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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Details Activities (14) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Ground water sampling, desorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and a radiometric geophysical survey was conducted in conjunction with geological mapping at three geothermal prospects in northern Nevada. Orientation sample lines from 610 m (2000 ft.) to 4575 m (15,000 ft.) in length were surveyed at right angles to known and suspected faults. Scintillometer readings (gamma radiation - total counts / second) were also

2

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado

3

Evaluation of Groundwater Movement in the Frenchman Flat CAU Using Geochemical and Isotopic Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal pathway for radionuclide migration from underground tests in Frenchman Flat, on the Nevada Test Site, to the accessible environment is groundwater flow. Two potential pathways for radionuclide transport via groundwater have been identified from hydrologic data: (1) radionuclide transport downward from the alluvial and volcanic aquifers into the underlying carbonate aquifer; and (2) radionuclide transport laterally to the carbonate aquifer surrounding Frenchman Flat. This report presents an evaluation of geochemical and environmental isotopic data to test these potential pathways and to identify other groundwater flowpaths in, and out of, Frenchman Flat.

R. Hershey; J. Thomas; T. Rose; J. Paces; I. Farnham; C. Benedict, Jr.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

HBH-GEOCHEM-GEOPHY  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003015WKSTN00 Hiereachical Bayesian Model for Combining Geochemical and Geophysical Data for Environmental Applications Software   

5

Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics of sediment from a naturally reduced zone in a uranium Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics...

6

Geochemical characterization of karst groundwater in the cradle of humankind world heritage site, South Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The karst of the Cradle of Humankind World Heritage Site plays a major role ... model, indicating varying contributions of three identified end members (acid mine drainage, treated sewage ... , geochemical and sp...

M. Holland; K. T. Witthüser

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Related Techniques Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Data Analysis Geothermometry Gas Geothermometry Isotope Geothermometry Liquid Geothermometry Cation Geothermometers Multicomponent Geothermometers Silica Geothermometers Thermal Ion Dispersion

8

NUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In-Situ Leach Mining Facilities Manuscript Completed: December 2006 Date associated with uranium mining sites throughout the United States are also included in this report. A tableNUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical Issues in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In

9

Geochemical Data Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Data Analysis Geochemical Data Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Data Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Data Analysis: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geochemical_Data_Analysis&oldid=594157" Categories: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Techniques

10

Geochemical and isotopic variations in shallow groundwater in areas of the Fayetteville Shale development, north-central Arkansas q  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

similar to the brine in the Fayetteville Shale. Nonetheless, no spatial relationship was found between CH4. The integration of multiple geochemical and isoto- pic proxies shows no direct evidence of contamination

Jackson, Robert B.

11

Geochemical and isotopic results for groundwater, drainage waters, snowmelt, permafrost, precipitation in Barrow, Alaska (USA) 2012-2013  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

Data include a large suite of analytes (geochemical and isotopic) for samples collected in Barrow, Alaska (2012-2013). Sample types are indicated, and include soil pore waters, drainage waters, snowmelt, precipitation, and permafrost samples.

Wilson, Cathy; Newman, Brent; Heikoop, Jeff

12

The relationship of the Yucca Mountain repository block to the regional ground-water system: A geochemical model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Yucca Mountain, in southern Nevada, is being studied by the Department of Energy and the State of Nevada as the site of a high-level nuclear waste repository. Geochemical and isotopic modeling were used in this study to define the relationship of the volcanic tuff aquifers and aquitards to the underlying regional carbonate ground-water system. The chemical evolution of a ground water as it passes through a hypothetical tuffaceous aquifer was developed using computer models PHREEQE, WATEQDR and BALANCE. The tuffaceous system was divided into five parts, with specific mineralogies, reaction steps and temperatures. The initial solution was an analysis of a soil water from Rainier Mesa. The ending solution in each part became the initial solution in the next part. Minerals consisted of zeolites, smectites, authigenic feldspars and quartz polymorphs from described diagentic mineral zones. Reaction steps were ion exchange with zeolites. The solution from the final zone, Part V, was chosen as most representative, in terms of pH, element molalities and mineral solubilities, of tuffaceous water. This hypothetical volcanic water from Part V was mixed with water from the regional carbonate aquifer, and the results compared to analyses of Yucca Mountain wells. Mixing and modeling attempts were conducted on wells in which studies indicated upward flow.

Matuska, N.A.; Hess, J.W. [Nevada Univ., Reno, NV (United States). Water Resources Center

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Evapotranspiration And Geochemical Controls On Groundwater Plumes At Arid Sites: Toward Innovative Alternate End-States For Uranium Processing And Tailings Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Management of legacy tailings/waste and groundwater contamination are ongoing at the former uranium milling site in Tuba City AZ. The tailings have been consolidated and effectively isolated using an engineered cover system. For the existing groundwater plume, a system of recovery wells extracts contaminated groundwater for treatment using an advanced distillation process. The ten years of pump and treat (P&T) operations have had minimal impact on the contaminant plume – primarily due to geochemical and hydrological limits. A flow net analysis demonstrates that groundwater contamination beneath the former processing site flows in the uppermost portion of the aquifer and exits the groundwater as the plume transits into and beneath a lower terrace in the landscape. The evaluation indicates that contaminated water will not reach Moenkopi Wash, a locally important stream. Instead, shallow groundwater in arid settings such as Tuba City is transferred into the vadose zone and atmosphere via evaporation, transpiration and diffuse seepage. The dissolved constituents are projected to precipitate and accumulate as minerals such as calcite and gypsum in the deep vadose zone (near the capillary fringe), around the roots of phreatophyte plants, and near seeps. The natural hydrologic and geochemical controls common in arid environments such as Tuba City work together to limit the size of the groundwater plume, to naturally attenuate and detoxify groundwater contaminants, and to reduce risks to humans, livestock and the environment. The technical evaluation supports an alternative beneficial reuse (“brownfield”) scenario for Tuba City. This alternative approach would have low risks, similar to the current P&T scenario, but would eliminate the energy and expense associated with the active treatment and convert the former uranium processing site into a resource for future employment of local citizens and ongoing benefit to the Native American Nations.

Looney, Brian B.; Denham, Miles E.; Eddy-Dilek, Carol A.; Millings, Margaret R.; Kautsky, Mark

2014-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

14

Environmental isotope and geochemical investigation of groundwater in Big Bend National Park, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Panther Junction and Rio Grande Village Areas of Big Bend National Park, Texas. The regional groundwater flow in the Panther Junction area is interpreted to occur in a radially outward direction away from the Chisos Mountain slopes. This interpretation... s Physiographic Setting Panther Junction Area. Rio Grande Village Area. Climate and Vegetation. Previous Work Geology. Hydrogeology 1 3 3 6 6 6 7 8 8 9 GEOLOGY. Regional Geology. Geology of the Panther Junction Geologv of the Rio Grande Village...

Lopez Sepulveda, Hector Javier

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

15

Category:Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geochemical Techniques page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geochemical Techniques Add.png Add a new Geochemical Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. G [×] Geochemical Data Analysis‎ 3 pages Pages in category "Geochemical Techniques" This category contains only the following page. G Geochemical Data Analysis Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Geochemical_Techniques&oldid=689823"

16

GIS Regional Spatial Data from the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy: Geochemical, Geodesic, Geologic, Geophysical, Geothermal, and Groundwater Data  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy, part of the University of Nevada, Reno, conducts research towards the establishment of geothermal energy as an economically viable energy source within the Great Basin. The Center specializes in collecting and synthesizing geologic, geochemical, geodetic, geophysical, and tectonic data, and using Geographic Information System (GIS) technology to view and analyze this data and to produce favorability maps of geothermal potential. The center also makes its collections of spatial data available for direct download to the public. Data are in Lambert Conformable Conic Projection.

17

Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce...

18

Computed solid phases limiting the concentration of dissolved constituents in basalt aquifers of the Columbia Plateau in eastern Washington. Geochemical modeling and nuclide/rock/groundwater interaction studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A speciation-solubility geochemical model, WATEQ2, was used to analyze geographically-diverse, ground-water samples from the aquifers of the Columbia Plateau basalts in eastern Washington. The ground-water samples compute to be at equilibrium with calcite, which provides both a solubility control for dissolved calcium and a pH buffer. Amorphic ferric hydroxide, Fe(OH)/sub 3/(A), is at saturation or modestly oversaturated in the few water samples with measured redox potentials. Most of the ground-water samples compute to be at equilibrium with amorphic silica (glass) and wairakite, a zeolite, and are saturated to oversaturated with respect to allophane, an amorphic aluminosilicate. The water samples are saturated to undersaturated with halloysite, a clay, and are variably oversaturated with regard to other secondary clay minerals. Equilibrium between the ground water and amorphic silica presumably results from the dissolution of the glassy matrix of the basalt. The oversaturation of the clay minerals other than halloysite indicates that their rate of formation lags the dissolution rate of the basaltic glass. The modeling results indicate that metastable amorphic solids limit the concentration of dissolved silicon and suggest the same possibility for aluminum and iron, and that the processes of dissolution of basaltic glass and formation of metastable secondary minerals are continuing even though the basalts are of Miocene age. The computed solubility relations are found to agree with the known assemblages of alteration minerals in the basalt fractures and vesicles. Because the chemical reactivity of the bedrock will influence the transport of solutes in ground water, the observed solubility equilibria are important factors with regard to chemical-retention processes associated with the possible migration of nuclear waste stored in the earth's crust.

Deutsch, W.J.; Jenne, E.A.; Krupka, K.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Geothermal/Geochemical Database | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Chart: GeothermalGeochemical DatabaseInfo GraphicMapChart Author Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published...

20

Hanford 100-N Area In Situ Apatite and Phosphate Emplacement by Groundwater and Jet Injection: Geochemical and Physical Core Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to evaluate emplacement of phosphate into subsurface sediments in the Hanford Site 100-N Area by two different technologies: groundwater injection of a Ca-citrate-PO4 solution and water-jet injection of sodium phosphate and/or fish-bone apatite. In situ emplacement of phosphate and apatite adsorbs, then incorporates Sr-90 into the apatite structure by substitution for calcium. Overall, both technologies (groundwater injection of Ca-citrate-PO4) and water-jet injection of sodium phosphate/fish-bone apatite) delivered sufficient phosphate to subsur¬face sediments in the 100-N Area. Over years to decades, additional Sr-90 will incorporate into the apatite precipitate. Therefore, high pressure water jetting is a viable technology to emplace phosphate or apatite in shallow subsurface sediments difficult to emplace by Ca-citrate-PO4 groundwater injections, but further analysis is needed to quantify the relevant areal extent of phosphate deposition (in the 5- to 15-ft distance from injection points) and cause of the high deposition in finer grained sediments.

Szecsody, James E.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Williams, Mark D.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Phillips, Jerry L.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geochemical engineering problem identification and program description. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Geochemical Engineering Program has as its goal the improvement of geochemical fluid management techniques. This document presents the strategy and status of the Geochemical Engineering Program. The magnitude and scope of geochemical-related problems constraining geothermal industry productivity are described. The goals and objectives of the DGE Geochemical Engineering Program are defined. The rationale and strategy of the program are described. The structure, priorities, funding, and management of specific elements within the program are delineated, and the status of the overall program is presented.

Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Geochemical challenge to earthquake prediction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...indicate that the anomalous radon change before the 1978...nonappearance of coseismic radon drops at the KSM (Kashima...as a trigger for the project in Japan and the United...plated. In 1973, the International Symposium on Earthquake...Uzbekistan, and changes in radon concentration in groundwater...

H Wakita

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Experimental Geochemical Studies Relevant to Carbon Sequestration  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geochemical Studies Relevant to Geochemical Studies Relevant to Carbon Sequestration James G. Blencoe (blencoejg@ornl.gov; 865-574-7041) David R. Cole (coledr@ornl.gov; 865-574-5473) Juske Horita (horitaj@ornl.gov; 865-576-2750) Geochemistry Group Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Building 4500-S Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6110 Gerilynn R. Moline (molinegr@ornl.gov; 865-576-5134) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Building 1505 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6038 Introduction Evidence is mounting that rising levels of atmospheric CO 2 will have profound effects on future global climates (1-2) . Consequently, many experts agree that technologies are needed to slow, and ultimately stop, further buildup (3-5) . One of the strategies proposed to achieve this aim

24

Category:Geochemical Data Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Geochemical Data Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geochemical Data Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geochemical Data Analysis Add.png Add a new Geochemical Data Analysis Technique Pages in category "Geochemical Data Analysis" The following 3 pages are in this category, out of 3 total. G Geothermometry T Thermal Ion Dispersion Thermochronometry Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Geochemical_Data_Analysis&oldid=689825"

25

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Abstract This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales,rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples fromwhich the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. Thesedata provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermalenergy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in thisregion. Authors Los Alamos National Laboratory and NM Published

26

Geochemical and Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment of Vadose Zone Sediments for Uranium Remediation. Geochemical and Geophysical Changes during Ammonia Gas Treatment of Vadose Zone...

27

Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Patrick Walsh Ormat Nevada Inc. Innovative technologies May 19, 2010...

28

Exploring Frontiers in Kinetics and Mechanisms of Geochemical Processes at the Mineral/Water Interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exploring Frontiers in Kinetics and Mechanisms of Geochemical Processes at the Mineral in the Earth's Critical Zone is the kinetics. The timescales for geochemical processes range from milliseconds geochemical processes including surface complexation, mineral transformations, and oxidation

Sparks, Donald L.

29

Geochemical factors affecting radionuclide transport through near and far fields at a Low-Level Waste Disposal Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concentration of low-level waste (LLW) contaminants in groundwater is determined by the amount of contaminant present in the solid waste, rate of release from the waste and surrounding barriers, and a number of geochemical processes including adsorption, desorption, diffusion, precipitation, and dissolution. To accurately predict radionuclide transport through the subsurface, it is essential that the important geochemical processes affecting radionuclide transport be identified and, perhaps more importantly, accurately quantified and described in a mathematically defensible manner.

Kaplan, D.I.; Seme, R.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Piepkho, M.G. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Abstract There are 1000 thermal springs in Nevada for which a location is known, but for which there are no available temperature (or chemical) measurements. Although many of these sites are within known geothermal areas and are located near springs for which temperature and/or geochemical data are available for one of the springs, many of these sites are not so located and require evaluation before the geothermal potential of the area can be assessed. In order to begin filling in data gaps, water sampling commenced in 2002 when over 70 analyses were obtained from springs with previously

31

Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Factor and canonical correlation analysis of geochemical data from eight fossil fumaroles suggest that six major factors controlled the formation and evolution of fumarolic encrustations on the 1912 ash-flow sheet in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS). The six-factor solution model explains a large proportion (low of 74% for Ni to high of 99% for Si) of the individual element data variance. Although the primary fumarolic

32

A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La...

33

A Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal System, Danakil Depression, Eritrea Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal System, Danakil Depression, Eritrea Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermalsystem underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea Alid is avery late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widelyover an area of ~10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an activehydrothermal system underlies much of that part of

34

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Hg contents of soils in geothermal areas in the western U.S. were measured and a three-fold distribution was observed: peak, aureole and background. Peak values (up to several 100 ppm Hg) occur in fumaroles of vapour-dominated systems, around hot springs, and in zones overlying steeply dipping, hot-water aquifers. Aureoic values (up to several 100 ppb Hg) are found in zones surrounding the peak areas and delineate areas with shallow geothermal convection. Background values vary between 7 and 40 ppb

35

A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Results of exploration drilling combined with results of geologic, geophysical, and hydrogeochemical investigations have been used to construct a geochemical model of the Platanares geothermal system, Honduras. Three coreholes were drilled, two of which produced fluids from fractured Miocene andesite and altered Cretaceous to Eocene conglomerate at

36

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fumarole discharges (95-560°C) collected from the dacite dome inside Mount St. Helens crater show temporal changes in their isotopic and chemical compositions. A ΔD vs. Δ18O plot shows that condensed waters from the gases are mixtures of meteoric and magmatic components, but that the apparent magmatic end-member in 1994 was depleted by about 7‰ in ΔD relative to the apparent end-member in 1980. Based on ΔD modeling, approximately 63% of shallow, post-1980 magma has yet to degas.

37

Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Eastern California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Eastern California Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Banded, epithermal quartz-adularia veins have produced about 1.5 million ounces of gold and 7 million ounces of silver from the Bodie mining district, eastern California. The veins cut dacitic lava flows, pyroclastic rocks and intrusions. Sinter boulders occur in a graben structure at the top of Bodie Bluff and fragments of sinter and mineralized quartz veins occur in hydrothermal breccias nearby. Explosive venting evidently was part of the evolution of the ore-forming geothermal systems which, at one time,

38

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute Fluxes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute Fluxes Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We present and analyze a chemical dataset that includes the concentrations and fluxes of HCO3-, SO42-, Cl-, and F- in the major rivers draining Yellowstone National Park (YNP) for the 2002-2004 water years (1 October 2001 - 30 September 2004). The total (molar) flux in all rivers decreases in the following order, HCO3- > Cl- > SO42- > F-, but each river is characterized by a distinct chemical composition, implying large-scale

39

A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Sierra La Primavera, a late Pleistocene rhyolitic caldera complex in Jalisco, Mexico, contains fumaroles and large-discharge 65°C hot springs that are associated with faults related to caldera collapse and to later magma insurgence. The nearly-neutral, sodium bicarbonate, hot springs occur at low elevations at the margins of the complex, whereas the water-rich fumaroles are high and central. The Comision Federal de Electricidad de Mexico (CFE) has recently drilled two deep holes at the

40

Crustal melting in the Himalayan orogen : field, geochemical and geochronological studies in the Everest region, Nepal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A combination of field studies and geochemical techniques were used to investigate the timing and processes involved in leucogranite generation in the Everest region of the Himalayan orogen. Geochemical investigations ...

Viskupic, Karen M. (Karen Marie), 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Geochemical Modeling of ILAW Lysimeter Water Extracts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemical modeling results of water extracts from simulated immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW) glasses, placed in lysimeters for eight years suggest that the secondary phase reaction network developed using product consistency test (PCT) results at 90°C may need to be modified for field conditions. For sediment samples that had been collected from near the glass samples, the impact of glass corrosion could be readily observed based upon the pH of their water extracts. For unimpacted sediments the pH ranged from 7.88 to 8.11 with an average of 8.04. Sediments that had observable impacts from glass corrosion exhibited elevated pH values (as high as 9.97). For lysimeter sediment samples that appear to have been impacted by glass corrosion to the greatest extent, saturation indices determined for analcime, calcite, and chalcedony in the 1:1 water extracts were near equilibrium and were consistent with the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. Fe(OH)3(s) also appears to be essentially at equilibrium in extracts impacted by glass corrosion, but with a solubility product (log Ksp) that is approximately 2.13 units lower than that used in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The solubilities of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) also appear to be much lower than that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C. The extent that the solubility of TiO2(am) and ZrO2(am) were reduced relative to that assumed in the secondary phase reaction network developed using PCT results at 90°C could not be quantified because the concentrations of Ti and Zr in the extracts were below the estimated quantification limit. Gibbsite was consistently highly oversaturated in the extract while dawsonite was at or near equilibrium. This suggests that dawsonite might be a more suitable phase for the secondary phase reaction network than gibbsite under field conditions. This may be due to the availability of carbonate that exists in the Hanford sediments as calcite. A significant source of carbonate was not available in the PCTs and this may account for why this phase did not appear in the PCTs. Sepiolite was consistently highly undersaturated, suggesting that another phase controls the solubility of magnesium. For samples that were most impacted by the effects of glass corrosion, magnesite appears to control glass corrosion. For samples that show less impacts from glass corrosion, clinochlore-7A or saponite-Mg appears to control the magnesium concentrations. For zinc, it appears that zincite is a better candidate than Zn(OH)2-? for controlling zinc concentrations in the extracts; however, in some samples all zinc phases considered were highly oversaturated. As a result the phase that controls zinc concentrations in the lysimeter extracts remains uncertain.

Cantrell, Kirk J.

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

42

Geochemical Data on Waters, gases, scales, and rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales, rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples from which the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. These data provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermal energy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in this region.

Goff, Fraser; Bergfeld, Deborah; Janik, C.J.; et al

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

U.S. Geological Survey National Produced Waters Geochemical Database v2.0 (PROVISIONAL)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Geological Survey National Produced Waters Geochemical Database v2.0 (PROVISIONAL (USGS) National Produced Waters Geochemical Database v2.0 are provisional and subject to revision Produced Waters Geochemical Database v2.0 should be used with careful consideration of its limitations

Torgersen, Christian

44

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This program will combine detailed gravity, high resolution aeromagnetic, and LIDAR data, all of which will be combined for structural modeling, with hyperspectral data, which will identify and map specific minerals and mineral assemblages that may point to upflow zones. The collection of these surveys and analyses of the merged data and model will be used to site deeper slim holes. Slim holes will be flow tested to determine whether or not Ormat can move forward with developing this resource. An innovative combination of geophysical and geochemical tools will significantly reduce risk in exploring this area, and the results will help to evaluate the value of these tools independently and in combination when exploring for blind resources where structure, permeability, and temperature are the most pressing questions. The slim holes will allow testing of models and validation of methods, and the surveys within the wellbores will be used to revise the models and site production wells if their drilling is warranted.

45

NMR of Layered Silicates in Argonne Coals and Geochemical Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

NMR of Layered Silicates in Argonne Coals and Geochemical Implications ... Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 ... High-resolution 27Al and 29Si NMR were employed to characterize layered silicates in the suite of eight Argonne Premium coals. ...

A. R. Thompson; R. E. Botto

2000-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

46

Geophysical Monitoring of Coupled Microbial and Geochemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Bonn, 53115 Bonn, Germany, Department of Environmental Science, Policy and Management with measurement frequency (0.125and1Hz)andwasdependentuponthedominantmetabolic process. The spectral effect Groundwater contamination by industrial sources and nuclear weapons programs has promoted research

Hubbard, Susan

47

Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters Abstract The alkali carbonates, Na, K, and Li, are relatively soluble at all temperatures and generally precipitate only where there is extreme evapora- tion. In contrast, the alkaline earth carbonates. Ca. Ht, Sr, and Ba, are moderately to sparingly soluble and commonly precipitate in bydrothecmal systems. Calcite is by far the most abundant and important carbonate found

48

Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The results to date of chemical modeling of the Raft River KGRA are presented. Earlier work indicated a northwest-southeast anomaly in the contours. Modeling techniques applied to more complete data allowed further definition of the anomaly. Models described in this report show the source of various minerals in the geothermal water. There appears to be a regional heat source that gives rise to uniform conductive heat flow in the region, but convective flow is concentrated near the upwelling in the Crook well

49

Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The objective of this ongoing project is the development of a representative geochemical database for a comprehensive range of elemental and isotopic parameters (i.e., beyond the typical data suite) for a range of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Development of this database is one of the first steps in understanding the nature of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Of particular importance in the Great Basin is utilizing

50

Version 4. 00 of the MINTEQ geochemical code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MINTEQ code is a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate solution equilibria for geochemical applications. Included in the MINTEQ code are formulations for ionic speciation, ion exchange, adsorption, solubility, redox, gas-phase equilibria, and the dissolution of finite amounts of specified solids. Since the initial development of the MINTEQ geochemical code, a number of undocumented versions of the source code and data files have come into use at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report documents these changes, describes source code modifications made for the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) program, and provides comprehensive listings of the data files. A version number of 4.00 has been assigned to the MINTEQ source code and the individual data files described in this report.

Eary, L.E.; Jenne, E.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Version 4.00 of the MINTEQ geochemical code  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MINTEQ code is a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate solution equilibria for geochemical applications. Included in the MINTEQ code are formulations for ionic speciation, ion exchange, adsorption, solubility, redox, gas-phase equilibria, and the dissolution of finite amounts of specified solids. Since the initial development of the MINTEQ geochemical code, a number of undocumented versions of the source code and data files have come into use at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report documents these changes, describes source code modifications made for the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) program, and provides comprehensive listings of the data files. A version number of 4.00 has been assigned to the MINTEQ source code and the individual data files described in this report.

Eary, L.E.; Jenne, E.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Asphaltenes as indicators of the geochemical history of oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method of decomposition of native asphaltenes from naphthenic oils is proposed as a source of information on the geochemical history of the oils. It is demonstrated that formation of naphthenic oils occurs in nature through biodegradation of primary paraffinic oils. The relative abundances of structural groups and individual saturated hydrocarbons obtained from the asphaltenes in naphthenic oils is similar to the relative abundance of hydrocarbons in paraffinic oils, which are their genetic precursors. (JMT)

Aref'yev, O.A.; Makushina, V.M.; Petrov, A.A.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Argonne Geothermal Geochemical Database v2.0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A database of geochemical data from potential geothermal sources aggregated from multiple sources as of March 2010. The database contains fields for the location, depth, temperature, pH, total dissolved solids concentration, chemical composition, and date of sampling. A separate tab contains data on non-condensible gas compositions. The database contains records for over 50,000 wells, although many entries are incomplete. Current versions of source documentation are listed in the dataset.

Christopher Harto

2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

54

A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Abstract N/A Author Donald Thomas Published Journal US Geological Survey Professional Paper 1350, 1987 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Citation Donald Thomas. 1987. A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone. US Geological Survey Professional Paper 1350. (!) . Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_geochemical_model_of_the_Kilauea_east_rift_zone&oldid=682589" Categories: Missing Required Information References Uncited References Geothermal References

55

INEEL Subregional Conceptual Model Report Volume 2: Summary of Existing Knowledge of Geochemical Influences on the Fate and Transport of Contaminants in the Subsurface at the INEEL  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes previous descriptions of geochemical system conceptual models for the vadose zone and groundwater zone (aquifer) beneath the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The primary focus is on groundwater because contaminants derived from wastes disposed at INEEL are present in groundwater, groundwater provides a pathway for potential migration to receptors, and because geochemical characteristics in and processes in the aquifer can substantially affect the movement, attenuation, and toxicity of contaminants. The secondary emphasis is perched water bodies in the vadose zone. Perched water eventually reaches the regional groundwater system, and thus processes that affect contaminants in the perched water bodies are important relative to the migration of contaminants into groundwater. Similarly, processes that affect solutes during transport from nearsurface disposal facilities downward through the vadose zone to the aquifer are relevant. Sediments in the vadose zone can affect both water and solute transport by restricting the downward migration of water sufficiently that a perched water body forms, and by retarding solute migration via ion exchange. Geochemical conceptual models have been prepared by a variety of researchers for different purposes. They have been published in documents prepared by INEEL contractors, the United States Geological Survey (USGS), academic researchers, and others. The documents themselves are INEEL and USGS reports, and articles in technical journals. The documents reviewed were selected from citation lists generated by searching the INEEL Technical Library, the INEEL Environmental Restoration Optical Imaging System, and the ISI Web of Science databases. The citation lists were generated using the keywords ground water, groundwater, chemistry, geochemistry, contaminant, INEL, INEEL, and Idaho. In addition, a list of USGS documents that pertain to the INEEL was obtained and manually searched. The documents that appeared to be the most pertinent were selected from further review. These documents are tabulated in the citation list. This report summarizes existing geochemical conceptual models, but does not attempt to generate a new conceptual model or select the ''right'' model. This document is organized as follows. Geochemical models are described in general in Section 2. Geochemical processes that control the transport and fate of contaminants introduced into groundwater are described in Section 3. The natural geochemistry of the Eastern Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) is described in Section 4. The effect of waste disposal on the INEEL subsurface is described in Section 5. The geochemical behavior of the major contaminants is described in Section 6. Section 7 describes the site-specific geochemical models developed for various INEEL facilities.

Paul L. Wichlacz; Robert C. Starr; Brennon Orr

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Optimizing parameters for predicting the geochemical behavior and performance of discrete fracture networks in geothermal systems  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Optimizing parameters for predicting the geochemical behavior and performance of discrete fracture networks in geothermal systems presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

57

Novel Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical Investigation of Blind Geothermal Resources in Fault-Controlled Dilational Corners  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Novel Coupled Thermochronometric and Geochemical Investigation of Blind Geothermal Resources in Fault-Controlled Dilational Corners presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

58

Improved Geothermometry Through Multivariate Reaction Path Modeling and Evaluation of Geomicrobiological Influences on Geochemical Temperature Indicators  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Improved Geothermometry Through Multivariate Reaction Path Modeling and Evaluation of Geomicrobiological Influences on Geochemical Temperature Indicators presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

59

Advective diffusive/dispersive transport in geochemical processes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comprehensive understanding of chemical transport in response to fluid flow and diffusion in geologic processes requires thermodynamic and transport properties of a wide variety of aqueous species at the temperature and pressure of interest, as well as mass transfer computer codes that provide simultaneously for fluid flow, diffusion, dispersion, homogeneous chemical reactions, and mineral solubilities. As a result of research carried out with support from DOE in prior years of this grant, considerable progress has been made in developing computer codes to calculate advective-dispersive-diffusional transport at both high and low pressures and temperatures. These codes have become highly sophisticated, but their application to geochemical processes is limited by the availability of thermodynamic and transport data for the major solute species in the aqueous phase. Over the past three years, research has been directed primarily toward characterizing the thermodynamic behavior of concentrated supercritical aqueous electrolyte solutions and predicting the diffusion coefficients of organic species in oil field brines. Related research has been concerned with characterizing the growth rate of hydrothermal alteration zones and assessing the relative importance of aqueous diffusion and heterogeneous reactions at mineral surfaces in geochemical processes. 103 refs., 12 figs.

Helgeson, H.C.

1991-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

60

Surface and Subsurface Geochemical Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Surface and Subsurface Geochemical Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil C. Magnier1, V Monitoring of an EOR-CO2 Field: Buracica, Brazil -- This paper presents a surface and subsurface geochemical survey of the Buracica EOR-CO2 field onshore Brazil. We adopted a methodology coupling the stable

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

WATEQ3 geochemical model: thermodynamic data for several additional solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemical models such as WATEQ3 can be used to model the concentrations of water-soluble pollutants that may result from the disposal of nuclear waste and retorted oil shale. However, for a model to competently deal with these water-soluble pollutants, an adequate thermodynamic data base must be provided that includes elements identified as important in modeling these pollutants. To this end, several minerals and related solid phases were identified that were absent from the thermodynamic data base of WATEQ3. In this study, the thermodynamic data for the identified solids were compiled and selected from several published tabulations of thermodynamic data. For these solids, an accepted Gibbs free energy of formation, ..delta..G/sup 0//sub f,298/, was selected for each solid phase based on the recentness of the tabulated data and on considerations of internal consistency with respect to both the published tabulations and the existing data in WATEQ3. For those solids not included in these published tabulations, Gibbs free energies of formation were calculated from published solubility data (e.g., lepidocrocite), or were estimated (e.g., nontronite) using a free-energy summation method described by Mattigod and Sposito (1978). The accepted or estimated free energies were then combined with internally consistent, ancillary thermodynamic data to calculate equilibrium constants for the hydrolysis reactions of these minerals and related solid phases. Including these values in the WATEQ3 data base increased the competency of this geochemical model in applications associated with the disposal of nuclear waste and retorted oil shale. Additional minerals and related solid phases that need to be added to the solubility submodel will be identified as modeling applications continue in these two programs.

Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Merging high resolution geophysical and geochemical surveys to reduce exploration risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Technologies Peer Review - 2010. The primary objective of this project is to combine a suite of high resolution geophysical and geochemical techniques to reduce exploration risk by characterizing hydrothermal alteration, fault geometries and relationships.

63

UPb and geochemical evidence for a Cryogenian magmatic arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U­Pb and geochemical evidence for a Cryogenian magmatic arc in central Novaya Zemlya, Arctic Russia-0349 Oslo, Norway Introduction The High Arctic of Scandinavia and Russia consists of a collage

Svensen, Henrik

64

Geochemical characteristics and formation process of natural gas in Kela 2 gas field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On the basis of a large amount of natural gas components and the carbon isotope as well ... as some other analysis data in Kela 2 gas field, the geochemical characteristics, source, origin, and formation process ...

Mengjun Zhao; Shuangfang Lu; Tingdong Wang; Jian Li

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Do geochemical estimates of sediment focusing pass the sediment test in the equatorial Pacific?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Do geochemical estimates of sediment focusing pass the sediment test in the equatorial Pacific] The paleoceanographic recording fidelity of pelagic sediments is limited by chemical diagenesis and physical mixing (bioturbation and horizontal sediment transport). Diagenesis and bioturbation are relatively well

Kurapov, Alexander

66

Microbiological and Geochemical Heterogeneity in an In Situ Uranium Bioremediation Field Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...VI) bioremediation. FIG. 1. Stratigraphy of borehole logs. Borehole logs collected from the in situ treatment plot installed...geochemical gradients that could be attributed in large part to the manner in which acetate was distributed...

Helen A. Vrionis; Robert T. Anderson; Irene Ortiz-Bernad; Kathleen R. O'Neill; Charles T. Resch; Aaron D. Peacock; Richard Dayvault; David C. White; Philip E. Long; Derek R. Lovley

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Migratory patterns of American shad (Alosa sapidissima) revealed by natural geochemical tags in otoliths  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemical signatures in the otoliths of diadromous fishes may allow for retrospective analyses of natal origins. In an assessment of river-specific signatures in American shad (Alosa sapidissima), an anadromous clupeid ...

Walther, Benjamin (Benjamin Dwaine)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

A Geological and Hydro-Geochemical Study of the Animas Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydro-Geochemical Study of the Animas Geothermal Area, Hidalgo County, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Geological...

69

Geochemical modeling of the near-surface hydrothermal system beneath the southern moat of Long Valley Caldera, California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Geochemical reaction path and mass balance modeling techniques were used to test the hypothesis that an eastwardly flowing plume of thermal water in the southern moat of the Long Valley caldera system reacts with hydrothermally altered intra-caldera tuffs and mixes with non-thermal groundwater. Our conceptual model is based on hypotheses in the literature and published geochemical and petrologic data. Mixing of thermal and non-thermal waters and reaction with wall rock were simulated using the reaction path code EQ3/6. Mass balance calculations were conducted to estimate the extent of water–rock interaction between the intra-caldera tuffs and fluids. A mixing ratio of 82% thermal and 18% non-thermal water reacting with altered tuff minerals closely matches Casa Diablo fluid compositions and minerals observed in petrographic studies. Results of this study show that the mineralogy and fluid chemistry observed in the shallow reservoir at Long Valley caldera are formed in an open system. Further, calcite precipitated in the system serves as a sink for high levels of CO2 generated by the deeper magmatic system. Our study serves as an example that processes acting in a geothermal system can be effectively quantified using geochemical modeling and mass balance calculations.

Regina N. Tempel; Daniel M. Sturmer; Jill Schilling

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

Wilson, T.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

HYDROGEOCHEM: A coupled model of HYDROlogic transport and GEOCHEMical equilibria in reactive multicomponent systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the development of a hydrogeochemical transport model for multicomponent systems. The model is designed for applications to proper hydrological setting, accommodation of complete suite of geochemical equilibrium processes, easy extension to deal with chemical kinetics, and least constraints of computer resources. The hydrological environment to which the model can be applied is the heterogeneous, anisotropic, saturated-unsaturated subsurface media under either transient or steady state flow conditions. The geochemical equilibrium processes included in the model are aqueous complexation, adsorption-desorption, ion exchange, precipitation-dissolution, redox, and acid-base reactions. To achieve the inclusion of the full complement of these geochemical processes, total analytical concentrations of all chemical components are chosen as the primary dependent variables in the hydrological transport equations. Attendant benefits of this choice are to make the extension of the model to deal with kinetics of adsorption-desorption, ion exchange, precipitation-dissolution, and redox relatively easy. To make the negative concentrations during the iteration between the hydrological transport and geochemical equilibrium least likely, an implicit form of transport equations are proposed. To alleviate severe constraints of computer resources in terms of central processing unit (CPU) time and CPU memory, various optional numerical schemes are incorporated in the model. The model consists of a hydrological transport module and geochemical equilibrium module. Both modules were thoroughly tested in code consistency and were found to yield plausible results. The model is verified with ten examples. 79 refs., 21 figs., 17 tabs.

Yeh, G.T.; Tripathi, V.S.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Model evaluation of geochemically induced swelling/shrinkage in argillaceous formations for nuclear waste disposal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Argillaceous formations are being considered as host rocks for geologic disposal of nuclear waste in a number of countries. One advantage of emplacing nuclear waste in such formations is the potential self-sealing capability of clay due to swelling, which is of particular importance for the sealing and healing of disturbed rock zones (DRZ). It is therefore necessary to understand and be able to predict the changes in swelling properties within clay rock near the waste-emplacement tunnel. In this paper, considering that the clay rock formation is mostly under saturated conditions and the swelling property changes are mostly due to geochemical changes, we propose a modeling method that links a THC simulator with a swelling module that is based on diffuse double layer theory. Simulations were conducted to evaluate the geochemically induced changes in the swelling properties of the clay rock. Our findings are as follows: (1) geochemically induced swelling/shrinkage occurs exclusively in the EBS–clay formation interface, within a few meters from the waste-emplacement tunnels; (2) swelling/shrinkage-induced porosity changes are generally much smaller than those caused by mineral precipitation/dissolution processes; (3) geochemically induced swelling/shrinkage of the host clay rock is affected by variations in the pore water chemistry, exchangeable cations, and smectite abundance. Neglecting any of these three factors might lead to a miscalculation of the geochemically induced swelling pressure.

Liange Zheng; Jonny Rutqvist; Hui-Hai Liu; Jens T. Birkholzer; Eric Sonnenthal

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Abstract Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area has resulted in the development of distinctive trace element signatures. Geochemical analysis of soil sample, shallow temperature gradient drill hole cuttings and deep drill hole cutting provides a three dimensional perspective of trace element distributions within the system. Distributions of As, Hg and Li provide the clearest expression of hydrothermal activity. Comparison of these distribution

75

A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In The Geothermal Field Of Milos Island (Greece) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In The Geothermal Field Of Milos Island (Greece) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents a study of hydrothermal alteration on Milos island, Greece. Examination of cores and cuttings from the two drill sites, obtained from a depth of about 1100 m in Milos geothermal field, showed that the hydrothermal minerals occurring in the rock include: K-feldspar, albite, chlorite, talc, diopside, epidote, muscovite, tremolite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, alunite, anhydrite, gypsum, calcite, and opaque minerals.

76

Geochemical studies of commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of source term characterization studies for the commercially operated low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites located in the eastern United States are used to provide an understanding of the importance of hydrological and geochemical factors in controlling the mechanics of leachate formation, evolution of leachate compositions, microbial degradation of organic waste and development of anoxia in the trenches, and the nature and extent of leaching of waste materials. The varying degrees of the intensity of these processes, as determined by the different site characteristics, are clearly reflected in the contrasting leachate geochemistries of Maxey Flats and West Valley trenches, as compared to those of Barnwell and Sheffield trenches. These are important geochemical considerations which not only define LLW source terms but also shed light on the nature and extent of geochemical changes that are likely to occur along a redox gradient outside of the trench environment.

Dayal, R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Clinton, J.H.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

insights into the possible contributions of geothermal systems to groundwater chemistry and development of mitigation strategies for attendant environmental issues....

78

Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} < 1), indicating a lack of association of iodine with the surficial organic matter and the possibility of interaction between the seeping hydrocarbons and soil iodine. Further, the distribution pattern of iodine compares well with two surface geochemical indicators: the adsorbed light gaseous hydrocarbons (methane through butane) and the propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

Mani, Devleena, E-mail: devleenatiwari@ngri.res.in [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India); Kumar, T. Satish [Oil India Limited (India); Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V. [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

New technology of optimizing heavy oil reservoir management by geochemical means: A case study in block Leng 43, Liaohe Oilfield, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Geochemical methods can be used to optimize heavy oil reservoir management. The distribution of some biomarkers in oils is different with the degree of biodegradation. Geochemical parameters can be used to pre...

Zhao Hongjing; Zhang Chunming; Mei Bowen; S. R. Larter…

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The global geochemical cycles of iron and calcium: using novel isotope systems to understand weathering, global mass budgets, natural reaction rates, and paleoclimate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Traditional geochemical proxies utilize variations in the oxygen, carbon, and boron isotopic compositionThe global geochemical cycles of iron and calcium: using novel isotope systems to understand of California, Berkeley Spring 2005 #12;The global geochemical cycles of iron and calcium: using novel isotope

Fantle, Matthew

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Geochemical data package for the Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment (ILAW PA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method of disposing of the portion that is classified as low-activity waste is to vitrify the liquid/slurry and place the solid product in near-surface, shallow-land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the porewater of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assists LMHC in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the disposal facility, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) and the thermodynamic solubility product (K{sub sp}), respectively. In this data package, the authors approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. In future geochemical data packages, they will determine whether a more rigorous measure of solubility is necessary or warranted based on the dose predictions emanating from the ILAW 2001 PA and reviewers' comments. The K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the ILAW system. In addition to the best-estimate K{sub d}s, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. They assume that K{sub d} values are log normally distributed over the cited ranges. Currently, they do not give estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, they supply different values for both the K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the ILAW system and supply time-varying K{sub d}s for the concrete zone, should the final repository design include concrete vaults or cement amendments to buffer the system pH.

DI Kaplan; RJ Serne

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

82

The impact of local geochemical variability on quantifying hillslope soil production and chemical weathering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the physical and chemical processes of soil production and erosion and revisit three granitic study areas on the hillslope-scale physical and chemical soil production and erosion processes. To explain why understandingThe impact of local geochemical variability on quantifying hillslope soil production and chemical

Heimsath, Arjun M.

83

Microscale geochemical gradients in Hanford 300 Area sediment biofilms and influence of uranium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The presence and importance of microenvironments in the subsurface at contaminated sites were suggested by previous geochemical studies. However, no direct quantitative characterization of the geochemical microenvironments had been reported. We quantitatively characterized microscale geochemical gradients (dissolved oxygen (DO), H(2), pH, and redox potential) in Hanford 300A subsurface sediment biofilms. Our results revealed significant differences in geochemical parameters across the sediment biofilm/water interface in the presence and absence of U(VI) under oxic and anoxic conditions. While the pH was relatively constant within the sediment biofilm, the redox potential and the DO and H(2) concentrations were heterogeneous at the microscale (<500-1000 ?m). We found microenvironments with high DO levels (DO hotspots) when the sediment biofilm was exposed to U(VI). On the other hand, we found hotspots (high concentrations) of H(2) under anoxic conditions both in the presence and in the absence of U(VI). The presence of anoxic microenvironments inside the sediment biofilms suggests that U(VI) reduction proceeds under bulk oxic conditions. To test this, we operated our biofilm reactor under air-saturated conditions in the presence of U(VI) and characterized U speciation in the sediment biofilm. U L(III)-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS) showed that 80-85% of the U was in the U(IV) valence state.

Nguyen, Hung D.; Cao, Bin; Mishra, Bhoopesh; Boyanov, Maxim I.; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Beyenal, Haluk

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

22th International Meeting on org. geochem. The fate of organic matter in mangrove sediments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

22th International Meeting on org. geochem. The fate of organic matter in mangrove sediments and the unvegetated sediments, and various vascular plants specific to these swamps. An elemental, pyrolytic sediments characterised by great changes in the redox conditions. Several specific results have already been

Boyer, Edmond

85

Laghi di Monticchio (Southern Italy, Region Basilicata): genesis of sediments--a geochemical study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Laghi di Monticchio (Southern Italy, Region Basilicata): genesis of sediments--a geochemical study and Sediments, Telegrafenberg C328, 14473 Potsdam, Germany (2) Institut des Sciences de la Terre d'Orléans (ISTO Cedex 2, France Abstract The sedimentation record of Lago Grande di Monticchio (LGM) is one of the most

Boyer, Edmond

86

Discrimination of geochemical compositions between the Changjiang and the Huanghe sediments and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrimination of geochemical compositions between the Changjiang and the Huanghe sediments and its application for the identi¢cation of sediment source in the Jiangsu coastal plain, China S.Y. Yang a;b;� , C 2002 Abstract Concentrations of 25 elements in the fine-grained fraction ( 6 63 Wm) of bottom sediments

Yang, Shouye

87

Continental Shelf Research 26 (2006) 1524 Geochemical compositions of river and shelf sediments in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Continental Shelf Research 26 (2006) 15­24 Geochemical compositions of river and shelf sediments in the Yellow Sea: Grain-size normalization and sediment provenance D.I. Lima,�, H.S. Jungb , J.Y. Choic , S 14 November 2005 Abstract The geochemistry of sediment samples from Korean and Chinese rivers

Yang, Shouye

88

Large volume recycling of oceanic lithosphere over short time scales: geochemical constraints from the Caribbean Large  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Large volume recycling of oceanic lithosphere over short time scales: geochemical constraints from with derivation from recycled oceanic crust, while the depleted lavas are derived from a highly residual source source mantle could have been 9 500 Ma before CLIP formation and interpreted to reflect the recycling

Graham, David W.

89

A GEOCHEMICAL MODULE FOR "AMDTreat" TO COMPUTE CAUSTIC QUANTITY, EFFLUENT QUALITY, AND SLUDGE VOLUME1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1413 A GEOCHEMICAL MODULE FOR "AMDTreat" TO COMPUTE CAUSTIC QUANTITY, EFFLUENT QUALITY, AND SLUDGE with the quantities of chemical added and sludge produced. The pH and metals concentrations do not change linearlyH and the corresponding effluent composition and sludge volume can not be accurately determined without empirical

90

Inferring dispersal and migrations from incomplete geochemical baselines: analysis of population structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 2008). Trace element tags as well as stable iso- topes contained within inert structures, such as fish baseline or reference atlas. Individuals of unknown origin are then assigned to one of the sources in this reference atlas based on their geochemical signature. The identifiability of potential sources is

Shima, Jeff

91

CAN THE GEOCHEMICAL TOPSOIL ATLAS BE USED TO PREDICT TRACE METAL DEFICIENCY IN CATTLE?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CAN THE GEOCHEMICAL TOPSOIL ATLAS BE USED TO PREDICT TRACE METAL DEFICIENCY IN CATTLE? By: Emily courtesy LTSN Bioscience. http://bio.ltsn.ac.uk/imagebank/ Just as trace metals are important to humans to the structural stability of molecules and membranes. For these reasons, incorrect trace metal levels can

Nottingham, University of

92

Organic geochemical evidence for pine tar production in middle Eastern Sweden during the Roman Iron Age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Organic geochemical evidence for pine tar production in middle Eastern Sweden during the Roman Iron Laboratory, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm, Sweden b Upplands muse´et, St: Eriks gra¨nd 6, SE-753 10 Uppsala, Sweden Received 21 September 2004; received in revised form 15 June 2005; accepted 21

93

Geochemical Constraints on the Origin of a Shallow Ash Occurrence: in the Mahanadi Basin, offshore India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geochemical Constraints on the Origin of a Shallow Ash Occurrence: in the Mahanadi Basin, offshore sampled in the continental margins offshore India (Fig 1). A volcanic ash layer was recovered below seafloor Surrounding Sediments: Grey sediment in A is a nannofossil and plant debris bearing clay

New Hampshire, University of

94

Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin Natural Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Co Mo Ni UU Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin Natural Resources Canada Geological Survey of Canada with Provincial and Territorial Collaboration Introduction The Wheeler River Property, host of Denison Mine's Phoenix uranium deposit

95

Origin of geochemical heterogeneity in the mantle : constraints from volcanism associated with Hawaiian and Kerguelen mantle plumes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lavas derived from long-lived mantle plumes provide important information of mantle compositions and the processes that created the geochemical heterogeneity within the mantle. Kerguelen and Hawaii are two long-lived mantle ...

Xu, Guangping

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Geochemical Aspects of the Carbonation of Magnesium Silicates in an Aqueous Medium  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GEOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF THE CARBONATION OF MAGNESIUM GEOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF THE CARBONATION OF MAGNESIUM SILICATES IN AN AQUEOUS MEDIUM George D. Guthrie, Jr. (gguthrie@lanl.gov 505-665-6340) J. William Carey (bcarey@lanl.gov 505-667-5540) Deborah Bergfeld (debberrg@lanl.gov 505-667-1812) Darrin Byler (dbyler@lanl.gov 505-665-9562) Steve Chipera (chipera@lanl.gov 505-667-1110) Hans-Joachim Ziock (ziock@lanl.gov 505-667-7265) Hydrology, Geochemistry, & Geology Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 Klaus Lackner (ksl@lanl.gov 505-667-5694) Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM and Columbia University, New York, NY KEYWORDS: CO 2 sequestration, magnesium silicate, mineral carbonation INTRODUCTION The volume of carbon dioxide associated with the use of fossil fuels to produce

97

Isotope and Ion Selectivity in Reverse Osmosis Desalination: Geochemical Tracers for Man-made Freshwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A systematic measurement of ions and 2H/1H, 7Li/6Li, 11B/10B, 18O/16O, and 87Sr/86Sr isotopes in feed-waters, permeates, and brines from commercial reverse osmosis (RO) desalination plants in Israel (Ashkelon, Eilat, and Nitzana) and Cyprus (Larnaca) reveals distinctive geochemical and isotopic fingerprints of fresh water generated from desalination of seawater (SWRO) and brackish water (BWRO). ... The specific geochemical and isotopic fingerprints of SWRO provide a unique tool for tracing “man-made” fresh water as an emerging recharge component of natural water resources. ... O and H isotopes were determined by dual inlet and continuous flow mass spectrometry following gas–water equilibration (analytical uncertainties ±0.8‰ for ?2H and ±0.1‰ for ?18O). ...

Wolfram Kloppmann; Avner Vengosh; Catherine Guerrot; Romain Millot; Irena Pankratov

2008-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

98

Geologic and geochemical studies of the New Albany Shale Group (Devonian-Mississippian) in Illinois. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Illinois State Geological Survey is conducting geological and geochemical investigations to evaluate the potential of New Albany Group shales as a source of hydrocarbons, particularly natural gas. Geological studies include stratigraphy and structure, mineralogic and petrographic characterization; analyses of physical properties; and development of a computer-based resources evaluation system. Geochemical studies include organic carbon content and trace elements; hydrocarbon content and composition; and adsorption/desorption studies of gas through shales. Separate abstracts have been prepared for each task reported.

Bergstrom, R.E.; Shimp, N.F.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

99

Hydrological and geochemical monitoring for a CO2 sequestration pilot in a brine formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrological and geochemical monitoring are key components of site characterization and CO2 plume monitoring for a pilot test to inject CO2 into a brine-bearing sand of the fluvial-deltaic Frio formation in the upper Texas Gulf Coast. In situ, injected CO2 forms a supercritical phase that has gas-like properties (low density and viscosity) compared to the surrounding brine, while some CO2 dissolves in the brine. The pilot test employs one injection well and one monitor well, with continuous pressure and flow-rate monitoring in both wells, and continuous surface fluid sampling and periodic down-hole fluid sampling from the monitor well. Pre-injection site-characterization includes pump tests with pressure-transient analysis to estimate single-phase flow properties, establish hydraulic connectivity between the wells, determine appropriate boundary conditions, and analyze ambient phase conditions within the formation. Additionally, a pre-injection tracer test furnishes estimates of kinematic porosity and the geometry of flow paths between injection and monitor wells under single-phase conditions. Pre-injection geochemical sampling provides a baseline for subsequent geochemical monitoring and helps determine the optimal tracers to accompany CO2 injection. During CO2 injection, hydrological monitoring enables estimation of two-phase flow properties and helps track the movement of the injected CO2 plume, while geochemical sampling provides direct evidence of the arrival of CO2 and tracers at the monitor well. Furthermore, CO2-charged water acts as a weak acid, and reacts to some extent with the minerals in the aquifer, producing a distinct chemical signature in the water collected at the monitor well. Comparison of breakthrough curves for the single-phase tracer test and the CO2 (and its accompanying tracers) illuminates two-phase flow processes between the supercritical CO2 and native brine, an area of current uncertainty that must be better understood to effectively sequester CO2 in saline aquifers.

Doughty, Christine; Pruess, Karsten; Benson, Sally M.; Freifeld, Barry M.; Gunter, William D.

2004-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

100

Oxidation-induced geochemical changes in trench leachates from the Maxey Flats low-level radioactive waste disposal site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A knowledge of extra-trench processes related to oxidation-induced geochemical changes that are likely to occur when iron-rich, anoxic trench waters encounter an oxidizing environment along a redox gradient is essential for modeling radionuclide transport at low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites. The results of laboratory oxidation experiments on several trench leachates from the Maxey Flats site show that, upon oxidation, a series of geochemical changes were initiated that resulted in a drastically different solute geochemistry, involving oxidation of ferrous iron and subsequent precipitation of ferric oxyhydroxide, changes in alkalinity and acidity, a drastic increase in redox potential (Eh), and generally relatively little change in the concentrations of /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs, and /sup 85/Sr in solution. The observations made in this study have important geochemical implications for the modeling of LLW sites in that the source term as an input parameter cannot be assumed to be constant, both spatially and temporally. The acid-generating potential and buffering capacity of an anoxic source term are important geochemical controls that maintain a balance between acidity and alkalinity and largely determine the nature and extent of oxidation-induced geochemical changes likely to occur along a redox gradient. The presence of organic chelating agents can alter the source term geochemistry to such an extent that authigenic ferric oxyhydroxide, which represents a geochemical discontinuity at the redox interface along leachate migration paths, proves to be a relatively ineffective sink for radionuclides.

Dayal, R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Clinton, J.H.

1986-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Geochemical Processes Data Package for the Vadose Zone in the Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This data package discusses the geochemistry of vadose zone sediments beneath the single-shell tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Hanford Site. The purpose of the report is to provide a review of the most recent and relevant geochemical process information available for the vadose zone beneath the single-shell tank farms and the Integrated Disposal Facility. Two companion reports to this one were recently published which discuss the geology of the farms (Reidel and Chamness 2007) and groundwater flow and contamination beneath the farms (Horton 2007).

Cantrell, Kirk J.; Zachara, John M.; Dresel, P. Evan; Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R. Jeffrey

2007-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

102

Geochemical Data Package for Performance Assessment Calculations Related to the Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site disposes of certain types of radioactive waste within subsurface-engineered facilities. One of the tools used to establish the capacity of a given site to safely store radioactive waste (i.e., that a site does not exceed its Waste Acceptance Criteria) is the Performance Assessment (PA). The objective of this document is to provide the geochemical values for the PA calculations. This work is being conducted as part of the on-going maintenance program that permits the PA to periodically update existing calculations when new data becomes available. Because application of values without full understanding of their original purpose may lead to misuse, this document also provides the geochemical conceptual model, approach used for selecting the values, the justification for selecting data, and the assumptions made to assure that the conceptual and numerical geochemical models are reasonably conservative (i.e., reflect conditions that will tend to predict the maximum risk to the hypothetical recipient). The geochemical parameters describe transport processes for 38 elements (>90 radioisotopes) potentially occurring within eight disposal units (Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Low Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (ILV) Vaults, TRU-Pad-1, Naval Reactor Waste Pads, Components-in-Grout Trenches, and Saltstone Facility). This work builds upon well-documented work from previous PA calculations (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). The new geochemical concepts introduced in this data package are: (1) In the past, solubility products were used only in a few conditions (element existing in a specific environmental setting). This has been expanded to >100 conditions. (2) Radionuclide chemistry in cementitious environments is described through the use of both the Kd and apparent solubility concentration limit. Furthermore, the solid phase is assumed to age during the assessment period (thousands of years), resulting in three main types of controlling solid phases, each possessing a unique set of radionuclide sorption parameters (Kd and solubility concentration limit). (3) A large amount of recent site-specific sorption research has been conducted since the last PA (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). These new data have replaced previous Kd values derived from literature values, thus reducing uncertainty and improving accuracy. Finally, because this document will be used by future PA calculations and external acceptance of the document will eventually be required, this document was extensively reviewed. The review process, including the internal review, site review, and external review process is described.

Kaplan, D

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

103

Geochemical information for sites contaminated with low-level radioactive wastes: II. St. Louis Airport Storage Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The St. Louis Airport Storage Site (SLASS) became radioactively contaminated as a result of wastes that were being stored from operations to recover uranium from pitchblende ores in the 1940s and 1950s. The US Department of Energy is considering various remedial action options for the SLASS under the Formerly Utilized Site Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). This report describes the results of geochemical investigations, carried out to support the FUSRAP activities and to aid in quantifying various remedial action options. Soil and groundwater samples from the site were characterized, and sorption ratios for uranium and radium and apparent concentration limit values for uranium were measured in soil/groundwater systems by batch contact methodology. The uranium and radium concentrations in soil samples were significantly above background near the old contaminated surface horizon (now at the 0.3/sup -/ to 0.9/sup -/m depth); the maximum values were 1566 ..mu..g/g and 101 pCi/g, respectively. Below about the 6/sup -/m depth, the concentrations appeared to be typical of those naturally present in soils of this area (3.8 +- 1.2 ..mu..g/g and 3.1 +- 0.6 pCi/g). Uranium sorption ratios showed stratigraphic trends but were generally moderate to high (100 to 1000 L/kg). The sorption isotherm suggested an apparent uranium concentration limit of about 200 mg/L. This relatively high solubility can probably be correlated with the carbonate content of the soil/groundwater systems. The lower sorption ratio values obtained from the sorption isotherm may have resulted from changes in the experimental procedure or the groundwater used. The SLASS appears to exhibit generally favorable behavior for the retardation of uranium solubilized from waste in the site. Parametric tests were conducted to estimate the sensitivity of uranium sorption and solubility to the pH and carbonate content of the system.

Seeley, F.G.; Kelmers, A.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Blind Geothermal System Exploration in Active Volcanic Environments; Multi-phase Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys in Overt & Subtle Volcanic Systems, Hawaii & Maui  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE Geothermal Technologies Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project Objective: To use a combination of traditional geophysical and geochemical tools with exploration suites not typically used in geothermal exploration.

105

Geochemical investigations at Maxey Flats radioactive waste disposal site. [Shallow land burial  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the NRC efforts to develop a data base on source term characteristics for low level wastes, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has produced and analyzed a large amount of data on trench leachate chemistry at existing shallow land burial sites. In this report, we present the results of our investigations at the Maxey Flats, Kentucky disposal site. In particular, data on trench leachate chemistry are reviewed and discussed in terms of mechanisms and processes controlling the composition of trench solutes. Particular emphasis is placed on identifying both intra- and extra-trench factors and processes contributing to source term characteristics, modifications, and uncertainties. BNL research on the Maxey Flats disposal site has provided important information not only on the source term characteristics and the factors contributing to uncertainties in the source term but also some generic insights into such geochemical processes and controls as the mechanics of leachate formation, microbial degradation and development of anoxia, organic complexation and radionuclide mobility, redox inversion and modification of the source term, solubility constraints on solute chemistry, mineral authigenesis, corrosion products and radionuclide scavenging, and the role of organic complexants in geochemical partitioning of radionuclides. A knowledge of such processes and controls affecting the geochemical cycling of radionuclides as well as an understanding of the important factors that contribute to variability and uncertainties in the source term is essential for evaluating the performance of waste package and the site, making valid predictions of release for dose calculations, and for planning site performance monitoring as well as remedial actions. 43 references, 47 figures, 30 tables.

Dayal, R.; Pietrzak, R.F.; Clinton, J.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Geochemical evaluation of CO2 injection and containment in a depleted gas field  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The short- and long-term geochemical impact of CO2 injection into a depleted gas reservoir (DGR) is investigated using reservoir/geochemical modeling with TOUGH2/TOUGHREACT and 1D kinetic diffusion modeling with PHREEQC (caprock/well-cement). Simulations of CO2 injection into the reservoir predict displacement and buoyancy of post-production CH4, as well as dry-out of the near-well zone. We computed that the areal extent of the CH4/brine dominated zone and the dry-out zone are relatively small compared to the CO2/brine dominated zone after well-closure. For the current DGR model we therefore conclude that it is reasonable to model geochemical reactions in the reservoir without taking into account post-production CH4. Although the CO2 dissolution capacity of the studied DGR is smaller compared to a deep saline aquifer of similar size, the modeling predicts that dissolution and subsequent CO2 mineral trapping proceed faster. Precipitation of dawsonite and magnesite were yet predicted at initial CO2 partial pressure (PCO2) of 9.3 bar, while these minerals were not identified in reservoir samples. This could indicate that their tendency of precipitation is overestimated by the model and hence the database used. This has significant impact on long-term modeled bulk porosity and PCO2. Simulations of CO2 diffusion through the caprock show that mineral reactions significantly retard the total dissolved carbon (TDC) plume. After 10,000 years, 99% of the TDC is present within the first 6.4 m above the reservoir contact. The progression of the TDC plume in the caprock is sensitive to the composition, kinetic rates, and surface area of primary and secondary minerals. Cement alteration modeling shows progressive carbonation of cement phases, resulting in three zones of distinct mineralogy and porosity. The three zones are predominantly characterized by: (i) unaltered cement, (ii) portlandite dissolution, and (iii) calcite precipitation. The simulated thickness of the affected zone is 3.8 cm after 100 years. This distance is sensitive to kinetic rate constants of C–S–H phases, but less sensitive to kinetic rate constant of portlandite. In summary, our applied methodology provides quantitative predictions of the geochemical impact of CO2 on the DGR storage complex. The methodology can be used for screening of potential DGR storage locations and to define criteria for minimal caprock and cement sheet thickness, for assuring short- and long-term integrity of the storage location.

Tim J. Tambach; Mariëlle Koenen; Laura J. Wasch; Frank van Bergen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Geochemical Characterization of Chromate Contamination in the 100 Area Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major objectives of the proposed study were to: 1.) determine the leaching characteristics of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated sediments collected from 100 Area spill sites; 2.) elucidate possible Cr(VI) mineral and/or chemical associations that may be responsible for Cr(VI) retention in the Hanford Site 100 Areas through the use of i.) macroscopic leaching studies and ii.) microscale characterization of contaminated sediments; and 3.) provide information to construct a conceptual model of Cr(VI) geochemistry in the Hanford 100 Area vadose zone. In addressing these objectives, additional benefits accrued were: (1) a fuller understanding of Cr(VI) entrained in the vadose zone that will that can be utilized in modeling potential Cr(VI) source terms, and (2) accelerating the Columbia River 100 Area corridor cleanup by providing valuable information to develop remedial action based on a fundamental understanding of Cr(VI) vadose zone geochemistry. A series of macroscopic column experiments were conducted with contaminated and uncontaminated sediments to study Cr(VI) desorption patterns in aged and freshly contaminated sediments, evaluate the transport characteristics of dichromate liquid retrieved from old pipelines of the 100 Area; and estimate the effect of strongly reducing liquid on the reduction and transport of Cr(VI). Column experiments used the < 2 mm fraction of the sediment samples and simulated Hanford groundwater solution. Periodic stop-flow events were applied to evaluate the change in elemental concentration during time periods of no flow and greater fluid residence time. The results were fit using a two-site, one dimensional reactive transport model. Sediments were characterized for the spatial and mineralogical associations of the contamination using an array of microscale techniques such as XRD, SEM, EDS, XPS, XMP, and XANES. The following are important conclusions and implications. Results from column experiments indicated that most of contaminant Cr travels fast through the sediments and appears as Cr(VI) in the effluents. The significance of this for groundwater concentrations would, however, depend on the mass flux of recharge to the water table. adsorption of Cr(VI) to sediments from spiked Cr(VI) solution is low; calculated retardation coefficients are close to one. Calcium polysulfide solutions readily reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in column experiments. However a significant amount of the Cr(VI) was mobilized ahead of the polysulfide solution front. This has significant implications for in-situ reductive remediation techniques. The experiments suggest that it would be difficult to design a remedial measure using infiltration of liquid phase reductants without increasing transport of Cr(VI) toward the water table. The microscopic characterization results are consistent with the column studies. Cr(VI) is found as ubiquitous coatings on sediment grain surfaces. Small, higher concentration, chromium sites are associated with secondary clay mineral inclusions, with occasional barium chromate minerals, and reduced to Cr(III) in association with iron oxides that are most likely magnetite primary minerals. Within the restricted access domains of sediment matrix, ferrous iron could also diffuse from in situ, high-surface-area minerals to cause the reductive immobilization of chromate. This process may be favored at microscale geochemical zones where ferrous iron could be supplied. Once nucleated, micrometer-scale precipitates are favored as growing locales for further accumulation, causing the formation of discrete zones of Cr(III).

Dresel, P. Evan; Qafoku, Nikolla; McKinley, James P.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Liu, Chongxuan; Ilton, Eugene S.; Phillips, J. L.

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

108

Geochemical Society  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the Ha y-Lacroix Prize rewarded the PhD work of Aur lie Violette and Johan Villeneuve (see Elements, volume 7, number 4...its vibrational spectra Jakub Matusik, Eva Scholtzov , and Daniel Tunega Clay mineralogy of the Zhada sediments: Evidence for...

109

Geochemical handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... FOUR years have elapsed since the pub lication of Part 4 of the Handbook of Geochemistry, the longest gap in the pro duction schedule, which has extended almost ... 1500 pages. The original intention of the editorial board was that Volume 2 of the Handbook would ultimately contain approximately 2000 pages in four instalments, with publication completed several years ...

D.G. Murchison

1979-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

110

Geochemical and geologic factors effecting the formulation of gas hydrate: Task No. 5, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objective of our work has been to determine the primary geochemical and geological factors controlling gas hydrate information and occurrence and particularly in the factors responsible for the generation and accumulation of methane in oceanic gas hydrates. In order to understand the interrelation of geochemical/geological factors controlling gas hydrate occurrence, we have undertaken a multicomponent program which has included (1) comparison of available information at sites where gas hydrates have been observed through drilling by the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) on the Blake Outer Ridge and Middle America Trench; (2) regional synthesis of information related to gas hydrate occurrences of the Middle America Trench; (3) development of a model for the occurrence of a massive gas hydrate as DSDP Site 570; (4) a global synthesis of gas hydrate occurrences; and (5) development of a predictive model for gas hydrate occurrence in oceanic sediment. The first three components of this program were treated as part of a 1985 Department of Energy Peer Review. The present report considers the last two components and presents information on the worldwide occurrence of gas hydrates with particular emphasis on the Circum-Pacific and Arctic basins. A model is developed to account for the occurrence of oceanic gas hydrates in which the source of the methane is from microbial processes. 101 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

Kvenvolden, K.A.; Claypool, G.E.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Characterization of the geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils on the Savannah River Site: Field sampling activities. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There are 36,000 acres of wetlands on the Savannah River Site (SRS) and an additional 5,000 acres of floodplain. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste sites at SRS have shown that some wetlands have been contaminated with pollutants resulting from SRS operations. In general, releases of contaminants to wetland areas have been indirect. These releases may have originated at disposal lagoons or waste facilities located in the vicinity of the wetland areas. Transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, soil erosion, sediment transport, and groundwater seepage into downgradient wetland areas are responsible for the indirect discharges to the wetland areas. The SRS determined that a database of background geochemical and physical properties for wetland soils on the SRS was needed to facilitate future remedial investigations, human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, and feasibility studies for the wetland areas. These data are needed for comparison to contaminant data collected from wetland soils that have been affected by contamination from SRS operations. This report describes the efforts associated with the collection of soil cores, preparation of a lithologic log for each core, and the processing and packaging of individual soil samples for shipment to analytical laboratory facilities.

Dixon, K.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Evaluating oil quality and monitoring production from heavy oil reservoirs using geochemical methods: Application to the Boscan Field, Venezuela  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many oil fields worldwide contain heavy oil in one or more reservoir units. The low gravity of these oils is most frequently due to biodegradation and/or low maturity. The challenge is to find ways to economically recover this oil. Methods which reduce the operating costs of producing heavy oil add significant value to such projects. Geochemical techniques which use the composition of the reservoir fluids as natural tracers offer cost effective methods to assist with reservoir management. The low viscosity and gravity of heavy oil, combined with frequent high water cuts, low flow rates, and the presence of downhole artificial lift equipment, make many conventional production logging methods difficult to apply. Therefore, monitoring production, especially if the produced oil is commingled from multiple reservoirs, can be difficult. Geochemical methods can be used to identify oil/water contacts, tubing string leaks and to allocate production to individual zones from commingled production. An example of a giant heavy oil field where geochemical methods may be applicable is the Boscan Field in Venezuela. Low maturity oil, averaging 10{degrees} API gravity, is produced from the Eocene Upper and Lower Boscan (Miosa) Sands. Geochemical, stratigraphic and engineering data have helped to better define the controls on oil quality within the field, identified new reservoir compartments and defined unique characteristics of the Upper and Lower Boscan oils. This information can be used to identify existing wells in need of workovers due to mechanical problems and to monitor production from new infill wells.

Kaufman, R.L.; Noguera, V.H.; Bantz, D.M. [Chevron Overseas Petroleum, San Ramon, CA (United States); Rodriguez, R. [Maraven, S.A., Caracas (Venezuela)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Coupled Geochemical and Hydrological Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Radionuclides and Toxic Metals Beneath the Hanford Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this research was to provide an improved understanding and predictive capability of coupled hydrological and geochemical mechanisms that are responsible for the accelerated migration and immobilization of radionuclides and toxic metals in the badose zone beneath the Hanford Tank Farms.

Scott Fendorf; Phil Jardine

2006-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

114

PUBLISHED ONLINE: 19 JUNE 2011 | DOI: 10.1038/NGEO1183 Influence of subsurface biosphere on geochemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

estimate the net flux of methane, carbon dioxide and hydrogen from diffuse and focused hydrothermal vents on geochemical fluxes from diffuse hydrothermal fluids Scott D. Wankel1 , Leonid N. Germanovich2 , Marvin D. Girguis1 * Hydrothermal vents along mid-ocean systems host unique, highly productive biological

Girguis, Peter R.

115

Oxygen is a key element for biology and the cycling of geochemical elements, and has shaped the chemical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oxygen is a key element for biology and the cycling of geochemical elements, and has shaped the chemical and biological evolution of Earth. The oceans appear to be loosing oxygen due to on-going climate change, with resulting impacts on marine ecosystems and global biogeochemical cycles. As oxygen levels

Handy, Todd C.

116

Petroleum geochemistry of Lower Indus Basin, Pakistan: I. Geochemical interpretation and origin of crude oils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The study focused on the petroleum geochemistry of crude oils produced from Cretaceous reservoirs. Geochemical portrayal of crude oils has been carried out by means of diagnostic biomarker parameters like relative distribution of steranes (C27–C28–C29 ???-20R steranes), C19 and C23 tricyclic terpanes (TT), C24 tetracyclic terpanes (TeT) and hopanes. These parameters suggest that the crude oils contain terrigenous organic matter (OM) mixed with small input of marine OM. The OM of the source rocks was deposited in oxic depositional environment. Maturity parameters, C32 22S/(22S+22R) homohopanes and sterane isomerization ratios [20S/(20S+20R), ???/(???+???) for C29 steranes] indicate that these crude oil are produced from the source rocks at early mature stage to mature stage.

Arif Nazir; Tahira Fazeelat

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera: proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A workshop reviewed the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and tectonic processes. Workshop participants discussed the need to instrument sites for continuous measurements of several parameters and to obtain additional hydrologic and chemical information from intermediate and deep drill holes. In addition to seismic and deformation monitoring, programs are currently in progress to monitor changes in the discharge characteristics of hot springs, fumaroles, and soil gases, as well as pressures and temperatures in wells. Some hydrochemical parameters are measured continuously, others are measured monthly or at longer intervals. This report summarizes the information presented at the hydrologic monitoring workshop, following the workshop agenda which was divided into four sessions: (1) overview of the hydrothermal system; (2) monitoring springs, fumaroles, and wells; (3) monitoring gas emissions; and (4) conclusions and recommendations.

Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Burning of coal waste piles from Douro Coalfield (Portugal): Petrological, geochemical and mineralogical characterization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the Douro Coalfield anthracites were exploited for decades (1795–1994). Besides many small mines Douro Coalfield had two principal mining areas (S. Pedro da Cova and Pejăo). Coal mining activities cause several impacts on the environment, one of which is the amount of discard or waste which was disposed of all over Douro Coalfield resulting in one of the most significant and severe impacts on the environment. Over 20 waste piles exist in the old mining areas, geographically dispersed, and three of them are presently burning. Their ignition was caused by forest fires during the summer of 2005. Samples from the burning and unburned zones of the waste piles were studied as were the gas from vents and the minerals resulting after combustion. Geochemical processes and mineralogical transformations in the burning coal waste pile were investigated. Microscopic analyses of the samples identified some particular aspects related with combustion: oxidation of pyrite, the presence of iron oxides, organic particles with cracks and rims with lowered (suppressed) Rr, devolatilization vacuoles and some char structures. The occurrence of vitreous (glassy) material as well as Fe–Al spinels in the burning coal waste provide evidences that the combustion temperature could have reached values above 1000 °C. Due to combustion, and as expected, the samples studied reported high ash yields. Samples taken from the burning zones reported an increase of As, Cr, Li, Nb, Ni, Pb, Rb, Sr and LREE concentrations and a decrease in Zr and HREE concentrations. Enrichment in Cs, Li and Rb was noted when comparing with the geochemical composition of black shales and world coals composition that is related with the contribution of granitic rocks in the sediments that originated the main lithologies of the Douro Coalfield (carbonaceous shale and lithic arenites). Cluster analyses (R-type and Q-type) were performed to understand the trend between the unburned and burning samples and it seems that some chemical variations are responsible for this separation. Elemental sulphur and salammoniac (ammonium salt) are the coal fire gas minerals neoformed on the surface of piles, near the burning zones. They were identified by different techniques, mainly SEM-EDX, XRD and FTIR. Relatively high concentrations of several aromatic compounds were detected in the gas collected at the studied areas, as well as aliphatic hydrocarbons. The highest concentrations of aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in gas samples from S. Pedro da Cova waste pile. The exposure to hazardous compounds present in the gas is a serious risk to human health and the environment.

J. Ribeiro; E. Ferreira da Silva; D. Flores

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical aspects of site-specific studies of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource of southern Louisiana. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report consists of four sections dealing with progress in evaluating geologic, geochemical, and geophysical aspects of geopressured-geothermal energy resources in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual sections. (ACR)

Pilger, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Topical Report CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380 Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2011 Oil & Natural Gas Technology Office of Fossil Energy Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah Topical Report Reporting Period: October 31, 2009 through March 31, 2011 Authors: Lauren P. Birgenheier, Energy and Geoscience Insitute, University of Utah

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the InSalah CO2 Storage Project  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the In Salah CO 2 Storage Project Background Safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs is critical to geologic sequestration. The In Salah Project (joint venture of British Petroleum (BP), Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro) has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 billion cubic feet per year (bcfy) natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian

122

Use of iodine surface geochemical surveys in the Lodgepole and Minnelusa plays, U.S. northern Rockies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of surface geochemistry is becoming more prevalent in oil exploration, especially for focusing specific target areas for 2D and 3D seismic surveys. Presented here are two surface geochemical surveys utilizing the iodine method in delineating Upper Minnelusa sands of Permian age in the Powder River basin and Lodgepole Waulsortian-like mounds of Mississippian age in the Williston basin. Iodine is an indirect indicator of a petroleum accumulation at depth. Increases in iodine anomalies are caused by the presence of petroleum seepage in the upper part of the soil section. In the very shallow surface, less than 10 ft, a reaction occurs between hydrocarbons and iodine under sunlight forming inorganic compounds. The source of the iodine is either from minerals in the soil and/or from the atmosphere with ultraviolet light as the initiator of the reaction. Any iodine in the subsurface could not migrate far in the presence of hydrocarbons and due to its large molecular size. The compounds that form in the soil remain solid and are relatively difficult to remove. Any surface geochemical anomaly needs to be followed by seismic in order to provide a specific drilling target. If a surface geochemical survey is properly designed and implemented, when no anomaly is present, then to date regardless of the type of method used the results have been dry holes. If a surface geochemical anomaly is present, the intensity, areal extent, and quality of the anomaly cannot determine the economic viability of the accumulation of depth, but there is a significant increase in the success rate. The best utilization of these methods is to determine areas where there is no possibility of finding petroleum and focusing on areas that do. In the case of the Lodgepole and Minnelusa plays, surface geochemistry allows a low cost approach and helps focus and minimize 2D and 3D survey costs.

Tedesco, S.A.; Bretz, S. [Atoka Geochemical Services Corp., Englewood, CO (United States)

1995-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

123

GEOCHEMICAL APPROACHES TO THE STUDY OF LIFE AND DEATH OF DINOSAURS FROM THE EARLY CRETACEOUS CEDAR MOUNTAIN FORMATION, UTAH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., Brown, T., Kirkland, J., and Stantucci, V. (Eds.), Proceedings of the 8th Conference on Fossil Resources, May 19-21, St. George, UT. 7-9. 8 Trueman, C. N., Benton, M.J., and Palmer, M.R. (2003) Geochemical taphonomy and shallow marine vertebrate... Chapter 2. Heterogeneous rare earth element (REE) patterns and concentrations in a fossil bone: implications for the use of REE in vertebrate taphonomy and fossilization history...........................................................................9...

Suarez, Celina Angelica

2010-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

124

The application of iodine and magnetic susceptibility surface geochemical surveys in the Lodgepole Play, Eastern Williston Basin, North Dakota  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of surface geochemistry as a first pass exploration tool is becoming more prevalent in petroleum exploration. This is especially true due to the high cost of 2-D and 3-D surveys in defining small targets such as the Waulsortian mounds of the Lodgepole Formation. Surface geochemical surveys are very effective in pinpointing specific target areas for seismic surveying and thus reducing costs. Presented are examples of surface geochemical surveys utilizing magnetic susceptibility and iodine methods in delineating reservoirs in the Lodgepole, Mission Canyon and Red River formations. The types of surveys presented vary from reconnaissance to detail and examples of how to define a grid will be discussed. Surface geochemical surveys can be very effective when the areal extent of the target(s) and the purpose of the survey are clearly defined prior to implementation. By determining which areas have microseepage and which areas do not, surface geochemistry can be a very effective tool in focusing exploration efforts and maximizing exploration dollars.

Tedesco, S.A. [Atoka Geochemical Services Corp., Englewood, CO (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Trace element geochemical zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area has resulted in the development of distinctive trace element signatures. Geochemical analysis of soil samples, shallow temperature-gradient drill hole cuttings and deep drill hole cuttings provides a three-dimensional perspective of trace element distributions within the system. Distributions of As, Hg and Li provide the clearest expression of hydrothermal activity. Comparison of these distributions suggests that Li, followed by As and Hg, are progressively deposited by outward flowing, cooling, thermal fluids. Hg, in contrast to As and Li, is distributed only within the outer portions of the thermal system where temperatures are less than about 225/sup 0/C. Heating experiments indicate that extensive Hg remobilization in Roosevelt samples occurs at temperatures as low as 200/sup 0/ to 250/sup 0/C. This suggests that the distribution of Hg largely reflects the present system thermal configuration and that this distribution may be a useful soild geothermometer.

Christensen, O.D.; Moore, J.N.; Capuano, R.M.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Geochemical Fingerprinting of Coltan Ores by Machine Learning on Uneven Datasets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two modern machine learning techniques, Linear Programming Boosting (LPBoost) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs), are introduced and applied to a geochemical dataset of niobium-tantalum ('coltan') ores from Central Africa to demonstrate how such information may be used to distinguish ore provenance, i.e., place of origin. The compositional data used include uni- and multivariate outliers and elemental distributions are not described by parametric frequency distribution functions. The 'soft margin' techniques of LPBoost and SVMs can be applied to such data. Optimization of their learning parameters results in an average accuracy of up to c. 92%, if spot measurements are assessed to estimate the provenance of ore samples originating from two geographically defined source areas. A parameterized performance measure, together with common methods for its optimization, was evaluated to account for the presence of uneven datasets. Optimization of the classification function threshold improves the performance, as class importance is shifted towards one of those classes. For this dataset, the average performance of the SVMs is significantly better compared to that of LPBoost.

Savu-Krohn, Christian, E-mail: christian.savu-krohn@unileoben.ac.at; Rantitsch, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.rantitsch@unileoben.ac.at [Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Department of Applied Geosciences and Geophysics (Austria); Auer, Peter, E-mail: auer@unileoben.ac.at [Chair for Information Technology, Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria); Melcher, Frank, E-mail: frank.melcher@bgr.de; Graupner, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.graupner@bgr.de [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (Germany)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

127

Final Report: Molecular Basis for Microbial Adhesion and Geochemical Surface Reactions: A Study Across Scales  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Computational chemistry was used to help provide a molecular level description of the interactions of Gram-negative microbial membranes with subsurface materials. The goal is to develop a better understanding of the molecular processes involved in microbial metal binding, microbial attachment to mineral surfaces, and, eventually, oxidation/reduction reactions (electron transfer) that can occur at these surfaces and are mediated by the bacterial exterior surface. The project focused on the interaction of the outer microbial membrane, which is dominated by an exterior lipopolysaccharide (LPS) portion, of Pseudomonas aeruginosa with the mineral goethite and with solvated ions in the environment. This was originally a collaborative project with T.P. Straatsma and B. Lowery of the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The University of Alabama effort used electronic structure calculations to predict the molecular behavior of ions in solution and the behavior of the sugars which form a critical part of the LPS. The interactions of the sugars with metal ions are expected to dominate much of the microscopic structure and transport phenomena in the LPS. This work, in combination with the molecular dynamics simulations of Straatsma and the experimental electrochemistry and microscopy measurements of Lowry, both at PNNL, is providing new insights into the detailed molecular behavior of these membranes in geochemical environments. The effort at The University of Alabama has three components: solvation energies and structures of ions in solution, prediction of the acidity of the critical groups in the sugars in the LPS, and binding of metal ions to the sugar anions. An important aspect of the structure of the LPS membrane as well as ion transport in the LPS is the ability of the sugar side groups such as the carboxylic acids and the phosphates to bind positively charged ions. We are studying the acidity of the acidic side groups in order to better understand the ability of these groups to bind metal ions. We need to understand the solvation properties of the metal ions in solution and their ability to bind not only to the sugars but to proteins and to other anions. Our goal is then to be able to predict the ability of the side groups to bind metal ions. One result from the earlier molecular dynamics simulations is the exclusion of water from the inner hydrophobic part of the membrane. We thus need to investigate the binding of the cations in media with different dielectric constants.

Dixon, David Adams [The University of Alabama

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

Development and Application of a Paleomagnetic/Geochemical Method for Constraining the Timing of Burial Diagenetic and Fluid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of diagenesis caused by fluid migration or other events are commonly hindered by a lack of temporal control. Our results to date demonstrate that a paleomagnetic/geochemical approach can be used to date fluid migration as well as burial diagenetic events. Our principal working hypothesis is that burial diagenetic processes (e.g., maturation of organic-rich sediments and clay diagenesis) and the migration of fluids can trigger the authigenesis of magnetic mineral phases. The ages of these events can be constrained by comparing chemical remanent magnetizations (CRMs) to independently established Apparent Polar Wander Paths. While geochemical (e.g. stable isotope and organic analyses) and petrographic studies provide important clues for establishing these relationships, the ultimate test of this hypothesis requires the application of independent dating methods to verify the paleomagnetic ages. Towards this end, we have used K-Ar dating of illitization as an alternative method for constraining the ages of magnetic mineral phases in our field areas.

Elmore, Richard D.; Engel, Michael H.

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

129

A Geochemical Model of the Kilauea East Rift Zone | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

exceeding the Curie point of basalt. The shallow ground-water hydrology and chemistry on the lower rift are strongly affected by natural thermal discharge from the rift...

130

AQUIFER BIOTHERMOREMEDIATION USING HEAT PUMPS: SOUND THEORETICAL BASIS AND RESULTS ON THERMAL, GEOCHEMICAL AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

example, the long-term use of groundwater heat pumps for air conditioning of homes or buildings can induce and hydrogeological background. The presence of organic pollutants in the aquifer can amplify these phenomena/or the well productivity, (ii) an inappropriate temperature for the use of groundwater heat pumps for air

Boyer, Edmond

131

Microbiological and Geochemical Heterogeneity in an In Situ Uranium Bioremediation Field Site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Heterogeneity in an In Situ Uranium Bioremediation Field...and microbiology of a uranium-contaminated subsurface...oxides were highly depleted, groundwater sulfate...populations to in situ uranium bioremediation. Uranium...serious threat to human health and the natural environment...

Helen A. Vrionis; Robert T. Anderson; Irene Ortiz-Bernad; Kathleen R. O'Neill; Charles T. Resch; Aaron D. Peacock; Richard Dayvault; David C. White; Philip E. Long; Derek R. Lovley

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Geochemical and hydrodynamic controls on arsenic and trace metal cycling in a seasonally stratified US  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.O. Box 1000, 61 Route 9W, Palisades, NY 10964-8000, USA c Department of Geology and Geophysics, Texas A, and U, which suggested reductive precipitation in the pond's hypolimnion. Uranium levels, however, were between surface and groundwaters with U- and As-rich geological formations rather than large- scale

Louchouarn, Patrick

133

Petrographic, geochemical, and paleohydrologic evidence of nature of petroleum migration in Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed studies of the petrography and geochemistry of petroleum source rocks, the geochemistry of petroleum accumulations, and the paleohydrology of the Illinois basin suggest an episode of long-range migration of Devonian-sourced petroleum during a period of regional ground water flow. Petrographic analyses of samples of the New Albany Shale group (Devonian/Mississippian) were used to define lateral and vertical variation in composition and thermal maturity of organic matter within the basin. These data delineate likely New Albany Shale group petroleum source areas. GC, GCMS, and carbon isotopic analyses of thermally mature New Albany Shale in southeastern Illinois and Silurian-reservoired petroleum samples from central Illinois were used in making oil-oil and oil-source rock correlations. These correlations indicate long-range lateral and downward cross-stratigraphic net migration. Compaction-driven and elevation head-driven ground-water flows within the basin were numerically modeled using available stratigraphic, structural, and hydrologic data. Calculations based on compaction-driven flow show the possibility of down-stratigraphic migration. Compaction-driven flow, however, cannot explain the amount of lateral transport inferred. Regional ground-water flow due to the uplift of the Pascola arch could explain the long-range lateral migration. Calculations of the effects of advective heat transport by elevation head-driven flow agree with estimates of temperatures made from fluid inclusions in basin mineralization.

Bethke, C.M.; Pruitt, J.D.; Barrows, M.H.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Final Report: Improved Site Characterization And Storage Prediction Through Stochastic Inversion Of Time-Lapse Geophysical And Geochemical Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During the last months of this project, our project activities have concentrated on four areas: (1) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir bulk/shear moduli and density; the need for this inversion was not anticipated in the original scope of work, (2) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir porosity and permeability, (3) complete the software needed to perform geochemical inversions and (4) use the software to perform stochastic inversion of aqueous chemistry data to deduce mineral volume fractions. This report builds on work described in progress reports previously submitted (Ramirez et al., 2009, 2010, 2011 - reports fulfilled the requirements of deliverables D1-D4) and fulfills deliverable D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product. The main challenge with our stochastic inversion approach is its large computational expense, even for single reservoir patterns. We dedicated a significant level of effort to improve computational efficiency but inversions involving multiple patterns were still intractable by project's end. As a result, we were unable to fulfill Deliverable D6: Field-based multi-pattern simulations work product.

Ramirez, A; Mcnab, W; Hao, Y; White, D; Johnson, J

2011-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

135

Petrographic and geochemical constraints on the deposition and diagenesis of the Haynesville Formation (Upper Jurassic), southwestern Alabama  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Haynesville Formation in Clarke County, southwestern Alabama, is a 250 m thick, halite-dominated evaporite rock composed of four vertically stacked evaporite facies. The different facies present include a basal chevron-dominated unit, a gray cumulate unit, a unit dominated by brown, organic-rich cumulates, and a unit composed of halite and anhydrite interbedded with sand and mud. The facies are defined by halite textures, the presence of anhydrite laminae and dissolution surfaces, and the relative amount of terrigenous material. These criteria were used because they provide some constraint on the brine depths present during precipitation of the salt. The integration of geochemical data with petrographic observations has been used to formulate a model for the deposition and diagenesis of the deposits. The bromide concentrations within the basal chevron zone systematically rise from 36 ppm to 101 ppm, while the bromide concentrations within the overlying cumulate zone rise more rapidly from 121 ppm to 440 ppm. The strontium isotopic composition of the salt over this interval systematically increases from 0.7068 to 0.7084. Bromide concentrations, strontium isotope ratios, and other chemical parameters, in combination with petrographic observations, constrain the relative importance of depositional and diagenetic processes. Processes that are important in controlling the geochemistry of the deposits include the influx of seawater and meteoric fluid into the basin, synsedimentary dissolution and recycling of solutes, the reflux of brines within the basin, and burial diagenetic processes.

Eustice, R. (Univ. of Texas, Austin (United States))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Progress Report, December 2010: Improved Site Characterization And Storage Prediction Through Stochastic Inversion Of Time-Lapse Geophysical And Geochemical Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last project six months, our project activities have concentrated on three areas: (1) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir permeability, (2) development of the geochemical inversion strategy and implementation of associated software, and (3) completing the software implementation of TProGS and the geostatistical analysis that provides the information needed when using the software to produce realizations of the Midale reservoir. The report partially the following deliverables: D2: Model development: MCMC tool (synthetic fluid chemistry data); deliverable completed. D4: Model development/verification: MCMC tool (TProGS, field seismic/chemistry data) work product; deliverable requirements partially fulfilled. D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product; deliverable requirements partially fulfilled. When completed, our completed stochastic inversion tool will explicitly integrate reactive transport modeling, facies-based geostatistical methods, and a novel stochastic inversion technique to optimize agreement between observed and predicted storage performance. Such optimization will be accomplished through stepwise refinement of: (1) the reservoir model - principally its permeability magnitude and heterogeneity - and (2) geochemical parameters - primarily key mineral volume fractions and kinetic data. We anticipate that these refinements will facilitate significantly improved history matching and forward modeling of CO{sub 2} storage. Our tool uses the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methodology. Deliverable D1, previously submitted as a report titled ''Development of a Stochastic Inversion Tool To Optimize Agreement Between The Observed And Predicted Seismic Response To CO{sub 2} Injection/Migration in the Weyburn-Midale Project'' (Ramirez et al., 2009), described the stochastic inversion approach that will identify reservoir models that optimize agreement between the observed and predicted seismic response. The software that implements this approach has been completed, tested, and used to process seismic data from pattern 16. A previously submitted report titled ''Model verification: synthetic single pattern simulations using seismic reflection data'', Ramirez et al. 2010, partially fulfilled deliverable D3 by summarizing verification activities that evaluate the performance of the seismic software and its ability to recover reservoir model permeabilities using synthetic seismic reflection data. A future progress report will similarly describe summarizing verification activities of the geochemical inversion software, thereby completing deliverable D3. This document includes a chapter that shows and discusses permeability models produced by seismic inversion that used seismic data from pattern 16 in Phase 1A. It partially fulfills deliverable D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product. The D5 work product is supposed to summarize the results of applying NUFT/MCMC to refine the reservoir model and geochemical parameters by optimizing observation/prediction agreement for the seismic/geochemical response to CO{sub 2} injection/migration within a single pattern of Phase 1A/1B. A future progress report will show inversion results for the same pattern using geochemical data, thereby completing deliverable D5. This document also contains a chapter that fulfills deliverable D2: Model development: MCMC tool (synthetic fluid chemistry data). The chapter will summarize model development activities required to facilitate application of NUFT/MCMC to optimize agreement between the observed and predicted geochemical response to CO{sub 2} injection/migration. Lastly, this document also contains a chapter that partially fulfills deliverable D4: Model development/verification: MCMC tool (TProGS, field seismic/chemistry data) work product. This work product is supposed to summarize model development activities required for (1) application of TProGS to Weyburn, (2) use of TProGS within the MCMC tool, and (3) application of the MCMC tool to address field seismic and g

Ramirez, A; Mcnab, W; Carle, S; Hao, Y; White, D; Johnson, J

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

137

Laboratory Investigations on the Geochemical Response of Groundwater-sediment Environment to Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The extraction of energy resources from unconventional reservoirs using improved horizontal drilling and hydraulic fracturing technologies is expected to play an important role in serving… (more)

Liu, Shuai

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Geochemical and Mineralogical Investigation of Uranium in Multi–element Contaminated, Organic–rich Subsurface Sediment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alluvial sediments characterized by an abundance of refractory or lignitic organic carbon compounds and reduced Fe and S bearing mineral phases have been identified through drilling activities at the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Integrated Field Research Challenge (IFRC) site at Rifle, CO. Regions of the subsurface from which such sediments are derived are referred to as Naturally Reduced Zones (NRZ). We conducted a study with NRZ sediments with the objective to: i.) Characterize solid phase contamination of U and other co-contaminants; ii.) Document the occurrence of potential U host minerals; iii.) Determine U valence state and micron scale spatial association with co-contaminants. Macroscopic (wet chemical batch extractions and a column experiment), microscopic (SEM-EDS), and spectroscopic (Mössbauer, µ-XRF and XANES) techniques were employed. Results showed that sediments’ solid phase had significant concentrations of U, S, As, Zn, V, Cr, Cu and Se, and a remarkable assortment of potential U hosts (sorbents and/or electron donors), such as Fe oxides (hematite, magnetite, Al-substituted goethite), siderite, reduced Fe(II) bearing clays, sulfides of different types, Zn sulfide framboids and multi – element sulfides. Multi-contaminants, micron size (ca. 5 to 30 µm) areas of mainly U(IV) and some U(VI), and/or other electron scavengers or donors such as Se, As, Cr, and V were discovered in the sediments, suggesting complex micron-scale system responses to transient redox conditions, and different extent and rates of competing U redox reactions than those of single contaminant systems. Collectively, the results improve our understanding and ability to predict U and NRZ’s complex behavior and will delineate future research directions to further study both the natural attenuation and persistence of contaminant plumes and their contribution to groundwater contamination.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Gartman, Brandy N.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Arey, Bruce W.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Mouser, Paula J.; Heald, Steve M.; Bargar, John R.; Janot, Noemie; Yabusaki, Steven B.; Long, Philip E.

2014-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

139

CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

140

Geochemical study of evaporite and clay mineral-oxyhydroxide samples from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Samples of clay minerals, insoluble oxyhydroxides, and their host evaporites from the WIPP site have been studied for their major and minor elements abundances, x-ray diffraction characteristics, K-Ar ages, and Rb-Sr ages. This study was undertaken to determine their overall geochemical characteristics and to investigate possible interactions between evaporates and insoluble constituents. The evaporite host material is water-soluble, having Cl/Br ratios typical of marine evaporites, although the Br content is low. Insoluble material (usually a mixture of clay minerals and oxyhydroxide phases) yields very high Cl/Br ratios, possibly because of Cl from admixed halide minerals. This same material yields K/Rb and Th/U ratios in the normal range for shales; suggesting little, if any, effect of evaporite-induced remobilization of U, K, or Rb in the insoluble material. The rare-earth element (REE) data also show normal REE/chondrite (REE/CHON) distribution patterns, supporting the K/Rb and Th/U data. Clay minerals yield K-Ar dates in the range 365 to 390 Ma and a Rb-Sr isochron age of 428 {+-} 7 Ma. These ages are well in excess of the 220- to 230-Ma formational age of the evaporites, and confirm the detrital origin of the clays. The ages also show that any evaporite or clay mineral reactions that might have occurred at or near the time of sedimentation and diagenesis were not sufficient to reset the K-Ar and Rb-Sr systematics of the clay minerals. Further, x-ray data indicate a normal evaporitic assemblage of clay minerals and Fe-rich oxyhydroxide phases. The clay minerals and other insoluble material appear to be resistant to the destructive effects of their entrapment in the evaporites, which suggests that these insoluble materials would be good getters for any radionuclides (hypothetically) released from the storage of radioactive wastes in the area.

Brookins, D.G. [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (US). Dept. of Geology

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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141

Detailed geochemical study of the Dan River-Danville Triassic Basin, North Carolina and Virginia. National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This abbreviated data report presents results of surface geochemical reconnaissance in the Dan River-Danville Triassic Basin of north-central North Carolina and south-central Virginia. Unweathered rock samples were collected at 380 sites within the basin at a nominal sampling density of one site per square mile. Field measurements and observations are reported for each site; analytical data and field measurements are presented in tables and maps. A detailed four-channel spectrometric survey was conducted, and the results are presented as a series of symbol plot maps for eU, eTh, and eU/eTh. Data from rock sample sites (on microfiche in pocket) include rock type and color and elemental analyses for U, Th, Hf, Al, Ce, Dy, Eu, Fe, La, Lu, Mn, Na, Sc, Sm, Ti, V, and Yb. Elemental uranium in 362 sedimentary rock samples from the Dan River-Danville Basin ranges from a low of 0.1 to a maximum of 13.3 parts per million (ppM). The log mean uranium concentration for these same samples is 0.37 ppM, and the log standard deviation is 0.24 ppM. Elemental uranium in 10 diabase dike samples from within the basin is in the range 0.1 to 0.7 ppM. The log mean uranium concentration for diabase samples is -.65 ppM, and the log standard deviation is 0.27. This report is issued in draft form, without detailed technical and copy editing. This was done to make the report available to the public before the end of the NURE program.

Thayer, P. A.; Cook, J. R.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Geochemical and hydrogeologic evolution of alkaline discharges from abandoned coal mines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Numerous large flow (> 2,000 l/min), historically (pre-1973) acidic, abandoned underground deep mine discharges in southwestern Pennsylvania are now alkaline in character, with circumneutral pH. Recently measured flow rates are consistent with those measured 25--30 years ago; thus the change in chemistry is not simply due to dilution by increased flows of uncontaminated water through the mines. It is likely that flooding of the mines has decreased the extent of acidity enhancing aerobic conditions, and that decades of weathering have reduced the amount of reactive pyrite. However, the mines continue to yield a sulfate-rich, Fe-contaminated (19--79 ppm) drainage. These highly alkaline discharges (up to 330 ppm as CaCO{sub 3}) are accompanied by large concentrations of sodium (up to 700 ppm) and suggest cation exchange with the associated overburden. To assess the hydrogeological conditions that result in the formation of alkaline Fe-contaminated mine discharges, the authors examined all the major discharges from a single synclinal basin. The northeast-trending Irwin synclinal coal basin encompasses 94 mi{sup 2} and was extensively mined by underground methods during the first half of this century. All major streams that arise within or cross the syncline are polluted by mine drainage that ranges from highly acidic Fe- and Al-contaminated discharges in the northern portion of the syncline to highly alkaline, iron and sulfate-contaminated discharges to the south. The hydrology of the basin is controlled by its southern plunging structure, by outcrops or drainage tunnels on the western arms of the syncline, and by several coal barriers. A first-order hydrogeologic model was constructed to evaluate ground water flow into and through the mine complexes found in the basin. The model integrates the basin geometry with structural and mine barrier components to determine groundwater flow paths and estimate residence time. Water quality is related to the cumulative proportion of up-gradient flooded and unflooded mine workings. Small discharges from unflooded, gravity-flow portions of the mined-out portion of the Pittsburgh Coal seam are highly acidic, and large artesian flows of water affected by only a short flow through flooded anoxic mine pools are moderately acidic. Those discharges subjected to increased residence time in flooded anoxic portions of the mines are increasingly alkaline. Refinement of this model could aid in prediction and hydrogeologic manipulation of these high flow Fe-contaminated discharges that are the main pollutant in many streams throughout Northern Appalachia and other coal mining areas throughout the world.

Winters, W.R.; Capo, R.C.; Wolinsky, M.A.; Weaver, T.J.; Hedin, R.S.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Geochemical and Cosmochemical Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Rehkämper et al. (E10) used ID-ICPMS to determine the PGEsIr, Ru, Pt, and Pdin mantle-derived xenoliths from the Cameroon Line and northern Tanzania. ... The 9-Ma half-life of 182Hf, combined with the highly refractory and immobile character of both Hf and W, makes this a useful system for studying processes that occurred in the early solar system. ...

Michael E. Lipschutz; Stephen F. Wolf; John M. Hanchar; F. Bartow Culp

1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

144

Geochemical and Cosmochemical Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The accompanying seven papers were able to compare remote spectral observations with limited ground truth, obtained after a soft landing on the minor planet. ... Hence, the impactor was not part of a comet shower. ... TEM studies of carbon-rich, fragile interplanetary dust particles (IDP)presumably of cometary origindo not contain nanodiamonds (G1), while carbon-rich meteorites contain 750?1500 ppm of them. ...

Michael E. Lipschutz; Stephen F. Wolf; John M. Hanchar; F. Bartow Culp

2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

145

Geochemical and Cosmochemical Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The 10-volume Treatise on Geochemistry (A3) devotes its first volume to meteorites, comets, and planets, with information on specific analytical techniques scattered throughout the work. ... The Stardust mission launched in February 1999 is to bring dust from the coma of comet 81P/Wild 2 collected on 2 January 2004 to Earth on 15 January 2006 for detailed laboratory analysis. ... Soil at this site compositionally resembles those at prior Martian landing sites while fresh rock surfaces suggest low-K primitive basalts, differing from those at the Pathfinder sites. ...

Michael E. Lipschutz; Stephen F. Wolf; F. Bartow Culp; John M. Hanchar

2005-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

146

Geochemical and Cosmochemical Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Asphaug (C2) provided a perspective for seven accompanying papers describing results from the Hayabusa (Falcon) spacecraft that flew by, and may have briefly landed on the 500-m S-type asteroid, 25143 Itokawa, to sample and, hopefully return surface materials to Earth. ... As part of a six-paper series describing the Spirit and Opportunity exploration rovers' results from the Gusev crater and Meridiani Planum landing places, respectively, Yen et al. (C6) described and compared the soil chemistry at mineralogy on opposite sites of Mars. ... As one of a six-paper report on the Deep Impact collision with Comet 9P/Tempel 1, Mumma et al. (C7) used high-dispersion IR (2.8?5.0 ?m) spectroscopy to quantify H2O, C2H6, HCN, CO, CH3OH, H2CO, C2H2, and CH4 in the comet before and after impact. ...

Michael E. Lipschutz; Stephen F. Wolf; F. Bartow Culp; Adam J. R. Kent

2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

147

Novel imaging techniques, integrated with mineralogical, geochemical and microbiological characterizations to determine the biogeochemical controls on technetium mobility in FRC sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research program was to take a highly multidisciplinary approach to define the biogeochemical factors that control technetium (Tc) mobility in FRC sediments. The aim was to use batch and column studies to probe the biogeochemical conditions that control the mobility of Tc at the FRC. Background sediment samples from Area 2 (pH 6.5, low nitrate, low {sup 99}Tc) and Area 3 (pH 3.5, high nitrate, relatively high {sup 99}Tc) of the FRC were selected (http://www.esd.ornl.gov/nabirfrc). For the batch experiments, sediments were mixed with simulated groundwater, modeled on chemical constituents of FRC waters and supplemented with {sup 99}Tc(VII), both with and without added electron donor (acetate). The solubility of the Tc was monitored, alongside other biogeochemical markers (nitrate, nitrite, Fe(II), sulfate, acetate, pH, Eh) as the 'microcosms' aged. At key points, the microbial communities were also profiled using both cultivation-dependent and molecular techniques, and results correlated with the geochemical conditions in the sediments. The mineral phases present in the sediments were also characterized, and the solid phase associations of the Tc determined using sequential extraction and synchrotron techniques. In addition to the batch sediment experiments, where discrete microbial communities with the potential to reduce and precipitate {sup 99}Tc will be separated in time, we also developed column experiments where biogeochemical processes were spatially separated. Experiments were conducted both with and without amendments proposed to stimulate radionuclide immobilization (e.g. the addition of acetate as an electron donor for metal reduction), and were also planned with and without competing anions at high concentration (e.g. nitrate, with columns containing Area 3 sediments). When the columns had stabilized, as determined by chemical analysis of the effluents, we used a spike of the short-lived gamma emitter {sup 99m}Tc (50-200 MBq; half life 6 hours) and its mobility was monitored using a {gamma}-camera. Incorporation of low concentrations of the long-lived 99Tc gave a tracer that can be followed by scintillation counting, should the metastable form of the radionuclide decay to below detection limits before the end of the experiment (complete immobilization or loss of the Tc from the column). After the Tc was reduced and immobilized, or passed through the system, the columns were dismantled carefully in an anaerobic cabinet and the pore water geochemistry and mineralogy of the columns profiled. Microbial community analysis was determined, again using molecular and culture-dependent techniques. Experimental results were also modeled using an established coupled speciation and transport code, to develop a predictive tool for the mobility of Tc in FRC sediments. From this multidisciplinary approach, we hoped to obtain detailed information on the microorganisms that control the biogeochemical cycling of key elements at the FRC, and we would also be able to determine the key factors that control the mobility of Tc at environmentally relevant concentrations at this site.

Jonathan R. Lloyd

2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

148

/ http://www.sciencemag.org/content/early/recent / 17 April 2014 / Page 1/ 10.1126/science.1249047 A diverse set of geochemical records has been developed from ice re-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

silty ice. This isotope is contin- uously produced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere, is delivered.1249047 A diverse set of geochemical records has been developed from ice re- covered in the 3054-m Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 (GISP2) core. These data provide a detailed history of climate and ice

Napp, Nils

149

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical definition of oil-shale facies in the lower Parachute Creek Member of Green River Formation, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical studies of two drill cores penetrating the lower Saline zone of the Parachute Creek Member (middle L-4 oil-shale zone through upper R-2 zone) of the Green River Formation in north-central Piceance Creek basin, Colorado, indicate the presence of two distinct oil-shale facies. The most abundant facies has laminated stratification and frequently occurs in the L-4, L-3 and L-2 oil-shale zones. The second, and subordinate facies, has ''streaked and blebby'' stratification and is most abundant in the R-4, R-3 and R-2 zones. Laminated oil shale originated by slow, regular sedimentation during meromictic phases of ancient Lake Uinta, whereas streaked and blebby oil shale was deposited by episodic, non-channelized turbidity currents. Laminated oil shale has higher contents of nahcolite, dawsonite, quartz, K-feldspar and calcite, but less dolomite/ankerite and albite than streaked and blebby oil shale. Ca-Mg-Fe carbonate minerals in laminated oil shale have more variable compositions than those in streaked and blebby shales. Streaked and blebby oil shale has more kerogen and a greater diversity of kerogen particles than laminated oil shale. Such variations may produce different pyrolysis reactions when each shale type is retorted.

Cole, R.D.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Geochemical, mineralogical and microbiological characteristics of sediment from a naturally reduced zone in a uranium-contaminated aquifer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Localized zones or lenses of naturally reduced sediments have the potential to play a significant role in the fate and transport of redox-sensitive metals and metalloids in aquifers. To assess the mineralogy, microbiology, and redox processes that occur in these zones, we examined several cores from a region of naturally occurring reducing conditions in a uranium-contaminated aquifer (Rifle, CO). Sediment samples from a transect of cores ranging from oxic/suboxic Rifle aquifer sediment to naturally reduced sediment were analyzed for uranium and iron content, oxidation state, and mineralogy, reduced sulfur phases, and solid phase organic carbon content using a suite of analytical and spectroscopic techniques on bulk sediment and size fractions. Solid-phase uranium concentrations were higher in the naturally reduced zone, with a high proportion of the uranium present as reduced U(IV). The sediments were also elevated in reduced sulfur phases and Fe(II), indicating it is very likely that U(VI), Fe(III), and sulfate reduction occurred or is occurring in the sediment. The microbial community was assessed using lipid- and DNA-based techniques, and statistical redundancy analysis was performed to determine correlations between the microbial community and the geochemistry. Increased concentration of solid phase organic carbon and biomass in the naturally reduced sediment suggests that natural bioreduction is stimulated by a zone of increased organic carbon concentration associated with fine-grained material and lower permeability to groundwater flow. Characterization of the naturally bioreduced sediment provides an understanding of the natural processes that occur in the sediment under reducing conditions and how they may impact natural attenuation of radionuclides and other redox sensitive materials. Results also suggest the importance of recalcitrant organic carbon for maintaining reducing conditions and uranium immobilization.

Campbell, Kate M.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Peacock, Aaron D.; Lesher, E.; Williams, Kenneth H.; Bargar, John R.; Wilkins, Michael J.; Figueroa, Linda A.; Ranville, James; Davis, James; Long, Philip E.

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

151

Organic geochemical studies at a commercial shallow-land disposal site of low-level nuclear waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The subsurface migration of radionuclides has been studied at a commercial, shallow-land burial site of low-level nuclear waste at Maxey Flats, Kentucky. A variety of radionuclides including /sup 3/H, /sup 238/ /sup 239/ /sup 240/Pu, /sup 60/Co, /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr have migrated short distances on-site (meters to tens of meters). A number of the mobile radionuclides, notably plutonium and /sup 60/Co, appear to exist as anionic species with organic properties. As a result, we have studied the organic geochemistry of radioactive leachates pumped from a number of waste burial trenches throughout the site. The major aim of the organic research is to elucidate the role of organic compounds in mediating the subsurface migration of the mobile radionuclides in groundwater. A survey study of the hydrophilic and hydrophobic organic content of the waste leachates has revealed that organic compounds are readily leached from the buried waste. Organic chelating agents like EDTA, HEDTA and ED3A are the major hydrophilic organic compounds in the leachates, their concentrations ranging from 78 ppB to 19,511 ppB. A number of carboxylic acids are also present in the leachates, ranging from 675 ppB to 8757 ppB, collectively. A variety of hydrophobic organic compounds including barbiturates and other aromatic compounds, presumably waste-derived, are also present in the leachates, generally at lower ppB concentrations. A detailed chemical speciation study, aimed at determining whether any of the organic compounds identified in the survey study are associated with the mobile radionuclides, was undertaken using leachate from one of the waste trenches. It is clear that EDTA is chelated to plutonium and /sup 60/Co in the leachate, potentially mobilizing these radionuclides. Other radionuclides, /sup 137/Cs and /sup 90/Sr, may be associated with polar organic compounds such as carboxylic acids. 14 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

Toste, A.P.; Kirby, L.J.; Pahl, T.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Simulation of the effects of geochemical reactions on groundwater quality during planned flooding of the Königstein uranium mine, Saxony, Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

?Uranium mining in southeastern Germany resulted in significant environmental risks. Closure of the mines and subsequent rises of water levels may result in heavy-metal and radionuclide-bearing mine waters pen...

Daniel Biehler; W. Eberhard Falck

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

DOE ER63951-3 Final Report: An Integrated Assessment of Geochemical and Community Structure Determinants of Metal Reduction Rates in Subsurface Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to examine the importance of microbial community structure in influencing uranium reduction rates in subsurface sediments. If the redox state alone is the key to metal reduction, then any organisms that can utilize the oxygen and nitrate in the subsurface can change the geochemical conditions so metal reduction becomes an energetically favored reaction. Thus, community structure would not be critical in determining rates or extent of metal reduction unless community structure influenced the rate of change in redox. Alternatively, some microbes may directly catalyze metal reduction (e.g., specifically reduce U). In this case the composition of the community may be more important and specific types of electron donors may promote the production of communities that are more adept at U reduction. Our results helped determine if the type of electron donor or the preexisting community is important in the bioremediation of metal-contaminated environments subjected to biostimulation. In a series of experiments at the DOE FRC site in Oak Ridge we have consistently shown that all substrates promoted nitrate reduction, while glucose, ethanol, and acetate always promoted U reduction. Methanol only occasionally promoted extensive U reduction which is possibly due to community heterogeneity. There appeared to be limitations imposed on the community related to some substrates (e.g. methanol and pyruvate). Membrane lipid analyses (phospholipids and respiratory quinones) indicated different communities depending on electron donor used. Terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism and clone libraries indicated distinct differences among communities even in treatments that promoted U reduction. Thus, there was enough metabolic diversity to accommodate many different electron donors resulting in the U bioimmobilization.

Susan Pfiffner

2010-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

154

Geochemical Characterization of Chromate Contamination in the 100 Area Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site - Part 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the Hanford Site, chromate was used throughout the 100 Areas (100-B, 100-C, 100-D/DR, 100-F, 100-H, and 100 K) as a corrosion inhibitor in reactor cooling water. Chromate was delivered in rail cars, tanker trucks, barrels, and local pipelines as dichromate granular solid or stock solution. In many occasions, chromate was inevitably discharged to surface or near-surface ground through spills during handling, pipeline leaks, or during disposal to cribs. The composition of the liquids that were discharged is not known and it is quite possible that Cr(VI) fate and transport in the contaminated sediments would be a function of the chemical composition of the waste fluids. The major objectives of this investigation which was limited in scope by the financial resources available, were to 1) determine the leaching characteristics of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated sediments collected from 100-D Area spill sites; 2) elucidate possible Cr(VI) mineral and/or chemical associations that may be responsible for Cr(VI) retention in the Hanford Site 100 Areas through the use of macroscopic leaching studies, and microscale characterization of contaminated sediments; and 3) provide information to construct a conceptual model of Cr(VI) geochemistry in the Hanford 100 Area vadose zone that can be used for developing options for environmental remediation. The information gathered from this research effort will help to further improve our understanding of Cr(VI) behavior in the vadose zone and will also help in accelerating the 100 Area Columbia River Corridor cleanup by providing valuable information to develop remedial action based on a fundamental understanding of Cr(VI) vadose zone geochemistry. A series of column experiments were conducted with contaminated sediments to study Cr(VI) desorption patterns. Column experiments used the field size fraction of the sediment samples and a simulated Hanford Site groundwater solution. Periodic stop flow events were applied to evaluate the change in elemental concentration during time periods of no flow and greater fluid residence time. Sediments were characterized for the spatial and mineralogical associations of the contamination using some microscale techniques such as X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Mössbauer spectroscopy.

Qafoku, Nikolla; Dresel, P. Evan; McKinley, James P.; Ilton, Eugene S.; Um, Wooyong; Resch, Charles T.; Kukkadapu, Ravi K.; Petersen, Scott W.

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

155

Data Package for Past and Current Groundwater Flow and Contamination beneath Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Areas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This appendix summarizes historic and recent groundwater data collected from the uppermost aquifer beneath the 200 East and 200 West Areas. Although the area of interest is the Hanford Site Central Plateau, most of the information discussed in this appendix is at the scale of individual single-shell tank waste management areas. This is because the geologic, and thus the hydraulic, properties and the geochemical properties (i.e., groundwater composition) are different in different parts of the Central Plateau.

Horton, Duane G.

2007-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

156

GEOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF ATMOSPHERIC EVOLUTION  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...red-beds and continental grey-green beds are often demonstrably...formations are at least in the green schist facies of metamorphism...stratified dolomites are replaced lime- stones, formed under a variety...Proterozoic strata is due to the mineral being of postlithification metasomatic...

Charles F. Davidson

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Freshwater wetlands are an important natural resource; on a local scale they function to buffer hydrological and geochemical processes, and on a global scale they are  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. To properly model the heat transport, I modified the US Geological Survey SUTRA groundwater and energy-urbanized watershed. Heat and hydraulic head data measured in the peat of a large bog in Minnesota was modeled) that provide drinking water to the City of New York. The focus of my study was to evaluate how wetlands control

McKenzie, Jeffrey M.

158

Reduced-Order Model for the Geochemical Impacts of Carbon Dioxide, Brine and Trace Metal Leakage into an Unconfined, Oxidizing Carbonate Aquifer, Version 2.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) consists of 5 U.S DOE national laboratories collaborating to develop a framework for predicting the risks associated with carbon sequestration. The approach taken by NRAP is to divide the system into components, including injection target reservoirs, wellbores, natural pathways including faults and fractures, groundwater and the atmosphere. Next, develop a detailed, physics and chemistry-based model of each component. Using the results of the detailed models, develop efficient, simplified models, termed reduced order models (ROM) for each component. Finally, integrate the component ROMs into a system model that calculates risk profiles for the site. This report details the development of the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer at PNNL. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM for the Edwards Aquifer uses a Wellbore Leakage ROM developed at LANL as input. The detailed model, using the STOMP simulator, covers a 5x8 km area of the Edwards Aquifer near San Antonio, Texas. The model includes heterogeneous hydraulic properties, and equilibrium, kinetic and sorption reactions between groundwater, leaked CO2 gas, brine, and the aquifer carbonate and clay minerals. Latin Hypercube sampling was used to generate 1024 samples of input parameters. For each of these input samples, the STOMP simulator was used to predict the flux of CO2 to the atmosphere, and the volume, length and width of the aquifer where pH was less than the MCL standard, and TDS, arsenic, cadmium and lead exceeded MCL standards. In order to decouple the Wellbore Leakage ROM from the Groundwater Geochemistry ROM, the response surface was transformed to replace Wellbore Leakage ROM input parameters with instantaneous and cumulative CO2 and brine leakage rates. The most sensitive parameters proved to be the CO2 and brine leakage rates from the well, with equilibrium coefficients for calcite and dolomite, as well as the number of illite and kaolinite sorption sites proving to be of secondary importance. The Groundwater Geochemistry ROM was developed using nonlinear regression to fit the response surface with a quadratic polynomial. The goodness of fit was excellent for the CO2 flux to the atmosphere, and very good for predicting the volumes of groundwater exceeding the pH, TDS, As, Cd and Pb threshold values.

Bacon, Diana H.

2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Groundwater Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., Groundwater Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Groundwater Sampling At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Groundwater Sampling Activity Date 1983 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Groundwater_Sampling_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=689261"

160

Microbiological, Geochemical and Hydrologic Processes Controlling Uranium Mobility: An Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Site at Rifle, Colorado, Quality Assurance Project Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is cleaning up and/or monitoring large, dilute plumes contaminated by metals, such as uranium and chromium, whose mobility and solubility change with redox status. Field-scale experiments with acetate as the electron donor have stimulated metal-reducing bacteria to effectively remove uranium [U(VI)] from groundwater at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site in Rifle, Colorado. The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and a multidisciplinary team of national laboratory and academic collaborators has embarked on a research proposed for the Rifle site, the object of which is to gain a comprehensive and mechanistic understanding of the microbial factors and associated geochemistry controlling uranium mobility so that DOE can confidently remediate uranium plumes as well as support stewardship of uranium-contaminated sites. This Quality Assurance Project Plan provides the quality assurance requirements and processes that will be followed by the Rifle Integrated Field-Scale Subsurface Research Challenge Project.

Fix, N. J.

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

DOE/SC0001389 Final technical report: Investigation of uranium attenuation and release at column and pore scales in response to advective geochemical gradients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental approach Column experiments were devised to investigate the role of changing fluid composition on mobility of uranium through a sequence of geologic media. Fluids and media were chosen to be relevant to the ground water plume emanating from the former S-3 ponds at the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge (ORIFC) site. Synthetic ground waters were pumped upwards at 0.05 mL/minute for 21 days through layers of quartz sand alternating with layers of uncontaminated soil, quartz sand mixed with illite, quartz sand coated with iron oxides, and another soil layer. Increases in pH or concentration of phosphate, bicarbonate, or acetate were imposed on the influent solutions after each 7 pore volumes while uranium (as uranyl) remained constant at 0.1mM. A control column maintained the original synthetic groundwater composition with 0.1mM U. Pore water solutions were extracted to assess U retention and release in relation to the advective ligand or pH gradients. Following the column experiments, subsamples from each layer were characterized using microbeam X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES) in conjunction with X-ray fluorescence mapping and compared to sediment core samples from the ORIFC, at SSRL Beam Line 2-3. Results U retention of 55 â?? 67 mg occurred in phosphate >pH >control >acetate >carbonate columns. The mass of U retained in the first-encountered quartz layer in all columns was highest and increased throughout the experiment. The rate of increase in acetate- and bicarbonate-bearing columns declined after ligand concentrations were raised. U also accumulated in the first soil layer; the pH-varied column retained most, followed by the increasing-bicarbonate column. The mass of U retained in the upper layers was far lower. Speciation of U, interpreted from microbeam XANES spectra and XRF maps, varied within and among the columns. Evidence of minor reduction to U(IV) was observed in the first-encountered quartz layer in the phosphate, bicarbonate, and pH columns while only U(VI) was observed in the control and acetate columns. In the soil layer, the acetate and bicarbonate columns both indicate minor reduction to U(IV), but U(VI) predominated in all columns. In the ORIFC soils, U was consistently present as U(VI); sorption appears to be the main mechanism of association for U present with Fe and/or Mn, while U occurring with P appears in discrete particles consistent with a U mineral phase. U in soil locations with no other elemental associations shown by XRF are likely uranium oxide phases.

Savage, Kaye S. [Wofford College; Zhu, Wenyi [Wofford College; Barnett, Mark O. [Auburn University

2013-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

162

Spatial and temporal variability in vegetation and coal facies as reflected by organic petrological and geochemical data in the Middle Miocene Çayirhan coal field (Turkey)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Coal channel samples of Middle Miocene age are collected from the first (Tv) and second (Tb) seams from underground mines and from exploration boreholes within the Çayirhan coal field in the Beypazari Basin (Turkey). They are investigated in order to detect spatial and temporal changes in maceral and molecular composition of coal and to relate them to changes in vegetation and depositional environment. The mean random reflectance values of ulminite (0.40% Rr) indicate a lignite to subbituminous-C coal in rank. Maceral composition and biomarker ratios of the samples from both seams at the Çayirhan deposit argue for coal formation in a limno-telmatic environment under dysoxic to anoxic conditions. Alkaline surface waters of changing pH-values and a high and unstable water level at the palaeomire are evidenced by moderate to high gelification index (GI) and ground water influence (GWI) values, as well as high sulphur contents. Variations in tissue preservation index (TPI) and vegetation index (VI) values point to minor variations in the palaeovegetation during peat formation. Herbaceous plants dominated in both Tb and Tv palaeomires (low TPI and VI values), whereas in the surroundings arboreal vegetation were predominant. The decreasing trends in pristane/phytane ratios and carbon preference index (CPI) values towards the NE are suggested to reflect oxygen deficient conditions during peat formation due to a higher (ground)water level in this part of the basin. The occurrence of C29 diasterenes in low abundances provides evidence for periods of lower pH in the mire. The borehole samples from the NE show slightly enhanced contributions of n-alkanes from algal and microbial sources. The terpenoid hydrocarbons present in the lignite argue for a major contribution of angiosperms to peat formation and slightly enhanced proportions of gymnosperms in the Tv palaeomire in the NE. Based on the high concentrations of lupane-type triterpenoids in the coal seams from the underground mine, a higher density of Betulaceae in the arboreal vegetation in the SW is indicated.

Achim Bechtel; Ali Ihsan Karayi?it; Reinhard F. Sachsenhofer; Hülya ?naner; Kimon Christanis; Reinhard Gratzer

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Investigating groundwater and surface water interactions using novel isotopes and geochemical tracers in the upper Merced River Basin, Sierra Nevada, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tubbs, and H. E. Gove, Thermonuclear 36 Cl pulse in naturalTubbs, and H. E. Gove, Thermonuclear 36 Cl pulse in naturalfrom above-ground thermonuclear weapons testing, similar to

Shaw, Glenn David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Investigating groundwater and surface water interactions using novel isotopes and geochemical tracers in the upper Merced River Basin, Sierra Nevada, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

48 Measured electrical conductivity vs. predicted electricalFigure 2.8: Measured electrical conductivity vs. predicted

Shaw, Glenn David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

A Conceptual Model of Groundwater Flow at the Midway, Utah Fish Hatchery as Constrained by Geochemical, Physical Hydrogeological, and Geophysical Methods.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In addition to a loss of potential revenues from Utah’s $393 million sport fishing industry, the state expends millions of dollars every year on costs… (more)

Durrant, Camille 1978-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

A Conceptual Model of Groundwater Flow at the Midway, Utah Fish Hatchery as Constrained by Geochemical, Physical Hydrogeological, and Geophysical Methods.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In addition to a loss of potential revenues from Utah's $393 million sport fishing industry, the state expends millions of dollars every year on costs… (more)

Durrant, Camille

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004-2011) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004-2011) Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004-2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Groundwater Sampling At Raft River Geothermal Area (2004-2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Groundwater Sampling Activity Date 2004 - 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Collect new water chemistry data on geothermal field Notes From mid-2004 to present, US Geothermal Inc. has collected geochemical data from geothermal and monitoring wells in the field, as well as other shallow wells in the area. An additional sampling program was completed in July 2010 to measure a wider range of trace elements and key water isotopes (δ18O, δD, and 3H (Tritium)) in the field. The data indicate that the

168

Groundwater Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

can be a useful geochemical indicator for geothermal exploration when other water chemistry techniques are ambiguous. This research was useful for locating some areas which...

169

GSUE: urban geochemical mapping in Great Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...traffic fume contamination as it is added to diesel to reduce soot emissions (e.g. Petkov...mechanism of action of antismoke additives for diesel fuels. Oxidation Communications , 22...Heavy metal contents in vegetables and market garden soils in Hong Kong. Environmental...

F.M. Fordyce; S.E. Brown; E.L. Ander; B.G. Rawlins; K.E. O'Donnell; T.R. Lister; N. Breward; C.C. Johnson

170

Geochemical characerization of endmember mantle components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis uses trace elements and radiogenic isotope tracers to define elemental abundances in reservoirs of the Earth's mantle, including EM2 (the Enriched Mantle 2), as seen in the Samoan hotspot track, and DMM (the ...

Workman, Rhea K

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Organic geochemical biosignatures in alkaline Hydrothermal ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The 13C content of microbial products are controlled by many factors, including the 13C content of the growth substrate, growth rate, the flux of carbon through various parts of the biochemical network, and the isotopic ...

Bradley, Alexander Smith

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Pelagic Sedimentation of Aragonite: Its Geochemical Significance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DEPOSITION AND CALCAREOUS ALGAE IN BIGHT OF ABACO, BAHAMAS - BUDGET...oceanography Pacific Ocean Panama Basin pelagic environment pelagic...A C A C A C A C flux Panama Basin (station PB) (5 21'N...station E) and the Pan-ama Basin in the Pacific (station PB...

ROBERT A. BERNER; SUSUMU HONJO

1981-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

173

Geochemical aspects of radioactive waste disposal  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The book addresses various topics related to the geochemistry of waste disposal: natural radioactivity, kinds of radioactive waste, details of possible disposal sites, low-level waste, uranium mill tailing, natural analogs, waste forms, and engineered barriers. Emphasis throughout is on the importance of natural analogs, the behavior of elements resembling those to be put in a waste repository as they occur in natural situations where the temperature, pressure, and movement of ground water are similar to those expected near a repository. The author is convinced that conclusions drawn from the study of analog elements are directly applicable to predictions about radionuclide behavior, and that the observed near-immobility of most of these elements in comparable geologic environments is good evidence that radioactive waste can be disposed of underground with negligible effects on the biosphere. Much of his own research has been in this area, and the best parts of the book are the descriptions of his work on trace elements in the salt minerals at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in southeastern New Mexico, on the movement of radionuclides and their daughter elements from the famous Precambrian reactor at Oklahoma in Gabon, and on the distribution of analog elements in rocks near the contacts of igneous intrusions.

Brookins, D.G.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Geochemical, Genetic, and Community Controls on Mercury  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) are soil bacteria that share two common characteristics, strict anaerobiosis and the ability to respire sulfate. The metabolic activities of these bacteria play significant roles in the global sulfur cycle, anaerobic degradation of biomass, biological metal corrosion in the environment and, recently, degradation of toxic compounds. The accumulation of evidence suggests these bacteria are also key to the production of the neurotoxin methylmercury in environmental settings. We propose to use our experience with the development of genetics in sulfate-reducing bacteria of the genus Desulfovibrio to create mutations that will eliminate the methylation of mercury, thereby identifying the genes essential for this process. This information may allow the environmental monitoring of the mercury methylation potential to learn the location and quantity of the production this toxin. From these data, more accurate predictive models of mercury cycling can be generated.

Wall, Judy D.

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

175

Geochemical taphonomy of shallow marine vertebrate assemblages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: bones; taphonomy; rare earth elements; diagenesis; redox; marine 1. Introduction 1.1. Background Many). Trueman and Benton (1997) and Staron et al. (2001) demonstrated that the rare earth ele- ment (REE.R. Palmer b a Department of Earth Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol BS8 1RJ, UK b School of Ocean

Benton, Michael

176

Optimizing parameters for predicting the geochemical behavior...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of Fracture Networks and Fluid Flow in EGS Reservoirs; II: Full-Waveform Inversion of 3D-9C VSP data from Bradys EGS Site and Update of the Brady Reservoir Scale Model...

177

New geochemical insights into volcanic degassing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...It is clear that, as well as measuring gas emissions...Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research. Scientific...eruptions. J. Volcanol. Geothermal Res. 134, 77-107...Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico, from olivine-hosted...analysis. J. Volcanol. Geothermal Res. 108, 11-31...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Estimation of the release and migration of lead through soils and groundwater at the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was performed to evaluate the potential for transport of lead from the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground to the surrounding surface- and groundwater. Burial of metal components containing nickel alloy steel and lead at this location may eventually result in release of lead to the subsurface environment, including groundwater aquifers that may be used for domestic and agricultural purposes in the future and, ultimately, to the Columbia River. The rate at which lead is transported to downgradient locations depends on a complex set of factors, such as climate, soil and groundwater chemistry, and the geologic and hydrologic configuration of the subsurface region between the burial ground and a potential receptor location. The groundwater transport analysis was conducted using a one-dimensional screening model with a relatively conservative matrix of parameters obtained from the hydrogeologic and geochemical studies.

Rhoads, K.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Lewis, R.E.; Teel, S.S.; Cantrell, K.J.; Serne, R.J.; Smoot, J.L.; Kincaid, C.T.; Wurstner, S.K.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Estimation of the release and migration of lead through soils and groundwater at the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground. Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study was performed to evaluate the potential for transport of lead from the Hanford Site 218-E-12B Burial Ground to the surrounding surface- and groundwater. Burial of metal components containing nickel alloy steel and lead at this location may eventually result in release of lead to the subsurface environment, including groundwater aquifers that may be used for domestic and agricultural purposes in the future and, ultimately, to the Columbia River. The rate at which lead is transported to downgradient locations depends on a complex set of factors, such as climate, soil and groundwater chemistry, and the geologic and hydrologic configuration of the subsurface region between the burial ground and a potential receptor location. The groundwater transport analysis was conducted using a one-dimensional screening model with a relatively conservative matrix of parameters obtained from the hydrogeologic and geochemical studies.

Rhoads, K.; Bjornstad, B.N.; Lewis, R.E.; Teel, S.S.; Cantrell, K.J.; Serne, R.J.; Smoot, J.L.; Kincaid, C.T.; Wurstner, S.K.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Field Mapping At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References William R. Henkle Jr., Wayne C. Gundersen, Thomas D. Gundersen (2005) Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Radiometrics At Reese River Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

References William R. Henkle Jr., Wayne C. Gundersen, Thomas D. Gundersen (2005) Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three...

182

Mercury Vapor At Silver Peak Area (Henkle, Et Al., 2005) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

William R. Henkle Jr., Wayne C. Gundersen, Thomas D. Gundersen (2005) Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal...

183

Updated Conceptual Model for the 300 Area Uranium Groundwater Plume  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 300 Area uranium groundwater plume in the 300-FF-5 Operable Unit is residual from past discharge of nuclear fuel fabrication wastes to a number of liquid (and solid) disposal sites. The source zones in the disposal sites were remediated by excavation and backfilled to grade, but sorbed uranium remains in deeper, unexcavated vadose zone sediments. In spite of source term removal, the groundwater plume has shown remarkable persistence, with concentrations exceeding the drinking water standard over an area of approximately 1 km2. The plume resides within a coupled vadose zone, groundwater, river zone system of immense complexity and scale. Interactions between geologic structure, the hydrologic system driven by the Columbia River, groundwater-river exchange points, and the geochemistry of uranium contribute to persistence of the plume. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) recently completed a Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Study (RI/FS) to document characterization of the 300 Area uranium plume and plan for beginning to implement proposed remedial actions. As part of the RI/FS document, a conceptual model was developed that integrates knowledge of the hydrogeologic and geochemical properties of the 300 Area and controlling processes to yield an understanding of how the system behaves and the variables that control it. Recent results from the Hanford Integrated Field Research Challenge site and the Subsurface Biogeochemistry Scientific Focus Area Project funded by the DOE Office of Science were used to update the conceptual model and provide an assessment of key factors controlling plume persistence.

Zachara, John M.; Freshley, Mark D.; Last, George V.; Peterson, Robert E.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program Groundwater Monitoring Data Compendium, Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a compendium of water quality and hydrologic characterization data obtained through December 2005 from the network of groundwater monitoring wells and surface water sampling stations (including springs and building sumps) at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Y-12 National Security Complex (Y-12) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee that have been sampled since January 2003. The primary objectives of this document, hereafter referenced as the Y-12 Groundwater Protection Program (GWPP) Compendium, are to: (1) Serve as a single-source reference for monitoring data that meet the requirements of the Y-12 GWPP, as defined in the Y-12 GWPP Management Plan (BWXT Y-12 L.L.C. [BWXT] 2004); (2) Maintain a detailed analysis and evaluation of the monitoring data for each applicable well, spring, and surface water sampling station, with a focus on results for the primary inorganic, organic, and radiological contaminants in groundwater and surface water at Y-12; and (3) Ensure retention of ''institutional knowledge'' obtained over the long-term (>20-year) history of groundwater and surface water monitoring at Y-12 and the related sources of groundwater and surface water contamination. To achieve these goals, the Y-12 GWPP Compendium brings together salient hydrologic, geologic, geochemical, water-quality, and environmental compliance information that is otherwise disseminated throughout numerous technical documents and reports prepared in support of completed and ongoing environmental contamination assessment, remediation, and monitoring activities performed at Y-12. The following subsections provide background information regarding the overall scope and format of the Y-12 GWPP Compendium and the planned approach for distribution and revision (i.e., administration) of this ''living'' document.

None

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

A User’s Guide to the Comprehensive Water Quality Database for Groundwater in the Vicinity of the Nevada Test Site, Rev. No.: 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This water quality database (viz.GeochemXX.mdb) has been developed as part of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Program with the cooperation of several agencies actively participating in ongoing evaluation and characterization activities under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO). The database has been constructed to provide up-to-date, comprehensive, and quality controlled data in a uniform format for the support of current and future projects. This database provides a valuable tool for geochemical and hydrogeologic evaluations of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and surrounding region. Chemistry data have been compiled for groundwater within the NTS and the surrounding region. These data include major ions, organic compounds, trace elements, radionuclides, various field parameters, and environmental isotopes. Colloid data are also included in the database. The GeochemXX.mdb database is distributed on an annual basis. The extension ''XX'' within the database title is replaced by the last two digits of the release year (e.g., Geochem06 for the version released during the 2006 fiscal year). The database is distributed via compact disc (CD) and is also uploaded to the Common Data Repository (CDR) in order to make it available to all agencies with DOE intranet access. This report provides an explanation of the database configuration and summarizes the general content and utility of the individual data tables. In addition to describing the data, subsequent sections of this report provide the data user with an explanation of the quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) protocols for this database.

Farnham, Irene

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Research Project on CO2 Geological Storage and Groundwater Resources: Water Quality Effects Caused by CO2 Intrusion into Shallow Groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One promising approach to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is injecting CO{sub 2} into suitable geologic formations, typically depleted oil/gas reservoirs or saline formations at depth larger than 800 m. Proper site selection and management of CO{sub 2} storage projects will ensure that the risks to human health and the environment are low. However, a risk remains that CO{sub 2} could migrate from a deep storage formation, e.g. via local high-permeability pathways such as permeable faults or degraded wells, and arrive in shallow groundwater resources. The ingress of CO{sub 2} is by itself not typically a concern to the water quality of an underground source of drinking water (USDW), but it will change the geochemical conditions in the aquifer and will cause secondary effects mainly induced by changes in pH, in particular the mobilization of hazardous inorganic constituents present in the aquifer minerals. Identification and assessment of these potential effects is necessary to analyze risks associated with geologic sequestration of CO{sub 2}. This report describes a systematic evaluation of the possible water quality changes in response to CO{sub 2} intrusion into aquifers currently used as sources of potable water in the United States. Our goal was to develop a general understanding of the potential vulnerability of United States potable groundwater resources in the event of CO{sub 2} leakage. This goal was achieved in two main tasks, the first to develop a comprehensive geochemical model representing typical conditions in many freshwater aquifers (Section 3), the second to conduct a systematic reactive-transport modeling study to quantify the effect of CO{sub 2} intrusion into shallow aquifers (Section 4). Via reactive-transport modeling, the amount of hazardous constituents potentially mobilized by the ingress of CO{sub 2} was determined, the fate and migration of these constituents in the groundwater was predicted, and the likelihood that drinking water standards might be exceeded was evaluated. A variety of scenarios and aquifer conditions was considered in a sensitivity evaluation. The scenarios and conditions simulated in Section 4, in particular those describing the geochemistry and mineralogy of potable aquifers, were selected based on the comprehensive geochemical model developed in Section 3.

Birkholzer, Jens; Apps, John; Zheng, Liange; Zhang, Yingqi; Xu, Tianfu; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Groundwater monitoring program evaluation For A/M Area, Savannah River Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This investigation was undertaken with the primary purpose of assessing the groundwater monitoring program within the A/M Area to identify ways in which the monitoring program could be improved. The task was difficult due to the large number of wells located within the A/M Area and the huge database of analytical data. It was recognized early in this investigation that one of the key tasks was to develop a way to gain access to the groundwater databases so that recommendations could be made. To achieve this, geographic information systems (GIS) technology was used to extract pertinent groundwater quality information from the Geochemical Information Management System (GIMS) groundwater database and display the extracted information spatially. GIS technology was also used to determine the location of well screen and annular material zones within the A/M Area hydrostratigraphy and to identify wells that may breach confining units. Recommendations developed from this study address: (1) wells that may not be providing reliable data but continue to be routinely sampled (2) wells that may be inappropriately located but continue to be routinely sampled and (3) further work that should be undertaken, including well development, evaluation of wells that may be breaching confining units, and development of an automated link to GIMS using GIS so that GIMS data can easily be accessed and displayed geographically.

Hiergesell, R.A.; Bollinger, J.S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Chemical and isotopic data for groundwater in southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents a compilation of chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples analyzed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Program (UGTA) for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office. Included are data for 107 samples collected from wells and springs located on and around the Nevada Test Site (NTS), within an area approximately bounded by latitudes 36{sup o} to 38{sup o}15'N and longitudes 115{sup o} to 117{sup o}15'W. The samples were collected during the time period 1992 to early 1997. The data represents one of the largest internally consistent geochemical data sets to be gathered for groundwater in southern Nevada. This database is available in electronic or hardcopy formats to interested parties upon request. In addition to the LLNL data we have included a table of selected isotopic data summarized from a larger database compiled by GeoTrans, Inc. (1994). This data is included for comparative purposes as a means of placing the LLNL data in the context of other data for the same geographic region.

Rose, T. P., LLNL

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

The impact of CO2 on shallow groundwater chemistry: observations at a natural analog site and implications for carbon sequestration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a natural analog study of risks associated with carbon sequestration, impacts of CO{sub 2} on shallow groundwater quality have been measured in a sandstone aquifer in New Mexico, USA. Despite relatively high levels of dissolved CO{sub 2}, originating from depth and producing geysering at one well, pH depression and consequent trace element mobility are relatively minor effects due to the buffering capacity of the aquifer. However, local contamination due to influx of saline waters in a subset of wells is significant. Geochemical modeling of major ion concentrations suggests that high alkalinity and carbonate mineral dissolution buffers pH changes due to CO{sub 2} influx. Analysis oftrends in dissolved trace elements, chloride, and CO2 reveal no evidence of in-situ trace element mobilization. There is clear evidence, however, that As, U, and Pb are locally co-transported into the aquifer with CO{sub 2}-rich saline water. This study illustrates the role that local geochemical conditions will play in determining the effectiveness of monitoring strategies for CO{sub 2} leakage. For example, if buffering is significant, pH monitoring may not effectively detect CO2 leakage. This study also highlights potential complications that CO{sub 2}carrier fluids, such as saline waters, pose in monitoring impacts ofgeologic sequestration.

Keating, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fessenden, Julianna [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kanjorski, Nancy [NON LANL; Koning, Dan [NM BUREAU OF GEOLOGY AND MINERAL RESOURCES; Pawar, Rajesh [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

A Transient Numerical Simulation of Perched Ground-Water Flow at the Test Reactor Area, Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho, 1952-94  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies of flow through the unsaturated zone and perched ground-water zones above the Snake River Plain aquifer are part of the overall assessment of ground-water flow and determination of the fate and transport of contaminants in the subsurface at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). These studies include definition of the hydrologic controls on the formation of perched ground-water zones and description of the transport and fate of wastewater constituents as they moved through the unsaturated zone. The definition of hydrologic controls requires stratigraphic correlation of basalt flows and sedimentary interbeds within the saturated zone, analysis of hydraulic properties of unsaturated-zone rocks, numerical modeling of the formation of perched ground-water zones, and batch and column experiments to determine rock-water geochemical processes. This report describes the development of a transient numerical simulation that was used to evaluate a conceptual model of flow through perched ground-water zones beneath wastewater infiltration ponds at the Test Reactor Area (TRA).

B. R. Orr (USGS)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Groundwater model recalibration and remediation well network design at the F-Area Seepage Basins  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On September 30, 1992, the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) issued a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Hazardous Waste Part B Permit prescribing remediation of contaminated groundwater beneath and downgradient of the F- and H-Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site. The remediation outlined in the Part B Permit calls for a three phase approach. For the F-Area Seepage Basins, the first phase requires the ``installation of an adequate number of pumping and injection wells or trenches, as appropriate, to capture and remediate those portions of-the contaminant plume delineated by the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour.`` Geochemical results from 1992 groundwater monitoring were used to delineate this isoconcentration contour in the Corrective Action Program (CAP) (WSRC, 1992a). The 1992 results were used based on SCDHEC written requirement to use the most recent data available at the time the CAP was formulated. The rationale used by SCDHEC in selecting the 10,000 pCi/ml tritium isoconcentration contour was that it also encompassed most of the other contaminants listed in the Groundwater Protection Standards. After extraction and treatment, the water is required to be reinjected into the aquifer due to the high levels of tritium still present in the treated water. The conceptual plan is to have recirculation of the tritium (as much as can practically be accomplished) to allow more time for radioactive decay before natural discharge to surface water.

Sadler, W.R.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2009.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is being performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater was sampled twice yearly from September 2005 until September 2007 for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation (reductive dechlorination) processes in the subsurface environment. The results from the two-year sampling program demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound in a localized groundwater plume that has shown little movement. The relative concentrations of chloroform, the primary degradation product of carbon tetrachloride, suggested that some degree of reductive dechlorination or natural biodegradation was taking place in situ at the former CCC/USDA facility on a localized scale. The CCC/USDA subsequently developed an Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007b), proposing a pilot test of the Adventus EHC technology for in situ chemical reduction (ISCR). The proposed interim measure (IM) was approved by the KDHE in November 2007 (KDHE 2007). Implementation of the pilot test occurred in November-December 2007. The objective was to create highly reducing conditions that would enhance both chemical and biological reductive dechlorination in the injection test area (Argonne 2009a). The KDHE (2008a) has requested that sitewide monitoring continue at Centralia until a final remedy has been selected (as part of a Corrective Action Study [CAS] evaluation) and implemented for this site. In response to this request, twice-yearly sampling of 10 monitoring wells and 6 piezometers (Figure 1.1) previously approved by the KDHE for monitoring of the groundwater at Centralia (KDHE 2005a,b) was continued in 2008. The sampling events under this extension of the two-year (2005-2007) monitoring program occurred in March and September 2008 (Argonne 2008b, 2009b). Additional piezometers specifically installed to evaluate the progress of the IM pilot test (PMP1-PMP9; Figure 1.2) were also sampled in 2008; the results of these analyses were reported and discussed separately (Argonne 2009a). On the basis of results of the 2005-2008 sitewide monitoring and the 2008 IM pilot test monitoring, the CCC/USDA recommended a revised sampling program to address both of the continuing monitoring objectives until a CAS for Centralia is developed (Section 4.2 in Argonne 2009b). The elements of this interim monitoring plan are as follows: (1) Annual sampling of twelve previously established (before the pilot test) monitoring points (locations identified in Figure 1.3) and the five outlying pilot test monitoring points (PMP4, PMP5, PMP6, PMP7, PMP9; Figure 1.4); and (2) Sampling twice yearly at the five pilot test monitoring points inside the injection area (PMP1-PMP3, PMP8, MW02; Figure 1.4). With the approval of the KDHE (2009), groundwater sampling for analyses of VOCs and selected other geochemical parameters was conducted at Centralia under the interim monitoring program outlined above in April and October 2009. This report documents the findings of the 2009 monitoring events.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2010-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

193

Geochemical Society and the Mineralogical Society of America  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Society and the Mineralogical Society of America Society and the Mineralogical Society of America Reviews in Mineralogy and Geochemistry (2006) Volume 63 Neutron Scattering in Earth Sciences Hans-Rudolf Wenk (Editor) (Click text for link. * Means no presentation available.) Short Course Presentations Chapter 1: Introduction to Neutron Properties and Applications. By John B. Parise *Chapter 2: Neutron Production, Neutron Facilities and Neutron Instrumentation. By Sven C. Vogel and Hans-Georg Priesmeyer Chapter 3: Single-Crystal Neutron Diffraction: Present and Future Applications. By Nancy L. Ross and Christina Hoffman Chapter 4: Neutron Rietveld Refinement. By Robert B. Von Dreele Chapter 5: Application of Neutron Powder-Diffraction to Mineral Structures. By Karsten Knorr and Wulf Depmeier

194

A geochemical, petrological, and geophysical case study of Caryn Seamount  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

changing bulk chemistry of oceanic islands with overall relative distances from mid-ocean ridges (Aumento, 1968; Chayes, 1972; Gass, 1972). 11 A number of genetic models have been proposed to account for the variation in oceanic basalt chemistry...

Drew, Fred Prescott

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The Galapagos Plume from a primarily geochemical perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the Galapagos Hotspot at c. 90 Ma? e.g. Duncan & Hargraves, 1984; Sinton et al., 1998; Hauff et al., 2000

Geist, Dennis

196

SURVEY OF GEOCHEMICAL SELF-PATTERNING PHENOMENA Enrique Merino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

11111osiIion;11 zoning can occur in intern~edicltev o l c a n i c rocks. S e l f - o r g a n i z a t i o

Polly, David

197

GEOCHEMICAL TESTING AND MODEL DEVELOPMENT - RESIDUAL TANK WASTE TEST PLAN  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Test Plan describes the testing and chemical analyses release rate studies on tank residual samples collected following the retrieval of waste from the tank. This work will provide the data required to develop a contaminant release model for the tank residuals from both sludge and salt cake single-shell tanks. The data are intended for use in the long-term performance assessment and conceptual model development.

CANTRELL KJ; CONNELLY MP

2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

198

Hydrologic and Geochemical Monitoring in Long Valley Caldera...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

geothermal wells; flow rates of selected springs and stream sites; mean daily water or gas temperatures at selected sites; mean daily atmospheric pressures and water levels at...

199

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

but each river is characterized by a distinct chemical composition, implying large-scale spatial heterogeneity in the inputs of the various solutes. The data also display...

200

Microbiological and Geochemical Characterization of Fluvially Deposited Sulfidic Mine Tailings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Frank Rosenzweig for their review of and suggestions for improving...Inc. 1989. Field operations plan for Silver Bow Creek flood modeling...sulfate-reducing bacteria in soil and mining waste water environments by...hyporheic zone in a historic mining floodplain . Wielinga B. W...

Bruce Wielinga; Juliette K. Lucy; Johnnie N. Moore; October F. Seastone; James E. Gannon

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

ORIGINAL PAPER Evaluating sedimentary geochemical lake-level tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Walker Lake has been generated through analysis of total inorganic car- bon (TIC), total organic carbon (TOC), and oxy- gen and carbon isotope ratios (d18 O and d13 C) of both downcore bulk TIC and ostracods in %TIC, %TOC, and d13 C and d18 O of TIC and ostracods are all associated to varying degrees with changes

Linsley, Braddock K.

202

Effect of Subgrid Heterogeneity on Scaling Geochemical and Biogeochemi...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

A Case of U(VI) Desorption. Abstract: The effect of subgrid heterogeneity in sediment properties on the rate of uranylU(VI) desorption was investigated using a sediment...

203

Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

examined and chemically analyzed for trace elements by emission spectrographic and atomic absorption methods. Sixty-five samples were analyzed for major elements by X-ray...

204

Impacts of Geochemical Reactions on Geologic Carbon Sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In the face of increasing energy demands, geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS) is a promising option to mitigate the adverse effects of climate change. To ensure the environmental sustainability of this option, we must understand the rates and mechanisms of ...

Young-Shin Jun; Daniel E. Giammar; Charles J. Werth

2012-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

205

Microbiological and Geochemical Characterization of Fluvially Deposited Sulfidic Mine Tailings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...NO3 , and Mn(IV) are depleted. However, it has been...REFERENCES American Public Health Association Phenanthroline...microorganisms inhabiting uranium mill tailings. . Moore...Microbial diversity in uranium mine waste heaps...bacteria in the Nordic Uranium tailings deposit, Elliot...

Bruce Wielinga; Juliette K. Lucy; Johnnie N. Moore; October F. Seastone; James E. Gannon

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Geophysical and geochemical constraints on geoneutrino fluxes from Earth's mantle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Keywords: geoneutrinos Earth's heat budget bulk silicate Earth composition depleted mantle composition cooling of the Earth, and heat generated by decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes of uranium, thorium estimates of depleted mantle (DM), which is the source of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), vary by a similar

Zhong, Shijie

207

Geophysical and geochemical constraints on geoneutrino fluxes from Earth's mantle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

budget bulk silicate Earth composition depleted mantle composition thermochemical mantle piles a b s t r cooling of the Earth, and heat generated by decay of long-lived radioactive isotopes of uranium, thorium estimates of depleted mantle (DM), which is the source of mid-ocean ridge basalt (MORB), vary by a similar

Kite, Edwin

208

Microbiological and Geochemical Characterization of Fluvially Deposited Sulfidic Mine Tailings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...investigation final report/ground water and tailings investigation...been overlooked when remediation strategies for metal...geochemistry geomicrobiology ground water heavy metals heterogeneity...pollutants pollution remediation sediments Silver Bow...

Bruce Wielinga; Juliette K. Lucy; Johnnie N. Moore; October F. Seastone; James E. Gannon

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Awardee Website http:www.ormat.com Funding Opportunity Announcement DE-FOA-0000109 DOE Funding Level (total award amount) 4,377,000.00 Awardee Cost Share 1,417,500.00...

210

Microbiological and Geochemical Characterization of Fluvially Deposited Sulfidic Mine Tailings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...stabilization warrants further investigation. The culture-based...environment. Further investigation is needed to determine...environment. Typical remedial technologies that...Silver Bow Creek remedial investigation final report/ground...

Bruce Wielinga; Juliette K. Lucy; Johnnie N. Moore; October F. Seastone; James E. Gannon

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Ecological and Geochemical Aspects of Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

exploitation of nearby geothermal energy resources. Dixieexploitation of nearby geothermal energy resources. In Napachange (USFWS, 2009), geothermal energy development (BLM,

Forrest, Matthew James

212

GEOTECHNICAL/GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COAL PROCESS WASTE STREAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thirteen solid wastes, six coals and one unreacted sorbent produced from seven advanced coal utilization processes were characterized for task three of this project. The advanced processes from which samples were obtained included a gas-reburning sorbent injection process, a pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion process, a coal-reburning process, a SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, RO{sub x}, BOX process, an advanced flue desulfurization process, and an advanced coal cleaning process. The waste samples ranged from coarse materials, such as bottom ashes and spent bed materials, to fine materials such as fly ashes and cyclone ashes. Based on the results of the waste characterizations, an analysis of appropriate waste management practices for the advanced process wastes was done. The analysis indicated that using conventional waste management technology should be possible for disposal of all the advanced process wastes studied for task three. However, some wastes did possess properties that could present special problems for conventional waste management systems. Several task three wastes were self-hardening materials and one was self-heating. Self-hardening is caused by cementitious and pozzolanic reactions that occur when water is added to the waste. All of the self-hardening wastes setup slowly (in a matter of hours or days rather than minutes). Thus these wastes can still be handled with conventional management systems if care is taken not to allow them to setup in storage bins or transport vehicles. Waste self-heating is caused by the exothermic hydration of lime when the waste is mixed with conditioning water. If enough lime is present, the temperature of the waste will rise until steam is produced. It is recommended that self-heating wastes be conditioned in a controlled manner so that the heat will be safely dissipated before the material is transported to an ultimate disposal site. Waste utilization is important because an advanced process waste will not require ultimate disposal when it is put to use. Each task three waste was evaluated for utilization potential based on its physical properties, bulk chemical composition, and mineral composition. Only one of the thirteen materials studied might be suitable for use as a pozzolanic concrete additive. However, many wastes appeared to be suitable for other high-volume uses such as blasting grit, fine aggregate for asphalt concrete, road deicer, structural fill material, soil stabilization additives, waste stabilization additives, landfill cover material, and pavement base course construction.

Edwin S. Olson; Charles J. Moretti

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

The earliest Cambrian record of animals and ocean geochemical change  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...South China: Me-Meishucun, Xi-Xiaotan, An-Anjiahe, Ji-Jijiapo...Cervato, C., and Yugan, Jin, 2006, A new U/Pb date for...1144/0016-76492005-126. Ping, Chen , 1984, [Discovery of...Aihua, Yang, and Yugan, Jin, 2005, U-Pb ages from the...

Adam C. Maloof; Susannah M. Porter; John L. Moore; Frank Ö. Dudás; Samuel A. Bowring; John A. Higgins; David A. Fike; Michael P. Eddy

214

3Geochemistry Published by AGU and the Geochemical Society  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

identified by a systematic grid of conductive heat flow measure- 15 ments. An array of conductive heat flow, conductive heat flow data indicate a general crossvalley fluid flow, where 18 seawater enters the shallow occurring within faults that surround the fluid discharge sites. These conductive 23 heat flow data

Johnson, H. Paul

215

A Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Robert O. Fournier, Theoderos Tesfai, Wendell A. Duffield, Michael A. Clynne, James G. Smith, Leake Woldegiorgis, Kidane Weldemariam and Gabreab Kahsai Published Journal...

216

Geochemical Data for 95 Thermal and Nonthermal Waters of the...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in hydrology, structural geology, hydrothermal alterations, and hydrothermal solution chemistry. Authors Fraser E. Goff, Tamsin McCormick, Pat E. Trujillo Jr, Dale A. Counce and...

217

Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustatio...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Up to 87% of the individual element data variance is apparently controlled by the chemistry of the ejecta on which the relict encrustations are found. This matrix chemistry...

218

Geochemical Modeling of the Near-Surface Hydrothermal System...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in petrographic studies. Results of this study show that the mineralogy and fluid chemistry observed in the shallow reservoir at Long Valley caldera are formed in an open...

219

Hydrologic and Geochemical Monitoring in Long Valley Caldera...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

causing earthquakes and crustal deformation. Differences since 1982 in fluid chemistry of springs has been minor except at Casa Diablo, where rapid fluctuations in...

220

Anthropogenic versus lithological influences on soil geochemical patterns in Cyprus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...studies on the trace element composition of the TOC geology or associated...agricultural areas but the use of other agrochemicals, such as soil enhancers, pesticides...drainage Asia bedrock chemical composition copper ores Cyprus cyprus-type...

David R. Cohen; Neil F. Rutherford; Eleni Morisseau; Irene Christoforou; Andreas M. Zissimos

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

INDEPENDENT TECHNICAL EVALUATION AND RECOMMENDATIONS FOR CONTAMINATED GROUNDWATER AT THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF LEGACY MANAGEMENT RIVERTON PROCESSING SITE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management (DOE-LM) manages the legacy contamination at the Riverton, WY, Processing Site – a former uranium milling site that operated from 1958 to 1963. The tailings and associated materials were removed in 1988-1989 and contaminants are currently flushing from the groundwater. DOE-LM commissioned an independent technical team to assess the status of the contaminant flushing, identify any issues or opportunities for DOE-LM, and provide key recommendations. The team applied a range of technical frameworks – spatial, temporal, hydrological and geochemical – in performing the evaluation. In each topic area, an in depth evaluation was performed using DOE-LM site data (e.g., chemical measurements in groundwater, surface water and soil, water levels, and historical records) along with information collected during the December 2013 site visit (e.g., plant type survey, geomorphology, and minerals that were observed, collected and evaluated). A few of the key findings include: ? Physical removal of the tailings and associated materials reduced contaminant discharges to groundwater and reduced contaminant concentrations in the near-field plume. ? In the mid-field and far-field areas, residual contaminants are present in the vadose zone as a result of a variety of factors (e.g., evaporation/evapotranspiration from the capillary fringe and water table, higher water levels during tailings disposal, and geochemical processes). ? Vadose zone contaminants are widely distributed above the plume and are expected to be present as solid phase minerals that can serve as “secondary sources” to the underlying groundwater. The mineral sample collected at the site is consistent with thermodynamic predictions. ? Water table fluctuations, irrigation, infiltration and flooding will episodically solubilize some of the vadose zone secondary source materials and release contaminants to the groundwater for continued down gradient migration – extending the overall timeframe for flushing. ? Vertical contaminant stratification in the vadose zone and surficial aquifer will vary from location to location. Soil and water sampling strategies and monitoring well construction details will influence characterization and monitoring data. ? Water flows from the Wind River, beneath the Riverton Processing Site and through the plume toward the Little Wind River. This base flow pattern is influenced by seasonal irrigation and other anthropogenic activities, and by natural perturbations (e.g., flooding). ? Erosion and reworking of the sediments adjacent to the Little Wind River results in high heterogeneity and complex flow and geochemistry. Water flowing into oxbow lakes (or through areas where oxbow lakes were present in the past) will be exposed to localized geochemical conditions that favor chemical reduction (i.e., “naturally reduced zones”) and other attenuation processes. This attenuation is not sufficient to fully stabilize the plume or to reduce contaminant concentrations in the groundwater to target levels. Consistent with these observations, the team recommended increased emphasis on collecting data in the zones where secondary source minerals are projected to accumulate (e.g., just above the water table) using low cost methods such as x-ray fluorescence. The team also suggested several low cost nontraditional sources of data that have the potential to provide supplemental data (e.g., multispectral satellite imagery) to inform and improve legacy management decisions. There are a range of strategies for management of the legacy contamination in the groundwater and vadose zone near the Riverton Processing Site. These range from the current strategy, natural flushing, to intrusive remedies such as plume scale excavation of the vadose zone and pump & treat. Each option relates to the site specific conditions, issues and opportunities in a unique way. Further, each option has advantages and disadvantages that need to be weighed. Scoping evaluation was performed for three major classes

Looney, B.; Denham, M.; Eddy-Dilek, C.

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

222

Annual report of groundwater monitoring at Centralia, Kansas, in 2010.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In September 2005, periodic sampling of groundwater was initiated by the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) in the vicinity of a grain storage facility formerly operated by the CCC/USDA at Centralia, Kansas. The sampling at Centralia is performed on behalf of the CCC/USDA by Argonne National Laboratory, in accord with a monitoring program approved by the Kansas Department of Health and Environment (KDHE). The objective is to monitor levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in the groundwater at Centralia (Argonne 2003, 2004, 2005a). Under the KDHE-approved monitoring plan (Argonne 2005b), the groundwater was sampled twice yearly from September 2005 until September 2007 for analyses for volatile organic compounds (VOCs), as well as measurement of selected geochemical parameters to aid in the evaluation of possible natural contaminant degradation processes (reductive dechlorination) in the subsurface environment (Argonne 2006, 2007a, 2008a). The results from the two-year sampling program demonstrated the presence of carbon tetrachloride contamination at levels exceeding the KDHE Tier 2 risk-based screening level (RBSL) of 5 {micro}g/L for this compound, in a localized groundwater plume that has shown little movement. The relative concentrations of chloroform, the primary degradation product of carbon tetrachloride, suggested that some degree of reductive dechlorination or natural biodegradation was talking place in situ at the former CCC/USDA facility on a localized scale. The CCC/USDA subsequently developed an Interim Measure Conceptual Design (Argonne 2007b), proposing a pilot test of the Adventus EHC technology for in situ chemical reduction (ISCR). The proposed interim measure (IM) was approved by the KDHE in November 2007 (KDHE 2007). Implementation of the pilot test occurred in November-December 2007. The objective was to create highly reducing conditions that would enhance both chemical and biological reductive dechlorination in the injection test area (Argonne 2009a). The KDHE (2008a) requested that sitewide monitoring continue until a final remedy is selected (as part of a Corrective Action Study [CAS] evaluation) and implemented. In response to this request, the established sampling across the site and additional sampling in the IM pilot test area continued in 2008 (Argonne 2008b, 2009a,b). On the basis of results of the 2005-2008 sitewide monitoring and the 2008 IM pilot test monitoring, the CCC/USDA recommended a revised sampling program for both the wider site and the IM pilot test area (Section 4.2 in Argonne 2009b). The elements of this interim monitoring plan are as follows: (1) Annual sampling of twelve monitoring points across the site (Figure 1.1) and five outlying IM pilot test monitoring points (PMP4, PMP5, PMP6, PMP7, PMP9; Figure 1.2); and (2) Twice yearly sampling of five IM pilot test monitoring points inside the injection area (PMP1-PMP3, PMP8, MW02; Figure 1.2). With the approval of the KDHE (2009), the initial groundwater sampling for VOCs and geochemical analyses under the interim monitoring plan outlined above was conducted in 2009 (Argonne 2010). The present report documents the findings of the 2010 monitoring events, conducted on April 5 and September 19-21, 2010.

LaFreniere, L. M. (Environmental Science Division)

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

223

Iodine-129 and Iodine-127 speciation in groundwater at the Hanford Site, U.S.: iodate incorporation into calcite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hanford Site, the most contaminated nuclear site in the United States, has large radioactive waste plumes containing high 129I levels. The geochemical transport and fate of radioiodine depends largely on its chemical speciation that is greatly affected by environmental factors. This study reports, for the first time, the speciation of stable and radioactive iodine in the groundwater from the Hanford Site. Iodate was the dominant species and accounts for up to 84%, followed by organo-iodine and minimal levels of iodide. The relatively high pH and oxidizing environment may have prevented iodate reduction. Our results identified that calcite precipitation caused by degassing of CO2 during deep groundwater sampling incorporated between 7 to 40% of dissolved iodine (including 127I and 129I) that was originally in the groundwater, transforming dissolved to particulate iodate during sampling. In order to understand the mechanisms underlying iodine incorporation by calcite, laboratory experiments were carried out to replicate this iodine sequestering processes. Two methods were utilized in this study, 1) addition of sodium carbonate; 2) addition of calcium chloride followed by sodium carbonate where the pH was well controlled at ~8.2, which is close to the average pH of Hanford Site groundwater. It was demonstrated that iodate was the main species incorporated into calcite and this incorporation process could be impeded by elevated pH and decreasing ionic strength in groundwater. This study provides critical information for predicting the long-term fate and transport of 129I at the Hanford Site and reveals a potential means for improved remediation strategies of 129I.

Zhang, Saijin [Texas A and M Univ. at Galveston, TX (United States). Dept. of Marine Science; Xu, Chen [Texas A and M Univ. at Galveston, TX (United States). Dept. of Marine Science; Creeley, Danielle [Texas A and M Univ. at Galveston, TX (United States). Dept. of Marine Science; Ho, Yi-Fang [Texas A and M Univ. at Galveston, TX (United States). Dept. of Marine Science; Li, Hsiu-Ping [Texas A and M Univ. at Galveston, TX (United States). Dept. of Marine Science; Grandbois, Russell [Texas A and M Univ. at Galveston, TX (United States). Dept. of Marine Science; Schwehr, Kathy [Texas A and M Univ. at Galveston, TX (United States). Dept. of Marine Science; Kaplan, Daniel I. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, SC (United States); Yeager, Chris [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wellman, Dawn M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Santschi, Peter H. [Texas A and M Univ. at Galveston, TX (United States). Dept. of Marine Science

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

224

Evidence for ground-water circulation in the brine-filled aquitard, Oak Ridge, Tennessee  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Various geologic, hydrologic, and geochemical methods were used to assess active ground-water circulation in a brine-filled, deep (> 50 m below land surface) aquitard underlying the Oak Ridge Reservation, Tennessee. In places, the brine which was presumed to be stagnant in the past, contains various contaminants. If ground-water circulation is viable in the brine-containing formations, then remediation or containment of the deep-seated contaminants should be considered a high priority. Data used to determine this included (1) spatial and temporal pressures and hydraulic heads measured in the aquitard, (2) hydraulic parameters of the formations in question, (3) vertical temperature gradients, and (4) spatial and temporal chemical and isotopic composition of the saline ground water. Conclusions suggest that the saline water contained at depth is not isolated (in terms of recharge and discharge) from the overlying active and fresh-water-(< 500 mg/l) bearing units. Consequently, influx of young water (and contamination) from land surface does occur. Potential discharge into the shallow aquifers was assumed where the hydraulic head of the saline water was higher than that in the shallow aquifers, accounting for temperature and salinity anomalies observed close to land surface. The confined water (and dissolved solutes) move along open conduits at relatively high velocity into adjacent, more permeable units.

Nativ, R. [Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem (Israel). Dept. of Soil and Water Sciences; Halleran, A.; Hunley, A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Probabilistic evaluation of shallow groundwater resources at a hypothetical carbon sequestration site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Carbon sequestration in geologic reservoirs is an important approach for mitigating greenhouse gases emissions to the atmosphere. This study first develops an integrated Monte Carlo method for simulating CO2 and brine leakage from carbon sequestration and subsequent geochemical interactions in shallow aquifers. Then, we estimate probability distributions of five risk proxies related to the likelihood and volume of changes in pH, total dissolved solids, and trace concentrations of lead, arsenic, and cadmium for two possible consequence thresholds. The results indicate that shallow groundwater resources may degrade locally around leakage points by reduced pH and increased total dissolved solids (TDS). The volumes of pH and TDS plumes are most sensitive to aquifer porosity, permeability, and CO2 and brine leakage rates. The estimated plume size of pH change is the largest, while that of cadmium is the smallest among the risk proxies. Plume volume distributions of arsenic and lead are similar to those of TDS. The scientific results from this study provide substantial insight for understanding risks of deep fluids leaking into shallow aquifers, determining the area of review, and designing monitoring networks at carbon sequestration sites.

Dai, Zhenxue; Keating, Elizabeth; Bacon, Diana H.; Viswanathan, Hari; Stauffer, Philip; Jordan, Amy B.; Pawar, Rajesh

2014-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

226

Radionuclides in shallow groundwater at Solid Waste Storage Area 5 North, Oak Ridge National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a compilation of groundwater monitoring data from Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 5 North at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) between November 1989 and September 1993. Monitoring data were collected as part of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program that was implemented in 1989 in response to DOE Order 5820.2A. SWSA 5 North was established for the retrievable storage of transuranic (TRU) wastes in 1970. Four types of storage have been used within SWSA 5 North: bunkers, vaults, wells, and trenches. The fenced portion of SWSA 5 North covers about 3.7 ha (9 acres) in the White Oak Creek watershed south of ORNL. The area is bounded by White Oak Creek and two ephemeral tributaries of White Oak Creek. Since 1989, groundwater has been monitored in wells around SWSA 5 North. During that time, elevated gross alpha contamination (reaching as high as 210 Bq/L) has consistently been detected in well 516. This well is adjacent to burial trenches in the southwest corner of the area. Water level measurements in wells 516 and 518 suggest that water periodically inundates the bottom of some of those trenches. Virtually all of the gross alpha contamination is generated by Curium 244 and Americium 241. A special geochemical investigation of well 516 suggests that nearly all of the Curium 44 and Americium 241 is dissolved or associated with dissolved organic matter. These are being transported at the rate of about 2 m/year from the burial trenches, through well 516, to White Oak Creek, where Curium 244 has been detected in a few bank seeps. Concentrations at these seeps are near detection levels (<1 Bq/L).

Ashwood, T.L.; Marsh, J.D. Jr.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Microsoft Word - S06654_ESL.doc  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Analysis and Geochemical Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado July 2010 LMS/RFN/S06654 ESL-RPT-2010-01 This page intentionally left blank LMS/RFN/S06654 ESL-RPT-2010-01 Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado July 2010 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater, Rifle, Colorado July 2010 Doc. No. S06654 Page i Contents Abbreviations................................................................................................................................. iii Executive Summary .........................................................................................................................v

228

Microsoft Word - S06654_ESL.doc  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and Geochemical and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado July 2010 LMS/RFN/S06654 ESL-RPT-2010-01 This page intentionally left blank LMS/RFN/S06654 ESL-RPT-2010-01 Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado July 2010 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater, Rifle, Colorado July 2010 Doc. No. S06654 Page i Contents Abbreviations................................................................................................................................. iii Executive Summary .........................................................................................................................v

229

Use of Dissolved H2 Concentrations To Determine Distribution of Microbially Catalyzed Redox Reactions in Anoxic Groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

similartothe HZconcentrationsthat havepreviously been reported for aquatic sedimentswith the same TEAPs. In two aquifers contaminated with petroleum products, it was impossible with standard geochemical analyses actuallyexist (i.e.,there arenofreeelectrons); (2) the redox status of most natural waters cannot be accurately

Lovley, Derek

230

The influence of naturally-occurring organic acids on model estimates of lakewater acidification using the model of acidification of groundwater in catchments (MAGIC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A project for the US Department of Energy, entitled Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and Testing of the Revised Model UsingIndependent Data Sources'' was initiated by E S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. in March, 1992. Major components of the project include: improving the MAGIC model by incorporating a rigorous organic acid representation, based on empirical data and geochemical considerations, and testing the revised model using data from paleolimnological hindcasts of preindustrial chemistry for 33 Adirondack Mountain lakes, and the results of whole-catchment artificial acidification projects in Maine and Norway. The ongoing research in this project involves development of an organic acid representation to be incorporated into the MAGIC modeland testing of the improved model using three independent data sources. The research during Year 1 has included conducting two workshops to agree on an approach for the organic acid modeling, developing the organic subroutine and incorporating it into MAGIC (Task 1), conducing MAGIC hindcasts for Adirondack lakes and comparing the results with paleolimnological reconstructions (Task 2), and conducting site visits to the manipulation project sites in Maine and Norway. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the work that has been conducted on this project during Year 1. Tasks 1 and 2 have now been completed.

Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M. (E and S Environmental Chemistry, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)); Cosby, B.J. (Virginia Univ., Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences); Driscoll, C.T. (Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Hemond, H.F. (Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Charles, D.F.

1993-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

231

The Hanford Story: Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This second chapter of The Hanford Story explains how more than 100 square miles of groundwater under the Hanford Site became contaminated and what workers are doing to restore groundwater to its highest beneficial use.

232

Reactivity of Organic Compounds in Hot Water: Geochemical and Technological Implications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...HIGH-TEMPERATURE HYDROLYSIS AND THERMOLYSIS OF TETRAHYDROTHIOPHENE IN RELATION TO STEAM STIMULATION...HIGH-TEMPERATURE HYDROLYSIS OF TETRAHYDROTHIOPHENE AND THIOPHENE, FUEL 63 : 125...3. REACTION OF THIOPHENE AND TETRAHYDROTHIOPHENE WITH VANADYL AND NICKEL SALTS...

MICHAEL SISKIN; ALAN R. KATRITZKY

1991-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

233

Geochemical study of boron isotopes in the process of loess weathering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the boron contents and boron isotopic composition of acid-soluble phases in loess and paleosol samples are determined for the first time. The boron contents of acid-soluble phases in the Luochuan...

Zhiqi Zhao; Congqiang Liu; Yingkai Xiao…

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

The geological and geochemical study of the mud volcanoes of Azerbaijan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Azerbaijan is a classic region for the study of mud volcanism. Of the 700 mud volcanoes known in the world, 220 are in Azerbaijan. These are of great interest, not least in relation to oil and gas exploration since they give information on subsurface sediments beyond the reach of drilling. Mud volcanoes are clearly visible on satellite images. They are confined to structural lineaments and associated fractures. Changes in the morphology of some mud volcanoes post-eruption can be detected from a series of images pre-dating and post-dating eruptions. Mud volcanoes are notable for gradients of temperature that are by an order of magnitude or a factor of 102 greater than the temperature gradients established elsewhere. The gases of mud volcanoes consist mainly of methane (95-100%). There are small amounts of C{sub 2-6}, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, He and Ar. The isotopic composition of carbon (ICC) within the methane varies from -61.29. to -35.W{close_quotes} which is isotopically heavier than the methane from producing fields. The ICC of the CO{sub 2} has a very wide range (from -49.6% to +23.1%), indicating several sources of its formation. The isotopically superheavy CO{sub 2} (+5%) is especially interesting. Oils from mud volcanoes are typically severely biodegraded. Their ICC ranges from -24.76% to -28.2%. A relationship between {partial_derivative}{sup l3}C of oils and ages of accumulations has been established. Waters of mud volcanoes are lightly mineralised, containing chiefly bicarbonates and sodium. The hydrogen composition of the water is abnormally heavy. Ejected rocks from mud volcanoes range in age from Cretaceous - Pliocene. Their study suggests that deeply buried reservoirs maintain good poroperm characteristics because of relatively little catagenesis.

Guliyev, I.A.; Aliyev, A.A.; Rahmanov, R.R. [Geological Institute of the Azerbaijan academy of sciences (GIA), Baku (Azerbaijan)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Geochemical and rheological constraints on the dynamics of the oceanic upper mantle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I provide constraints on mantle convection through observations of the rheology and composition of the oceanic upper mantle. Convection cannot be directly observed, yet is a fundamental part of the plate tectonic cycle. ...

Warren, Jessica Mendelsohn

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Geochemical arguments for an Earth-like Moon-forming impactor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...2010 Constraints on the formation age, highly siderophile element budget and noble gas...2001JE001617 ) 67 Walker, RJ . 2009 Highly siderophile elements in the Earth, Moon...2005JE002656 ) 167 Yamashita, N , . 2010 Uranium on the Moon: global distribution and...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Mechanisms of geochemical and geophysical variations along the western Galapagos Spreading Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stephanie Ingle, Garrett Ito, John J. Mahoney, William Chazey III, and John Sinton Department of Geology January 2010; Published 16 April 2010. Ingle, S., G. Ito, J. J. Mahoney, W. Chazey III, J. Sinton, M

Ito, Garrett

238

Correlated geophysical, geochemical, and volcanological manifestations of plume-ridge interaction along the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oceanographic Institution, Woods Hole, Massachusetts 02453, USA (rdetrick@whoi.edu) J. M. Sinton School of Ocean (sinton@soest.hawaii.edu) G. Ito School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology, University of Hawaii; Accepted 21 June 2002; Published 10 October 2002. Detrick, R. S., J. M. Sinton, G. Ito, J. P. Canales, M

Ito, Garrett

239

Geological and geochemical aspects of uranium deposits: a selected, annotated bibliography. [474 references  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This bibliography, a compilation of 474 references, is the fourth in a series compiled from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Bibliographic Data Base. This data base was created for the Grand Junction Office of the Department of Energy's National Uranium Resource Evaluation Project by the Ecological Sciences Information Center, Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The references in the bibliography are arranged by subject category: (1) geochemistry, (2) exploration, (3) mineralogy, (4) genesis of deposits, (5) geology of deposits, (6) uranium industry, (7) geology of potential uranium-bearing areas, and (8) reserves and resources. The references are indexed by author, geographic location, quadrangle name, geoformational feature, and keyword.

Thomas, J.M.; Garland, P.A.; White, M.B.; Daniel, E.W.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Geochemical and Geomechanical Effects on Wellbore Cement Fractures: Data Information for Wellbore Reduced Order Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP) program is to develop a defensible, generalized, and science-based methodology and platform for quantifying risk profiles at CO2 injection and storage sites. The methodology must incorporate and define the scientific basis for assessing residual risks associated with long-term stewardship and help guide site operational decision-making and risk management. Development of an integrated and risk-based protocol will help minimize uncertainty in the predicted long-term behavior of the CO2 storage site and thereby increase confidence in storage integrity. The risk profile concept has proven useful in conveying the qualitative evolution of risks for CO2 injection and storage site. However, qualitative risk profiles are not sufficient for specifying long-term liability for CO2 storage sites. Because there has been no science-based defensible and robust methodology developed for quantification of risk profiles for CO2 injection and storage, NRAP has been focused on developing a science-based methodology for quantifying risk profiles for various risk proxies.

Um, Wooyong; Jung, Hun Bok; Kabilan, Senthil; Suh, Dong-Myung; Fernandez, Carlos A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

E-Print Network 3.0 - argentina geochemical constraints Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Collection: Environmental Sciences and Ecology ; Geosciences 20 geopolitics of gas working paper series Summary: America's Southern Cone (Argentina, Bolivia, Brazil,...

242

E-Print Network 3.0 - argentina mineralogical geochemical Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

connection as a stage for understanding crustal magmatism Summary: ), and the Sifton range in northern Canadian Cordillera (Miskovic and Francis, 2006). 2.1.2....

243

An integrated geochemical and mineralogical approach for the evaluation of arsenic mobility in mining soils  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The assessment of risk related to the presence of potentially toxic elements in soils is strictly related to the knowledge of their form and mobility. These relevant properties depend on the complex interactio...

Nadia Kreidie; Giovanna Armiento; Giannantonio Cibin…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION AND MINERALOGIC PROPERTIES OF MENGEN OIL SHALE (LUTETIAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, lignite, and oil shale sequences. Oil shale deposit has been accumulated in shallow restricted back

unknown authors

245

Broad bounds on Earth's accretion and core formation constrained by geochemical models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

accretion at either 301,5 or 1002,3 Myr after solar system formation. These models as- sume full metal. Impacts of numerous Moon- to Mars-sized planetary embryos on the growing Earth re- leased sufficient

Rudge, John

246

Formation mechanism and geochemical characteristics of shallow natural gas in heavy oil province, China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Shallow gas reservoirs are distributed widely in Chinese heavy oil-bearing basins. At present, shallow gas resources have opened up giant potentials. The previous researches indicate the intimate genetic relat...

GuangYou Zhu; ShuiChang Zhang; WenZhi Zhao…

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Experiment-based modeling of geochemical interactions in CO2-based geothermal systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and effects on fluid and heat transfer, and (3) determinesome favorable fluid dynamics and heat transfer properties2008) for modeling heat transfer and fluid dynamics of a CO

Jung, Y.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

A geochemical study of Lakes Bonney and Vanda, Victoria Land, Antarctica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

active consideration. tent of the monimolimnoin of Lake Bonney suggests either a sea-water origin or salt­ water contamination. It is also possible that the waters are a magnesian brine resulting from extensive past concentration either by a freezing... molluscan faunas of the Illinois Valley region: Illinois Geol. Survey Circ. 304, 32 p. OLSON, E . A., and BROECKER, W. S., 1958, Sample contamination and reliability of radiocarbon dates: New York Acad. Sci. Trans., ser. II , v. 20, p. 593-604. RUBIN...

Armitage, Kenneth

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Petroleum potential of the Upper Ordovician Maquoketa Group in Illinois: A coordinated geological and geochemical study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Ordovician Maquoketa Group in Illinois, predominantly composed of shale, calcareous shale, and carbonates, has long been considered a potential source for Illinois basin hydrocarbons. Methods used to better define the petroleum potential of the Maquoketa in the Illinois basin were lithostratigraphic study, Rock-Eval (pyrolysis) analyses, comparison of molecular markers from whole-rock extracts and produced oil, and construction of burial history models. Organic-rich submature Maquoketa potential source rocks are present in western Illinois at shallow depths on the basin flank. Deeper in the basin in southern Illinois, Rock-Eval analyses indicate that the Maquoketa shale is within the oil window. Solvent extracts of the Maquoketa from western Illinois closely resemble the Devonian New Albany Shale, suggesting that past studies may have erroneously attributed Maquoketa-generated petroleum to a New Albany source or failed to identify mixed source oils. Subtle differences between Maquoketa and New Albany solvent extracts include differences in pristane/phytane ratios, proportions of steroids, and distribution of dimethyldibenzothiophene isomers. Maquoketa solvent extracts show little resemblance to Middle Ordovician oils from the Illinois or Michigan basins. Lithostratigraphic studies identified localized thick carbonate facies in the Maquoketa, suggesting depositional response to upper Ordovician paleostructures. Sandstone facies in the Maquoketa in southwestern Illinois offer a potential source/trap play, as well as serving as potential carrier beds for hydrocarbon migration. Maquoketa source and carrier beds may feed older Ordovician rocks in faulted areas along and south of the Cottage Grove fault system in southern Illinois.

Crockett, J.E.; Oltz, D.F. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign (USA)); Kruge, M.A. (Southern Illinois Univ., Carbondale (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

22nd International Senckenberg Conference Exceptional geochemical preservation of vertebrate remains from the Eocene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, tuetken@uni-bonn.de. The 47-Myr-old middle Eocene oil shale deposits of the UNESCO World Heritage Site as the embedding oil shale, were also analyzed to characterize the isotope compositions of diagenetic mineral phases. The oil shale and siderite have values of 18OCO3 (0.3 to 1.5) and 13CCO3 (14.8 to 17

Schöne, Bernd R.

251

Geomechanical/Geochemical Modeling Studies Conducted within the International DECOVALEX Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scale Heater Test at Yucca Mountain,” International JournalA is a simplified model of the Yucca Mountain site, a deepthe Drift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain (a setting similar to

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Geochemical and Petrological Investigations into Mantle Minerals from Experiments and Natural Samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concentrations approaching halite saturation. Results show~0.13 molal approaching halite saturation. These data yieldin pure water to >0.5 molal at halite saturation (Newton and

Macris, Catherine Amy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Geochemical evidence of chemical equilibria in the South Meager Creek Geothermal System, British Columbia, Canada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Meager geothermal reservoir appears to be in ''thermochemical'' equilibrium as indicated by constant ion-concentration ratios (B/Li, B/K, NaLi, Na/Cl etc.). The Na/Li ratio describes the thermal conditions of the first and the deepest equilibrium reached by the thermal waters, whereas the Na/K indicates a secondary and shallower equilibrium. Analysis of the correlations between K, Na and Cl indicate that discharge from well MCl is probably a mixture between a single brine and high-chloride cool waters.

Ghomshel, M.M.; Croft, S.A.S.; Stauder, J.J.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Geomorphic and Geochemical Characteristics of Five Alpine Fens in the San Juan Mountains, Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fens are abundant in the San Juan Mountains. By exploring the geomorphology and geochemistry of fen wetlands, the functions that fens serve can be better understood. In this research, two main studies were conducted involving the geomorphology...

McClenning, Bree Kathleen 1985-

2012-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

255

Geochemical and geophysical evidence on the geothermal potential of Caledonian granites in Britain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... production with depth but there are good indications that the area is interesting from a geothermal energy viewpoint, especially where granite is overlain by low conductivity sediments.

G. C. BROWN; JANE PLANT; M. K. LEE

1979-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

256

Across-arc geochemical trends in the Izu-Bonin arc: Contributions from the subducting slab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., vol. 2, Paper number 2000GC000105 [12,776 words, 15 figures, 3 tables]. Published July 2, 2001. 1

Taylor, Brian

257

Geochemical evidence for possible natural migration of Marcellus Formation brine to shallow aquifers in Pennsylvania  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...opportunities . Environ Sci Technol 44 : 5679 – 5684 . 3 Howarth RW Ingraffea A Engelder T ( 2011 ) Natural gas: Should fracking stop? Nature 477 : 271 – 275 . 4 Osborn SG Vengosh A Warner NR Jackson RB ( 2011 ) Methane contamination of drinking water...

Nathaniel R. Warner; Robert B. Jackson; Thomas H. Darrah; Stephen G. Osborn; Adrian Down; Kaiguang Zhao; Alissa White; Avner Vengosh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Summary of geochemical measurements taken in an around the G-Tunnel underground facility, NTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A summary of field and supporting laboratory data collected in and around the G-Tunnel Underground Facility (GTUF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is presented to provide information concerning the ability of tuffs to contain radioactive wastes. The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) Project is investigating the possibility of constructing a high-level nuclear waste repository within similar tuffs at Yucca Mountain on and adjacent to the NTS. The GTUF investigations included geomechanical measurements covering: in situ stresses, intact rock and joint slip strengths, rock-mass deformational behavior, rock-mass thermal and thermomechanical properties, and rock-mass behavior associated with rock dewatering and fracture flows. The summary primarily contains data and describes behavioral trends for the tuffs as obtained in four major NNWSI-sponsored field testing efforts. NNWSI-sponsored laboratory data and other non-NNWSI-sponsored information obtained from tuffs in the immediate vicinity of the GTUF are included to augment the findings. 81 refs., 27 figs., 22 tabs.

Zimmerman, R.M.; Finley, R.E.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Experiment-based modeling of geochemical interactions in CO2-based geothermal systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2000), “A hot dry rock geothermal energy concept utilizingsequestration with geothermal energy capture in naturallyreservoirs) for geothermal energy recovery. The major

Jung, Y.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Section 3. Introduction to the Geochemical Evolution of the Earth’s Ecosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Morse and Mackenzie, 1990; Kump et al., 2009; and Veizer and Mackenzie, 2004 for summary), as well as Earth system models of seawater composition (Hardie, 1996; Zeebe, 2001; Tyrrell and Zeebe, 2004; Ridgwell and Zeebe, 2005...

Fred T. Mackenzie; Andreas J. Andersson

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Measuring prehistoric mobility strategies based on obsidian geochemical and technological signatures in the Owens Valley, California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

signatures in the Owens Valley, California Jelmer W. Eerkens a,*, Amy M. Spurling a,c , Michelle A. Gras b, a village site in southern Owens Valley, eastern California. Previous archaeological studies suggest quarrying within long-distance trips to distant hunting grounds, and subsequently transported bifacial cores

262

Geochemical anomalies in the surface media over the Phoenix Deposit, Athabasca Basin Ressources naturelles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

summers. The surface topography on the Wheeler River Property consists mainly of gently rolling hills at the Wheeler River Property. The small hills in the background indicate gentle topographical relief. Figure 5: View through the forest, with abundant young black spruce and extensive mossy undergrowth. Samples

263

Geochemical modeling of an aquifer storage and recovery project in Union County, Arkansas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Sparta aquifer in Union County, Arkansas has served as an important potable water supply to the public and industrial sectors in the area. However, increasing water demand and sustained heavy pumping from the aquifer ...

Zhu, Ni, M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Constructing modal mineralogy from geochemical composition: A geometric-Bayesian approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Modal mineralogical composition is known to carry more information than major element geochemistry, though the latter is far easier to determine in the lab. Constructing mineral compositions from geochemistry can be seen as a typical end-member problem, ... Keywords: CIPW norm, Convex hull, Endmember, Normative mineralogy, Unmixing

R. Tolosana-Delgado; H. von Eynatten; V. Karius

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Hydraulic and Geochemical Framework of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory Vadose Zone  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pore waters beneath a mixed waste disposal site in the unsaturated zone. p. 241-247...actinides from a transuranic waste disposal site in the vadose zone. Radiochim...Characterization of plutonium in waters at Maxey Flats, Kentucky and near the Idaho Chemical...

John R. Nimmo; Joseph P. Rousseau; Kim S. Perkins; Kenneth G. Stollenwerk; Pierre D. Glynn; Roy C. Bartholomay; LeRoy L. Knobel

266

Geochemical Modeling of Leaching from MSWI Air-Pollution-Control Residues  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abbreviations are:? gyp, gypsum; bar, barite; Ba(S,Cr)O4(1), XCr = 0.23; cal, calcite; ett, ettringite; leu, leucite; por, porlandite; qtz, quartz; wai, wairakite; wol, wollastonite. ... Comparing measured data with the solubilities of Al(OH)3, Al2O3, and ettringite (Ca6Al2(SO4)3OH12·26H2O), it was found that ettringite likely controlled Al leaching at pH-values above 9.5?10 for both residues. ... Al(OH)3, Al2O3, and ettringite have previously been identified in waste incineration APC residues (13, 22); however, only amorphous Al(OH)3 has been suggested to control leaching in nonstabilized APC residues (13, 18). ...

Thomas Astrup; Joris J. Dijkstra; Rob N. J. Comans; Hans A. van der Sloot; Thomas H. Christensen

2006-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

267

Geochemical Modeling of Weathering Reactions in Municipal Solid Waste Incinerator Bottom Ash  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The stability constants for ettringite (log Ksp = ?56.7; ... Additionally, ettringite (Ca6Al2(SO4)3(OH)12·26H2O) was identified in samples QUE1 and 6WK. ... Abbreviations:? por, portlandite; gyp, gypsum; ett, ettringite; cal, calcite; Ala, am-Al(OH)3; Alc, gibbsite; Fe1, ferrihydrite; Fe2, ferrihydrite (GS5 with fixed EH); Fe3, ferrihydrite (6WK with fixed EH); Fe4, ferrihydrite (QUE1 with fixed EH); SiO2, am-SiO2; wai, wairakite; ill, illite (12YR); bru, brucite; sep, sepiolite. ...

Jeannet A. Meima; Rob N. J. Comans

1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

268

Geochemical Monitoring for Potential Environmental Impacts of Geologic Sequestration of CO2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...produced water and other wastes (Benson and Cook 2005...obtained from the Dakota gasification plant near Beulah, North...significantly in the petroleum industry and would not be used...using sulfur-bearing waste gas. Chem Geol 217...saline aquifers. J Air Waste Manage Assoc 53:645-715...

Yousif K. Kharaka; David R. Cole; James J. Thordsen; Kathleen D. Gans; R. Burt Thomas

269

Geotechnical/geochemical characterization of advanced coal process waste streams: Task 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Successful disposal practices for solid wastes produced from advanced coal combustion and coal conversion processes must provide for efficient management of relatively large volumes of wastes in a cost-effective and environmentally safe manner. At present, most coal-utilization solid wastes are disposed of using various types of land-based systems, and it is probable that this disposal mode will continue to be widely used in the future for advanced process wastes. Proper design and operation of land-based disposal systems for coal combustion wastes normally require appropriate waste transfer, storage, and conditioning subsystems at the plant to prepare the waste for transport to an ultimate disposal site. Further, the overall waste management plan should include a by-product marketing program to minimize the amount of waste that will require disposal. In order to properly design and operate waste management systems for advanced coal-utilization processes, a fundamental understanding of the physical properties, chemical and mineral compositions, and leaching behaviors of the wastes is required. In order to gain information about the wastes produced by advanced coal-utilization processes, 55 waste samples from 16 different coal gasification, fluidized-bed coal combustion (FBC), and advanced flue gas scrubbing processes were collected. Thirty-four of these wastes were analyzed for their bulk chemical and mineral compositions and tested for a detailed set of disposal-related physical properties. The results of these waste characterizations are presented in this report. In addition to the waste characterization data, this report contains a discussion of potentially useful waste management practices for advanced coal utilization processes.

Moretti, C.J.; Olson, E.S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Fatty Acids in Eleven Species of Blue-Green Algae: Geochemical Significance  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...FATTY ACID ESTERS FOR GAS CHROMATOGRAPHIC ANALYSIS...WOODFORD, F.P., GAS-LIQUID CHROMATOGRAPHY...48 km) south of Corpus Christi, Texas. The isolation...per milliliter. t Natural.: Ob-tained from...identified and measured by gas chromatography on...

Patrick L. Parker; Chase Van Baalen; Larry Maurer

1967-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

271

Using Trends and Geochemical Analysis to Assess Salinity Sources along the Pecos River, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the reservoir rose as much as 10 mg/L per year and often approached the drinking water standard for potable water (1000 mg/L). Since this time, control efforts have focused on reducing the river's salinity, requiring the identification of salt sources...

Hoff, Aaron

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

272

The destruction of geochemical heterogeneities by differential fluid motions during mantle convection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......melting of mantle rocks. Nonetheless, seawater and pelagic sediments can contaminate...increase in both computing time and core storage. The doubling time, T,, defined as...White (1982) which involves long-term storage of subducted oceanic lithosphere at the......

N. R. A. Hoffman; D. P. McKenzie

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Geophysical monitoring of coupled microbial and geochemical processes during stimulated subsurface bioremediation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electrical properties of unconsolidated sediments. Geophys.induced polarization in sandy unconsolidated sediments andcomprised of ca. 6.5 m of unconsolidated sands, silts, clays

Williams, K.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Investigation of Coupled Hydrologic and Geochemical Impacts of Wildfire on Southern California Watersheds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environ. ; 367: 222-233. Fairbrother A, Turnley JG. 2005.downstream communities (Fairbrother and Turnley 2005; NOAA-

Burke, Megan Patricia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Assessing XRF for the geochemical characterization of radiolarian chert artifacts from northeastern North America  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 Keywords: Chert XRF Geochemistry Non-destructive Weathering Quarries Quebec a b s t r a c sourcing. Chemical signatures for the Touladi and La Martre prehistoric quarries from the lower St the provenance of regional chert artifacts. Chert experimental flakes, created from quarry geological hand

Long, Bernard

276

Geochemical characteristics and correlation of oil and nonmarine source rocks from Mongolia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rocks and petroleum systems of...northwest China: AAPG Bulletin...All-Union Export and Import, 291-p...Marine and Petroleum Geol-ogy...rocks and petroleum systems of...northwest China: AAPG Bulletin...All-Union Export and Import, 291 p...

Cari L. Johnson; Todd J. Greene; David A. Zinniker; J. Michael Moldowan; Marc S. Hendrix; Alan R. Carroll

277

First results of operating and monitoring an innovative design of a permeable reactive barrier for the remediation of chromate contaminated groundwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An innovative setup of a permeable reactive barrier (PRB) was installed in Willisau, Switzerland to remediate chromate contaminated groundwater. Instead of a conventional continuous barrier, this PRB consists of cylinders installed in rows: a single row for lower expected CrVI-concentrations and an offset double row for higher expected CrVI-concentrations. The cylinders are filled with reactive grey cast-Fe shavings mixed with gravel to prevent extensive precipitation of secondary phases in the pore space. The treatment of the contaminants takes place both within the cylinders and in the dissolved FeII plume generated downstream of the barrier. Monitoring of the contamination situation over a period of 3 a provided evidence of the mobilization, transport and behavior of the contaminants in the aquifer. Groundwater and reactive material were sampled upstream, within and downstream of the barrier by a Multi-Port Sampling System (MPSS) that revealed the geochemical processes as a function of time and space. Comprehensive chemical analyses included sensitive parameters such as CrVI, FeII/FeIII, redox potential, dissolved O2 and pH. Several campaigns using multiple optical tracers revealed a rather complex hydrological regime at different scales, thereby complicating the barrier performance. Results from the large 3D hydrogeochemical dataset show that the double row of cylinders successfully treated the chromate contamination. Remediation by the single row was not effective enough due to insufficient lateral overlap of the cylinders and their FeII-plumes. The low amount of precipitated secondary phases observed in the pore space of the reactive material reduced the risk of clogging the system and suggested a favorable longevity of the barrier. Limiting factors for the long-term operation are inferred to be the availability and accessibility of FeII within the cylinders and the concentration within the generated FeII-plume.

Bettina Flury; Urs Eggenberger; Urs Mäder

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Amchitka Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Miscellaneous Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master...

279

Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

280

Groundwater Remediation and Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Because of the author’s vantage point, this chapter is necessarily based on experience in ground-water remediation in the United States. Much of that...

Peter Shanahan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Measured solubilities and speciations of neptunium, plutonium, and americium in a typical groundwater (J-13) from the Yucca Mountain region; Milestone report 3010-WBS 1.2.3.4.1.3.1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solubility and speciation data are important in understanding aqueous radionuclide transport through the geosphere. They define the source term for transport retardation processes such as sorption and colloid formation. Solubility and speciation data are useful in verifying the validity of geochemical codes that are part of predictive transport models. Results are presented from solubility and speciation experiments of {sup 237}NpO{sub 2}{sup +}, {sup 239}Pu{sup 4+}, {sup 241}Am{sup 3+}/Nd{sup 3+}, and {sup 243}Am{sup 3+} in J-13 groundwater (from the Yucca Mountain region, Nevada, which is being investigated as a potential high-level nuclear waste disposal site) at three different temperatures (25{degree}, 60{degree}, and 90{degree}C) and pH values (5.9, 7.0, and 8.5). The solubility-controlling steady-state solids were identified and the speciation and/or oxidation states present in the supernatant solutions were determined. The neptunium solubility decreased with increasing temperature and pH. Plutonium concentrations decreased with increasing temperature and showed no trend with pH. The americium solutions showed no clear solubility trend with increasing temperature and increasing pH.

Nitsche, H.; Gatti, R.C.; Standifer, E.M. [and others] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The influence of naturally-occurring organic acids on model estimates of lakewater acidification using the model of acidification of groundwater in catchments (MAGIC). Summary of research conducted during year 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A project for the US Department of Energy, entitled ``Incorporation of an organic acid representation into MAGIC (Model of Acidification of Groundwater in Catchments) and Testing of the Revised Model UsingIndependent Data Sources`` was initiated by E&S Environmental Chemistry, Inc. in March, 1992. Major components of the project include: improving the MAGIC model by incorporating a rigorous organic acid representation, based on empirical data and geochemical considerations, and testing the revised model using data from paleolimnological hindcasts of preindustrial chemistry for 33 Adirondack Mountain lakes, and the results of whole-catchment artificial acidification projects in Maine and Norway. The ongoing research in this project involves development of an organic acid representation to be incorporated into the MAGIC modeland testing of the improved model using three independent data sources. The research during Year 1 has included conducting two workshops to agree on an approach for the organic acid modeling, developing the organic subroutine and incorporating it into MAGIC (Task 1), conducing MAGIC hindcasts for Adirondack lakes and comparing the results with paleolimnological reconstructions (Task 2), and conducting site visits to the manipulation project sites in Maine and Norway. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the work that has been conducted on this project during Year 1. Tasks 1 and 2 have now been completed.

Sullivan, T.J.; Eilers, J.M. [E and S Environmental Chemistry, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States)] [E and S Environmental Chemistry, Inc., Corvallis, OR (United States); Cosby, B.J. [Virginia Univ., Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences] [Virginia Univ., Charlottesville, VA (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Driscoll, C.T. [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Syracuse Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Hemond, H.F. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering] [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering; Charles, D.F. [Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, PA (United States). Patrick Center for Environmental Research] [Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia, PA (United States). Patrick Center for Environmental Research; Norton, S.A. [Maine Univ., Orono, ME (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences] [Maine Univ., Orono, ME (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences

1993-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

283

Groundwater in the Great Plains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

7 The importance of conservation 7 What is Groundwater? The Hydrologic Cycle 8 Groundwater flow patterns 9 Saturated and unsaturated zones 9 Aquifers 10 Sole source aquifers 10 Water wells 12 Groundwater Quality Contamination and pollution, measuring... The High Plains Aquifer 22 Population served by groundwater 23 Competing uses for a limited resource 23 Groundwater declines 24 Contamination and Health Issues Water Testing 26 Regulatory Standards, Treatment Options 27 Table of Contents 3 Public...

Jensen, R.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Coupling and Testing the Fate and Transport of Heavy Metals and Other Ionic Species in a Groundwater Setting at Oak Ridge, TN - 13498  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historical data show that heavy metals (including mercury) were released from Y -12 National Security Complex (NSC) at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, to the surrounding environments during its operation in 1950's. Studies have also shown that metals accumulated in the soil, rock, and groundwater, and are, at the present time, sources of contamination to nearby rivers and creeks (e.g., East Fork Poplar Creek, Bear Creek). For instance, mercury (Hg), zinc (Zn), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) have been found and reported on the site groundwater. The groundwater type at the site is Ca-Mg-HCO{sub 3}. This paper presents a modeling application of PHREEQC, a model that simulates geochemical processes and couples them to flow and transport settings. The objective was to assess the capability of PHREEQC to simulate the transport of ionic species in groundwater at Oak Ridge, Tennessee; data were available from core holes and monitoring wells over a 736-m distance, within 60-300 m depths. First, predictions of the transport of major ionic species (i.e., Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+}) in the water were made between monitoring wells and for GW-131. Second, the model was used to assess hypotheses under two scenarios of transport for Zn, Cd, Pb and Hg, in Ca-Mg-HCO{sub 3} water, as influenced by the following solid-liquid interactions: a) the role of ion exchange and b) the role of both ion exchange and sorption, the latter via surface complexation with Fe(OH){sub 3}. The transport scenario with ion exchange suggests that significant ion exchange is expected to occur for Zn, Cd and Pb concentrations, with no significant impact on Hg, within the first 100 m. Predictions match the expected values of the exchange coefficients relative to Ca{sup 2+} and Mg{sup 2+} (e.g., K{sub Ca/Zn} = K{sub Ca/Cd} > K{sub Ca/Pb} > K{sub Ca/Hg}). The scenario with both ion exchange and sorption does affect the concentrations of Zn and Cd to a small extent within the first 100 m, but does more meaningfully reduce the concentration of Pb, within the same distance, and also decreases the concentration of Hg in between core holes. Analysis of the above results, in the light of available literature on the ions of this study, does fundamentally support the capability of PHREEQC to predict the transport of major ions in a groundwater setting; it also generally supports the hypothesized role of ion exchange and sorption. The results indicate the potential of the model as a tool in the screening, selection and monitoring of remediation technologies for contaminated groundwater sites. (authors)

Noosai, Nantaporn; Fuentes, Hector R. [CEE Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)] [CEE Florida International University, Miami, FL 33174 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Groundwater Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Groundwater Sampling Groundwater Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Groundwater Sampling Details Activities (3) Areas (2) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Field Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Field Sampling Parent Exploration Technique: Water Sampling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Determination of mixing ratios between different fluid end-members. Determination of fluid recharge rates and residence times. Thermal: Water temperature. Dictionary.png Groundwater Sampling: Groundwater sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of subsurface aqueous systems. Groundwater sampling

286

Lead Groundwater Contamination of Groundwater in the Northeast ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The detailed description of the migration of pollutants is fundamental for the groundwater monitoring and it ... historical data with a, groundwater contamination sampling for water quality analyses ... can be toxic to living organisms. Lead can ...

2001-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

287

Buying, Selling and Exporting Groundwater: Implications for Groundwater Conservation Districts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a Sales/ Lease Agreement, by Sandra Burns. Regulation of Exportation of Underground Water, by Doug Caroom. Roberts County Transportation Permits, by C.E. Williams. Export Fees: A Groundwater District Limits and Uses, by Jace Houston. The report also... in Texas, by Ronald Kaiser. Groundwater Transactions: Buyers Perspective, by Russell Johnson. Purchasing Groundwater for Export: The Kinney County Proposal, by Lynn Sherman. Model Lease of Groundwater Rights, by Ned Meister. Protecting Your Land and Water...

Kaiser, Ronald; Lesikar, Bruce A.; Silvey, Valeen

288

Multicomponent fluid flow by discontinuous Galerkin and mixed methods in unfractured and fractured media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Numerical examples in unfractured and fractured media illustrate the efficiency and robustness in gas-condensate reservoirs), hydrology and geochemical engineering (contamination of groundwater field, sharp variations in the rock properties, and high nonlinearity of the multicomponent system due

Firoozabadi, Abbas

289

Groundwater Database | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Groundwater Database Groundwater Database Groundwater Database DOE has one of the largest ground water contamination problems and subsequent cleanup responsibilities for a single entity in the world, in terms of the sheer volume of affected groundwater, number of plumes, range of hydrogeologic settings, and diversity of contaminant types. The Groundwater Database was developed to provide a centralized location for information relating to groundwater flow, contamination, and remedial approaches across the DOE complex. The database provides DOE management and other interested parties with an easily accessible, high level understanding of the type of contamination, magnitude of contamination, and dynamics of groundwater systems at DOE sites. It also identifies remedial approaches, exit strategies, long-term stewardship requirements, regulatory

290

Characterization of 200-UP-1 Aquifer Sediments and Results of Sorption-Desorption Tests Using Spiked Uncontaminated Groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Core characterization showed only 4 out of 13 core liner samples were intact samples and that the others were slough material. The intact samples showed typical Ringold Unit E characteristics such as being dominated by gravel and sand. Moderately reducing conditions are inferred in some core from borehole C4299. This reducing condition was caused by the hard tool process used to drill the wells. One core showed significant presence of ferric iron oxide/clay coatings on the gravels. There were no highly contaminated sediments found in the cores from the three new boreholes in UP-1 operable unit, especially for uranium. The presence of slough and ''flour'' caused by hard tooling is a serious challenge to obtaining field relevant sediments for use in geochemical experiments to determine the adsorption-desorption tendencies of redox sensitive elements such as uranium. The adsorption of COCs on intact Ringold Formation sediments and Fe/clay coatings showed that most of the anionic contaminants [Tc(VII), Se(VI), U(VI), Cr(VI), and I(-I)] did not adsorbed very well compared to cationic [Np(V), Sr(II), and Cs(I)] radionuclides. The high hydrous iron oxide content in Fe/clay coatings caused the highest Kd values for U and Np, suggesting these hydrous oxides are the key solid adsorbent in the sediments. Enhanced adsorption behavior for Tc, and Cr and perhaps Se on the sediments was considered an ?artifact? result caused by the induced reducing conditions from the hard tool drilling. Additional U(VI) adsorption Kd studies were performed on Ringold Formation sediments to develop more robust Kd data base for U. The <2 mm size separates of three UP-1 sediments showed a linear U(VI) adsorption isotherm up 1 ppm of total U(VI) concentration in solution. The additional U(VI) Kds obtained from varying carbonate concentration indicated that U(VI) adsorption was strongly influenced by the concentration of carbonate in solution. U(VI) adsorption decreased with increasing concentrations of carbonate up to a point. Then as carbonate and calcium concentrations in the groundwater reach values that exceed the solubility limit for the mineral calcite there is a slight increase in U(VI) Kd likely caused by uranium co-precipitation with the fresh calcite. If remediation of the UP-1 groundwater plume is required, such as pump and treat, it is recommended that the aquifer be treated with chemicals to increase pH and alkalinity and decrease dissolved calcium and magnesium [so that the precipitation of calcite is prevented]. Alternative methods to immobilize the uranium in place might be more effective than trying to remove the uranium by pump and treat. Unfortunately, no aquifer sediments were obtained that contained enough Hanford generated uranium to perform quantitative desorption tests germane to the UP-1 plume remediation issue. Recommended Kd values that should be used for risk predictions for the UP-1 groundwater plume traveling through the lithologies within the aquifer present at the UP-1 (and by proxy ZP-1) operable units were provided. The recommended values Kd values are chosen to include some conservatism (lower values are emphasized from the available range) as is standard risk assessment practice. In general, desorption Kd values for aged contaminated sediments can be larger than Kd values determined in short-term laboratory experiments. To accommodate the potential for desorption hysteresis and other complications, a second suite of uranium desorption Kd values were provided to be used to estimate removal of uranium by pump and treat techniques.

Um, Wooyong; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Bjornstad, Bruce N.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Brown, Christopher F.; Legore, Virginia L.; Geiszler, Keith N.; Baum, Steven R.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Kutnyakov, Igor V.; Vickerman, Tanya S.; Lindberg, Michael J.

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

291

Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-460 -460 Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report Third Quarter, 1997 October 1997 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. 1 - I : ~vailablk to DOE and DOE contractors from the. Office of Scientific - and Technical .Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 3783 1 ; prices available from (423) 576-840 1. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22 16 1, telephone (703) 487-4650. RULISON SITE GROUNDWATER MONITORING REPORT THIRD QUARTER, 1997 DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada

292

Biological stability of groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional (e.g., coagulation, flocculation, and filtration) or membrane filtration treatment trains were used to remove organic compounds from groundwater. For the conventional train with sand-anthracite columns, the assimilable organic carbon (AOC) of the groundwater was reduced from 349 {+-} 127 {micro}g/L C to 54 {+-} 51 {micro}g/L C. For the membrane filtration train, there was no statistical difference between the AOC of the raw water influent (388 {+-} 126 {micro}g C) and that of the membrane permeate (334 {+-} 156 {micro}g/L C), suggesting that this treatment produced biologically unstable water. Similar results were obtained using the heterotrophic growth response (HGR) method. Comparison of the biostability methods showed that HGR was positively correlated with AOC (r = 0.52; P < 0.0001; n = 156), indicating that AOC only partially explains the ability of heterotrophic bacteria to grow in water samples.

Noble, P.A. [Univ. of Maryland Biotechnology Inst., Baltimore, MD (United States). Center of Marine Biotechnology; Clark, D.L. [Irvine Ranch Water District, CA (United States); Olson, B.H. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States). School of Social Ecology, Environmental Analysis, and Design

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Questa Baseline and Pre-Mining Ground-Water Quality Investigation. 3. Historical Ground-Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................................................................................... 9 Mine history and ground-water development ....................................................................................................................................................... 11 Ground-water quality database.......................................................................................................................................................... 29 Compilation of complete database

294

The distribution of chitin in the water and sediment columns in the Gulf of Mexico and its geochemical significance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with distilled water. 0 2. The sample was then hydrolysed with HC1 (6N) for 6 'nours at 100 C. 3. The glucosamine in the neutralized hydrolysate was acetylated with acetylacetone (1. 0 ml of acetylacetone in 50 ml Na CO olution) 0 for 15 minutes at 100 C. 4... with distilled water. 0 2. The sample was then hydrolysed with HC1 (6N) for 6 'nours at 100 C. 3. The glucosamine in the neutralized hydrolysate was acetylated with acetylacetone (1. 0 ml of acetylacetone in 50 ml Na CO olution) 0 for 15 minutes at 100 C. 4...

Ho, Wai Kwok

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

295

Geochemical and palynological study of the Upper Famennian Dasberg event horizon from the Holy Cross Mountains (central Poland)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...from the source. These wind-blown charcoal particles, usually...a case study from the Gulf of Suez, Egypt. Organic Geochemistry 33...the Russian Plate. In Atlas of Spores and Pollen of...hydrotermal petroleums from the Gulf of California and Northeast...

LESZEK MARYNOWSKI; PAWE? FILIPIAK; MICHA? ZATO?

296

A 3D partial-equilibrium model to simulate coupled hydrogeological, microbiological, and geochemical processes in subsurface systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a laboratory column and redox zonation in a contaminated aquifer. INDEX TERMS: 1615 Global and Lasaga, 1994] or kinetic [e.g., Zheng, 1999; MacQuarrie and Sudicky, 2001] descriptions, efforts

297

Vegetation along hydrologic, edaphic, and geochemical gradients in a high-elevation poor fen in Canaan Valley, West Virginia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wetland plant community composition and pattern are regulated by a host of abiotic/environmental gradients and biotic factors. We used multivariate analyses to classify wetland plant communities and determine ...

James S. Rentch; James T. Anderson; Sam Lamont…

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Calculation of calorific values of coals from ultimate analyses: theoretical basis and geochemical implications. Final report. Part 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The various formulae for calculating calorific values for coals from ultimate analyses depend essentially on a propositon due to Dulong, that the heat of combustion of an organic compound is nearly equal to the heats of combustion of the elements in it, multiplied by their percentage content in the compound in question. This proposition assumes that the enthalpy of decomposition is negligible compared with the heat of combustion. The various published formulae, such as that due to Mott and Spooner, include empirical adjustments to allow for the fact that the enthalpy of formation or decomposition of no organic compound is zero (except rarely by chance). A new equation is proposed, which excludes empirical correction terms but includes a term explicitly related to the enthalpy of decomposition. As expected from the behavior of known compounds, this enthalpy varies with rank, but it also varies at the same level of rank with the geological history of the sample: rank is not the only source of variance in coal properties. The new equation is at least as effective in predicting calorific values for a set of 992 coals as equivalent equations derived for 6 subsets of the coals. On the whole, the distributions of differences between observed and calculated calorific values are skewed to only a small extent. About 86% of the differences lie between -300 and +300 Btu/lb (+- 700 kJ/kg). 10 references, 7 figures, 4 tables.

Given, P.H.; Weldon, D.; Zoeller, J.H.

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Geochemical and geophysical responses during the infiltration of fresh water into the contaminated saprolite of the Oak Ridge Integrated  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

saprolite of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research Challenge site, Tennessee A. Revil,1,2 Y. Wu,3 M 2013; accepted 19 June 2013; published 12 August 2013. [1] At the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research the infiltration of fresh water into the contaminated saprolite of the Oak Ridge Integrated Field Research

Hubbard, Susan

300

Reactive Geochemical Transport Modeling of Concentrated Aqueous Solutions: Supplement to TOUGHREACT User's Guide for the Pitzer Ion-Interaction Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Activity Coefficient of CaCl2 80 degree C Measured Osmotic80 degree C Measured Calculated Molality of CaCl2 Molalityof CaCl2 Figure 5-1. Comparison of the TOUGHREACT-

Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

A 6000-year geochemical record of human activities from Alexandria Alain J. Vron a,c,*, Clment Flaux a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Available online 27 October 2013 Keywords: Alexandria Egypt Pre and Early dynasty Lead isotopes Copper-based relics in the Alex- andria region during the Pre and Early dynastic periods, and provide insights bay with a significant peak in pollution at the culmination of the Roman occupation (Goiran, 2001

302

Quantification of Hydrological, Geochemical, and Mineralogical Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Uranium over Multiple Scales in Hanford Sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A long-term measure of the DOE Environmental Remediation Sciences Division is to provide sufficient scientific understanding to allow a significant fraction of DOE sites to incorporate coupled biological, chemical, and physical processes into decision making for environmental remediation and long-term stewardship by 2015. Our research targets two related, major obstacles to understanding and predicting contaminant transport at DOE sites: the heterogeneity of subsurface geologic media, and the scale dependence of experimental and modeled results.

Fendorf, Scott; Mayes, Melanie A.; Perfect, Edmund; van den Berg, Elmer; Parker, Jack C.; Jardine, Philip M.; Tang, Guoping

2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

303

Reactive Geochemical Transport Modeling of Concentrated Aqueous Solutions: Supplement to TOUGHREACT User's Guide for the Pitzer Ion-Interaction Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gypsum, niter, soda niter, halite, sylvite, epsomite, Mg(NO7 1.0E-8 1.0E-9 Gypsum Halite CaCl2:2H2O Sylvite Calcite Na+

Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Studies of the geochemical stability of a salt-saturated expansive grout. Final report, October 1986-June 1987  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments were conducted on several aspects of durability of grout in the special environment of a repository for radioactive wastes in bedded halite rock. Variables tested include solubility of grout components, phase changes, and mobility of chloride relative to interfaces with rock and brine or freshwater. The grout tested had large percentages of both chloride and sulfate. Chloride was more mobile when the grout was exposed to freshwater, and sulfate when exposed to brine. Removal of chloride from the grout accompanied loss of chloroaluminate phase, rather than simply dissolution of sodium chloride. However, chloride gradients were not apparently related to an interface between grout and halite rock. With extended exposure to brine or freshwater, calcium represented the largest fraction of mass loss, as determined by analyses of exposure solutions. Sulfate loss was the second largest. This effect increased with time and temperature of exposure. Volume increase of test specimens indicated continued or renewed expansion, even after the initial curing or storage period (28 days or 9 months), when the grout was exposed to water or brine. The combination of volume increase with mass loss suggests a density decrease, but this did not cause loss of physical integrity of specimens.

Wakeley, L.D.; Poole, T.S.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Dismantling the deep earth : geochemical constraints from hotspot lavas for the origin and lengthscales of mantle heterogeneity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 1 presents the first published measurements of Sr-isotope variability in olivine-hosted melt inclusions. Melt inclusions in just two Samoan basalt hand samples exhibit most of the total Sr-isotope variability ...

Jackson, Matthew G. (Matthew Gerald)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Geochemical, metagenomic and metaproteomic insights into trace metal utilization by methane-oxidizing microbial consortia in sulfidic marine sediments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbes have obligate requirements for trace metals in metalloenzymes that catalyze important biogeochemical reactions. In anoxic methane- and sulfide-rich environments, microbes may have unique adaptations for metal acquisition and utilization due to decreased bioavailability as a result of metal sulfide precipitation. However, micronutrient cycling is largely unexplored in cold ( 10 C) and sulfidic (>1 mM H2S) deep-sea methane seep ecosystems. We investigated trace metal geochemistry and microbial metal utilization in methane seeps offshore Oregon and California, USA, and report dissolved concentrations of nickel (0.5-270 nM), cobalt (0.5-6 nM), molybdenum (10-5,600 nM) and tungsten (0.3-8 nM) in Hydrate Ridge sediment porewaters. Despite low levels of cobalt and tungsten, metagenomic and metaproteomic data suggest that microbial consortia catalyzing anaerobic oxidation of methane utilize both scarce micronutrients in addition to nickel and molybdenum. Genetic machinery for cobalt-containing vitamin B12 biosynthesis was present in both anaerobic methanotrophic archaea (ANME) and sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). Proteins affiliated with the tungsten-containing form of formylmethanofuran dehydrogenase were expressed in ANME from two seep ecosystems, the first evidence for expression of a tungstoenzyme in psychrotolerant microorganisms. Finally, our data suggest that chemical speciation of metals in highly sulfidic porewaters may exert a stronger influence on microbial bioavailability than total concentration

Glass, DR. Jennifer [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Yu, DR. Hang [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Steele, Joshua [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Dawson, Katherine [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena; Sun, S [University of California, San Diego; Chourey, Karuna [ORNL; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L [ORNL; Orphan, V [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Effect of Subgrid Heterogeneity on Scaling Geochemical and Biogeochemical Reactions: A Case of U(VI) Desorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of subgrid heterogeneity in sediment properties on the rate of uranyl[U(VI)] desorption was investigated using a sediment collected from the US Department of Energy Hanford site. The sediment was sieved into 7 grain size fractions that each exhibited different U(VI) desorption properties. Six columns were assembled using the sediment with its grain size fractions arranged in different spatial configurations to mimic subgrid heterogeneity in reactive transport properties. The apparent rate of U(VI) desorption varied significantly in the columns. Those columns with sediment structures leading to preferential transport had much lower rates of U(VI) desorption than those with relatively homogeneous transport. Modeling analysis indicated that the U(VI) desorption model and parameters characterized from well-mixed reactors significantly over-predicted the measured U(VI) desorption in the columns with preferential transport. A dual domain model, which operationally separates reactive transport properties into two subgrid domains improved the predictions significantly. A similar effect of subgrid heterogeneity, albeit at a less degree, was observed for denitrification, which also occurred in the columns. The results imply that subgrid heterogeneity is an important consideration in extrapolating reaction rates from the laboratory to field.

Liu, Chongxuan; Shang, Jianying; Shan, Huimei; Zachara, John M.

2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

308

Present Jurassic petroleum charge facing Paleozoic biodegraded oil: Geochemical challenges and potential upsides, Embla field, North Sea  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...resulted in precipitation of asphaltenes and wax from the first petroleum charge, thus...The first petroleum charge had a high wax content and was terrestrially influenced...Paleocene sandy Siri Fairway: An efficient pipeline draining the prolific Central Graben...

Sverre Ekrene Ohm; Dag A. Karlsen; Nghia T. Phan; Tor Strand; Gunnar Iversen

309

Geochemical characterization of solid bitumen in the Chesterian (Mississippian) sandstone reservoir of the Hitch field, southwest Kansas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The relative amounts of wax components in the produced oils...to those of the extractable wax hydrocarbons from the corresponding...Striegler, 1981, Studies of wax deposition in the trans-Alaska pipeline: Journal of Petroleum Technology...

Dongwon Kim; R. Paul Philp; Raymond P. Sorenson

310

PII S0016-7037(01)00864-X Geochemical evidence for diversity of dust sources in the southwestern United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shows that Owens (dry) Lake and mining wastes from the adjacent Cerro Gordo mining district. The majority of studies of airborne dust in the southwestern United States employed air-filtration techniques anthropogenic pollution (e.g., Young et al., 1988; Pinnick et al., 1993; Malm et al., 1994). However, most

Ahmad, Sajjad

311

Coal fly ash interaction with environmental fluids: Geochemical and strontium isotope results from combined column and batch leaching experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major element and Sr isotope systematics and geochemistry of coal fly ash and its interactions with environmental waters were investigated using laboratory flow-through column leaching experiments (sodium carbonate, acetic acid, nitric acid) and sequential batch leaching experiments (water, acetic acid, hydrochloric acid). Column leaching of Class F fly ash samples shows rapid release of most major elements early in the leaching procedure, suggesting an association of these elements with soluble and surface bound phases. Delayed release of certain elements (e.g., Al, Fe, Si) signals gradual dissolution of more resistant silicate or glass phases as leaching continues. Strontium isotope results from both column and batch leaching experiments show a marked increase in {sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr ratio with continued leaching, yielding a total range of values from 0.7107 to 0.7138. For comparison, the isotopic composition of fluid output from a fly ash impoundment in West Virginia falls in a narrow range around 0.7124. The experimental data suggest the presence of a more resistant, highly radiogenic silicate phase that survives the combustion process and is leached after the more soluble minerals are removed. Strontium isotopic homogenization of minerals in coal does not always occur during the combustion process, despite the high temperatures encountered in the boiler. Early-released Sr tends to be isotopically uniform; thus the Sr isotopic composition of fly ash could be distinguishable from other sources and is a useful tool for quantifying the possible contribution of fly ash leaching to the total dissolved load in natural surface and ground waters.

Brubaker, Tonya M.; Stewart, Brian W.; Capo, Rosemary C.; Schroeder, Karl T.; Chapman, Elizabeth C.; Spivak-Birndorf, Lev J.; Vesper, Dorothy J.; Cardone, Carol R.; Rohar, Paul C.

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Climate change in the Pacific North America region over the past millennium : development and application of novel geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Barbara Basin Box Core SCB Southern California Bight SCMbasins, sills and islands make up the California Borderland Province, located in the Southern California Bight (

Roach, Lydia Darcy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The geochemical evolution of the Sonju Lake intrusion: assimilation and fractional crystallization in a layered mafic intrusion near Finland, Mn.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The Sonju Lake Intrusion, located within the Beaver Bay Complex near Finland, MN, is the most completely differentiated intrusion related to the Midcontinent Rift System… (more)

Dayton, Ryan N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

The application of PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, to aid in the management of a wastewater treatment wetland  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Volatile Compounds Pol chlorinated Bi hen ls 1. 5-25. 9 128-1190 ND-0. 2 ND 2. 9-5. 0 1170-1800 0. 5-3. 1 ND-0. 1 1. 0-17. 1 0. 3-1, 6 42-366 2-4 2860-6340 ND-241 ND-0. 9 ND-0. 1 0. 088-2. 155 0. 03-0. 07 37. 88-174. 84 ND ND-0. 02 ND-1. 31 ND... to Enhance Treatment Capability at the TMPA Site. . Step 1 . . Step 2. . Step 3 . . Page nl IV V I I IX 4 4 10 10 13 18 18 20 26 26 28 29 29 32 32 33 33 36 43 43 44 55 59 59 59 62 62 64 64 CONCLUSIONS . . PHREEQCI...

Mitzman, Stephanie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

GeoT User's Guide: A Computer Program for Multicomponent Geothermometry and Geochemical Speciation, Version 1.4  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Variable: Format: NAME_S ICON TRIAL_C A I F INPUT_C F NAME_+ and H 2 O), in any order ICON: flag to specify the meaningactual species. For pH, use ICON=3 and input 10 –pH . The

Sonnenthal, N. Spycher, N., L. Peiffer, and E.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Combining particle-tracking and geochemical data to assess public supply well vulnerability to arsenic and uranium q  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Bhattacharya, Associate Editor Keywords: Vulnerability Particle-tracking Arsenic Uranium Classification tree through aquifer systems and also through specific redox and pH zones within aquifers. Time were generally strongest for variables computed for distinct redox zones. Classification tree analysis

317

Variability of geochemical properties in a microbially dominated coalbed gas system from the eastern margin of the Illinois Basin, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study outlines gas characteristics along the southeastern margins of the Illinois Basin and evaluates regional versus local gas variations in Seelyville and Springfield coal beds. Our findings suggest that high permeability and shallow (100–250 m) depths of these Indiana coals allowed inoculation with methanogenic microbial consortia, thus leading to widespread microbial methane generation along the eastern marginal part of the Illinois Basin. Low maturity coals in the Illinois Basin with a vitrinite reflectance Ro~0.6% contain significant amounts of coal gas (~3 m3/t, 96 scf/t) with ?97 vol.% microbial methane. The amount of coal gas can vary significantly within a coal seam both in a vertical seam section as well as laterally from location to location. Therefore sampling of an entire core section is required for accurate estimates of coal gas reserves.

Strapoc, D.; Mastalerz, M.; Schimmelmann, A.; Drobniak, A.; Hedges, S.W.

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

318

Heavy metal pollution in farmland irrigated with river water near a steel plant—magnetic and geochemical signature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......et-al. 2011). Wastewater irrigation is...published on wastewater-irrigated soils...purposes without any treatment (Awofolu et-al...were found in wastewater-irrigated soils...near a steel plant in Loudi city...for measuring mass-specific susceptibility...field translation balance system (applied......

Chunxia Zhang; Erwin Appel; Qingqing Qiao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Compound Classification by Computer Treatment of Low Resolution Mass Spectra—Application to Geochemical and Environmental Problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... A., and Biemann, K., Anal. Chem., 43, 681 (1971).ASTM Standards on Petroleum Products and Lubricants, 1120 38th ed. (American Society for Testing ...

D. H. SMITH; G. EGLINTON

1972-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

320

Dimensions, texture-distribution, and geochemical heterogeneities of fracture–related dolomite geobodies hosted in Ediacaran limestones, northern Oman  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...identification and genesis as revealed by staining: Journal of Sedimentary Petrology, v.-36, p.-. Faqira, M. , M. Rademakers, and A. M. Afifi, 2009, New insights into the Hercynian Orogeny, and their implications for the Paleozoic hydrocarbon...

Veerle Vandeginste; Cédric M. John; John W. Cosgrove; Christina Manning

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Geochemical Evolution of a High Arsenic, Alkaline Pit-Lake in the Mother Lode Gold District, California  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cobalt metals, gallium arsenide, galena, wollastonite...ultrapure (MilleQ) water and analyzed as...account for its higher solubility in ground water relative to waters...reflect the lower solubility of CO2 in water with slightly higher...

Kaye S. Savage; Roger P. Ashley; Dennis K. Bird

322

Chemostratigraphy And Geochemical Constraints On The Deposition Of The Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, Eastern Montana And Western North Dakota.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Rowe, Harold The late Devonian-early Mississippian Bakken Formation was deposited in a structural-sedimentary intracratonic basin that extends across a large part of modern day North… (more)

Maldonado, David Nyrup

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Chemostratigraphy And Geochemical Constraints On The Deposition Of The Bakken Formation, Williston Basin, Eastern Montana And Western North Dakota.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Rowe, Harold The late Devonian-early Mississippian Bakken Formation was deposited in a structural-sedimentary intracratonic basin that extends across a large part of modern day North… (more)

Maldonado, David Nyrup

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

A Geochemical and Sedimentary Record of High Southern Latitude Holocene Climate Evolution from Lago Fagnano, Tierra del Fuego  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Situated at the southern margin of the hemispheric westerly wind belt and immediately north of the Antarctic Polar Frontal zone, Tierra del Fuego is well-positioned to monitor coupled changes in the ocean-atmosphere system of the high southern latitudes. Here we describe a Holocene paleoclimate record from sediment cores obtained from Lago Fagnano, a large lake in southern Tierra del Fuego at 55{sup o}S, to investigate past changes in climate related to these two important features of the global climate system. We use an AMS radiocarbon chronology for the last 8,000 years based on pollen concentrates, thereby avoiding contamination from bedrock-derived lignite. Our chronology is consistent with a tephrochronologic age date for deposits from the middle Holocene Volcan Hudson eruption. Combining bulk organic isotopic ({delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 15}N) and elemental (C and N) parameters with physical sediment properties allow us to better understand sediment provenance and transport mechanisms and to interpret Holocene climate and tectonic change during the last 8,000 years. Co-variability and long-term trends in C/N ratio, carbon accumulation rate, and magnetic susceptibility reflect an overall Holocene increase in the delivery of terrestrial organic and lithogenic material to the deep eastern basin. We attribute this variability to westerly wind-derived precipitation. Increased wind strength and precipitation in the late Holocene drives the Nothofagus forest eastward and enhances run-off and terrigenous inputs to the lake. Superimposed on the long-term trend are a series of abrupt 9 negative departures in C/N ratio, which constrain the presence of seismically-driven mass flow events in the record. We identify an increase in bulk {delta}{sup 13}C between 7,000 and 5,000 cal yr BP that we attribute to enhanced aquatic productivity driven by warmer summer temperatures. The Lago Fagnano {delta}{sup 13}C record shows similarities with Holocene records of sea surface temperature from the mid-latitude Chilean continental shelf and Antarctic air temperatures from the Taylor Dome ice core record in East Antarctica. Mid-Holocene warming occurred simultaneously across the Antarctic Frontal Zone, and in particular, in locations currently influenced by the Antarctic Circumpolar Current.

Moy, C M; Dunbar, R B; Guilderson, T P; Waldmann, N; Mucciarone, D A; Recasens, C; Austin, J A; Anselmetti, F S

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

325

Numerical modeling of time-lapse seismic data from fractured reservoirs including fluid flow and geochemical processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) models. My seismic simulation study suggests that CO2 saturated reservoir shows approximately ten times more attenuation than brine saturated reservoir. Similarly, large P-wave velocity variation in CO2 saturated reservoir...

Shekhar, Ravi

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Geochemical Journal, Vol. 46, pp. 000 to 000, 2012 *Corresponding author (e-mail: pinti.daniele@uqam.ca)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Disequilibrium of MarĂ­taro Hydrothermal Deposits, Los Azufres Geothermal Field, Mexico CAROLYNE PICKLER,1 DANIELE measured in the geothermal wells and hot springs of the Los Azufres field (from 118 to 3098 dpm/ gwater, Michoacan, 58060, Mexico (Received January 31, 2012; Accepted September 7, 2012) In order to calculate

Long, Bernard

327

A geochemical assessment of petroleum from underground oil storage caverns in relation to petroleum from natural reservoirs offshore Norway.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The aim of this study is to compare oils from known biodegraded fields offshore Norway to waxes and oils from an artificial cavern storage facility,… (more)

Řstensen, Marie

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Experimental measurements of the diffusion parameters of light hydrocarbons in water-saturated sedimentary rocks: II. Results and geochemical significance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffusion parameters (diffusion coefficient, diffusion permeability, solubility coefficient) for methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, methylpropane and 2,2-dimethylpropane were measured on 21 samples of water-saturated sedimentary rocks at different temperatures (30, 50, and 70 C). The rock samples include sandstones, siltstones, and claystones with porosities ranging from 0.4 to 16.5% and permeabilities from <0.005 to 33.4 millidarcy. Experimental diffusion coefficients ranged from c. 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}10} to 9 {times} 10{sup {minus}13} m{sup 2}/s, solubility coefficients covered a range from c. 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}1} to 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, and diffusion permeabilities lay between c. 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}12} and 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}14} m{sup 2}/s. Diffusion coefficients decrease with increasing molecular weight of the hydrocarbon compound, the decrease depending on the petrophysical properties and the mineralogy of the rocks and being most drastic in shales. None of the petrophysical parameters examined in this study (porosity, permeability, formation resistivity factor) gave a good correlation with the nonsteady-state diffusion coefficient, D. An excellent correlation was found between the formation resistivity factor, F, and the steady-state diffusion permeability. P. A possibly useful-though less significant-relation bearing some resemblance with Archie's law appears to exist between the porosity and the diffusion permeability. The temperature dependence of the diffusion parameters was determined on two calcareous sandstones. Based on an activated diffusion model activation energies for the diffusion process ranging around 50 kJ/mol were calculated for all hydrocarbons examined.

Krooss, B.M.; Leythaeuser, D. (Institute of petroleum and Organic Geochemistry, Juelich (Germany, F.R.))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ORDER 5400.1, GENERAL ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION PROGRAM, REQUIRES THE DEVELOPMENT AND IMPLEMENTATION OF A GROUNDWATER PROTECTION PROGRAM. THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DESCRIPTION PROVIDES AN OVERVIEW OF HOW THE LABORATORY ENSURES THAT PLANS FOR GROUNDWATER PROTECTION, MONITORING, AND RESTORATION ARE FULLY DEFINED, INTEGRATED, AND MANAGED IN A COST EFFECTIVE MANNER THAT IS CONSISTENT WITH FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS.

PAQUETTE,D.E.; BENNETT,D.B.; DORSCH,W.R.; GOODE,G.A.; LEE,R.J.; KLAUS,K.; HOWE,R.F.; GEIGER,K.

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

groundwater | netl.doe.gov  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany Contact NETL Key Staff Mission and Overview History Organization Awards & Recognition Education Site Enviromental Quality Visiting NETL Ground...

331

Questions about Groundwater Conservation Districts in Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Groundwater conservation districts (GCDs) are being created in many parts of Texas to allow local citizens to manage and protect their groundwater. This publication answers frequently asked questions about groundwater and GCDs....

Lesikar, Bruce J.; Silvy, Valeen

2008-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

332

Groundwater Discharge Permit and Registration (New Hampshire)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Groundwater Discharge Permitting and Registration Program seeks to protect groundwater quality by establishing standards, criteria, and procedures for wastewater discharges. The program...

333

Anatomy of a Groundwater Uranium Plume  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Groundwater containing legacy contaminants (pollutants that remain after their sources have been controlled) moves through aquifers in response to the hydraulic gradient. As the groundwater moves,...

334

Groundwater Protection, Brookhaven National Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Groundwater Groundwater placeholder DOE, BNL, elected officials, and community leaders mark the opening of the first off-site groundwater treatment system. From the outset, the Department of Energy (DOE) and the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) considered the protection of human health to be the most important goal of the cleanup program. Because exposure to groundwater contamination had the greatest potential to impact human health, the focus was to ensure that local drinking water supplies were clean and safe. Early efforts concentrated on determining the locations of the contamination, installing treatment systems to clean up the groundwater, and remediating sources of contamination like landfills and underground tanks. DOE and the Lab are committed to protecting Long Island's sole-source aquifer, a vital natural resource.

335

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is an apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid (NF) is selected to simulated the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid (OF) is selected to create an aerobic environment with anaerobic pockets. NF is injected periodically while OF is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. NF stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodically forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is acceptable. NF can be methane and OF be air, for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially TCE and tetrachloroethylene.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Bioremediation of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for in situ remediation of contaminated subsurface soil or groundwater contaminated by chlorinated hydrocarbons. A nutrient fluid is selected to stimulate the growth and reproduction of indigenous subsurface microorganisms that are capable of degrading the contaminants; an oxygenated fluid is selected to create a generally aerobic environment for these microorganisms to degrade the contaminants, leaving only pockets that are anaerobic. The nutrient fluid is injected periodically while the oxygenated fluid is injected continuously and both are extracted so that both are drawn across the plume. The nutrient fluid stimulates microbial colony growth; withholding it periodicially forces the larger, healthy colony of microbes to degrade the contaminants. Treatment is continued until the subsurface concentration of contaminants is reduced to an acceptable, preselected level. The nutrient fluid can be methane and the oxygenated fluid air for stimulating production of methanotrophs to break down chlorohydrocarbons, especially trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene.

Hazen, Terry C. (Augusta, GA); Fliermans, Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

JGI - Why Sequence Contaminated Groundwater?  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Contaminated Groundwater? Contaminated Groundwater? Because the majority of microorganisms in nature have never been cultured, little is known about their genetic properties, biochemical functions, and metabolic characteristics. Although the sequence of the microbial community "genome" can now be determined with high-throughput sequencing technology, the complexity and magnitude of most microbial communities make meaningful data acquisition and interpretation difficult. Thus, the sequence determination of a groundwater microbial community with manageable diversity and complexity (~20 phylotypes) is a timely challenge. The samples for this project come from the Natural and Accelerated Bioremediation Research (NABIR) Field Research Center (FRC), Well FW-010. The overall objective is to provide a fundamental and comprehensive

338

Managing Texas Groundwater Resources through Groundwater Conservation Districts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This publication gives an overview of Texas water law and the regulations governing groundwater conservation districts. The powers and responsibilities of districts are summarized. Color maps show the coverage of existing conservation and special...

Fipps, Guy

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Microsoft Word - Groundwater Discharge Permit  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

State Renews Groundwater Discharge Permit for WIPP CARLSBAD, N.M., September 11, 2008 - The New Mexico Environment Department (NMED) has renewed the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) groundwater discharge permit until 2013. The permit regulates the discharge of water from WIPP facilities and operations to lined ponds, which protect groundwater resources. The permit allows WIPP to discharge domestic wastewater, non-hazardous wastewater and storm water into 13 on-site, synthetically-lined ponds. The new permit also provides for increased daily discharge volumes to allow more flexibility in plant operations. "This permit is the result of a positive year-long effort with the New Mexico Groundwater Quality Bureau," said Jody Plum, DOE Carlsbad Field Office Permitting and

340

Groundwater Conservation Districts: Success Stories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand for water is increasing, so our aquifers must be conserved and protected. The Groundwater Conservation Districts in Texas are carrying out a number of successful programs in the areas of education and public awareness, technical assistance...

Porter, Dana; Persyn, Russell A.; Enciso, Juan

1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

 Illinois Groundwater Protection Act (Illinois)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the State of Illinois to restore, protect, and enhance the groundwaters of the State, as a natural and public resource. The State recognizes the essential and pervasive role of...

342

Factors Effecting the Fate and Transport of CL-20 in the Vadose Zone and Groundwater: Final Report 2002 - 2004 SERDP Project CP-1255  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This SERDP-funded project was initiated to investigate the fate of CL-20 in the subsurface environment, with a focus on identification and quantification of geochemical and microbial reactions of CL-20. CL-20 can be released to the surface and subsurface terrestrial environment by: a) manufacturing processes, b) munition storage, and c) use with low order detonation or unexploded ordnance. The risk of far-field subsurface migration was assessed through labora-tory experiments with a variety of sediments and subsurface materials to quantify processes that control CL-20 sorption-limited migration and degradation. Results of this study show that CL-20 will exhibit differing behavior in the subsurface terrestrial environment: 1. CL-20 on the sediment surface will photodegrade and interact with plants/animals (described in other SERDP projects CU 1254, 1256). CL-20 will exhibit greater sorption in humid sediments to organic matter. Transport will be solubility limited (i.e., low CL-20 aqueous solubility). 2. CL-20 infiltration into soils (<2 m) from spills will be subject to sorption to soil organic matter (if present), and low to high biodegradation rates (weeks to years) depending on the microbial population (greater in humid environment). 3. CL-20 in the vadose zone (>2 m) will be, in most cases, subject to low sorption and low degradation rates, so would persist in the subsurface environment and be at risk for deep migration. Low water content in arid regions will result in a decrease in both sorption and the degradation rate. Measured degradation rates in unsaturated sediments of years would result in significant subsurface migration distances. 4. CL-20 in groundwater will be subject to some sorption but likely very slow degradation rates. CL-20 sorption will be greater than RDX. Most CL-20 degradation will be abiotic (ferrous iron and other transition metals), because most deep subsurface systems have extremely low natural microbial populations. Degradation rates will range from weeks (iron reducing systems) to years. Although CL-20 will move rapidly through most sediments in the terrestrial environment, subsurface remediation can be utilized for cleanup. Transformation of CL-20 to intermediates can be rapidly accomplished under: a) reducing conditions (CL-20 4.1 min. half-life, RDX 18 min. half-life), b) alkaline (pH >10) conditions, and c) bioremediation with added nutrients. CL-20 degradation to intermediates may be insufficient to mitigate environmental impact, as the toxicity of many of these compounds is unknown. Biostimulation in oxic to reducing systems by carbon and nutrient addition can mineralize CL-20, with the most rapid rates occurring under reducing conditions.

Szecsody, James E.; Riley, Robert G.; Devary, Brooks J.; Girvin, Donald C.; Resch, Charles T.; Campbell, James A.; Fredrickson, Herbert L.; Thompson, Karen T.; Crocker, Fiona H.; Qasim, Mohammad M.; Gamerdinger, Amy P.; Lemond, Luke A.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Bikini Atoll groundwater development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear weapons testing during the 1950's has left the soil and ground water on Bikini Atoll contaminated with cesium-137, and to a lesser extent, strontium-90. Plans currently are underway for the clean-up and resettlement of the atoll by removal of approximately the upper 30 cm of soil. Any large-scale resettlement program must include provisions for water supply. This will be achieved principally by catchment and storage of rain water, however, since rainfall in Bikini is highly seasonal and droughts occur frequently, ground water development must also be considered. The quantity of potable ground water that can be developed is limited by its salinity and radiological quality. The few ground water samples available from Bikini, which have been collected from only about the top meter of the groundwater body, indicate that small bodies of potable ground water exist on Bikini and Eneu, the two principal living islands, but that cesium and strontium in the Bikioni ground water exceed drinking water standards. In order to make a reasonable estimate of the ground water development potential for the atoll, some 40 test boreholes will be drilled during July/August 1985, and a program of water quality monitoring initiated. This paper will describe preliminary results of the drilling and monitoring work.

Peterson, F.L.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Geotechnical Research Centre  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

remediation and site restoration n Groundwater and geochemical modelling n Groundwater and surface water engineering, slope stability, tunnelling in soft ground tunnels and foundations in rock, and concrete dams Stability of soil and rock slopes n Soft ground tunnelling n Deep excavations and tunnels in rock n

Lennard, William N.

345

Soil & Groundwater Remediation | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Soil & Groundwater Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages the largest groundwater and soil remediation effort in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris contaminated with radionuclides, metals, and organics. The Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation is working with DOE site managers around the country regarding specific technical issues. At the large sites such as Hanford, Savannah River, and Oak Ridge, the Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation has conducted research and demonstration projects to test new technologies and remediation

346

In situ Groundwater Remediation Using Treatment Walls  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of treatment wall technology for the clean up of contaminated ground-water resources has expanded in the past few...ex situ and other in situ ground-water remediation approaches is reduced operation a...

Radisav D. Vidic; Frederick G. Pohland

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

INTEC Groundwater Monitoring Report 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes 2006 perched water and groundwater monitoring activities at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). During 2006, groundwater samples were collected from a total of 22 Snake River Plain Aquifer (SRPA) monitoring wells, plus six aquifer wells sampled for the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF) monitoring program. In addition, perched water samples were collected from 21 perched wells and 19 suction lysimeters. Groundwater and perched water samples were analyzed for a suite of radionuclides and inorganic constituents. Laboratory results in this report are compared to drinking water maximum contaminant levels (MCLs). Such comparison is for reference only and it should be noted that the Operable Unit 3-13 Record of Decision does not require that perched water comply with drinking water standards.

J. R. Forbes

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwate...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

VOCs Miamisburg Environmental Management Project - Tritium More Documents & Publications Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

349

AUTOMATING GROUNDWATER SAMPLING AT HANFORD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Until this past October, Fluor Hanford managed Hanford's integrated groundwater program for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). With the new contract awards at the Site, however, the CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) has assumed responsibility for the groundwater-monitoring programs at the 586-square-mile reservation in southeastern Washington State. These programs are regulated by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). The purpose of monitoring is to track existing groundwater contamination from past practices, as well as other potential contamination that might originate from RCRA treatment, storage, and disposal (TSD) facilities. An integral part of the groundwater-monitoring program involves taking samples of the groundwater and measuring the water levels in wells scattered across the site. More than 1,200 wells are sampled each year. Historically, field personnel or 'samplers' have been issued pre-printed forms that have information about the well(s) for a particular sampling evolution. This information is taken from the Hanford Well Information System (HWIS) and the Hanford Environmental Information System (HEIS)--official electronic databases. The samplers used these hardcopy forms to document the groundwater samples and well water-levels. After recording the entries in the field, the samplers turned the forms in at the end of the day and the collected information was posted onto a spreadsheet that was then printed and included in a log book. The log book was then used to make manual entries of the new information into the software application(s) for the HEIS and HWIS databases. This is a pilot project for automating this tedious process by providing an electronic tool for automating water-level measurements and groundwater field-sampling activities. The automation will eliminate the manual forms and associated data entry, improve the accuracy of the information recorded, and enhance the efficiency and sampling capacity of field personnel. The goal of the effort is to eliminate 100 percent of the manual input to the database(s) and replace the management of paperwork by the field and clerical personnel with an almost entirely electronic process. These activities will include the following: scheduling the activities of the field teams, electronically recording water-level measurements, electronically logging and filing Groundwater Sampling Reports (GSR), and transferring field forms into the site-wide Integrated Document Management System (IDMS).

CONNELL CW; HILDEBRAND RD; CONLEY SF; CUNNINGHAM DE

2009-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

350

ALLISON DVORAK CENTRAL VALLEY GROUNDWATER BANK OPERATIONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i ALLISON DVORAK CENTRAL VALLEY GROUNDWATER BANK OPERATIONS: HYDROLOGY, GROUNDWATER OPERATING RULE affect California's SWP (State Water Project) and CVP (Central Valley Project) water supply deliveries-operation of groundwater storage, both north and south of the Delta, can increase long-term average project deliveries

Lund, Jay R.

351

Groundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. DOI: 10.1061/ ASCE 0733-9496 2002 128:6 431 CE Database keywords: Ground water; Remedial action; Algorithms; Ground-water management. Introduction The contamination of groundwater is a widespread problemGroundwater Remediation Strategy Using Global Optimization Algorithms Shreedhar Maskey1 ; Andreja

Neumaier, Arnold

352

Removing High Explosives from Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

LOS ALAMOS, N.M. – In an initiative supported by EM, Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Corrective Actions Program is addressing high explosive contamination in surface water and groundwater at a location this summer in the forests surrounding the laboratory.

353

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

11 - 320 of 28,905 results. 11 - 320 of 28,905 results. Download CX-000316: Categorical Exclusion Determination Massachusetts Revision 1 - High Performance Buildings Program CX(s) Applied: B1.15, B1.22, B1.23, B1.31, B2.1, B2.3, B2.5, A1, A9, A11, B1.3, B1.4, B1.5, B1.7, B5.1 Date: 11/19/2009 Location(s): Massachusetts Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/cx-000316-categorical-exclusion-determination Download Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/analysis-and-geochemical-modeling-vanadium-contamination-groundwater

354

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

091 - 8100 of 26,764 results. 091 - 8100 of 26,764 results. Download Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado http://energy.gov/lm/downloads/analysis-and-geochemical-modeling-vanadium-contamination-groundwater Download Proposed rule: re-opening of public comment period Proposed rule: re-opening of public comment period. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is re-opening the public comment period for proposed amendments to its regulations governing compliance with... http://energy.gov/nepa/downloads/proposed-rule-re-opening-public-comment-period Download Semiannual Report to Congress: October 1, 2010- March 31, 2011

355

Situ treatment of contaminated groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for treating dissolved halogenated organic compounds in groundwater that relies upon electrolytically-generated hydrogen to chemically reduce the halogenated compounds in the presence of a suitable catalyst. A direct current is placed across at least a pair, or an array, of electrodes which are housed within groundwater wells so that hydrogen is generated at the cathode and oxygen at the anode. A pump is located within the well housing in which the cathode(s) is(are) located and draws in groundwater where it is hydrogenated via electrolysis, passes through a well-bore treatment unit, and then transported to the anode well(s) for reinjection into the ground. The well-bore treatment involves a permeable cylinder located in the well bore and containing a packed bed of catalyst material that facilitates the reductive dehalogenation of the halogenated organic compounds by hydrogen into environmentally benign species such as ethane and methane. Also, electro-osmatic transport of contaminants toward the cathode also contributes to contaminant mass removal. The only above ground equipment required are the transfer pipes and a direct circuit power supply for the electrodes. The electrode wells in an array may be used in pairs or one anode well may be used with a plurality of cathode wells. The DC current flow between electrode wells may be periodically reversed which controls the formation of mineral deposits in the alkaline cathode well-bore water, as well as to help rejuvenate the catalysis.

McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Ruiz, Roberto (Tracy, CA); Pico, Tristan M. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Groundwater Management Areas (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Management Areas (Texas) Management Areas (Texas) Groundwater Management Areas (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality This legislation authorizes the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality and the Texas Water Development Board to establish Groundwater Management Areas to provide for the conservation, preservation, protection, recharging, and prevention of waste of groundwater and groundwater

357

Groundwater Conservation Districts (Texas) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conservation Districts (Texas) Conservation Districts (Texas) Groundwater Conservation Districts (Texas) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Texas Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Texas Commission on Environmental Quality Groundwater Conservation Districts, as created following procedures described in Water Code 36, are designed to provide for the conservation, preservation, protection, recharging, and prevention of waste of groundwater, and of groundwater reservoirs or their subdivisions, and to

358

Metropolitan Groundwater Plans (Minnesota) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Groundwater Plans (Minnesota) Groundwater Plans (Minnesota) Metropolitan Groundwater Plans (Minnesota) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Minnesota Program Type Environmental Regulations This section gives metropolitan counties the authority to prepare and adopt groundwater plans, or to grant this responsibility to soil and water

359

Groundwater Cleanup Operational Changes Are Being Implemented...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

is based on EPA National Primary Drinking Water Regulations. The progress of groundwater remediation is reported each year in the SER. Operation metrics indicate that, although...

360

Montana Groundwater Information Center Webpage | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Center Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Groundwater Information Center Webpage Abstract Provides access to...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Leach test of cladding removal waste grout using Hanford groundwater  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes laboratory experiments performed during 1986-1990 designed to produce empirical leach rate data for cladding removal waste (CRW) grout. At the completion of the laboratory work, funding was not available for report completion, and only now during final grout closeout activities is the report published. The leach rates serve as inputs to computer codes used in assessing the potential risk from the migration of waste species from disposed grout. This report discusses chemical analyses conducted on samples of CRW grout, and the results of geochemical computer code calculations that help identify mechanisms involved in the leaching process. The semi-infinite solid diffusion model was selected as the most representative model for describing leaching of grouts. The use of this model with empirically derived leach constants yields conservative predictions of waste release rates, provided no significant changes occur in the grout leach processes over long time periods. The test methods included three types of leach tests--the American Nuclear Society (ANS) 16.1 intermittent solution exchange test, a static leach test, and a once-through flow column test. The synthetic CRW used in the tests was prepared in five batches using simulated liquid waste spiked with several radionuclides: iodine ({sup 125}I), carbon ({sup 14}C), technetium ({sup 99}Tc), cesium ({sup 137}Cs), strontium ({sup 85}Sr), americium ({sup 241}Am), and plutonium ({sup 238}Pu). The grout was formed by mixing the simulated liquid waste with dry blend containing Type I and Type II Portland cement, class F fly ash, Indian Red Pottery clay, and calcium hydroxide. The mixture was allowed to set and cure at room temperature in closed containers for at least 46 days before it was tested.

Serne, R.J.; Martin, W.J.; Legore, V.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant- Quadrant I Groundwater Investigative (5-Unit) Area Plume  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Groundwater Database Report - Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant - Quadrant I Groundwater Investigative (5-Unit) Area Plume

363

Microbial Community Dynamics of Lactate Enriched Hanford Groundwaters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamics of Lactate Enriched Hanford Groundwaters Jenniferof Energy site at Hanford, WA, has been historicallyof lactate-enriched Hanford well H-100 groundwater sample.

Mosher, Jennifer J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers...

365

Slick Rock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Slick Rock - Old North Continent Slick Rock - Union Carbide More Documents & Publications South Valley Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports...

366

DOE Responds to Advisory Board Recommendation on Groundwater...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

created a groundwater strategy document that described the potential for releases from waste disposal sites and storage areas. The document also prioritized known groundwater...

367

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky...

368

Flow and Storage in Groundwater Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...groundwater removed from storage today was recharged...result of water pumped from wells that...Herrera, Eds., Seawater Intrusion in Coastal...conductivity, specific storage, and thickness...groundwater removed from storage today was recharged...result of water pumped from wells that...

William M. Alley; Richard W. Healy; James W. LaBaugh; Thomas E. Reilly

2002-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

369

In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Bacterial Diversity and Aerobic Biodegradation Potential in a BTEX-Contaminated Aquifer Water Air Soil21/11/08 1 In situ bioremediation of petrol contaminated groundwater Guido Miguel Delgadillo EVS and facts · Likelihood of contamination · Benefits of in situ bioremediation So... Ask not what groundwater

Blouin-Demers, Gabriel

370

Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

September 13, 2011 September 13, 2011 Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers have treated more than 800 million gallons of groundwater at the Hanford Site so far this year, a record annual amount. Last year, workers with DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company treated 600 mil- lion gallons of groundwater at the site. "It's great to know the amount of treated groundwater is increasing. We are meeting our goals, which means we are protecting the Columbia River," said Bill Barrett, CH2M HILL director of pump and treat operations and maintenance. American Recovery and Reinvestment Act work to expand Hanford's capacity for treating contami- nated groundwater led to the 2011 record amount. The Recovery Act funded the installation of more

371

Yucca Mountain Area Saturated Zone Dissolved Organic Carbon Isotopic Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater samples in the Yucca Mountain area were collected for chemical and isotopic analyses and measurements of water temperature, pH, specific conductivity, and alkalinity were obtained at the well or spring at the time of sampling. For this project, groundwater samples were analyzed for major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and dissolved organic carbon (DOC). The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) performed all the fieldwork on this project including measurement of water chemistry field parameters and sample collection. The major ions dissolved in the groundwater, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) were analyzed by the USGS. All preparation and processing of samples for DOC carbon isotopic analyses and geochemical modeling were performed by the Desert Research Institute (DRI). Analysis of the DOC carbon dioxide gas produced at DRI to obtain carbon-13 and carbon-14 values was conducted at the University of Arizona Accelerator Facility (a NSHE Yucca Mountain project QA qualified contract facility). The major-ion chemistry, deuterium, oxygen-18, and carbon isotopes of DIC were used in geochemical modeling (NETPATH) to determine groundwater sources, flow paths, mixing, and ages. The carbon isotopes of DOC were used to calculate groundwater ages that are independent of DIC model corrected carbon-14 ages. The DIC model corrected carbon-14 calculated ages were used to evaluate groundwater travel times for mixtures of water including water beneath Yucca Mountain. When possible, groundwater travel times were calculated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient sample sites. DOC carbon-14 groundwater ages were also calculated for groundwaters in the Yucca Mountain area. When possible, groundwater travel times were estimated for groundwater flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient groundwater sample sites using the DOC calculated groundwater ages. The DIC calculated groundwater ages were compared with DOC calculated groundwater ages and both of these ages were compared to travel times developed in ground-water flow and transport models. If nuclear waste is stored in Yucca Mountain, the saturated zone is the final barrier against the release of radionuclides to the environment. The most recent rendition of the TSPA takes little credit for the presence of the saturated zone and is a testament to the inadequate understanding of this important barrier. If radionuclides reach the saturated zone beneath Yucca Mountain, then there is a travel time before they would leave the Yucca Mountain area and flow down gradient to the Amargosa Valley area. Knowing how long it takes groundwater in the saturated zone to flow from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas is critical information for potential radionuclide transport. Radionuclide transport in groundwater may be the quickest pathway for radionuclides in the proposed Yucca Mountain repository to reach land surface by way of groundwater pumped in Amargosa Valley. An alternative approach to ground-water flow and transport models to determine the travel time of radionuclides from beneath Yucca Mountain to down gradient areas in the saturated zone is by carbon-14 dating of both inorganic and organic carbon dissolved in the groundwater. A standard method of determining ground-water ages is to measure the carbon-13 and carbon-14 of DIC in the groundwater and then correct the measured carbon-14 along a flow path for geochemical reactions that involve carbon containing phases. These geochemical reactions are constrained by carbon-13 and isotopic fractionations. Without correcting for geochemical reactions, the ground-water ages calculated from only the differences in carbon-14 measured along a flow path (assuming the decrease in carbon-14 is due strictly to radioactive decay) could be tens of thousands of years too old. The computer program NETPATH, developed by the USGS, is the best geochemical program for correcting carbon-14 activities for geochemical r

Thomas, James; Decker, David; Patterson, Gary; Peterman, Zell; Mihevc, Todd; Larsen, Jessica; Hershey, Ronald

2007-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

372

The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides the quality assurance guidelines that will be followed by the groundwater project.

Walker, Thomas G.

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

373

Quantitative maps of groundwater resources in Africa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In Africa, groundwater is the major source of drinking water and its use for irrigation is forecast to increase substantially to combat growing food insecurity. Despite this, there is little quantitative information on groundwater resources in Africa, and groundwater storage is consequently omitted from assessments of freshwater availability. Here we present the first quantitative continent-wide maps of aquifer storage and potential borehole yields in Africa based on an extensive review of available maps, publications and data. We estimate total groundwater storage in Africa to be 0.66 million km3 (0.36–1.75 million km3). Not all of this groundwater storage is available for abstraction, but the estimated volume is more than 100 times estimates of annual renewable freshwater resources on Africa. Groundwater resources are unevenly distributed: the largest groundwater volumes are found in the large sedimentary aquifers in the North African countries Libya, Algeria, Egypt and Sudan. Nevertheless, for many African countries appropriately sited and constructed boreholes can support handpump abstraction (yields of 0.1–0.3 l s?1), and contain sufficient storage to sustain abstraction through inter-annual variations in recharge. The maps show further that the potential for higher yielding boreholes ( > 5 l s?1) is much more limited. Therefore, strategies for increasing irrigation or supplying water to rapidly urbanizing cities that are predicated on the widespread drilling of high yielding boreholes are likely to be unsuccessful. As groundwater is the largest and most widely distributed store of freshwater in Africa, the quantitative maps are intended to lead to more realistic assessments of water security and water stress, and to promote a more quantitative approach to mapping of groundwater resources at national and regional level.

A M MacDonald; H C Bonsor; B É Ó Dochartaigh; R G Taylor

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Geochronological, geochemical and Sr–Nd–Hf isotopic constraints on the origin of the Cretaceous intraplate volcanism in West Qinling, Central China: Implications for asthenosphere–lithosphere interaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper reports new zircon LA-ICP-MS \\{UPb\\} age and Lu-Hf isotopes, laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar age, mineral chemistry, bulk-rock major and trace element, and SrNd isotope data from intraplate volcanic rocks in the Duofuntun Area, West Qinling. It was dated at 105.8 ± 0.9 Ma (UPb Zircon) and 103 ± 2 Ma (matrix glass laser-fusion 40Ar/39Ar dating). The Duofuntun Volcanic Rocks (DVR) are dominantly composed of alkali basalts with minor basanites and basaltic andesites. Some evolved samples of the DVR underwent a variable fractionation of olivine, clinopyroxene, plagioclase, FeTi oxide, Cr-rich spinel and apatite. Chondrite-normalized rare earth element and primitive mantle-normalized trace element patterns of the DVR remarkably resemble those of oceanic island basalts (OIB). Nearly all the alkali basalts show positive Nb, Ta and Ti anomalies and negative Rb, Th and P anomalies, whereas basanites do not display positive Ti anomalies. Nearly all the samples show marked negative Rb and K anomalies relative to their neighbouring elements on a primitive mantle normalized trace element diagram. 87Sr/86Sr(i) and 143Nd/144Nd(i) ratios for all the mafic samples also show an OIB affinity, covering a range of 0.703264–0.705032 and 0.512718–0.512873, respectively. Several lines of evidence indicate that both garnet and amphibole play a key role for the genesis of the DVR. The melt segregation PT conditions in the source region, around 1371 °C at 1.98–3.25 GPa, combined with trace element collectively suggest a polybaric melting process during the formation of the DVR. The non-modal batch partial melting modelling result indicates the DVR were generated by small-degree polybaric partial melting of amphibole-bearing spinel peridotites (ca. 4%) and amphibole-bearing garnet peridotites (ca. 0.7%). We suggest the DVR were not formed in a plume. Rather, they originated by the interaction between the upwelling asthenosphere, which might provide both materials and heat flux, and hydrous mineral-bearing (amphibole) lithosphere during lithospheric extension.

Xiao-Wei Li; Xuan-Xue Mo; Xue-Hui Yu; Yi Ding; Xiong-Fei Huang; Ping Wei; Wen-Yan He

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Micas from mariupolite of the Oktiabrski massif (SE Ukraine): An insight into the host rock evolution – Geochemical data supported by Raman microspectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Muscovite and two dark mica varieties (the coarse-crystalline, pegmatitic, and fine-crystalline with signs of early weathering) representing members of the biotite series, originating from mariupolite of the Oktiabrski massif, (Ukraine), were investigated along with their solid inclusions using electron microprobe and Raman micro-spectroscopy to discuss their genesis and relationship to the parental magma. The coarse-crystalline, pegmatitic biotite, (K1.90Rb0.02Na0.01)(Fe2+3.56Mg1.34Ti0.36Fe3+0.34Mn0.03)[(Si5.73Al2.10Fe3+0.17)O20](OH3.24 F0.76) represents the primary, magmatic annite that crystallized from an alkaline, Fe-rich and Mg-depleted host magma, whereas the fine-crystalline biotite, partly altered to vermiculite, (K1.75Rb0.03Na0.03)(Fe3+3.23Fe2+1.16Mg0.26Mn0.04Ti0.10)[(Si5.16 Al2.84)O20](OH)4.00, devoid of F, represents a re-equilibrated or secondary, post-magmatic Fe3+-bearing mica crystallized from alkaline to the subalkaline host magma. Muscovite, (K1.96Na0.06)(Al3.97Fe2+0.06)[(Si5.99Al2.01)O20](OH)4, with low Na/(Na + K) ratio, low Fe and devoid of Ti and also F, forms only tiny, subhedral flakes formed in the post-magmatic, hydrothermal stage. The primary, unaltered biotite contains numerous solid inclusions of primary origin (albite, aegirine, zircon, K-feldspar, nepheline, pyrochlore, magnetite) and secondary origin (natrolite, hematite, Ti-Mn oxides/hydroxides); most of them are accompanied by a carbonaceous substance, all confirmed by scanning electron microscopy and Raman microspectroscopy.

Magdalena Duma?ska-S?owik; Aleksandra Wese?ucha-Birczy?ska; Adam Pieczka

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

GEOCHEMICAL AND GEOCHRONOLOGICAL CONSTRAINTS ON EARLY LUNAR BOMBARDMENT HISTORY. B. A. Cohen, Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology, School of Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

should create a trace sidero- phile signature in impact melts. If comets or other volatile-rich impactors]. Siderophile element signatures of impact melts at the Apollo landing sites (Fig. 1) suggest that some had

Cohen, Barbara Anne

377

Geologic history of the Neogene “Qena Lake” developed during the evolution of the Nile Valley: A sedimentological, mineralogical and geochemical approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Siliciclastic and carbonate sediments were laid down in southern Wadi Qena and around the Qena Nile bend (Middle Egypt) in a lacustrine–alluvial environment which dominated a relatively wide lake, the “Qena Lake” that interrupted the Nile course during the Neogene time. These sediments are represented mainly by the oldest dominantly lacustrine chocolate brown mudstones of the Khuzam Formation that accumulated nearer to the center of that lake (now forming a 185 m terrace above sea level), overlain by the dominantly lacustrine carbonates and marls of the Durri Formation which accumulated during semi-arid conditions, mainly nearer to the periphery of the lake (now forming 170, 180 and 185 m terraces a.s.l. in the studied sections). The water level of the “Qena Lake” reached 240 m. above sea level, as indicated by the maximum carbonate elevation reached in the region. Finally fanglomerates of the Higaza Formation with its chert and limestone conglomerates accumulated during torrential periods at higher elevations (forming 240, 300 and 400 m terraces a.s.l.). These three formations accumulated in this particular area before and during the unroofing of the basement rocks of the Eastern Desert, west of the watershed. According to the known Early Miocene initial development of the Nile Valley, beside the occurrence of similar deposits of Oligocene age along the eastern side of the basement range, the earlier known Pliocene age given for these sediments in the Qena area is here questioned. It might belong to earlier Miocene?–Pliocene times. As the basement rocks of the Eastern Desert were still covered by Cretaceous–Paleogene sedimentary rocks while the Khuzam, Durri and Higaza Formations were accumulating in the Qena Lake region, it is believed, contrary to the belief of some authors, that the basement rocks of the Eastern Desert were not the source of these sediments. The carbonate petrographic study, beside the X-ray, and the11 major oxides and 22 trace elements analyses, all point to that the mudrock sediments of the oldest Neogene Khuzam and Durri Formations of the “Qena Lake” phase were carried out and entered the area of southern Wadi Qena and around the Qena Nile bend mainly from the south. The intermediate igneous rocks of southern Egypt and northern Sudan were the main source areas. Additional contributions had possibly come from the weathering of the non-marine to brackish Cretaceous (pre-Campanian) shales of southern Egypt. Accumulation of conglomerates with mixed igneous and sedimentary clasts followed (forming 7 terraces in Wadi Qena, ranging from 240 m in the north to 140 m a.s.l. in the south), constituting the newly introduced Late Pliocene formation; El Heita Formation. These conglomerates were mainly drained from the then exposed basement rocks of the middle parts of Wadi Qena, and cut through the older Neogene sediments. Later on, after the lake became connected to the northern parts of the Nile Valley, the lake water level was lowered to 180 m a.s.l., and another lake with this lower level was formed (Isawiyya Lake). With the successive lowering of water level the younger well known Issawia, Qena, Abbassia and Dandara Formations accumulated successively; nearer to, and within, the present Nile Valley.

Emad R. Philobbos; Mahmoud A. Essa; Mustafa M. Ismail

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES, II. A PRELIMINARY REPORT ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, IN BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENT LAKE SEDIMENT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...The normal hydrocarbons of the rich oil shale from the Green River Formation exhibit...n-C17 alkane in the Green River oil shale is consistent with the theory that...rise to the organic material of rich oil shale. Although the Florida Mud Lake ooze...

Jerry Han; E. D. McCarthy; William Van Hoeven; Melvin Calvin; W. H. Bradley

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Geochemical and optical characterization of diagenetic and hydrothermal dolomite from the Bonneterre formation within the Southeastern Missouri Lead-Zinc District  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

core, b. single high Fe rim, c. single outer dark rim 73 41 MS-1-1044. 0 Color cathodoluminescence, 200X. . 74 42 MS-1-1044. 0 Ferrous iron staining of dolomite by potassium ferricyanide, uncrossed nicols, 200X. . . , 74 43 MS-1-1044. 0 Linescan... rim 3, e. single rim 4. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 LIST OF FIGURES (continued) ~Fi ure ~Pa e 46 MS-4-983. 0 a. Ferrous iron staining of dolomite by potassium ferricyanide, uncrossed nicols, 220X. . . . . . 77 47 NS-4-983. 0b Plane light...

Borkowski, Richard Michael

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Geochemical monitoring at Soultz-sous-Forts (France) between October 2006 and March 2007 1 EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the main fracture and porosity zones of the granite to optimize their permeability. Before the injection Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706 PARTICIPANT ORGANIZATION NAME: BRGM Related with Work Package WP5 (Reservoir of the fractured areas, and recovering significant amounts of drilling wastes (grease, rests of cuttings), rock

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Final Report Coupled In Silico Microbial and Geochemical Reactive Transport Models: Extension to Multi-Organism Communities, Upscaling, and Experimental Validation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The project was highly successful in improving the understanding of physiological and ecological factors controlling the growth and interaction of subsurface microorganisms and in developing better strategies for in silico modeling of the interactions of subsurface microorganisms with other species and their environment.

Lovley, Derek R.

2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

382

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mineralogic model of Yucca Mountain, Nevada, Rev 2.0 . , Losfrom tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. Geochim.in zeolitized tuffs at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, USA. Geochim.

Xu, Tianfu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Motivation, description, and summary status of geomechanical and geochemical modeling studies in Task D of the International DECOVALEX-THMC Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scale Heater Test at Yucca Mountain. International JournalA is a simplified model of the Yucca Mountain site, a deepDrift Scale Test at Yucca Mountain ( a setting similar to

Birkholzer, J.T.; Barr, D.; Rutqvist, J.; Sonnenthal, E.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

01 0.41427325E+04 -0.12694335E+05 'halite' 1.000 ' na+' 1.000 'cl-' 'halite' 'halite' 1.2697E+02 -8.0477E+02 -1.2435E-01 4.4956E+04 -

Xu, Tianfu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbonate chimneys with brucite, blue amphiboles, phengite,partition coefficients. One brucite sample separated from ahigh ? 37 Cl value in the brucite separate sample probably

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Geochemical and Microbiological Characterization of the Arbuckle Saline Aquifer, a Potential CO2 Storage Reservoir; Implications for Hydraulic Separation and Caprock Integrity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

oil field in Sumner County, Kansas. Results from field characterization present strong evidence of hydraulic separation of the Upper and Lower Arbuckle and the likelihood of an extensive fracture network evidenced by essentially homogeneous brines...

Scheffer, Aimee

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

387

The resolution of past heat flow in sedimentary basins from non-linear inversion of geochemical data: the smoothest model approach, with synthetic examples  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......correspond to the oil generation window...1982; Castano 1985; Price & Barker 1985...reflectance will increase on heating. The other factor...experienced by the sample (Price 1983, 1985; Barker...ranges relevant to oil generation (-50 -150...D. L., 1983. Oil generation in overthrust......

Kerry Gallagher; Malcolm Sambridge

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Geochemical Rate-RNA Integration Study: Ribulose-1,5-Bisphosphate Carboxylase/Oxygenase Gene Transcription and Photosynthetic Capacity of Planktonic Photoautotrophs  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Transcription and Photosynthetic Capacity of Planktonic Photoautotrophs...relationship between photosynthetic capacity of autotrophic plankton and...with maxima for photosynthetic capacity (P max) and rbcL mRNA occurring...feedback mechanisms between solar irradiance, marine microbial...

Jorge E. Corredor; Boris Wawrik; John H. Paul; Hiep Tran; Lee Kerkhof; José M. López; Angel Dieppa; Oswaldo Cárdenas

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 12 Modelled maturity variations in g10013C of methane through butane, relative to g10013C of total source kerogen .......................................................... 29 13 Diagrams showing various processes and resulting compositional... gas contains methane (CH4) as a major constituent (70-100%), ethane (C2H6) (1-10%), lower percentages of higher hydrocarbons ?propane (C3H8), butane (C4H10), pentane (C5H12)? through hexanes (C6H14), and traces up through nonanes (C9H20) (Tissot...

Ozgul, Ercin

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

390

Inferences on the hydrothermal system beneath the resurgent dome in Long Valley Caldera, east-central California, USA, from recent pumping tests and geochemical sampling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Quaternary volcanic unrest has provided heat for episodic hydrothermal circulation in the Long Valley caldera, including the present-day hydrothermal system, which has been active over the past 40 kyr. The most recent period of crustal unrest in this region of east-central California began around 1980 and has included periods of intense seismicity and ground deformation. Uplift totaling more than 0.7 m has been centered on the caldera’s resurgent dome, and is best modeled by a near-vertical ellipsoidal source centered at depths of 6–7 km. Modeling of both deformation and microgravity data now suggests that (1) there are two inflation sources beneath the caldera, a shallower source 7–10 km beneath the resurgent dome and a deeper source ?15 km beneath the caldera’s south moat and (2) the shallower source may contain components of magmatic brine and gas. The Long Valley Exploration Well (LVEW), completed in 1998 on the resurgent dome, penetrates to a depth of 3 km directly above this shallower source, but bottoms in a zone of 100°C fluid with zero vertical thermal gradient. Although these results preclude extrapolations of temperatures at depths below 3 km, other information obtained from flow tests and fluid sampling at this well indicates the presence of magmatic volatiles and fault-related permeability within the metamorphic basement rocks underlying the volcanic fill. In this paper, we present recently acquired data from LVEW and compare them with information from other drill holes and thermal springs in Long Valley to delineate the likely flow paths and fluid system properties under the resurgent dome. Additional information from mineralogical assemblages in core obtained from fracture zones in LVEW documents a previous period of more vigorous and energetic fluid circulation beneath the resurgent dome. Although this system apparently died off as a result of mineral deposition and cooling (and/or deepening) of magmatic heat sources, flow testing and tidal analyses of LVEW water level data show that relatively high permeability and strain sensitivity still exist in the steeply dipping principal fracture zone penetrated at a depth of 2.6 km. The hydraulic properties of this zone would allow a pressure change induced at distances of several kilometers below the well to be observable within a matter of days. This indicates that continuous fluid pressure monitoring in the well could provide direct evidence of future intrusions of magma or high-temperature fluids at depths of 5–7 km.

Christopher D. Farrar; Michael L. Sorey; Evelyn Roeloffs; Devin L. Galloway; James F. Howle; Ronald Jacobson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

ORGANIC GEOCHEMICAL STUDIES, II. A PRELIMINARY REPORT ON THE DISTRIBUTION OF ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS IN ALGAE, IN BACTERIA, AND IN A RECENT LAKE SEDIMENT  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...higher-molecular- TABLE 1. Hydrocarbons from algae. n-C, n-C1. Pristane A-C17 n-Cl? Branched C1s Phytane n-Cis, n-Ci8 n-C2u Higher mol wt hydrocarbons Major component .-Blue-Green Algae- Nostoc Anacysti8 0.42 28 0.42 3.4 4.0 100 100 19...

Jerry Han; E. D. McCarthy; William Van Hoeven; Melvin Calvin; W. H. Bradley

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Geochemical provenance of anomalous metal concentrations in stream sediments in the Ashton 1:250,000 quadrangle, Idaho/Montana/Wyoming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Stream-sediment samples from 1500 sites in the Ashton, Idaho/Montana/Wyoming 1:250,000 quadrangle were analyzed for 45 elements. Almost all samples containing anomalous concentrations (exceeding one standard deviation above the mean value of any element) were derived from drainage basins underlain by Quaternary rhyolite, Tertiary andesite or Precambrian gneiss and schist. Aluminum, barium, calcium, cobalt, iron, nickel, magnesium, scandium, sodium, strontium, and vanadium have no andesite provenance. Most anomalous manganese, europium, hafnium, and zirconium values were derived from Precambrian rocks. All other anomalous elemental concentrations are related to Quaternary rhyolite. This study demonstrates that multielemental stream-sediment analyses can be used to infer the provenance of stream sediments. Such data are available for many parts of the country as a result of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation. This study suggests that stream-sediment samples collected in the Rocky Mountains can be used either as pathfinders or as direct indicators to select targets for mineral exploration for a host of metals.

Shannon, S.S. Jr.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Drift, heat was applied solely to the drift-center gridsquares) indicate grid block coordinates. Heat was appliedgrid block KCYC=KCYC+1 Time step: ?t Solve fluid and heat

Xu, Tianfu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Reply to the discussion by F. Lagroix and S.K. Banerjee of “Geochemical evidence for the origin of late Quaternary loess in central Alaska”  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...cryoturbated paleosols at the Chena Hot Springs Road loess section, east of...the Gold Hill locality and at Chena Hot Springs Road, the Dome tephra has been...cryoturbated paleosols at the Chena Hot Springs Road loess section, east of...

Daniel R. Muhs; James R. Budahn

395

Geochemical Water and Sediment Data: Reformatted Data from the National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) Program  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program was initiated by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) in 1973 with a primary goal of identifying uranium resources in the United States. The Hydrogeochemical and Stream Sediment Reconnaissance (HSSR) program (initiated in 1975) was one of nine components of NURE. Planned systematic sampling of the entire United States began in 1976 under the responsibility of four DOE national laboratories: Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL), Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL), Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP), and Savannah River Laboratory (SRL). The NURE program effectively ended about 1983-84 when funding disappeared. Out of a total of 625 quadrangles that cover the entire lower 48 States and Alaska, only 307 quadrangles were completely sampled, some were partially completed, and many had not been done at all. Over the years various efforts have been made to finish the original task or analyze the stored samples or complete final reports. The sample archive was transferred to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in 1985. The archive reportedly contained about 380,000 original sediment samples from all four laboratories, about 250,000 replicates, splits, size fractions or other samples and approximately 500,000 resin samples of waters.

Smith, Steven M.(USGS)

396

Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility Construction of the largest groundwater treatment facility at the Hanford Site – a major American Recovery and Reinvestment Act project – is on schedule and more than 70 percent complete. Recovery Act workers with DOE contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company are on pace to finish construction of the 200 West Groundwater Treatment Facility this year. Recovery Act Supports Construction of Site's Largest Groundwater Treatment Facility More Documents & Publications Hanford Treats Record Amount of Groundwater Recovery Act Invests in Cleanup, Preservation of Hanford Site Locomotives,

397

Groundwater Protection Act (Iowa) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Groundwater Protection Act (Iowa) Groundwater Protection Act (Iowa) Groundwater Protection Act (Iowa) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Home Weatherization Water Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Program Info State Iowa Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Iowa Department of Natural Resources The Commissioner of the Iowa Department of Natural Resources is required to

398

Groundwater Data Package for Hanford Assessments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents data and interpreted information that supports the groundwater module of the System Assessment Capability (SAC) used in Hanford Assessments. The objective of the groundwater module is to predict movement of radioactive and chemical contaminants through the aquifer to the Columbia River or other potential discharge locations. This data package is being revised as part of the deliverables under the Characterization of Systems Project (#49139) aimed at providing documentation for assessments being conducted under the Hanford Assessments Project (#47042). Both of these projects are components of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessments Projects, managed by the Management and Integration Project (#47043).

Thorne, Paul D.; Bergeron, Marcel P.; Williams, Mark D.; Freedman, Vicky L.

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

Burn site groundwater interim measures work plan.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Work Plan identifies and outlines interim measures to address nitrate contamination in groundwater at the Burn Site, Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico. The New Mexico Environment Department has required implementation of interim measures for nitrate-contaminated groundwater at the Burn Site. The purpose of interim measures is to prevent human or environmental exposure to nitrate-contaminated groundwater originating from the Burn Site. This Work Plan details a summary of current information about the Burn Site, interim measures activities for stabilization, and project management responsibilities to accomplish this purpose.

Witt, Jonathan L. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID); Hall, Kevin A. (North Wind, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID)

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Water Budget Analysis and Groundwater Inverse Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the hydraulic conductivity field conditioned on the measurements of hydraulic conductivity and hydraulic head for saturated flow in randomly heterogeneous porous media. The groundwater modeling approach was found to be efficient in identifying the dominant...

Farid Marandi, Sayena

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the first quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and the other documentation for this program and provides a record of the program's activities and rationale and an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of the analytical data and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data and related data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

Not Available

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

402

California Groundwater Management Plans | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: California Groundwater Management PlansLegal Published NA Year Signed or Took Effect 2014...

403

Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

From 1951 to 1992, the Unites States government conducted 828 underground nuclear tests at the Nevada National Security Site. About one-third of these tests occurred near, below or within the water table - the very top portion of the groundwater layer where rock and soil are completely saturated with water. As a result, some groundwater was contaminated. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began exploring the effects of groundwater contamination in the 1970s. Though contamination from underground testing has never been detected on public land, the DOE was committed to developing an advanced, reliable monitoring network that ensures the long-term protection of the public. An intensive groundwater investigation program was launched in 1989.

None

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

404

GIS Techniques for Mapping Groundwater Contamination Risk  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The groundwater contamination risk map of a samplealluvial area was produced by using the IlwisGeographical Information System (GIS) to construct andto overlay thematic maps. The risk map has beenderived from the...

Daniela Ducci

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial groundwater recharge Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the groundwater is usually called recharge. Recharge causes the local... groundwater level to rise which creates a gradient that causes groundwater to flow away from the...

406

Mixed Waste Management Facility Groundwater Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1997, eleven constituents exceeded final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) in groundwater samples from downgradient monitoring wells at the Mixed Waste Management Facility. No constituents exceeded final PDWS in samples from upgradient monitoring wells. As in previous quarters, tritium and trichloroethylene were the most widespread elevated constituents. The groundwater flow directions and rates in the three hydrostratigraphic units were similar to those of previous quarters.

Chase, J.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children’s Water Festival. Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children's Water Festival. Kids have fun cleaning up “polluted” groundwater at the Children’s Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. Kids have fun cleaning up "polluted" groundwater at the Children's Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children's Water Festival. Kids have fun cleaning up "polluted" groundwater at the Children's Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - Every spring, about 2,500 fifth graders in

408

Groundwater Report Goes Online, Interactive | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Groundwater Report Goes Online, Interactive Groundwater Report Goes Online, Interactive Groundwater Report Goes Online, Interactive September 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A screenshot of Hanford's online groundwater monitoring annual report. A screenshot of Hanford's online groundwater monitoring annual report. RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Richland Operations Office (RL) has moved its 1,200-page annual report on groundwater monitoring to a fully online and interactive web application. The application allows users to access expert interpretation of groundwater conditions and trends for each of the Hanford site's 12 groundwater interest areas. Users can access the typical content of the paper-based report but can also explore all supporting data using an intuitive map-based interface. Groundwater monitoring is conducted to meet requirements of the DOE, U.S

409

Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival Kids Clean Up 'Polluted' Groundwater at Festival May 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children’s Water Festival. Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children's Water Festival. Kids have fun cleaning up “polluted” groundwater at the Children’s Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. Kids have fun cleaning up "polluted" groundwater at the Children's Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. Fifth graders learn about cleaning up groundwater at the Children's Water Festival. Kids have fun cleaning up "polluted" groundwater at the Children's Water Festival in Grand Junction, Colo. GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - Every spring, about 2,500 fifth graders in

410

Quantifying Stove Emissions Related to Different Use Patterns for the Silver mini (Small Turkish) Space Heating Stove  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

24 (1333-1340) Appendix 1: Results of Coal Analysis 1A.Geochemical Testing, Coal Analysis Report: Nailakh 1B.Geochemical Testing, Coal Analysis Report: Utah

Maddalena, Randy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Feasibility of In Situ Redox Manipulation of Subsurface Sediments for RDX Remediation at Pantex  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This laboratory study was conducted to assess RDX (hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5 triazine) abiotic degradation by chemically reduced sediments and other geochemical aspects of the application of this technology to remediation of RDX contamination in groundwater at the U.S. DOE Pantex facility...

Szecsody, James E.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Mckinley, Mark A.; Resch, Charles T.; Gilmore, Tyler J.

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

412

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Oct. 2005, p. 63086318 Vol. 71, No. 10 0099-2240/05/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.71.10.63086318.2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rights Reserved. Microbiological and Geochemical Heterogeneity in an In Situ Uranium Bioremediation Field 2005/Accepted 30 April 2005 The geochemistry and microbiology of a uranium-contaminated subsurface the injection gallery where microbially reducible Fe(III) oxides were highly depleted, groundwater sulfate

Lovley, Derek

413

Geophysical Research Abstracts Vol. 13, EGU2011-4868, 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to better understand the global functioning of the system from the hydrological, geochemical, ecological(s) 2011 Multi-isotopes systematics to constrain surface water­groundwater interactions in an alluvial, France (p.negrel@brgm.fr) This work is dedicated to wetlands of the Loire River systems and aims

Boyer, Edmond

414

Long term biosustainability in a high energy, low diversity crustal biome  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Geochemical, microbiological, and molecular analyses of alkaline saline groundwater at 2.8 kilometers depth in Archaean metabasalt revealed a microbial biome dominated by a single phylotype affiliated with thermophilic sulfate reducers belonging to Firmicutes. These sulfate reducers were sustained by geologically produced sulfate and hydrogen at concentrations sufficient to maintain activities for millions of years with no apparent reliance on photosynthetically derived substrates.

Lin, L-H.; Wang, P-L.; Rumble, D.; Lippmann-Pipke, J.; SherwoodLollar, B.; Boice, E.; Pratt, L.; Brodie, E.; Hazen, T.C.; Andersen,G.L.; DeSantis, T.; Moser, D.P.; Kershaw, D.; Onstott, T.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

A case against Kd-based transport models: natural attenuation at a mill tailings site  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study compares numerical modeling results of contaminant transport using a multi-component coupled reactive mass transport model and a distribution coefficient (Kd)-based transport model. The study site is a contaminated groundwater ... Keywords: contaminant, coupled processes, geochemical modeling, transport

Chen Zhu

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Optimized groundwater containment using linear programming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater extraction systems are typically installed to contain contaminant plumes. These systems are expensive to install and maintain. A traditional approach to designing such a wellfield is to use a series of trial-and-error simulations to test the effects of various well locations and pump rates. However, optimal locations and pump rates of extraction wells are difficult to determine when the objectives of the potential pumping scheme and the site hydrogeology are considered. This paper describes a case study of an application of linear programming theory to determine optimal well placement and pump rates. Calculations were conducted by using ModMan to link a calibrated MODFLOW flow model with LINDO, a linear programming package. Past activities at the site under study included disposal of contaminants in pits. Several groundwater plumes have been identified, and others may be present. The area of concern is bordered on three sides by a wetland, which receives a portion of its input water budget as groundwater discharge from the disposal area. The objective function of the optimization was to minimize the rate of groundwater extraction while preventing discharge to the marsh across a user-specified boundary. In this manner, the optimization routine selects well locations and pump rates to produce a groundwater divide along this boundary.

Quinn, J.J.; Johnson, R.L.; Durham, L.A.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Method to Remove Uranium/Vanadium Contamination from Groundwater  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for removing uranium/vanadium-based contaminants from groundwater using a primary in-ground treatment media and a pretreatment media that chemically adjusts the groundwater contaminant to provide for optimum treatment by the primary treatment media.

Metzler, Donald R.; Morrison Stanley

2004-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

418

Influence of flooding on groundwater flow in central Cambodia  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Cambodia is affected by flooding from the Mekong, Tonle Sap and Bassac ... paper is to highlight the effects of river flooding on groundwater flow using numerical simulation. A two-dimensional groundwater flow mo...

Raksmey May; Kenji Jinno; Atsushi Tsutsumi

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Heat Transport in Groundwater Systems--Finite Element Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into groundwater aquifers for long term energy storage. Analytical solutions are available that predict water temperatures as hot water is injected into a groundwater aquifer, but little field and laboratory data are available to verify these models. The objectives...

Grubaugh, E. K.; Reddell, D. L.

420

Rules and Regulations for Groundwater Quality (Rhode Island)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These regulations provide standards for groundwater quality in the state of Rhode Island. The rules are intended to protect and restore the quality of the state's groundwater resources for use as...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing Contamination at West Valley Demonstration Project Unconventional Groundwater System Proves Effective in Reducing Contamination at West Valley Demonstration Project July 22, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis In the two years prior to the operation of the permeable treatment wall, pictured here, WVDP conducted extensive engineering and planning to ensure it would effectively remove strontium-90. In the two years prior to the operation of the permeable treatment wall, pictured here, WVDP conducted extensive engineering and planning to ensure it would effectively remove strontium-90. This 2009 photo shows a trenching machine, which is capable of cutting a continuous trench up to 30 feet deep and 3 feet wide. The machine was used in a pilot study to evaluate the effectiveness of zeolite placement as the trench was dug. This ensured a consistent depth and width for the zeolite placement along the entire length of the permeable treatment wall.

422

Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Accomplishments  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Accomplishments Demolition, Groundwater Cleanup Highlight Paducah's 2013 Accomplishments December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A high-reach shear removes debris from the tallest structure of the C-340 complex at Paducah. Watch a video of this work here. The 120-foot-high Metals Plant was the tallest building at the Paducah site and encompassed about 1.5 million cubic feet, the volume of a football field roughly three stories tall. Demolition debris filled 28 rail cars and was shipped offsite for disposal. A high-reach shear removes debris from the tallest structure of the C-340 complex at Paducah. Watch a video of this work here. The 120-foot-high Metals Plant was the tallest building at the Paducah site and encompassed

423

X-701B Groundwater Remedy Portsmouth Ohio  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

X-701B Groundwater Remediation X-701B Groundwater Remediation ETR Report Date: December 2008 ETR-20 United States Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE-EM) External Technical Review of the X-701B Groundwater Remedy, Portsmouth, Ohio Why DOE-EM Did This Review The Department of Energy (DOE) Portsmouth Paducah Project Office (PPPO) has responsibility for remediation of the X-701B ground water plume with the key contaminant of trichloroethene (TCE). The remedy has been divided into four phases: Phase I- Initial Source Area Treatment, Phase II-Expanded Source Area Treatment, Phase III-Evaluation and Reporting, and Phase IV- Downgradient Remediation and Confirmation of Source Area Treatment. Phase II treatment has injected

424

Chemical speciation of radionuclides migrating in groundwaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to more accurately predict the rates and mechanisms of radionuclide migration from low-level waste disposal facilities via groundwater transport, ongoing studies are being conducted at field sites at Chalk River Laboratories to identify and characterize the chemical speciation of mobile, long-lived radionuclides migrating in groundwaters. Large-volume water sampling techniques are being utilized to separate and concentrate radionuclides into particular, cationic, anionic, and nonionic chemical forms. Most radionuclides are migrating as soluble, anionic species that appear to be predominantly organoradionuclide complexes. Laboratory studies utilizing anion exchange chromatography have separated several anionically complexed radionuclides, e.g., {sup 60}Co and {sup 106}Ru, into a number of specific compounds or groups of compounds. Further identification of the anionic organoradionuclide complexes is planned utilizing high resolution mass spectrometry. Large-volume ultra-filtration experiments are characterizing the particulate forms of radionuclides being transported in these groundwaters.

Robertson, D.; Schilk, A.; Abel, K.; Lepel, E.; Thomas, C.; Pratt, S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Cooper, E.; Hartwig, P.; Killey, R. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON (Canada). Chalk River Nuclear Labs.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Vapor port and groundwater sampling well  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

ICDP Complex Groundwater Monitoring Plan REV 5  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Groundwater Monitoring Plan, along with the Quality Assurance Project Plan for Waste Area Groups 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, and Removal Actions, constitutes the sampling and analysis plan for groundwater and perched water monitoring at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility (ICDF). A detection monitoring system was installed in the Snake River Plan Aquifer to comply with substantive requirements of "Releases from Solid Waste Management Units" of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act. This detection monitoring wells constructed in the Snake River Plain Aquifer.

Cahn, L. S.

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

427

Groundwater Protection 7 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT7-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and to implement best management practices designed to protect groundwater. Examples include upgrading unGroundwater Protection 7 2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT7-1 7.1 THE BNL GROUNDWATER PROTECTION's program helps to fulfill the environmental monitoring requirements outlined in U.S. Department of Energy

Homes, Christopher C.

428

Uranium Contamination in the Subsurface Beneath the 300 Area, Hanford Site, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a description of uranium contamination in the subsurface at the Hanford Site's 300 Area. The principal focus is a persistence plume in groundwater, which has not attenuated as predicted by earlier remedial investigations. Included in the report are chapters on current conditions, hydrogeologic framework, groundwater flow modeling, and geochemical considerations. The report is intended to describe what is known or inferred about the uranium contamination for the purpose of making remedial action decisions.

Peterson, Robert E.; Rockhold, Mark L.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Thorne, Paul D.; Williams, Mark D.

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

429

Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

Lienau, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Data acquisition for low-temperature geothermal well tests and long-term monitoring. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater monitoring is an essential part of the development of a low-temperature geothermal field for production and injection wells. State water resource and environmental departments are requiring both geothermal well testing and long-term monitoring as a part of the permitting process for geothermal developments. This report covers water-level measurement methods, instruments used for well testing, geochemical sampling, examples of data acquisition and regulatory mandates on groundwater monitoring.

Lienau, P.J.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Geothermal exploration in Trans-Pecos, Texas/New Mexico. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in alternative energy has encouraged the investigation of possible geothermal resources in Trans Pecos, Texas/New Mexico in an area of extensive Cenozoic volcanism with several hot springs. Geochemical analysis of groundwater samples resulted in the definition of two major areas of geothermal interest: the Hueco Bolson in northeastern El Paso County, and the Presidio Bolson. Regional temperature gradient measurements also supported the existence of anomalies in these places, and showed another smaller anomaly in the Finlay Mountains, Hudspeth County. Detailed geophysical and geochemical studies were conducted on these three targets.

Roy, R.; Taylor, B.; Miklas, M.P. Jr.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Modeling biogechemical reactive transport in a fracture zone  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A coupled model of groundwater flow, reactive solute transport and microbial processes for a fracture zone of the Aspo site at Sweden is presented. This is the model of the so-called Redox Zone Experiment aimed at evaluating the effects of tunnel construction on the geochemical conditions prevailing in a fracture granite. It is found that a model accounting for microbially-mediated geochemical processes is able to reproduce the unexpected measured increasing trends of dissolved sulfate and bicarbonate. The model is also useful for testing hypotheses regarding the role of microbial processes and evaluating the sensitivity of model results to changes in biochemical parameters.

Molinero, Jorge; Samper, Javier; Yang, Chan Bing, and Zhang, Guoxiang; Guoxiang, Zhang

2005-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

433

The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted by EPD/EMS in the first quarter of 1991. In includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program, provides a record of the program's activities and rationale, and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

Not Available

1991-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

434

Hanford Treats Groundwater Ahead of Schedule  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

RICHLAND, Wash. – EM’s Richland Operations Office and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL) are ahead of schedule in meeting EM's annual goals for treating contaminated groundwater at the Hanford site in southeast Washington state.

435

PARAMETER ESTIMATION IN PETROLEUM AND GROUNDWATER MODELING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on grand challenge problems. In today's petroleum industry, reservoir simulators are routinely usedPARAMETER ESTIMATION IN PETROLEUM AND GROUNDWATER MODELING R.E. Ewing, M.S. Pilant, J.G. Wade in the model, the numerical discretization used, and the solution algorithms employed. Parameter identification

Ewing, Richard E.

436

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted during the first quarter of 1992. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

Not Available

1992-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

437

A Deterministic Smart Market Model for Groundwater  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Efficient management of water requires balancing environmental needs, externality considerations, and economic efficiency. Toward that end, this paper presents a deterministic linear program that could be used to operate a smart spot market for groundwater. ... Keywords: bidding/auctions, environment, games/group decisions, natural resources, water resources

John F. Raffensperger; Mark W. Milke; E. Grant Read

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Groundwater Protection Plan (West Virginia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Groundwater Protection Plan (West Virginia) Groundwater Protection Plan (West Virginia) Groundwater Protection Plan (West Virginia) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Construction Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Retail Supplier Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Fuel Distributor Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Program Info State West Virginia Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection Groundwater Protection Plans (GPPs) are required for all facilities having the potential to impact groundwater. They are "preventive maintenance"

439

Groundwater level status report for 2009, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2009 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 179 monitoring wells, including 55 regional aquifer wells (including 11 regional/intermediate wells), 26 intermediate wells, 98 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 161 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells.

Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Groundwater level status report for 2010, Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The status of groundwater level monitoring at Los Alamos National Laboratory in 2010 is provided in this report. This report summarizes groundwater level data for 194 monitoring wells, including 63 regional aquifer wells (including 10 regional/intermediate wells), 34 intermediate wells, 97 alluvial wells, and 12 water supply wells. Pressure transducers were installed in 162 monitoring wells for continuous monitoring of groundwater levels. Time-series hydrographs of groundwater level data are presented along with pertinent construction and location information for each well. The report also summarizes the groundwater temperatures recorded in intermediate and regional aquifer monitoring wells and seasonal responses to snowmelt runoff observed in intermediate wells.

Koch, Richard J.; Schmeer, Sarah

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Optimized remedial groundwater extraction using linear programming  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Groundwater extraction systems are typically installed to remediate contaminant plumes or prevent further spread of contamination. These systems are expensive to install and maintain. A traditional approach to designing such a wellfield uses a series of trial-and-error simulations to test the effects of various well locations and pump rates. However, the optimal locations and pump rates of extraction wells are difficult to determine when objectives related to the site hydrogeology and potential pumping scheme are considered. This paper describes a case study of an application of linear programming theory to determine optimal well placement and pump rates. The objectives of the pumping scheme were to contain contaminant migration and reduce contaminant concentrations while minimizing the total amount of water pumped and treated. Past site activities at the area under study included disposal of contaminants in pits. Several groundwater plumes have been identified, and others may be present. The area of concern is bordered on three sides by a wetland, which receives a portion of its input budget as groundwater discharge from the pits. Optimization of the containment pumping scheme was intended to meet three goals: (1) prevent discharge of contaminated groundwater to the wetland, (2) minimize the total water pumped and treated (cost benefit), and (3) avoid dewatering of the wetland (cost and ecological benefits). Possible well locations were placed at known source areas. To constrain the problem, the optimization program was instructed to prevent any flow toward the wetland along a user-specified border. In this manner, the optimization routine selects well locations and pump rates so that a groundwater divide is produced along this boundary.

Quinn, J.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

New Resin Improves Efficiency, Reduces Costs in Hanford Site Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. The new resin was installed at the 100-DX Groundwater Treatment Facility, where it operated over one year without a single resin change. An operator tests the resin at a 100K Area pump-andtreat system to determine how much hexavelent chromium contamination it has gathered from the groundwater. An operator tests the resin at a 100K Area pump-andtreat system to determine how much hexavelent chromium contamination it has gathered from the groundwater. ResinTech SIR-700 is being implemented at groundwater treatment systems along the Columbia River to increase efficiency and reduce costs. ResinTech SIR-700 is being implemented at groundwater treatment systems

443

Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals Hanford Groundwater Contamination Areas Shrink as EM Exceeds Cleanup Goals June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford’s largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. The 200 West Pump and Treat System is Hanford's largest facility for treating contaminated groundwater. A graphic showing the 200 West Pump and Treat plumes and well network. RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers supporting groundwater cleanup for EM's

444

LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood October 16, 2012 - 10:50am Addthis LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood LM Conducts Groundwater and Soil Investigation at Riverton, Wyoming, in Response to 2010 Flood What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment A team representing two Federal agencies-U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management and U.S. Geological Survey-is evaluating

445

Groundwater Report Goes Online, Interactive | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Report Goes Online, Interactive Report Goes Online, Interactive Groundwater Report Goes Online, Interactive September 30, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A screenshot of Hanford's online groundwater monitoring annual report. A screenshot of Hanford's online groundwater monitoring annual report. RICHLAND, Wash. - EM's Richland Operations Office (RL) has moved its 1,200-page annual report on groundwater monitoring to a fully online and interactive web application. The application allows users to access expert interpretation of groundwater conditions and trends for each of the Hanford site's 12 groundwater interest areas. Users can access the typical content of the paper-based report but can also explore all supporting data using an intuitive map-based interface. Groundwater monitoring is conducted to meet requirements of the DOE, U.S

446

The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has monitored groundwater on the Hanford Site since the 1940s to help determine what chemical and radiological contaminants have made their way into the groundwater. As regulatory requirements for monitoring increased in the 1980s, there began to be some overlap between various programs. DOE established the Groundwater Performance Assessment Project (groundwater project) in 1996 to ensure protection of the public and the environment while improving the efficiency of monitoring activities. The groundwater project is designed to support all groundwater monitoring needs at the site, eliminate redundant sampling and analysis, and establish a cost-effective hierarchy for groundwater monitoring activities. This document provides the quality assurance guidelines that will be followed by the groundwater project. This QA Plan is based on the QA requirements of DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance, and 10 CFR 830, Subpart A--General Provisions/Quality Assurance Requirements as delineated in Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Standards-Based Management System. In addition, the groundwater project is subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Requirements for Quality Assurance Project Plans (EPA/240/B-01/003, QA/R-5). The groundwater project has determined that the Hanford Analytical Services Quality Assurance Requirements Documents (HASQARD, DOE/RL-96-68) apply to portions of this project and to the subcontractors. HASQARD requirements are discussed within applicable sections of this plan.

Luttrell, Stuart P.

2006-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

447

Sabine Uplift regions of Texas and Louisiana  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

system (GIS) framework, and (3) to provide geologic and geochemical information for the primary coal

unknown authors

448

Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

About NETL About NETL Groundwater Monitoring at NETL-Albany GEO Probe Ground Water Testing Program NETL is committed to the safety and health of its employees and of nearby residents and to protecting the environment. As part of a DOE environmental protection program, NETL initiated a ground water monitoring program in 2001 with the Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) to evaluate the groundwater flowing beneath the Albany, OR facility. Ground water monitoring wells were installed at that time, and periodic samples were taken. In March 2005, a newly-installed monitoring well on NETL's property indicated elevated ground water levels of a chemical commonly used as a degreaser or solvent until the late 1970's, trichloroethene (TCE). TCE is of concern because prolonged exposure may cause health problems, and it has been identified as a probable human carcinogen (cancer-causing substance).

449

EM_GroundwaterSurveyRport_formatted.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

81006 81006 WILLOWSTICK TECHNOLOGIES LLC.: ELECTROMAGNETIC GROUNDWATER SURVEY: A demonstration of an Electromagnetic Groundwater Survey to Identify Flowpaths of Injected Water in the Shannon Sandstone, Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, Teapot Dome Field, Wyoming Final Report for the Period of July 26 - November 1, 2005 Date Completed: May 19, 2006 By Brian Black Prepared for the United States Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy Work performed under Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) CRADA 2005-060 This document may contain protected CRADA information produced under CRADA no. 2005-060 and is not to be further disclosed for a period of 5 years from the date it was produced except as expressly provided for in the CRADA

450

Modular, multi-level groundwater sampler  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus for taking a multiple of samples of groundwater or pressure measurements from a well simultaneously. The apparatus comprises a series of chambers arranged in an axial array, each of which is dimensioned to fit into a perforated well casing and leave a small gap between the well casing and the exterior of the chamber. Seals at each end of the container define the limits to the axial portion of the well to be sampled. A submersible pump in each chamber pumps the groundwater that passes through the well casing perforations into the gap from the gap to the surface for analysis. The power lines and hoses for the chambers farther down the array pass through each chamber above them in the array. The seals are solid, water-proof, non-reactive, resilient disks supported to engage the inside surface of the well casing. Because of the modular design, the apparatus provides flexibility for use in a variety of well configurations.

Nichols, Ralph L. (812 Plantation Point Dr., N. Augusta, SC 29841); Widdowson, Mark A. (4204 Havana Ct., Columbia, SC 29206); Mullinex, Harry (10 Cardross La., Columbia, SC 29209); Orne, William H. (12 Martha Ct., Sumter, SC 29150); Looney, Brian B. (1135 Ridgemont Dr., Aiken, SC 29803)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

The Savannah River Site's groundwater monitoring program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site's (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During third quarter 1990 (July through September) EPD/EMS conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EPD/EMS established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. All analytical results from third quarter 1990 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all site custodians. One or more analytes exceeded Flag 2 in 87 monitoring well series. Analytes exceeded Flat 2 for the first since 1984 in 14 monitoring well series. In addition to groundwater monitoring, EPD/EMS collected drinking water samples from SRS drinking water systems supplied by wells. The drinking water samples were analyzed for radioactive constituents.

Not Available

1991-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

452

Oak Ridge EM Program Collaborates with Regulators on Groundwater Strategy |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Collaborates with Regulators on Groundwater Collaborates with Regulators on Groundwater Strategy Oak Ridge EM Program Collaborates with Regulators on Groundwater Strategy June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EM uses data collected at monitoring wells to determine groundwater migration patterns and potential risks. EM uses data collected at monitoring wells to determine groundwater migration patterns and potential risks. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The Oak Ridge EM program has joined state and federal regulators in a series of workshops to address contaminated groundwater on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation are working with Oak Ridge's EM program and other organizations interested in the site's environmental cleanup and quality. Those entities include URS | CH2M Oak Ridge, Oak Ridge's prime

453

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL’s greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A.

454

Guidelines for the Protection of Surface and Groundwater Resources During  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Guidelines for the Protection of Surface and Groundwater Resources During Guidelines for the Protection of Surface and Groundwater Resources During Exploration Drilling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Guidelines for the Protection of Surface and Groundwater Resources During Exploration Drilling Author Government of Western Australia Organization Department of Mines and Petroleum Published N/A, 2002 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Guidelines for the Protection of Surface and Groundwater Resources During Exploration Drilling Citation Government of Western Australia (Department of Mines and Petroleum). 2002. Guidelines for the Protection of Surface and Groundwater Resources During Exploration Drilling. N\A: N/A. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Guidelines_for_the_Protection_of_Surface_and_Groundwater_Resources_During_Exploration_Drilling&oldid=686528"

455

New Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River at Hanford Site New Resin Brings Efficiencies to Groundwater Treatment along Columbia River at Hanford Site June 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Dean Neshem, a pump-and-treat operations and maintenance engineer, observes operations at one of the Hanford site's five groundwater treatment facilities. Based on technical recommendations from DOE, CH2M HILL engineers tested and compared multiple resins to determine the products capable of removing contaminants from the groundwater. Dean Neshem, a pump-and-treat operations and maintenance engineer, observes operations at one of the Hanford site's five groundwater treatment facilities. Based on technical recommendations from DOE, CH2M HILL engineers tested and compared multiple resins to determine the products

456

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination Oak Ridge Removes Laboratory's Greatest Source of Groundwater Contamination May 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL’s greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. The 6,500-pound Tank W-1A is shipped away from ORNL. Workers remove the 4,000-gallon Tank W-1A, which was ORNL's greatest source of groundwater contamination. Workers load boxes containing contaminated soil that surrounded Tank W-1A.

457

Oak Ridge EM Program Collaborates with Regulators on Groundwater Strategy |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Oak Ridge EM Program Collaborates with Regulators on Groundwater Oak Ridge EM Program Collaborates with Regulators on Groundwater Strategy Oak Ridge EM Program Collaborates with Regulators on Groundwater Strategy June 26, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis EM uses data collected at monitoring wells to determine groundwater migration patterns and potential risks. EM uses data collected at monitoring wells to determine groundwater migration patterns and potential risks. OAK RIDGE, Tenn. - The Oak Ridge EM program has joined state and federal regulators in a series of workshops to address contaminated groundwater on the Oak Ridge Reservation. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation are working with Oak Ridge's EM program and other organizations interested in the site's environmental cleanup and

458

News Release: DOE to Conduct Additional Groundwater Tests at Riverton  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

to Conduct Additional Groundwater Tests at to Conduct Additional Groundwater Tests at Riverton UMTRCA Site News Release: DOE to Conduct Additional Groundwater Tests at Riverton UMTRCA Site July 30, 2012 - 11:08am Addthis News Contact: Contractor, Judy Miller, S.M. Stoller Corporation Public Affairs (970) 248-6363 jmiller@lm.doe.gov Tests will indicate progress of current groundwater remediation strategy The U.S. Department of Energy will conduct additional characterization work at the Riverton, WY, Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act (UMTRCA) Site this summer, including extensive groundwater and soil sampling. The Department will use the sampling results to update the site conceptual model and to develop a revised groundwater flow and transport model to more accurately simulate natural flushing processes.

459

Modeling the effects of atmospheric emissions on groundwater composition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A composite model of atmospheric, unsaturated and groundwater transport is developed to evaluate the processes determining the distribution of atmospherically derived contaminants in groundwater systems and to test the sensitivity of simulated contaminant concentrations to input parameters and model linkages. One application is to screen specific atmospheric emissions for their potential in determining groundwater age. Temporal changes in atmospheric emissions could provide a recognizable pattern in the groundwater system. The model also provides a way for quantifying the significance of uncertainties in the tracer source term and transport parameters on the contaminant distribution in the groundwater system, an essential step in using the distribution of contaminants from local, point source atmospheric emissions to examine conceptual models of groundwater flow and transport.

Brown, T.J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

460

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2006  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater monitoring for FY 2006 on DOE's Hanford Site. Results of groundwater remediation, vadose zone monitoring, and characterization are summarized. DOE monitors groundwater at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and Washington Administrative Code (WAC).

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the ground-water surveillance project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performs ground-water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) Hanford Site in support of DOE`s environmental surveillance responsibilities. The purpose of this document is to translate DOE`s General Environmental Protection Program (DOE Order 5400.1) into a comprehensive ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the Hanford Site. This sample collection and analysis plan sets forth the environmental surveillance objectives applicable to ground water, identifies the strategy for selecting sample collection locations, and lists the analyses to be performed to meet those objectives.

Bryce, R.W.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the ground-water surveillance project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory performs ground-water sampling activities at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Hanford Site in support of DOE's environmental surveillance responsibilities. The purpose of this document is to translate DOE's General Environmental Protection Program (DOE Order 5400.1) into a comprehensive ground-water sample collection and analysis plan for the Hanford Site. This sample collection and analysis plan sets forth the environmental surveillance objectives applicable to ground water, identifies the strategy for selecting sample collection locations, and lists the analyses to be performed to meet those objectives.

Bryce, R.W.; Evans, J.C.; Olsen, K.B.

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Groundwater Protection Group (GPG), Brookhaven National Laboratory, BNL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

EPD Home EPD Home Site Details GPG Home Groundwater Projects Surface Projects Land Use & Institutional Controls Mapping Administrative Record Contacts Reports Other Information Reactor Projects (HFBR & BGRR) Groundwater Protection Group The Groundwater Protection Group (formerly know as the Long Term Response Action (LTRA) Group) was formed in 2004 as part of the Environmental Protection Division. The GPG Group is responsible for the long-term surveillance, monitoring, maintenance, operating, reporting, and community involvement activities required to complete the CERCLA environmental cleanup activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Ongoing Projects: g-2 Record of Decision Groundwater Projects Surface Projects Land Use and Institutional Control Five Year Review

464

Hanford Exceeds Annual Goal for Cleaning up Groundwater near...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

River that are treating contaminated groundwater. Nuclear Chemical Operator Mike Fish monitors operations of a pump-and-treat system at the Hanford site. Nuclear Chemical...

465

Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the ERDF and report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF ROD2 and the ERDF Amended ROD (EPA 1999). The overall objective of the groundwater monitoring program is to determine whether ERDF has impacted the groundwater. This objective is complicated by the fact that the ERDF is situated downgradient of the numerous groundwater contamination plumes originating from the 200 West Area.

Weiss, R. L.; Lawrence, B. L.

2011-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

466

SWMU ASSESSMENT REPORT NUMBER: NAME: Northeast Groundwater Plume  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NUMBER: NAME: Northeast Groundwater Plume DATE: July 21 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Inside and outside security fence east, northeast ofplant operations. See attached map for...

467

SciTech Connect: Conjunctive Surface and Groundwater Management...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Conjunctive Surface and Groundwater Management in Utah: Implications for Oil Shale and Oil Sands Development Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Conjunctive Surface and...

468

In-Ground Heating Removes Groundwater Contamination at EM's Paducah...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

status that maximized productivity while reducing costs through automation, said Kelly Layne, groundwater project manager for the company. "Specifically, our site...

469

Page Previous Reports-1 Previous Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

information and procedures. Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring Report for 2012, DOERL-2013-22: http:www.hanford.govc.cfmsgrpGWRep12start.htm Hanford Site...

470

Central Plateau Groundwater and Deep Vadose Zone Strategy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of interest to the Council? * Examples of groundwater and vadose zone integration - Deep Vadose Zone treatability testing leading to evaluation of measures to protect...

471

Oxidative Dissolution of UO2 in a Simulated Groundwater Containing...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Groundwater Containing Synthetic Nanocrystalline Mackinawite. Abstract: The long-term success of in situ reductive immobilization of uranium (U) depends on the stability of...

472

Novel Remediation Schemes for Groundwater and Urban Runoff.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Anthropogenic environmental contamination is having a profound effect on ground and surface water bodies. Contaminants, such as, chlorinated solvents in groundwater and heavy metals… (more)

Olson, Pamela Renee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program Welcomes Peer...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

the computer modeling approach developed to better understand how historic underground nuclear testing in Yucca Flat affected the groundwater. In early April, five peer...

474

Nebraska Groundwater Management and Protection Act (Nebraska) | Department  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Nebraska Groundwater Management and Protection Act (Nebraska) Nebraska Groundwater Management and Protection Act (Nebraska) Nebraska Groundwater Management and Protection Act (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Natural Resources This section defines broad policy goals concerning the utilization and management of groundwater, and encourages local implementation of these

475

Georgia Groundwater Use Act (Georgia) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Groundwater Use Act (Georgia) Groundwater Use Act (Georgia) Georgia Groundwater Use Act (Georgia) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Developer Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Georgia Program Type Environmental Regulations Siting and Permitting Provider Georgia Department of Natural Resources The purpose of the Georgia Groundwater Use Act is to establish procedures

476

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-affected groundwater areas Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

flow and contaminant transport in this area. The groundwater flow model... -SCALE WATER RESOURCES MANAGEMENT WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF GLOWA-DANUBE - PART A: THE GROUNDWATER MODEL...

477

E-Print Network 3.0 - automating groundwater sampling Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

GROUNDWATER MANAGEMENT... summary of selected case studies is presented below. BACKGROUND A typical groundwater sampling event... . Automation through the use of sensors...

478

Probabilistic estimation and prediction of groundwater recharge in a semi-arid environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantifying and characterizing groundwater recharge are critical for water resources management. Unfortunately, low recharge rates are difficult to resolve in dry environments, where groundwater is often most important. ...

Ng, Gene-Hua Crystal

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

E-Print Network 3.0 - altered groundwater chemistry Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

groundwater chemistry Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: altered groundwater chemistry Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Seawater intrusion...

480

Groundwater Quality Standards (Nebraska) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Quality Standards (Nebraska) Quality Standards (Nebraska) Groundwater Quality Standards (Nebraska) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nebraska Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Environmental Quality These regulations, promulgated by the Department of Environmental Quality,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical groundwater geochemical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Summary of Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2004  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This booklet is the summary chapter of the large groundwater report printed in booklet form with a CD of the complete report inside the back cover. It contains information on the current status of groundwater beneath the Hanford Site, highlights of FY 2004 monitoring, and emerging issues.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2005-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

482

Groundwater and Leachate Monitoring and Sampling at ERDF, CY 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reports the findings of the groundwater and leachate monitoring and sampling at the Environmental restoration Disposal Facility for calendar year 2009. The purpose of this annual monitoring report is to evaluate the conditions of and identify trends for groundwater beneath the ERDF and report leachate results in fulfillment of the requirements specified in the ERDF ROD and the ERDF Amended ROD.

R.L. Weiss, B.L. Lawrence, D.W. Woolery

2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

483

Threatened groundwater resources in rural India : an example of monitoring  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in rural areas. Therefore, quality and quantity aspects of groundwater management constitute acute issues the villages, and pollution plumes downgradient of the main inhabited areas. The absence of sewage or solid waste collection and treatment facilities threatens groundwater quality by increasing its chloride

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

484

In-situ remediation system for groundwater and soils  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a system for in-situ remediation of contaminated groundwater and soil. In particular the present invention relates to stabilizing toxic metals in groundwater and soil. The United States Government has rights in this invention pursuant to Contract No. DE-AC09-89SR18035 between the US Department of Energy and Westinghouse Savannah River Company.

Corey, J.C.; Kaback, D.S.; Looney, B.B.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Groundwater Protection 7 2007 Site environmental report7-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by cleaning up contaminated soil and ground- water, and 4) communicating with stakeholders on groundwater monitoring wells during 2,289 individual sampling events. Twelve groundwater remediation systems removed 198 pounds of volatile organic compounds and returned approximately 1.2 billion gallons of treated water

486

Groundwater Protection 7 2006 Site environmental report7-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contaminated soil and ground- water, and 4) communicating with stakeholders on groundwater protection issues and restoration efforts are working. Ground- water monitoring is focused on two general ar during 2,337 individual sampling events. Eleven groundwater remediation systems removed 372 pounds

487

Groundwater Protection 7 2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT7-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) communicating with stakeholders on ground- water protection issues. BNL is committed to protecting groundwater remediation systems removed 652 pounds of volatile organic compounds and returned approximately 1.5 billion gallons of treated water to the Upper Glacial aquifer. Since the beginning of active groundwater

488

Groundwater Protection 7 2005 Site environmental report7-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contaminated soil and ground- water, and 4) communicating with stakeholders on groundwater protection issues during 2,567 individual sampling events. Twelve groundwater remediation systems removed 472 pounds of volatile organic compounds and returned approximately 1.7 billion gallons of treated water to the Upper

489

Nevada National Security Site Groundwater Program Welcomes Peer Review Team  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Recently, an independent peer review team was invited to assess the groundwater characterization program at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). This nationally recognized group of experts, from various external organizations, will examine the computer modeling approach developed to better understand how historic underground nuclear testing in Yucca Flat affected the groundwater.

490

Groundwater Protection 7 2012 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT7-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to ensure that plans for groundwater protection, management, monitor- ing, and restoration are fully defined operating permits, DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment, and DOE Order 436Groundwater Protection 7 2012 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT7-1 Brookhaven National Laboratory has

491

Groundwater Protection 7 2013 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT7-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Protection Program is to ensure that plans for groundwater protection, management, monitor- ing in various New York State operating permits, DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the PublicGroundwater Protection 7 2013 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT7-1 Brookhaven National Laboratory has

492

Groundwater Protection 7 2011 Site environmental report7-1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is to ensure that plans for groundwater protection, management, monitor- ing, and restoration are fully defined operating permits, DOE Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment, and DOE Order 436Groundwater Protection 7 2011 Site environmental report7-1 Brookhaven National Laboratory has