized as follows. Geochemical models are described in general in Section 2. Geochemical processes that control the transport and fate of contaminants introduced into groundwater are described in Section 3. The natural geochemistry of the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) is described in Section 4. The effect of waste disposal on the INEEL subsurface is described in Section 5. The geochemical behavior of the major contaminants is described in Section 6. Section 7 describes the site-specific geochemical models developed for various INEEL facilities.

Paul L. Wichlacz; Robert C. Starr; Brennon Orr

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Geochemical Characterization of Chromate Contamination in the 100 Area Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The major objectives of the proposed study were to: 1.) determine the leaching characteristics of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated sediments collected from 100 Area spill sites; 2.) elucidate possible Cr(VI) mineral and/or chemical associations that may be responsible for Cr(VI) retention in the Hanford Site 100 Areas through the use of i.) macroscopic leaching studies and ii.) microscale characterization of contaminated sediments; and 3.) provide information to construct a conceptual model of Cr(VI) geochemistry in the Hanford 100 Area vadose zone. In addressing these objectives, additional benefits accrued were: (1) a fuller understanding of Cr(VI) entrained in the vadose zone that will that can be utilized in modeling potential Cr(VI) source terms, and (2) accelerating the Columbia River 100 Area corridor cleanup by providing valuable information to develop remedial action based on a fundamental understanding of Cr(VI) vadose zone geochemistry. A series of macroscopic column experiments were conducted with contaminated and uncontaminated sediments to study Cr(VI) desorption patterns in aged and freshly contaminated sediments, evaluate the transport characteristics of dichromate liquid retrieved from old pipelines of the 100 Area; and estimate the effect of strongly reducing liquid on the reduction and transport of Cr(VI). Column experiments used the < 2 mm fraction of the sediment samples and simulated Hanford groundwater solution. Periodic stop-flow events were applied to evaluate the change in elemental concentration during time periods of no flow and greater fluid residence time. The results were fit using a two-site, one dimensional reactive transport model. Sediments were characterized for the spatial and mineralogical associations of the contamination using an array of microscale techniques such as XRD, SEM, EDS, XPS, XMP, and XANES. The following are important conclusions and implications. Results from column experiments indicated that most of contaminant Cr travels fast through the sediments and appears as Cr(VI) in the effluents. The significance of this for groundwater concentrations would, however, depend on the mass flux of recharge to the water table. adsorption of Cr(VI) to sediments from spiked Cr(VI) solution is low; calculated retardation coefficients are close to one. Calcium polysulfide solutions readily reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in column experiments. However a significant amount of the Cr(VI) was mobilized ahead of the polysulfide solution front. This has significant implications for in-situ reductive remediation techniques. The experiments suggest that it would be difficult to design a remedial measure using infiltration of liquid phase reductants without increasing transport of Cr(VI) toward the water table. The microscopic characterization results are consistent with the column studies. Cr(VI) is found as ubiquitous coatings on sediment grain surfaces. Small, higher concentration, chromium sites are associated with secondary clay mineral inclusions, with occasional barium chromate minerals, and reduced to Cr(III) in association with iron oxides that are most likely magnetite primary minerals. Within the restricted access domains of sediment matrix, ferrous iron could also diffuse from in situ, high-surface-area minerals to cause the reductive immobilization of chromate. This process may be favored at microscale geochemical zones where ferrous iron could be supplied. Once nucleated, micrometer-scale precipitates are favored as growing locales for further accumulation, causing the formation of discrete zones of Cr(III).

Dresel, P. Evan; Qafoku, Nikolla; McKinley, James P.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Liu, Chongxuan; Ilton, Eugene S.; Phillips, J. L.

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

197

NETL: Methane Hydrates - DOE/NETL Projects - Measurement and Interpretation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement and Interpretation of Seismic Velocities and Attenuation in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 Measurement and Interpretation of Seismic Velocities and Attenuation in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments Last Reviewed 12/18/2013 DE-FE0009963 Goal The primary project objectives are to relate seismic and acoustic velocities and attenuations to hydrate saturation and texture. The information collected will be a unique dataset in that seismic attenuation will be acquired within the seismic frequency band. The raw data, when combined with other measurements (e.g., complex resistivity, micro-focus x-ray computed tomography, etc.), will enable researchers to understand not only the interaction between mineral surfaces and gas hydrates, but also how the hydrate formation method affects the hydrate-sediment system in terms of elastic properties. An over-arching goal of this research is to calibrate geophysical

198

NREL: Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Models - Interpreting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interpreting Results Interpreting Results Sample Results from JEDI. Download a text-version (MS Excel 44 KB) The Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) models estimate the number of jobs and economic impacts associated with power generation, fuel production, and other projects. Economic activity in input-output models is typically assessed in three categories. NREL's JEDI models classify the first category of results-on-site labor and professional services results-as dollars spent on labor from companies engaged in development and on-site construction and operation of power generation and transmission. These results include labor only-no materials. Companies or businesses that fall into this category of results include project developers, environmental and permitting consultants, road builders, concrete-pouring

199

Integrating knowledge-based techniques into well-test interpretation  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the Spirit Project was to develop a prototype of next-generation well-test-interpretation (WTI) software that would include knowledge-based decision support for the WTI model selection task. This paper describes how Spirit makes use of several different types of information (pressure, seismic, petrophysical, geological, and engineering) to support the user in identifying the most appropriate WTI model. Spirit`s knowledge-based approach to type-curve matching is to generate several different feasible interpretations by making assumptions about the possible presence of both wellbore storage and late-time boundary effects. Spirit fuses information from type-curve matching and other data sources by use of a knowledge-based decision model developed in collaboration with a WTI expert. The sponsors of the work have judged the resulting prototype system a success.

Harrison, I.W.; Fraser, J.L. [Artificial Intelligence Applications Inst., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Use of GPS network data for HF Doppler measurements interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The method of measurement of Doppler frequency shift of ionospheric signal - HF Doppler technique - is one of well-known and widely used methods of ionosphere research. It allows to research various disturbances in the ionosphere. There are some sources of disturbances in the ionosphere. These are geomagnetic storms, solar flashes, metrological effects, atmospheric waves. This method allows to find out the influence of earthquakes, explosions and other processes on the ionosphere, which occur near to the Earth. HF Doppler technique has the high sensitivity to small frequency variations and the high time resolution, but interpretation of results is difficult. In this work we make an attempt to use GPS data for Doppler measurements interpretation. Modeling of Doppler frequency shift variations with use of TEC allows to separate ionosphere disturbances of medium scale.

Petrova, Inna R; Latypov, Ruslan R

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Structural interpretation of the Coso geothermal field. Summary report,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, October 1986-August 1987 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Structural interpretation of the Coso geothermal field. Summary report, October 1986-August 1987 Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal Field, located east of the Sierra Nevada at the northern edge of the high Mojave Desert in Southern California, is an excellent example of a structurally controlled geothermal resource. Author(s): Austin, C.F.; Moore, J.L. Published: Publisher Unknown, 9/1/1987 Document Number: Unavailable DOI: Unavailable Source: View Original Report Geothermal Literature Review At Coso Geothermal Area (1987) Coso Geothermal Area Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Structural_interpretation_of_the_Coso_geothermal_field._Summary_report,_October_1986-August_1987&oldid=473519"

202

Hydrogen isotope fractionation in algae: III. Theoretical interpretations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Hydrogen isotope measurements of lipid biomarkers preserved in sediments are most commonly interpreted as qualitative, rather than quantitative indicators of paleoprecipitation owing to an imperfect knowledge of all factors controlling the isotopic fractionation occurring during biosynthesis. Here, we first offer a brief review of appropriate procedures for preparing enriched isotope substrates for use in tracer studies and outline the approximate ?D threshold at which this transition occurs. We then present new interpretations to explain deviations from common stable isotope effects observed in our previous culture experiments and other studies. We draw particular attention to the disagreement between intercept and slope for product–substrate relationships from those predicted for isotope systems, even when R2 values are high, and attribute it to kinetic isotope fractionation. We demonstrate that reconstructing paleoenvironmental water ?D values by simply adding a ? to measured biomarkers ?D values will result in a bias toward deuterium enriched values. This applies even to implicit reconstructions in the form of qualitative interpretations of measured lipid ?D values as indicators of past hydroclimate. We therefore recommend reconstructing water ?D values from lipid ?D values using fractionation factor (?). We also discuss the apparently contradictory increase in D/H fractionation observed at elevated temperature and suggest that this may be the result of the unique wave-particle duality of hydrogen isotopes, which permits isotopologues to avoid surmounting the activation energy barrier that is necessary in traditional kinetic reactions.

Zhaohui Zhang; Daniel B. Nelson; Julian P. Sachs

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Interpretation of equilibria in game-theoretic rough sets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Intelligent decision making models aim at improving the quality of decision making under uncertainty. The fundamental issues that are generally encountered in these models are too many options to choose from and the involvement of contradictory decision making criteria. The game-theoretic rough set (GTRS) model provides an intelligent decision making mechanism that exploits a game-theoretic environment for analyzing strategic situations between cooperative or conflicting decision making criteria in the probabilistic rough set framework. The concept of equilibria is of central importance in the GTRS model which has not been sufficiently addressed in the current literature. Two key issues in this regard are the interpretation of equilibria and the establishment of their existence. By reviewing, examining and defining the basic game constructs in the GTRS model, we are able to interpret an equilibrium in terms of the decision thresholds that control the rough sets based decision regions. In particular, an equilibrium is defined in terms of a pair of thresholds such that no player has a unilateral incentive to change these thresholds within the game. An example game is considered to demonstrate the use of the interpretation in determining the thresholds. The issue of existence of equilibria is addressed by considering a couple of typical two-player games in the GTRS model. The results suggest that the existence of equilibria may be established under certain limited conditions.

Nouman Azam; JingTao Yao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Aladdin: an assembly language assertion-driven debugging interpreter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ALADDIN: AN ASSEMBI Y LQiGUAGE ASSERTION-DR DIEM DEBUGGII'IG TNTERPRETER A Thesis DAVl3) AIAN HARBIN Su'bnitted. to the Graduate College of Texas MuM Un'versity ln partial fulfillment of tl e requires. nt for the degree of I9BTER OF SCBENCE...: An Assembly Language Assertion-Driven Debugging Interpreter. (August 1977) David Alan Hardin, B. S. , Texas AkM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard E. Fairley Most current assembly language debuggers offer a user the ability to specify...

Hardin, David Alan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

205

Neural network and area method interpretation of pulsed experiments  

SciTech Connect

The determination of the subcriticality level is an important issue in accelerator-driven system technology. The area method, originally introduced by N. G. Sjoestrand, is a classical technique to interpret flux measurement for pulsed experiments in order to reconstruct the reactivity value. In recent times other methods have also been developed, to account for spatial and spectral effects, which were not included in the area method, since it is based on the point kinetic model. The artificial neural network approach can be an efficient technique to infer reactivities from pulsed experiments. In the present work, some comparisons between the two methods are carried out and discussed. (authors)

Dulla, S.; Picca, P.; Ravetto, P. [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento di Energetica, Corso Duca degli Abruzzi, 24 - 10129 Torino (Italy); Canepa, S. [Lab of Reactor Physics and Systems Behaviour LRS, Paul Scherrer Inst., 5232 Villigen (Switzerland)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Significance of Secondary Porosity in Interpreting Sandstone Composition  

SciTech Connect

Secondary porosity resulting from dissolution of unstable framework grains such as feldspar and rock fragments (including chert) is common in sandstones. Extensive dissolution of framework grains may result in misinterpreting the original composition of a sandstone and, hence, in misinterpreting its provenance. To avoid these problems, secondary porosity caused by grain dissolution must be recognized. Sandstone composition may be properly evaluated by including the dissolved portion of a framework grain as a grain, rather than as porosity, while point counting. This should be useful in interpreting original composition of sandstones and in paleogeographic reconstruction of prospect areas.

Shanmugam, G.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

The Everett-Wheeler interpretation and the open future  

SciTech Connect

I discuss the meaning of probability in the Everett-Wheeler interpretation of quantum mechanics, together with the problem of defining histories. To resolve these, I propose an understanding of probability arising from a form of temporal logic: the probability of a future-tense proposition is identified with its truth value in a many-valued and context-dependent logic. In short, probability is degree of truth. These ideas relate to traditional naive ideas of time and chance. Indeed, I argue that Everettian quantum mechanics is the only form of scientific theory that truly incorporates the perception that the future is open.

Sudbery, Anthony [Department of Mathematics, University of York, Heslington, York, YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

208

Theoretical interpretation of high-energy nuclear collisions.  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear collisions are interpreted theoretically. The nuclear equation of state is studied in a wide energy range. Subnucleonic degrees of freedom are invoked at high energy densities and at short length-scales. Questions of dynamical collision simulations are investigated. Direct support is provided for experiment in the form of collaborative projects. The major objective of this nuclear theory program is a better understanding of the properties of strongly interacting matter on the nuclear energy scale, as manifested in high-energy heavy-ion collisions.

Fai, G.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site gravity survey and interpretation  

SciTech Connect

A portion of the WIPP site has been extensively surveyed with high-precision gravity. The main survey (in T22S, R31E) covered a rectangular area 2 by 4-1/3 mi encompassing all of WIPP site Zone II and part of the disturbed zone to the north of the site. Stations were at 293-ft intervals along 13 north-south lines 880 ft apart. The data are considered accurate to within a few hundredths of a milligal. Long-wavelength gravity anomalies correlate well with seismic time structures on horizons below the Castile Formation. Both the gravity anomalies and the seismic time structures are interpreted as resulting from related density and velocity variations within the Ochoan Series. Shorter wavelength negative gravity anomalies are interpreted as resulting from bulk density alteration in the vicinity of karst conduits. The WIPP gravity survey was unable to resolve low-amplitude, long-wavelength anomalies that should result from the geologic structures within the disturbed zone. It did indicate the degree and character of karst development within the surveyed area.

Barrows, L.J.; Fett, J.D.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

XLOGS: An expert system for environmental interpretation of wireline logs  

SciTech Connect

Wireline logs provide information on vertical sequences that can be useful for preliminary interpretation of depositional environments. Although the specific causes of any log response are related to many factors, including lithology, density, and pore fluid, geologists often can gain a general impression of vertical heterogeneity, cyclicity, and gradation without performing a rigorous petrophysical analysis of log responses. The authors have attempted to model these heuristics of well logs in a computer program - XLOGS - that emphasizes pattern recognition and fuzzy logic. XLOGS begins with segmentation of a given digitized log in interactive graphical mode. Next, the log shape is characterized by comparison with a set of type motifs, such as straight, serrated, funnel, and bell shapes. Shapes are described in terms of numerical attributes such as amplitude and slope. By using fuzzy values to express membership, any shape can be described. Related subenvironments can be recognized from characteristic vertical sequences, such as the upward-coarsening prograding delta lobe that produces a funnel-shaped mouth-bar segment above a straight to serrated prodelta segment. Variability in the depth scale is accommodated by iterative segmentation; trials with coarser or finer segmentation can be evaluated as alternative interpretations for distinguishing sequence and parasequence boundaries.

Shultz, A.W.; Fang, J.H.; Chen, H.C. (Univ. of Alabama, Tuscaloosa (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

A condensed matter interpretation of SM fermions and gauge fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the bundle Aff(3) x C x /(R^3), with a geometric Dirac equation on it, as a three-dimensional geometric interpretation of the SM fermions. Each C x /(R^3) describes an electroweak doublet. The Dirac equation has a doubler-free staggered spatial discretization on the lattice space Aff(3) x C (Z^3). This space allows a simple physical interpretation as a phase space of a lattice of cells in R^3. We find the SM SU(3)_c x SU(2)_L x U(1)_Y action on Aff(3) x C x /(R^3) to be a maximal anomaly-free special gauge action preserving E(3) symmetry and symplectic structure, which can be constructed using two simple types of gauge-like lattice fields: Wilson gauge fields and correction terms for lattice deformations. The lattice fermion fields we propose to quantize as low energy states of a canonical quantum theory with Z_2-degenerated vacuum state. We construct anticommuting fermion operators for the resulting Z_2-valued (spin) field theory. A metric theory of gravity compatible with this model is presented too.

I. Schmelzer

2009-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

212

E-Print Network 3.0 - air photo interpretation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

photo interpretation Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air photo interpretation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 20 JEM--VoluME 10, NuMbEr...

213

Improving digital ink interpretation through expected type prediction and dynamic dispatch  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interpretation accuracy of current applications dependent on interpretation of handwritten "digital ink" can be improved by providing contextual information about an ink sample's expected type. This expected type, however, ...

Tay, Kah Seng

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Review article Entomotoxicology, experimental set-up and interpretation for forensic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review article Entomotoxicology, experimental set-up and interpretation for forensic toxicologists-up . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.4. Interpretation in forensic cases a useful tool in forensic investigations [1,2]. Although this science has permitted to provide answers

Rasmont, Pierre

215

Novel Gas Isotope Interpretation Tools to Optimize Gas Shale  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Final Report to Final Report to Report Number 08122.15.Final Novel Gas Isotope Interpretation Tools to Optimize Gas Shale Production Contract: 08122-15 Principal Investigator: William A. Goddard, III Title: Director, Materials and Process Simulation Center California Institute of Technology Wag@wag.caltech.edu Co-PIs: Yongchun Tang, Ph.D. Title: Director, Power Environmental Energy Research Institute Other Author(s) Sheng Wu, Ph.D Andrew Deev, Ph.D Qisheng Ma, Ph.D Gao Li, Ph.D. June 5, 2013 2 LEGAL NOTICE This report was prepared by California Institute of Technology as an account of work sponsored by the Research Partnership to Secure Energy for America, RPSEA. Neither RPSEA members of RPSEA, the National Energy Technology Laboratory, the U.S. Department of Energy, nor any person acting on behalf of

216

Structural interpretation of Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Structural interpretation of Coso Geothermal field, Inyo County, California Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The Coso Geothermal field, located east of the Sierra Nevada at the northern edge of the high Mojave Desert in southern California, is an excellent example of a structurally controlled geothermal resource. The geothermal system appears to be associated with at least one dominant north-south-trending feature which extends several miles through the east-central portion of the Coso volcanic field. Wells drilled along this feature have encountered production from distinct fractures in crystalline basement rocks. The identified producing fractures occur in zones which

217

Interpretation of self-potential measurements during injection tests at  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

self-potential measurements during injection tests at self-potential measurements during injection tests at Raft River, Idaho. Final report Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Interpretation of self-potential measurements during injection tests at Raft River, Idaho. Final report Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Self-potential measurements before and during injection tests at Raft River KGRA, Idaho indicate a small negative change. The magnitude of the change (5 to 10 mV) is near the noise level (5 mV) but they extend over a fairly broad area. The presence of a cathodic protection system clouds the issue of the validity of the changes, however the form of the observed changes cannot be explained by any simple change in the current strength of the protection system. Furthermore, similar changes are observed for two

218

Los Alamos technologies help scientists detect, record & interpret  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

March » March » 'Monster' burst of gamma rays Los Alamos technologies help scientists detect, record & interpret 'monster' burst of gamma rays The burst was detected by NASA's Swift satellite. March 21, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Contact Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office

219

A new physics interpretation of the IceCube data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IceCube has recently observed 37 events of TeV-PeV energies. The angular distribution, with a strong preference for downgoing directions, the spectrum, and the small muon to shower ratio in the data can not be accommodated assuming standard interactions of atmospheric neutrinos. We obtain an excellent fit, however, if a diffuse flux of ultrahigh energy (cosmogenic) neutrinos experiences collisions where only a small fraction of the energy is transferred to the target nucleon. We show that consistent models of TeV gravity or other non-Wilsonian completions of the standard model provide cross sections with these precise features. An increased statistics could clearly distinguish our scenario from the one assumed by IceCube (a diffuse flux of astrophysical neutrinos with a E^{-2} spectrum) and establish the need for new physics in the interpretation of the data.

José Ignacio Illana; Manuel Masip; Davide Meloni

2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

220

A Realist Interpretation of the Quantum Measurement Problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new, realist interpretation of the quantum measurement processes is given. In this scenario a quantum measurement is a non-equilibrium phase transition in a ``resonant cavity'' formed by the entire physical universe including all its material and energy content. Both the amplitude and the phase of the quantum mechanical wavefunction acquire substantial meaning in this picture, and the probabilistic element is removed from the foundations of quantum mechanics, its apparent presence in the quantum measurement process is viewed as a result of the sensitive dependence on initial/boundary conditions of the non-equilibrium phase transitions in a many degree-of-freedom system. The implications of adopting this realist ontology to the clarification and resolution of lingering issues in the foundations of quantum mechanics, such as wave-particle duality, Heisenberg's uncertainty relation, Schrodinger's Cat paradox, first and higher order coherence of photons and atoms, virtual particles, the existence of commutation relations and quantized behavior, etc., are also presented.

Xiaolei Zhang

2006-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Stochastic electrodynamics and the interpretation of quantum physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arguments are given for the plausibility that quantum mechanics is a stochastic theory and that many quantum phenomena derive from the existence of a real noise consisting of vacuum fluctuations of the fields existing in nature. I revisit stochastic electrodynamics (SED), a theory that studies classical systems of electrically charged particles immersed in a real electromagnetic zeropoint field with spectral density proportional to the cube of the frequency, Planck's constant appearing as the parameter fixing the scale. Asides from briefly reviewing known results, I make a detailed comparison between SED and quantum mechanics which shows that both theories make different predictions in many cases. However SED might be a guide for a stochastic interpretation of quantum mechanics

Emilio Santos

2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

222

Final Report: Improved Site Characterization And Storage Prediction Through Stochastic Inversion Of Time-Lapse Geophysical And Geochemical Data  

SciTech Connect

During the last months of this project, our project activities have concentrated on four areas: (1) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir bulk/shear moduli and density; the need for this inversion was not anticipated in the original scope of work, (2) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir porosity and permeability, (3) complete the software needed to perform geochemical inversions and (4) use the software to perform stochastic inversion of aqueous chemistry data to deduce mineral volume fractions. This report builds on work described in progress reports previously submitted (Ramirez et al., 2009, 2010, 2011 - reports fulfilled the requirements of deliverables D1-D4) and fulfills deliverable D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product. The main challenge with our stochastic inversion approach is its large computational expense, even for single reservoir patterns. We dedicated a significant level of effort to improve computational efficiency but inversions involving multiple patterns were still intractable by project's end. As a result, we were unable to fulfill Deliverable D6: Field-based multi-pattern simulations work product.

Ramirez, A; Mcnab, W; Hao, Y; White, D; Johnson, J

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

223

Petrographic and geochemical constraints on the deposition and diagenesis of the Haynesville Formation (Upper Jurassic), southwestern Alabama  

SciTech Connect

The Haynesville Formation in Clarke County, southwestern Alabama, is a 250 m thick, halite-dominated evaporite rock composed of four vertically stacked evaporite facies. The different facies present include a basal chevron-dominated unit, a gray cumulate unit, a unit dominated by brown, organic-rich cumulates, and a unit composed of halite and anhydrite interbedded with sand and mud. The facies are defined by halite textures, the presence of anhydrite laminae and dissolution surfaces, and the relative amount of terrigenous material. These criteria were used because they provide some constraint on the brine depths present during precipitation of the salt. The integration of geochemical data with petrographic observations has been used to formulate a model for the deposition and diagenesis of the deposits. The bromide concentrations within the basal chevron zone systematically rise from 36 ppm to 101 ppm, while the bromide concentrations within the overlying cumulate zone rise more rapidly from 121 ppm to 440 ppm. The strontium isotopic composition of the salt over this interval systematically increases from 0.7068 to 0.7084. Bromide concentrations, strontium isotope ratios, and other chemical parameters, in combination with petrographic observations, constrain the relative importance of depositional and diagenetic processes. Processes that are important in controlling the geochemistry of the deposits include the influx of seawater and meteoric fluid into the basin, synsedimentary dissolution and recycling of solutes, the reflux of brines within the basin, and burial diagenetic processes.

Eustice, R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Characterization of the geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils on the Savannah River Site: Field sampling activities. Final report  

SciTech Connect

There are 36,000 acres of wetlands on the Savannah River Site (SRS) and an additional 5,000 acres of floodplain. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste sites at SRS have shown that some wetlands have been contaminated with pollutants resulting from SRS operations. In general, releases of contaminants to wetland areas have been indirect. These releases may have originated at disposal lagoons or waste facilities located in the vicinity of the wetland areas. Transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, soil erosion, sediment transport, and groundwater seepage into downgradient wetland areas are responsible for the indirect discharges to the wetland areas. The SRS determined that a database of background geochemical and physical properties for wetland soils on the SRS was needed to facilitate future remedial investigations, human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, and feasibility studies for the wetland areas. These data are needed for comparison to contaminant data collected from wetland soils that have been affected by contamination from SRS operations. This report describes the efforts associated with the collection of soil cores, preparation of a lithologic log for each core, and the processing and packaging of individual soil samples for shipment to analytical laboratory facilities.

Dixon, K.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

The relationship of the Yucca Mountain repository block to the regional ground-water system: A geochemical model  

SciTech Connect

Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, is being studied by the Department of Energy and the State of Nevada as the site of a high-level nuclear waste repository. Geochemical and isotopic modeling were used in this study to define the relationship of the volcanic tuff aquifers and aquitards to the underlying regional carbonate ground-water system. The chemical evolution of a ground water as it passes through a hypothetical tuffaceous aquifer was developed using computer models PHREEQE, WATEQDR and BALANCE. The tuffaceous system was divided into five parts, with specific mineralogies, reaction steps and temperatures. The initial solution was an analysis of a soil water from Rainier Mesa. The ending solution in each part became the initial solution in the next part. Minerals consisted of zeolites, smectites, authigenic feldspars and quartz polymorphs from described diagentic mineral zones. Reaction steps were ion exchange with zeolites. The solution from the final zone, Part V, was chosen as most representative, in terms of pH, element molalities and mineral solubilities, of tuffaceous water. This hypothetical volcanic water from Part V was mixed with water from the regional carbonate aquifer, and the results compared to analyses of Yucca Mountain wells. Mixing and modeling attempts were conducted on wells in which studies indicated upward flow.

Matuska, N.A.; Hess, J.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Interpreting a nested Mach-Zehnder interferometer with classical optics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In an recent work with the title "Asking Photons Where They Have Been", Danan et al. experimentally demonstrate an intriguing behavior of photons in an interferometer [Phys. Rev. Lett. 111, 240402 (2013)]. In their words: "The photons tell us that they have been in the parts of the interferometer through which they could not pass." They interpret the results using the two-state vector formalism of quantum theory and say that, although an explanation of the experimental results in terms of classical electromagnetic waves in the interferometer is possible (and they provide a partial description), it is not so intuitive. Here we present a more detailed classical description of their experimental results, showing that it is actually intuitive. The same description is valid for the quantum wave function of the photons propagating in the interferometer. In particular, we show that it is essential that the wave propagates through all parts of the interferometer to describe the experimental results. We hope that our work helps to give a deeper understanding of these interesting experimental results.

Pablo L. Saldanha

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

227

Progress Report, December 2010: Improved Site Characterization And Storage Prediction Through Stochastic Inversion Of Time-Lapse Geophysical And Geochemical Data  

SciTech Connect

Over the last project six months, our project activities have concentrated on three areas: (1) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir permeability, (2) development of the geochemical inversion strategy and implementation of associated software, and (3) completing the software implementation of TProGS and the geostatistical analysis that provides the information needed when using the software to produce realizations of the Midale reservoir. The report partially the following deliverables: D2: Model development: MCMC tool (synthetic fluid chemistry data); deliverable completed. D4: Model development/verification: MCMC tool (TProGS, field seismic/chemistry data) work product; deliverable requirements partially fulfilled. D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product; deliverable requirements partially fulfilled. When completed, our completed stochastic inversion tool will explicitly integrate reactive transport modeling, facies-based geostatistical methods, and a novel stochastic inversion technique to optimize agreement between observed and predicted storage performance. Such optimization will be accomplished through stepwise refinement of: (1) the reservoir model - principally its permeability magnitude and heterogeneity - and (2) geochemical parameters - primarily key mineral volume fractions and kinetic data. We anticipate that these refinements will facilitate significantly improved history matching and forward modeling of CO{sub 2} storage. Our tool uses the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methodology. Deliverable D1, previously submitted as a report titled ''Development of a Stochastic Inversion Tool To Optimize Agreement Between The Observed And Predicted Seismic Response To CO{sub 2} Injection/Migration in the Weyburn-Midale Project'' (Ramirez et al., 2009), described the stochastic inversion approach that will identify reservoir models that optimize agreement between the observed and predicted seismic response. The software that implements this approach has been completed, tested, and used to process seismic data from pattern 16. A previously submitted report titled ''Model verification: synthetic single pattern simulations using seismic reflection data'', Ramirez et al. 2010, partially fulfilled deliverable D3 by summarizing verification activities that evaluate the performance of the seismic software and its ability to recover reservoir model permeabilities using synthetic seismic reflection data. A future progress report will similarly describe summarizing verification activities of the geochemical inversion software, thereby completing deliverable D3. This document includes a chapter that shows and discusses permeability models produced by seismic inversion that used seismic data from pattern 16 in Phase 1A. It partially fulfills deliverable D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product. The D5 work product is supposed to summarize the results of applying NUFT/MCMC to refine the reservoir model and geochemical parameters by optimizing observation/prediction agreement for the seismic/geochemical response to CO{sub 2} injection/migration within a single pattern of Phase 1A/1B. A future progress report will show inversion results for the same pattern using geochemical data, thereby completing deliverable D5. This document also contains a chapter that fulfills deliverable D2: Model development: MCMC tool (synthetic fluid chemistry data). The chapter will summarize model development activities required to facilitate application of NUFT/MCMC to optimize agreement between the observed and predicted geochemical response to CO{sub 2} injection/migration. Lastly, this document also contains a chapter that partially fulfills deliverable D4: Model development/verification: MCMC tool (TProGS, field seismic/chemistry data) work product. This work product is supposed to summarize model development activities required for (1) application of TProGS to Weyburn, (2) use of TProGS within the MCMC tool, and (3) application of the MCMC tool to address field seismic and g

Ramirez, A; Mcnab, W; Carle, S; Hao, Y; White, D; Johnson, J

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

228

CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect

An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

Geochemical study of evaporite and clay mineral-oxyhydroxide samples from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site  

SciTech Connect

Samples of clay minerals, insoluble oxyhydroxides, and their host evaporites from the WIPP site have been studied for their major and minor elements abundances, x-ray diffraction characteristics, K-Ar ages, and Rb-Sr ages. This study was undertaken to determine their overall geochemical characteristics and to investigate possible interactions between evaporates and insoluble constituents. The evaporite host material is water-soluble, having Cl/Br ratios typical of marine evaporites, although the Br content is low. Insoluble material (usually a mixture of clay minerals and oxyhydroxide phases) yields very high Cl/Br ratios, possibly because of Cl from admixed halide minerals. This same material yields K/Rb and Th/U ratios in the normal range for shales; suggesting little, if any, effect of evaporite-induced remobilization of U, K, or Rb in the insoluble material. The rare-earth element (REE) data also show normal REE/chondrite (REE/CHON) distribution patterns, supporting the K/Rb and Th/U data. Clay minerals yield K-Ar dates in the range 365 to 390 Ma and a Rb-Sr isochron age of 428 {+-} 7 Ma. These ages are well in excess of the 220- to 230-Ma formational age of the evaporites, and confirm the detrital origin of the clays. The ages also show that any evaporite or clay mineral reactions that might have occurred at or near the time of sedimentation and diagenesis were not sufficient to reset the K-Ar and Rb-Sr systematics of the clay minerals. Further, x-ray data indicate a normal evaporitic assemblage of clay minerals and Fe-rich oxyhydroxide phases. The clay minerals and other insoluble material appear to be resistant to the destructive effects of their entrapment in the evaporites, which suggests that these insoluble materials would be good getters for any radionuclides (hypothetically) released from the storage of radioactive wastes in the area.

Brookins, D.G. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (US). Dept. of Geology

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Detailed geochemical study of the Dan River-Danville Triassic Basin, North Carolina and Virginia. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program  

SciTech Connect

This abbreviated data report presents results of surface geochemical reconnaissance in the Dan River-Danville Triassic Basin of north-central North Carolina and south-central Virginia. Unweathered rock samples were collected at 380 sites within the basin at a nominal sampling density of one site per square mile. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site; analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. A detailed four-channel spectrometric survey was conducted, and the results are presented as a series of symbol plot maps for eU, eTh, and eU/eTh. Data from rock sample sites (on microfiche in pocket) include rock type and color and elemental analyses for U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Na, Sc, Sm, Ti, V, and Yb. Elemental uranium in 362 sedimentary rock samples from the Dan River-Danville Basin ranges from a low of 0.1 to a maximum of 13.3 parts per million (ppM). The log mean uranium concentration for these same samples is 0.37 ppM, and the log standard deviation is 0.24 ppM. Elemental uranium in 10 diabase dike samples from within the basin is in the range 0.1 to 0.7 ppM. The log mean uranium concentration for diabase samples is -.65 ppM, and the log standard deviation is 0.27. This report is issued in draft form, without detailed technical and copy editing. This was done to make the report available to the public before the end of the NURE program.

Thayer, P. A.; Cook, J. R.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Geochemical information for sites contaminated with low-level radioactive wastes: II. St. Louis Airport Storage Site  

SciTech Connect

The St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLASS) became radioactively contaminated as a result of wastes that were being stored from operations to recover uranium from pitchblende ores in the 1940s and 1950s. The US Department of Energy is considering various remedial action options for the SLASS under the Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). This report describes the results of geochemical investigations, carried out to support the FUSRAP activities and to aid in quantifying various remedial action options. Soil and groundwater samples from the site were characterized, and sorption ratios for uranium and radium and apparent concentration limit values for uranium were measured in soil/groundwater systems by batch contact methodology. The uranium and radium concentrations in soil samples were significantly above background near the old contaminated surface horizon (now at the 0.3/sup -/ to 0.9/sup -/m depth); the maximum values were 1566 ..mu..g/g and 101 pCi/g, respectively. Below about the 6/sup -/m depth, the concentrations appeared to be typical of those naturally present in soils of this area (3.8 +- 1.2 ..mu..g/g and 3.1 +- 0.6 pCi/g). Uranium sorption ratios showed stratigraphic trends but were generally moderate to high (100 to 1000 L/kg). The sorption isotherm suggested an apparent uranium concentration limit of about 200 mg/L. This relatively high solubility can probably be correlated with the carbonate content of the soil/groundwater systems. The lower sorption ratio values obtained from the sorption isotherm may have resulted from changes in the experimental procedure or the groundwater used. The SLASS appears to exhibit generally favorable behavior for the retardation of uranium solubilized from waste in the site. Parametric tests were conducted to estimate the sensitivity of uranium sorption and solubility to the pH and carbonate content of the system.

Seeley, F.G.; Kelmers, A.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Interpretation of earth tide response of three deep, confined aquifers  

SciTech Connect

The response of a confined, areally infinite aquifer to external loads imposed by earth tides is examined. Because the gravitational influence of celestial objects occurs over large areas of the earth, the confined aquifer is assumed to respond in an undrained fashion. Since undrained response is controlled by water compressibility, earth tide response can be directly used only to evaluate porous medium compressibility if porosity is known. Moreover, since specific storage S/sub s/ quantifies a drained behavior of the porous medium, one cannot directly estimate S/sub s/from earth tide response. Except for the fact that barometric changes act both on the water surface in the well and on the aquifer as a whole while stress changes associated with earth tides act only in the aquifer, the two phenomena influence the confined aquifer in much the same way. In other words, barometric response contains only as much information on the elastic properties of the aquifer as the earth tide response does. Factors such as well bore storage, aquifer transmissivity, and storage coefficient contribute to time lag and damping of the aquifer response as observed in the well. Analysis shows that the observation of fluid pressure changes alone, without concurrent measurement of external stress changes, is sufficient to interpret uniquely earth tide response. In the present work, change in external stress is estimated from dilatation by assuming a reasonable value for bulk modulus. Earth tide response of geothermal aquifers from Marysville, Montana. East Mesa, California; and Raft River Valley, Idaho, were analyzed, and the ratio of S/sub 3/ to porosity was estimated. Comparison of these estimates with independent pumping tests show reasonable agreement.

Narasimhan, T.N.; Kanehiro, B.Y.; Witherspoon, P.A.

1984-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

233

Political Theory After the Interpretive Turn: Charles Taylor on Knowledge, Values, and Politics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

37, pgs. 534-7 Symposium, “What is Political Theory? ”Political Theory, December 2002, Vol.30:4 “FromPress, 1976 Interpreting Political Responsibility: Essays

Choi, Naomi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

E-Print Network 3.0 - automated spectra interpretation Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

scheme for detection of prostate cancer from magnetic Summary: in interpretation and analysis of MRS data, some researchers have begun to develop computer-aided detection...

235

Geochemical Processes Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical process information available for the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tank farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility. Two companion reports to this one were recently published which discuss the geology of the farms (Reidel and Chamness 2007) and groundwater flow and contamination beneath the farms (Horton 2007).

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Zachara, John M.; Dresel, P. Evan; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

236

Comment on ``A quantitative framework for interpretation of basal ice facies formed by ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heave would be expected to produce were revealed beneath the Kamb Ice Stream by the pioneering boreholeComment on ``A quantitative framework for interpretation of basal ice facies formed by ice quantitative framework for interpretation of basal ice facies formed by ice accretion over subglacial sediment

Worster, M. Grae

237

The Purification of Water by Zone Melting: A Phase Diagram Interpretation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Purification of Water by Zone Melting: A Phase Diagram Interpretation ... The author comments on the application of zone melting to the purification of water from aqueous NaCl solutions by giving an interpretation of some results taking into account the binary phase diagram. ... Water / Water Chemistry ...

Mohamed Jemal

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Interpreting Civic Education in American Educational Thought from Progressivism Through Multiculturalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2011 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction Interpreting Civic Education in American Educational Thought from.... Blanton Walter D. Kamphoefner Head of Department, Dennie Smith August 2011 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction iii ABSTRACT Interpreting Civic Education in American Educational Thought from Progressivism Through Multiculturalism...

Williams, Jeremy Kelton

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

239

Automated Interpretation of Optic Nerve Images: A Data Mining Framework for Glaucoma Diagnostic Support  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Interpretation of Optic Nerve Images: A Data Mining Framework for Glaucoma Diagnostic high-quality images of the optic disc (the retinal re- gion where the optic nerve exits the eye processing and data mining methods, to support the interpretation of CSLT optic nerve images. Our framework

Abidi, Syed Sibte Raza

240

Model sparsity and brain pattern interpretation of classification models in neuroimaging  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Interest is increasing in applying discriminative multivariate analysis techniques to the analysis of functional neuroimaging data. Model interpretation is of great importance in the neuroimaging context, and is conventionally based on a 'brain map' ... Keywords: Classification, Kernel methods, Machine learning, Model interpretation, NPAIRS resampling, Neuroimaging, Pattern analysis, Regularization, Sparsity

Peter M. Rasmussen; Lars K. Hansen; Kristoffer H. Madsen; Nathan W. Churchill; Stephen C. Strother

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Three-Way Decision: An Interpretation of Rules in Rough Set Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Three-Way Decision: An Interpretation of Rules in Rough Set Theory Yiyu Yao Department of Computer theory is to induce classification or de- cision rules that indicate the decision class of an object. A new interpretation of rules in rough set theory is intro- duced. According to the positive, boundary

Yao, Yiyu

242

On the interpretation of constrained climate model ensembles Benjamin M. Sanderson (1), Reto Knutti (2),  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a distribution of models, such that model and truth are statistically indistinguishable. Both interpretations are ubiquitous and have different consequences for the uncertainty of model projections, and the interpretation of the ensemble may evolve seamlessly from the former to the latter. We show some `truth plus

243

INTERPRETIVE GUIDANCE ON THE REQUIREMENTS OF 10 C.F.R. § 205.322 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTERPRETIVE GUIDANCE ON THE REQUIREMENTS OF 10 C.F.R. § 205.322 INTERPRETIVE GUIDANCE ON THE REQUIREMENTS OF 10 C.F.R. § 205.322 INTERPRETIVE GUIDANCE ON THE REQUIREMENTS OF 10 C.F.R. § 205.322 This guidance is intended to clarify the Department of Energy (DOE)'s interpretation of 10 C.F.R. § 205.322, which sets forth the contents of an application for a Presidential permit issued by DOE under Executive Order (E.O.) 10485, as amended by E.O. 12038. Anyone seeking to construct, operate, maintain, or connect an electric transmission facility crossing the borders of the United States must first obtain a Presidential permit. INTERPRETIVE GUIDANCE ON THE REQUIREMENTS OF 10 C.F.R. § 205.322 More Documents & Publications Application for Presidential Permit OE Docket No. PP-371 Northern Pass: Comments from Conservation Law Foundation, Appalachian Mountain Club, and

244

Geochemical and Cosmochemical Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rehkämper et al. (E10) used ID-ICPMS to determine the PGEsIr, Ru, Pt, and Pdin mantle-derived xenoliths from the Cameroon Line and northern Tanzania. ... The 9-Ma half-life of 182Hf, combined with the highly refractory and immobile character of both Hf and W, makes this a useful system for studying processes that occurred in the early solar system. ...

Michael E. Lipschutz; Stephen F. Wolf; John M. Hanchar; F. Bartow Culp

1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

245

Geochemical and Cosmochemical Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The accompanying seven papers were able to compare remote spectral observations with limited ground truth, obtained after a soft landing on the minor planet. ... Hence, the impactor was not part of a comet shower. ... TEM studies of carbon-rich, fragile interplanetary dust particles (IDP)presumably of cometary origindo not contain nanodiamonds (G1), while carbon-rich meteorites contain 750?1500 ppm of them. ...

Michael E. Lipschutz; Stephen F. Wolf; John M. Hanchar; F. Bartow Culp

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

246

Geochemical and Cosmochemical Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 10-volume Treatise on Geochemistry (A3) devotes its first volume to meteorites, comets, and planets, with information on specific analytical techniques scattered throughout the work. ... The Stardust mission launched in February 1999 is to bring dust from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2 collected on 2 January 2004 to Earth on 15 January 2006 for detailed laboratory analysis. ... Soil at this site compositionally resembles those at prior Martian landing sites while fresh rock surfaces suggest low-K primitive basalts, differing from those at the Pathfinder sites. ...

Michael E. Lipschutz; Stephen F. Wolf; F. Bartow Culp; John M. Hanchar

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

247

Geochemical and Cosmochemical Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Asphaug (C2) provided a perspective for seven accompanying papers describing results from the Hayabusa (Falcon) spacecraft that flew by, and may have briefly landed on the 500-m S-type asteroid, 25143 Itokawa, to sample and, hopefully return surface materials to Earth. ... As part of a six-paper series describing the Spirit and Opportunity exploration rovers' results from the Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum landing places, respectively, Yen et al. (C6) described and compared the soil chemistry at mineralogy on opposite sites of Mars. ... As one of a six-paper report on the Deep Impact collision with Comet 9P/Tempel 1, Mumma et al. (C7) used high-dispersion IR (2.8?5.0 ?m) spectroscopy to quantify H2O, C2H6, HCN, CO, CH3OH, H2CO, C2H2, and CH4 in the comet before and after impact. ...

Michael E. Lipschutz; Stephen F. Wolf; F. Bartow Culp; Adam J. R. Kent

2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

248

Evaluation and combined geophysical interpretations of NURE and related geoscience data in the Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidido, and Emory Peak quadrangles, Texas. Volume 1. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report (two volumes) is the culmination of a two-year study of the six Trans-Pecos Texas quadrangles (Van Horn, Pecos, Marfa, Fort Stockton, Presidio, and Emory Park) surveyed as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program. Volume I contains a discussion of the aeromagnetic, gravity and geochemical data, their processing, and their analysis. The geologic history and setting of the Trans-Pecos are discussed along with the uranium potential of the region. Uranium anomalies and occurrences characteristic of numerous different NURE classes are present in the study area, and information is presented on 33 drill holes into these targets. Volume II is a folio of maps reduced to a scale of 1:500,000. Geologic maps for each of the six quadrangles are included and the geophysical maps have been prepared to be overlays for the goelogic maps. In addition to the geologic maps, residual aeromagnetic anomaly, complete Bouguer gravity anomaly, flight line index, gravity station index, and anomaly interpretative maps were prepared for each quadrangle. A large suite of digitally processed maps of gravity and aeromagnetic data were prepared and are included in Volume II.

Keller, G.R.; Hinze, W.J.; Aiken, C.L.V.; Goodell, P.C.; Roy, R.F.; Pingitore, N.E.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Seismic reprocessing, interpretation and petroleum prospectivity of the East Cano Rondon Area, Llanos Basin, Colombia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

be balanced. Seismic balance is needed in order to improve horizon ties at crossing hnes. These misties occur when multi-vintage data is used. In this protect three different vintages were used and thus this step ivas essential. The next step was to tie.... Syntool was used to create the synthetic setsmograms. Once the synthetic t&e has been aclueved, the interpretation of the seisnuc grid ivas done. Seisworks 2D was the software used for the interpretation. Faults ivere interpreted and 11 honzons were...

Molina, German D

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Automated Interpretation of LIBS Spectra using a Fuzzy Logic Inference Engine  

SciTech Connect

Automated interpretation of laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) data is necessary due to the plethora of spectra that can be acquired in a relatively short time. However, traditional chemometric and artificial neural network methods that have been employed are not always transparent to a skilled user. A fuzzy logic approach to data interpretation has now been adapted to LIBS spectral interpretation. A fuzzy logic inference engine (FLIE) was used to differentiate between various copper containing and stainless steel alloys as well as unknowns. Results using FLIE indicate a high degree of confidence in spectral assignment.

Jeremy J. Hatch; Timothy R. McJunkin; Cynthia Hanson; Jill R. Scott

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

INTERPRETATION REGARDING THE APPLICATION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARD 1027-92,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTERPRETATION REGARDING THE APPLICATION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARD INTERPRETATION REGARDING THE APPLICATION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARD 1027-92, HAZARD CATEGORIZATION AND ACCIDENT ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH DOE ORDER 5480.23, NUCLEAR SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORTS, UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF 10 C.F.R. § 830.202(b)(3). INTERPRETATION REGARDING THE APPLICATION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARD 1027-92, HAZARD CATEGORIZATION AND ACCIDENT ANALYSIS TECHNIQUES FOR COMPLIANCE WITH DOE ORDER 5480.23, NUCLEAR SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORTS, UNDER THE PROVISIONS OF 10 C.F.R. § 830.202(b)(3). The following document is the Department of Energy Office of General Counsel interpretation regarding the application of DOE Technical Standard 1027-92, Hazard Categorization and Accident Analysis Techniques for Compliance with DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, under

252

3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field, 3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field, Indonesia Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: 3-D Interpretation Of Magnetotelluric Data At The Bajawa Geothermal Field, Indonesia Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Three-dimensional (3-D) interpretation was carried out for the magnetotelluric (MT) data obtained in a geothermal area in Indonesia. The inversion scheme was based on the linearized leastsquares method with smoothness regularization. In addition to the subsurface resistivity structure, static shifts were also included as unknown parameters in the inversion. Forward modeling was by the finite difference scheme. The sensitivity matrix was computed once for a homogeneous half space and used

253

Blue Star Memorial By-Way Dedication: Weldon Spring Interpretive Center |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Blue Star Memorial By-Way Dedication: Weldon Spring Interpretive Blue Star Memorial By-Way Dedication: Weldon Spring Interpretive Center Blue Star Memorial By-Way Dedication: Weldon Spring Interpretive Center July 12, 2013 - 1:04pm Addthis Since 2003, the Lewis and Clark Garden Club (LCGC) of St. Charles County, Missouri, has held their monthly meetings in the Weldon Spring Interpretive Center (WSIC). The LCGC has 22 active members and takes care of 2 garden beds at the WSIC Native Plant Educational Garden under the site's Adopt-A-Garden program. In 2010 the LCGC contacted the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), seeking approval to install a Blue Star Memorial By-Way Marker as a tribute to the nation's armed forces (see bottom of page for a history of the Blue Star Memorials). A 2,300-pound pink mica memorial marker was placed

254

A TOPOS FOR A NONSTANDARD FUNCTIONAL INTERPRETATION BENNO VAN DEN BERG  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A TOPOS FOR A NONSTANDARD FUNCTIONAL INTERPRETATION BENNO VAN DEN BERG Abstract. We introduce a new: January 11, 2013. 1 #12;2 BENNO VAN DEN BERG It will also be convenient to introduce the following piece

van den Berg, Benno

255

Automated Interpretation of Myocardial SPECT Perfusion Images Using Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Interpretation of Myocardial SPECT Perfusion Images Using Artificial Neural Networks Dan as inputs to multilayer perceptron artificial neural networks. The networks were trained to detect coronary% and not statistically significant. Conclusions: Artificial neural networks can detect coronary artery disease

Peterson, Carsten

256

Colorado Stories: Interpreting HIstory for Public Audiences at the History Colorado Center.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Interpreting cultural conflict at History Colorado’s communities exhibit, Colorado Stories, created a three-way dialogue between scholars, museum audiences, and community stakeholders. Four communities, Amache, Sand… (more)

Convery, William III

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

TITLE: Article 2 of the UNFCCC: Historical Origins, Recent Interpretations AUTHORS: Oppenheimer, M., & Petsonk, A.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 TITLE: Article 2 of the UNFCCC: Historical Origins, Recent Interpretations AUTHORS: Oppenheimer, M., & Petsonk, A. AFFILIATIONS: Oppenheimer, Michael: Woodrow Wilson School and Department Oppenheimer Robertson Hall 448 Princeton University Princeton, NJ 08544 Tel: 609-258-2338 Fax: 609

Oppenheimer, Michael

258

Background and interpretation of the ‘Marine Trophic Index’ as a measure of biodiversity  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...interpretation of the Marine Trophic Index as a measure of biodiversity Daniel Pauly * Reg Watson...other human impacts on marine biodiversity. 2. Trophic level...countries cannot monitor marine biodiversity if they do not monitor...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

E-Print Network 3.0 - aerial photo interpretation Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: aerial photo interpretation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Updating Urban DataBases from Aerial Photos...

260

The Interpretation of Magnetograph Results: The Formation of Absorption Lines in a Magnetic Field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The theory of line formation in a magnetic field is reviewed. It is shown how the ... of the solar atmosphere. The properties of magnetic filaments are reviewed. It is shown how ... interpretation of magnetograph...

J. O. Stenflo

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A communion of voices : an interpretive analysis of communication among American Catholic Priests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This project focuses on the communication of American Catholic Priests gained from interpretive interviews with over 25 area priests. Analysis of the interview texts revealed that these priests utilize very similar communication patterns to deal...

Koegler, Shelley

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

262

Spin-rotor Interpretation of Identical Bands and Quantized Alignment in Superdeformed A $\\approx$ 190 Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ``identical'' bands in superdeformed mercury, thallium, and lead nuclei are interpreted as examples of orbital angular momentum rotors with the weak spin-orbit coupling of pseudo-$SU(3)$ symmetries and supersymmetries.

J. A. Cizewski; R. Bijker

1995-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

263

Interpretation of high-frequency coda at large distances: stochastic modelling and method of inversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......structure and attenuation the Lg phase, site effects, and interpretation of...W. , 1986. Yield estimates of Nevada test site explosions obtained from seismic...W., 1986. Yield estimates of Nevada test site explosions obtained from seismic......

J. Xie; O. W. Nuttli

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Exclusive breastfeeding in Sri Lanka: problems of interpretation of reported rates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Accurate interpretation of reported breastfeeding rates is essential in understanding the true picture of a country's breastfeeding status. In Sri Lanka, where the reported exclusive breastfeeding (EBF) rate a...

Suneth B Agampodi; Thilini C Agampodi…

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Regularization and improved interpretation of linear data mappings and adaptive distance measures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regularization and improved interpretation of linear data mappings and adaptive distance measures dimensional data sets linear transformations are not necessarily uniquely determined, though, and alternative learning algorithms. Principal component analysis (PCA) is a good example of a standard technique

Biehl, Michael

266

Interpretation of the propagation of surface altimetric observations in terms of planetary waves and geostrophic turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The interpretation of surface altimetric signals in terms of Rossby waves is revisited. Rather than make the long-wave approximation, the horizontal scale of the waves is adjusted to optimally fit the phase speed predicted ...

Tulloch, Ross

267

Using Plan Recognition for Interpreting Referring Expressions Dustin A. Smith and Henry Lieberman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using Plan Recognition for Interpreting Referring Expressions Dustin A. Smith and Henry Lieberman MIT Media Lab 20 Ames St. Cambridge, MA 02139 Abstract Referring expressions such as "a long meeting

Lieberman, Henry

268

Global versus Structured Interpretation of Motion: Moving Light Displays Jeffrey E. Boyd \\Lambda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global versus Structured Interpretation of Motion: Moving Light Displays Jeffrey E. Boyd \\Lambda structure. However, recent work by Little and Boyd has shown that it is possible to recognize individual

Boyd, Jeffrey E.

269

Analysis of an esoteric interpretation of a threshold in beta decay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A threshold associated with a small mixing of a heavy neutrino in beta decay cannot be interpreted as due to the production of a fictitious neutral scalar in conjunction with a light neutrino.

G. Karl; V. Novikov; J. J. Simpson

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Lighting studies: interpreting lighting styles from traditional media in computer-generated imagery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The goal of this research is to determine whether lighting styles from traditional media can be effectively interpreted in computer-generated scenes. Five paintings and a film still were carefully analyzed for their lighting styles, and scenes...

Hong, Cindy Christine

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Crustal interpretation of three-component seismic data from southwestern New Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) standardizing all seismic data to a seismometer response of 1. 0 Hz with 70% of critical damping; and (3) reorienting the seismic data such that the three components were approximately parallel to the average P, SV, and SH wave polarizations. Raytracing... trace format. . Page . . . 22 2. Interpreted arrival times for the Tyrone and Santa Rita reduced-time sections . . . . 44 3. The interpreted crustal model. . 51 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Previous seismic studies in the area . Page 12 2. Map...

Riehle, Michael George

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

272

Sharing Texas resources: interpretation handbook for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Page INTRODUCTION. Interpretation Defined Project Description. 2 3 THE AGENCY PLAN Mission Statement Park Operations Statement Past, Present, and Future Interpretation. RESOURCE INVENTORY 4 5 5 Flora and Fauna Cultural Resources. Park... Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program Program t for Lea Plan gl Plan g2 Plan g 3 Plan 44 Plan $5 Plan g6 Plan g7 Plan g8 Plan g9 Plan N10 Plan /11...

Herrick, Tommie L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

/ http://www.sciencemag.org/content/early/recent / 17 April 2014 / Page 1/ 10.1126/science.1249047 A diverse set of geochemical records has been developed from ice re-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

silty ice. This isotope is contin- uously produced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere, is delivered.1249047 A diverse set of geochemical records has been developed from ice re- covered in the 3054-m Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 (GISP2) core. These data provide a detailed history of climate and ice

Napp, Nils

274

Evapotranspiration And Geochemical Controls On Groundwater Plumes At Arid Sites: Toward Innovative Alternate End-States For Uranium Processing And Tailings Facilities  

SciTech Connect

Management of legacy tailings/waste and groundwater contamination are ongoing at the former uranium milling site in Tuba City AZ. The tailings have been consolidated and effectively isolated using an engineered cover system. For the existing groundwater plume, a system of recovery wells extracts contaminated groundwater for treatment using an advanced distillation process. The ten years of pump and treat (P&T) operations have had minimal impact on the contaminant plume – primarily due to geochemical and hydrological limits. A flow net analysis demonstrates that groundwater contamination beneath the former processing site flows in the uppermost portion of the aquifer and exits the groundwater as the plume transits into and beneath a lower terrace in the landscape. The evaluation indicates that contaminated water will not reach Moenkopi Wash, a locally important stream. Instead, shallow groundwater in arid settings such as Tuba City is transferred into the vadose zone and atmosphere via evaporation, transpiration and diffuse seepage. The dissolved constituents are projected to precipitate and accumulate as minerals such as calcite and gypsum in the deep vadose zone (near the capillary fringe), around the roots of phreatophyte plants, and near seeps. The natural hydrologic and geochemical controls common in arid environments such as Tuba City work together to limit the size of the groundwater plume, to naturally attenuate and detoxify groundwater contaminants, and to reduce risks to humans, livestock and the environment. The technical evaluation supports an alternative beneficial reuse (“brownfield”) scenario for Tuba City. This alternative approach would have low risks, similar to the current P&T scenario, but would eliminate the energy and expense associated with the active treatment and convert the former uranium processing site into a resource for future employment of local citizens and ongoing benefit to the Native American Nations.

Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Millings, Margaret R.; Kautsky, Mark

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

275

"Interpreting Mill"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and commonplace version. Amartya Sen has argued thatretrospect. Endnotes Amartya Sen, Rationality and Freedom (12 (1980): 125-6. Amartya Sen, “Consequentialist Evaluation

Weinstein, David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Microsoft Word - Part 850 Interpretation to be posted on GC Website with date 8 16 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL INTERPRETATION REGARDING MEDICAL REMOVAL PROTECTION BENEFITS PURSUANT TO 10 CFR PART 850, CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM The Department of Energy (DOE) General Counsel has been asked to provide a legal interpretation of the regulations regarding medical removal protection benefits under 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program. 1 This interpretation addresses the questions below. 1. Who decides whether a worker should be removed temporarily or permanently from exposure to beryllium under 10 CFR Part 850? The decision as to whether a worker should be temporarily or permanently removed from exposure to beryllium is made by the Site Occupational Medical Director (SOMD).

277

VIQI: A New Approach for Visual Interpretation of Deep Web Query Interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deep Web databases contain more than 90% of pertinent information of the Web. Despite their importance, users don't profit of this treasury. Many deep web services are offering competitive services in term of prices, quality of service, and facilities. As the number of services is growing rapidly, users have difficulty to ask many web services in the same time. In this paper, we imagine a system where users have the possibility to formulate one query using one query interface and then the system translates query to the rest of query interfaces. However, interfaces are created by designers in order to be interpreted visually by users, machines can not interpret query from a given interface. We propose a new approach which emulates capacity of interpretation of users and extracts query from deep web query interfaces. Our approach has proved good performances on two standard datasets.

Boughamoura, Radhouane; Omri, Mohamed Nazih

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF GENERAL COUNSEL INTERPRETATION REGARDING EXEMPTION RELIEF PURSUANT TO  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INTERPRETATION REGARDING EXEMPTION RELIEF PURSUANT TO 10 C.F.R. PART 820, PROCEDURAL RULES FOR DOE NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES, SUBPART E, EXEMPTION RELIEF, AND NON-COMPLIANT "DOCUMENTED SAFETY ANALYSES" SUBJECT TO 10 C.F.R. PART 830, NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT, SUBPART B, SAFETY BASIS REQUIREMENTS Subpart D to 10 C.F.R Part 820 provides that the Department of Energy's (DOE) General Counsel (GC) shall be responsible for interpreting the DOE Nuclear Safety Requirements. Pursuant to that authority, the GC here responds to two questions received regarding contractor compliance with safety basis requirements: 1. Does 10 C.F.R. Part 820, Procedural Rules for DOE Nuclear Activities, allow

279

Everettian Rationality: defending Deutsch's approach to probability in the Everett interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An analysis is made of Deutsch's recent claim to have derived the Born rule from decision-theoretic assumptions. It is argued that Deutsch's proof must be understood in the explicit context of the Everett interpretation, and that in this context, it essentially succeeds. Some comments are made about the criticism of Deutsch's proof by Barnum, Caves, Finkelstein, Fuchs, and Schack; it is argued that the flaw which they point out in the proof does not apply if the Everett interpretation is assumed. A longer version of this paper, entitled "Quantum Probability and Decision Theory, Revisted", is also available online.

David Wallace

2003-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

280

Interpretation of kinetic rate data taken in a channel flow cell  

SciTech Connect

Nonuniform current distribution can complicate the interpretation of kinetic rate measurements. This paper shows explicitly how nonuniformities affect measurements in the flow-channel cell. Results are given for linear and Tafel kinetics and can be used to relate measurable electrochemical quantities to kinetic parameters. In addition to the appropriate polarization parameter, the interpretation of data requires knowledge of the ratio of the two characteristic lengths and the placement of the reference electrode. The analysis assumes that the ohmic potential drop is subtracted from the measurements by the interruption of current, and that concentration variations are negligible.

West, A.C.; Newman, J. (Materials and Chemical Sciences Div., Lawrence Berkeley Lab., and Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (US))

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A Geochemical and Sedimentary Record of High Southern Latitude Holocene Climate Evolution from Lago Fagnano, Tierra del Fuego  

SciTech Connect

Situated at the southern margin of the hemispheric westerly wind belt and immediately north of the Antarctic Polar Frontal zone, Tierra del Fuego is well-positioned to monitor coupled changes in the ocean-atmosphere system of the high southern latitudes. Here we describe a Holocene paleoclimate record from sediment cores obtained from Lago Fagnano, a large lake in southern Tierra del Fuego at 55{sup o}S, to investigate past changes in climate related to these two important features of the global climate system. We use an AMS radiocarbon chronology for the last 8,000 years based on pollen concentrates, thereby avoiding contamination from bedrock-derived lignite. Our chronology is consistent with a tephrochronologic age date for deposits from the middle Holocene Volcan Hudson eruption. Combining bulk organic isotopic ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N) and elemental (C and N) parameters with physical sediment properties allow us to better understand sediment provenance and transport mechanisms and to interpret Holocene climate and tectonic change during the last 8,000 years. Co-variability and long-term trends in C/N ratio, carbon accumulation rate, and magnetic susceptibility reflect an overall Holocene increase in the delivery of terrestrial organic and lithogenic material to the deep eastern basin. We attribute this variability to westerly wind-derived precipitation. Increased wind strength and precipitation in the late Holocene drives the Nothofagus forest eastward and enhances run-off and terrigenous inputs to the lake. Superimposed on the long-term trend are a series of abrupt 9 negative departures in C/N ratio, which constrain the presence of seismically-driven mass flow events in the record. We identify an increase in bulk {delta}{sup 13}C between 7,000 and 5,000 cal yr BP that we attribute to enhanced aquatic productivity driven by warmer summer temperatures. The Lago Fagnano {delta}{sup 13}C record shows similarities with Holocene records of sea surface temperature from the mid-latitude Chilean continental shelf and Antarctic air temperatures from the Taylor Dome ice core record in East Antarctica. Mid-Holocene warming occurred simultaneously across the Antarctic Frontal Zone, and in particular, in locations currently influenced by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

Moy, C M; Dunbar, R B; Guilderson, T P; Waldmann, N; Mucciarone, D A; Recasens, C; Austin, J A; Anselmetti, F S

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

282

Agent-Based Evolutionary Approach for Interpretable Rule-Based Knowledge Extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

College of Electrical Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027, PRC 4 Department of Electronic formulation and interpretability-based regulation method. Based on the obtained fuzzy sets, the Pittsburgh of fuzzy systems into considerations. In addition, the fuzzy set agents can cooperate with each other

Jin, Yaochu

283

On the use of the Boussinesq equation for interpreting recession hydrographs from sloping aquifers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the use of the Boussinesq equation for interpreting recession hydrographs from sloping aquifers solutions to the one-dimensional Boussinesq equation for unconfined flow in a homogeneous and horizontal compare analytical solutions to the linearized one-dimensional Boussinesq equation for a sloping aquifer

Tullos, Desiree

284

The Identification and Interpretation of Differences in the Transcriptomes of Organically and Conventionally Grown Potato Tubers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Identification and Interpretation of Differences in the Transcriptomes of Organically and Conventionally Grown Potato Tubers ... ppb, c4-heptenal enhanced overall earthy, potato-like flavors in freshly boiled mashed potatoes, but these levels caused stale flavors in reconstituted dehydrated potatoes. ... Boiled potato off-flavor is a cardboard-like note, that develops within hours when boiled potatoes are stored. ...

Jeroen P. van Dijk; Katarina Cankar; Peter J. M. Hendriksen; Henriek G. Beenen; Ming Zhu; Stanley Scheffer; Louise V. T. Shepherd; Derek Stewart; Howard V. Davies; Carlo Leifert; Steve J. Wilkockson; Kristina Gruden; Esther J. Kok

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

285

Efficiency evaluation for pooling resources in health care: An Interpretation for Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency evaluation for pooling resources in health care: An Interpretation for Managers Peter T centres, and nursing wards. In recent years this organizational model has been challenged by the idea that higher quality of care and efficiency in service delivery can be achieved when services are organized

Boucherie, Richard J.

286

Tropospheric Nitric Acid Columns from IASI Interpreted with a Chemical Transport Model Matthew Cooper1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Tropospheric Nitric Acid Columns from IASI Interpreted with a Chemical Transport Model Matthew from the IASI satellite instrument with a global chemical transport model (GEOS-Chem). GEOS the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI) instrument on the MetOp satellite platform. IASI

Martin, Randall

287

POLANYI ON INSTITUTIONS AND MONEY -AN INTERPRETATION SUGGESTED BY A READING OF COMMONS,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

POLANYI ON INSTITUTIONS AND MONEY - AN INTERPRETATION SUGGESTED BY A READING OF COMMONS, MITCHELL of Karl Polanyi who thinks of money as an institution that embeds the economy into social relationships. In this analytical framework, stripping money of its institutional character and trying to reduce it to a commodity

Boyer, Edmond

288

Automated Interpretation of Myocardial SPECT Perfusion Images Using Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Automated Interpretation of Myocardial SPECT Perfusion Images Using Artificial Neural Networks Dan. Conclusion: Artificial neural networks can detect CAD in myocardial bull's-eye scintigrams with such a high significant potential. Key Words: diagnosis; computer-assisted; artificial intelligence; neural networks

Peterson, Carsten

289

Interpreting clone-mediated perturbations of morphogen profiles Avigdor Eldar, Naama Barkai*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was employed for identifying genes that shape morphogen profiles in the Drosophila wing-imaginal disc. Interpreting such experiments poses a theoretical challenge. We present a general framework that links specific factors of the TGF-h, Wingless (Wg), and Hedgehog (Hh) families (Briscoe and Ericson, 2001; Chuang

Barkai, Naama

290

A Generative Approach to Model Interpreter Evolution Jing Zhang, Jeff Gray, and Yuehua Lin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a simulation engine or analysis tool [12]. Generally speaking, a meta- model is relatively stable and seldomA Generative Approach to Model Interpreter Evolution Jing Zhang, Jeff Gray, and Yuehua Lin} @ cis.uab.edu Abstract. Domain-specific modeling techniques are being adopted with more frequency

Gray, Jeffrey G.

291

Oskar Lange and how IS-LM came to be interpreted as a Walrasian model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Oskar Lange and how IS-LM came to be interpreted as a Walrasian model Goulven Rubin 1 Abstract's model, identified with IS-LM, as a particular case of the Walrasian model. This view of IS-LM has often been rationalized by a basic syllogism: IS-LM was invented by John Hicks, Hicks was a Walrasian, hence

Boyer, Edmond

292

Measurement and Interpretation of Voice Traffic on the Internet N. F. Maxemchuk S. Lo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement and Interpretation of Voice Traffic on the Internet N. F. Maxemchuk S. Lo AT&T Labs ­ Research Lucent Tech. ­ Bell labs ABSTRACT The Internet is being used to carry voice conversations describe the results of a set of measurements on intrastate, cross country, and international Internet

Maxemchuk, Nicholas F.

293

VAMPIRE microarray suite: a web-based platform for the interpretation of gene expression data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

density. We pre- sent here a publicly available, web-based platform that allows users to easily load data the analysis of large data sets, this interface allows users to quickly load data and characterize experimentalVAMPIRE microarray suite: a web-based platform for the interpretation of gene expression data

294

Observations of Solar Neutron Events by Ground Based Detectors, and Their Interpretation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chiba et al. (1992a, b...) came to conclusion that the excess signals in the scintillators can be interpreted as muon production by solar neutrons of energies 5–10 GeV and the average flux in this energy interval...

Prof. Lev I. Dorman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Background and interpretation of the `Marine Trophic Index' as a measure of biodiversity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Background and interpretation of the `Marine Trophic Index' as a measure of biodiversity Daniel human impacts on marine biodiversity. 2. TROPHIC LEVEL: HISTORY AND DEFINITIONS Predation is one known as `fishing down marine food webs', and the publication of a critical rejoinder by Food

Pauly, Daniel

296

Seismic interpretation of hydrocarbon seep features, Garden Banks, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

identified and interpreted in Garden Banks lease blocks 424 and 425. The seep features consisted of two mud volcanoes and a mud in-filled depression. The hydrocarbon seep features were characterized by their rates and styles of seepage. All of the seep...

Mullins, Adam Joseph

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Role of the interpretation of stochastic calculus in systems with cross-correlated Gaussian white noises  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We derive the Fokker-Planck equation for multivariable Langevin equations with cross-correlated Gaussian white noises for an arbitrary interpretation of the stochastic differential equation. We formulate the conditions when the solution of the Fokker-Planck equation does not depend on which stochastic calculus is adopted. Further, we derive an equivalent multivariable Ito stochastic differential equation for each possible interpretation of the multivariable Langevin equation. To demonstrate the usefulness and significance of these general results, we consider the motion of Brownian particles. We study in detail the stability conditions for harmonic oscillators with two white noises, one of which is additive, random forcing, and the other, which accounts for fluctuations of either the damping or the spring coefficient, is multiplicative. We analyze the role of cross correlation in terms of the different noise interpretations and confirm the theoretical predictions via numerical simulations. We stress the interest of our results for numerical simulations of stochastic differential equations with an arbitrary interpretation of the stochastic integrals.

Vicenç Méndez; S. I. Denisov; Daniel Campos; Werner Horsthemke

2014-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

298

favour of atoms must be interpreted as evi-dence for their inner complexity. The pres-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

favour of atoms must be interpreted as evi- dence for their inner complexity. The pres- ence of absorption and plasma spectra alone suggests that atoms must contain vibrating elements. Another problem presented by atomic theory concerns the possibility of extending the concepts of our

Rose, William I.

299

Shirokov's contracting lifetimes and the interpretation of velocity eigenstates for unstable quantons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is concerned with the interpretation of velocity eigenstates for unstable quantons, their relationship to space like momentum eigenstates for such quantons and the explanation of Shirokovs contracting lifetimes for such velocity eigenstates. It is an elaboration of a portion of the authors earlier study.

Gordon N. Fleming

2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

300

Fraunhofer-Center fr Silizium-Photovoltaik CSP INTERPRETATION OF CELL FRACTURE IN PV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

© Fraunhofer-Center für Silizium-Photovoltaik CSP INTERPRETATION OF CELL FRACTURE IN PV MODULES stability of PV modules" #12;© Fraunhofer-Center für Silizium-Photovoltaik CSP Agenda Motivation #12;© Fraunhofer-Center für Silizium-Photovoltaik CSP Motivation & Background Thermo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Directional fine structure in absorption of white x rays: A tomographic interpretation P. Korecki,1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structure in absorption of white x rays can be interpreted as real-space projections of atomic structure from neigh- boring atoms.1 A straightforward analysis of the extended x-ray absorption fine structure of the absorbing atoms. Thus, the absorption cross section is effectively modulated by the x-ray scattering

Korecki, Pawe³

302

Interpreting data from within: supporting humandata interaction in museum exhibits through perspective taking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As data rather than physical artifacts become more commonly the product of modern scientific endeavor, we must attend to humandata interactions as people reason about and with representations of data increasingly being presented in museum settings. Complex ... Keywords: actor perspective, data interpretation, embodied interaction, gis, museum exhibit design, personalized interaction

Jessica Roberts, Leilah Lyons, Francesco Cafaro, Rebecca Eydt

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

AC 2010-567: THE IMPORTANCE OF PROBLEM INTERPRETATION FOR ENGINEERING STUDENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

include the cognitive processes of engineering design, gender issues in engineering, and creative selfAC 2010-567: THE IMPORTANCE OF PROBLEM INTERPRETATION FOR ENGINEERING STUDENTS Gay Lemons, Tufts University Gay Lemons, Ph.D., is a post-doctoral research associate in Engineering Education at Tufts

304

INFORMATION SCIENCES xx, 1xx (1994) 1 Interpretations of Belief Functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of rough sets with finite universe. The concept of standard rough set algebras is generalized in two universes, which leads to the notion of interval algebras. Pawlak rough set algebras may be used to interpret belief functions whose focal elements form a partition of the universe. Generalized rough set

Yao, Yiyu

305

Topic Models to Interpret MeSH MEDLINE's Medical Subject Headings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://ii.nlm.nih.gov/mti.shtml #12;MeSH heading Major MeSH heading Major qualifier MeSH-qualifier combination Humans Brain metabolism Brain (metabolism) Table 1. Most frequent MeSH headings, major MeSH headings, major qualifiers and MeTopic Models to Interpret MeSH � MEDLINE's Medical Subject Headings David Newman12 , Sarvnaz Karimi

Newman, David

306

Interpretation of clogging effects on the hydraulic behavior of ion treated geotextiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interpretation of clogging effects on the hydraulic behavior of ion treated geotextiles Lee, K. W. Department of Civil Engineering, Dongseo University, Busan, Korea Jeon, H. Y. Division of Nano-Systems Engineering, INHA University, Incheon, Korea Zornberg, J. Department of Civil, Architectural and Environmental

Zornberg, Jorge G.

307

IMAGE CONTENT-BASED RETRIEVAL AND AUTOMATED INTERPRETATION OF FLUORESCENCE MICROSCOPE IMAGES VIA THE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to microscope images. Our group has developed sets of Subcellular Location Features (SLF) and demonstrated. More significantly, we demonstrate that the use of the SLF can provide automated interpretation-vocabulary means for entering the annotations and also triggers calculation of the SLF features for each cell

Gordon, Geoffrey J.

308

Interpretation of tropical thermocline cooling in the Indian and Pacific oceans during recent decades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, but also could benefit fish industry because changes in vertical structure of oceanic temperature can have substan- tial effects on marine ecosystems and fisheries (e.g., a review paper by Brill [1994]). 2. DataInterpretation of tropical thermocline cooling in the Indian and Pacific oceans during recent

Han, Weiqing

309

Absorption of solar radiation by the cloudy atmosphere: Further interpretations of collocated aircraft measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Absorption of solar radiation by the cloudy atmosphere: Further interpretations of collocated%) of this enhanced cloud absorption occurs at wavelengths 680 nm, and that the observed cloud absorption does stated, the purpose of ARESE was to address the issue of cloud shortwave (SW) absorption. Do clouds

Zender, Charles

310

Hydraulic testing of Salado Formation evaporites at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: Second interpretive report  

SciTech Connect

Pressure-pulse, constant-pressure flow, and pressure-buildup tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Transmissivities have been interpreted from six sequences of tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within 15 m of the WIPP underground excavations.

Beauheim, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Roberts, R.M.; Dale, T.F.; Fort, M.D.; Stensrud, W.A. [INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

An interpretation of the Cover and Leung capacity region for the MAC with feedback through  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

stochastic control Achilleas Anastasopoulos and Kihyuk Sohn EECS Department, University of Michigan Abstract interpretation provides an understanding of the role of auxiliary random variables and can also hint at on-line capacity-achieving transmission schemes. I. INTRODUCTION Shannon showed in his early work [1

Anastasopoulos, Achilleas

312

Improving Context Interpretation by Using Fuzzy Policies: The Case of Adaptive Video Streaming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improving Context Interpretation by Using Fuzzy Policies: The Case of Adaptive Video Streaming {provensi, frank, romanvi}@ifi.uio.no Romain Rouvoy INRIA Lille-Nord Europe University of Lille 1, France for media streaming applications. The evaluation results show the benefits of our approach in terms

Eliassen, Frank

313

The magnetic field and wind confinement of b Cephei: new clues for interpreting the Be phenomenon?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The magnetic field and wind confinement of b Cephei: new clues for interpreting the Be phenomenon and of the associated magnetically confined wind and circumstellar environment. A re- examination of the fundamental with an inclination of the rotation axis of about 608. Using two different modelling strategies, we obtain

Donati, Jean-François

314

Formal verification of a static analyzer: abstract interpretation in type theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formal verification of a static analyzer: abstract interpretation in type theory Xavier Leroy Inria Paris-Rocquencourt xavier.leroy@inria.fr (Joint work with David Pichardie, Sandrine Blazy, Jacques-Henri Jourdan, and Vincent Laporte.) Abstract Static analysis is the automatic inference and checking of simple

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

315

Optimization Strategy apply to an Attribute Algorithm for the Abstract Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cedex FRANCE e-mail: musumbu@labri.fr Abstract Presented in this work is a novel approach to implement of the transformation and that fixed point is the abstract semantics of the given logic program. Presented in this workOptimization Strategy apply to an Attribute Algorithm for the Abstract Interpretation Kaninda

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

316

General Counsel Legal Interpretation Regarding Medical Removal Protection Benefits Pursuant to 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following document is the Office of the General Counsel (GC) interpretation regarding Medical Removal Protection Benefits Pursuant to 10 CFR Part 850, Chronic Beryllium Disease Prevention Program.

317

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

Cole, R.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

South African farm workers' interpretation of risk assessment data expressed as pictograms on pesticide labels  

SciTech Connect

Pesticide companies and regulators in developing countries use the United Nations Food and Agricultural Organization (FAO) recommended pictograms on pesticide labels to communicate risk information based on toxicological and environmental risk assessment data. The pesticide label not only is often the only access people have to pesticide risk information, but also in many countries is a legally binding document. As a result of the crucial role pesticide labels play in protecting health and the environment and as a legal instrument, pictograms are used to overcome literacy challenges in transmitting pesticide risk information. Yet, this risk communication tool is often prone to misinterpretations of the risk information which results in hazardous exposures to pesticides for farm workers and end-users generally. In this paper, results are presented from a study with 115 farm workers on commercial vineyards in the Western Cape, South Africa, assessing their interpretations of 10 commonly used pictograms. A standardized questionnaire based on four commonly used pesticide labels was administered. Overall, 50% or more of the study farm workers had misleading, incorrect and critically confused interpretations of the label pictograms. Interpretations often reflected farm workers' social and cultural frames of reference rather than the technically intended risk information. For example, the pictogram indicating a pesticide's toxicity requires boots must be worn, evoked interpretations of 'dangerous to pedestrians' and 'don't walk through pesticides'. Furthermore, there was a gender variation in pictogram comprehension whereby males generally had more correct interpretations than females. This is a result both of a lack of training for women who are assumed to not work with pesticides, as well as a lack of pictograms relevant for female exposures. These findings challenge the viability of the United Nations current initiative to globally harmonize pictograms used on all chemical labels under the new Globally Harmonized System for the Classification and Labelling of Chemicals (GHS). Particularly as the GHS pictograms were not piloted prior to adoption of the system and represent complex risk assessment data such as chronic hazards. Public health and pesticide policy, backed by relevant research, need to address developing applicable and effective pesticide risk communication tools, particularly for developing country populations. Merely providing risk assessment derived information in a pictogram does not ensure that an end-user will interpret the message as intended and be able to make risk decisions which mitigate risks from exposures to pesticides or chemicals in general.

Rother, Hanna-Andrea [Occupational and Environmental Health Research Unit, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory, 7925 Cape Town (South Africa)], E-mail: andrea.rother@uct.ac.za

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Geological interpretation of Mount Ciremai geothermal system from remote sensing and magneto-teluric analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The exploration of geothermal system at Mount Ciremai has been started since the early 1980s and has just been studied carefully since the early 2000s. Previous studies have detected the potential of geothermal system and also the groundwater mechanism feeding the system. This paper will discuss the geothermal exploration based on regional scale surface temperature analysis with Landsat image to have a more detail interpretation of the geological setting and magneto-telluric or MT survey at prospect zones, which identified by the previous method, to have a more exact and in depth local scale structural interpretation. Both methods are directed to pin point appropriate locations for geothermal pilot hole drilling and testing. We used four scenes of Landsat Enhanced Thematic Mapper or ETM+ data to estimate the surface manifestation of a geothermal system. Temporal analysis of Land Surface Temperature or LST was applied and coupled with field temperature measurement at seven locations. By combining the TTM with ...

Sumintadireja, Prihadi; Irawan, Dasapta E; Irawan, Diky; Fadillah, Ahmad

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

An improved method for interpreting API filter press hydraulic conductivity test results  

SciTech Connect

The American Petroleum Institute (API) filter press is frequently used to measure the hydraulic conductivity of soil-bentonite backfill during the mix design process and as part of construction quality controls. However, interpretation of the test results is complicated by the fact that the seepage-induced consolidation pressure varies from zero at the top of the specimen to a maximum value at the bottom of the specimen. An analytical solution is available which relates the stress, compressibility, and hydraulic conductivity in soil consolidated by seepage forces. This paper presents the results of a laboratory investigation undertaken to support application of this theory to API hydraulic conductivity tests. When the API test results are interpreted using seepage consolidation theory, they are in good agreement with the results of consolidometer permeameter tests. Limitations of the API test are also discussed.

Heslin, G.M.; Baxter, D.Y.; Filz, G.M. [Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA (United States); Davidson, R.R. [Woodward-Clyde Consultants, Denver, CO (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Equations of Motion with Multiple Proper Time: A New Interpretation of Spin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to show that: when a single particle moving under 3-proper time (three-dimensional time), the trajectories of a classical particle are equivalent to a quantum field with spin. Three-proper time models are built for spinless particle, particles with integer spin and half-integer spin respectively. The models recreate the same physical behavior as quantum field theory of free particles -- by using pure classical methods with three proper time. A new interpretation of spin is given. It provides us more evident that it is possible to interpret quantum physics by using multiple dimensional time. In the last part of this paper, Bose-Einstein statistics and Fermi-Dirac statistics are derived under classical method.

Xiaodong Chen

2005-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

322

Structural Interpretation of Paramagnetic Relaxation Enhancement-Derived Distances for Disordered Protein States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Paramagnetic relaxation enhancement (PRE) is a powerful technique for studying transient tertiary organizations of unfolded and partially folded proteins. The heterogeneous and dynamic nature of disordered protein states, together with the r?6 dependence of PRE, presents significant challenges for reliable structural interpretation of PRE-derived distances. Without additional knowledge of accessible conformational substates, ensemble-simulation-based protocols have been used to calculate structure ensembles that appear to be consistent with the PRE distance restraints imposed on the ensemble level with the proper r?6 weighting. However, rigorous assessment of the reliability of such protocols has been difficult without intimate knowledge of the true nature of disordered protein states. Here we utilize sets of theoretical PRE distances derived from simulated structure ensembles that represent the folded, partially folded and unfolded states of a small protein to investigate the efficacy of ensemble-simulation-based structural interpretation of PRE distances. The results confirm a critical limitation that, due to r?6 weighting, only one or a few members need to satisfy the distance restraints and the rest of the ensemble are essentially unrestrained. Consequently, calculated structure ensembles will appear artificially heterogeneous no matter whether the PRE distances are derived from the folded, partially unfolded or unfolded state. Furthermore, the nature of the heterogeneous ensembles is largely determined by the protein model employed in structure calculation and reflects little on the true nature of the underlying disordered state. These findings suggest that PRE measurements on disordered protein states alone generally do not contain enough information for a reliable structural interpretation and that the latter will require additional knowledge of accessible conformational substates. Interestingly, when a very large number of PRE measurements is available, faithful structural interpretation might be possible with intermediate ensemble sizes under ideal conditions.

Debabani Ganguly; Jianhan Chen

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Methods for deconvoluting and interpreting complex gamma- and x-ray spectral regions  

SciTech Connect

Germanium and silicon detectors are now widely used for the detection and measurement of x and gamma radiation. However, some analysis situations and spectral regions have heretofore been too complex to deconvolute and interpret by techniques in general use. One example is the L x-ray spectrum of an element taken with a Ge or Si detector. This paper describes some new tools and methods that were developed to analyze complex spectral regions; they are illustrated with examples.

Gunnink, R.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Decision Theory is a Red Herring for the Many Worlds Interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There have been many attempts over the years to derive the Born Rule from the wave equation since Everett's Many Worlds Interpretation was proposed; however, none of these have been satisfactory as shown when critics pointed out loopholes and unsupported assumptions. In this paper the case is made that the currently fashionable decision-theoretic approach founded by David Deutsch and explicated by David Wallace is likewise unsatisfactory. A more fundamental computationalist approach is advocated.

Jacques Mallah

2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

325

Absolute pollen influx and paleoenvironmental interpretations from Lake Wabamun, Alberta, Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSOLUTE POI. I, EN INFLUX AND PALEOEXVIRONNV-'NTAL XNTERPRETATTONS FROII LAKE WABAPRI:. I, ALBERTA, CANADA A Thesis RICHARD GEORGE HOLLOWAY Submitted to the Graduate Collcpe of Texas A&II University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degr. . ;. . of MASTER OF SCTENCL' August. 1978 I!ajor Suhject: Botany ABSOLUTE POLLFN INFLUX AND PALEOENVIRONMENTAL INTERPRETATIONS FROM lAKE WABAMUN, ALBERTA, CANADA A Thesis by RICHARD GEORGE HOLLOWAY Appreoved as to style and content by...

Holloway, Richard George

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

326

Equations of Motion with Multiple Proper Time: A New Interpretation of Basic Quantum Physics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equations of motion for single particle under two proper time model and three proper time model have been proposed and analyzed. The motions of particle are derived from pure classical method but they exhibit the same properties of quantum physics: the quantum wave equation, de Broglie equations, uncertainty relation, statistical result of quantum wave-function. This shows us a possible new way to interpret quantum physics. We will also prove that physics with multiple proper time does not cause causality problem.

xiaodong Chen

2005-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

Computed solid phases limiting the concentration of dissolved constituents in basalt aquifers of the Columbia Plateau in eastern Washington. Geochemical modeling and nuclide/rock/groundwater interaction studies  

SciTech Connect

A speciation-solubility geochemical model, WATEQ2, was used to analyze geographically-diverse, ground-water samples from the aquifers of the Columbia Plateau basalts in eastern Washington. The ground-water samples compute to be at equilibrium with calcite, which provides both a solubility control for dissolved calcium and a pH buffer. Amorphic ferric hydroxide, Fe(OH)/sub 3/(A), is at saturation or modestly oversaturated in the few water samples with measured redox potentials. Most of the ground-water samples compute to be at equilibrium with amorphic silica (glass) and wairakite, a zeolite, and are saturated to oversaturated with respect to allophane, an amorphic aluminosilicate. The water samples are saturated to undersaturated with halloysite, a clay, and are variably oversaturated with regard to other secondary clay minerals. Equilibrium between the ground water and amorphic silica presumably results from the dissolution of the glassy matrix of the basalt. The oversaturation of the clay minerals other than halloysite indicates that their rate of formation lags the dissolution rate of the basaltic glass. The modeling results indicate that metastable amorphic solids limit the concentration of dissolved silicon and suggest the same possibility for aluminum and iron, and that the processes of dissolution of basaltic glass and formation of metastable secondary minerals are continuing even though the basalts are of Miocene age. The computed solubility relations are found to agree with the known assemblages of alteration minerals in the basalt fractures and vesicles. Because the chemical reactivity of the bedrock will influence the transport of solutes in ground water, the observed solubility equilibria are important factors with regard to chemical-retention processes associated with the possible migration of nuclear waste stored in the earth's crust.

Deutsch, W.J.; Jenne, E.A.; Krupka, K.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

DOE ER63951-3 Final Report: An Integrated Assessment of Geochemical and Community Structure Determinants of Metal Reduction Rates in Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research was to examine the importance of microbial community structure in influencing uranium reduction rates in subsurface sediments. If the redox state alone is the key to metal reduction, then any organisms that can utilize the oxygen and nitrate in the subsurface can change the geochemical conditions so metal reduction becomes an energetically favored reaction. Thus, community structure would not be critical in determining rates or extent of metal reduction unless community structure influenced the rate of change in redox. Alternatively, some microbes may directly catalyze metal reduction (e.g., specifically reduce U). In this case the composition of the community may be more important and specific types of electron donors may promote the production of communities that are more adept at U reduction. Our results helped determine if the type of electron donor or the preexisting community is important in the bioremediation of metal-contaminated environments subjected to biostimulation. In a series of experiments at the DOE FRC site in Oak Ridge we have consistently shown that all substrates promoted nitrate reduction, while glucose, ethanol, and acetate always promoted U reduction. Methanol only occasionally promoted extensive U reduction which is possibly due to community heterogeneity. There appeared to be limitations imposed on the community related to some substrates (e.g. methanol and pyruvate). Membrane lipid analyses (phospholipids and respiratory quinones) indicated different communities depending on electron donor used. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone libraries indicated distinct differences among communities even in treatments that promoted U reduction. Thus, there was enough metabolic diversity to accommodate many different electron donors resulting in the U bioimmobilization.

Susan Pfiffner

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

329

CX-001926: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

926: Categorical Exclusion Determination 926: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-001926: Categorical Exclusion Determination Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geologic, Geophysical, and Geochemical Interpretation CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 04/27/2010 Location(s): Dixie Valley, Nevada Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Golden Field Office AltaRock Energy, Inc. (AltaRock) would test the hypothesis that the potential for Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS) can be characterized, and drilling targets can be identified, through integration of existing and new geosciences data. The project includes both field work and limited laboratory work. Field work would take place in a 5 kilometer X 5 kilometer area in Dixie Valley Nevada. Laboratory work would take place at

330

Interpreting Velocities from Heat-Based Flow Sensors by NumericalSimulation  

SciTech Connect

We have carried out numerical simulations of three-dimensional non-isothermal flow around an in situ heat-based flow sensor to investigate how formation heterogeneities can affect the interpretation of ground water flow velocities from this instrument. The flow sensor operates by constant heating of a 0.75 m long, 5 cm diameter cylindrical probe, which contains 30 thermistors in contact with the formation. The temperature evolution at each thermistor can be inverted to obtain an estimate of the ground water flow velocity vector using the standard interpretive method, which assumes that the formation is homogeneous. Analysis of data from heat-based flow sensors installed in a sand aquifer at the Former Fort Ord Army Base near Monterey, California suggested an unexpected component of downward flow. The magnitudes of the vertical velocities were expected to be much less than the horizontal velocities at this site because the sensors were installed just above a clay aquitard. Numerical simulations were conducted to examine how differences in thermal conductivities may lead to spurious indications of vertical flow velocities. We found that a decrease in the thermal conductivity near the bottom of the sensor can perturb the temperature profiles along the instrument in such a manner that analyses assuming homogeneous thermal conductivity could indicate a vertical flow component even though flow is actually horizontal. This work demonstrates how modeling can be used to simulate instrument response to formation heterogeneity, and shows that caution must be used in interpreting data from such devices using overly simplistic assumptions.

Su, Grace W.; Freifeld, Barry M.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Jordan,Preston D.; Daley, Paul F.

2005-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

331

Short-range Ising spin glasses: the metastate interpretation of replica symmetry breaking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parisi's formal replica-symmetry--breaking (RSB) scheme for mean-field spin glasses has long been interpreted in terms of many pure states organized ultrametrically. However, the early version of this interpretation, as applied to the short-range Edwards-Anderson model, runs into problems because as shown by Newman and Stein (NS) it does not allow for chaotic size dependence, and predicts non-self-averaging that cannot occur. NS proposed the concept of the metastate (a probability distribution over infinite-size Gibbs states in a given sample that captures the effects of chaotic size dependence) and a non-standard interpretation of the RSB results in which the metastate is non-trivial and is responsible for what was called non-self-averaging. Here we use the effective field theory of RSB, in conjunction with the rigorous definitions of pure states and the metastate in infinite-size systems, to show that the non-standard picture follows directly from the RSB mean-field theory. In addition, the metastate-averaged state possesses power-law correlations throughout the low temperature phase; the corresponding exponent $\\zeta$ takes the value $4$ according to the field theory in high dimensions $d$, and describes the effective fractal dimension of clusters of spins. Further, the logarithm of the number of pure states in the decomposition of the metastate-averaged state that can be distinguished if only correlations in a window of size $W$ can be observed is of order $W^{d-\\zeta}$. These results extend the non-standard picture quantitatively; we show that arguments against this scenario are inconclusive.

N. Read

2014-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

332

Deep Atomic Binding (DAB) Approach in Interpretation of Fission Products Behavior in Terrestrial and Water Ecosystems  

SciTech Connect

A large number of studies and models were established to explain the fission products (FP) behavior within terrestrial and water ecosystems, but a number of behaviors were non understandable, which always attributed to unknown reasons. According to DAB hypothesis, almost all fission products behaviors in terrestrial and water ecosystems could be interpreted in a wide coincidence. The gab between former models predictions, and field behavior of fission products after accidents like Chernobyl have been explained. DAB represents a tool to reduce radio-phobia as well as radiation protection expenses. (author)

Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali M.S. [Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Amman 11814 (Jordan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Salient experimental observations on the electroosmotic dewatering (EOD) of clays and sludges and their interpretation  

SciTech Connect

An attempt is made to summarize the salient experimental observations on electroosmotic dewatering (EOD), as reported extensively but diffusely in the previous literature. The effects of the following factors on EOD have been examined: voltage; current magnitude and type (i.e., interrupted or continuous DC); salts; acids; flocculants; clay types; electrode materials, etc. This whole range of experimental data has been encapsulated as thirteen factual observations. The possible theoretical interpretation of each of the thirteen observations is proposed either by developing suitable arguments here or by referring to the author`s previous theoretical papers on the subject.

Vijh, A.K. [Inst. de Recherche d`Hydro-Quebec, Varennes, Quebec (Canada)

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Communication: The correct interpretation of surface hopping trajectories: How to calculate electronic properties  

SciTech Connect

In a recent paper, we presented a road map for how Tully's fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) algorithm can be derived, under certain circumstances, from the mixed quantum-classical Liouville equation. In this communication, we now demonstrate how this new interpretation of surface hopping can yield significantly enhanced results for electronic properties in nonadiabatic calculations. Specifically, we calculate diabatic populations for the spin-boson problem using FSSH trajectories. We show that, for some Hamiltonians, without changing the FSSH algorithm at all but rather simply reinterpreting the ensemble of surface hopping trajectories, we recover excellent results and remove any and all ambiguity about the initial condition problem.

Landry, Brian R.; Falk, Martin J.; Subotnik, Joseph E. [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, 231 S. 34th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, 231 S. 34th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

335

A new interpretation of the corrosion loss processes for weathering steels in marine atmospheres  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Most available data sets for the long-term corrosion loss of various grades of weathering steel exposed to marine atmospheric environments are demonstrated to be consistent with the multi-phase corrosion model previously proposed for steels exposed to marine environments. This means that the early corrosion of weathering steels by oxidation is gradually inhibited by the build-up of corrosion products. These produce anoxic and sub-oxic conditions that may permit microbiological activity to govern the longer-term corrosion loss process. This new interpretation for the long-term corrosion of weathering steels may have implications for the design of such steels.

R.E. Melchers

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Interpretation of the depths of maximum of extensive air showers measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect

To interpret the mean depth of cosmic ray air shower maximum and its dispersion, we parametrize those two observables as functions of the first two moments of the ln A distribution. We examine the goodness of this simple method through simulations of test mass distributions. The application of the parameterization to Pierre Auger Observatory data allows one to study the energy dependence of the mean ln A and of its variance under the assumption of selected hadronic interaction models. We discuss possible implications of these dependences in term of interaction models and astrophysical cosmic ray sources.

Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

UHE nuclei propagation and the interpretation of the ankle in the cosmic-ray spectrum  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the stochastic propagation of high-energy protons and nuclei in the cosmological microwave and infrared backgrounds, using revised photonuclear cross-sections and following primary and secondary nuclei in the full 2D nuclear chart. We confirm earlier results showing that the high-energy data can be fit with a pure proton extragalactic cosmic ray (EGCR) component if the source spectrum is \\propto E^{-2.6}. In this case the ankle in the CR spectrum may be interpreted as a pair-production dip associated with the propagation. We show that when heavier nuclei are included in the source with a composition similar to that of Galactic cosmic-rays (GCRs), the pair-production dip is not present unless the proton fraction is higher than 85%. In the mixed composition case, the ankle recovers the past interpretation as the transition from GCRs to EGCRs and the highest energy data can be explained by a harder source spectrum \\propto E^{-2.2} - E^{-2.3}, reminiscent of relativistic shock acceleration predictions, and in good agreement with the GCR data at low-energy and holistic scenarios.

D. Allard; E. Parizot; E. Khan; S. Goriely; A. V. Olinto

2005-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

338

Extragalactic cosmic-ray source composition and the interpretation of the ankle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the stochastic propagation of high-energy protons and nuclei in the cosmological microwave and infrared backgrounds, using revised photonuclear cross-sections and following primary and secondary nuclei in the full 2D nuclear chart. We confirm earlier results showing that the high-energy data can be fit with a pure proton extragalactic cosmic ray (EGCR) component if the source spectrum is $\\propto E^{-2.6}$. In this case the ankle in the cosmic ray (CR) spectrum may be interpreted as a pair-production dip associated with the propagation. We show that when heavier nuclei are included in the source with a composition similar to that of Galactic cosmic-rays (GCRs), the pair-production dip is not present unless the proton fraction is higher than 85%. In the mixed composition case, the ankle recovers the past interpretation as the transition from GCRs to EGCRs and the highest energy data can be explained by a harder source spectrum $\\propto E^{-2.2}$-- $E^{-2.3}$, reminiscent of relativistic shock acceleration predictions, and in good agreement with the GCR data at low-energy and holistic scenarios. While the expected cosmogenic neutrino fluxes at high energy are very similar for pure proton and mixed composition hypothesis, the two scenarii predict very different elongation rates from $10^{17.5}$ to $10^{20}$ eV.

D. Allard; E. Parizot; A. V. Olinto; E. Khan; S. Goriely

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

339

Understanding the faculty experience of teaching using educational technology in the academic capitalism era: an interpretive critical inquiry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This interpretive critical inquiry was aimed at coming to understand the experiences of faculty at research universities who teach using educational technology in the present academic capitalism era, and how these experiences affect their job...

Demps, Elaine Linell

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Human interactome resource and gene set linkage analysis for the functional interpretation of biologically meaningful gene sets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......interactome resource and gene set linkage analysis for the functional interpretation of biologically meaningful gene sets Xi Zhou Pengcheng Chen Qiang Wei Xueling Shen Xin Chen * *To whom correspondence should be addressed. Department of Bioinformatics, College......

Xi Zhou; Pengcheng Chen; Qiang Wei; Xueling Shen; Xin Chen

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Use of Subtractive Techniques in Interpreting On-Line FT-IR Spectra of HPLC Column Eluates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......tive applications are the spectroscopic completion of a chro- matographically incomplete...Results and Interpretation Spectroscopic Completion of a Chromatographically Incomplete Separation...ence of bulk (matrix) and surface (index of refraction) spectral distortion effects......

D.W. Vidrine

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Size distribution of associated clusters in liquid alcohols: Interpretation of simulation results in the frame of SAFT approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the frame of SAFT approach Ji� Janecek and Patrice Paricaud Citation: J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174502 (2013); doi in liquid alcohols: Interpretation of simulation results in the frame of SAFT approach Jir� Janecek1,2,a

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

343

Interpretation of Pennsylvania Bartlesville sandstone in southeastern Kansas and northeastern Oklahoma from continuous dipmeter and gamma-ray logs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTERPRETATION OF PENNSYLVANIAN BARTLESVILLE SANDSTONE IN SOUTHEASTERN KANSAS AND NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA FROM CONTINUOUS DIPMETER AND GAMMA-RAY LOGS A Thesis by DWIGHT STANLEY KRANZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1981 Major Subject: Geology INTERPRETATION OF PENNSYLVANIAN SARTLESVILLE SANDSTONE IN SOUTHEASTERN KANSAS AND NORTHEASTERN OKLAHOMA FROM CONTINUOUS DIPMETER AND GAMMA...

Kranz, Dwight Stanley

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

344

GEOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF ATMOSPHERIC EVOLUTION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...red-beds and continental grey-green beds are often demonstrably...formations are at least in the green schist facies of metamorphism...stratified dolomites are replaced lime- stones, formed under a variety...Proterozoic strata is due to the mineral being of postlithification metasomatic...

Charles F. Davidson

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Geochemical challenge to earthquake prediction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...indicate that the anomalous radon change before the 1978...nonappearance of coseismic radon drops at the KSM (Kashima...as a trigger for the project in Japan and the United...plated. In 1973, the International Symposium on Earthquake...Uzbekistan, and changes in radon concentration in groundwater...

H Wakita

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

using air photos to interpret quality of marbled murrelet nesting habitat 17JEM--VoluME 9, NuMbEr 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using air photos to interpret quality of marbled murrelet nesting habitat 17JEM--VoluME 9, NuMbEr 1. Using air photos to interpret quality of Marbled Murrelet nesting habitat in south coastal British Journal of Ecosystems and Management Using air photos to interpret quality of Marbled Murrelet nesting

347

using air photos to interpret quality of marbled murrelet nesting habitat 1JEM--VoluME 9, NuMbEr 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using air photos to interpret quality of marbled murrelet nesting habitat 1JEM--VoluME 9, NuMbEr 1. Using air photos to interpret quality of Marbled Murrelet nesting habitat in south coastal British Journal of Ecosystems and Management Using air photos to interpret quality of Marbled Murrelet nesting

348

Interpreting scattering wave functions in the presence of energy-dependent interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In scattering theory, the squared relative wave function $|\\phi({\\bf q},{\\bf r})|^2$ is often interpreted as a weight, due to final-state interactions, describing the probability enhancement for emission with asymptotic relative momentum $q$. An equivalence relation also links the integral of the squared wave function over all coordinate space to the density of states. This relation, which plays an important role in understanding two-particle correlation phenomenology, is altered for the case where the potential is energy dependent, as is assumed in various forms of reaction theory. Here, the modification to the equivalence relation is derived, and it is shown that the squared wave function should be augmented by a additional factor if it is to represent the emission enhancement for final-state interactions. Examples with relativistic vector interactions, e.g., the Coulomb interaction, are presented.

Scott Pratt

2007-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

349

Impact penetrometry on a comet nucleus — interpretation of laboratory data using penetration models  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The first — and possibly deepest — in situ science measurements on the 46P/Wirtanen nucleus will be made by two sensors of the Rosetta Lander's MUPUS experiment. A piezoelectric shock accelerometer (ANC-M) and a resistance temperature sensor (ANC-T) will be mounted in the Lander's harpoon anchor. This will be shot into the surface at about 60 m s?1 on touchdown, reaching a final depth of between a few centimetres and about 2.5 m, depending on the hardness of the ground and the maximum available cable length. Early indications of the strength of the surface material and any distinct layers should prove valuable to subsequent depth-sensitive investigations, including the MUPUS thermal probe, seismic sounding experiments, the sampling drill and composition analyses of the extracted material. Interpretation of the ANC-M data will help to constrain models of the formation and evolution of the material found at the landing site and document the mechanical and structural context of nearby sampled material. We report on the results of recent test shots performed with a prototype anchor into several porous materials: two types of glass foam, H2O ice and CO2 ice. With the help of data from direct shear tests and quasi-static penetration tests, we interpret the processed deceleration data using a cavity-expansion penetration model. Layers of distinctly different strengths can be detected and located, and the deceleration profiles are in reasonable agreement with the profiles obtained by quasi-static tests. The anchor projectile's long sharp tip tends to smear out the boundaries, however. In applying the penetration model we found that the coefficient of sliding friction and the target's volumetric strain have a much stronger influence on the deceleration profile than the initial target density and angle of internal friction. Very small values of volumetric strain (corresponding to high ‘drag coefficient’) were required to fit deceleration profiles to the measured data for the glass foam, contrary to what we initially expected by inspecting the thin layer of crushed material around the walls of the penetrated channel. We interpret this to mean that such brittle, porous materials as the glass foam (and perhaps highly porous, brittle, cryogenic ice) do not exhibit plastic deformation before failing completely by the crushing of cell walls. The decelerating forces are thus thought to be dominated by momentum transfer to the crushed material and by the crushing strength of the cellular microstructure, rather than by the force required to deform the target plastically. The cavity-expansion model seems to be well-suited to the ice shots, but for the brittle, cellular glass foam, alternative approaches, taking into account the material's microstructure, are needed. As a first step in this direction, a microstructural model linking textural properties of the material (pore and grain size, and relative contact area between grains) is applied to the glass foam data, obtained from quasi-static penetration tests and from direct shear strength tests. It is demonstrated that the dependence of strength on porosity can be well represented by the model suggested. A microstructural model for sintered ices, relating strength properties to porosity and thermal properties, would be useful for interpretation of MUPUS ANC-M data in the context of other physical properties measurements. The work presented here may also have some relevance to the design of future comet landers or penetrators. The harpoon anchor/penetrometer approach could be employed on other minor body landing missions, while the modelling technique is similar in many ways to that appropriate for other penetrometers/penetrators.

Norbert I Kömle; Andrew J Ball; Günter Kargl; Thomas Keller; Wolfgang Macher; Markus Thiel; Jakob Stöcker; Christian Rohe

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Quantum cosmological solutions: their dependence on the choice of gauge conditions and physical interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In "extended phase space" approach to quantum geometrodynamics numerical solutions to Schrodinger equation corresponding to various choice of gauge conditions are obtained for the simplest isotropic model. The "extended phase space" approach belongs to those appeared in the last decade in which, as a result of fixing a reference frame, the Wheeler - DeWitt static picture of the world is replaced by evolutionary quantum geometrodynamics. Some aspects of this approach were discussed at two previous PIRT meetings. We are interested in the part of the wave function depending on physical degrees of freedom. Three gauge conditions having a clear physical meaning are considered. They are the conformal time gauge, the gauge producing the appearance of Lambda-term in the Einstein equations, and the one covering the two previous cases as asymptotic limits. The interpretation and discussion of the obtained solutions is given.

T. P. Shestakova

2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

Interpretive geophysical fault map across the central block of Yucca Mountain, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

Geophysical data collected along 29 traverses across the central block of Yucca Mountain in southwest Nevada reveal anomalies associated with known fault sand indicate a number of possible concealed faults beneath the eastern flank of Yucca Mountain. Geophysical interpretations indicate that Midway Valley is characterized by several known and previously unknown faults, that the existence of the Yucca Wash fault is equivocal, and that the central part of the eastern flank of Yucca Mountain is characterized by numerous low-amplitude anomalies that probably reflect numerous small-scale faults. Gravity and magnetic data also reveal several large-amplitude anomalies that reflect larger-scale faulting along the margins of the central block.

Ponce, D.A.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

352

DIRECT RADIO PROBING AND INTERPRETATION OF THE SUN'S PLASMA DENSITY PROFILE  

SciTech Connect

The Sun's electron number density profile n{sub e} (r) is vital for solar physics but not well measured or understood within a few solar radii R{sub S} . Here, a new technique extracts n{sub e} (r) directly from coronal type III radio bursts for 40 <= f <= 180 MHz. Unexpectedly, wind-like regions with n{sub e} propor to (r - R{sub S} ){sup -2} are quite common below 2R{sub S} , and coronal type IIIs often have closely linear 1/f - t spectra. The profile n{sub e} propor to (r - R{sub S} ){sup -2} is consistent with the radio data and simulations and is interpreted in terms of conical flow from localized sources (e.g., UV funnels) close to the photosphere. It is consistent with solar wind acceleration occurring for 2 <= r/R{sub S} <= 10.

Cairns, I. H.; Lobzin, V. V.; Li, B.; Robinson, P. A. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Warmuth, A.; Mann, G. [Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam, D 14482 Potsdam (Germany)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Comprehensive Four-Quark Interpretation of Ds(2317), Ds(2457), and Ds(2632)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The recently observed new member of the charm-strange family Ds(2632), which has a surprisingly narrow width, is challenging our theory. Ds(2317) and Ds(2457), which were observed earlier, have similar behaviors and receive various theoretical explanations. Some authors use the heavy hadron chiral effective theory to evaluate heavy-light quark systems and obtain a reasonable evaluation on the masses of Ds(2317) and Ds(2457). An alternative picture is to interpret them as four-quark or molecular states. In this work, we are following the latter and propose a unitive description for all three new members, Ds(2632), Ds(2317), and Ds(2457), and, at least, so far our picture is consistent with the data.

Yu-Qi Chen and Xue-Qian Li

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Global interpretation of direct Dark Matter searches after CDMS-II results  

SciTech Connect

We perform a global fit to data from Dark Matter (DM) direct detection experiments, including the recent CDMS-II results. We discuss possible interpretations of the DAMA annual modulation signal in terms of spin-independent and spin-dependent DM-nucleus interactions, both for elastic and inelastic scattering. We find that for the spin-dependent inelastic scattering off protons a good fit to all data is obtained. We present a simple toy model realizing such a scenario. In all the remaining cases the DAMA allowed regions are disfavored by other experiments or suffer from severe fine tuning of DM parameters with respect to the galactic escape velocity. Finally, we also entertain the possibility that the two events observed in CDMS-II are an actual signal of elastic DM scattering, and we compare the resulting CDMS-II allowed regions to the exclusion limits from other experiments.

Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Model to interpret pulsed-field-gradient NMR data including memory and superdispersion effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We propose a versatile model specifically designed for the quantitative interpretation of NMR velocimetry data. We use the concept of mobile or immobile tracer particles applied in dispersion theory in its Lagrangian form, adding two mechanisms: (i) independent random arrests of finite average representing intermittent periods of very low velocity zones in the mean flow direction and (ii) the possibility of unexpectedly long (but rare) displacements simulating the occurrence of very high velocities in the porous medium. Based on mathematical properties related to subordinated Lévy processes, we give analytical expressions of the signals recorded in pulsed-field-gradient NMR experiments. We illustrate how to use the model for quantifying dispersion from NMR data recorded for water flowing through a homogeneous grain pack column in single- and two-phase flow conditions.

Marie-Christine Néel; Daniela Bauer; Marc Fleury

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

356

Interpretations of Tracer Tests Performed in the Culebra Dolomite at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Site  

SciTech Connect

This report provides (1) an overview of all tracer testing conducted in the Culebra Dolomite Member of the Rustler Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) site, (2) a detailed description of the important information about the 1995-96 tracer tests and the current interpretations of the data, and (3) a summary of the knowledge gained to date through tracer testing in the Culebra. Tracer tests have been used to identify transport processes occurring within the Culebra and quantify relevant parameters for use in performance assessment of the WIPP. The data, especially those from the tests performed in 1995-96, provide valuable insight into transport processes within the Culebra. Interpretations of the tracer tests in combination with geologic information, hydraulic-test information, and laboratory studies have resulted in a greatly improved conceptual model of transport processes within the Culebra. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is low (< 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a single-porosity medium in which advection occurs largely through the primary porosity of the dolomite matrix. At locations where the transmissivity of the Culebra is high (> 4 x 10{sup -6} m{sup 2}/s), we conceptualize the Culebra as a heterogeneous, layered, fractured medium in which advection occurs largely through fractures and solutes diffuse between fractures and matrix at multiple rates. The variations in diffusion rate can be attributed to both variations in fracture spacing (or the spacing of advective pathways) and matrix heterogeneity. Flow and transport appear to be concentrated in the lower Culebra. At all locations, diffusion is the dominant transport process in the portions of the matrix that tracer does not access by flow.

MEIGS,LUCY C.; BEAUHEIM,RICHARD L.; JONES,TOYA L.

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Circumveiloped by Obscuritads. The nature of interpretation in quantum mechanics, hermeneutic circles and physical reality, with cameos of James Joyce and Jacques Derrida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The quest for finding the right interpretation of Quantum Mechanics (QM) is as old als QM and still has not ended, and may never end. The question what an interpretation of QM is has hardly ever been raised explicitly, let alone answered. We raise it and answer it. Then the quest for the right interpretation can continue self-consciously, for we then know exactly what we are after. We present a list of minimal requirements that something has to meet in order to qualify as an interpretation of QM. We also raise, as a side issue, the question how the discourse on the interpretation of QM relates to hermeneutics in Continental Philosophy.

F. A. Muller

2014-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

358

Novel imaging techniques, integrated with mineralogical, geochemical and microbiological characterizations to determine the biogeochemical controls on technetium mobility in FRC sediments  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research program was to take a highly multidisciplinary approach to define the biogeochemical factors that control technetium (Tc) mobility in FRC sediments. The aim was to use batch and column studies to probe the biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of Tc at the FRC. Background sediment samples from Area 2 (pH 6.5, low nitrate, low {sup 99}Tc) and Area 3 (pH 3.5, high nitrate, relatively high {sup 99}Tc) of the FRC were selected (http://www.esd.ornl.gov/nabirfrc). For the batch experiments, sediments were mixed with simulated groundwater, modeled on chemical constituents of FRC waters and supplemented with {sup 99}Tc(VII), both with and without added electron donor (acetate). The solubility of the Tc was monitored, alongside other biogeochemical markers (nitrate, nitrite, Fe(II), sulfate, acetate, pH, Eh) as the 'microcosms' aged. At key points, the microbial communities were also profiled using both cultivation-dependent and molecular techniques, and results correlated with the geochemical conditions in the sediments. The mineral phases present in the sediments were also characterized, and the solid phase associations of the Tc determined using sequential extraction and synchrotron techniques. In addition to the batch sediment experiments, where discrete microbial communities with the potential to reduce and precipitate {sup 99}Tc will be separated in time, we also developed column experiments where biogeochemical processes were spatially separated. Experiments were conducted both with and without amendments proposed to stimulate radionuclide immobilization (e.g. the addition of acetate as an electron donor for metal reduction), and were also planned with and without competing anions at high concentration (e.g. nitrate, with columns containing Area 3 sediments). When the columns had stabilized, as determined by chemical analysis of the effluents, we used a spike of the short-lived gamma emitter {sup 99m}Tc (50-200 MBq; half life 6 hours) and its mobility was monitored using a {gamma}-camera. Incorporation of low concentrations of the long-lived 99Tc gave a tracer that can be followed by scintillation counting, should the metastable form of the radionuclide decay to below detection limits before the end of the experiment (complete immobilization or loss of the Tc from the column). After the Tc was reduced and immobilized, or passed through the system, the columns were dismantled carefully in an anaerobic cabinet and the pore water geochemistry and mineralogy of the columns profiled. Microbial community analysis was determined, again using molecular and culture-dependent techniques. Experimental results were also modeled using an established coupled speciation and transport code, to develop a predictive tool for the mobility of Tc in FRC sediments. From this multidisciplinary approach, we hoped to obtain detailed information on the microorganisms that control the biogeochemical cycling of key elements at the FRC, and we would also be able to determine the key factors that control the mobility of Tc at environmentally relevant concentrations at this site.

Jonathan R. Lloyd

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

359

The impact of high-frequency sedimentation cycles on stratigraphic interpretation  

SciTech Connect

Global cyclostratigraphy, a methodology that utilizes climate change to evaluate sediment flux, characterizes the impact of sediment cycles on stratigraphy. Climatic succession, sediment yield cycles, and the phase relationship of sediment cycles to eustatic cycles are all determined in the early stages of basin analysis. Sedimentologic information is then used to assist in sequence evaluations. Climatic successions are intrinsically associated with global position (paleogeography) and are not necessarily synchronous with glacioeustatic sea-level cycles. A preliminary evaluation of the effect of climate on sediment supply from modem river systems indicates that sediment yield may vary by well over two orders of magnitude during one climate cycle. Consequently, basins in different climatic belts can have distinctly different volumes and lithologies for systems tracts that have similar base-level changes. The stratigraphic computer program Sedpak was utilized to examine the possible impact of different sedimentation cycles on sequence interpretation and reservoir forecasts. The effect of sedimentation cycles on reservoir distribution in real world sequences is demonstrated with a comparison of the Miocene section of the Surma basin, Bangladesh, and the Plio-Pleistocene section of the Gulf of Mexico. In the Surma basin, reservoirs are most likely to occur in transgressive and highstand systems tracts, while reservoirs in the Gulf of Mexico are more likely in lowstand prograding complexes.

Perlmutter, M.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Radovich, B.J.; Matthews, M.D. [Texaco Central Exploration Division, Bellaire, TX (United States)] [and others

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

INTERPRETING THE GLOBAL 21 cm SIGNAL FROM HIGH REDSHIFTS. I. MODEL-INDEPENDENT CONSTRAINTS  

SciTech Connect

The sky-averaged (global) 21 cm signal is a powerful probe of the intergalactic medium (IGM) prior to the completion of reionization. However, so far it has been unclear whether it will provide more than crude estimates of when the universe's first stars and black holes formed, even in the best case scenario in which the signal is accurately extracted from the foregrounds. In contrast to previous work, which has focused on predicting the 21 cm signatures of the first luminous objects, we investigate an arbitrary realization of the signal and attempt to translate its features to the physical properties of the IGM. Within a simplified global framework, the 21 cm signal yields quantitative constraints on the Ly? background intensity, net heat deposition, ionized fraction, and their time derivatives without invoking models for the astrophysical sources themselves. The 21 cm absorption signal is most easily interpreted, setting strong limits on the heating rate density of the universe with a measurement of its redshift alone, independent of the ionization history or details of the Ly? background evolution. In a companion paper, we extend these results, focusing on the confidence with which one can infer source emissivities from IGM properties.

Mirocha, Jordan; Harker, Geraint J. A.; Burns, Jack O., E-mail: jordan.mirocha@colorado.edu [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, Campus Box 389, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States)

2013-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

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361

LORENTZ-FACTOR-ISOTROPIC-LUMINOSITY/ENERGY CORRELATIONS OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS AND THEIR INTERPRETATION  

SciTech Connect

The bulk Lorentz factor of the gamma-ray burst (GRB) ejecta ({Gamma}{sub 0}) is a key parameter to understanding GRB physics. Liang et al. have discovered a correlation between {Gamma}{sub 0} and isotropic {gamma}-ray energy: {Gamma}{sub 0}{proportional_to}E{sup 0.25}{sub {gamma},iso,52}. By including more GRBs with updated data and more methods to derive {Gamma}{sub 0}, we confirm this correlation and obtain {Gamma}{sub 0} {approx_equal} 91E{sup 0.29}{sub {gamma},iso,52}. Evaluating the mean isotropic {gamma}-ray luminosities L{sub {gamma},iso} of the GRBs in the same sample, we discover an even tighter correlation {Gamma}{sub 0} {approx_equal} 249L{sup 0.30}{sub {gamma},iso,52}. We propose an interpretation to this later correlation. Invoking a neutrino-cooled hyperaccretion disk around a stellar mass black hole as the central engine of GRBs, we derive jet luminosity powered by neutrino annihilation and baryon loading from a neutrino-driven wind. Applying beaming correction, we finally derive {Gamma}{sub 0}{proportional_to}L{sup 0.22}{sub {gamma},iso}, which is consistent with the data. This suggests that the central engine of long GRBs is likely a stellar mass black hole surrounded by a hyper-accreting disk.

Lue Jing; Zou Yuanchuan; Lei Weihua; Wu Qingwen; Wang Dingxiong [School of Physics, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang Bing; Lue Houjun [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Nevada Las Vegas, 4505 Maryland Parkway, Box 454002, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4002 (United States); Liang Enwei, E-mail: zouyc@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: leiwh@hust.edu.cn, E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu [Department of Physics, Guangxi University, Nanning 530004 (China)

2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

362

Structure of the Presidio Bolson area, Texas, interpreted from gravity data  

SciTech Connect

To obtain a better understanding of the structure and tectonism of the region, an integrated geophysical-geological study of the Presidio area, Texas, was undertaken using gravity measurements and deep drilling data. New gravity data were combined with existing data to construct simple Bouguer anomaly maps of the Presidio area, and two-dimensional computer modeling of gravity profiles was used to derive earth models. These data outline the major geologic features of the area that are dominated by the effects of Tertiary block faulting and volcanism. The main feature of interest was the Presidio Graben, which is approximately 1.5 km deep near Ruidosa, Texas. One motivation for this study was the collection of a part of the basic scientific data needed to assess the geothermal potential of the area, and the results obtained support the hypothesis that hot springs associated with the Presidio Graben derive their heat from deep circulation along its boundary faults. However, some gravity anomalies observed could be interpreted as indicating the presence of late Tertiary intrusions that could provide heat for the hot springs.

Mraz, J.R.; Keller, G.R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Interpretation of frequency modulation atomic force microscopy in terms of fractional calculus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is widely recognized that small amplitude frequency modulation atomic force microscopy probes the derivative of the interaction force between tip and sample. For large amplitudes, however, such a physical connection is currently lacking, although it has been observed that the frequency shift presents a quantity intermediate to the interaction force and energy for certain force laws. Here we prove that these observations are a universal property of large amplitude frequency modulation atomic force microscopy, by establishing that the frequency shift is proportional to the half-fractional integral of the force, regardless of the force law. This finding indicates that frequency modulation atomic force microscopy can be interpreted as a fractional differential operator, where the order of the derivative?integral is dictated by the oscillation amplitude. We also establish that the measured frequency shift varies systematically from a probe of the force gradient for small oscillation amplitudes, through to the measurement of a quantity intermediate to the force and energy (the half-fractional integral of the force) for large oscillation amplitudes. This has significant implications to measurement sensitivity, since integrating the force will smooth its behavior, while differentiating it will enhance variations. This highlights the importance in choice of oscillation amplitude when wishing to optimize the sensitivity of force spectroscopy measurements to short-range interactions and consequently imaging with the highest possible resolution.

John E. Sader and Suzanne P. Jarvis

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

364

Interpretation of Coal-Seam Sequestration Data Using a New Swelling and Shrinkage Model  

SciTech Connect

This paper deals with the influence of swelling and shrinkage of coal on the production of methane from, and sequestration of carbon dioxide in, a coalbed reservoir. A three-dimensional swelling and shrinkage model was developed. It is based on constitutive equations that account for coupled fluid pressure-deformation behavior of a porous medium that undergoes swelling and shrinkage. The swelling and shrinkage strains are computed on the basis of the amounts of different gases (e.g., CO2, CH4) sorbed or desorbed. The amounts of sorption and desorption are computed from measured isotherms with the aid of the Ideal Adsorbed Solution model for mixed gases. The permeability of the reservoir is modified according to the swelling-shrinkage model. The paper presents numerical results for the influence of swelling and shrinkage on reservoir performance during injection of carbon dioxide. The paper includes results from a number of examples, and analysis of a field injection into a coal seam at a site in the San Juan basin. Results show that with the incorporation of swelling and shrinkage into the analysis, it is possible to get a better history-match of production data. Results also show that coal swelling can reduce the injection volumes of carbon dioxide significantly. The interpretation of field data with the new swelling-shrinkage model shows that the coal swelling during carbon dioxide sequestration in coal-seams is an important factor that can influence field performance.

Siriwardane, H.J.; Smith, D.H.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Fostering interconnectivity dimension of low-carbon cities: The triple bottom line re-interpretation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In facilitating the progress towards low-carbon cities, there is no lack of available green technologies, planning techniques, economic tools, social development strategies, etc. These technologies, strategies and techniques have, in fact, long been deployed in many cities and communities around the world. However, the outcomes have been somewhat slow and less than expected. This is also manifested in the lower-than-expectation outcomes of the formation of a meaningful global climate change treaty so far. The barriers have clearly been unveiled as disconnection among the triple bottom lines (TBL) in the approach. By linking the concept of low-carbon cities to sustainable development (informed by the TBL), the paper highlights the implication of misinterpretation of a popular TBL diagram, leading to fragmented, compromised approach to LCC. Cases in point are isolating and excluding social and economic activities that are not environmental friendly, and trading-off environmentally-friendly activities that are not profitable in economic sense. Re-interpretation the popular TBL diagram literally from a three-dimensional lens offers an alternative approach, presented in an integrated framework towards low-carbon cities. The vital factors in the framework are safeguarding the positive dynamic interconnectivities of the three bottom lines, aligning their core values (in contrast to the isolating and excluding exercise), amplifying their common interest (instead of trading-off activities), and deploying strategies from planning, renewable technologies, education and policy making to address multiple and interconnected issues reciprocally.

Wynn Chi Nguyen Cam

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Automated method for the systematic interpretation of resonance peaks in spectrum data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for spectral signature interpretation. The method includes the creation of a mathematical model of a system or process. A neural network training set is then developed based upon the mathematical model. The neural network training set is developed by using the mathematical model to generate measurable phenomena of the system or process based upon model input parameter that correspond to the physical condition of the system or process. The neural network training set is then used to adjust internal parameters of a neural network. The physical condition of an actual system or process represented by the mathematical model is then monitored by extracting spectral features from measured spectra of the actual process or system. The spectral features are then input into said neural network to determine the physical condition of the system or process represented by the mathematical. More specifically, the neural network correlates the spectral features (i.e. measurable phenomena) of the actual process or system with the corresponding model input parameters. The model input parameters relate to specific components of the system or process, and, consequently, correspond to the physical condition of the process or system.

Damiano, Brian (Knoxville, TN); Wood, Richard T. (Knoxville, TN)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

INTERPRETING THE RESULTS OF SOIL TESTS FOR HEAVY METALS Vern Grubinger and Don Ross, University of Vermont  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

toxicity of a heavy metal will be affected by soil texture, organic matter, and pH. The health effects1 INTERPRETING THE RESULTS OF SOIL TESTS FOR HEAVY METALS Vern Grubinger and Don Ross, University of Vermont Agricultural soils normally contain low background levels of heavy metals. Contamination from

Hayden, Nancy J.

368

General syllabus for doctoral (third cycle) education in Musical Performance and Interpretation at the University of Gothenburg  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

General syllabus for doctoral (third cycle) education in Musical Performance and Interpretation at the University of Gothenburg 1. Decision Regulations regarding doctoral (third cycle) education and admission:100). Local regulations for doctoral (third cycle) education are to be found in the University of Gothenburg

Johannesson, Henrik

369

Nuclear reactions of medium and heavy target nuclei with high-energy particles IV. Interpretation of mass fragment yields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Target residue mass distributions in 3·65 A GeV12C-ion- and 3·65 GeV proton-induced reactions on medium and heavy target nuclei have been interpreted in the theoretical framework of the intranuclear cascade and a...

P. Kozma; K. Hänssgen

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Mapping and interpretation of Sinlap crater on Titan using Cassini VIMS and Stphane Le Moulic1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Mapping and interpretation of Sinlap crater on Titan using Cassini VIMS and RADAR data Stéphane- Huygens mission. Among these, Sinlap is the only one that has been observed both by the RADAR and VIMS in VIMS false color composites of band ratios in the Sinlap area, suggesting compositional heterogeneities

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

371

MODEL BASED ROAD EXTRACTION FOR THE REGISTRATION AND INTERPRETATION OF REMOTE SENSING DATA Institut f ur Theoretische Nachrichtentechnik und Informationsverarbeitung  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extraction, GIS, Registration, GIS verification, Remote Sensing, GIS update ABSTRACT Due to the increasing of maps and the environmental or agricultural monitoring, there is a need to automate the registration) in different sensor data (SAR, IR, VIS and maps) which is employed for registration and interpretation

372

Measurement in the de Broglie-Bohm interpretation: Double-slit, Stern-Gerlach and EPR-B  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement in the de Broglie-Bohm interpretation: Double-slit, Stern-Gerlach and EPR-B Michel important experiments of quantum measurement: double-slit, Stern-Gerlach and EPR-B. First, we present the EPR-B experiment, the Bohm version of the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen exper- iment. Its theoretical

Recanati, Catherine

373

The effect of rotation and viscous heating on the interpretation of experimental heat diffusivities in the edge pedestal  

SciTech Connect

A formalism is presented for evaluating the effect of plasma rotation, via viscous heating, on the interpretation of thermal conductivities from measured temperature and density gradients in the edge pedestal. An application to a H-mode DIII-D [J. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)] discharge indicates that the effect could be significant.

Stacey, Weston M. [Fusion Research Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, Georgia 30332 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

374

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant simulated RH TRU waste experiments: Data and interpretation pilot  

SciTech Connect

The simulated, i.e., nonradioactive remote-handled transuranic waste (RH TRU) experiments being conducted underground in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) were emplaced in mid-1986 and have been in heated test operation since 9/23/86. These experiments involve the in situ, waste package performance testing of eight full-size, reference RH TRU containers emplaced in horizontal, unlined test holes in the rock salt ribs (walls) of WIPP Room T. All of the test containers have internal electrical heaters; four of the test emplacements were filled with bentonite and silica sand backfill materials. We designed test conditions to be ``near-reference`` with respect to anticipated thermal outputs of RH TRU canisters and their geometrical spacing or layout in WIPP repository rooms, with RH TRU waste reference conditions current as of the start date of this test program. We also conducted some thermal overtest evaluations. This paper provides a: detailed test overview; comprehensive data update for the first 5 years of test operations; summary of experiment observations; initial data interpretations; and, several status; experimental objectives -- how these tests support WIPP TRU waste acceptance, performance assessment studies, underground operations, and the overall WIPP mission; and, in situ performance evaluations of RH TRU waste package materials plus design details and options. We provide instrument data and results for in situ waste container and borehole temperatures, pressures exerted on test containers through the backfill materials, and vertical and horizontal borehole-closure measurements and rates. The effects of heat on borehole closure, fracturing, and near-field materials (metals, backfills, rock salt, and intruding brine) interactions were closely monitored and are summarized, as are assorted test observations. Predictive 3-dimensional thermal and structural modeling studies of borehole and room closures and temperature fields were also performed.

Molecke, M.A.; Argueello, G.J.; Beraun, R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A COMPREHENSIVE STATISTICALLY-BASED METHOD TO INTERPRET REAL-TIME FLOWING MEASUREMENTS  

SciTech Connect

In this project, we are developing new methods for interpreting measurements in complex wells (horizontal, multilateral and multi-branching wells) to determine the profiles of oil, gas, and water entry. These methods are needed to take full advantage of ''smart'' well instrumentation, a technology that is rapidly evolving to provide the ability to continuously and permanently monitor downhole temperature, pressure, volumetric flow rate, and perhaps other fluid flow properties at many locations along a wellbore; and hence, to control and optimize well performance. In this first year, we have made considerable progress in the development of the forward model of temperature and pressure behavior in complex wells. In this period, we have progressed on three major parts of the forward problem of predicting the temperature and pressure behavior in complex wells. These three parts are the temperature and pressure behaviors in the reservoir near the wellbore, in the wellbore or laterals in the producing intervals, and in the build sections connecting the laterals, respectively. Many models exist to predict pressure behavior in reservoirs and wells, but these are almost always isothermal models. To predict temperature behavior we derived general mass, momentum, and energy balance equations for these parts of the complex well system. Analytical solutions for the reservoir and wellbore parts for certain special conditions show the magnitude of thermal effects that could occur. Our preliminary sensitivity analyses show that thermal effects caused by near-wellbore reservoir flow can cause temperature changes that are measurable with smart well technology. This is encouraging for the further development of the inverse model.

Pinan Dawkrajai; Analis A. Romero; Keita Yoshioka; Ding Zhu; A.D. Hill; Larry W. Lake

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A Comprehensive Statistically-Based Method to Interpret Real-Time Flowing Measurements  

SciTech Connect

With the recent development of temperature measurement systems, continuous temperature profiles can be obtained with high precision. Small temperature changes can be detected by modern temperature measuring instruments such as fiber optic distributed temperature sensor (DTS) in intelligent completions and will potentially aid the diagnosis of downhole flow conditions. In vertical wells, since elevational geothermal changes make the wellbore temperature sensitive to the amount and the type of fluids produced, temperature logs can be used successfully to diagnose the downhole flow conditions. However, geothermal temperature changes along the wellbore being small for horizontal wells, interpretations of a temperature log become difficult. The primary temperature differences for each phase (oil, water, and gas) are caused by frictional effects. Therefore, in developing a thermal model for horizontal wellbore, subtle temperature changes must be accounted for. In this project, we have rigorously derived governing equations for a producing horizontal wellbore and developed a prediction model of the temperature and pressure by coupling the wellbore and reservoir equations. Also, we applied Ramey's model (1962) to the build section and used an energy balance to infer the temperature profile at the junction. The multilateral wellbore temperature model was applied to a wide range of cases at varying fluid thermal properties, absolute values of temperature and pressure, geothermal gradients, flow rates from each lateral, and the trajectories of each build section. With the prediction models developed, we present inversion studies of synthetic and field examples. These results are essential to identify water or gas entry, to guide flow control devices in intelligent completions, and to decide if reservoir stimulation is needed in particular horizontal sections. This study will complete and validate these inversion studies.

Keita Yoshioka; Pinan Dawkrajai; Analis A. Romero; Ding Zhu; A. D. Hill; Larry W. Lake

2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

377

A Comprehensive Statistically-Based Method to Interpret Real-Time Flowing Measurements  

SciTech Connect

This project is motivated by the increasing use of distributed temperature sensors for real-time monitoring of complex wells (horizontal, multilateral and multi-branching wells) to infer the profiles of oil, gas, and water entry. Measured information can be used to interpret flow profiles along the wellbore including junction and build section. In this second project year, we have completed a forward model to predict temperature and pressure profiles in complex wells. As a comprehensive temperature model, we have developed an analytical reservoir flow model which takes into account Joule-Thomson effects in the near well vicinity and multiphase non-isothermal producing wellbore model, and couples those models accounting mass and heat transfer between them. For further inferences such as water coning or gas evaporation, we will need a numerical non-isothermal reservoir simulator, and unlike existing (thermal recovery, geothermal) simulators, it should capture subtle temperature change occurring in a normal production. We will show the results from the analytical coupled model (analytical reservoir solution coupled with numerical multi-segment well model) to infer the anomalous temperature or pressure profiles under various conditions, and the preliminary results from the numerical coupled reservoir model which solves full matrix including wellbore grids. We applied Ramey's model to the build section and used an enthalpy balance to infer the temperature profile at the junction. The multilateral wellbore temperature model was applied to a wide range of cases varying fluid thermal properties, absolute values of temperature and pressure, geothermal gradients, flow rates from each lateral, and the trajectories of each build section.

Pinan Dawkrajai; Keita Yoshioka; Analis A. Romero; Ding Zhu; A.D. Hill; Larry W. Lake

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Near-threshold excitation in light rare-earth compounds: A new interpretation of 3 d appearance-potential spectra  

SciTech Connect

A two-step model describing the transitions in electron-excited appearance-potential spectroscopy (APS) is presented for the 3{ital d} thresholds of La and Ce compounds. The model permits a consistent interpretation of APS spectra taken with different modes (soft x-ray APS (SXAPS), Auger-electron APS, disappearance-potential spectroscopy). Within this model an investigation has been performed on La and Ce compounds exhibiting different valencies: LaB{sub 6}, CeB{sub 6}, and CeO{sub 2}. The spectra are discussed in terms of atomiclike 4{ital f} states. The fine structure reflects the multiplet structure of the excited configurations modified by state-selective excitation probabilities near the threshold and---in SXAPS---by dipole selection rules. The interpretation of the APS data is supported by comparison with multiplet calculations and core-level electron-energy-loss spectra recorded at low excitation energy.

Hinkers, H.; Stiller, R.; Merz, H. (Physikalisches Institut der Universitaet Munster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Strasse 10, D-4400 Munster, Federal Republic of Germany (DE))

1989-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Joint interpretation of on-board vision and static GPS cartography for determination of correct speed limit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present here a first prototype of a "Speed Limit Support" Advance Driving Assistance System (ADAS) producing permanent reliable information on the current speed limit applicable to the vehicle. Such a module can be used either for information of the driver, or could even serve for automatic setting of the maximum speed of a smart Adaptive Cruise Control (ACC). Our system is based on a joint interpretation of cartographic information (for static reference information) with on-board vision, used for traffic sign detection and recognition (including supplementary sub-signs) and visual road lines localization (for detection of lane changes). The visual traffic sign detection part is quite robust (90% global correct detection and recognition for main speed signs, and 80% for exit-lane sub-signs detection). Our approach for joint interpretation with cartography is original, and logic-based rather than probability-based, which allows correct behaviour even in cases, which do happen, when both vision and cartograp...

Bargeton, Alexandre; Nashashibi, Fawzi; Puthon, Anne-Sophie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Deep Atomic Binding (DAB) Approach in Interpretation of Fission Products Behavior in Human Body, and Health Consequences  

SciTech Connect

According to models used to predict health effects of fission products enter the human body, a large number of fatalities, malignancies, thyroid cancer, born (genetic) defects,...etc.. But the actual data after Chernobyl and TMI accidents, and nuclear detonations in USA and Marshal Islands, were not consistent with these models. According to DAB, these data could be interpreted, and conflicts between former models predictions and actual field data explained. (author)

Ajlouni, Abdul-Wali M.S. [Ministry of Energy and Mineral Resources, Amman 11814 (Jordan)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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381

An analysis of the effectiveness of interpretive signing on the accuracy of visitor perceptions in an impressionistic style exhibit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more than any other non-personal channel of communication with the possible exception of news releases. Interpreters have only a limited amount of research data to rely on when working with exhibitry. Professionals in the field of environmental... of thoughts or ideas so that understanding is achieved. Exhibits, with the possible exception of news releases, are the most often used category of visual mass media utilized by natural resource agencies. The effectiveness of an exhibit depends upon a...

Kirwan, Janet Ann

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

382

DOE/SC0001389 Final technical report: Investigation of uranium attenuation and release at column and pore scales in response to advective geochemical gradients  

SciTech Connect

Experimental approach Column experiments were devised to investigate the role of changing fluid composition on mobility of uranium through a sequence of geologic media. Fluids and media were chosen to be relevant to the ground water plume emanating from the former S-3 ponds at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFC) site. Synthetic ground waters were pumped upwards at 0.05 mL/minute for 21 days through layers of quartz sand alternating with layers of uncontaminated soil, quartz sand mixed with illite, quartz sand coated with iron oxides, and another soil layer. Increases in pH or concentration of phosphate, bicarbonate, or acetate were imposed on the influent solutions after each 7 pore volumes while uranium (as uranyl) remained constant at 0.1mM. A control column maintained the original synthetic groundwater composition with 0.1mM U. Pore water solutions were extracted to assess U retention and release in relation to the advective ligand or pH gradients. Following the column experiments, subsamples from each layer were characterized using microbeam X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with X-ray fluorescence mapping and compared to sediment core samples from the ORIFC, at SSRL Beam Line 2-3. Results U retention of 55 â?? 67 mg occurred in phosphate >pH >control >acetate >carbonate columns. The mass of U retained in the first-encountered quartz layer in all columns was highest and increased throughout the experiment. The rate of increase in acetate- and bicarbonate-bearing columns declined after ligand concentrations were raised. U also accumulated in the first soil layer; the pH-varied column retained most, followed by the increasing-bicarbonate column. The mass of U retained in the upper layers was far lower. Speciation of U, interpreted from microbeam XANES spectra and XRF maps, varied within and among the columns. Evidence of minor reduction to U(IV) was observed in the first-encountered quartz layer in the phosphate, bicarbonate, and pH columns while only U(VI) was observed in the control and acetate columns. In the soil layer, the acetate and bicarbonate columns both indicate minor reduction to U(IV), but U(VI) predominated in all columns. In the ORIFC soils, U was consistently present as U(VI); sorption appears to be the main mechanism of association for U present with Fe and/or Mn, while U occurring with P appears in discrete particles consistent with a U mineral phase. U in soil locations with no other elemental associations shown by XRF are likely uranium oxide phases.

Savage, Kaye S. [Wofford College; Zhu, Wenyi [Wofford College; Barnett, Mark O. [Auburn University

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

383

Development and anlysis of fast, approximate 3D Algorithms for interpretation of multi-component induction logging data  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the effects of electrical anisotropy on the 3D inversion of single-well induction logging data when anisotropy is not considered. Of concern are possible artifacts that may lead to an incorrect interpretation of the formation about the borehole. Comparison is made of 3D isotropic inversion on a suite of model data, with and without anisotropy, consisting of an infinite layer and layer terminated at the borehole. In both cases, the layer dip (or well deviation) is varied. Inversion of the anisotropic data result in an overestimate of the layer conductivity, and the lateral extent of the layer about the borehole.

David L. Alumbaugh

2006-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

384

Interpretation of Colloid-Homologue Tracer Test 10-03, Including Comparisons to Test 10-01  

SciTech Connect

This presentation covers the interpretations of colloid-homologue tracer test 10-03 conducted at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, in 2010. It also provides a comparison of the interpreted test results with those of tracer test 10-01, which was conducted in the same fracture flow system and using the same tracers than test 10-03, but at a higher extraction flow rate. A method of correcting for apparent uranine degradation in test 10-03 is presented. Conclusions are: (1) Uranine degradation occurred in test 10-03, but not in 10-01; (2) Uranine correction based on apparent degradation rate in injection loop in test 11-02 seems reasonable when applied to data from test 10-03; (3) Colloid breakthrough curves quite similar in the two tests with similar recoveries relative to uranine (after correction); and (4) Much slower apparent desorption of homologues in test 10-03 than in 10-01 (any effect of residual homologues from test 10-01 in test 10-03?).

Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

385

3-D structural and seismic stratigraphic interpretation of the Guasare-Misoa Interval, VLE 196 Area, Block V, Lamar Field, Lake Maracaibo, Venezuela  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this study, the structure, depositional system, and the seismic stratigraphy of the VLE 196 area, Block V in Lamar Field were interpreted using 3-D seismic data and well logs to characterize structural and depositional settings of the Guasare...

Arzuman, Sadun

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

386

Seismic interpretation and regional geologic correlation established for offshore Togo, West Africa: a preliminary evaluation of hydrocarbon potential in deep water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3-D seismic data acquired by Petroleum Geo-Services Inc. (PGS), Houston, Texas. The study area ranges from approximately 180 m - 2500 m water depth. Research included regional geologic correlation, seismic interpretation, and structural modeling...

Gray, Max Daniel

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

387

An interpretive analysis of Texas ranchers' perceptions of endangered species management policy as related to management of golden-cheeked warbler habitat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN INTERPRETIVE ANALYSIS OF TEXAS RANCHERS' PERCEPTIONS OF ENDANGERED SPECIES MANAGEMENT POLICY AS RELATED TO MANAGEMENT OF GOLDEN-CHEEKED WARBLER HABITAT A Thesis by CRISTI LAINE CHOAT HORTON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies... of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF ARTS May 1992 Major Subject: Speech Communication AN INTERPRETIVE ANALYSIS OF TEXAS RANCHERS' PERCEPTIONS OF ENDANGERED SPECIES MANAGEMENT POLICY...

Horton, Cristi Laine Choat

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

388

THE PHOTOSPHERIC RADIATION MODEL FOR THE PROMPT EMISSION OF GAMMA-RAY BURSTS: INTERPRETING FOUR OBSERVED CORRELATIONS  

SciTech Connect

We show that the empirical E{sub p}-L, {Gamma}-L, E{sub p}-{Gamma}, and {eta}-bar{sub {gamma}}-E{sub p} correlations (where L is the time-averaged luminosity of the prompt emission, E{sub p} is the spectral peak energy, {Gamma} is the bulk Lorentz factor, and {eta}-bar{sub {gamma}} is the emission efficiency of gamma-ray bursts, GRBs) are well consistent with the relations between the analogous parameters predicted in the photospheric radiation model of the prompt emission of GRBs. The time-resolved thermal radiation of GRB 090902B does follow the E{sub p}-L and {Gamma}-L correlations. A reliable interpretation of the four correlations in alternative models is still lacking. These may point toward a photospheric origin of prompt emission of some GRBs.

Fan Yizhong; Wei Daming; Zhang Fuwen [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Zhang Binbin, E-mail: yzfan@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: dmwei@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: fwzhang@pmo.ac.cn, E-mail: bbzhang@psu.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2012-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

389

Classical and Bayesian interpretation of the Birge test of consistency and its generalized version for correlated results from interlaboratory evaluations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A well-known test of consistency in the results from an interlaboratory evaluation is the Birge test, named after its developer Raymond T Birge, a physicist. We show that the Birge test of consistency may be interpreted as a classical test of the null hypothesis that the variances of the results are less than or equal to their stated values against the alternative hypothesis that the variances of the results are greater than their stated values. A modern protocol for hypothesis testing is to calculate the classical p-value of the test statistic. The p-value is the maximum probability under the null hypothesis of realizing in conceptual replications a value of the test statistic equal to or larger than the realized (observed) value of the test statistic. The null hypothesis is rejected when the p-value is too small. We show that, interestingly, the classical p-value of the Birge test statistic is equal to the Bayesian posterior probability of the null hypothesis based on suitably chosen non-informative improper prior distributions for the unknown statistical parameters. Thus the Birge test may be interpreted also as a Bayesian test of the null hypothesis. The Birge test of consistency was developed for those interlaboratory evaluations where the results are uncorrelated. We present a general test of consistency for both correlated and uncorrelated results. Then we show that the classical p-value of the general test statistic is equal to the Bayesian posterior probability of the null hypothesis based on non-informative prior distributions. The general test makes it possible to check the consistency of correlated results from interlaboratory evaluations. The Birge test is a special case of the general test.

Raghu N Kacker; Alistair Forbes; Rüdiger Kessel; Klaus-Dieter Sommer

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Interpreting Standard Usage Empirically.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Writers, editors, and everyday language users look to dictionaries, style guides, usage guides, and other published works to help inform their language decisions. They want… (more)

Frandsen, Jacob F.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Interpretations of Epidemiologic Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...assist in another field that has been largely...Scott2 in which the production of the disease re...shows the estimated cumulative mortality from gastric...which shows the cumulative mortality from lung...perhaps, to croton oil and that we should...exposure to shale oil and carcinoma of...

Richard Doll

1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Interpretations of Epidemiologic Data  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Andrea Nestor-Kalinoski Kathryn M. Eisenmann Univ. of Toledo Health Science Campus, Toledo, OH. Epithelial ovarian cancer...transition within single cells emanating from these clinically dangerous structures that are fundamental to EOC dissemination and disease...

Richard Doll

1963-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Introduction Simple Promela Interpreter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Similar to enum in C mtype = {RED, BLUE, GREEN}; mtype color = RED; #12;Variables Five different Break can be used to break out of do. #12;Communication Communication between processes is done through = [] of {,, ... }; For rendezvous channels, dim = 0 #12;Communication Sending

Plotkin, Joshua B.

394

Small-scale faulting in the Upper Cretaceous of the Groningen block (The Netherlands): 3D seismic interpretation, fault plane analysis and regional paleostress  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Over the last years, field-based studies have shown that fault surfaces can exhibit a considerable self-affine topography. It is reasonable to assume that similar undulations are also present in fault interpretations from 3D reflection seismic data, however both the interpretation uncertainty and geophysical resolution limits hinder their analysis. This study analyses a set of small-scale, non-reactivated faults in the Upper Cretaceous Chalk Group (Upper Ommelanden Formation) of the NW-part of the Groningen Block, the Netherlands, in a high quality Pre Stack Depth Migrated 3D seismic data set. The studied faults are fully contained inside the Chalk Group, in an area located between the major tectonic-bounding faults of the NW Groningen Block. Over 200 faults, with offsets in the order of 30–50 m, were interpreted across an area of ca. 150 km2, showing a clear preferential orientation for strike, dip and dip-direction. Detailed interpretations and 3D fault plane analyses show undulations on the fault plane. We show that these undulations are not an interpretation or gridding artefact, and interpret these to indicate direction of fault slip. These results were used to calculate a paleostress tensor, using all faults to calculate a single stress tensor for the entire study area by Numerical Dynamic Analysis. Based on the orientation, position and a thickness analysis, it is interpreted that these faults formed due to the tectonic reactivation of salt structures in the Latest Cretaceous. The calculated paleostress state shows a general NW–SE-extension, with a vertical maximum principle stress, and a stress ratio of about 0.3, indicating that the studied faults are not the result of dewatering. This interpretation agrees both with a nearby salt-tectonic reconstruction, as well as field-based paleostress results from the UK, Belgium and France. A first look at other surveys from the Dutch sector indicates that similar faults are present in other areas, with different orientations. We propose that a dedicated analysis of these faults across on- and offshore Europe would allow extending the stress map of the Late Cretaceous into areas where the Chalk is not outcropping.

Heijn van Gent; Stefan Back; Janos L. Urai; Peter Kukla

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

GSUE: urban geochemical mapping in Great Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...traffic fume contamination as it is added to diesel to reduce soot emissions (e.g. Petkov...mechanism of action of antismoke additives for diesel fuels. Oxidation Communications , 22...Heavy metal contents in vegetables and market garden soils in Hong Kong. Environmental...

F.M. Fordyce; S.E. Brown; E.L. Ander; B.G. Rawlins; K.E. O'Donnell; T.R. Lister; N. Breward; C.C. Johnson

396

Geophysical Monitoring of Coupled Microbial and Geochemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, University of Bonn, 53115 Bonn, Germany, Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management with measurement frequency (0.125and1Hz)andwasdependentuponthedominantmetabolic process. The spectral effect Groundwater contamination by industrial sources and nuclear weapons programs has promoted research

Hubbard, Susan

397

Geochemical characerization of endmember mantle components  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis uses trace elements and radiogenic isotope tracers to define elemental abundances in reservoirs of the Earth's mantle, including EM2 (the Enriched Mantle 2), as seen in the Samoan hotspot track, and DMM (the ...

Workman, Rhea K

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Organic geochemical biosignatures in alkaline Hydrothermal ecosystems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 13C content of microbial products are controlled by many factors, including the 13C content of the growth substrate, growth rate, the flux of carbon through various parts of the biochemical network, and the isotopic ...

Bradley, Alexander Smith

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Pelagic Sedimentation of Aragonite: Its Geochemical Significance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DEPOSITION AND CALCAREOUS ALGAE IN BIGHT OF ABACO, BAHAMAS - BUDGET...oceanography Pacific Ocean Panama Basin pelagic environment pelagic...A C A C A C A C flux Panama Basin (station PB) (5 21'N...station E) and the Pan-ama Basin in the Pacific (station PB...

ROBERT A. BERNER; SUSUMU HONJO

1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

400

Geochemical aspects of radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect

The book addresses various topics related to the geochemistry of waste disposal: natural radioactivity, kinds of radioactive waste, details of possible disposal sites, low-level waste, uranium mill tailing, natural analogs, waste forms, and engineered barriers. Emphasis throughout is on the importance of natural analogs, the behavior of elements resembling those to be put in a waste repository as they occur in natural situations where the temperature, pressure, and movement of ground water are similar to those expected near a repository. The author is convinced that conclusions drawn from the study of analog elements are directly applicable to predictions about radionuclide behavior, and that the observed near-immobility of most of these elements in comparable geologic environments is good evidence that radioactive waste can be disposed of underground with negligible effects on the biosphere. Much of his own research has been in this area, and the best parts of the book are the descriptions of his work on trace elements in the salt minerals at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico, on the movement of radionuclides and their daughter elements from the famous Precambrian reactor at Oklahoma in Gabon, and on the distribution of analog elements in rocks near the contacts of igneous intrusions.

Brookins, D.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Geochemical, Genetic, and Community Controls on Mercury  

SciTech Connect

The sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are soil bacteria that share two common characteristics, strict anaerobiosis and the ability to respire sulfate. The metabolic activities of these bacteria play significant roles in the global sulfur cycle, anaerobic degradation of biomass, biological metal corrosion in the environment and, recently, degradation of toxic compounds. The accumulation of evidence suggests these bacteria are also key to the production of the neurotoxin methylmercury in environmental settings. We propose to use our experience with the development of genetics in sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genus Desulfovibrio to create mutations that will eliminate the methylation of mercury, thereby identifying the genes essential for this process. This information may allow the environmental monitoring of the mercury methylation potential to learn the location and quantity of the production this toxin. From these data, more accurate predictive models of mercury cycling can be generated.

Wall, Judy D.

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

Geochemical taphonomy of shallow marine vertebrate assemblages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: bones; taphonomy; rare earth elements; diagenesis; redox; marine 1. Introduction 1.1. Background Many). Trueman and Benton (1997) and Staron et al. (2001) demonstrated that the rare earth ele- ment (REE.R. Palmer b a Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1RJ, UK b School of Ocean

Benton, Michael

403

Optimizing parameters for predicting the geochemical behavior...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs; II: Full-Waveform Inversion of 3D-9C VSP data from Bradys EGS Site and Update of the Brady Reservoir Scale Model...

404

New geochemical insights into volcanic degassing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...It is clear that, as well as measuring gas emissions...Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. Scientific...eruptions. J. Volcanol. Geothermal Res. 134, 77-107...Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico, from olivine-hosted...analysis. J. Volcanol. Geothermal Res. 108, 11-31...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Geomorphological significance of Ontario Lacus on Titan: Integrated interpretation of Cassini VIMS, ISS and RADAR data and comparison with the Etosha Pan (Namibia)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geomorphological significance of Ontario Lacus on Titan: Integrated interpretation of Cassini VIMS (ISS) in 2004 and 2005, Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) in 2007 and 2009 and RADAR of Ontario Lacus, based on a joint analysis of ISS, VIMS and RADAR SAR datasets, along with the T49

Brest, Université de

406

NUCLEAR PHYSICS 41. INTERPRET This problem is about the age of the Earth in half-lives of the isotopes specified.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is about 4.5 billion years old. 55. INTERPRET You're asked what is the long-term radioactivity of plutonium in terms of nuclear waste storage. DEVELOP The amount of plutonium will decrease by where the half-life is1

Ringwald, Frederick A.

407

Quantum of area {Delta}A=8{pi}l{sub P}{sup 2} and a statistical interpretation of black hole entropy  

SciTech Connect

In contrast to alternative values, the quantum of area {Delta}A=8{pi}l{sub P}{sup 2} does not follow from the usual statistical interpretation of black hole entropy; on the contrary, a statistical interpretation follows from it. This interpretation is based on the two concepts: nonadditivity of black hole entropy and Landau quantization. Using nonadditivity a microcanonical distribution for a black hole is found and it is shown that the statistical weight of a black hole should be proportional to its area. By analogy with conventional Landau quantization, it is shown that quantization of a black hole is nothing but the Landau quantization. The Landau levels of a black hole and their degeneracy are found. The degree of degeneracy is equal to the number of ways to distribute a patch of area 8{pi}l{sub P}{sup 2} over the horizon. Taking into account these results, it is argued that the black hole entropy should be of the form S{sub bh}=2{pi}{center_dot}{Delta}{Gamma}, where the number of microstates is {Delta}{Gamma}=A/8{pi}l{sub P}{sup 2}. The nature of the degrees of freedom responsible for black hole entropy is elucidated. The applications of the new interpretation are presented. The effect of noncommuting coordinates is discussed.

Ropotenko, Kostiantyn [State Administration of Communications, Ministry of Transport and Communications of Ukraine, 22, Khreschatyk, 01001, Kyiv (Ukraine)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

408

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C7, supplkment au no 12, Tome 38, dkcembre 1977,page C7-178 THE TRANSITION STATE AS AN INTERPRETATION OF DIFFUSE INTENSITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the electron diffraction patterns of vacancy short range ordered substoichiometrictran- sition metal carbides-178 THE TRANSITION STATE AS AN INTERPRETATION OF DIFFUSE INTENSITY CONTOURS IN SUBSTITUTIONALLY DISORDERED SYSTEMS'ordre corres- pondant est dtfini comme un ttat de transition. On propose un modele qui permet la description de

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

409

We have developed a software system that takes standard electro-cardiogram (ECG) input and interprets this input along with user-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a software system that takes standard electro- cardiogram (ECG) input and interprets this input along months 30 patients were monitored using a digital ECG system and this information was used to test that T wave inversions are sometimes seen on normal ECGs. Control ECGs of normal hearts were also taken

O'Sullivan, Carol

410

High-resolution crosswell imaging of a west Texas carbonate reservoir. Part 1: Project summary and interpretation  

SciTech Connect

A carbon dioxide flood pilot is being conducted in a section of Chevron`s McElroy field in Crane County, west Texas. Prior to CO{sub 2} injection, two high-frequency crosswell seismic profiles were recorded to investigate the use of seismic profiling for high-resolution reservoir delineation and CO{sub 2} monitoring. These preinjection profiles provide the baseline for time-lapse monitoring. Profile {number_sign}1 was recorded between an injector well and an offset observation well at a nominal well-to-well distance of 184 ft (56 m). Profile {number_sign}2 was recorded between a producing well and the observation well at a nominal distance of 600 ft (183 m). The combination of traveltime tomography and stacked CDP reflection amplitudes demonstrates how high-frequency crosswell seismic data can be used to image both large and small scale heterogeneity between wells: transmission traveltime tomography is used to image the large scale velocity variations; CDP reflection imaging is then used to image smaller scale impedance heterogeneities. The results of this integrated study demonstrate (1) the use of crosswell seismic profiling to produce a high-resolution reservoir delineation and (2) the possibility for successful monitoring of CO{sub 2} in carbonate reservoirs. The crosswell data were acquired with a piezoelectric source and a multilevel hydrophone array. Both profiles, nearly 80,000 seismic traces, were recorded in approximately 80 hours using a new acquisition technique of shooting on-the-fly. This paper presents the overall project summary and interpretation of the results from the near-offset profile.

Harris, J.M.; Nolen-Hoeksema, R.C.; Van Schaack, M.; Lazaratos, S.K.; Rector, J.W. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States)] [Stanford Univ., CA (United States); Langan, R.T. [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States)] [Chevron Petroleum Technology Co., La Habra, CA (United States); [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Geophysics Dept.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Interpretation of brine-permeability tests of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site: First interim report  

SciTech Connect

Pressure-pulse tests have been performed in bedded evaporites of the Salado Formation at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) site to evaluate the hydraulic properties controlling brine flow through the Salado. Hydraulic conductivities ranging from about 10{sup {minus}14} to 10{sup {minus}11} m/s (permeabilities of about 10{sup {minus}21} to 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2}) have been interpreted from nine tests conducted on five stratigraphic intervals within eleven meters of the WIPP underground excavations. Tests of a pure halite layer showed no measurable permeability. Pore pressures in the stratigraphic intervals range from about 0.5 to 9.3 MPa. An anhydrite interbed (Marker Bed 139) appears to be one or more orders of magnitude more permeable than the surrounding halite. Hydraulic conductivities appear to increase, and pore pressures decrease, with increasing proximity to the excavations. These effects are particularly evident within two to three meters of the excavations. Two tests indicated the presence of apparent zero-flow boundaries about two to three meters from the boreholes. The other tests revealed no apparent boundaries within the radii of influence of the tests, which were calculated to range from about four to thirty-five meters from the test holes. The data are insufficient to determine if brine flow through evaporites results from Darcy-like flow driven by pressure gradients within naturally interconnected porosity or from shear deformation around excavations connecting previously isolated pores, thereby providing pathways for fluids at or near lithostatic pressure to be driven towards the low-pressure excavations. Future testing will be performed at greater distances from the excavations to evaluate hydraulic properties and processes beyond the range of excavation effects.

Beauheim, R.L. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)); Saulnier, G.J. Jr.; Avis, J.D. (INTERA, Inc., Austin, TX (United States))

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Field application of an interpretation method of downhole temperature and pressure data for detecting water entry in horizontal/highly inclined gas wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

condition change, wellbore structure change, geothermal environment change, or simple just noise of measurement. To separate flow condition change from the other causes of temperature change, we require a comprehensive understanding of flow dynamics. 5.... The interpretation model for downhole temperature and pressure data is a coupled thermal wellbore/reservoir flow model. The model is built on fundamental flow and energy conservation equations for both the reservoir and wellbore. These equations are: Mass balance...

Achinivu, Ochi I.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

This manuscript has been published as: S Bernard, J Frisn, KL Spalding. A mathematical model for the interpretation of nuclear bomb test derived 14C incorporation in biological systems (2010) Nucl. Instr.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the interpretation of nuclear bomb test derived 14C incorporation in biological systems (2010) Nucl. Instr. and Meth for the interpretation of nuclear bomb test derived 14 C incorporation in biological systems Samuel Bernard1 , Jonas nuclear bomb testing during the cold war (1955-1963). For slowly renewing tissues, this method provides

Boyer, Edmond

414

An Appalachian-sourced deltaic sequence, northeastern Alabama, USA: biofacies-lithofacies relationships and interpreted community patterns  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thin sequence of Lower Pennsylvania rocks along Sand Mountain, Plateau coal field, northeastern Alabama, U.S.A., records the deposition in a deltaic coastal-plain paleoenvironment along the ancient Appalachian seaway. The section is laterally continuous, well exposed, and preserves a rich macrobiota. Identified coexisting paleodepositional environments contain distinctive biofacies. Specific paleoenvironments of deposition contain unique biofacies in this Late Carboniferous (Westphalian A) sequence. The criteria established for the recognition of these biofacies can be utilized to assist in refined interpretations of deltaic sites in Carboniferous coastal paleoenvironments. Identifiable biofacies include those preserved under a variety of forested wetland (swamp) conditions, distributary and crevasse-splay channels, coastal bays (“interdistributary” and lagoonal), barrier sands, and distal storm deposits (Fig. 1; Gastaldo et al., 1989). Vegetation in forested wetlands grew either in clastic substrates or peat substrates. The principal biofacies preserved in clastic substrate swamps were lycophyte-dominated, and can be recognized by either a predominance of canopy litter or subterranean stigmarian appendages (Gastaldo, 1986). The canopy litter that has accumulated on the forest floor was preserved under unique sedimentological conditions, and reflects the ecological gradient associated with the distribution of lycophyte genera in the swamp (Gastaldo, 1987). A monotypic assemblage of lycophytes characterized edaphically stressed sites. In sites proximal to the levee, a mixed assemblage of lycophytes, calamiteans, pteridophytes and pteridosperms is common. In the absence of compressed canopy macrodetritus, subterranean axes with helically arranged appendages (“rootlets”) crosscutting the bedding may be preserved. Macro-invertebrates are restricted to traces and trails, reflecting behavioral traits when conditions were conducive for their movement into these sites. Peat-colonizing vegetation parallels that of the clastic swamp. Deep distributary channels contain sandstone-cast and compressed aerial trunks of lycophytes and spenophytes. These occur in bedload deposits along with quartz and quartzose pebbles and cobble-size phyllite clasts. Degradation of external morphology usually precludes assignment of logs to a systematic position lower than order. In shallower, en-echelon stacked crevasse sands occur a mixture of lycophyte, calamitean and pteridosperm “woody” parts. Additionally, scoriaceous fern-like foliage may be found. Little evidence exists for macro-invertebrate communities in these unstable settings. Coastal bays preserve in situ macro-invertebrate communities, as well as allochthonous macrodetritus that was derived principally from levee vegetation. Four phases of biofacies development can be delineated (Gibson and Gastaldo, 1987). Stress-tolerant inarticulate brachiopods dominate the initial transgressive phase. Individuals are found isolated in the siltstone, commonly preserved by authigenic cementation in siderite concretions. Rarely are patches or clusters of individual encountered. Where clustering does occur it is associated with the colonization of “woody” plant parts. Transition to the molluscan-dominated phase is accompanied by the establishment of a rich ichnofauna. Continued transgression and the development of more normal salinities under lagoonal conditions are paralleled by an increase in species richness and abundance. The third biofacies phase remains molluscan dominated, but the assemblages at any particular point in time are represented by monospecific genera. Plant macrodetritus was utilized by the macro-invertebrate communities, and that which is preserved is restricted to highly fragmentary, unindentifiable remains. The fourth biofacies phase reflects the development of lagoonal conditions. This change can be recognized by macro-invertebrate body and ichnofossil fauna (Seilacher's Cruziana ichnofacies) diversification. An increase in the abundance of brachiopods and other

R.A. Gastaldo; M.A. Gibson; T.D. Gray

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Preliminary Interpretation of a Radionuclide and Colloid Tracer Test in a Granodiorite Shear Zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland  

SciTech Connect

In February and March 2012, a tracer test involving the injection of a radionuclide-colloid cocktail was conducted in the MI shear zone at the Grimsel Test Site, Switzerland, as part of the Colloids Formation and Migration (CFM) project. The colloids were derived from FEBEX bentonite, which is mined in Spain and is being considered as a potential waste package backfill in a Spanish nuclear waste repository. The tracer test, designated test 12-02 (second test in 2012), involved the injection of the tracer cocktail into borehole CFM 06.002i2 and extraction from the Pinkel surface packer at the main access tunnel wall approximately 6.1 m from the injection interval. The test configuration is depicted in Figure 1. This configuration has been used in several conservative tracer tests and two colloid-homologue tracer tests since 2007, and it is will be employed in an upcoming test involving the emplacement of a radionuclide-doped bentonite plug into CFM 06.002i2 to evaluate the swelling and erosion of the bentonite and the transport of bentonite colloids and radionuclides from the source to the extraction point at the tunnel wall. Interpretive analyses of several of the previous tracer tests, from 09-01 through 12-02 were provided in two previous Used Fuel Disposition Program milestone reports (Arnold et al., 2011; Kersting et al., 2012). However, only the data for the conservative tracer Amino-G Acid was previously analyzed from test 12-02 because the other tracer data from this test were not available at the time. This report documents the first attempt to quantitatively analyze the radionuclide and colloid breakthrough curves from CFM test 12-02. This report was originally intended to also include an experimental assessment of colloid-facilitated transport of uranium by bentonite colloids in the Grimsel system, but this assessment was not conducted because it was reported by German collaborators at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) that neither uranium nor neptunium adsorbed appreciably to FEBEX bentonite colloids in Grimsel groundwater (Huber et al., 2011). The Grimsel groundwater has a relatively high pH of {approx}9, so the lack of uranium and neptunium adsorption to clay is not surprising given the tendency for these actinides to form very stable negative or neutrally-charged uranyl- or calcium-uranyl-carbonate complexes at these pH, particularly in a water that is effectively saturated with respect to calcite. It was also observed in testing conducted at LANL earlier in 2012 that uranium did not adsorb measurably to Grimsel granodiorite in a synthetic Grimsel groundwater at pH {approx}8.5 (Kersting et al., 2012). Thus, the planned experimental work was not pursued because all the available information clearly pointed to an expected result that uranium transport would not be facilitated by clay colloids in the Grimsel system.

Reimus, Paul W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

Geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany Group (Devonian Black Shale) in Illinois to evaluate its characteristics as a source of hydrocarbons. Quarterly progress report, January 1-March 31, 1980  

SciTech Connect

This project is a detailed analysis of the lithology, stratigraphy, and structure of the New Albany Group in Illinois to determine those characteristics of lithology, thickness, regional distribution, vertical and lateral variability, and deformation that are most relevant to the occurrence of hydrocarbons. The mineralogic and petrographic properties of the New Albany Shale in Illinois are characterized. This includes the quantitative and qualitative characterization, by optical and x-ray techniques, of the inorganic mineral constituents, the dispersed organic matter, and the fabric of the shale. Not less than 49 major, minor, and trace elements are determined in 300 to 500 shale samples, which are representative cross sections of the cores taken. Organic and mineral carbon are included; total hydrogen; total sulfur and when that exceeds 0.5%, pyritic and sulfate sulfur. Also, other elements observed during normal routine analysis are reported. The character of off-gases from approximately 10-foot intervals in cores collected in the Illinois Basin is determined. In addition, the relative distribution of hydrocarbons is determined in ten specially prepared core samples, which are the same as those in previous unit. The carbon isotopic composition of methane in off-gases is determined from core samples whenever sufficient methane can be collected. This data is compared to other pertinent data such as gas composition and vitrinite reflectance for the purpose of making interpretations as to the origin and maturity of the gas. Laboratory experiments are performed to study the relative effects and significance of chemical and isotopic fractionation that occurs as gas is released from core samples. Data accumulated can be evaluated to gain a better understanding of the origin, migration, and location of natural gas associated with the shales.

Bergstrom, R.E.; Shimp, N.F.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

INTERPRETATION REGARDING EXEMPTION RELIEF UNDER 10 C.F.R. PART 820, SUBPART E, EXEMPTION RELIEF, AND NON-COMPLIANT ‘DOCUMENTED SAFETY ANALYSES’ SUBJECT TO 10 C.F.R. PART 830, NUCLEAR SAFETY MANAGEMENT, SUBPART B, SAFETY BASIS REQUIREMENTS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The following document is the Office of General Counsel (GC) interpretation regarding exemption relief pursuant to 10 C.F.R. Part 820, Procedural Rules for DOE Nuclear Activities, Subpart E,...

418

Using Realistic MHD Simulations for Modeling and Interpretation of Quiet-Sun Observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The solar atmosphere is extremely dynamic, and many important phenomena develop on small scales that are unresolved in observations with the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) instrument on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). For correct calibration and interpretation, it is very important to investigate the effects of small-scale structures and dynamics on the HMI observables, such as Doppler shift, continuum intensity, spectral line depth, and width. We use 3D radiative hydrodynamics simulations of the upper turbulent convective layer and the atmosphere of the Sun, and a spectro-polarimetric radiative transfer code to study observational characteristics of the Fe I 6173A line observed by HMI in quiet-Sun regions. We use the modeling results to investigate the sensitivity of the line Doppler shift to plasma velocity, and also sensitivities of the line parameters to plasma temperature and density, and determine effective line formation heights for observations of solar regions located at different dista...

Kitiashvili, Irina N; Lagg, Andreas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Peircean Interpretation of Postmodern Architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

VIII.2.5 Case Study – Robert Venturi .......................................................... 316 VIII.2.6 Case Study – Mario Botta .............................................................. 337 VIII.3 Result of Case Study...: Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles .............................................. 308 Figure 13: Vanna Venturi House, Pennsylvania ........................................................... 317 Figure 14: Sainsbury Wing, National Galley Addition...

Takahashi, Iwao

2013-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

420

Modal Matters for Interpretability Logics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......flavor. In this introduction we shall informally describe the project of this paper. Formal definitions are postponed to later sections...confident that no confusion will arise from this. 4 We take the liberty to not make a distinction between a syntactical object and......

Evan Goris; Joost J. Joosten

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Interpreting atomic resolution spectroscopic images  

SciTech Connect

Core-loss electron energy loss spectroscopy is a powerful experimental tool providing information about electronic structure essential for understanding the properties of new and emerging materials. Here we show that the shape and width of spectroscopic images do not show a simple variation with binding energy, as commonly assumed. Rather they exhibit a complex dependence on the effective nonlocal scattering potential, and also on the dynamical channeling and absorption of the incident probe through the specimen. Consequently, in LaMnO$_3$, the low lying La N$_{4,5}$ edge at 99 eV can produce images of similar width to higher lying edges such as the O $K$ edge at 532 eV.

Oxley, Mark P [ORNL; Varela del Arco, Maria [ORNL; Pennycook, Timothy J [ORNL; van Benthem, Klaus [ORNL; Findlay, Scott D. [University of Melbourne, Australia; Allen, L. J. [University of Melbourne, Australia; Pennycook, Stephen J [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

SOIL TEST INTERPRETATIONS RECOMMENDATIONS HANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Buchholz Revised 5/2004 Contributors: James R. Brown Deanna K. Crocker John D. Garrett Roger G. Hanson John levels. Major contributors to this handbook include Daryl D. Buchholz, James R. Brown, Roger G. Hanson, Howell N. Wheaton, John D. Garrett, Robin R. Rodriguez,

Noble, James S.

423

SCHROTH INTERPRETIVE TRAIL DEMONSTRATION PRAIRIE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(SCULPTURE) KEY 3.0 mi/68 min 2.4 mi/53 min 2.2 mi/49 min 1.1 mi/25 min 2.1 mi/48 min 2.6 mi/59 min 0.8 mi/19 min Total 14.2 mi/5.5 hrs approximate distance/time HIKING TRAILS MAP Named one of the 7 Wonders

Frank, Thomas D.

424

Interpretation of Lagrangian drifter data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for environmental monitoring and satellite communications. Low-cost, expendable buoys of this configuration have been proposed for deploy- ment in large numbers as part of FGGE (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, 1973). The buoy illustrated in Fig. 5... for environmental monitoring and satellite communications. Low-cost, expendable buoys of this configuration have been proposed for deploy- ment in large numbers as part of FGGE (Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission, 1973). The buoy illustrated in Fig. 5...

Angell, Gordon Gilbert

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

425

Interpreting Biodiversity Margret C. Domroese  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Calvo, Betsy Carlson, James Connor, Myrtle Flowers, Kevin Frey, Joan Haley, Susan Jacobson, Sharon Katz, Peter Maille, Alison Ormsby, Dana Porfirio, Thérèse Ratodiarisoa, John Shores, and Michael Simsik

426

AGE DEPENDENCIES OF 90Sr INCORPORATION IN DENTAL TISSUES: COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS AND INTERPRETATION OF DIFFERENT KINDS OF MEASUREMENTS OBTAINED FOR RESIDENTS ON THE TECHA RIVER  

SciTech Connect

Human teeth have been considered as dosimeters for decades. Methods include the in vivo measurement of 90Sr/90Y in teeth with a tooth-beta counter (TBC), the radiochemical determination of 90Sr in whole teeth, and the measurement of dose in teeth by use of electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Presented in this paper are results of 2,514 TBC measurements, 334 radiochemical measurements, and 218 EPR measurements for residents living in settlements along the Techa River. All three kinds of measurements indicate a sharp peak that corresponds to the uptake of 90Sr by tooth tissue. The results can be interpreted in terms of an intake function for 90Sr only if the period of calcification of each individual tooth is considered?such detail on a tooth by tooth basis is presented in this paper. The conclusion is reached that the TBC data are the most reliable in terms of reconstruction of 90Sr intake; this is due in part to the fact that the TBC measures four teeth (all at position 1) with essentially the same time periods of mineralization and because there are a large number of TBC measurements. The main utility of EPR measurements is considered to be the validation of estimates of external dose; but for this purpose teeth with 90Sr taken up into enamel must be avoided.

Tolstykh, E I.; Shishkina, Elena A.; Degteva, M O.; Ivanov, Denis V.; Shved, Valentina A.; Bayankin, Sergey N.; Anspaugh, Lynn R.; Napier, Bruce A.; Wieser, Albrecht; Jacob, Peter

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

11 - 320 of 28,905 results. 11 - 320 of 28,905 results. Download CX-000316: Categorical Exclusion Determination Massachusetts Revision 1 - High Performance Buildings Program CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.22, B1.23, B1.31, B2.1, B2.3, B2.5, A1, A9, A11, B1.3, B1.4, B1.5, B1.7, B5.1 Date: 11/19/2009 Location(s): Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000316-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/analysis-and-geochemical-modeling-vanadium-contamination-groundwater

428

CLUMPING AND THE INTERPRETATION OF kpc-SCALE MAPS OF THE INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM: SMOOTH H I AND CLUMPY, VARIABLE H{sub 2} SURFACE DENSITY  

SciTech Connect

Many recent models consider the structure of individual interstellar medium (ISM) clouds as a way to explain observations of large parts of galaxies. To compare such models to observations, one must understand how to translate between surface densities observed averaging over large ({approx}kpc) scales and surface densities on the scale of individual clouds ({approx}pc scale), which are treated by models. We define a ''clumping factor'' that captures this translation as the ratio of the mass-weighted surface density, which is often the quantity of physical interest, to the area-weighted surface density, which is observed. We use high spatial resolution (sub-kpc) maps of CO and H I emission from nearby galaxies to measure the clumping factor of both atomic and molecular gas. The molecular and atomic ISM exhibit dramatically different degrees of clumping. As a result, the ratio H{sub 2}/H I measured at {approx}kpc resolution cannot be trivially interpreted as a cloud-scale ratio of surface densities. H I emission appears very smooth, with a clumping factor of only {approx}1.3. Based on the scarce and heterogeneous high-resolution data available, CO emission is far more clumped with a widely variable clumping factor, median {approx}7 for our heterogeneous data. Our measurements do not provide evidence for a universal mass-weighted surface density of molecular gas, but also cannot conclusively rule out such a scenario. We suggest that a more sophisticated treatment of molecular ISM structure, one informed by high spatial resolution CO maps, is needed to link cloud-scale models to kpc-scale observations of galaxies.

Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observtory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Lee, Cheoljong [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, 530 McCormick Road, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Schruba, Andreas [California Institute for Technology, 1200 E California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bolatto, Alberto [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Hughes, Annie; Sandstrom, Karin; Schinnerer, Eva; Walter, Fabian [Max Planck Institute fuer Astronomie, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Pety, Jerome [Institut de Radioastronomie Millimetrique, 300 Rue de la Piscine, F-38406 Saint Martin d'Heres (France)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

429

97PT20.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gallagher Research and Development Company Gallagher Research and Development Company Characterization of Shallow Hydrocarbon Reservoirs Using Surface Geochemical Methods Teapot Dome Field, Natrona County, Wyoming GRDC 1576 South Robb Way Lakewood, Colorado 80232 Telephone 303.986.2783 Fax 303.986.1593 Table of Contents Abstract (presented August 1997, AAPG Rocky Mtn. Section Meeting) Introduction Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 History General Geologic Setting NPR-3 Stratigraphy GRDC Study Area Reservoir Summaries * Shannon Sandstone * Steele Shale * Niobrara Shale * Second Wall Creek Geochemical Methods Results from the Standard Analysis Reservoir Characterization * Estimated API Gravity Interpretation * Estimated GOR Interpretation * Estimated Reservoir Rock Interpretation * Hydrocarbon Ratio Interpretation

430

Geochemical Society and the Mineralogical Society of America  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Society and the Mineralogical Society of America Society and the Mineralogical Society of America Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry (2006) Volume 63 Neutron Scattering in Earth Sciences Hans-Rudolf Wenk (Editor) (Click text for link. * Means no presentation available.) Short Course Presentations Chapter 1: Introduction to Neutron Properties and Applications. By John B. Parise *Chapter 2: Neutron Production, Neutron Facilities and Neutron Instrumentation. By Sven C. Vogel and Hans-Georg Priesmeyer Chapter 3: Single-Crystal Neutron Diffraction: Present and Future Applications. By Nancy L. Ross and Christina Hoffman Chapter 4: Neutron Rietveld Refinement. By Robert B. Von Dreele Chapter 5: Application of Neutron Powder-Diffraction to Mineral Structures. By Karsten Knorr and Wulf Depmeier

431

A geochemical, petrological, and geophysical case study of Caryn Seamount  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

changing bulk chemistry of oceanic islands with overall relative distances from mid-ocean ridges (Aumento, 1968; Chayes, 1972; Gass, 1972). 11 A number of genetic models have been proposed to account for the variation in oceanic basalt chemistry...

Drew, Fred Prescott

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

The Galapagos Plume from a primarily geochemical perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Galapagos Hotspot at c. 90 Ma? e.g. Duncan & Hargraves, 1984; Sinton et al., 1998; Hauff et al., 2000

Geist, Dennis

433

SURVEY OF GEOCHEMICAL SELF-PATTERNING PHENOMENA Enrique Merino  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11111osiIion;11 zoning can occur in intern~edicltev o l c a n i c rocks. S e l f - o r g a n i z a t i o

Polly, David

434

GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN  

SciTech Connect

This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

435

Hydrologic and Geochemical Monitoring in Long Valley Caldera...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal wells; flow rates of selected springs and stream sites; mean daily water or gas temperatures at selected sites; mean daily atmospheric pressures and water levels at...

436

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

but each river is characterized by a distinct chemical composition, implying large-scale spatial heterogeneity in the inputs of the various solutes. The data also display...

437

Microbiological and Geochemical Characterization of Fluvially Deposited Sulfidic Mine Tailings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Frank Rosenzweig for their review of and suggestions for improving...Inc. 1989. Field operations plan for Silver Bow Creek flood modeling...sulfate-reducing bacteria in soil and mining waste water environments by...hyporheic zone in a historic mining floodplain . Wielinga B. W...

Bruce Wielinga; Juliette K. Lucy; Johnnie N. Moore; October F. Seastone; James E. Gannon

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

ORIGINAL PAPER Evaluating sedimentary geochemical lake-level tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Walker Lake has been generated through analysis of total inorganic car- bon (TIC), total organic carbon (TOC), and oxy- gen and carbon isotope ratios (d18 O and d13 C) of both downcore bulk TIC and ostracods in %TIC, %TOC, and d13 C and d18 O of TIC and ostracods are all associated to varying degrees with changes

Linsley, Braddock K.

439

Effect of Subgrid Heterogeneity on Scaling Geochemical and Biogeochemi...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Case of U(VI) Desorption. Abstract: The effect of subgrid heterogeneity in sediment properties on the rate of uranylU(VI) desorption was investigated using a sediment...

440

Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

examined and chemically analyzed for trace elements by emission spectrographic and atomic absorption methods. Sixty-five samples were analyzed for major elements by X-ray...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Impacts of Geochemical Reactions on Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the face of increasing energy demands, geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) is a promising option to mitigate the adverse effects of climate change. To ensure the environmental sustainability of this option, we must understand the rates and mechanisms of ...

Young-Shin Jun; Daniel E. Giammar; Charles J. Werth

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

442

Microbiological and Geochemical Characterization of Fluvially Deposited Sulfidic Mine Tailings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...NO3 , and Mn(IV) are depleted. However, it has been...REFERENCES American Public Health Association Phenanthroline...microorganisms inhabiting uranium mill tailings. . Moore...Microbial diversity in uranium mine waste heaps...bacteria in the Nordic Uranium tailings deposit, Elliot...

Bruce Wielinga; Juliette K. Lucy; Johnnie N. Moore; October F. Seastone; James E. Gannon

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Geophysical and geochemical constraints on geoneutrino fluxes from Earth's mantle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Keywords: geoneutrinos Earth's heat budget bulk silicate Earth composition depleted mantle composition cooling of the Earth, and heat generated by decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes of uranium, thorium estimates of depleted mantle (DM), which is the source of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), vary by a similar

Zhong, Shijie

444

Geophysical and geochemical constraints on geoneutrino fluxes from Earth's mantle  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

budget bulk silicate Earth composition depleted mantle composition thermochemical mantle piles a b s t r cooling of the Earth, and heat generated by decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes of uranium, thorium estimates of depleted mantle (DM), which is the source of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), vary by a similar

Kite, Edwin

445

Microbiological and Geochemical Characterization of Fluvially Deposited Sulfidic Mine Tailings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...investigation final report/ground water and tailings investigation...been overlooked when remediation strategies for metal...geochemistry geomicrobiology ground water heavy metals heterogeneity...pollutants pollution remediation sediments Silver Bow...

Bruce Wielinga; Juliette K. Lucy; Johnnie N. Moore; October F. Seastone; James E. Gannon

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Awardee Website http:www.ormat.com Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0000109 DOE Funding Level (total award amount) 4,377,000.00 Awardee Cost Share 1,417,500.00...

447

Microbiological and Geochemical Characterization of Fluvially Deposited Sulfidic Mine Tailings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...stabilization warrants further investigation. The culture-based...environment. Further investigation is needed to determine...environment. Typical remedial technologies that...Silver Bow Creek remedial investigation final report/ground...

Bruce Wielinga; Juliette K. Lucy; Johnnie N. Moore; October F. Seastone; James E. Gannon

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Ecological and Geochemical Aspects of Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exploitation of nearby geothermal energy resources. Dixieexploitation of nearby geothermal energy resources. In Napachange (USFWS, 2009), geothermal energy development (BLM,

Forrest, Matthew James

449

GEOTECHNICAL/GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COAL PROCESS WASTE STREAMS  

SciTech Connect

Thirteen solid wastes, six coals and one unreacted sorbent produced from seven advanced coal utilization processes were characterized for task three of this project. The advanced processes from which samples were obtained included a gas-reburning sorbent injection process, a pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion process, a coal-reburning process, a SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, RO{sub x}, BOX process, an advanced flue desulfurization process, and an advanced coal cleaning process. The waste samples ranged from coarse materials, such as bottom ashes and spent bed materials, to fine materials such as fly ashes and cyclone ashes. Based on the results of the waste characterizations, an analysis of appropriate waste management practices for the advanced process wastes was done. The analysis indicated that using conventional waste management technology should be possible for disposal of all the advanced process wastes studied for task three. However, some wastes did possess properties that could present special problems for conventional waste management systems. Several task three wastes were self-hardening materials and one was self-heating. Self-hardening is caused by cementitious and pozzolanic reactions that occur when water is added to the waste. All of the self-hardening wastes setup slowly (in a matter of hours or days rather than minutes). Thus these wastes can still be handled with conventional management systems if care is taken not to allow them to setup in storage bins or transport vehicles. Waste self-heating is caused by the exothermic hydration of lime when the waste is mixed with conditioning water. If enough lime is present, the temperature of the waste will rise until steam is produced. It is recommended that self-heating wastes be conditioned in a controlled manner so that the heat will be safely dissipated before the material is transported to an ultimate disposal site. Waste utilization is important because an advanced process waste will not require ultimate disposal when it is put to use. Each task three waste was evaluated for utilization potential based on its physical properties, bulk chemical composition, and mineral composition. Only one of the thirteen materials studied might be suitable for use as a pozzolanic concrete additive. However, many wastes appeared to be suitable for other high-volume uses such as blasting grit, fine aggregate for asphalt concrete, road deicer, structural fill material, soil stabilization additives, waste stabilization additives, landfill cover material, and pavement base course construction.

Edwin S. Olson; Charles J. Moretti

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

The earliest Cambrian record of animals and ocean geochemical change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...South China: Me-Meishucun, Xi-Xiaotan, An-Anjiahe, Ji-Jijiapo...Cervato, C., and Yugan, Jin, 2006, A new U/Pb date for...1144/0016-76492005-126. Ping, Chen , 1984, [Discovery of...Aihua, Yang, and Yugan, Jin, 2005, U-Pb ages from the...

Adam C. Maloof; Susannah M. Porter; John L. Moore; Frank Ö. Dudás; Samuel A. Bowring; John A. Higgins; David A. Fike; Michael P. Eddy

451

3Geochemistry Published by AGU and the Geochemical Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

identified by a systematic grid of conductive heat flow measure- 15 ments. An array of conductive heat flow, conductive heat flow data indicate a general crossvalley fluid flow, where 18 seawater enters the shallow occurring within faults that surround the fluid discharge sites. These conductive 23 heat flow data

Johnson, H. Paul

452

A Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Robert O. Fournier, Theoderos Tesfai, Wendell A. Duffield, Michael A. Clynne, James G. Smith, Leake Woldegiorgis, Kidane Weldemariam and Gabreab Kahsai Published Journal...

453

Geochemical Data for 95 Thermal and Nonthermal Waters of the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in hydrology, structural geology, hydrothermal alterations, and hydrothermal solution chemistry. Authors Fraser E. Goff, Tamsin McCormick, Pat E. Trujillo Jr, Dale A. Counce and...

454

Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up to 87% of the individual element data variance is apparently controlled by the chemistry of the ejecta on which the relict encrustations are found. This matrix chemistry...

455

Geochemical Modeling of the Near-Surface Hydrothermal System...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in petrographic studies. Results of this study show that the mineralogy and fluid chemistry observed in the shallow reservoir at Long Valley caldera are formed in an open...

456

Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

insights into the possible contributions of geothermal systems to groundwater chemistry and development of mitigation strategies for attendant environmental issues....

457

Hydrologic and Geochemical Monitoring in Long Valley Caldera...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

causing earthquakes and crustal deformation. Differences since 1982 in fluid chemistry of springs has been minor except at Casa Diablo, where rapid fluctuations in...

458

Anthropogenic versus lithological influences on soil geochemical patterns in Cyprus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...studies on the trace element composition of the TOC geology or associated...agricultural areas but the use of other agrochemicals, such as soil enhancers, pesticides...drainage Asia bedrock chemical composition copper ores Cyprus cyprus-type...

David R. Cohen; Neil F. Rutherford; Eleni Morisseau; Irene Christoforou; Andreas M. Zissimos

459

Interpretation of data obtained from non-destructive and destructive post-test analyses of an intact-core column of culebra dolomite  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has been developing a nuclear waste disposal facility, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located approximately 42 km east of Carlsbad, New Mexico. The WIPP is designed to demonstrate the safe disposal of transuranic wastes produced by the defense nuclear-weapons program. Pefiormance assessment analyses (U.S. DOE, 1996) indicate that human intrusion by inadvertent and intermittent drilling for resources provide the only credible mechanisms for significant releases of radionuclides horn the disposal system. These releases may occur by five mechanisms: (1) cuttings, (2) cavings, (3) spallings, (4) direct brine releases, and (5) long- term brine releases. The first four mechanisms could result in immediate release of contaminant to the accessible environment. For the last mechanisq migration pathways through the permeable layers of rock above the Salado are important, and major emphasis is placed on the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation because this is the most transmissive geologic layer in the disposal system. For reasons of initial quantity, half-life, and specific radioactivity, certain isotopes of T~ U, Am, and Pu would dominate calculated releases from the WIPP. In order to help quantifi parameters for the calculated releases, radionuclide transport experiments have been carried out using five intact-core columns obtained from the Culebra dolomite member of the Rustler Formation within the Waste Isolation Pilot Pknt (WIPP) site in southeastern New Mexico. This report deals primarily with results of analyses for 241Pu and 241Am distributions developed during transport experiments in one of these cores. All intact-core column transport experiments were done using Culebra-simukmt brine relevant to the core recovery location (the WIPP air-intake shaft - AK). Hydraulic characteristics (i.e., apparent porosity and apparent dispersion coefficient) for intact-core columns were obtained via experiments using conservative tracer `Na. Elution experiments carried out over periods of a few days with tracers `2U and `?Np indicated that these tracers were weakly retarded as indicated by delayed elution of these species. Elution experiments with tracers 24% and 24*Arn were performed, but no elution of either species was observed in any flow experiment to date, including experiments of many months' duration. In order to quanti~ retardation of the non-eluted species 24*Pu and 241Arn afler a period of brine flow, non-destructive and destructive analyses of an intact-core column were carried out to determine distribution of these actinides in the rock. Analytical results indicate that the majority of the 241Am is present very near the top (injection) surface of the core (possibly as a precipitate), and that the majority of the 241Pu is dispersed with a very high apparent retardation value. The 24]Pu distribution is interpreted using a single-porosity advection-dispersion model, and an approximate retardation value is reported for this actinide. The specific radionuclide isotopes used in these experiments were chosen to facilitate analysis. Even though these isotopes are not necessarily the same as those that are most important to WIPP performance, they are isotopes of the same elements, and their chemical and transport properties are therefore identical to those of isotopes in the inventory.

Lucero, Daniel L.; Perkins, W. George

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

CX-009278: Categorical Exclusion Determination  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Measurement and Interpretation of Seismic Velocities and Attenuation in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.2, B3.6 Date: 09/07/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2012 7, 2012 CX-009279: Categorical Exclusion Determination Verification of Capillary Pressure Functions and Relative Permeability Equations for Modeling Gas CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/07/2012 Location(s): Michigan Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 7, 2012 CX-009278: Categorical Exclusion Determination Measurement and Interpretation of Seismic Velocities and Attenuation in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.2, B3.6 Date: 09/07/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 7, 2012 CX-009277: Categorical Exclusion Determination "Clean Start" - Development of a National Liquid Propane (Autogas) Refueling Network CX(s) Applied: B5.22 Date: 09/07/2012 Location(s): Illinois, Wisconsin Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory

462

Categorical Exclusion (CX) Determinations By Date | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2012 7, 2012 CX-009280: Categorical Exclusion Determination Subtask 7.1 - Management and Reporting CX(s) Applied: A1, A9, A11 Date: 09/07/2012 Location(s): North Dakota Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 7, 2012 CX-009279: Categorical Exclusion Determination Verification of Capillary Pressure Functions and Relative Permeability Equations for Modeling Gas CX(s) Applied: A9 Date: 09/07/2012 Location(s): Michigan Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 7, 2012 CX-009278: Categorical Exclusion Determination Measurement and Interpretation of Seismic Velocities and Attenuation in Hydrate-Bearing Sediments CX(s) Applied: A9, B2.2, B3.6 Date: 09/07/2012 Location(s): Colorado Offices(s): National Energy Technology Laboratory September 7, 2012

463

CX-003637: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

637: Categorical Exclusion Determination 637: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-003637: Categorical Exclusion Determination Establish, Maintain, and Monitor Long-Term Lysimeters CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 07/30/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office Establish a field location and install a 10-year field experiment to simulate and study the movement of radionuclides through an artificial vadose zone. The general objectives of the study are to: 1. Identify and quantify key long-term (10 year) radiological geochemical and transport phenomena under field vadose zone conditions. 2. Identify coupled (interacting) long-term processes that are not evident in short duration laboratory experiments. 3. Reduce uncertainty and improve technical justification for selection of geochemical conceptual models in various

464

CX-004453: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

453: Categorical Exclusion Determination 453: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-004453: Categorical Exclusion Determination Establish, Maintain, and Monitor Long-Term Lysimeters CX(s) Applied: B3.1 Date: 10/07/2010 Location(s): Aiken, South Carolina Office(s): Savannah River Operations Office Establish a field location and install a 10-year field experiment to simulate and study the movement of radionuclides through an artificial vadose zone. The general objectives of the study are to: 1. identify and quantify key long-term (10 year) radiological geochemical and transport phenomena under field vadose zone conditions. 2. identify coupled (interacting) long-term processes that are not evident in short duration laboratory experiments. 3. reduce uncertainty and improve technical justification for selection of geochemical conceptual models in various

465

Interpreting signals from astrophysical transient experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...either to observing high energies from space (e.g...differentiated the science discoveries at the shortest time...ultimate physical limits in energy and time to explosive...determine the properties of dark matter and dark energy. - Test the propagation...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Measurement and interpretation of plutonium spectra  

SciTech Connect

The atomic spectroscopic data available for plutonium are among the rickest of any in the periodic system. They include high-resolution grating and Fourier-transform spectra as well as extensive Zeeman and isotope-shift studies. We summarize the present status of the term analysis and cite the configurations that have been identified. A least-squares adjustment of a parametric Hamiltonian for configurations of both Pu I and Pu II has shown that almost all of the expected low levels are now known. The use of a model Hamiltonian applicable to both lanthanide and actinide atomic species has been applied to the low configurations of Pu I and Pu II making use of trends predicted by ab initio calculations. This same model has been used to describe the energy levels of Pu/sup 3 +/ in LaCl/sub 3/, and an extension has permitted preliminary calculations of the spectra of other valence states.

Blaise, J.; Fred, M.S.; Carnall, W.T.; Crosswhite, H.M.; Crosswhite, H.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

The Interpretation of Reflection-Seismographs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...excep- tion the fundamental requirement that...interior- wall of boiler-room. This...the buildings safe for operation and providing...amperes for normal operation. A Laon tube...0.1, the fundamental REPORTS AND PAPERS...

H. M. Rutherford

468

Automatic interpretation of loosely encoded input  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Knowledge-based systems are often brittle when given unanticipated input, i.e. assertions or queries that misalign with the ontology of the knowledge base. We call such misalignments ''loose speak''. We found that loose speak occurs frequently in interactions ... Keywords: Knowledge based systems, Metonymy, Noun compound, Question answering

James Fan; Ken Barker; Bruce Porter

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

On the interpretation of concealed questions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determiner phrases have the ability to act as "concealed questions" (CQs), embedded questions in sentences like John knows the time (i.e., John knows what time it is). The fact that know and wonder differ in their ability ...

Nathan, Lance Edward

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Interpreting Deep Structures of Information Systems Security  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......network, infrastructure and regulatory) of the organization...adopting stringent regulatory review of the security policies...present ways to deal with regulatory actions such as developing contingency plans (disaster recovery in......

Manoj Thomas; Gurpreet Dhillon

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Design and interpretation of cell trajectory assays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...delta, j delta). Simulations are performed in...by some external chemical signal [17...stochastic exclusion process model, allowing...biased exclusion process that has been described...from the discrete simulations are related to a...design. We use Matlab's LSQNONLIN routine...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Interpreting the M22 Spike Events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently Sahu et al., using the Hubble Space Telescope to monitor stars in the direction of the old globular cluster M22, detected six events in which otherwise constant stars brightened by ~50% during a time of 1 AU would have been ionized by random stellar encounters. Most unbound planets would have escaped the core via evaporation which preferentially affects such low-mass objects. Bound or free-floating planets can exist in the outer halo of M22; however, for reasonable assumptions, the maximum optical depth to such a population falls short of the observed optical depth, tau ~ 3x10^{-6}, by a factor of 5-10. Therefore, if real, these events represent the detection of a significant free-floating Galactic planet population. The optical depth to these planets is comparable to and mutually exclusive from the optical depth to resolved events measured by microlensing survey collaborations toward the bulge, and thus implies a similar additional mass of lensing objects. Such a population is difficult to reconcile with both theory and observations.

B. Scott Gaudi

2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

473

Human evolutionary genomics: ethical and interpretive issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Biomedical Ethics, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA, USA 4 Departments of Genetics and Biology, University Bottleneck: an event in the history of a population when the population size decreases sharply, resulting the population as competing variants are wiped out. Directional selection: a form of natural selection in which

474

Conservation, the search for an interpretive method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many historic zones within old cities of developing countries like India are vulnerable to pressures of growth and modernization. While the process of modernization brings in the economic resource to improve the environment, ...

Dutta, Partho

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Nucleon Form Factor Measurements and Interpretation  

SciTech Connect

The data base for the form factors of the nucleon obtained from elastic ep scattering is discussed, as well as some recent developments in their calculation.

Charles F. Perdrisat

2007-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

476

Interpretation der Polarisationsmessungen am polarisierten Wasserstofftarget  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1 Hyperfeinstrukturaufspaltung von Wasserstoff . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2.2 Die Atomstrahlquelle

477

ARM - Publications: Science Team Meeting Documents: Interpretation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University of New York at Stony Brook The CERESTRMM single satellite footprint (SSF) dataset, available for January 1998 to August 1998, provides not only radiometric data, but...

478

Chateaurenard field test recovery mechanisms and interpretation  

SciTech Connect

The Chateaurenard micellar/polymer field test was conducted between 1976 and 1980 in the south part of the Paris Bassin. Pilot design, operations and oil production results have already been presented. We present a detailled analysis of the effluents. It appears that surfactant, most of wich remained trapped in the reservoir, is associated with calcium in the oil when produced, as a result of sodium exchange with the calcium associated with the clay in the reservoir sand. Supporting phase studies and floods through sandpacks are presented to quantify this cation exchange and investigate its influence on oil recovery and phase trapping.

Bourdarot, G.; Putz, A.; Sardin, M.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

This is the fourth paper in a series on developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) as a logging tool for geothermal bore holes. Here we address methods of displaying...

480

Inductive Definitions, Semantics and Abstract Interpretation \\Lambda  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U is a set, ffl \\Phi is a set of rules instances P c where P ` U and c 2 U , ffl ? ` U is the basis

Cousot, Patrick

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical interpretation cxs" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Thermodynamical interpretation of gravity in braneworld scenarios  

SciTech Connect

We study the thermodynamical properties of the apparent horizon in the various braneworld scenarios. First, we show that the Friedmann equations can be written directly in the form of the first law of thermodynamics, dE = T{sub h}dS{sub h}+WdV, at apparent horizon on the brane, regardless of whether there is the intrinsic curvature term on the brane or a Gauss-Bonnet term in the bulk. This procedure leads to extract an entropy expression in terms of horizon geometry associated with the apparent horizon. Then, we examine the time evolution of the total entropy, including the derived entropy of the apparent horizon and the entropy of the matter fields inside the apparent horizon. We find that the derived entropy of the apparent horizon on the brane satisfies the generalized second law of thermodynamics in braneworld scenarios. These results further support the idea that gravitation on a macroscopic scale is a manifestation of thermodynamics.

Sheykhi, Ahmad, E-mail: sheykhi@mail.uk.ac.ir [Department of Physics, Shahid Bahonar University, P.O. Box 76175, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Shahid Bahonar University, P.O. Box 76175, Kerman (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

482

Interpretable Dimension Reduction HUGH A. CHIPMAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Lock, 1993), with 17 variables such as price, fuel economy, weight, engine size, etc. Variable names be an effective tool for reducing dimensionality in problems where many variables are measured. This is especially an average) of the variables, and consequently correspond to overall size. Subsequent directions may identify

Gu, Hong

483

Interpreting Alaminos : the cultural context of form  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents a methodology for transforming designs from their traditional context to a new, though continuous, form. In particular, this thesis examines the interactional role of holism - and its underlying ...

Larkin, Celine M

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Origin and palaeoenvironmental interpretation of sarsens  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... distinction can be made between those occurrences associated with weathering profiles (weathering profile sileretes, WPS), and those that are not (non-weathering profile sileretes, N- ... ), and those that are not (non-weathering profile sileretes, N-WPS). These differences in field occurrence are accompanied by contrasting chemical and micromorphological characteristics. ...

M. A. Summerfield

1979-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

485

Technology: Machine and its interpretation in architecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Utrecht (1923-4). 26. Le Corbusier, Dom-ino skeleton (1914-5) . . . . . . . . 4 1 . . . . . . 42 27. Le Corbusier, Citrohan House (1920). 28. Le Corbusier, Village at Pessac (1925) . 29. W. Gropius, Serial Houses (1921) . . . . . . . . . 43..., Utrecht (1923-4). 26. Le Corbusier, Dom-ino skeleton (1914-5) . . . . . . . . 4 1 . . . . . . 42 27. Le Corbusier, Citrohan House (1920). 28. Le Corbusier, Village at Pessac (1925) . 29. W. Gropius, Serial Houses (1921) . . . . . . . . . 43...

Kim, Ju Hong

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

486

Interpreting signals from astrophysical transient experiments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...gamma-ray detectors can survey large sky areas (thousands...time scales, optical surveys have tended to monitor...example, PTF, Panoramic Survey Telescope and Rapid Response...ultimate physical limits in energy and time to explosive...determine the properties of dark matter and dark energy...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Interpretation of data from a pulse reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and CP at these points are denoted by CB(M, K) and CP(M, J, K), respectively. M, K, snd J are integers. M denotes the Z? increments, K denotes the T ? increments, and J denotes the position in the interior of the catalyst pellet at a particular M and K...~It used during the course of study are tabulated in Tables I, 2, snd 3 following the programs. 37 C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C C PROGRAM SITES List of variables used in the program CB(M...

Desai, Nayneshkumar Shantilal

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

488

Evaluation and Interpretation of Saft Images  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the classical tasks of ultrasonic NDT is the detection, sizing and characterization of material damages like cracks of welded metallic structures. The characterization implies the defini- tion of types of ...

V. Schmitz; W. Müller

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Abstract N/A Author U.S. Department of Energy Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation Citation U.S. Department of Energy. Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and

490

A PROPELLER-EFFECT INTERPRETATION OF MAXI/GSC LIGHT CURVES OF 4U 1608-52 AND Aql X-1 AND APPLICATION TO XTE J1701-462  

SciTech Connect

We present the luminosity dwell-time distributions during the hard states of two low-mass X-ray binaries containing a neutron star (NS), 4U 1608-52 and Aql X-1, observed with MAXI/GSC. The luminosity distributions show a steep cutoff on the low-luminosity side at {approx}1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 36} erg s{sup -1} in both sources. The cutoff implies a rapid luminosity decrease in their outburst decay phases and this decrease can be interpreted as being due to the propeller effect. We estimate the surface magnetic field of 4U 1608-52 to be (0.5-1.6) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} G and Aql X-1 to be (0.6-1.9) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 8} G from the cutoff luminosity and apply the same propeller mechanism to the similar rapid luminosity decrease observed in the transient Z source, XTE J1701-462, with RXTE/ASM. Assuming that the spin period of the NS is on the order of milliseconds, the observed cutoff luminosity implies a surface magnetic field on the order of 10{sup 9} G.

Asai, K.; Matsuoka, M.; Mihara, T.; Sugizaki, M.; Serino, M. [MAXI Team, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Nakahira, S. [ISS Science Project Office, ISAS, JAXA, 2-1-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8505 (Japan); Negoro, H. [Department of Physics, Nihon University, 1-8-14 Kanda-Surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan); Ueda, Y. [Department of Astronomy, Kyoto University, Kitashirakawa, Oiwake-cho, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Yamaoka, K., E-mail: kazumi@crab.riken.jp [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshino-dai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

491

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume V S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect

Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (V), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4996 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

492

Deep Downhole Seismic Testing at the Waste Treatment Plant Site, Hanford, WA. Volume VI S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 Seismic Records, Wave-Arrival Identifications and Interpreted S-Wave Velocity Profile.  

SciTech Connect

Velocity measurements in shallow sediments from ground surface to approximately 370 to 400 feet bgs were collected by Redpath Geophysics using impulsive S- and P-wave seismic sources (Redpath 2007). Measurements below this depth within basalt and sedimentary interbeds were made by UTA between October and December 2006 using the T-Rex vibratory seismic source in each of the three boreholes. Results of these measurements including seismic records, wave-arrival identifications and interpreted velocity profiles are presented in the following six volumes: I. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 II. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 III. P-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 IV. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4993 V. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4996 VI. S-Wave Measurements in Borehole C4997 In this volume (VI), all S-wave measurements are presented that were performed in Borehole C4997 at the WTP with T-Rex as the seismic source and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) 3-D wireline geophone as the at-depth borehole receiver.

Stokoe, Kenneth H.; Li, Song Cheng; Cox, Brady R.; Menq, Farn-Yuh

2007-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

493

The Sun as an X-Ray Star. II. Using the Yohkoh/Soft X-Ray Telescope-derived Solar Emission Measure versus Temperature to Interpret Stellar X-Ray Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper is the second of a project dedicated to using solar Yohkoh/SXT data as a guide and a template to interpret data on stellar coronae. In the light of the large differences in scope and approach between solar and stellar studies, we have developed a method to translate Yohkoh/SXT data of the whole solar corona into stellar-like data, i.e., to put them in the same format and context as the stellar ones. First from the Yohkoh/SXT images we derive the whole-Sun X-ray emission measure versus temperature [EM(T)], in the range 105.5-108 K, during the specific observation. Then, we synthesize the solar X-ray spectrum; finally, we fold the spectrum through the instrumental response of nonsolar X-ray observatories, for instance, ROSAT/PSPC and ASCA/SIS. Finally, we analyze such solar coronal data in the same band and with the same methods used for stellar observations, allowing a direct and homogeneous comparison with them. In this paper we present in detail our method and, as an example of results, we show and discuss EM(T) and stellar-like spectra for three phases of the solar cycle: maximum, intermediate phase, and minimum. The total amount and the distribution of the emission measure change dramatically during the cycle, in particular at temperatures above 106 K. We also show the EM(T) of the whole solar corona during a large flare. The ROSAT/PSPC- and ASCA/SIS-like X-ray spectra of the Sun as a star that we obtain are discussed in the context of stellar coronal physics. The Sun's coronal total luminosity in the ROSAT/PSPC band ranges from ?2.7 ? 1026 ergs s-1 (at minimum) to ?4.7 ? 1027 ergs s-1 (at maximum). We discuss future developments and possible applications of our method.

G. Peres; S. Orlando; F. Reale; R. Rosner; H. Hudson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Development of Exploration Methods for Engineered Geothermal Systems Through Integrated Geophysical, Geologic and Geochemical Interpretation the Seismic Analysis Component Authors Ileana M. Tibuleac, Joe Iovenitti, David von Seggern, Jon Sainsbury, Glenn Biasi and John G. Anderson Conference Stanford Geothermal Conference; Stanford University; 2013 Published PROCEEDINGS, Thirty-Eighth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir Engineering Stanford University;, 2013 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org

495

Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A5 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A5 A5 Categorical Exclusion Determinations: A5 Existing Regulations A5: Interpretive rulemakings with no change in environmental effect Rulemakings interpreting or amending an existing rule or regulation that does not change the environmental effect of the rule or regulation being amended. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 2, 2013 CX-010755: Categorical Exclusion Determination Final Rule to Exempt 100 Watt R20 Short Incandescent Reflector Lamps from Energy Conversion Standards CX(s) Applied: A5 Date: 08/02/2013 Location(s): Nationwide Offices(s): Golden Field Office August 2, 2013 CX-010744: Categorical Exclusion Determination Final Rule to Exempt 100 Watt R20 Short Incandescent Reflector Lamps from Energy Conversion Standards CX(s) Applied: A5 Date: 08/02/2013

496

The function of interpretation as perceived by park visitors and interpreters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the National Park Service was studied by Clark (1949) and in state park systems by Weaver (1952). These writi ngs identify i nterpretati on and nature study as the same activity. Merriam (1972) used the term educat1on synonymously with interpretat1on 1n... to the resource. Due to the nature of the activity, settings of interpreation are often organizationally based, that is, occurring within an organizational jurisdiction, not alone. In this case, one park system was selected for sampling: Texas...

Silvy, Valeen Adams

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

497

USING RECENT ADVANCES IN 2D SEISMIC TECHNOLOGY AND SURFACE GEOCHEMISTRY TO ECONOMICALLY REDEVELOP A SHALLOW SHELF CARBONATE RESERVOIR: VERNON FIELD, ISABELLA COUNTRY, MI  

SciTech Connect

The principal objective of this demonstration project is to test surface geochemical techniques for detecting trace amounts of light hydrocarbons in pore gases as a means of reducing risk in hydrocarbon exploration and production. A major part of the remaining project will focus on using surface geochemistry to delineate prospects. A Niagaran reef field geochemical survey, the Bagley Prospect area in Otsego County, Michigan is scheduled to take place this summer. Previous wells drilled in Bagley Prospect area in the early 1970's and in place in late 2002 and early 2003 resulted in discoveries and numerous hydrocarbon shows in the Brown Niagaran reservoir interval. The Bagley region is still considered an area of interest by the industry and appears ripe for a geochemical survey. Our industry partner is interested in a possible test in the Bagley prospect because subsurface geophysical and geological interpretation indicates the presence of structures. Anomalous production and pressure data further suggest the region is not yet well understood and should not be considered mature. The most recent well, the Bagley 1-22A sidetrack, was unsuccessful at locating a new reef culmination to the south of the original vertical well and did not encounter hydrocarbon shows. The sidetrack and well were plugged and abandoned. The proposed geochemical survey will concentrate on areas away from the Bagley 1-22A to the north and west but will include the entire prospect so that the existing data can be used in interpretations. Bagley appears to offer a unique combination of potential and data for a geochemical study that focuses on looking for new oil in an area that has exhausted traditional geologic and geophysical methods. The Bear Lake pinnacle reef trend in Manistee County, Michigan, is also scheduled for further geochemical work this summer. Industry interest, mostly by small companies, is picking up in this area and it is also ripe for targeted geochemical surveys for the same reasons cited above.

James R. Wood; A. Wylie; W. Quinlan

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Reactivity of Organic Compounds in Hot Water: Geochemical and Technological Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...HIGH-TEMPERATURE HYDROLYSIS AND THERMOLYSIS OF TETRAHYDROTHIOPHENE IN RELATION TO STEAM STIMULATION...HIGH-TEMPERATURE HYDROLYSIS OF TETRAHYDROTHIOPHENE AND THIOPHENE, FUEL 63 : 125...3. REACTION OF THIOPHENE AND TETRAHYDROTHIOPHENE WITH VANADYL AND NICKEL SALTS...

MICHAEL SISKIN; ALAN R. KATRITZKY

1991-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

499

Geochemical study of boron isotopes in the process of loess weathering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the boron contents and boron isotopic composition of acid-soluble phases in loess and paleosol samples are determined for the first time. The boron contents of acid-soluble phases in the Luochuan...

Zhiqi Zhao; Congqiang Liu; Yingkai Xiao…

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

The geological and geochemical study of the mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect

Azerbaijan is a classic region for the study of mud volcanism. Of the 700 mud volcanoes known in the world, 220 are in Azerbaijan. These are of great interest, not least in relation to oil and gas exploration since they give information on subsurface sediments beyond the reach of drilling. Mud volcanoes are clearly visible on satellite images. They are confined to structural lineaments and associated fractures. Changes in the morphology of some mud volcanoes post-eruption can be detected from a series of images pre-dating and post-dating eruptions. Mud volcanoes are notable for gradients of temperature that are by an order of magnitude or a factor of 102 greater than the temperature gradients established elsewhere. The gases of mud volcanoes consist mainly of methane (95-100%). There are small amounts of C{sub 2-6}, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, He and Ar. The isotopic composition of carbon (ICC) within the methane varies from -61.29. to -35.W{close_quotes} which is isotopically heavier than the methane from producing fields. The ICC of the CO{sub 2} has a very wide range (from -49.6% to +23.1%), indicating several sources of its formation. The isotopically superheavy CO{sub 2} (+5%) is especially interesting. Oils from mud volcanoes are typically severely biodegraded. Their ICC ranges from -24.76% to -28.2%. A relationship between {partial_derivative}{sup l3}C of oils and ages of accumulations has been established. Waters of mud volcanoes are lightly mineralised, containing chiefly bicarbonates and sodium. The hydrogen composition of the water is abnormally heavy. Ejected rocks from mud volcanoes range in age from Cretaceous - Pliocene. Their study suggests that deeply buried reservoirs maintain good poroperm characteristics because of relatively little catagenesis.

Guliyev, I.A.; Aliyev, A.A.; Rahmanov, R.R. [Geological Institute of the Azerbaijan academy of sciences (GIA), Baku (Azerbaijan)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z