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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Geochemical Data Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Data Analysis Geochemical Data Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Data Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Data Analysis: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition References No exploration activities found. Print PDF Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Geochemical_Data_Analysis&oldid=594157" Categories: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Techniques

2

Category:Geochemical Data Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Geochemical Data Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geochemical Data Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geochemical Data Analysis Add.png Add a new Geochemical Data Analysis Technique Pages in category "Geochemical Data Analysis" The following 3 pages are in this category, out of 3 total. G Geothermometry T Thermal Ion Dispersion Thermochronometry Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Geochemical_Data_Analysis&oldid=689825"

3

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Analysis and Geochemical Modeling of Vanadium Contamination in Groundwater New Rifle Processing Site, Colorado

4

GeoSys.Chem: Estimate of reservoir fluid characteristics as first step in geochemical modeling of geothermal systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer code GeoSys.Chem for the calculation of deep geothermal reservoir fluid characteristics from the measured physical-chemical parameters of separated water and condensed vapor samples obtained from drilled wells is presented. It was written ... Keywords: GeoChem, GeoSys.Chem, Geochemical modeling, Los Azufres, VB.NET

Mahendra P. Verma

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 2002 - 2002 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The objective of the study was to expand knowledge of Nevada's geothermal resource potential by providing new geochemical data from springs in less studied geothermal areas and to refine geochemical data from springs for which only incomplete data were available. This work fills in gaps in publicly available geochemical data, thereby enabling comprehensive

6

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (White,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (White, Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Used various geochemical techniques to obtain data from which information regarding mass transfer rates. This then led to conclucions of the history/evolution of the geothermal system. Unclear whether useful for exploration purposes. References Art F. White, Nancy J. Chuma, Fraser Goff (1992) Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal System,

7

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Details Activities (61) Areas (32) Regions (6) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Water rock interaction Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Origin of hydrothermal fluids; Mixing of hydrothermal fluids Thermal: Isotopic ratios can be used to characterize and locate subsurface thermal anomalies. Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Fluid: Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in

8

Using toughreact to model reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport in hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The interaction between hydrothermal fluids and the rocks through which they migrate alters the earlier formed primary minerals and leads to the formation of secondary minerals, resulting in changes in the physical and chemical properties of the system. We have developed a comprehensive numerical simulator, TOUGHREACT, which considers nonisothermal multi-component chemical transport in both liquid and gas phases. A variety of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered under a wide range of conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. The code can be applied to problems in fundamental analysis of the hydrothermal systems and in the exploration of geothermal reservoirs including chemical evolution, mineral alteration, mineral scaling, changes of porosity and permeability, and mineral recovery from geothermal fluids.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

9

Development and Application of a Paleomagnetic/Geochemical Method for Constraining the Timing of Burial Diagenetic and Fluid  

SciTech Connect

Studies of diagenesis caused by fluid migration or other events are commonly hindered by a lack of temporal control. Our results to date demonstrate that a paleomagnetic/geochemical approach can be used to date fluid migration as well as burial diagenetic events. Our principal working hypothesis is that burial diagenetic processes (e.g., maturation of organic-rich sediments and clay diagenesis) and the migration of fluids can trigger the authigenesis of magnetic mineral phases. The ages of these events can be constrained by comparing chemical remanent magnetizations (CRMs) to independently established Apparent Polar Wander Paths. While geochemical (e.g. stable isotope and organic analyses) and petrographic studies provide important clues for establishing these relationships, the ultimate test of this hypothesis requires the application of independent dating methods to verify the paleomagnetic ages. Towards this end, we have used K-Ar dating of illitization as an alternative method for constraining the ages of magnetic mineral phases in our field areas.

Elmore, Richard D.; Engel, Michael H.

2005-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

10

Using toughreact to model reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport in hydrothermal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

multiphase flow, solute transport and reactive chemistry in porousmultiphase fluid flow, mass transport and chemical reactions, (2) reactive fluid flow and transport in fractured rocks as well as porous

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Multiphase fluid flow and subsequent geochemical transport in variably saturated fractured rocks: 1. Approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

multiphase flow, solute transport and reactive chemistry in porousmultiphase flow, solute transport and reactive chemistry in porousmultiphase fluid flow, mass transport and chemical reactions, (2) we consider not only porous

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Fluid Inclusion Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis Fluid Inclusion Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Fluid Inclusion Analysis Details Activities (20) Areas (11) Regions (1) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Fluid composition at a point in time and space Thermal: The minimum temperature of fluid inclusion formation Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 17.571,757 centUSD 0.0176 kUSD 1.757e-5 MUSD 1.757e-8 TUSD / sample Median Estimate (USD): 17.571,757 centUSD 0.0176 kUSD 1.757e-5 MUSD 1.757e-8 TUSD / sample High-End Estimate (USD): 26.782,678 centUSD

13

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (White, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (White, Et Al., Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Used various geochemical techniques to obtain data from which information regarding mass transfer rates. This then led to conclucions of the history/evolution of the geothermal system. Unclear whether useful for exploration purposes. References Art F. White, Nancy J. Chuma, Fraser Goff (1992) Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal System,

14

Fluid Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fluid Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Lab Analysis Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Results can aid in the determination of fluid source regions and circulation pathways, and assist in determining the degree of mixing between different hydrothermal fluids. Thermal: Certain elements exhibit high spatial correlation with high-temperature geothermal systems; Isotopic ratios can be used to characterize and locate subsurface thermal anomalies.

15

Definition: Fluid Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Lab Analysis Fluid Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Fluid Lab Analysis Fluid lab analysis encompasses a broad array of techniques used for the analysis of water and gas samples. These analyses are used in a variety of disciplines to quantify the chemical components and properties of groundwater systems. In geothermal exploration and development, fluid analyses often provide a first look into the characteristics of a hydrothermal system, and are routinely used in ongoing monitoring of geothermal reservoirs.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Water chemistry analyses are carried out to identify and quantify the chemical components and properties of a certain water. This include pH, major cations and anions, trace elements and isotopes. Water chemistry

16

Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Isotopes are atoms of the same element that have different numbers of neutrons. An isotopic analysis looks at a particular isotopic element(s) in a given system, while the conditions which increase/decrease the number of neutrons are well understood and measurable. Fluid isotopes are used to characterize a fluids origin, age, and/or interaction with rocks or other fluids based on unique isotopic ratios or concentrations.[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Isotope geochemistry is an aspect of geology based upon study of the relative and absolute concentrations of the elements and their isotopes in

17

Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geochemical Techniques Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(1) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: None Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Geochemical Techniques: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Related Techniques Geochemical Techniques Geochemical Data Analysis Geothermometry Gas Geothermometry Isotope Geothermometry Liquid Geothermometry Cation Geothermometers Multicomponent Geothermometers Silica Geothermometers Thermal Ion Dispersion

18

Apparatus And Method For Fluid Analysis  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an apparatus and method for analyzing a fluid used in a machine or in an industrial process line. The apparatus has at least one meter placed proximate the machine or process line and in contact with the machine or process fluid for measuring at least one parameter related to the fluid. The at least one parameter is a standard laboratory analysis parameter. The at least one meter includes but is not limited to viscometer, element meter, optical meter, particulate meter, and combinations thereof.

Wilson, Bary W. (Richland, WA); Peters, Timothy J. (Richland, WA); Shepard, Chester L. (West Richland, WA); Reeves, James H. (Richland, WA)

2003-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

19

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

range kg/yr Cl sources and sinks Water or rock mass mol/kgtemperature at the source of fluid-rock reactions, asto identify the fluid-rock reactions at source. In addition,

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Category:Fluid Lab Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Fluid Lab Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Fluid Lab Analysis page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Fluid Lab Analysis Add.png Add a new Fluid Lab Analysis Technique Pages in category "Fluid Lab Analysis" The following 5 pages are in this category, out of 5 total. C Compound and Elemental Analysis F Fluid Inclusion Analysis I Isotopic Analysis- Fluid M Mercury Vapor T Trace Element Analysis Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Fluid_Lab_Analysis&oldid=689846"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fluids fuel extremophilic Archaea on a Mariana forearc serpentinite mud volcano: Ocean Drillingfluid flow in the western Nankai subduction zone, Japan. Proceedings of the Ocean Drilling

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Geochemical tracers of processes affecting the formation of seafloor hydrothermal fluids and deposits in the Manus back-arc basin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Systematic differences in trace element compositions (rare earth element (REE), heavy metal, metalloid concentrations) of seafloor vent fluids and related deposits from hydrothermal systems in the Manus back-arc basin ...

Craddock, Paul R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

In-Line Fluid Analysis Technology - Available Technologies ...  

Computers & Electronics; Manufacturing & Warehousing; Oil & Gas; Brochure(s) In-Line Fluid Analysis Brochure (pdf) Enabled by the Office ...

24

Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 DOE Award No.: DE-FE0001243 Topical Report CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH Submitted by: University of Utah Institute for Clean and Secure Energy 155 South 1452 East, Room 380 Salt Lake City, UT 84112 Prepared for: United States Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory April 2011 Oil & Natural Gas Technology Office of Fossil Energy Core-based integrated sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical analysis of the oil shale bearing Green River Formation, Uinta Basin, Utah Topical Report Reporting Period: October 31, 2009 through March 31, 2011 Authors: Lauren P. Birgenheier, Energy and Geoscience Insitute, University of Utah

25

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Twitter icon Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home...

26

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Geysers Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active

27

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera Geothermal Region (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Region (1990) Geothermal Region (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Valles Caldera Geothermal Region (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active

28

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Mexico Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Our examination of Cerro Prieto gas analyses indicates that the geothermal system structure is changing with time. Gas data routinely measured in most geothermal fields; hence fluid-flow plots as presented here can be accomplished with little cost. Gas analytical data, therefore, are useful

29

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0) 0) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first seven months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems

30

Definition: Fluid Inclusion Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

or liquid) and occasionally mineral crystals, that are considered to represent the chemical and physical properties of a hydrothermal fluid at a single point in time and...

31

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis 1) To determine if analyses of fluid propene and propane species in fluid inclusions can be used to interpret fluid type, history, or process. 2) To evaluate the geology and thermal history of the East Flank, in order to better understand how the rocks will behave during hydro-fracturing. Notes 1) Analyses were performed on drill cuttings at 20ft intervals from four Coso geothermal wells. Two wells are good producers, one has cold-water entrants in the production zone, and the fourth is a non-producer. The ratios show distinct differences between producing and the non-producing

32

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1996) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

) ) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1996 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures and salinities demonstrate that cool, low salinity ground waters were present when the thermal plume was emplaced. Dilution of the thermal waters occurred above and below the plume producing strong gradients in their compositions. Comparison of mineral and fluid inclusion based temperatures demonstrates that cooling has occurred along the margins of the thermal system but that the interior of the system

33

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 2007 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the location of the heat source Notes Fluids have been sampled from 9 wells and 2 fumaroles from the East Flank of the Coso hydrothermal system with a view to identifying, if possible, the location and characteristics of the heat source inflows into this portion of the geothermal field. Preliminary results show that there has been extensive vapor loss in the system, most probably in response to

34

Category:Geochemical Techniques | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Category:Geochemical Techniques Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Geochemical Techniques page? For detailed information on exploration techniques, click here. Category:Geochemical Techniques Add.png Add a new Geochemical Techniques Technique Subcategories This category has only the following subcategory. G [×] Geochemical Data Analysis‎ 3 pages Pages in category "Geochemical Techniques" This category contains only the following page. G Geochemical Data Analysis Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Category:Geochemical_Techniques&oldid=689823"

35

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California. Supplement.

36

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate deep reservoir temperature Notes The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures

37

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Sierra Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Sierra Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of

38

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine recharge for the system Notes Thirty-nine water samples were collected from the Coso geothermal system and vicinity and were analyzed for major chemical constituents and deltaD and delta18O. Non-thermal ground waters from the Coso Range were found to be isotopically heavier than non-thermal ground waters from the Sierra Nevada to the west. The deltaD value for the deep thermal water at Coso is

39

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References

40

Elemental Analysis with Fluid Inclusion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

0.46 months job High-End Estimate: 4 weeks0.0767 years 672 hours 28 days 0.92 months job Dictionary.png Elemental Analysis with Fluid Inclusion: No definition has been...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Rose Valley Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Rose Valley Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the recharge of the area Notes Hydrogen and oxygen isotope data on waters of Coso thermal and nonthermal waters were studied. Hydrogen and oxygen isotopes do not uniquely define the recharge area for the Coso geothermal system but strongly suggest Sierran recharge with perhaps some local recharge. References Whelan, J. A. (1 September 1990) Water geochemistry study of

42

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1999) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1999 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Well and steam sample comparison Notes Vein and alteration assemblages from eight Coso wells have been collected and their fluid-inclusion gases analyzed by quadrupole mass spectrometry. Four major types of alteration were sampled: 1) young calcite-hematite-pyrite veins; 2) wairakite or epidote veins and alteration that are spatially associated with deep reservoirs in the main field and eastern wells; 3) older sericite and pyrite wallrock alteration; and 4) stilbite-calcite veins that are common in cooler or marginal portions of

43

Isotopic Analysis Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Coso Geothermal Area (1997) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1997 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Identify the source of chlorine Notes The 36Cl/Cl values for several geothermal water samples and reservoir host rock samples have been measured. The results suggest that the thermal waters could be connate waters derived from sedimentary formations, presumably underlying and adjacent top the granitic rocks, which have recently migrated into the host rocks. Alternatively, most of the chlorine but not the water, may have recently input into the system from magmatic

44

Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Gas Analysis Of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions- A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration Details Activities (7) Areas (6) Regions (0) Abstract: To increase our knowledge of gaseous species in geothermal systems by fluid inclusion analysis in order to facilitate the use of gas analysis in geothermal exploration. The knowledge of gained by this program can be applied to geothermal exploration, which may expand geothermal

45

Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Mercury Geochemical, Groundwater Geochemical, And Radiometric Geophysical Signatures At Three Geothermal Prospects In Northern Nevada Details Activities (14) Areas (3) Regions (0) Abstract: Ground water sampling, desorbed mercury soil geochemical surveys and a radiometric geophysical survey was conducted in conjunction with geological mapping at three geothermal prospects in northern Nevada. Orientation sample lines from 610 m (2000 ft.) to 4575 m (15,000 ft.) in length were surveyed at right angles to known and suspected faults. Scintillometer readings (gamma radiation - total counts / second) were also

46

COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS MODELING ANALYSIS OF COMBUSTORS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the current fiscal year FY01, several CFD simulations were conducted to investigate the effects of moisture in biomass/coal, particle injection locations, and flow parameters on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} inside a 150 MW GEEZER industrial boiler. Various simulations were designed to predict the suitability of biomass cofiring in coal combustors, and to explore the possibility of using biomass as a reburning fuel to reduce NO{sub x}. Some additional CFD simulations were also conducted on CERF combustor to examine the combustion characteristics of pulverized coal in enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environments. Most of the CFD models available in the literature treat particles to be point masses with uniform temperature inside the particles. This isothermal condition may not be suitable for larger biomass particles. To this end, a stand alone program was developed from the first principles to account for heat conduction from the surface of the particle to its center. It is envisaged that the recently developed non-isothermal stand alone module will be integrated with the Fluent solver during next fiscal year to accurately predict the carbon burnout from larger biomass particles. Anisotropy in heat transfer in radial and axial will be explored using different conductivities in radial and axial directions. The above models will be validated/tested on various fullscale industrial boilers. The current NO{sub x} modules will be modified to account for local CH, CH{sub 2}, and CH{sub 3} radicals chemistry, currently it is based on global chemistry. It may also be worth exploring the effect of enriched O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} environment on carbon burnout and NO{sub x} concentration. The research objective of this study is to develop a 3-Dimensional Combustor Model for Biomass Co-firing and reburning applications using the Fluent Computational Fluid Dynamics Code.

Mathur, M.P.; Freeman, Mark (U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory); Gera, Dinesh (Fluent, Inc.)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

) ) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2002 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analyses were averaged and plotted verses depth (Figure 4). Fluid inclusion gas analyses done on vein minerals from drill hole 68-6 that we earlier analyzed (Adams 2000) were plotted for comparison in order to confirm that similar analyses are obtained from chips and vein minerals. This comparison is far from ideal. The drill holes are better than a kilometer apart, samples analyzed in the two bore holes are not from the same depths, and the chip analyses were performed on the new dual quadrupole system that

48

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2003) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Area Coso Geothermal Area (2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2003 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis 1) Fracture/stress analysis. 2)To determine the driver of the relationship between hydrogen and organic species. Notes 1) Fluid inclusion analyses of cuttings from well 83-16 were used to determine the temperatures of vein mineralization. 2) Measurement of organic compounds in fluid inclusions shows that there are strong relationships between H2 concentrations and alkane/alkene ratios and benzene concentrations. Inclusion analyses that indicate H2 concentrations > 0.001 mol % typically have ethane > ethylene, propane > propylene, and

49

Geochemical engineering problem identification and program description. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The Geochemical Engineering Program has as its goal the improvement of geochemical fluid management techniques. This document presents the strategy and status of the Geochemical Engineering Program. The magnitude and scope of geochemical-related problems constraining geothermal industry productivity are described. The goals and objectives of the DGE Geochemical Engineering Program are defined. The rationale and strategy of the program are described. The structure, priorities, funding, and management of specific elements within the program are delineated, and the status of the overall program is presented.

Crane, C.H.; Kenkeremath, D.C.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Complex Fluid Analysis with the Advanced Distillation Curve Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the flask. Heaters are controlled by a model predictive proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controllerComplex Fluid Analysis with the Advanced Distillation Curve Approach Thomas J. Bruno, Lisa S. Ott of petroleomics, as asserted by Marshall and Rodgers, include quantitation of species, modeling, and informatics

51

Pre-test geological and geochemical evaluation of the Caprock, St. Peter Sandstone and formation fluids, Yakley Field, Pike County, Illinois  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of these studies is to ensure long-term stable containment of air in the underground reservoirs used in conjunction with compressed air energy storage (CAES) plants. The specific objective is to develop stability criteria and engineering guidelines for designing CAES reservoirs in each of the three major reservoir types, including aquifers, salt cavities, and mined hard rock caverns. This document characterizes the geologic nature of porous media constituents native to the aquifer field test site near Pittsfield, Illinois. The geologic samples were subjected to geochemical evaluations to determine anticipated responses to cyclic air injection, heating and moisture - conditions typical of an operating CAES reservoir. This report documents the procedures used and results obtained from these analyses.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The Moana geothermal system in Reno, Nevada: A hydrologic, geochemical, and thermal analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Moana geothermal systems, located in Reno, Nevada, is a moderate-temperature geothermal resource used for space heating applications. Both historic and new hydrologic, thermal, and groundwater chemistry data were collected to evaluate the Moana system and to develop a calibrated numerical model of the geothermal aquifer for investigation of resource development scenarios. The new data collection consisted of static water level measurements and temperature with depth measurements for a 13-month period at 26 geothermal wells to investigate hydrologic and thermal changes with time. In addition, groundwater chemistry sampling at 10 wells was used to evaluate mixing of thermal and nonthermal waters. Collected information indicates that in the most heavily used portion of the geothermal aquifer, the hydraulic heads have declined. This decline may induce additional leakage of cooler water from the overlying unconfined aquifer and lead to decreased temperatures at well locations in the geothermal aquifer. The groundwater chemistry data show concentration changes with temperature for boron, chloride, fluoride, lithium, and bicarbonate that are a function of the degree of mixing of thermal and nonthermal waters. Temporal changes in these constituents may be used as an indication of relative temperature changes in the geothermal system caused by mixing at a given location. An attempt was made to use the hydraulic head and maximum temperature data to develop a calibrated numerical model for the Moana geothermal system. However, lack of information about the horizontal and vertical thermal and fluid fluxes made the development of a calibrated model not possible at this time. 25 refs., 54 figs., 6 tabs.

Jacobson, E.A.; Johnston, J.W.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004-2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine if fluid inclusion stratigraphy is applicable to geothermal Notes Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a new technique developed for the oil industry in order to map borehole fluids.Fluid inclusion gas geochemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow and reservoir seals. Analyses from

54

Evaluation of fluid-modeling techniques in the seismic analysis of LMFBR reactors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid modeling is of great importance in the seismic analysis of the LMFBR primary system. If the fluid model used in the analysis is too simplified, the results could be very uncertain. On the other hand, if the model is too detailed, considerable difficulty might be encountered in the analysis. The objectives of this study are to examine the validity of the two commonly used fluid modeling techniques. i.e. simplified added mass method and lumped mass method and to provide some useful information on the treatment of fluid in seismic analysis. The validity of these two methods of analysis is examined by comparing the calculated seismic responses of a fluid-structure system based on these two methods with that calculated from a coupled fluid-structure interaction analysis in which the fluid is treated by continuum fluid elements.

Ma, D.C.; Gvildys, J.; Chang, Y.W.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

NUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mining and milling of uranium ore. Nonetheless, the use of leaching fluids to mine uranium contaminatesNUREG/CR-6870 Consideration of Geochemical Issues in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In in Groundwater Restoration at Uranium In-Situ Leach Mining Facilities Manuscript Completed: December 2006 Date

56

History of Geochemical Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 1   Sources of geochemical modeling software...www.telusplanet.net/public/geogams/index SOLVEQ/CHILLER Mark H. Reed Department of Geological

57

Sampling and analysis methods for geothermal fluids and gases  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The sampling procedures for geothermal fluids and gases include: sampling hot springs, fumaroles, etc.; sampling condensed brine and entrained gases; sampling steam-lines; low pressure separator systems; high pressure separator systems; two-phase sampling; downhole samplers; and miscellaneous methods. The recommended analytical methods compiled here cover physical properties, dissolved solids, and dissolved and entrained gases. The sequences of methods listed for each parameter are: wet chemical, gravimetric, colorimetric, electrode, atomic absorption, flame emission, x-ray fluorescence, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy, ion exchange chromatography, spark source mass spectrometry, neutron activation analysis, and emission spectrometry. Material on correction of brine component concentrations for steam loss during flashing is presented. (MHR)

Watson, J.C.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Multidimensional Data Model Research for Data Mart Based Analysis System of Drilling Fluid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the sake of complex analysis requirements of drilling fluid analysis system, this paper proposes a multidimensional data model and implement the solution of data mart due to the analyzing weaknesses of conventional information system. Since the database ... Keywords: drilling fluid, Data Mart, Multidimensional Data Model, Multi-Analysis, Fact Tables, Dimension Tables

Li Jian; Wang Bing; Xu Bihua; Liang Dachun

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

GPA a tool for fluid scalability analysis of massively parallel systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

analysis, GPA first generates an abstract representation of the system of ODEs and then dynamically. Hayden, and J. T. Bradley, "Fluid Analysis of Energy Consumption using Rewards in Massively ParallelGPA ­ a tool for fluid scalability analysis of massively parallel systems Anton Stefanek Richard A

Imperial College, London

60

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Rao, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Rao, Et Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References U. Fehn, R. T. D. Teng, Usha Rao, Fraser E. Goff (1996) Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Mexico- A 36Cl Study Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis-_Fluid_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Sulphur_Springs_Area_(Rao,_Et_Al.,_1996)&oldid=692543" Category: Exploration

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Raft River Geothermal Area (2011) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2011 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Hydrogen isotope values of muscovite (δDMs ∼-100‰) and fluid inclusions in quartz (δDFluid ∼-85‰) indicate the presence of meteoric fluids during detachment dynamics. Recrystallized grain-shape fabrics and quartz c-axis fabric patterns reveal a large component of coaxial strain (pure shear), consistent with thinning of the detachment section. Therefore, the high thermal gradient preserved in the Raft River

62

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1990) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

90) 90) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Salton Sea Geothermal Area (1990) Exploration Activity Details Location Salton Sea Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 1990 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. References Mckibben, M. A. (25 April 1990) Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems

63

Geochemical Enhancement Of Enhanced Geothermal System Reservoirs: An Integrated Field And Geochemical Approach  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The geochemical effects of injecting fluids into geothermal reservoirs are poorly understood and may be significantly underestimated. Decreased performance of injection wells has been observed in several geothermal fields after only a few years of service, but the reasons for these declines has not been established. This study had three primary objectives: 1) determine the cause(s) of the loss of injectivity; 2) utilize these observations to constrain numerical models of water-rock interactions; and 3) develop injection strategies for mitigating and reversing the potential effects of these interactions. In this study rock samples from original and redrilled injection wells at Coso and the Salton Sea geothermal fields, CA, were used to characterize the mineral and geochemical changes that occurred as a result of injection. The study documented the presence of mineral scales and at both fields in the reservoir rocks adjacent to the injection wells. At the Salton Sea, the scales consist of alternating layers of fluorite and barite, accompanied by minor anhydrite, amorphous silica and copper arsenic sulfides. Amorphous silica and traces of calcite were deposited at Coso. The formation of silica scale at Coso provides an example of the effects of untreated (unacidified) injectate on the reservoir rocks. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffractometry were used to characterize the scale deposits. The silica scale in the reservoir rocks at Coso was initially deposited as spheres of opal-A 1-2 micrometers in diameter. As the deposits matured, the spheres coalesced to form larger spheres up to 10 micrometer in diameter. Further maturation and infilling of the spaces between spheres resulted in the formation of plates and sheets that substantially reduce the original porosity and permeability of the fractures. Peripheral to the silica deposits, fluid inclusions with high water/gas ratios provide a subtle record of interactions between the injectate and reservoir rocks. In contrast, fluid inclusions trapped prior to injection are relatively gas rich. These results suggest that the rocks undergo extensive microfracturing during injection and that the composition of the fluid inclusions will be biased toward the youngest event. Interactions between the reservoir rocks and injectate were modeled using the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT. Changes in fluid pH, fracture porosity, fracture permeability, fluid temperature, and mineral abundances were monitored. The simulations predict that amorphous silica will precipitate primarily within a few meters of the injection well and that mineral deposition will lead to rapid declines in fracture porosity and permeability, consistent with field observations. In support of Enhanced Geothermal System development, petrologic studies of Coso well 46A-19RD were conducted to determine the regions that are most likely to fail when stimulated. These studies indicate that the most intensely brecciated and altered rocks in the zone targeted for stimulation (below 10,000 ft (3048 m)) occur between 11,200 and 11,350 ft (3414 and 3459 m). This zone is interpreted as a shear zone that initially juxtaposed quartz diorite against granodiorite. Strong pervasive alteration and veining within the brecciated quartz diorite and granodiorite suggest this shear zone was permeable in the past. This zone of weakness was subsequently exploited by a granophyre dike whose top occurs at 11,350 ft (3459 m). The dike is unaltered. We anticipate, based on analysis of the well samples that failure during stimulation will most likely occur on this shear zone.

Joseph N. Moore

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Fraser E. Goff, Charles O. Grigsby, Pat E. Trujillo Jr, Dale Counce, Andrea Kron (1981) Geology, Water Geochemistry And Geothermal Potential Of The Jemez Springs Area, Canon De San Diego, New Mexico Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis-_Fluid_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Goff,_Et_Al.,_1981)&oldid=692519

65

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. At shallow depths in the caldera References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis-_Fluid_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=692525

66

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis-_Fluid_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Redondo_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=692533"

67

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff &  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis-_Fluid_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Sulphur_Springs_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=692539"

68

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine effectiveness of FIS for geothermal exploration Notes In order to test FIS for geothermal exploration, drill chips were analyzed from Coso well 83-16, which were selected at 1000 ft intervals by Joseph Moore. Sequential crushes done by our CFS (crushfast-scan) method (Norman 1996) show that chips have a high density of homogeneous fluid inclusions.

69

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (1982) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (1982) Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (1982) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Helium isotope ratios have been measured in geothermal fluids. These ratios have been interpreted in terms of the processes which supply He in distinct isotopic ratios (i.e. magmatic He, ~10 Ra; atmospheric He, Ra; and crustal He, ~0.1 Ra) and in terms of the processes which can alter the isotopic ratio (hydrologic mixing, U-Th series alpha production and weathering

70

CORE-BASED INTEGRATED SEDIMENTOLOGIC, STRATIGRAPHIC, AND GEOCHEMICAL ANALYSIS OF THE OIL SHALE BEARING GREEN RIVER FORMATION, UINTA BASIN, UTAH  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integrated detailed sedimentologic, stratigraphic, and geochemical study of Utah's Green River Formation has found that Lake Uinta evolved in three phases (1) a freshwater rising lake phase below the Mahogany zone, (2) an anoxic deep lake phase above the base of the Mahogany zone and (3) a hypersaline lake phase within the middle and upper R-8. This long term lake evolution was driven by tectonic basin development and the balance of sediment and water fill with the neighboring basins, as postulated by models developed from the Greater Green River Basin by Carroll and Bohacs (1999). Early Eocene abrupt global-warming events may have had significant control on deposition through the amount of sediment production and deposition rates, such that lean zones below the Mahogany zone record hyperthermal events and rich zones record periods between hyperthermals. This type of climatic control on short-term and long-term lake evolution and deposition has been previously overlooked. This geologic history contains key points relevant to oil shale development and engineering design including: (1) Stratigraphic changes in oil shale quality and composition are systematic and can be related to spatial and temporal changes in the depositional environment and basin dynamics. (2) The inorganic mineral matrix of oil shale units changes significantly from clay mineral/dolomite dominated to calcite above the base of the Mahogany zone. This variation may result in significant differences in pyrolysis products and geomechanical properties relevant to development and should be incorporated into engineering experiments. (3) This study includes a region in the Uinta Basin that would be highly prospective for application of in-situ production techniques. Stratigraphic targets for in-situ recovery techniques should extend above and below the Mahogany zone and include the upper R-6 and lower R-8.

Lauren P. Birgenheier; Michael D. Vanden Berg,

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

71

Fluid flow analysis in a rough fracture (type II) using complex networks and lattice Boltzmann method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Complexity of fluid flow in a rough fracture is induced by the complex configurations of opening areas between the fracture planes. In this study, we model fluid flow in an evolvable real rock joint structure, which under certain normal load is sheared. In an experimental study, information regarding about apertures of the rock joint during consecutive 20 mm displacements and fluid flow (permeability) in different pressure heads have been recorded by a scanner laser. Our aim in this study is to simulate the fluid flow in the mentioned complex geometries using the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), while the characteristics of the aperture field will be compared with the modeled fluid flow permeability To characterize the aperture, we use a new concept in the graph theory, namely: complex networks and motif analysis of the corresponding networks. In this approach, the similar aperture profile along the fluid flow direction is mapped in to a network space. The modeled permeability using the LBM shows good correlat...

Ghaffari, H; Sharifzadeh, M; Young, R P

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Fluid injection profiles: modern analysis of wellbore temperature survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exact and approximate solutions for heat flow in a fluid injection well are presented. By using the approximate results, temperature surveys can be quickly analyzed in the field, and the well depths where fluids leave and the departing flow rates at these depths can be precisely determined. Although this method eliminates the need for indigenous and post injection shut-in temperatures, several surveys must be taken just before and during the injection period which can be as short as several hours. In the application described the method was used to locate the depths where hydraulic fractures were initiated in a hot dry rock geothermal well.

Murphy, H.D.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Sorey, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Useful for a whole variety of particular reservoir characterization goals, i.e.: "Isotopic values for the thermal waters become lighter with distance eastward from Casa Diablo, suggesting dilution with nonthermal ground waters from more easterly sources. In the Casa Diablo area, the effects of near-surface boiling cause the observed isotopic shift (along the line

74

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff, Et Al., 1991) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff, Et Al., 1991) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Goff, Et Al., 1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes At shallow depths in the caldera References Fraser Goff, Harold A. Wollenberg, D. C. Brookins, Ronald W. Kistler (1991) A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Isotopic_Analysis-_Fluid_At_Long_Valley_Caldera_Area_(Goff,_Et_Al.,_1991)&oldid=692527"

75

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate deep reservoir temperature Notes The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures

76

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) (Redirected from Water-Gas Samples At Coso Geothermal Area (2004)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis To determine effectiveness of FIS for geothermal exploration Notes In order to test FIS for geothermal exploration, drill chips were analyzed from Coso well 83-16, which were selected at 1000 ft intervals by Joseph Moore. Sequential crushes done by our CFS (crushfast-scan) method (Norman

77

Chemical analysis and sampling techniques for geothermal fluids and gases at the Fenton Hill Laboratory  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A general description of methods, techniques, and apparatus used for the sampling, chemical analysis, and data reporting of geothermal gases and fluids is given. Step-by-step descriptions of the procedures are included in the appendixes.

Trujillo, P.E.; Counce, D.; Grigsby, C.O.; Goff, F.; Shevenell, L.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Coupling of a multizone airflow simulation program with computational fluid dynamics for indoor environmental analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Current design of building indoor environment comprises macroscopIC approaches, such as CONT AM multizone airflow analysis tool, and microscopic approaches that apply Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). Each has certain ...

Gao, Yang, 1974-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Gas Analysis of Geothermal Fluid Inclusions: A New Technology For Geothermal Exploration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To increase our knowledge of gaseous species in geothermal systems by fluid inclusion analysis in order to facilitate the use of gas analysis in geothermal exploration. The knowledge of gained by this program can be applied to geothermal exploration, which may expand geothermal production. Knowledge of the gas contents in reservoir fluids can be applied to fluid inclusion gas analysis of drill chip cuttings in a similar fashion as used in the petroleum industry. Thus the results of this project may lower exploration costs both in the initial phase and lower drill hole completion costs. Commercial costs for fluid inclusion analysis done on at 20 feet intervals on chip samples for 10,000 ft oil wells is about $6,000, and the turn around time is a few weeks.

David I. Norman; Joseph Moore

2004-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

80

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Rao, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References U. Fehn, R. T. D. Teng, Usha Rao, Fraser E. Goff (1996) Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Mexico- A 36Cl Study Retrieved from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an enhanced geothermal system in the Coso geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: In situ stress, fracture, and fluid flow analysis in Well 38C-9: an enhanced geothermal system in the Coso geothermal field Abstract Geoscientists from the Coso Operating Company, EGI-Utah, GeoMechanics International, and the U.S. Geological Survey are cooperating in a multi-year study to develop an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) in the Coso Geothermal Field. Key to the creation of an EGS is an understanding of the relationship among natural fracture distribution, fluid flow, and the ambient tectonic stresses that exist within the resource in order to design

82

IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS-EAST FLANK OF THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: High rock temperatures, a high degree of fracturing, high tectonic stresses, and low permeability are the combination of qualities that define an ideal candidate-Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir. The Coso Geothermal Field is an area where fluid temperatures exceeding 300°C have been measured at depths less than 10,000 feet and the reservoir is both highly fractured and tectonically stressed. Some of the wells within this portion of the reservoir are relatively impermeable,

83

IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL 38C-9:AN ENHANCED  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL 38C-9:AN ENHANCED FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL 38C-9:AN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: IN SITU STRESS, FRACTURE, AND FLUID FLOW ANALYSIS IN WELL 38C-9:AN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL FIELD Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Geoscientists from the Coso Operating Company, EGI-Utah, GeoMechanics International, and the U.S. Geological Survey are cooperating in a multi-year study to develop an Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) in the Coso Geothermal Field. Key to the creation of an EGS is an understanding of the relationship among natural fracture distribution, fluid flow, and the ambient tectonic stresses that exist within the resource in order to design

84

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Rao, Et Al., 1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown References U. Fehn, R. T. D. Teng, Usha Rao, Fraser E. Goff (1996) Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New Mexico- A 36Cl Study Retrieved from

85

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area Analysis-Fluid At Raft River Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Raft River Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine which reservoir model best matches the isotope data. Notes 1) Chemical and light-stable isotope data are presented for water samples from the Raft River geothermal area and nearby. On the basis of chemical character, as defined by a trilinear plot of per cent milliequivalents, and light-stable isotope data, the waters in the geothermal area can be divided into waters that have and have not mixed with cold water. 2) Helium isotope ratios have been measured in geothermal fluids. These ratios have been interpreted in terms of the processes which supply He in distinct isotopic

86

Geochemical modeling at Raft River  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical analysis of water from three depth regimes at the Raft River KGRA indicate the presence of at least two distinct hydrothermal fluids. One fluid predominates in the fracture system on the west side of the valley, known as the Bridge Fault. This fluid is characterized by low conductivity (2,000 to 3,000 ..mu..s) and 6 to 9 ..mu..g/ml F/sup -/. The second fluid, encountered in the center of the valley, appears to be associated with the Narrows Structure and is characterized by a conductivity of 6,000 to 11,000 ..mu..s and F/sup -/ of 3 to 6 ..mu..g/ml. Contour mapping of conductivity and Cl/sup -//F/sup -/ ratios indicates upwelling of both deep geothermal fluids into the shallow system. This recharge into the intermediate and shallow zones produces high-conductivity water which is used for irrigation. Application of a simple mixing model shows that all the water sampled in intermediate and deep zones can be described by mixtures of two nearly pure fluids. One mechanism, consistent with the known data, is deep upwelling of a highly mineralized fluid which is heated by the basement rock and then penetrates sediment layers through fractures. The second fluid is relatively recent meteoric water conductively heated by the basement rock.

Allen, C.A.; Chaney, R.E.; McAtee, R.E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A fluid pressure and deformation analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide  

SciTech Connect

We present a hydro-mechanical model and deformation analysis for geological sequestration of carbon dioxide. The model considers the poroelastic effects by taking into account the two-way coupling between the geomechanical response and the fluid flow process in greater detail. In order for analytical solutions, the simplified hydro-mechanical model includes the geomechanical part that relies on the theory of linear elasticity, while the fluid flow is based on the Darcy's law. The model was derived through coupling the two parts using the standard linear poroelasticity theory. Analytical solutions for fluid pressure field were obtained for a typical geological sequestration scenario and the solutions for ground deformation were obtained using the method of Green's function. Solutions predict the temporal and spatial variation of fluid pressure, the effect of permeability and elastic modulus on the fluid pressure, the ground surface uplift, and the radial deformation during the entire injection period.

Xu, Zhijie; Fang, Yilin; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Bonneville, Alain HR

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

88

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1977) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1977) Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1977 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Estimate deep reservoir temperature Notes The oxygen isotope compositions of dissolved sulfate and water from hot springs and shallow drillholes have been tested. Methods are described to calculate the effects of boiling and dilution. The geothermometer, is applied to thermal systems of Yellowstone Park, Wyoming, Long Valley, California, and Raft River, Idaho to estimate deep reservoir temperatures

89

Modular In-Line Fluid Analysis System - PNNL: Available ...  

... Typical limits for large industrial diesel engines, or gas turbines (c) Requires 241Americium source (see specifications below) Infrared Analysis ...

90

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Chena Area (Erkan, Et. Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Chena Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Stable isotope analyses showthat thermalwaters at Chena Hot Springs are meteoric in origin. A Carbon-14 analysis indicates that the age of the springwaters is less than 3000 years. The minimum depth of circulation must

91

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) (Redirected from Isotopic Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981)) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff, Et Al., 1981) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Fraser E. Goff, Charles O. Grigsby, Pat E. Trujillo Jr, Dale Counce,

92

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2005-2006) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2005-2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2005-2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date 2005 - 2006 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Include more wells from previous analysis Notes This paper focuses on the interpretation of the additional wells (4 bore holes) and comparison to the previous wells. Preliminary correlation

93

AIR INGRESS ANALYSIS: PART 2 COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMIC MODELS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Idaho National Laboratory (INL), under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy, is performing research and development that focuses on key phenomena important during potential scenarios that may occur in very high temperature reactors (VHTRs). Phenomena Identification and Ranking Studies to date have ranked an air ingress event, following on the heels of a VHTR depressurization, as important with regard to core safety. Consequently, the development of advanced air ingress-related models and verification and validation data are a very high priority. Following a loss of coolant and system depressurization incident, air will enter the core of the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor through the break, possibly causing oxidation of the in-the core and reflector graphite structure. Simple core and plant models indicate that, under certain circumstances, the oxidation may proceed at an elevated rate with additional heat generated from the oxidation reaction itself. Under postulated conditions of fluid flow and temperature, excessive degradation of the lower plenum graphite can lead to a loss of structural support. Excessive oxidation of core graphite can also lead to the release of fission products into the confinement, which could be detrimental to a reactor safety. Computational fluid dynamic model developed in this study will improve our understanding of this phenomenon. This paper presents two-dimensional and three-dimensional CFD results for the quantitative assessment of the air ingress phenomena. A portion of results of the density-driven stratified flow in the inlet pipe will be compared with results of the experimental results.

Chang H. Oh; Eung S. Kim; Richard Schultz; Hans Gougar; David Petti; Hyung S. Kang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Indian Valley Hot Springs Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Inyo and Kern Counties, California. Supplement. Isotope geochemistry and Appendix H. Final report Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleIsotopicAnalysis-Flu...

95

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Long Valley Caldera Area (Evans, Et Al., 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Detailed chemical and isotopic studies not only help quantify the discharge, but also may provide additional insight to subsurface conditions. For example, CO2-rich groundwaters that are cold and dilute may

96

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from HDR well References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long

97

Complexity analysis of the turbulent environmental fluid flow time series  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the Kolmogorov complexities, sample and permutation entropies to quantify the randomness degree in river flow time series of two mountain rivers in Bosnia and Herzegovina, representing the turbulent environmental fluid, for the period 1926-1990. In particular, we have examined the monthly river flow time series from two rivers (Miljacka and Bosnia) in mountain part of their flow and then calculated the Kolmogorov Complexity (KL) based on the Lempel-Ziv Algorithm (LZA) (Lower - KLL and Upper - KLU), Sample Entropy (SE) and Permutation Entropy (PE) values for each time series. The results indicate that the KLL, KLU, SE and PE values in two rivers are close to each other regardless of the amplitude differences in their monthly flow rates. We have illustrated the changes in mountain river flow complexity by experiments using (i) the data set for the Bosnia River and (ii) anticipated human activities and projected climate changes. We have explored the sensitivity of considered measures in dependence on the length of time series. In addition, we have divided the period 1926-1990 into three sub-intervals: (a) 1926-1945, (b)1946-1965 and (c)1966-1990, and calculated the KLL, KLU, SE and PE values for the various time series in these sub-intervals. It is found that during the period 1946-1965, there is a decrease in their complexities, and corresponding changes in the SE and PE, in comparison to the period 1926-1990. This complexity loss may be primarily attributed to (i) human interventions, after Second World War, on these rivers because of their use for water consumption and (ii) climate change in recent time.

Dragutin T. Mihailovic; Emilija Nikolic-Djoric; Nusret Dreskovic; Gordan Mimic

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

98

Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Geysers Geothermal Area (1982) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

82) 82) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Geysers Geothermal Area (1982) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis-Fluid Activity Date 1982 Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Helium isotope ratios have been measured in geothermal fluids. These ratios have been interpreted in terms of the processes which supply He in distinct isotopic ratios (i.e. magmatic He, ~10 Ra; atmospheric He, Ra; and crustal He, ~0.1 Ra) and in terms of the processes which can alter the isotopic ratio (hydrologic mixing, U-Th series alpha production and weathering release of crustal He, magma aging and tritiugenic addition of 3He). Raft

99

Cold Plasma Wave Analysis in Magneto-Rotational Fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper is devoted to investigate the cold plasma wave properties. The analysis has been restricted to the neighborhood of the pair production region of the Kerr magnetosphere. The Fourier analyzed general relativistic magnetohydrodynamical equations are dealt under special circumstances and dispersion relations are obtained. We find the $x$-component of the complex wave vector numerically. The corresponding components of the propagation vector, attenuation vector, phase and group velocities are shown in graphs. The direction and dispersion of waves are investigated.

M. Sharif; Umber Sheikh

2010-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

100

A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geochemical Model Of The Platanares Geothermal System, Honduras Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Results of exploration drilling combined with results of geologic, geophysical, and hydrogeochemical investigations have been used to construct a geochemical model of the Platanares geothermal system, Honduras. Three coreholes were drilled, two of which produced fluids from fractured Miocene andesite and altered Cretaceous to Eocene conglomerate at

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

PDM performance Test Results and Preliminary Analysis: Incompressible and Compressible Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three, small diameter, Moineau, positive displacement (drilling) motors (PDMs) were dynamometer tested using water, air-water mist, air-water foam, and aerated water. The motors included (1) a 1.5-inch OD, single-lobe mud motor; (2) a 1.69-inch OD, 5:6 multi-lobe mud motor; and (3) a 1.75-inch OD, 5:6 multi-lobe air motor. This paper describes the test apparatus, procedures, data analysis, and results. Incompressible and compressible fluid performance are compared; linear performance, predicted by a positive displacement motor model, is identified where it occurs. Preliminary results and conclusions are (1) the performance of all three motors is accurately modeled using a two-variable, linear model for incompressible fluid and (2) the model was not successfully adapted to model compressible fluid performance.

Dreesen, D.S.; Gruenhagan, E.; Cohen, J.C.; Moran, D.W.

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

GEOCHEMICAL CONTROLS ON NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE MEASUREMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is used in the Earth Sciences as a means of obtaining information about the molecular-scale environment of fluids in porous geological materials. Laboratory experiments were conducted to advance our fundamental understanding of the link between the NMR response and the geochemical properties of geological materials. In the first part of this research project, we studied the impact of both the surface-area-to-volume ratio (S/V) of the pore space and the surface relaxivity on the NMR response of fluids in sand-clay mixtures. This study highlighted the way in which these two parameters control our ability to use NMR measurements to detect and quantify fluid saturation in multiphase saturated systems. The second part of the project was designed to explore the way in which the mineralogic form of iron, as opposed to simply the concentration of iron, affects the surface relaxation rate and, more generally, the NMR response of porous materials. We found that the magnitude of the surface relaxation rate was different for the various iron-oxide minerals because of changes in both the surface-area-to-volume ratio of the pore space, and the surface relaxivity. Of particular significance from this study was the finding of an anomalously large surface relaxivity of magnetite compared to that of the other iron minerals. Differences in the NMR response of iron minerals were seen in column experiments during the reaction of ferrihydrite-coated quartz sand with aqueous Fe(II) solutions to form goethite, lepidocrocite and magnetite; indicating the potential use of NMR as a means of monitoring geochemical reactions. The final part of the research project investigated the impact of heterogeneity, at the pore-scale, on the NMR response. This work highlighted the way in which the geochemistry, by controlling the surface relaxivity, has a significant impact on the link between NMR data and the microgeometry of the pore space.

Rosemary Knight

2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

103

Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Factors Controlling The Geochemical Evolution Of Fumarolic Encrustations, Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes, Alaska Details Activities (3) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Factor and canonical correlation analysis of geochemical data from eight fossil fumaroles suggest that six major factors controlled the formation and evolution of fumarolic encrustations on the 1912 ash-flow sheet in the Valley of Ten Thousand Smokes (VTTS). The six-factor solution model explains a large proportion (low of 74% for Ni to high of 99% for Si) of the individual element data variance. Although the primary fumarolic

104

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Seismicity And Fluid Geochemistry At Lassen Volcanic National Park, California- Evidence For Two Circulation Cells In The Hydrothermal System Details Activities (7) Areas (2) Regions (0) Abstract: Seismic analysis and geochemical interpretations provide evidence that two separate hydrothermal cells circulate within the greater Lassen hydrothermal system. One cell originates south to SW of Lassen Peak and within the Brokeoff Volcano depression where it forms a reservoir of hot fluid (235-270°C) that boils to feed steam to the high-temperature

105

Fluid Inclusion Analysis At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Fluid Inclusion Analysis At U.S. West Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location U.S. West Region Exploration Technique Fluid Inclusion Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Characterization and Conceptual Modeling of Magmatically-Heated and Deep-Circulation, High-Temperature Hydrothermal Systems in the Basin and Range and Cordilleran United States, Moore, Nash, Nemcok, Lutz, Norton, Kaspereit, Berard, van de Putte, Johnson and Deymonaz. Utilizing a wealth of formerly proprietary subsurface samples and datasets for exemplary high-temperature western U.S. geothermal systems, develop and publish detailed and refined new conceptual and numerical hydrothermal-history

106

Design sensitivity analysis and optimization of steady fluid-thermal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Design optimization of fluid-thermal systems has been an area of significant research interest for the aerospace and automotive industry. The subject studies the modification of internal and external flow passages under certain specified objective constraints while satisfying the governing flow equations. Amongst various available optimization procedures the analytical sensitivity analyses-based optimization is arguably the most efficient design tool for complex multi-dimensional practical problems. In this paper, we augmented the analysis capabilities of the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code with design sensitivity analysis (DSA). The design sensitivities are computed efficiently via analytical differentiation methods. The CFD DSA codes are then combined with numerical optimization schemes. Finally, CFD DSA design optimization algorithm is applied to the optimization of heat exchanger fin and HVAC duct systems. 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

Balagangadhar; Uid-thermal Systems

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Isotopic Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Walker-Lane Transitional Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

108

Isotopic Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Northern Basin & Range Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Northern Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

109

Isotopic Analysis At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Buffalo Valley Hot Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Buffalo Valley Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

110

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & ApplicationChapter 10 Lipid Separations Using Packed-Column Supercritical Fluid Chromatography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lipid Analysis and Lipidomics: New Techniques & Application Chapter 10 Lipid Separations Using Packed-Column Supercritical Fluid Chromatography Methods and Analyses eChapters Methods - Analyses Books AOCS Press Downloadabl

111

DNA-based methods of geochemical prospecting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present invention relates to methods for performing surveys of the genetic diversity of a population. The invention also relates to methods for performing genetic analyses of a population. The invention further relates to methods for the creation of databases comprising the survey information and the databases created by these methods. The invention also relates to methods for analyzing the information to correlate the presence of nucleic acid markers with desired parameters in a sample. These methods have application in the fields of geochemical exploration, agriculture, bioremediation, environmental analysis, clinical microbiology, forensic science and medicine.

Ashby, Matthew (Mill Valley, CA)

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

112

Shear-slip analysis in multiphase fluid-flow reservoir engineeringap plications using TOUGH-FLAC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes and demonstrates the use of the coupledTOUGH-FLAC simulator for geomechanical shear-slip (failure) analysis inmultiphase fluid-flow reservoir-engineering applications. Two approachesfor analyzing shear-slip are described, one using continuum stress-strainanalysis and another using discrete fault analysis. The use of shear-slipanalysis in TOUGH-FLAC is demonstrated on application examples related toCO2 sequestration and geothermal energy extraction. In the case of CO2sequestration, the shear-slip analysis is used to evaluate maximumsustainable CO2-injection pressure under increasing reservoir pressure,whereas in the case of geothermal energy extraction, the shear-slipanalysis is used to study induced seismicity during steam productionunder decreasing reservoir pressure and temperature.

Rutqvist, Jonny; Birkholzer, Jens; Cappa, Frederic; Oldenburg,Curt; Tsang, Chin-Fu

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

TEMPEST: A computer code for three-dimensional analysis of transient fluid dynamics  

SciTech Connect

TEMPEST (Transient Energy Momentum and Pressure Equations Solutions in Three dimensions) is a powerful tool for solving engineering problems in nuclear energy, waste processing, chemical processing, and environmental restoration because it analyzes and illustrates 3-D time-dependent computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer analysis. It is a family of codes with two primary versions, a N- Version (available to public) and a T-Version (not currently available to public). This handout discusses its capabilities, applications, numerical algorithms, development status, and availability and assistance.

Fort, J.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Computational Fluid Dynamic Analysis of the VHTR Lower Plenum Standard Problem  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energy is promoting the resurgence of nuclear power in the U. S. for both electrical power generation and production of process heat required for industrial processes such as the manufacture of hydrogen for use as a fuel in automobiles. The DOE project is called the next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) and is based on a Generation IV reactor concept called the very high temperature reactor (VHTR), which will use helium as the coolant at temperatures ranging from 450 C to perhaps 1000 C. While computational fluid dynamics (CFD) has not been used for past safety analysis for nuclear reactors in the U. S., it is being considered for safety analysis for existing and future reactors. It is fully recognized that CFD simulation codes will have to be validated for flow physics reasonably close to actual fluid dynamic conditions expected in normal and accident operational situations. To this end, experimental data have been obtained in a scaled model of a narrow slice of the lower plenum of a prismatic VHTR. The present report presents results of CFD examinations of these data to explore potential issues with the geometry, the initial conditions, the flow dynamics and the data needed to fully specify the inlet and boundary conditions; results for several turbulence models are examined. Issues are addressed and recommendations about the data are made.

Richard W. Johnson; Richard R. Schultz

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

The hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto revisited  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As the exploitation of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field continues, there is increasing evidence that the hydrogeologic model developed by Halfman et al. (1984, 1986) presents the basic features controlling the movement of geothermal fluids in the system. At the present time the total installed capacity at Cerro Prieto is 620 MWe requiring the production of more than 10,500 tonnes/hr of a brine-steam mixture. This significant rate of fluid production has resulted in changes in reservoir thermodynamic conditions and in the chemistry of the produced fluids. After reviewing the hydrogeologic-geochemical model of Cerro Prieto, some of the changes observed in the field due to its exploitation are discussed and interpreted on the basis of the model. 21 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab.

Lippmann, M.J.; Halfman, S.E.; Truesdell, A.H.; Manon M., A.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Experimental Analysis of Water Based Drilling Fluid Aging Processes at High Temperature and High Pressure Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In efforts to render the safest, fastest, and most cost efficient drilling program for a high temperature and high pressure (HT/HP) well the maximization of drilling operational efficiencies is key. Designing an adequate, HT/HP well specific, drilling fluid is of most importance and a technological challenge that can greatly affect the outcome of the overall operational efficiency. It is necessary to have a sound fundamental understanding of the behavior that water-based muds (WBM) exhibit when exposed to HT/HP conditions. Therefore, in order to adequately design and treat a WBM for a HT/HP well specific drilling program, it is essential that the mud be evaluated at HT/HP conditions. Currently, industry standard techniques used to evaluate WBM characteristics involve aging the fluid sample to a predetermined temperature, based on the anticipated bottom hole temperature (BHT), either statically or dynamically, for a predetermined length, then cooling and mixing the fluid and measuring its rheological properties at a significantly lower temperature. This, along with the fact that the fluid is not subjected to the anticipated bottom hole pressure (BHP) during or after the aging process, brings to question if the properties recorded are those that are truly experienced down-hole. Furthermore, these testing methods do not allow the user to effectively monitor the changes during the aging process. The research in this thesis is focused on evaluating a high performance WBM and the current test procedures used to evaluate their validity. Experimental static and dynamic aging tests were developed for comparative analysis as well to offer a more accurate and precise method to evaluate the effects experienced by WBM when subjected to HT/HP conditions. The experimental tests developed enable the user to monitor and evaluate, in real-time, the rheological changes that occur during the aging of a WBM while being subjected to true BHT and BHP. Detailed standard and experimental aging tests were conducted and suggest that the standard industry tests offer false rheological results with respect to true BHT and BHP. Furthermore, the experimental aging tests show that high pressure has a significant effect on the rheological properties of the WBM at elevated temperatures.

Zigmond, Brandon

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Development of Geothermal Binary Cycle Working Fluid Properties Information and Analysis of Cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research discussed in this report was performed at the University of Oklahoma during the period January 1, 1979 through December 31, 1979. Efforts were directed principally to the following tasks: (1) comparisons of mixture and pure fluid cascade cycles, (2) development of guidelines for working fluid selection for single boiler cycles, (3) continued evaluation of mixtures as working fluids, (4) working fluid thermophysical property correlation and presentations of properties information.

Starling, Kenneth E.; Iqbal, K.Z.; Malik, Z.I.; Chu, C.T.; Ramaswamy, S.; Kumar, K.H.; Lee, T. J.; Brule, M.R.; Aly, F.; Brunsman, K.J.; Plumb, P.

1979-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

118

Frequency response analysis of fluid control systems for parabolic trough solar collectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous studies of solar collector fluid control systems have utilized computer simulations of collector and piping dynamics to evaluate stability and response characteristics. To obtain reasonable simulation accuracy requires substantial computer memory and time, and is well beyond the capability of small desk-top computers. Here a linearized steady state frequency response is derived for parabolic trough collectors and for connecting piping, which can be used in standard gain-phase analyses to evaluate system stability and closed loop frequency response. The frequency response characteristics of a typical collector string and piping are used in a gain-phase analysis to get some insight into the effect on system stability of various system parameters such as controller gain, sensor and controller time constants, and sensor location.

Schindwolf, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Preliminary Analysis of Grande Ronde Basalt Formation Flow Top Transmissivity as it Relates to Assessment and Site Selection Applications for Fluid/Energy Storage and Sequestration Projects  

SciTech Connect

Preliminary Analysis of Grande Ronde Basalt Formation Flow Top Transmissivity as it Relates to Assessment and Site Selection Applications for Fluid/Energy Storage and Sequestration Projects

Spane, Frank A.

2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

120

The dynamics of oceanic transform faults : constraints from geophysical, geochemical, and geodynamical modeling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Segmentation and crustal accretion at oceanic transform fault systems are investigated through a combination of geophysical data analysis and geodynamical and geochemical modeling. Chapter 1 examines the effect of fault ...

Gregg, Patricia Michelle Marie

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Natural Circulation and Linear Stability Analysis for Liquid-Metal Reactors with the Effect of Fluid Axial Conduction  

SciTech Connect

The effect of fluid axial thermal conduction on one-dimensional liquid metal natural circulation and its linear stability was performed through nondimensional analysis, steady-state assessment, and linear perturbation evaluation. The Nyquist criterion and a root-search method were employed to find the linear stability boundary of both forward and backward circulations. The study provided a relatively complete analysis method for one-dimensional natural circulation problems with the consideration of fluid axial heat conduction. The results suggest that fluid axial heat conduction in a natural circulation loop should be considered only when the modified Peclet number is {approx}1 or less, which is significantly smaller than the practical value of a lead liquid metal-cooled reactor.

Piyush Sabharwall; Qiao Wu; James J. Sienicki

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Proceedings of the workshop on geochemical modeling  

SciTech Connect

The following collection of papers was presented at a workshop on geochemical modeling that was sponsored by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The LLNL Waste Management Program sponsored this conference based on their belief that geochemical modeling is particularly important to the radioactive waste disposal project because of the need to predict the consequences of long-term water-rock interactions at the proposed repository site. The papers included in this volume represent a subset of the papers presented at the Fallen Leaf Lake Conference and cover a broad spectrum of detail and breadth in a subject that reflects the diverse research interests of the conference participants. These papers provide an insightful look into the current status of geochemical modeling and illustrate how various geochemical modeling codes have been applied to problems of geochemical interest. The emphasis of these papers includes traditional geochemical modeling studies of individual geochemical systems, the mathematical and theoretical development and refinement of new modeling capabilities, and enhancements of data bases on which the computations are based. The papers in this proceedings volume have been organized into the following four areas: Geochemical Model Development, Hydrothermal and Geothermal Systems, Sedimentary and Low Temperature Environments, and Data Base Development. The participants of this symposium and a complete list of the talks presented are listed in the appendices.

Not Available

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Testing geochemical modeling codes using New Zealand hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of selected portions of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will: (1) ensure that we are providing adequately for all significant processes occurring in natural systems; (2) determine the adequacy of the mathematical descriptions of the processes; (3) check the adequacy and completeness of thermodynamic data as a function of temperature for solids, aqueous species and gases; and (4) determine the sensitivity of model results to the manner in which the problem is conceptualized by the user and then translated into constraints in the code input. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions. The kinetics of silica precipitation in EQ6 will be tested using field data from silica-lined drain channels carrying hot water away from the Wairakei borefield.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

A geochemical expert system prototype using object-oriented knowledge representation and a production rule system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Keywords: MINEQL, artificial intelligence, expert systems, geochemical expert system, geochemical modeling, geochemistry

Forrest M. Hoffman; Vijay S. Tripathi

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Analysis and macroscopic limit of a one-dimensional model for aging fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study a one-dimensional equation arising in the multiscale modeling of some non-Newtonian fluids. At a given shear rate, the equation provides the instantaneous mesoscopic response of the fluid, allowing to compute the corresponding stress. In a simple setting, we study the well-posedness of the equation and next the long-time behavior of its solution. In the limit of a response of the fluid much faster than the time variations of the ambient shear rate, we derive some equivalent macroscopic differential equations that relate the shear rate and the stress. Our analytical conclusions are confronted to some numerical experiments. The latter quantitatively confirm our derivations.

David Benoit; Claude Le Bris; Tony Lelivre

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

In Situ NMR Analysis of Fluids Contained in Sedimentary Rock Thomas M. de Swiet,* Marco Tomaselli,* Martin D. Hurlimann, and Alexander Pines*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Situ NMR Analysis of Fluids Contained in Sedimentary Rock Thomas M. de Swiet,* Marco Tomaselli of pore fluids may be obtained in situ by magic angle spinning (MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), which is normally used for solid samples. 1 H MAS­NMR spectra of water and crude oil in Berea sandstone

Pines, Alexander

127

GEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF F AREA SEEPAGE BASIN COMPOSITION AND VARIABILITY  

SciTech Connect

From the 1950s through 1989, the F Area Seepage Basins at the Savannah River Site (SRS) received low level radioactive wastes resulting from processing nuclear materials. Discharges of process wastes to the F Area Seepage Basins followed by subsequent mixing processes within the basins and eventual infiltration into the subsurface resulted in contamination of the underlying vadose zone and downgradient groundwater. For simulating contaminant behavior and subsurface transport, a quantitative understanding of the interrelated discharge-mixing-infiltration system along with the resulting chemistry of fluids entering the subsurface is needed. An example of this need emerged as the F Area Seepage Basins was selected as a key case study demonstration site for the Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management (ASCEM) Program. This modeling evaluation explored the importance of the wide variability in bulk wastewater chemistry as it propagated through the basins. The results are intended to generally improve and refine the conceptualization of infiltration of chemical wastes from seepage basins receiving variable waste streams and to specifically support the ASCEM case study model for the F Area Seepage Basins. Specific goals of this work included: (1) develop a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry for water infiltrating into the subsurface during basin operations, (2) estimate the nature of short term and long term variability in infiltrating water to support scenario development for uncertainty quantification (i.e., UQ analysis), (3) identify key geochemical factors that control overall basin water chemistry and the projected variability/stability, and (4) link wastewater chemistry to the subsurface based on monitoring well data. Results from this study provide data and understanding that can be used in further modeling efforts of the F Area groundwater plume. As identified in this study, key geochemical factors affecting basin chemistry and variability included: (1) the nature or chemistry of the waste streams, (2) the open system of the basins, and (3) duration of discharge of the waste stream types. Mixing models of the archetype waste streams indicated that the overall basin system would likely remain acidic much of the time. Only an extended periods of predominantly alkaline waste discharge (e.g., >70% alkaline waste) would dramatically alter the average pH of wastewater entering the basins. Short term and long term variability were evaluated by performing multiple stepwise modeling runs to calculate the oscillation of bulk chemistry in the basins in response to short term variations in waste stream chemistry. Short term (1/2 month and 1 month) oscillations in the waste stream types only affected the chemistry in Basin 1; little variation was observed in Basin 2 and 3. As the largest basin, Basin 3 is considered the primary source to the groundwater. Modeling showed that the fluctuation in chemistry of the waste streams is not directly representative of the source term to the groundwater (i.e. Basin 3). The sequence of receiving basins and the large volume of water in Basin 3 'smooth' or nullify the short term variability in waste stream composition. As part of this study, a technically-based 'charge-balanced' nominal source term chemistry was developed for Basin 3 for a narrow range of pH (2.7 to 3.4). An example is also provided of how these data could be used to quantify uncertainty over the long term variations in waste stream chemistry and hence, Basin 3 chemistry.

Millings, M.; Denham, M.; Looney, B.

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

128

TOUGHREACT-A simulation program for non-isothermal multiphase reactive geochemical transport in variably saturated geologic media: Applications to geothermal injectivity and CO2 geological sequestration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

TOUGHREACT is a numerical simulation program for chemically reactive non-isothermal flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media. The program was written in Fortran 77 and developed by introducing reactive geochemistry into the multiphase ... Keywords: CO2 geologic sequestration, Clay swelling, Geochemical transport, Hydrothermal systems, Injectivity enhancement, Mineral scaling, Mineral trapping, Reactive fluid flow, Saline aquifer, TOUGHREACT

Tianfu Xu; Eric Sonnenthal; Nicolas Spycher; Karsten Pruess

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Fluid bed adsorption of carbon dioxide on immobilized polyethyenimine (PEI): kinetic analysis and breakthrough behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The adsorption of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) by immobilized polyethylenimine (PEI) on mesoporous silica was investigated in a fluid bed. The tests were performed to determine breakthrough behavior with varying bed temperature, flow rates and feed concentrations. Experimental breakthrough curves were analyzed using a theoretical 1D model developed by Bohart and Adams. The results showed that Bohart-Adams model was suitable for the normal description of breakthrough curve for the temperature ranges of 40-90{degree}C. The maximum capacity increased with temperature up to 70{degree}C and then decreased. The adsorption rate constant exhibited a negative temperature dependence decreasing as the temperature increased. Parameters characteristic of a fluid bed adsorber were inferred from these breakthrough curves including the breakthrough time, saturation time, critical reactor length, and length of mass transfer zone LMTZ. These parameters can be used to design fluid bed adsorption system without resolving the mechanistic contributions of dispersion, mixing, and intraparticle diffusion.

Monazam, Esmail R.; Spenik,, James; Shadle, Lawrence J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Energy stability analysis for a hybrid fluid-kinetic plasma model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In plasma physics, a hybrid fluid-kinetic model is composed of a magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) part that describes a bulk fluid component and a Vlasov kinetic theory part that describes an energetic plasma component. While most hybrid models in the plasma literature are non-Hamiltonian, this paper investigates a recent Hamiltonian variant in its two-dimensional configuration. The corresponding Hamiltonian structure is described along with its Casimir invariants. Then, the energy-Casimir method is used to derive explicit sufficient stability conditions, which imply a stable spectrum and suggest nonlinear stability.

Philip J. Morrison; Emanuele Tassi; Cesare Tronci

2013-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

131

Computational analysis of fluid flow and zonal deposition in ferrocyanide single-shell tanks. Ferrocyanide Safety Program  

SciTech Connect

Safety of single-shell tanks containing ferrocyanide wastes is of concern. Ferrocyanide in the presence of an oxidizer such as NaNO{sub 3} or NaNO{sub 2} is explosively combustible when concentrated and heated. Evaluating the processes that could affect the fuel content of waste and distribution of the tank heat load is important. Highly alkaline liquid wastes were transferred in and out of the tanks over several years. Since Na{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} is much more soluble in alkaline media, the ferrocyanide could be dispersed from the tank more easily. If Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} or CsNaNiFe(CN){sub 6} are also soluble in alkaline media, solubilization and transport of {sup 137}Cs could also occur. Transporting this heat generating radionuclide to a localized area in the tanks is a potential mechanism for generating a ``hot spot.`` Fluid convection could potentially speed the transport process considerably over aqueous diffusion alone. A stability analysis was performed for a dense fluid layer overlying a porous medium saturated by a less dense fluid with the finding that the configuration is unconditionally unstable and independent of the properties of the porous medium or the magnitude of the fluid density difference. A parametric modeling study of the buoyancy-driven flow due to a thermal gradient was combusted to establish the relationship between the waste physical and thermal properties and natural convection heat transfer. The effects of diffusion and fluid convection on the redistribution of the {sup 137}Cs were evaluated with a 2-D coupled heat and mass transport model. The maximum predicted temperature rise associated with the formation of zones was only 5{degrees}C and thus is of no concern in terms of generating a localized ``hot spot.``

McGrail, B.P.; Trent, D.S.; Terrones, G.; Hudson, J.D.; Michener, T.E.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Field-based tests of geochemical modeling codes using New Zealand hydrothermal systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrothermal systems in the Taupo Volcanic Zone, North Island, New Zealand are being used as field-based modeling exercises for the EQ3/6 geochemical modeling code package. Comparisons of the observed state and evolution of the hydrothermal systems with predictions of fluid-solid equilibria made using geochemical modeling codes will determine how the codes can be used to predict the chemical and mineralogical response of the environment to nuclear waste emplacement. Field-based exercises allow us to test the models on time scales unattainable in the laboratory. Preliminary predictions of mineral assemblages in equilibrium with fluids sampled from wells in the Wairakei and Kawerau geothermal field suggest that affinity-temperature diagrams must be used in conjunction with EQ6 to minimize the effect of uncertainties in thermodynamic and kinetic data on code predictions.

Bruton, C.J.; Glassley, W.E.; Bourcier, W.L.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Fluid Resistance Analysis of Sand Control Slotted Liner with Compound Cavity Based on Fluent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Slotted liners have been used for many years to provide sand control in many oil industry applications. They are commonly applied in reservoirs that produce high-viscosity oil from horizontal wells with unconsolidated, high-permeability sands. However, ... Keywords: slotted liner, newly-designed slot, Fluid resistance

Hang Li; Yonghong Liu; Jianmin Ma; Xinfang Wei

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

R fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theory of collisionless fluids is developed in a unified picture, where nonrotating figures with anisotropic random velocity component distributions and rotating figures with isotropic random velocity component distributions, make adjoints configurations to the same system. R fluids are defined and mean and rms angular velocities and mean and rms tangential velocity components are expressed, by weighting on the moment of inertia and the mass, respectively. The definition of figure rotation is extended to R fluids. The generalized tensor virial equations are formulated for R fluids and further attention is devoted to axisymmetric configurations where, for selected coordinate axes, a variation in figure rotation has to be counterbalanced by a variation in anisotropy excess and vice versa. A microscopical analysis of systematic and random motions is performed under a few general hypotheses, by reversing the sign of tangential or axial velocity components of an assigned fraction of particles, leaving the distribution function and other parameters unchanged (Meza 2002). The application of the reversion process to tangential velocity components, implies the conversion of random motion rotation kinetic energy into systematic motion rotation kinetic energy. The application of the reversion process to axial velocity components, implies the conversion of random motion translation kinetic energy into systematic motion translation kinetic energy, and the loss related to a change of reference frame is expressed in terms of systematic (imaginary) motion rotation kinetic energy. A procedure is sketched for deriving the spin parameter distribution (including imaginary rotation) from a sample of observed or simulated large-scale collisionless fluids i.e. galaxies and galaxy clusters.

R. Caimmi

2007-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

135

Coupled computational fluid dynamics and heat transfer analysis of the VHTR lower plenum.  

SciTech Connect

The very high temperature reactor (VHTR) concept is being developed by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and other groups around the world for the future generation of electricity at high thermal efficiency (> 48%) and co-generation of hydrogen and process heat. This Generation-IV reactor would operate at elevated exit temperatures of 1,000-1,273 K, and the fueled core would be cooled by forced convection helium gas. For the prismatic-core VHTR, which is the focus of this analysis, the velocity of the hot helium flow exiting the core into the lower plenum (LP) could be 35-70 m/s. The impingement of the resulting gas jets onto the adiabatic plate at the bottom of the LP could develop hot spots and thermal stratification and inadequate mixing of the gas exiting the vessel to the turbo-machinery for energy conversion. The complex flow field in the LP is further complicated by the presence of large cylindrical graphite posts that support the massive core and inner and outer graphite reflectors. Because there are approximately 276 channels in the VHTR core from which helium exits into the LP and a total of 155 support posts, the flow field in the LP includes cross flow, multiple jet flow interaction, flow stagnation zones, vortex interaction, vortex shedding, entrainment, large variation in Reynolds number (Re), recirculation, and mixing enhancement and suppression regions. For such a complex flow field, experimental results at operating conditions are not currently available. Instead, the objective of this paper is to numerically simulate the flow field in the LP of a prismatic core VHTR using the Sandia National Laboratories Fuego, which is a 3D, massively parallel generalized computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code with numerous turbulence and buoyancy models and simulation capabilities for complex gas flow fields, with and without thermal effects. The code predictions for simpler flow fields of single and swirling gas jets, with and without a cross flow, are validated using reported experimental data and theory. The key processes in the LP are identified using phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT). It may be argued that a CFD code that accurately simulates simplified, single-effect flow fields with increasing complexity is likely to adequately model the complex flow field in the VHTR LP, subject to a future experimental validation. The PIRT process and spatial and temporal discretizations implemented in the present analysis using Fuego established confidence in the validation and verification (V and V) calculations and in the conclusions reached based on the simulation results. The performed calculations included the helicoid vortex swirl model, the dynamic Smagorinsky large eddy simulation (LES) turbulence model, participating media radiation (PMR), and 1D conjugate heat transfer (CHT). The full-scale, half-symmetry LP mesh used in the LP simulation included unstructured hexahedral elements and accounted for the graphite posts, the helium jets, the exterior walls, and the bottom plate with an adiabatic outer surface. Results indicated significant enhancements in heat transfer, flow mixing, and entrainment in the VHTR LP when using swirling inserts at the exit of the helium flow channels into the LP. The impact of using various swirl angles on the flow mixing and heat transfer in the LP is qualified, including the formation of the central recirculation zone (CRZ), and the effect of LP height. Results also showed that in addition to the enhanced mixing, the swirling inserts result in negligible additional pressure losses and are likely to eliminate the formation of hot spots.

El-Genk, Mohamed S. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Rodriguez, Salvador B.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Progress Report, December 2010: Improved Site Characterization And Storage Prediction Through Stochastic Inversion Of Time-Lapse Geophysical And Geochemical Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the last project six months, our project activities have concentrated on three areas: (1) performing a stochastic inversion of pattern 16 seismic data to deduce reservoir permeability, (2) development of the geochemical inversion strategy and implementation of associated software, and (3) completing the software implementation of TProGS and the geostatistical analysis that provides the information needed when using the software to produce realizations of the Midale reservoir. The report partially the following deliverables: D2: Model development: MCMC tool (synthetic fluid chemistry data); deliverable completed. D4: Model development/verification: MCMC tool (TProGS, field seismic/chemistry data) work product; deliverable requirements partially fulfilled. D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product; deliverable requirements partially fulfilled. When completed, our completed stochastic inversion tool will explicitly integrate reactive transport modeling, facies-based geostatistical methods, and a novel stochastic inversion technique to optimize agreement between observed and predicted storage performance. Such optimization will be accomplished through stepwise refinement of: (1) the reservoir model - principally its permeability magnitude and heterogeneity - and (2) geochemical parameters - primarily key mineral volume fractions and kinetic data. We anticipate that these refinements will facilitate significantly improved history matching and forward modeling of CO{sub 2} storage. Our tool uses the Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methodology. Deliverable D1, previously submitted as a report titled ''Development of a Stochastic Inversion Tool To Optimize Agreement Between The Observed And Predicted Seismic Response To CO{sub 2} Injection/Migration in the Weyburn-Midale Project'' (Ramirez et al., 2009), described the stochastic inversion approach that will identify reservoir models that optimize agreement between the observed and predicted seismic response. The software that implements this approach has been completed, tested, and used to process seismic data from pattern 16. A previously submitted report titled ''Model verification: synthetic single pattern simulations using seismic reflection data'', Ramirez et al. 2010, partially fulfilled deliverable D3 by summarizing verification activities that evaluate the performance of the seismic software and its ability to recover reservoir model permeabilities using synthetic seismic reflection data. A future progress report will similarly describe summarizing verification activities of the geochemical inversion software, thereby completing deliverable D3. This document includes a chapter that shows and discusses permeability models produced by seismic inversion that used seismic data from pattern 16 in Phase 1A. It partially fulfills deliverable D5: Field-based single-pattern simulations work product. The D5 work product is supposed to summarize the results of applying NUFT/MCMC to refine the reservoir model and geochemical parameters by optimizing observation/prediction agreement for the seismic/geochemical response to CO{sub 2} injection/migration within a single pattern of Phase 1A/1B. A future progress report will show inversion results for the same pattern using geochemical data, thereby completing deliverable D5. This document also contains a chapter that fulfills deliverable D2: Model development: MCMC tool (synthetic fluid chemistry data). The chapter will summarize model development activities required to facilitate application of NUFT/MCMC to optimize agreement between the observed and predicted geochemical response to CO{sub 2} injection/migration. Lastly, this document also contains a chapter that partially fulfills deliverable D4: Model development/verification: MCMC tool (TProGS, field seismic/chemistry data) work product. This work product is supposed to summarize model development activities required for (1) application of TProGS to Weyburn, (2) use of TProGS within the MCMC tool, and (3) application of the MCMC tool to address field seismic and g

Ramirez, A; Mcnab, W; Carle, S; Hao, Y; White, D; Johnson, J

2010-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

137

On-Line Dissolved Gas Analysis in High-Pressure Fluid-Filled Cables  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highly reliable underground transmission lines are essential to deliver power consistently. Reliability may be affected as underground laminar dielectric cable circuits age and their condition degenerates. High-pressure fluid-filled (HPFF) pipe-type cable systems have been the preferred high-voltage transmission cable type in North America from the earliest transmission cable installations in the 1930s through the late 1990s and still account for the largest percentage (80%) of installed length. Although...

2009-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

138

Isotopic Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Isotopic Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Isotopic Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of

139

SRM -? Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... These reference fluid formulations characterize the behavior of broad ranges of chemically similar fluids; in this way data on propane, for example ...

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Isotopic Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Isotopic Analysis- Fluid At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Isotopic Analysis- Fluid Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Analysis of drilling fluid rheology and tool joint effect to reduce errors in hydraulics calculations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study presents a simplified and accurate procedure for selecting the rheological model which best fits the rheological properties of a given non- Newtonian fluid and introduces five new approaches to correct for tool joint losses from expansion and contraction when hydraulics is calculated. The new approaches are enlargement and contraction (E&C), equivalent diameter (ED), two different (2IDs), enlargement and contraction plus equivalent diameter (E&C+ED), and enlargement and contraction plus two different IDs (E&C+2IDs). In addition to the Newtonian model, seven major non-Newtonian rheological models (Bingham plastic, Power law, API, Herschel-Bulkley, Unified, Robertson and Stiff, and Casson) provide alternatives for selecting the model that most accurately represents the shear-stress/shear-rate relationship for a given non- Newtonian fluid. The project assumes that the model which gives the lowest absolute average percent error (EAAP) between the measured and calculated shear stresses is the best one for a given non-Newtonian fluid. The results are of great importance in achieving correct results for pressure drop and hydraulics calculations and the results are that the API rheological model (RP 13D) provides, in general, the best prediction of rheological behavior for the mud samples considered (EAAP=1.51), followed by the Herschel-Bulkley, Robertson and Stiff, and Unified models. Results also show that corrections with E&C+2IDs and API hydraulics calculation give a good approximation to measured pump pressure with 9% of difference between measured and calculated data.

Viloria Ochoa, Marilyn

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Computational Fluid Dynamics in Support of the SNS Liquid Mercury Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Experimental and computational thermal-hydraulic research is underway to support the liquid mercury target design for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) facility. The SNS target will be subjected to internal nuclear heat generation that results from pulsed proton beam collisions with the mercury nuclei. Recirculation and stagnation zones within the target are of particular concern because of the likelihood that they will result in local hot spots and diminished heat removal from the target structure. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models are being used as a part of this research. Recent improvements to the 3D target model include the addition of the flow adapter which joins the inlet/outlet coolant pipes to the target body and an updated heat load distribution at the new baseline proton beam power level of 2 MW. Two thermal-hydraulic experiments are planned to validate the CFD model.

Siman-Tov, M.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L.

1999-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

143

A Robust Four-Fluid Transient Flow Simulator as an Analysis and Decision Making Tool for Dynamic Kill Operation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The worst scenario of drilling operation is blowout which is uncontrolled flow of formation fluid into the wellbore. Blowouts result in environmental damage with potential risk of injuries and fatalities. Although not all blowouts result in disaster, outcomes of blowouts are unknown and should be studied before starting an operation. Plans should be available to prevent blowouts or provide safe and secure ways of controlling the well before the drilling operation starts. The plan should include procedures in case of any blowout incident as a proactive measure. A few commercial softwares are available in the industry for dynamic kill and transient modeling. All models are proprietary and very complex which reduces the flexibility of the program for specific cases. The purpose of this study is to develop a pseudo transient hydraulic simulator for dynamic kill operations. The idea and concept is to consider the flow of each phase as a single phase flow. The summation of hydrostatic and frictional pressure of each phase determines the bottomhole pressure during the dynamic kill operation. The simulator should be versatile and capable of handling special cases that may encounter during blowouts. Some of the main features of the proposed dynamic kill simulator include; quick and robust simulation, fluid properties are corrected for pressure and temperature, sensitivity analysis can be performed through slide bars, and capable of handling variety of wellbore trajectories. The results from the proposed simulator were compared to the result of commercial software, OLGA ABC. The results were in agreement with each other. It is recommended to apply the simulator for operations with required kill fluid volumes of one to two wellbore volumes.

Haghshenas, Arash

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

GEOTHERMAL FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: GEOTHERMAL FLUID PROPENE AND PROPANE: INDICATORS OF FLUID Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The use of fluid inclusion gas analysis propene/propene ratios is investigated. Ratios of these species are affected by geothermal fluid temperature and oxidations state. Our purpose is to determine if analyses of these species in fluid inclusions these species to can be used to interpret fluid type, history, or process. Analyses were performed on drill cuttings at 20ft intervals from four Coso geothermal wells. Two wells are good producers, one has cold-water entrants in the production zone, and the fourth is a non-producer. The ratios show distinct differences between

145

Analysis of fluid flow and heat transfer in a rib grit roughened surface solar air heater using CFD  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the study of fluid flow and heat transfer in a solar air heater by using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) which reduces time and cost. Lower side of collector plate is made rough with metal ribs of circular, square and triangular cross-section, having 60 inclinations to the air flow. The grit rib elements are fixed on the surface in staggered manner to form defined grid. The system and operating parameters studied are: e/D{sub h} = 0.044, p/e = 17.5 and l/s = 1.72, for the Reynolds number range 3600-17,000. To validate CFD results, experimental investigations were carried out in the laboratory. It is found that experimental and CFD analysis results give the good agreement. The optimization of rib geometry and its angle of attack is also done. The square cross-section ribs with 58 angle of attack give maximum heat transfer. The percentage enhancement in the heat transfer for square plate over smooth surface is 30%. (author)

Karmare, S.V. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Government College Engineering, Karad 415 124, Maharashtra (India); Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra (India); Tikekar, A.N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Walchand College of Engineering, Sangli (India); Shivaji University, Kolhapur, Maharashtra (India)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

146

Fluid-Rock Characterization for NMR Well Logging and Special Core Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this effort is to develop, build and test a high-speed drilling motor that can meet the performance guidelines of the announcement, namely: 'The motors are expected to rotate at a minimum of 10,000 rpm, have an OD no larger than 7 inches and work downhole continuously for at least 100 hours. The motor must have common oilfield thread connections capable of making up to a drill bit and bottomhole assembly. The motor must be capable of transmitting drilling fluid through the motor'. To these goals, APS would add that the motor must be economically viable, in terms of both its manufacturing and maintenance costs, and be applicable to as broad a range of markets as possible. APS has taken the approach of using a system using planetary gears to increase the speed of a conventional mud motor to 10,000 rpm. The mud flow is directed around the outside of the gear train, and a unique flow diversion system has been employed. A prototype of the motor was built and tested in APS's high-pressure flow loop. The motor operated per the model up to {approx}4200 rpm. At that point a bearing seized and the performance was severely degraded. The motor is being rebuilt and will be retested outside of this program.

George Hirasaki; Kishore Mohanty

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

147

Analysis Of Residence Time Distribution Of Fluid Flow By Axial Dispersion Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive tracer {sup 82}Br in the form of KBr-82 with activity {+-} 1 mCi has been injected into steel pipeline to qualify the extent dispersion of water flowing inside it. Internal diameter of the pipe is 3 in. The water source was originated from water tank through which the water flow gravitically into the pipeline. Two collimated sodium iodide detectors were used in this experiment each of which was placed on the top of the pipeline at the distance of 8 and 11 m from injection point respectively. Residence time distribution (RTD) curves obtained from injection of tracer are elaborated numerically to find information of the fluid flow properties. The transit time of tracer calculated from the mean residence time (MRT) of each RTD curves is 14.9 s, therefore the flow velocity of the water is 0.2 m/s. The dispersion number, D/uL, for each RTD curve estimated by using axial dispersion model are 0.055 and 0.06 respectively. These calculations are performed after fitting the simulated axial dispersion model on the experiment curves. These results indicated that the extent of dispersion of water flowing in the pipeline is in the category of intermediate.

Sugiharto [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia); Centre for Applications of Isotopes and Radiation Technology-National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jl. Lebak Bulus Raya No. 49, Jakarta 12440 (Indonesia); Su'ud, Zaki; Kurniadi, Rizal; Waris, Abdul [Centre for Applications of Isotopes and Radiation Technology-National Nuclear Energy Agency, Jl. Lebak Bulus Raya No. 49, Jakarta 12440 (Indonesia); Abidin, Zainal [Department of Physics, Faculty of Mathematics and Natural Sciences, Bandung Institute of Technology, Jl. Ganesha 10, Bandung 40132 (Indonesia)

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

148

Proteomic analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid proteins from mice infected with Francisella tularensis ssp novicida  

SciTech Connect

Francisella tularensis causes the zoonosis tularemia in humans and is one of the most virulent bacterial pathogens. We utilized a global proteomic approach to characterize protein changes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from mice exposed to one of three organisms, F. tularensis ssp. novicida, an avirulent mutant of F. tularensis ssp. novicida (F.t. novicida-mglA); and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The composition of BALF proteins was altered following infection, including proteins involved in neutrophil activation, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses. Components of the innate immune response were induced including the acute phase response and the complement system, however the timing of their induction varied. Francisella tularensis ssp. novicida infected mice do not appear to have an effective innate immune response in the first hours of infection, however within 24 hours they show an upregulation of innate immune response proteins. This delayed response is in contrast to P. aeruginosa infected animals which show an early innate immune response. Likewise, F.t. novicida-mglA infection initiates an early innate immune response, however this response is dimished by 24 hours. Finally, this study identifies several candidate biomarkers, including Chitinase 3-like-1 (CHI3L1 or YKL-40) and peroxiredoxin 1, that are associated with F. tularensis ssp. novicida but not P. aeruginosa infection.

Varnum, Susan M.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Pounds, Joel G.; Moore, Ronald J.; Smith, Richard D.; Frevert, Charles; Skerret, Shawn J.; Wunschel, David S.

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

149

Performance analysis of developed vegetable-based cutting fluids by D-optimal experimental design in turning process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study is to determine the performances of developed vegetable-based cutting fluids VBCFs evaluated as a categorical factor with mineral and semi-synthetic cutting fluids CFs. D-optimal experimental design method in machining was used ... Keywords: D-optimal, EP additive, cutting force, surface roughness, turning, vegetable-based cutting fluids

Emel Kuram; M. Huseyin Cetin; Babur Ozcelik; Erhan Demirbas

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Abstract Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area has resulted in the development of distinctive trace element signatures. Geochemical analysis of soil sample, shallow temperature gradient drill hole cuttings and deep drill hole cutting provides a three dimensional perspective of trace element distributions within the system. Distributions of As, Hg and Li provide the clearest expression of hydrothermal activity. Comparison of these distribution

151

Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration. 1 fig.

Smith, D.D.; Hiller, J.M.

1998-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

152

Surfactant/detergent titration analysis method and apparatus for machine working fluids, surfactant-containing wastewater and the like  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an improved method and related apparatus for quantitatively analyzing machine working fluids and other aqueous compositions such as wastewater which contain various mixtures of cationic, neutral, and/or anionic surfactants, soluble soaps, and the like. The method utilizes a single-phase, non-aqueous, reactive titration composition containing water insoluble bismuth nitrate dissolved in glycerol for the titration reactant. The chemical reaction of the bismuth ion and glycerol with the surfactant in the test solutions results in formation of micelles, changes in micelle size, and the formation of insoluble bismuth soaps. These soaps are quantified by physical and chemical changes in the aqueous test solution. Both classical potentiometric analysis and turbidity measurements have been used as sensing techniques to determine the quantity of surfactant present in test solutions. This method is amenable to the analysis of various types of new, in-use, dirty or decomposed surfactants and detergents. It is a quick and efficient method utilizing a single-phase reaction without needing a separate extraction from the aqueous solution. It is adaptable to automated control with simple and reliable sensing methods. The method is applicable to a variety of compositions with concentrations from about 1% to about 10% weight. It is also applicable to the analysis of waste water containing surfactants with appropriate pre-treatments for concentration.

Smith, Douglas D. (Knoxville, TN); Hiller, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Experimental Geochemical Studies Relevant to Carbon Sequestration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Geochemical Studies Relevant to Geochemical Studies Relevant to Carbon Sequestration James G. Blencoe (blencoejg@ornl.gov; 865-574-7041) David R. Cole (coledr@ornl.gov; 865-574-5473) Juske Horita (horitaj@ornl.gov; 865-576-2750) Geochemistry Group Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Building 4500-S Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6110 Gerilynn R. Moline (molinegr@ornl.gov; 865-576-5134) Environmental Sciences Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008, Building 1505 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6038 Introduction Evidence is mounting that rising levels of atmospheric CO 2 will have profound effects on future global climates (1-2) . Consequently, many experts agree that technologies are needed to slow, and ultimately stop, further buildup (3-5) . One of the strategies proposed to achieve this aim

154

Frequency response analysis of fluid control systems for parabolic-trough solar collectors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A linearized steady-state frequency response is derived for parabolic-trough collectors and for connecting piping that can be used in standard gain-phase analyses to evaluate system stability and closed-loop frequency response. The frequency-response characteristics of a typical collector string and piping are used in a gain-phase analysis to get some insight into the effect on system stability of various system parameters such as controller gain, sensor and controller-time constants, and sensor location.

Schindwolf, R.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Steam Generator Management Program: Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of a Recirculating Steam Generator Using Commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics Software  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research was to demonstrate that a commercial computational fluid dynamics code can be set up to model the thermal-hydraulic physics that occur during the operation of a steam generator. Specific complexities in steam-generator thermal-hydraulic modeling include: phase change and two-phase fluid mechanics, hydrodynamic representation of the tube bundle, and thermal coupling between the primary and secondary sides. A commercial computational fluid dynamics code was used without any s...

2012-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

156

MAX Fluid Dynamics facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MAX Fluid Dynamics facility MAX Fluid Dynamics facility Capabilities Engineering Experimentation Reactor Safety Testing and Analysis Overview Nuclear Reactor Severe Accident Experiments MAX NSTF SNAKE Aerosol Experiments System Components Laser Applications Robots Applications Other Facilities Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr MAX Fluid Dynamics facility Providing high resolution data for development of computational tools that model fluid flow and heat transfer within complex systems such as the core of a nuclear reactor. 1 2 3 4 5 Hot and cold air jets are mixed within a glass tank while laser-based anemometers and a high-speed infrared camera characterize fluid flow and heat transfer behavior. Click on image to view larger size image.

157

Modeling and analysis of transient vehicle underhood thermo- hydrodynamic events using computational fluid dynamics and high performance computing.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work has explored the preliminary design of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool for the analysis of transient vehicle underhood thermo-hydrodynamic events using high performance computing platforms. The goal of this tool will be to extend the capabilities of an existing established CFD code, STAR-CD, allowing the car manufacturers to analyze the impact of transient operational events on the underhood thermal management by exploiting the computational efficiency of modern high performance computing systems. In particular, the project has focused on the CFD modeling of the radiator behavior during a specified transient. The 3-D radiator calculations were performed using STAR-CD, which can perform both steady-state and transient calculations, on the cluster computer available at ANL in the Nuclear Engineering Division. Specified transient boundary conditions, based on experimental data provided by Adapco and DaimlerChrysler were used. The possibility of using STAR-CD in a transient mode for the entire period of time analyzed has been compared with other strategies which involve the use of STAR-CD in a steady-state mode at specified time intervals, while transient heat transfer calculations would be performed for the rest of the time. The results of these calculations have been compared with the experimental data provided by Adapco/DaimlerChrysler and recommendations for future development of an optimal strategy for the CFD modeling of transient thermo-hydrodynamic events have been made. The results of this work open the way for the development of a CFD tool for the transient analysis of underhood thermo-hydrodynamic events, which will allow the integrated transient thermal analysis of the entire cooling system, including both the engine block and the radiator, on high performance computing systems.

Tentner, A.; Froehle, P.; Wang, C.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Modeling and analysis of transient vehicle underhood thermo - hydrodynamic events using computational fluid dynamics and high performance computing.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work has explored the preliminary design of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tool for the analysis of transient vehicle underhood thermo-hydrodynamic events using high performance computing platforms. The goal of this tool will be to extend the capabilities of an existing established CFD code, STAR-CD, allowing the car manufacturers to analyze the impact of transient operational events on the underhood thermal management by exploiting the computational efficiency of modern high performance computing systems. In particular, the project has focused on the CFD modeling of the radiator behavior during a specified transient. The 3-D radiator calculations were performed using STAR-CD, which can perform both steady-state and transient calculations, on the cluster computer available at ANL in the Nuclear Engineering Division. Specified transient boundary conditions, based on experimental data provided by Adapco and DaimlerChrysler were used. The possibility of using STAR-CD in a transient mode for the entire period of time analyzed has been compared with other strategies which involve the use of STAR-CD in a steady-state mode at specified time intervals, while transient heat transfer calculations would be performed for the rest of the time. The results of these calculations have been compared with the experimental data provided by Adapco/DaimlerChrysler and recommendations for future development of an optimal strategy for the CFD modeling of transient thermo-hydrodynamic events have been made. The results of this work open the way for the development of a CFD tool for the transient analysis of underhood thermo-hydrodynamic events, which will allow the integrated transient thermal analysis of the entire cooling system, including both the engine block and the radiator, on high performance computing systems.

Froehle, P.; Tentner, A.; Wang, C.

2003-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

159

Hybridized enriched space-time finite element method for analysis of thin-walled structures immersed in generalized Newtonian fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper addresses the numerical treatment of a specific class of fluid-structure interaction problems: flow-immersed thin structures undergoing considerable motion and deformation. The simultaneous solution procedure uses a mixed-hybrid velocity-based ... Keywords: Embedded thin structure, Enriched space-time approximation, Fluid-structure interaction, Strong coupling

A. Zilian; H. Netuzhylov

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Temporal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Trace Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Element Geochemical Zoning in the Roosevelt Hot Springs Thermal Area, Utah Abstract Chemical interaction of thermal brines with reservoir rock in the Roosevelt Hot Springs...

162

Fluid turbine  

SciTech Connect

A fluid turbine designed for increased power output includes an annular housing provided with a semi-spherical dome for directing incoming fluid flow to impinge on a plurality of rotor blades within the housing fixed to a vertical output shaft. An angle on the order of between 5 to 85/sup 0/, in the direction of rotation of the shaft, exists between the upper (Leading) and lower (Trailing) edges of each blade. The blades are manufactured from a plurality of aerodynamically-shaped, radially spaced ribs covered with a skin. The leading edge of each rib is curved, while the trailing edge is straight. The straight edge of the ribs in each blade approach a vertical plane through the vertical axis of the housing output shaft as the ribs progress radially inwardly towards the output shaft. The housing has fluid exit passages in its base so that deenergized fluid can be quickly flushed from the housing by the downwardly directed flow in combination with the novel blade configuration, which acts as a screw or force multiplier, to expel deenergized fluid. The airfoil shaped ribs also provide the blades with a contour for increasing the fluid velocity on the underside of the blades adjacent the fluid exit passage to aid in expelling the deenergized air while providing the turbine with both impulse and axial-flow, fluid impingement on the blades, resulting in a force vector of increased magnitude. A downwardly directed, substantially semi-cylindrical deflector frame connected to the housing blocks the path of flow of ambient fluid to create a low pressure area beneath the base to aid in continuously drawing fluid into the housing at high velocity to impinge on the rotor blades. The increased flow velocity and force on the blades along with the enhanced removal of deenergized fluid results in increased power output of the turbine.

Lebost, B.A.

1980-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

163

Real-time quadrupole mass spectrometer analysis of gas in borehole fluid samples acquired using the U-Tube sampling methodology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industries have long used tagged drilling fluids as anindicator of drilling fluid contamination [Withjack andNon-native fluids introduced by drilling and completion

Freifeld, Barry M.; Trautz, Robert C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Cutting Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 6   Cutting fluids for aluminum...Table 6 Cutting fluids for aluminum Type of lubricant Principal ingredients Viscosity range Application; maintenance Relative effectiveness Necessary precautions Mineral oils (fatty-additive type preferred) Mineral oil, lard, or neats-foot oil; oleic acid

165

Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Trace Element Analysis At Socorro Mountain Area (Owens, Et Al., 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Socorro Mountain Area Exploration Technique Trace Element Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes In order to determine which of the faults in these regions were active and open to hydrothermal fluid circulation, we have employed selective ion geochemistry that is a new geochemical method capable of detecting anomalous concentrations for up to 47 elements transported to soils by geochemical cells or low pressure vapors. Enzyme leach and Terrasol leach are two such techniques. This method has to datae been mostly applied to

166

Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Inverse Modeling Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Inverse Modeling Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Fluid Imaging Project Description EGS has been defined as enhanced reservoirs that have been created to extract economical amounts of heat from low permeability and/or porosity geothermal resources. Critical to the success of EGS is the successful manipulation of fluids in the subsurface to enhance permeability. Knowledge in the change in volume and location of fluids in the rocks and fractures (both natural and induced) will be needed to manage injection strategies such as the number and location of step out wells, in-fill wells and the ratio of injection to production wells. The key difficulty in manipulating fluids has been our inability to reliably predict their locations, movements and concentrations. We believe combining data from MEQ and electrical surveys has the potential to overcome these problems and can meet many of the above needs, economically. Induced seismicity is currently viewed as one of the essential methods for inferring the success of creating fracture permeability and fluid paths during large scale EGS injections. Fluids are obviously playing a critical role in inducing the seismicity, however, other effects such as thermal, geochemical and stress redistribution, etc. may also play a role.

167

The U-tube: A new paradigm in borehole fluid sampling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid samples from deep boreholes can provide insights into subsurface physical, chemical, and biological conditions. Recovery of intact, minimally altered aliquots of subsurface fluids is required for analysis of aqueous chemistry, isotopic composition, and dissolved gases, and for microbial community characterization. Unfortunately, for many reasons, collecting geofluids poses a number of challenges, from formation contamination by drilling to maintaining integrity during recovery from depths. Not only are there substantial engineering issues in retrieval of a representative sample, but there is often the practical reality that fluid sampling is just one of many activities planned for deep boreholes. The U-tube geochemical sampling system presents a new paradigm for deep borehole fluid sampling. Because the system is small, its ability to integrate with other measurement systems and technologies opens up numerous possibilities for multifunctional integrated wellbore completions. To date, the U-tube has been successfully deployed at four different field sites, each with a different deployment modality, at depths from 260 m to 2 km. While the U-tube has proven to be highly versatile, these installations have resulted in data that provide additional insights for improving future U-tube deployments.

Freifeld, B. M.

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Analysis of hydraulic power transduction in regenerative rotary shock absorbers as function of working fluid kinematic viscosity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This investigation seeks to investigate the relationship of kinematic fluid viscosity to the effective power transduction seen by a hydraulic motor. Applications of this research specifically relate to energy recovery from ...

Avadhany, Shakeel N

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

HYDRAULIC FLUIDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This fact sheet answers the most frequently asked health questions (FAQs) about hydraulic fluids. For more information, call the ATSDR Information Center at 1-888-422-8737. This fact sheet is one in a series of summaries about hazardous substances and their health effects. This information is important because this substance may harm you. The effects of exposure to any hazardous substance depend on the dose, the duration, how you are exposed, personal traits and habits, and whether other chemicals are present. HIGHLIGHTS: Exposure to hydraulic fluids occurs mainly in the workplace. Drinking certain types of hydraulic fluids can cause death in humans, and swallowing or inhaling certain types of hydraulic fluids has caused nerve damage in animals. Contact with some types of hydraulic fluids can irritate your skin or eyes. These substances have been found in at least 10 of the 1,428 National Priorities List sites identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). What are hydraulic fluids? (Pronounced ?????????????????) Hydraulic fluids are a large group of liquids made of many kinds of chemicals. They are used in automobile automatic

unknown authors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Geochemical exploration for uranium in the Red Desert, Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Geochemical exploration techniques for uranium were performed at a known deposit, the ENQ uranium deposit, which is in arkosic sandstones of the Battle Spring Formation in the Red Desert of Wyoming. Regional gross-gamma aerial data did not indicate the most favorable terrain for follow-up surveys, but instead the radionuclide distribution mapped radioactive mudstones. The /sup 234/U//sup 238/U activity ratio and total uranium concentration in ground water were successful downflow indicators of the ENQ deposit. Helium concentration increased downflow in the ground water flowing from the deposit, while Cu, Pb, and Ba decreased. Radon emanometric techniques generally produced data that coincided with the equivalent uranium concentrations at shallow depth. Helium content in soil was interpreted to reflect local lithology and gaseous migration. Multielement geochemical analyses on soils were effective in delineating the general vicinity of the orebody. Factor analysis was used to recognize three lithologic subgroups. Leachable uranium in soils was the best indicator of subsurface mineralization for the entire subregional area. Equivalent uranium, as determined from the gamma-spectral borehole logs, revealed a consistent dispersion pattern within the host sand of the Battle Spring Formation, whereas gross gamma logs could not detect the subtle gradients in radioelement content. Halo models developed to explain the distribution of helium, radon, radioelements, and trace elements demonstrate uranium itself as the most mobile indicator. Radon and helium appear to reflect local generation from radium accumulations. Vertical leakage due to hydraulic flow against an impermeable barrier is interpreted to be the major secondary redistribution process responsible for the measureable surface signals.

Pacer, J.C.; Bramlett, L.; Moll, S.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Up-Scaling Geochemical Reaction Rates for Carbon Dioxide (CO2) in Deep Saline Aquifers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The overall goal of the project was to bridge the gap between our knowledge of small-scale geochemical reaction rates and reaction rates meaningful for modeling transport at core scales. The working hypothesis was that reaction rates, determined from laboratory measurements based upon reactions typically conducted in well mixed batch reactors using pulverized reactive media may be significantly changed in in situ porous media flow due to rock microstructure heterogeneity. Specifically we hypothesized that, generally, reactive mineral surfaces are not uniformly accessible to reactive fluids due to the random deposition of mineral grains and to the variation in flow rates within a pore network. Expected bulk reaction rates would therefore have to be correctly up-scaled to reflect such heterogeneity. The specific objective was to develop a computational tool that integrates existing measurement capabilities with pore-scale network models of fluid flow and reactive transport. The existing measurement capabilities to be integrated consisted of (a) pore space morphology, (b) rock mineralogy, and (c) geochemical reaction rates. The objective was accomplished by: (1) characterizing sedimentary sandstone rock morphology using X-ray computed microtomography, (2) mapping rock mineralogy using back-scattered electron microscopy (BSE), X-ray dispersive spectroscopy (EDX) and CMT, (3) characterizing pore-accessible reactive mineral surface area, and (4) creating network models to model acidic CO{sub 2} saturated brine injection into the sandstone rock samples.

Lindquist, W Brent

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

172

Microbial community structure of hydrothermal deposits from geochemically different vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the effects of local fluid geochemistry on microbial communities associated with active hydrothermal vent deposits, we examined the archaeal and bacterial communities of 12 samples collected from two very different vent fields: the basalt-hosted Lucky Strike (37 17'N, 32 16.3'W, depth 1600-1750 m) and the ultramafic-hosted Rainbow (36 13'N, 33 54.1'W, depth 2270-2330 m) vent fields along the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR). Using multiplexed barcoded pyrosequencing of the variable region 4 (V4) of the 16S rRNA genes, we show statistically significant differences between the archaeal and bacterial communities associated with the different vent fields. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays of the functional gene diagnostic for methanogenesis (mcrA), as well as geochemical modelling to predict pore fluid chemistries within the deposits, support the pyrosequencing observations. Collectively, these results show that the less reduced, hydrogen-poor fluids at Lucky Strike limit colonization by strict anaerobes such as methanogens, and allow for hyperthermophilic microaerophiles, like Aeropyrum. In contrast, the hydrogen-rich reducing vent fluids at the ultramafic-influenced Rainbow vent field support the prevalence of methanogens and other hydrogen-oxidizing thermophiles at this site. These results demonstrate that biogeographical patterns of hydrothermal vent microorganisms are shaped in part by large scale geological and geochemical processes.

Flores, Gilberto E [Portland State University; Campbell, James H [ORNL; Kirshtein, Julie D [United States Geological Survey, Reston, VA; Meneghin, Jennifer [Portland State University; Podar, Mircea [ORNL; Steinberg, Joshua [Oregon Episcopal School, Portland, OR; Seewald, Jeffrey S [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Tivey, Margaret Kingston [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution (WHOI), Woods Hole, MA; Voytek, Mary A [United States Geological Survey & National Aeronautics and Space Administration; Reysenbach, Anna-Louise [Portland State University; Yang, Zamin Koo [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Thermodynamic Data for Geochemical Modeling of Carbonate Reactions Associated with CO2 Sequestration Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Permanent storage of anthropogenic CO2 in deep geologic formations is being considered as a means to reduce the concentration of atmospheric CO2 and thus its contribution to global climate change. To ensure safe and effective geologic sequestration, numerous studies have been completed of the extent to which the CO2 migrates within geologic formations and what physical and geochemical changes occur in these formations when CO2 is injected. Sophisticated, computerized reservoir simulations are used as part of field site and laboratory CO2 sequestration studies. These simulations use coupled multiphase flow-reactive chemical transport models and/or standalone (i.e., no coupled fluid transport) geochemical models to calculate gas solubility, aqueous complexation, reduction/oxidation (redox), and/or mineral solubility reactions related to CO2 injection and sequestration. Thermodynamic data are critical inputs to modeling geochemical processes. The adequacy of thermodynamic data for carbonate compounds has been identified as an important data requirement for the successful application of these geochemical reaction models to CO2 sequestration. A review of thermodynamic data for CO2 gas and carbonate aqueous species and minerals present in published data compilations and databases used in geochemical reaction models was therefore completed. Published studies that describe mineralogical analyses from CO2 sequestration field and natural analogue sites and laboratory studies were also reviewed to identify specific carbonate minerals that are important to CO2 sequestration reactions and therefore require thermodynamic data. The results of the literature review indicated that an extensive thermodynamic database exists for CO2 and CH4 gases, carbonate aqueous species, and carbonate minerals. Values of ?fG298 and/or log Kr,298 are available for essentially all of these compounds. However, log Kr,T or heat capacity values at temperatures above 298 K exist for less than approximately one-third of these compounds. Because the temperatures of host formations that will be used for CO2 injection and sequestration will be at temperatures in the range of 50C to 100C or greater, the lack of high temperature thermodynamic values for key carbonate compounds especially minerals, will impact the accuracy of some modeling calculations.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Cantrell, Kirk J.; McGrail, B. Peter

2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

174

Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Details Activities (4) Areas (4) Regions (0) Abstract: A system for analysis of inclusion gas contents based upon quadrupole mass spectrometry has been designed, assembled and tested during the first 7 months of funding. The system is currently being tested and calibrated using inclusions with known gas contents from active geothermal systems. Analyses are in progress on inclusions from the Salton Sea, Valles Caldera, Geysers, and Coso geothermal systems. Author(s): Mckibben, M. A.

175

Application of direct-fitting, mass-integral, and multi-rate methods to analysis of flowing fluid electric conductivity logs from Horonobe, Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

traces of drilling mud) and formation fluid flowing into theof drilling mud in the wellbore may impact fluid logging twodrilling mud itself is presumably significantly denser than formation fluid,

Doughty, C.; Tsang, C.-F.; Hatanaka, K.; Yabuuchi, S.; Kurikami, H.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Geochemical Sampling of Thermal Waters in Nevada Abstract There are 1000 thermal springs in Nevada for which a location is known, but for which there are no available temperature (or chemical) measurements. Although many of these sites are within known geothermal areas and are located near springs for which temperature and/or geochemical data are available for one of the springs, many of these sites are not so located and require evaluation before the geothermal potential of the area can be assessed. In order to begin filling in data gaps, water sampling commenced in 2002 when over 70 analyses were obtained from springs with previously

177

Molecular geomicrobiology: genes and geochemical cycling Jennifer Macalady 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Frontiers Molecular geomicrobiology: genes and geochemical cycling Jennifer Macalady 1 , Jillian F occurs. Yet, the field of molecular geomicrobiology remains in its infancy. In the foreseeable future, merging of modern biogeochemistry with molecularly resolved ecological studies will inspire

Macalady, Jenn

178

A Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal System, Danakil Depression, Eritrea Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Geochemical Reconnaissance Of The Alid Volcaniccenter And Geothermal System, Danakil Depression, Eritrea Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Geological and geochemical studies indicate that a high-temperature geothermalsystem underlies the Alid volcanic center in the northern Danakil depression of Eritrea Alid is avery late-Pleistocene structural dome formed by shallow intrusion of rhyolitic magma some of which vented as lavas and pyroclastic flows Fumaroles and boiling pools distributed widelyover an area of ~10 km2 on the northern half of Alid suggest that an activehydrothermal system underlies much of that part of

179

Final Report, DE-FG02-92ER14261, Pore Scale Geometric and Fluid Distribution Analysis  

SciTech Connect

The elucidation of the relationship between pore scale structure and fluid flow in porous media is a fundamental problem of long standing interest. Incomplete characterization of medium properties continues to be a limiting factor in accurate field scale simulations. The accomplishments of this grant have kept us at the forefront in investigating the applicability of X-ray computed microtomography (XCMT) as a tool for contributing to the understanding of this relationship. Specific accomplishments have been achieved in four areas: - development of numerical algorithms (largely in the field of computational geometry) to provide automated recognition of and measurements on features of interest in the pore space. These algorithms have been embodied in a software package, 3DMA-Rock. - application of these algorithms to extensive studies of the pore space of sandstones. - application of these algorithms to studies of fluid (oil/water) partitioning in the pore space of Berea sandstone and polyethylene models. - technology transfer.

W. Brent Lindquist

2005-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

180

National Geochemical Survey Database | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

federal data download, atomic absorption analysis, atomic emission spectrometry, geochemistry, lithostratigraphy, neutron activation analysis, soil chemistry, unconsolidated...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Universal fluid droplet ejector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A droplet generator comprises a fluid reservoir having a side wall made of glass or quartz, and an end cap made from a silicon plate. The end cap contains a micromachined aperture through which the fluid is ejected. The side wall is thermally fused to the end cap, and no adhesive is necessary. This means that the fluid only comes into contact with the side wall and the end cap, both of which are chemically inert. Amplitudes of drive pulses received by reservoir determine the horizontal displacements of droplets relative to the ejection aperture. The drive pulses are varied such that the dropper generates a two-dimensional array of vertically-falling droplets. Vertical and horizontal interdroplet spacings may be varied in real time. Applications include droplet analysis experiments such as Millikan fractional charge searches and aerosol characterization, as well as material deposition applications.

Lee, Eric R. (Redwood City, CA); Perl, Martin L. (Palo Alto, CA)

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

182

Failure Analysis of a 345 kV High-Pressure, Fluid-Filled Cable Insulated with Laminated Paper Polypropylene at New York Power Author ity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three cable pieces of a 345-kV high-pressure, fluid-filled, laminated paper151polypropylene (LPP) cable, each nearly 3 ft in length, were received from New York Power Authority in January 2010. The Detroit Edison Company performed the dissection and analysis to address the cause(s) of the failure that occurred in late December 2009 and that was experienced by this 10.1 circuit-mile cable that had been energized in service in May 1991. One of the pieces contained the failure, and the other two were adjace...

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

183

Reservoir simulation and geochemical study of Cerro Prieto I wells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Combined reservoir simulation and geochemical data analysis are used to investigate the effects of recharge and other reservoir processes occurring in the western part of the Cerro Prieto, Mexico, geothermal field (i.e., Cerro Prieto I area). Enthalpy-based temperatures and bottomhole temperatures are calculated based on simplified models of the system, considering different reservoir boundary conditions and zones of contrasting initial temperatures and reservoir properties. By matching the computed trends with geothermometer-based temperature and enthalpy histories of producing wells, the main processes active in the western area of Cerro Prieto are identified. This part of the geothermal system is strongly influenced by nearby groundwater aquifers; cooler waters readily recharge the reservoirs. In response to exploitation, the natural influx of cold water into the shallower alpha reservoir is mainly from the west and down Fault L, while the recharge to the deeper beta reservoir in this part of the field, seems to be only lateral, from the west and possibly south. 11 refs., 12 figs.

Lippmann, M.J. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (USA)); Truesdell, A.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Fluid extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent is described. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated .beta.-diketone. In especially preferred embodiments the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide, and the chelating agent comprises a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate, or a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkylphosphine oxide. Although a trialkyl phosphate can extract lanthanides and actinides from acidic solutions, a binary mixture comprising a fluorinated .beta.-diketone and a trialkyl phosphate or a trialkylphosphine oxide tends to enhance the extraction efficiencies for actinides and lanthanides. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The method is particularly useful for extracting actinides and lanthanides from acidic solutions. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Multi-dimensional finite element code for the analysis of coupled fluid energy, and solute transport (CFEST)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program is being conducted for the Department of Energy by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. A major thrust of this program has been the study of natural aquifers as hosts for thermal energy storage and retrieval. Numerical simulation of the nonisothermal response of the host media is fundamental to the evaluation of proposed experimental designs and field test results. This report represents the primary documentation for the coupled fluid, energy and solute transport (CFEST) code. Sections of this document are devoted to the conservation equations and their numerical analogues, the input data requirements, and the verification studies completed to date.

Gupta, S.K.; Kincaid, C.T.; Meyer, P.R.; Newbill, C.A.; Cole, C.R.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Covariant analysis of Newtonian multi-fluid models for neutron stars: II Stress - energy tensors and virial theorems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 4-dimensionally covariant approach to multiconstituent Newtonian fluid dynamics presented in the preceding article of this series is developed by construction of the relevant 4-dimensional stress energy tensor whose conservation in the non-dissipative variational case is shown to be interpretable as a Noether identity of the Milne spacetime structure. The formalism is illustrated by the application to homogeneously expanding cosmological models, for which appropriately generalised local Bernouilli constants are constructed. Another application is to the Iordanski type generalisation of the Joukowski formula for the Magnus force on a vortex. Finally, at a global level, a new (formally simpler but more generally applicable) version of the ``virial theorem'' is obtained for multiconsituent -- neutron or other -- fluid star models as a special case within an extensive category of formulae whereby the time evolution of variously weighted mass moment integrals is determined by corresponding space integrals of stress tensor components, with the implication that all such stress integrals must vanish for any stationary equilibrium configuration.

Brandon Carter; Nicolas Chamel

2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

187

Thermal-fluid and electrochemical modeling and performance study of a planar solid oxide electrolysis cell : analysis on SOEC resistances, size, and inlet flow conditions.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory and Idaho National Laboratory researchers are analyzing the electrochemical and thermal-fluid behavior of solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs) for high temperature steam electrolysis using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. The major challenges facing commercialization of steam electrolysis technology are related to efficiency, cost, and durability of the SOECs. The goal of this effort is to guide the design and optimization of performance for high temperature electrolysis (HTE) systems. An SOEC module developed by FLUENT Inc. as part of their general CFD code was used for the SOEC analysis by INL. ANL has developed an independent SOEC model that combines the governing electrochemical mechanisms based on first principals to the heat transfer and fluid dynamics in the operation of SOECs. The ANL model was embedded into the commercial STAR-CD CFD software, and is being used for the analysis of SOECs by ANL. The FY06 analysis performed by ANL and reported here covered the influence of electrochemical properties, SOEC component resistances and their contributing factors, SOEC size and inlet flow conditions, and SOEC flow configurations on the efficiency and expected durability of these systems. Some of the important findings from the ANL analysis are: (1) Increasing the inlet mass flux while going to larger cells can be a compromise to overcome increasing thermal and current density gradients while increasing the cell size. This approach could be beneficial for the economics of the SOECs; (2) The presence of excess hydrogen at the SOEC inlet to avoid Ni degradation can result in a sizeable decrease in the process efficiency; (3) A parallel-flow geometry for SOEC operation (if such a thing be achieved without sealing problems) yields smaller temperature gradients and current density gradients across the cell, which is favorable for the durability of the cells; (4) Contact resistances can significantly influence the total cell resistance and cell temperatures over a large range of operating potentials. Thus it is important to identify and avoid SOEC stack conditions leading to such high resistances due to poor contacts.

Yildiz, B.; Smith, J.; Sofu, T.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

188

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute Fluxes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of Yellowstone National Park- Inferences From River Solute Fluxes Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: We present and analyze a chemical dataset that includes the concentrations and fluxes of HCO3-, SO42-, Cl-, and F- in the major rivers draining Yellowstone National Park (YNP) for the 2002-2004 water years (1 October 2001 - 30 September 2004). The total (molar) flux in all rivers decreases in the following order, HCO3- > Cl- > SO42- > F-, but each river is characterized by a distinct chemical composition, implying large-scale

189

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Hg Anomalies In Soils- A Geochemical Exploration Method For Geothermal Areas Details Activities (5) Areas (5) Regions (0) Abstract: Hg contents of soils in geothermal areas in the western U.S. were measured and a three-fold distribution was observed: peak, aureole and background. Peak values (up to several 100 ppm Hg) occur in fumaroles of vapour-dominated systems, around hot springs, and in zones overlying steeply dipping, hot-water aquifers. Aureoic values (up to several 100 ppb Hg) are found in zones surrounding the peak areas and delineate areas with shallow geothermal convection. Background values vary between 7 and 40 ppb

190

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Temporal Geochemical Variations In Volatile Emissions From Mount St Helens, Usa, 1980-1994 Details Activities (2) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fumarole discharges (95-560°C) collected from the dacite dome inside Mount St. Helens crater show temporal changes in their isotopic and chemical compositions. A ΔD vs. Δ18O plot shows that condensed waters from the gases are mixtures of meteoric and magmatic components, but that the apparent magmatic end-member in 1994 was depleted by about 7‰ in ΔD relative to the apparent end-member in 1980. Based on ΔD modeling, approximately 63% of shallow, post-1980 magma has yet to degas.

191

Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Eastern California Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: Alteration And Geochemical Zoning In Bodie Bluff, Bodie Mining District, Eastern California Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Banded, epithermal quartz-adularia veins have produced about 1.5 million ounces of gold and 7 million ounces of silver from the Bodie mining district, eastern California. The veins cut dacitic lava flows, pyroclastic rocks and intrusions. Sinter boulders occur in a graben structure at the top of Bodie Bluff and fragments of sinter and mineralized quartz veins occur in hydrothermal breccias nearby. Explosive venting evidently was part of the evolution of the ore-forming geothermal systems which, at one time,

192

A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal Area, Jalisco, Mexico Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The Sierra La Primavera, a late Pleistocene rhyolitic caldera complex in Jalisco, Mexico, contains fumaroles and large-discharge 65°C hot springs that are associated with faults related to caldera collapse and to later magma insurgence. The nearly-neutral, sodium bicarbonate, hot springs occur at low elevations at the margins of the complex, whereas the water-rich fumaroles are high and central. The Comision Federal de Electricidad de Mexico (CFE) has recently drilled two deep holes at the

193

Multielement analysis of geologic materials by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Atomic emission spectroscopy using an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) source permits the rapid acquisition of multielement geochemical data from a wide variety of geologic materials. Rocks or other solid samples are taken into solution with a four acid digestion procedure and introduced directly into the plasma; fluid samples are acidified or analyzed directly. The entire process is computer-controlled, fully-automated, and requires less than five minutes per sample for quantitative determination of 37 elements. The procedures and instrumentation employed at the ESL for multielement ICP analysis of geologic materials are described and these are intended as a guide for evaluating analytic results reported from this laboratory. The quality of geochemical data can be characterized by precision, limits of quantitative determination, and accuracy. Precision values are a measure of the repeatability of analyses. In general, major element and analyses have precision of better than 5% and trace elements of better than 10% of the amount present. (MHR)

Christensen, O.D.; Kroneman, R.L.; Capuano, R.M.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Thermo-fluid-dynamics analysis of the unit 3 Fukushima Daiichi Accident with the RELAP5\\SCDAP code.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The aim of this thesis is the analysis of the physical phenomena involved in the nuclear accident at Fukushima NPP. This study has been articulated (more)

VENTURI, FRANCESCO LINO

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Computational analysis of coupled fluid, heat, and mass transport in ferrocyanide single-shell tanks: FY 1994 interim report. Ferrocyanide Tank Safety Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer modeling study was conducted to determine whether natural convection processes in single-shell tanks containing ferrocyanide wastes could generate localized precipitation zones that significantly concentrate the major heat-generating radionuclide, {sup 137}Cs. A computer code was developed that simulates coupled fluid, heat, and single-species mass transport on a regular, orthogonal finite-difference grid. The analysis showed that development of a ``hot spot`` is critically dependent on the temperature dependence for the solubility of Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6} or CsNaNiFe(CN){sub 6}. For the normal case, where solubility increases with increasing temperature, the net effect of fluid flow, heat, and mass transport is to disperse any local zones of high heat generation rate. As a result, hot spots cannot physically develop for this case. However, assuming a retrograde solubility dependence, the simulations indicate the formation of localized deposition zones that concentrate the {sup 137}Cs near the bottom center of the tank where the temperatures are highest. Recent experimental studies suggest that Cs{sub 2}NiFe(CN){sub 6}(c) does not exhibit retrograde solubility over the temperature range 25{degree}C to 90{degree}C and NaOH concentrations to 5 M. Assuming these preliminary results are confirmed, no natural mass transport process exists for generating a hot spot in the ferrocyanide single-shell tanks.

McGrail, B.P.

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Energy variational analysis of ions in water and channels: Field theory for primitive models of complex ionic fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy variational analysis of ions in water and channels: Field theory for primitive models EnVarA energy variational analysis that combines Hamilton's least action and Rayleigh's dissipation, and ion channels. Flows are driven by a combination of electrical and chemical potentials that depend

Liu, Chun

197

The U-tube sampling methodology and real-time analysis of geofluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U-tube geochemical sampling methodology, an extension of the porous cup technique proposed by Wood [1973], provides minimally contaminated aliquots of multiphase fluids from deep reservoirs and allows for accurate determination of dissolved gas composition. The initial deployment of the U-tube during the Frio Brine Pilot CO{sub 2} storage experiment, Liberty County, Texas, obtained representative samples of brine and supercritical CO{sub 2} from a depth of 1.5 km. A quadrupole mass spectrometer provided real-time analysis of dissolved gas composition. Since the initial demonstration, the U-tube has been deployed for (1) sampling of fluids down gradient of the proposed Yucca Mountain High-Level Waste Repository, Armagosa Valley, Nevada (2) acquiring fluid samples beneath permafrost in Nunuvut Territory, Canada, and (3) at a CO{sub 2} storage demonstration project within a depleted gas reservoir, Otway Basin, Victoria, Australia. The addition of in-line high-pressure pH and EC sensors allows for continuous monitoring of fluid during sample collection. Difficulties have arisen during U-tube sampling, such as blockage of sample lines from naturally occurring waxes or from freezing conditions; however, workarounds such as solvent flushing or heating have been used to address these problems. The U-tube methodology has proven to be robust, and with careful consideration of the constraints and limitations, can provide high quality geochemical samples.

Freifeld, Barry; Perkins, Ernie; Underschultz, James; Boreham, Chris

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Testing EQ3/6 and GEMBOCHS using fluid-mineral equilibria in the wairakei geothermal system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ability of the EQ3 and EQ6 geochemical modeling codes and the GEMBOCHS thermodynamic data bases to simulate geochemical changes in the post-emplacement environment at the potential Yucca Mountain, Nevada repository is being tested using observed mineral-fluid relations in the Taupo Volcanic Zone of New Zealand. In this report, comparisons between observed equilibria and simulations of field relations in the Wairakei geothermal system are used to test the codes and data bases in high temperature systems. Analysis of trends in water and gas chemistries and well discharge characteristics with time were used to identify a set of representative water and gas analyses from zones producing at about 250{degrees}C. The most common vein minerals at this temperature are: wairakite, adularia, epidote, quartz, albite, chlorite, calcite, prehnite, and pyrite. Calculations were carried out using version 7.2a R134 of EQ3 and version 7.2a R130 of EQ6 and the SUPCRT and COM subsets of the R24 version of GEMBOCHS. Thermodynamic data bases using different data for Al aqueous species were sued to identify the data set which produced the best matches between observed and calculated equilibria. The simulations described in this paper suggest that EQ6 can be used to identify facies of minerals that will be stable in various environments, but can not be used to predict the exact phase assemblage that is in equilibrium with a given water.

Bruton, C.J.

1995-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

199

HANFORD DST THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT ANSYS BENCHMARK ANALYSIS OF SEISMIC INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN A HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL PRIMARY TANK  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

M&D Professional Services, Inc. (M&D) is under subcontract to Pacific Northwest National Laboratories (PNNL) to perform seismic analysis of the Hanford Site Double-Shell Tanks (DSTs) in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DSV Integrity Project-DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses)''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford in support of Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-48-14. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The overall seismic analysis of the DSTs is being performed with the general-purpose finite element code ANSYS. The overall model used for the seismic analysis of the DSTs includes the DST structure, the contained waste, and the surrounding soil. The seismic analysis of the DSTs must address the fluid-structure interaction behavior and sloshing response of the primary tank and contained liquid. ANSYS has demonstrated capabilities for structural analysis, but the capabilities and limitations of ANSYS to perform fluid-structure interaction are less well understood. The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the capabilities and investigate the limitations of ANSYS for performing a fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste. To this end, the ANSYS solutions are benchmarked against theoretical solutions appearing in BNL 1995, when such theoretical solutions exist. When theoretical solutions were not available, comparisons were made to theoretical solutions of similar problems and to the results from Dytran simulations. The capabilities and limitations of the finite element code Dytran for performing a fluid-structure interaction analysis of the primary tank and contained waste were explored in a parallel investigation (Abatt 2006). In conjunction with the results of the global ANSYS analysis reported in Carpenter et al. (2006), the results of the two investigations will be compared to help determine if a more refined sub-model of the primary tank is necessary to capture the important fluid-structure interaction effects in the tank and if so, how to best utilize a refined sub-model of the primary tank. Both rigid tank and flexible tank configurations were analyzed with ANSYS. The response parameters of interest are total hydrodynamic reaction forces, impulsive and convective mode frequencies, waste pressures, and slosh heights. To a limited extent: tank stresses are also reported. The results of this study demonstrate that the ANSYS model has the capability to adequately predict global responses such as frequencies and overall reaction forces. Thus, the model is suitable for predicting the global response of the tank and contained waste. On the other hand, while the ANSYS model is capable of adequately predicting waste pressures and primary tank stresses in a large portion of the waste tank, the model does not accurately capture the convective behavior of the waste near the free surface, nor did the model give accurate predictions of slosh heights. Based on the ability of the ANSYS benchmark model to accurately predict frequencies and global reaction forces and on the results presented in Abatt, et al. (2006), the global ANSYS model described in Carpenter et al. (2006) is sufficient for the seismic evaluation of all tank components except for local areas of the primary tank. Due to the limitations of the ANSYS model in predicting the convective response of the waste, the evaluation of primary tank stresses near the waste free surface should be supplemented by results from an ANSYS sub-model of the primary tank that incorporates pressures from theoretical solutions or from Dytran solutions. However, the primary tank is expected to have low demand to capacity ratios in the upper wall. Moreover, due to the less than desired mesh resolution in the primary tank knuckle of the global ANSYS model, the evaluation of the primary tank stresses in the lo

MACKEY, T.C.

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

200

Multiphase fluid flow and subsequent geochemical transport in variably saturated fractured rocks: 1. Approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

dissolution and precipitation. Here we present a comprehensive modeling approach and numerical methods

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Distribution and Geochemical Evolution of Fluoride in Groundwater of Taiyuan Basin, China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydrogeochemistry data were utilized to understand origin, distribution, and geochemical evolution of the high-fluoride groundwater in Taiyuan basin, China. In the study area, the spatial distribution of the high fluoride groundwater are strictly controlled ... Keywords: fluoride, geochemical mechanism

Xiangquan Li; Xinwei Hou; Zhichao Zhou; Lingxia Liu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Crustal melting in the Himalayan orogen : field, geochemical and geochronological studies in the Everest region, Nepal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A combination of field studies and geochemical techniques were used to investigate the timing and processes involved in leucogranite generation in the Everest region of the Himalayan orogen. Geochemical investigations ...

Viskupic, Karen M. (Karen Marie), 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Merging High Resolution Geophysical and Geochemical Surveys to Reduce Exploration Risk at Glass Buttes, Oregon Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Validation of Innovative Exploration Technologies Project Description This program will combine detailed gravity, high resolution aeromagnetic, and LIDAR data, all of which will be combined for structural modeling, with hyperspectral data, which will identify and map specific minerals and mineral assemblages that may point to upflow zones. The collection of these surveys and analyses of the merged data and model will be used to site deeper slim holes. Slim holes will be flow tested to determine whether or not Ormat can move forward with developing this resource. An innovative combination of geophysical and geochemical tools will significantly reduce risk in exploring this area, and the results will help to evaluate the value of these tools independently and in combination when exploring for blind resources where structure, permeability, and temperature are the most pressing questions. The slim holes will allow testing of models and validation of methods, and the surveys within the wellbores will be used to revise the models and site production wells if their drilling is warranted.

204

Synthesis of organic geochemical data from the Eastern Gas Shales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over 2400 core and cuttings samples of Upper Devonian shales from wells in the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins have been characterized by organic geochemical methods to provide a basis for accelerating the exploitation of this unconventional, gas-rich resource. This work was part of a program initiated to provide industry with criteria for locating the best areas for future drilling and for the development of stimulation methods that will make recovery of the resource economically attractive. The geochemical assessment shows that the shale, in much of the Appalachian, Illinois, and Michigan Basins is source rock that is capable of generating enormous quantities of gas. In some areas the shales are also capable of generating large quantities of oil as well. The limiting factors preventing these sources from realizing most of their potential are their very low permeabilities and the paucity of potential reservoir rocks. This geochemical data synthesis gives direction to future selection of sites for stimulation research projects in the Appalachian Basin by pinpointing those areas where the greatest volumes of gas are contained in the shale matrix. Another accomplishment of the geochemical data synthesis is a new estimate of the total resource of the Appalachian Basin. The new estimate of 2500 TCF is 25 percent greater than the highest previous estimates. This gives greater incentive to government and industry to continue the search for improved stimulation methods, as well as for improved methods for locating the sites where those improved stimulation methods can be most effectively applied.

Zielinski, R. E.; McIver, R. D.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model for uranium  

SciTech Connect

As part of the Geochemical Modeling and Nuclide/Rock/Groundwater Interactions Studies Program, a study was conducted to partially validate the WATEQ4 aqueous speciation-solubility geochemical model for uranium. The solubility controls determined with the WATEQ4 geochemical model were in excellent agreement with those laboratory studies in which the solids schoepite (UO/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2/ . H/sub 2/O), UO/sub 2/(OH)/sub 2/, and rutherfordine ((UO/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) were identified as actual solubility controls for uranium. The results of modeling solution analyses from laboratory studies of uranyl phosphate solids, however, identified possible errors in the characterization of solids in the original solubility experiments. As part of this study, significant deficiencies in the WATEQ4 thermodynamic data base for uranium solutes and solids were corrected. Revisions included recalculation of selected uranium reactions. Additionally, thermodynamic data for the hydroxyl complexes of U(VI), including anionic (VI) species, were evaluated (to the extent permitted by the available data). Vanadium reactions were also added to the thermodynamic data base because uranium-vanadium solids can exist in natural ground-water systems. This study is only a partial validation of the WATEQ4 geochemical model because the available laboratory solubility studies do not cover the range of solid phases, alkaline pH values, and concentrations of inorganic complexing ligands needed to evaluate the potential solubility of uranium in ground waters associated with various proposed nuclear waste repositories. Further validation of this or other geochemical models for uranium will require careful determinations of uraninite solubility over the pH range of 7 to 10 under highly reducing conditions and of uranyl hydroxide and phosphate solubilities over the pH range of 7 to 10 under oxygenated conditions.

Krupka, K.M.; Jenne, E.A.; Deutsch, W.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

A Case Study Of The Influx Of Upper Mantle Fluids Into The Crust | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Influx Of Upper Mantle Fluids Into The Crust Influx Of Upper Mantle Fluids Into The Crust Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Case Study Of The Influx Of Upper Mantle Fluids Into The Crust Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Geochemical and geophysical investigations in the Bohai Gulf and adjacent areas, China, indicate that uplift of the high-conductivity layer in the lithosphere coincides with the area of high heat flow. In this area are distributed abundant oil and gas fields in a Tertiary fault basin and also large quantities of basaltic rocks. Gas fields, mostly CO2 bearing, occur at the basin margins, where a widespread alkaline olivine basalt has high contents of gold. Geochemical prospecting of the surface (soil and soil gas) in the area indicates that there is an anomaly zone of

207

Nonlinear Fluid Dynamics from Gravity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Black branes in AdS5 appear in a four parameter family labeled by their velocity and temperature. Promoting these parameters to Goldstone modes or collective coordinate fields -- arbitrary functions of the coordinates on the boundary of AdS5 -- we use Einstein's equations together with regularity requirements and boundary conditions to determine their dynamics. The resultant equations turn out to be those of boundary fluid dynamics, with specific values for fluid parameters. Our analysis is perturbative in the boundary derivative expansion but is valid for arbitrary amplitudes. Our work may be regarded as a derivation of the nonlinear equations of boundary fluid dynamics from gravity. As a concrete application we find an explicit expression for the expansion of this fluid stress tensor including terms up to second order in the derivative expansion.

Sayantani Bhattacharyya; Veronika E Hubeny; Shiraz Minwalla; Mukund Rangamani

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

208

Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development  

SciTech Connect

A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

Bill Turner

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

209

Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin:  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Paper: Geochemical characterization of geothermal systems in the Great Basin: Implications for exploration, exploitation, and environmental issues Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: The objective of this ongoing project is the development of a representative geochemical database for a comprehensive range of elemental and isotopic parameters (i.e., beyond the typical data suite) for a range of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Development of this database is one of the first steps in understanding the nature of geothermal systems in the Great Basin. Of particular importance in the Great Basin is utilizing

210

Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Lectures on geochemical interpretation of hydrothermal waters Abstract The alkali carbonates, Na, K, and Li, are relatively soluble at all temperatures and generally precipitate only where there is extreme evapora- tion. In contrast, the alkaline earth carbonates. Ca. Ht, Sr, and Ba, are moderately to sparingly soluble and commonly precipitate in bydrothecmal systems. Calcite is by far the most abundant and important carbonate found

211

Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Report: Geochemical modeling of the Raft River geothermal field Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The results to date of chemical modeling of the Raft River KGRA are presented. Earlier work indicated a northwest-southeast anomaly in the contours. Modeling techniques applied to more complete data allowed further definition of the anomaly. Models described in this report show the source of various minerals in the geothermal water. There appears to be a regional heat source that gives rise to uniform conductive heat flow in the region, but convective flow is concentrated near the upwelling in the Crook well

212

Version 4.00 of the MINTEQ geochemical code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MINTEQ code is a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate solution equilibria for geochemical applications. Included in the MINTEQ code are formulations for ionic speciation, ion exchange, adsorption, solubility, redox, gas-phase equilibria, and the dissolution of finite amounts of specified solids. Since the initial development of the MINTEQ geochemical code, a number of undocumented versions of the source code and data files have come into use at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report documents these changes, describes source code modifications made for the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) program, and provides comprehensive listings of the data files. A version number of 4.00 has been assigned to the MINTEQ source code and the individual data files described in this report.

Eary, L.E.; Jenne, E.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Version 4. 00 of the MINTEQ geochemical code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The MINTEQ code is a thermodynamic model that can be used to calculate solution equilibria for geochemical applications. Included in the MINTEQ code are formulations for ionic speciation, ion exchange, adsorption, solubility, redox, gas-phase equilibria, and the dissolution of finite amounts of specified solids. Since the initial development of the MINTEQ geochemical code, a number of undocumented versions of the source code and data files have come into use at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL). This report documents these changes, describes source code modifications made for the Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) program, and provides comprehensive listings of the data files. A version number of 4.00 has been assigned to the MINTEQ source code and the individual data files described in this report.

Eary, L.E.; Jenne, E.A.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Geochemical water sampling, mineral distribution...

215

Fluid transport container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitting for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container. 13 figs.

DeRoos, B.G.; Downing, J.P. Jr.; Neal, M.P.

1995-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

216

Fluid transport container  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved fluid container for the transport, collection, and dispensing of a sample fluid that maintains the fluid integrity relative to the conditions of the location at which it is taken. More specifically, the invention is a fluid sample transport container that utilizes a fitment for both penetrating and sealing a storage container under controlled conditions. Additionally, the invention allows for the periodic withdrawal of portions of the sample fluid without contamination or intermixing from the environment surrounding the sample container.

DeRoos, Bradley G. (41 James St., Sequim, WA 98382); Downing, Jr., John P. (260 Kala Heights Dr., Port Townsand, WA 98368); Neal, Michael P. (921 Amberly Pl., Columbus, OH 43220)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive geochemical Transport in Variable Saturated Geologic Media  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport and chemical reactions can be used for the assessment of mineral alteration in hydrothermal systems, waste disposal sites, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. A comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator, TOUGHREACT, has been developed. A wide range of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes is considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. The program can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The model can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can proceed either subject to local equilibrium or kinetic conditions. Changes in porosity and permeability due to mineral dissolution and precipitation can be considered. Linear adsorption and decay can be included. For the purpose of future extensions, surface complexation by double layer model is coded in the program. Xu and Pruess (1998) developed a first version of a non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport model, TOUGHREACT, by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). Xu, Pruess, and their colleagues have applied the program to a variety of problems such as: (1) supergene copper enrichment (Xu et al, 2001), (2) caprock mineral alteration in a hydrothermal system (Xu and Pruess, 2001a), and (3) mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline aquifers (Xu et al, 2003b and 2004a). For modeling the coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes during heater tests at proposed nuclear waste disposal site at Yucca Mountain (Nevada), Sonnenthal and Spycher (2000) and Spycher et al. (2003) enhanced TOUGHREACT on (1) high temperature geochemistry, (2) mineral reactive surface area calculations, and (3) porosity and permeability changes due to mineral alteration. On the other hand, Pruess et al. (1999) updated the TOUGH2 simulator to TOUGH2 V2. The present version of TOUGHREACT was developed by introducing the work of Sonnenthal and Spycher (2000) to the original work of Xu and Pruess (1998), and by replacing TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991) by TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al, 1999). The TOUGHREACT program makes use of ''self-documenting'' features. It is distributed with a number of input data files for sample problems. Besides providing benchmarks for proper code installation, these can serve as self-teaching tutorial in the use of TOUGHREACT, and they provide templates to help jump-start new applications. The fluid and heat flow part of TOUGHREACT is derived from TOUGH2 V2, so in addition to the current manual, users must have manual of the TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT provides the following different TOUGH2 fluid property or ''EOS'' (equation-of-state) modules: (1) EOS1 for water, or two waters with typical applications to hydrothermal problems, (2) EOS2 for multiphase mixtures of water and CO{sub 2} also with typical applications to hydrothermal problems, (3) EOS3 for multiphase mixtures of water and air with typical applications to vadose zone and nuclear waste disposal problems, (4) EOS4 that has the same capabilities as EOS3 but with vapor pressure lowering effects due to capillary pressure, (5) EOS9 for single phase water (Richards. equation) with typical applications to ambient reactive geochemical transport problems, (6) ECO2 for multiphase mixtures of water, CO{sub 2} and NaCl with typical applications to CO{sub 2} disposal in deep brine aquifers.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

218

Verification of the coupled fluid/solid transfer in a CASL grid-to-rod-fretting simulation : a technical brief on the analysis of convergence behavior and demonstration of software tools for verification.  

SciTech Connect

For a CASL grid-to-rod fretting problem, Sandia's Percept software was used in conjunction with the Sierra Mechanics suite to analyze the convergence behavior of the data transfer from a fluid simulation to a solid mechanics simulation. An analytic function, with properties relatively close to numerically computed fluid approximations, was chosen to represent the pressure solution in the fluid domain. The analytic pressure was interpolated on a sequence of grids on the fluid domain, and transferred onto a separate sequence of grids in the solid domain. The error in the resulting pressure in the solid domain was measured with respect to the analytic pressure. The error in pressure approached zero as both the fluid and solids meshes were refined. The convergence of the transfer algorithm was limited by whether the source grid resolution was the same or finer than the target grid resolution. In addition, using a feature coverage analysis, we found gaps in the solid mechanics code verification test suite directly relevant to the prototype CASL GTRF simulations.

Copps, Kevin D.

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Stream sediment geochemical surveys for uranium  

SciTech Connect

Stream sediment is more universally available than ground and surface waters and comprises the bulk of NURE samples. Orientation studies conducted by the Savannah River Laboratory indicate that several mesh sizes can offer nearly equivalent information. Sediment is normally sieved in the field to pass a 420-micrometer screen (US Std. 40 mesh) and that portion of the dried sediment passing a 149-micrometer screen (US Std. 100 mesh) is recovered for analysis. Sampling densities usually vary with survey objectives and types of deposits anticipated. Principal geologic features that can be portrayed at a scale of 1:250,000, such as major tectonic units, plutons, and pegmatite districts, are readily defined using a sampling density of 1 site per 5 square miles (13 km/sup 2/). More detailed studies designed to define individual deposits require greater sampling density. Analyses for elements known to be associated with uranium in a particular mineral host may be used to estimate the relative proportion of uranium in several forms. For example, uranium may be associated with thorium and cerium in monazite, and with zirconium and hafnium in zircon. Readily leachable uranium may be adsorbed to trapped in oxide coatings on mineral particles. Soluble or mobile uranium may indicate an ore source, whereas uranium in monazite or zircon is not likely to be economically attractive. Various schemes may be used to estimate for form of uranium in a sample. Simple elemental ratios are a useful first approach. Multiple ratios and subtractive formulas empirically designed to account for the presence of particular minerals are more useful. Residuals calculated from computer-derived regression equations or factor scores appear to have the greatest potential for locating uranium anomalies.

Price, V.; Ferguson, R.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Simulation and performance analysis of basic GAX and advanced GAX cycles with ammonia/water and ammonia/water/LiBr absorption fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) and branched GAX cycles are generally considered with NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O as their working fluid. The potential consequences of using a ternary mixture of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr (advanced fluids) in the GAX and Branched GAX (advanced cycles) are discussed in this study. A modular steady state absorption simulation model(ABSIM) was used to investigate the potential of combining the above advanced cycles with the advanced fluids. ABSIM is capable of modeling varying cycle configurations with different working fluids. Performance parameters of the cycles, including coefficient of performance (COP) and heat duties, were investigated as functions of different operating parameters in the cooling mode for both the NH {sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary and the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary mixtures. High performance potential of GAX and branched GAX cycles using the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O/LiBr ternary fluid mixture was achieved especially at the high range of firing temperatures exceeding 400{degrees}F. The cooling COP`s have been improved by approximately 21% over the COP achieved with the NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O binary mixtures. These results show the potential of using advanced cycles with advanced fluid mixtures (ternary or quaternary fluid mixtures).

Zaltash, A.; Grossman, G.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Geologic, geochemical, and geographic controls on NORM in produced water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal reservoirs. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water from Texas oil, gas, and geothermal wells contains natural radioactivity that ranges from several hundred to several thousand Picocuries per liter (pCi/L). This natural radioactivity in produced fluids and the scale that forms in producing and processing equipment can lead to increased concerns for worker safety and additional costs for handling and disposing of water and scale. Naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) in oil and gas operations are mainly caused by concentrations of radium-226 ({sup 226}Ra) and radium-228 ({sup 228}Ra), daughter products of uranium-238 ({sup 238}U) and thorium-232 ({sup 232}Th), respectively, in barite scale. We examined (1) the geographic distribution of high NORM levels in oil-producing and gas-processing equipment, (2) geologic controls on uranium (U), thorium (Th), and radium (Ra) in sedimentary basins and reservoirs, (3) mineralogy of NORM scale, (4) chemical variability and potential to form barite scale in Texas formation waters, (5) Ra activity in Texas formation waters, and (6) geochemical controls on Ra isotopes in formation water and barite scale to explore natural controls on radioactivity. Our approach combined extensive compilations of published data, collection and analyses of new water samples and scale material, and geochemical modeling of scale Precipitation and Ra incorporation in barite.

Fisher, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Abstract N/A Author Donald Thomas Published Journal US Geological Survey Professional Paper 1350, 1987 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone Citation Donald Thomas. 1987. A geochemical model of the Kilauea east rift zone. US Geological Survey Professional Paper 1350. (!) . Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_geochemical_model_of_the_Kilauea_east_rift_zone&oldid=682589" Categories: Missing Required Information References Uncited References Geothermal References

223

Environmentally safe fluid extractor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An environmentally safe fluid extraction device for use in mobile laboratory and industrial settings comprising a pump, compressor, valving system, waste recovery tank, fluid tank, and a exhaust filtering system.

Sungaila, Zenon F. (Orland Park, IL)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Drilling Fluid Corrosion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 8   Drilling fluid corrosion control troubleshooting chart...Table 8 Drilling fluid corrosion control troubleshooting chart Corrosion cause Primary source Identification Major corrosion forms Remedies Oxygen Atmosphere, mud conditioning, equipment, oxidizing

225

Application of direct-fitting, mass-integral, and multi-ratemethods to analysis of flowing fluid electric conductivity logs fromHoronobe, Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flowing fluid electric conductivity (FFEC) loggingmethod is an efficient way to provide information on the depths,salinities, and transmissivities of individual conductive featuresintercepted by a borehole, without the use of specialized probes. Usingit in a multiple-flow-rate mode allows, in addition, an estimate of theinherent "far-field" pressure heads in each of the conductive features.The multi-rate method was successfully applied to a 500-m borehole in agranitic formation and reported recently. The present paper presents theapplication of the method to two zones within a 1000-m borehole insedimentary rock, which produced, for each zone, three sets of logs atdifferent pumping rates, each set measured over a period of about oneday. The data sets involve a number of complications, such as variablewell diameter, free water table decline in the well, and effects ofdrilling mud. To analyze data from this borehole, we apply varioustechniques that have been developed for analyzing FFEC logs:direct-fitting, mass-integral, and the multi-rate method mentioned above.In spite of complications associated with the tests, analysis of the datais able to identify 44 hydraulically conducting fractures distributedover the depth interval 150-775 meters below ground surface. Thesalinities (in FEC), and transmissivities and pressure heads (indimensionless form) of these 44 features are obtained and found to varysignificantly among one another. These results are compared with datafrom eight packer tests with packer intervals of 10-80 m, which wereconducted in this borehole over the same depth interval. They are foundto be consistent with these independent packer-test data, thusdemonstrating the robustness of the FFEC logging method under non-idealconditions.

Doughty, C.; Tsang, C.-F.; Hatanaka, K.; Yabuuchi, S.; Kurikami, H.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Fluid Suspensions & Emulsions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid Suspensions & Emulsions. Summary: Our primary interest is protein ... protein solutions? 1. Health & Safety. There is ongoing ...

2013-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

227

3Geochemistry Published by AGU and the Geochemical Society  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

identified by a systematic grid of conductive heat flow measure- 15 ments. An array of conductive heat flow, conductive heat flow data indicate a general crossvalley fluid flow, where 18 seawater enters the shallow occurring within faults that surround the fluid discharge sites. These conductive 23 heat flow data

Johnson, H. Paul

228

Spinning fluid cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of a spinning fluid in a flat cosmological model is investigated. The space-time is itself generated by the spinning fluid which is characterized by an energy-momentum tensor consisting a sum of the usual perfect-fluid energy-momentum tensor and some Belinfante-Rosenfeld tensors. It is shown that the equations of motion admit a solution for which the fluid four-velocity and four-momentum are not co-linear in general. The momentum and spin densities of the fluid are expressed in terms of the scale factor.

Morteza Mohseni

2008-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

229

Spinning fluid cosmology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dynamics of a spinning fluid in a flat cosmological model is investigated. The space-time is itself generated by the spinning fluid which is characterized by an energy-momentum tensor consisting a sum of the usual perfect-fluid energy-momentum tensor and some Belinfante-Rosenfeld tensors. It is shown that the equations of motion admit a solution for which the fluid four-velocity and four-momentum are not co-linear in general. The momentum and spin densities of the fluid are expressed in terms of the scale factor.

Mohseni, Morteza

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Spinning fluids reactor  

SciTech Connect

A spinning fluids reactor, includes a reactor body (24) having a circular cross-section and a fluid contactor screen (26) within the reactor body (24). The fluid contactor screen (26) having a plurality of apertures and a circular cross-section concentric with the reactor body (24) for a length thus forming an inner volume (28) bound by the fluid contactor screen (26) and an outer volume (30) bound by the reactor body (24) and the fluid contactor screen (26). A primary inlet (20) can be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce flow-through first spinning flow of a first fluid within the inner volume (28). A secondary inlet (22) can similarly be operatively connected to the reactor body (24) and can be configured to produce a second flow of a second fluid within the outer volume (30) which is optionally spinning.

Miller, Jan D; Hupka, Jan; Aranowski, Robert

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

231

Stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Date Creek Basin, Arizona  

SciTech Connect

Results of the Date Creek Basin detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are reported for 239 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are displayed. A generalized geologic map of the area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Based on stream sediment geochemical data, significant concentrations of uranium are restricted to the Anderson Mine area. The 84th percentile concentrations of U-FL, U-NT, and U-FL/U-NT combined with low thorium/U-NT values reflect increased mobility and enrichment of uranium in the carbonate host rocks of that area. Elements characteristically associated with the uranium mineralization include lithium and arsenic. No well defined diffusion halos suggesting outliers of similar uranium mineralization were observed from the stream sediment data in other areas of the Date Creek Basin. Significant concentrations of U-FL or U-NT found outside the mine area are generally coincident with low U-FL/U-NT values and high concentrations of zirconium, titanium, and phosphorus. This suggests that the uranium is related to a resistate mineral assemblage derived from surrounding crystalline igneous and metamorphic rocks.

Butz, T.R.; Tieman, D.J.; Grimes, J.G.; Bard, C.S.; Helgerson, R.N.; Pritz, P.M.

1980-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

232

Helium measurements of pore-fluids obtained from SAFOD drillcore  

SciTech Connect

{sup 4}He accumulated in fluids is a well established geochemical tracer used to study crustal fluid dynamics. Direct fluid samples are not always collectable; therefore, a method to extract rare gases from matrix fluids of whole rocks by diffusion has been adapted. Helium was measured on matrix fluids extracted from sandstones and mudstones recovered during the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling in California, USA. Samples were typically collected as subcores or from drillcore fragments. Helium concentration and isotope ratios were measured 4-6 times on each sample, and indicate a bulk {sup 4}He diffusion coefficient of 3.5 {+-} 1.3 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} at 21 C, compared to previously published diffusion coefficients of 1.2 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (21 C) to 3.0 x 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (150 C) in the sands and clays. Correcting the diffusion coefficient of {sup 4}He{sub water} for matrix porosity ({approx}3%) and tortuosity ({approx}6-13) produces effective diffusion coefficients of 1 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (21 C) and 1 x 10{sup -7} (120 C), effectively isolating pore fluid {sup 4}He from the {sup 4}He contained in the rock matrix. Model calculations indicate that <6% of helium initially dissolved in pore fluids was lost during the sampling process. Complete and quantitative extraction of the pore fluids provide minimum in situ porosity values for sandstones 2.8 {+-} 0.4% (SD, n=4) and mudstones 3.1 {+-} 0.8% (SD, n=4).

Ali, S.; Stute, M.; Torgersen, T.; Winckler, G.; Kennedy, B.M.

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

233

Helium measurements of pore-fluids obtained from SAFOD drillcore  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

{sup 4}He accumulated in fluids is a well established geochemical tracer used to study crustal fluid dynamics. Direct fluid samples are not always collectable; therefore, a method to extract rare gases from matrix fluids of whole rocks by diffusion has been adapted. Helium was measured on matrix fluids extracted from sandstones and mudstones recovered during the San Andreas Fault Observatory at Depth (SAFOD) drilling in California, USA. Samples were typically collected as subcores or from drillcore fragments. Helium concentration and isotope ratios were measured 4-6 times on each sample, and indicate a bulk {sup 4}He diffusion coefficient of 3.5 {+-} 1.3 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} at 21 C, compared to previously published diffusion coefficients of 1.2 x 10{sup -18} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (21 C) to 3.0 x 10{sup -15} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (150 C) in the sands and clays. Correcting the diffusion coefficient of {sup 4}He{sub water} for matrix porosity ({approx}3%) and tortuosity ({approx}6-13) produces effective diffusion coefficients of 1 x 10{sup -8} cm{sup 2}s{sup -1} (21 C) and 1 x 10{sup -7} (120 C), effectively isolating pore fluid {sup 4}He from the {sup 4}He contained in the rock matrix. Model calculations indicate that fluids was lost during the sampling process. Complete and quantitative extraction of the pore fluids provide minimum in situ porosity values for sandstones 2.8 {+-} 0.4% (SD, n=4) and mudstones 3.1 {+-} 0.8% (SD, n=4).

Ali, S.; Stute, M.; Torgersen, T.; Winckler, G.; Kennedy, B.M.

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Modules based on the geochemical model PHREEQC for use in scripting and programming languages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The geochemical model PHREEQC is capable of simulating a wide range of equilibrium reactions between water and minerals, ion exchangers, surface complexes, solid solutions, and gases. It also has a general kinetic formulation that allows modeling of ... Keywords: C, C++, COM, Component object model, Fortran, Geochemical modeling, PHREEQC, Reactive-transport modeling

Scott R. Charlton; David L. Parkhurst

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Geochemical and Isotopic Interpretations of Groundwater Flow in the Oasis Valley Flow System, Southern Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the findings of a geochemical investigation of the Pahute Mesa-Oasis Valley groundwater flow system in southwestern Nevada. It is intended to provide geochemical data and interpretations in support of flow and contaminant transport modeling for the Western and Central Pahute Mesa Corrective Action Units.

J.M. Thomas; F.C. Benedict, Jr.; T.P. Rose; R.L. Hershey; J.B. Paces; Z.E. Peterman; I.M. Farnham; K.H. Johannesson; A.K. Singh; K.J. Stetzenbach; G.B. Hudson; J.M. Kenneally; G.F. Eaton; D.K. Smith

2003-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

236

Demonstration of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Tool Used...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Demonstration of a Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Tool Used for Data Center Modeling, Thermal Analysis and Operational Management Speaker(s): Saket Karajgikar Date: November...

237

Definition: Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Downhole Fluid Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Downhole Fluid Sampling Downhole fluid sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Downhole fluid sampling is typically performed to monitor water quality, study recharge and flow in groundwater systems, and evaluate resource potential of geothermal reservoirs. Analysis of both the liquid and gas fractions of the reservoir fluid allows for detailed characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of the subsurface hydrothermal system. View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Ret Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like.

238

Materials Science and Engineering B 117 (2005) 5361 Finite element analysis-based design of a fluid-flow control nano-valve  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of a fluid-flow control nano-valve M. Grujicica,, G. Caoa, B. Pandurangana, W.N. Royb a Department A finite element method-based procedure is developed for the design of molecularly functionalized nano-size devices. The procedure is aimed at the single-walled carbon nano-tubes (SWCNTs) used in the construction

Grujicic, Mica

239

A Reconnaissance Geochemical Study Of La Primavera Geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1100 and 1560 mgkg after flashing. Neither of the high-temperature wells produced steam in commercial quantities. The well at the western margin of the Sierra produced fluids...

240

Microwave fluid flow meter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

Billeter, Thomas R. (Richland, WA); Philipp, Lee D. (Richland, WA); Schemmel, Richard R. (Lynchburg, VA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Complex Fluids Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... applications in energy, sustainability, electronics and medicine. As these materials are typically in the fluid state during their production or end-use ...

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

242

Working/Functional Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power cycle except that it uses an organic working fluid instead of water to allow operation at lower temperatures, including geothermal or solar ...

2012-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

243

Fluid-rock interaction: A reactive transport approach  

SciTech Connect

Fluid-rock interaction (or water-rock interaction, as it was more commonly known) is a subject that has evolved considerably in its scope over the years. Initially its focus was primarily on interactions between subsurface fluids of various temperatures and mostly crystalline rocks, but the scope has broadened now to include fluid interaction with all forms of subsurface materials, whether they are unconsolidated or crystalline ('fluid-solid interaction' is perhaps less euphonious). Disciplines that previously carried their own distinct names, for example, basin diagenesis, early diagenesis, metamorphic petrology, reactive contaminant transport, chemical weathering, are now considered to fall under the broader rubric of fluid-rock interaction, although certainly some of the key research questions differ depending on the environment considered. Beyond the broadening of the environments considered in the study of fluid-rock interaction, the discipline has evolved in perhaps an even more important way. The study of water-rock interaction began by focusing on geochemical interactions in the absence of transport processes, although a few notable exceptions exist (Thompson 1959; Weare et al. 1976). Moreover, these analyses began by adopting a primarily thermodynamic approach, with the implicit or explicit assumption of equilibrium between the fluid and rock. As a result, these early models were fundamentally static rather than dynamic in nature. This all changed with the seminal papers by Helgeson and his co-workers (Helgeson 1968; Helgeson et al. 1969) wherein the concept of an irreversible reaction path was formally introduced into the geochemical literature. In addition to treating the reaction network as a dynamically evolving system, the Helgeson studies introduced an approach that allowed for the consideration of a multicomponent geochemical system, with multiple minerals and species appearing as both reactants and products, at least one of which could be irreversible. Helgeson's pioneering approach was given a more formal kinetic basis (including the introduction of real time rather than reaction progress as the independent variable) in subsequent studies (Lasaga 1981; Aagaard and Helgeson 1982; Lasaga 1984). The reaction path approach can be used to describe chemical processes in a batch or closed system (e.g., a laboratory beaker), but such systems are of limited interest in the Earth sciences where the driving force for most reactions is transport. Lichtner (1988) clarified the application of the reaction path models to water-rock interaction involving transport by demonstrating that they could be used to describe pure advective transport through porous media. By adopting a reference frame which followed the fluid packet as it moved through the medium, the reaction progress variable could be thought of as travel time instead. Multi-component reactive transport models that could treat any combination of transport and biogeochemical processes date back to the early 1980s. Berner and his students applied continuum reactive transport models to describe processes taking place during the early diagenesis of marine sediments (Berner 1980). Lichtner (1985) outlined much of the basic theory for a continuum model for multicomponent reactive transport. Yeh and Tripathi (1989) also presented the theoretical and numerical basis for the treatment of reactive contaminant transport. Steefel and Lasaga (1994) presented a reactive flow and transport model for nonisothermal, kinetically-controlled water-rock interaction and fracture sealing in hydrothermal systems based on simultaneous numerical solution of both reaction and transport This chapter begins with a review of the important transport processes that affect or even control fluid-rock interaction. This is followed by a general introduction to the governing equations for reactive transport, which are broadly applicable to both qualitative and quantitative interpretations of fluid-rock interactions. This framework is expanded through a discussion of specific topics that are the f

Steefel, C.; Maher, K.

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Holocene deposition in Northwest Providence Channel, Bahamas: a geochemical approach  

SciTech Connect

The origins and depositional history of Holocene sediment in Northwest Providence Channel, Bahamas (NWPC) have been determined using geochemical measurements coupled with textural data, petrographic examination, and scanning electron microscopy. Most of the channel is 200 to 2000 m deep, and nearly 100% of the sediment is calcium carbonate. Shallow water platform sources contribute 75-90% of the Holocene sediment in NWPC. Bank derived sand is most abundant near the platforms (nearly 100%) and is concentrically distributed around a central area of abundant non-platform sand. Bank-derived mud (<62 ..mu..m) accounts for more than 80% of the mud fraction in NWPC. The coarse silt (62-16 ..mu..m), fine silt (16-4 ..mu..m) and clay (< 4 ..mu..m) fractions from LLB (Bight of Abaco) are geochemically distinct from the mud fractions of Great Bahama Bank (GBB). Their distributions in NWPC demonstrate that both platforms are significant sediment contributors to NWPC. The observed sediment distribution clearly indicates that significant off bank transport occurs. With regard to sediment transport, no windward or leeward effects are observed in Holocene sediment deposition. Gravity flow processes are not significant to Holocene deposition. 80% of the present sedimentation rate results from the banktop flooding and confirms that 75%-90% of the Holocene sediment is derived from platform sources. The C-14 dated Holocene sediment layer is approximately 50 cm thick, and its transition with the Pleistocene occurs over a vertical interval of less than 20 cm as a result of mixing by benthonic organisms. This Holocene sediment layer should remain intact to permanently record this banktop episode, and should have a different diagenetic future from the underlying stable (calcite-rich) sediment.

Boardman, M.R.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Geochemical engineering design tools for uranium in situ recovery : the HYDROGEOCHEM codes.  

SciTech Connect

Geochemical Engineering Design (GED) is based on applications of the principles and various computer models that describe the biogeochemistry and physics of removal of contaminants from water by adsorption, precipitation and filtration. It can be used to optimize or evaluate the efficiency of all phases of in situ recovery (ISR). The primary tools of GED are reactive transport models; this talk describes the potential application of the HYDROGEOCHEM family of codes to ISR. The codes can describe a complete suite of equilibrium or kinetic aqueous complexation, adsorption-desorption, precipitation-dissolution, redox, and acid-base reactions in variably saturated media with density-dependent fluid flow. Applications to ISR are illustrated with simulations of (1) the effectiveness of a reactive barrier to prevent off-site uranium migration and (2) evaluation of the effect of sorption hysteresis on natural attenuation. In the first example, it can be seen that the apparent effectiveness of the barrier depends on monitoring location and that it changes over time. This is due to changes in pH, saturation of sorption sites, as well as the geometry of the flow field. The second simulation shows how sorption hysteresis leads to observable attenuation of a uranium contamination plume. Different sorption mechanisms including fast (or reversible), slow, and irreversible sorption were simulated. The migration of the dissolved and total uranium plumes for the different cases are compared and the simulations show that when 50-100% of the sites have slow desorption rates, the center of mass of the dissolved uranium plume begins to move upstream. This would correspond to the case in which the plume boundaries begin to shrink as required for demonstration of natural attenuation.

Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Li, Ming-Hsu (National Central University, Jhongli City, Taiwan); Yeh, Gour-Tsyh (University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL)

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Supercritical Fluid Extraction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In supercritical fluid extraction, many options are available for achieving and controlling the desired selectivity, which is extremely sensitive to variations in pressure, temperature, and choice of solvent. The ability of supercritical fluids to vaporize relatively nonvolatile compounds at moderate temperatures can reduce the energy requirements compared to distillation and liquid extraction.

Johnston, K. P.; Flarsheim, W. M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Changes in Bacterial And Archaeal Community Structure And Functional Diversity Along a Geochemically Variable Soil Profile  

SciTech Connect

Spatial heterogeneity in physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils allows for the proliferation of diverse microbial communities. Factors influencing the structuring of microbial communities, including availability of nutrients and water, pH, and soil texture, can vary considerably with soil depth and within soil aggregates. Here we investigated changes in the microbial and functional communities within soil aggregates obtained along a soil profile spanning the surface, vadose zone, and saturated soil environments. The composition and diversity of microbial communities and specific functional groups involved in key pathways in the geochemical cycling of nitrogen, Fe, and sulfur were characterized using a coupled approach involving cultivation-independent analysis of both 16S rRNA (bacterial and archaeal) and functional genes (amoA and dsrAB) as well as cultivation-based analysis of Fe(III)-reducing organisms. Here we found that the microbial communities and putative ammonia-oxidizing and Fe(III)-reducing communities varied greatly along the soil profile, likely reflecting differences in carbon availability, water content, and pH. In particular, the Crenarchaeota 16S rRNA sequences are largely unique to each horizon, sharing a distribution and diversity similar to those of the putative (amoA-based) ammonia-oxidizing archaeal community. Anaerobic microenvironments within soil aggregates also appear to allow for both anaerobic- and aerobic-based metabolisms, further highlighting the complexity and spatial heterogeneity impacting microbial community structure and metabolic potential within soils.

Hansel, C.M.; Fendorf, S.; Jardine, P.M.; Francis, C.A.

2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

248

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: TRACING...

249

FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect

Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

Subhash Shah

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Supercritical fluid extraction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of extracting metalloid and metal species from a solid or liquid material by exposing the material to a supercritical fluid solvent containing a chelating agent. The chelating agent forms chelates that are soluble in the supercritical fluid to allow removal of the species from the material. In preferred embodiments, the extraction solvent is supercritical carbon dioxide and the chelating agent is a fluorinated or lipophilic crown ether or fluorinated dithiocarbamate. The method provides an environmentally benign process for removing contaminants from industrial waste without using acids or biologically harmful solvents. The chelate and supercritical fluid can be regenerated, and the contaminant species recovered, to provide an economic, efficient process.

Wai, Chien M. (Moscow, ID); Laintz, Kenneth (Pullman, WA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a method currently being developed for use in geothermal systems to identify fractures and fluid types. This paper is the third in a series of papers on the development of FIS. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow and reservoir seals. Previously we showed that FIS analyses identify fluid types and

252

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Geochemical Data on Waters, Gases, Scales, and Rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999) Abstract This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales,rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples fromwhich the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. Thesedata provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermalenergy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in thisregion. Authors Los Alamos National Laboratory and NM Published

253

Geochemical heterogeneity in the Hawaiian plume : constraints from Hawaiian volcanoes and Emperor seamounts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 6000-km long, age-progressive linear Hawaii-Emperor Chain is one of the best defined hotspot tracks. This hotspot track plays an important role in the plume hypothesis. In this research, geochemical data on the ...

Huang, Shichun

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Migratory patterns of American shad (Alosa sapidissima) revealed by natural geochemical tags in otoliths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical signatures in the otoliths of diadromous fishes may allow for retrospective analyses of natal origins. In an assessment of river-specific signatures in American shad (Alosa sapidissima), an anadromous clupeid ...

Walther, Benjamin (Benjamin Dwaine)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery as a potential problem for the WIPP: Proceedings of a June 1995 workshop and analysis  

SciTech Connect

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is a facility of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), designed and constructed for the permanent disposal of transuranic (TRU) defense waste. The repository is sited in the New Mexico portion of the Delaware Basin, at a depth of 655 meters, in the salt beds of the Salado Formation. The WIPP is surrounded by reserves and production of potash, crude oil and natural gas. In selecting a repository site, concerns about extensive oil field development eliminated the Mescalero Plains site in Chaves County and concerns about future waterflooding in nearby oil fields helped eliminate the Alternate II site in Lea County. Ultimately, the Los Medanos site in Eddy County was selected, relying in part on the conclusion that there were no oil reserves at the site. For oil field operations, the problem of water migrating from the injection zone, through other formations such as the Salado, and onto adjacent property has long been recognized. In 1980, the DOE intended to prohibit secondary recovery by waterflooding in one mile buffer surrounding the WIPP Site. However, the DOE relinquished the right to restrict waterflooding based on a natural resources report which maintained that there was a minimal amount of crude oil likely to exist at the WIPP site, hence waterflooding adjacent to the WIPP would be unlikely. This document presents the workshop presentations and analyses for the fluid injection for salt water disposal and enhanced oil recovery utilizing fluid injection and their potential effects on the WIPP facility.

Silva, M.K.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY FOR PREDICTING THE FLUID FLOW ATTRIBUTES OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS FROM QUANTITATIVE GEOLOGIC DATA AND MODELING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work carried out during the period of September 29, 2000 to January 15, 2004 under DOE Research Contract No. DE-FC26-00BC15308. High temperatures and reactive fluids in sedimentary basins dictate that interplay and feedback between mechanical and geochemical processes significantly influence evolving rock and fracture properties. Not only does diagenetic mineralization fill in once open fractures either partially or completely, it modifies the rock mechanics properties that can control the mechanical aperture of natural fractures. In this study, we have evolved an integrated methodology of fractured reservoir characterization and we have demonstrated how it can be incorporated into fluid flow simulation. The research encompassed a wide range of work from geological characterization methods to rock mechanics analysis to reservoir simulation. With regard to the characterization of mineral infilling of natural fractures, the strong interplay between diagenetic and mechanical processes is documented and shown to be of vital importance to the behavior of many types of fractured reservoirs. Although most recent literature emphasizes Earth stress orientation, cementation in fractures is likely a critically important control on porosity, fluid flow attributes, and even sensitivity to effective stress changes. The diagenetic processes of dissolution and partial cementation are key controls on the creation and distribution of open natural fractures within hydrocarbon reservoirs. The continuity of fracture-porosity is fundamental to how fractures conduct fluids. In this study, we have made a number of important discoveries regarding fundamental properties of fractures, in particular related to the prevalence of kinematically significant structures (crack-seal texture) within otherwise porous, opening-mode fractures, and the presence of an aperture size threshold below which fractures are completely filled and above which porosity is preserved. These observations can be linked to models of quartz cementation. Significant progress has been made as well in theoretical fracture mechanics and geomechanical modeling, allowing prediction of spatial distributions of fractures that mimic patterns observed in nature. Geomechanical modeling shows the spatial arrangement of opening mode fractures (joints and veins) is controlled by the subcritical fracture index of the material. In particular, we have been able to identify mechanisms that control the clustering of fractures in slightly deformed rocks. Fracture mechanics testing of a wide range of clastic rocks shows that the subcritical index is sensitive to diagenetic factors. We show geomechanical simulations of fracture aperture development can be linked to diagenetic models, modifying fracture porosity as fractures grow, and affect the dynamics of fracture propagation. Fluid flow simulation of representative fracture pattern realizations shows how integrated modeling can give new insight into permeability assessment in the subsurface. Using realistic, geomechanically generated fracture patterns, we propose a methodology for permeability estimation in nonpercolating networks.

Jon E. Olson; Larry W. Lake; Steve E. Laubach

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Multielement geochemical exploration data for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area, Beaver and Millard counties, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multielement geochemical exploration data have been acquired for the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale Known Geothermal Resource Area (KGRA). This was accomplished by analysis of both whole rock and +3.3 specific gravity concentrate samples from cuttings composites collected from shallow rotary drill holes. Areal distributions are reported for arsenic, mercury, lead and zinc. These are elements indicated by previous studies to be broadly zoned around thermal centers in geothermal systems and thus to be useful for selecting and prioritizing drilling targets. Results from this work suggest that reservoir temperature and/or reservoir to surface permeability, and thus possibly overall potential for a geothermal resource, increase northward beneath the approximately 18 square mile area containing shallow drill holes, possibly to beyond the northern limits of the area. The data provide a basis for development of three principal target models for the geothermal system but do not permit prioritization of these models. It is recommended that geochemical, geological, and temperature gradient surveys be expanded northward from the present survey area to more fully define the area which appears to have the best resource potential and to aid prioritization of the target models.

Bamford, R.W.; Christensen, O.D.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Application of Cutting Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...is transferred to the drill by a rotating gland and is forced directly into the cutting zone. The fluid flowing from the hole assists in chip removal. Oil-hole drills have become very popular in

259

Basic fluid system trainer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention, a trainer mounted and housed within a mobile console, is used to teach and reinforce fluid principles to students. The system trainer has two centrifugal pumps, each driven by a corresponding two-speed electric motor. The motors are controlled by motor controllers for operating the pumps to circulate the fluid stored within a supply tank through a closed system. The pumps may be connected in series or in parallel. A number of valves are also included within the system to effect different flow paths for the fluid. In addition, temperature and pressure sensing instruments are installed throughout the closed system for measuring the characteristics of the fluid, as it passes through the different valves and pumps. These measurements are indicated on a front panel mounted to the console, as a teaching aid, to allow the students to observe the characteristics of the system.

Semans, J.P.; Johnson, P.G.; LeBoeuf, R.F. Jr.; Kromka, J.A.; Goron, R.H.; Hay, G.D.

1991-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

Basic fluid system trainer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A trainer, mounted and housed within a mobile console, is used to teach and reinforce fluid principles to students. The system trainer has two centrifugal pumps, each driven by a corresponding two-speed electric motor. The motors are controlled by motor controllers for operating the pumps to circulate the fluid stored within a supply tank through a closed system. The pumps may be connected in series or in parallel. A number of valves are also included within the system to effect different flow paths for the fluid. In addition, temperature and pressure sensing instruments are installed throughout the closed system for measuring the characteristics of the fluid, as it passes through the different valves and pumps. These measurements are indicated on a front panel mounted to the console, as a teaching aid, to allow the students to observe the characteristics of the system.

Semans, Joseph P. (Uniontown, PA); Johnson, Peter G. (Pittsburgh, PA); LeBoeuf, Jr., Robert F. (Clairton, PA); Kromka, Joseph A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goron, Ronald H. (Connellsville, PA); Hay, George D. (Venetia, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Phoresis in fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a unified theory of phoretic phenomena in single-component fluids. Simple formulas are given for the phoretic velocities of small inert force-free non-Brownian particles migrating through otherwise ...

Brenner, Howard

262

Laboratory tests, statistical analysis and correlations for regained permeability and breakthrough time in unconsolidated sands for improved drill-in fluid cleanup practices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Empirical models for estimating the breakthrough time and regained permeability for selected nondamaging drill-in fluids (DIF's) give a clear indication of formation damage and proper cleanup treatments for reservoir conditions analyzed in this study. We determined values of breakthrough time and regained permeability for common polymer-carbonate and sized-salt/saturated brine DIF's for a range at reservoir properties including temperature, drill solids content, and percent of acid in the cleanup treatment. We chose these DIF's because they form tight, thin filtercakes that control fluid leakoff and afford more complete wellbore cleanup properties than standard drilling muds, and we chose reservoir properties that could be varied and measured. Beginning with a large database of 101 tests with 8 independent variables such as type of drill-in fluid, temperature, screen type, presence of gravel pack, formation type, type of drill solids, concentration of drill solids, and cleanup treatments, we analyzed the importance of each variable. After that, we identified the independent variables we were taking into account during this research. Those variables were temperature, drill solids content, and concentration of hydrochloric acid in the cleanup treatment. Then we generated a matrix for each set of experiments that allowed us to organize and measure the conditions we were looking for, regained permeability and breakthrough time. In measuring the regained permeability, we used a linear-flow cell apparatus. In measuring the breakthrough time that particular cleaning procedures take to flow across the filter cake, we used a ceramic disc cell apparatus. We used statistical software to select properties, formation, and diagnostics of the models and to develop relationships among the properties of the DIF's. We developed four new empirical models for estimating the breakthrough time and regained permeability in polymer carbonate and sized salt. High correlations resulted with R values between 0.851 and 0.986 corroborated by close values of adjusted R-square and low P-values give validity to the correlations found. This technique gives a broad overview of the formation damage as well as the proper cleanup treatment for similar conditions presented in the field.

Serrano, Gerardo Enrique

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

MEASUREMENT OF INTERFACIAL TENSION IN FLUID-FLUID SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interfacial tension at fluid-fluid interfaces is a reflection of the excess energy associated with unsaturated in parts per million concentration (27). DYNAMIC INTERFACIAL TENSION MEASUREMENTS In fluid-fluid systems, detergency, foam or froth generation, and stability (3). In these pro- cesses, dynamic interfacial tensions

Loh, Watson

264

The generalized van der Waals theory of pure fluids and mixtures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses functional group analysis and partition function analysis of pure fluids and mixtures using generalized van der waals theory. (LSP)

Sandler, S.I.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Geochemical and physical properties of soils and shallow sediments at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A program to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of the unimpacted soils and shallow sediments at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has been completed. The maximum, minimum, median, standard deviation, and mean values for metals, radionuclides, inorganic anions, organic compounds, and agricultural indicator parameters are summarized for six soil series that were identified as representative of the 29 soil series at SRS. The soils from unimpacted areas of SRS are typical of soils found in moderately aggressive weathering environments, including the southeastern United States. Appendix 8 organic compounds were detected in all samples. Since these constituents are not generally present in soil, this portion of the investigation was intended to assess possible laboratory artifacts. An additional objective of the SRS Soil Study was to determine if the composition of the split spoon sampler biased chemical analysis of the soils. Twenty-five duplicate samples were analyzed for a number of metals, radiological and agricultural parameters, and organics by two laboratories currently contracted with to analyze samples during waste site characterization. In all cases, the absolute values of the average differences are relatively small compared to the overall variability in the population. 31 refs., 14 figs., 48 tabs.

Looney, B.B.; Eddy, C.A.; Ramdeen, M.; Pickett, J. (Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)); Rogers, V. (Soil Conservation Service, Aiken, SC (USA). Savannah River Site Savannah River Lab., Aiken, SC (USA)); Scott, M.T.; Shirley, P.A. (Sirrine Environmental Consultants, Greenville, SC (USA))

1990-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

266

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coolbaugh, Et Al., Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Geochemical water sampling, mineral distribution mapping, and shallow (30 cm) temperature probe measurements were conducted to expand on a previous field mapping study of surface geothermal features at Salt Wells, in order to evaluate the relationship between these features and structures that control geothermal fluid flow. Notes Water from six hot springs/seeps (out of some 20 seasonal discharges

267

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: FLUID GEOCHEMISTRY AT THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL FIELD, IDAHO- NEW DATA AND HYDROGEOLOGICAL IMPLICATIONS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Following a period of exploration and development in the mid-late 1970's, there was little activity at the Raft River geothermal field for the next ~20 years. US Geothermal Inc. acquired the project in 2002, and began commercial power generation in January 2008. From mid-2004 to present, US Geothermal Inc. has collected geochemical data from geothermal and monitoring wells in the field, as well as other shallow wells in the

268

Lecture notes Ideal fluid mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

involves energy loss--such fluids are known as viscous fluids--we will not consider them here. Some fluids of the basic equations underlying the dynamics of ideal fluids is based on three basic principles (see Chorin. Conservation of energy, energy is neither created nor destroyed. In turn these principles generate the: 1

Malham, Simon J.A.

269

Geochemical interpretation of Kings Mountain, North Carolina, orientation area  

SciTech Connect

An orientation study has been made of uranium occurrences in the area of Kings Mountain, North Carolina. This is one of the orientation studies of known uranium occurrences that are being conducted in several geologic provinces and under various climatic (weathering) conditions to provide the technical basis for design and interpretation of NURE geochemical reconnaissance programs. The Kings Mountain area was chosen for study primarily because of the reported presence of high-uranium monazite. This 750-mi/sup 2/ area is in the deeply weathered southern Appalachian Piedmont and spans portions of the Inner Piedmont, Kings Mountain, and Charlotte geologic belts. Uranium concentration maps for ground and surface water samples clearly outline the outcrop area of the Cherryville Quartz Monzonite with highs up to 10 ppb uranium near the reported uraninite. Several surface water samples appear to be anomalous because of trace industrial contamination. Uranium concentration maps for -100 to +200 mesh stream sediments indicate the area of monazite abundance. Several samples with >100 ppM uranium content appear to be high in uranium-rich resistate minerals. When the uranium content of sediment samples is ratioed to the sum of Hf, Dy, and Th, the anomaly pattern shifts to coincide with uranium highs in ground and surface water samples. False anomalies from concentrations of monazite (Ce,ThPO/sub 4/), xenotime (Y,DyPO/sub 4/), and zircon (Zr,HfSiO/sub 4/) in stream sediment samples can thus be eliminated. Residual anomalies should be related to unusual uranium enrichment of these common minerals or to the presence of an uncommon uranium-rich mineral. Tantalum, beryllium, and tin in stream sediments correspond to high concentrations of uranium in stream and ground water but not to uranium in sediments. In an initial reconnaissance, several media should be sampled, and it is essential to correct uranium in sediments for the sample mineralogy.

Price, V.; Ferguson, R.B.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Origin and geochemical evolution of the Michigan basin brine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical and isotopic data were collected on 126 oil field brine samples and were used to investigate the origin and geochemical evolution of water in 8 geologic formations in the Michigan basin. Two groups of brine are found in the basin, the Na-Ca-Cl brine in the upper Devonian formations, and Ca-Na-Cl brine from the lower Devonian and Silurian aged formations. Water in the upper Devonian Berea, Traverse, and Dundee formations originated from seawater concentrated into halite facies. This brine evolved by halite precipitation, dolomitization, aluminosilicate reactions, and the removal of SO{sub 4} by bacterial action or by CaSO{sub 4} precipitation. The stable isotopic composition (D, O) is thought to represent dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by meteoric water. Water in the lower Devonian Richfield, Detroit River Group, and Niagara-Salina formations is very saline Ca-Na-Cl brine. Cl/Br suggest it originated from seawater concentrated through the halite and into the MgSO{sub 4} salt facies, with an origin linked to the Silurian and Devonian salt deposits. Dolomitization and halite precipitation increased the Ca/Na, aluminosilicate reactions removed K, and bacterial action or CaSO{sub 4} precipitation removed SO{sub 4} from this brine. Water chemistry in the Ordovician Trenton-Black River formations indicates dilution of evapo-concentrated seawater by fresh or seawater. Possible saline end-members include Ordovician seawater, present-day upper Devonian brine, or Ca-Cl brine from the deeper areas in the basin.

Wilson, T.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Boiler using combustible fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluid fuel boiler is described comprising a combustion chamber, a cover on the combustion chamber having an opening for introducing a combustion-supporting gaseous fluid through said openings, means to impart rotation to the gaseous fluid about an axis of the combustion chamber, a burner for introducing a fluid fuel into the chamber mixed with the gaseous fluid for combustion thereof, the cover having a generally frustro-conical configuration diverging from the opening toward the interior of the chamber at an angle of between 15/sup 0/ and 55/sup 0/; means defining said combustion chamber having means defining a plurality of axial hot gas flow paths from a downstream portion of the combustion chamber to flow hot gases into an upstream portion of the combustion chamber, and means for diverting some of the hot gas flow along paths in a direction circumferentially of the combustion chamber, with the latter paths being immersed in the water flow path thereby to improve heat transfer and terminating in a gas outlet, the combustion chamber comprising at least one modular element, joined axially to the frustro-conical cover and coaxial therewith. The modular element comprises an inner ring and means of defining the circumferential, radial, and spiral flow paths of the hot gases.

Baumgartner, H.; Meier, J.G.

1974-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

272

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. , 1990. Uranium and (super 10) Be enrichments by fluidsabove 300 C. (Fig. Enrichments of uranium 238 U over 230 Th

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Donval, J. P. , 2005. Chlorine isotopic compositions ofand Davis, S. , 1984. Natural chlorine isotope variations.precision measurement of chlorine stable isotope ratios.

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Fluid origins, paths, and fluid-rock reactions at convergent margins, using halogens, Cl stable isotopes, and alkali metals as geochemical tracers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the oceans. Chemical Geology: Isotope Geoscience section 80(Geology and Geophysics, Louisiana State University, for her Li isotopeisotopes and origin of high-Cl magmas of the Stillwater Complex, Montana. Geology

Wei, Wei

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Lattice gas automata for flow and transport in geochemical systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lattice gas automata models are described, which couple solute transport with chemical reactions at mineral surfaces within pore networks. Diffusion in a box calculations are illustrated, which compare directly with Fickian diffusion. Chemical reactions at solid surfaces, including precipitation/dissolution, sorption, and catalytic reaction, can be examined with the model because hydrodynamic transport, solute diffusion and mineral surface processes are all treated explicitly. The simplicity and flexibility of the approach provides the ability to study the interrelationship between fluid flow and chemical reactions in porous materials, at a level of complexity that has not previously been computationally possible.

Janecky, D.R.; Chen, S.; Dawson, S.; Eggert, K.C.; Travis, B.J.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

RETRAN-3DA Program for Transient Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis of Complex Fluid Flow Systems: Volume 1: Theory and Numerics (Rev ision 3)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RETRAN-02 has proven to be a versatile and reliable computer program for use in best-estimate transient thermal-hydraulic analysis of light water reactor systems. The RETRAN-3D computer program is an extension of the RETRAN-02 program designed to provide analysis capabilities for (1) boiling water reactor (BWR) and pressurized water reactor (PWR) transients, (2) small break loss-of-coolant accidents, (3) anticipated transients without scram, (4) long-term transients, (5) transients with thermodynamic non...

1998-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

278

Computational fluid dynamics applications to improve crop production systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Computational fluid dynamics (CFD), numerical analysis and simulation tools of fluid flow processes have emerged from the development stage and become nowadays a robust design tool. It is widely used to study various transport phenomena which involve ... Keywords: Decision support tools, Greenhouse, Harvesting machines, Sprayers, Tillage

T. Bartzanas; M. Kacira; H. Zhu; S. Karmakar; E. Tamimi; N. Katsoulas; In Bok Lee; C. Kittas

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

On equivalence of thinning fluids used for hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper aims to answer the question: if and how non-Newtonian fluids may be compared in their mechanical action when used for hydraulic fracturing? By employing the modified formulation of the PKN problem we obtain its simple analytical solutions in the cases of perfectly plastic and Newtonian fluids. Since the results for shear thinning fluids are intermediate between those for these cases, the obtained equation for the fracture length suggests a criterion of the equivalence of various shear thinning fluids for the problem of hydraulic fractures. We assume fluids equivalent in their hydrofracturing action, when at a reference time they produce fractures of the same length. The equation for the fracture length translates the equivalence in terms of the hydraulic fracture length and treatment time into the equivalence in terms of the properties of a fracturing fluid (behavior and consistency indices). Analysis shows that the influence of the consistency and behavior indices on the fracture length, particle v...

Linkov, Alexander

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In The Geothermal Field Of Milos Island (Greece) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Mineralogical Petrographic And Geochemical Study Of Samples From Wells In The Geothermal Field Of Milos Island (Greece) Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: This paper presents a study of hydrothermal alteration on Milos island, Greece. Examination of cores and cuttings from the two drill sites, obtained from a depth of about 1100 m in Milos geothermal field, showed that the hydrothermal minerals occurring in the rock include: K-feldspar, albite, chlorite, talc, diopside, epidote, muscovite, tremolite, kaolinite, montmorillonite, alunite, anhydrite, gypsum, calcite, and opaque minerals.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media, V1.2.1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupled modeling of subsurface multiphase fluid and heat flow, solute transport, and chemical reactions can be applied to many geologic systems and environmental problems, including geothermal systems, diagenetic and weathering processes, subsurface waste disposal, acid mine drainage remediation, contaminant transport, and groundwater quality. TOUGHREACT has been developed as a comprehensive non-isothermal multi-component reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport simulator to investigate these and other problems. A number of subsurface thermo-physical-chemical processes are considered under various thermohydrological and geochemical conditions of pressure, temperature, water saturation, and ionic strength. TOUGHREACT can be applied to one-, two- or three-dimensional porous and fractured media with physical and chemical heterogeneity. The code can accommodate any number of chemical species present in liquid, gas and solid phases. A variety of equilibrium chemical reactions are considered, such as aqueous complexation, gas dissolution/exsolution, and cation exchange. Mineral dissolution/precipitation can take place subject to either local equilibrium or kinetic controls, with coupling to changes in porosity and permeability and capillary pressure in unsaturated systems. Chemical components can also be treated by linear adsorption and radioactive decay. The first version of the non-isothermal reactive geochemical transport code TOUGHREACT was developed (Xu and Pruess, 1998) by introducing reactive geochemistry into the framework of the existing multi-phase fluid and heat flow code TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991). TOUGHREACT was further enhanced with the addition of (1) treatment of mineral-water-gas reactive-transport under boiling conditions, (2) an improved HKF activity model for aqueous species, (3) gas species diffusion coefficients calculated as a function of pressure, temperature, and molecular properties, (4) mineral reactive surface area formulations for fractured and porous media, and (5) porosity, permeability, and capillary pressure changes owing to mineral precipitation/dissolution (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2000, 2001; Spycher et al., 2003a). Subsequently, TOUGH2 V2 was released with additional EOS modules and features (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT includes all of the previous extensions to the original version, along with the replacement of the original TOUGH2 (Pruess, 1991) by TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). TOUGHREACT has been applied to a wide variety of problems, some of which are included as examples, such as: (1) Supergene copper enrichment (Xu et al., 2001); (2) Mineral alteration in hydrothermal systems (Xu and Pruess, 2001a; Xu et al., 2004b; Dobson et al., 2004); (3) Mineral trapping for CO{sub 2} disposal in deep saline aquifers (Xu et al., 2003b and 2004a); (4) Coupled thermal, hydrological, and chemical processes in boiling unsaturated tuff for the proposed nuclear waste emplacement site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada (Sonnenthal et al., 1998, 2001; Sonnenthal and Spycher, 2000; Spycher et al., 2003a, b; Xu et al., 2001); (5) Modeling of mineral precipitation/dissolution in plug-flow and fracture-flow experiments under boiling conditions (Dobson et al., 2003); (6) Calcite precipitation in the vadose zone as a function of net infiltration (Xu et al., 2003); and (7) Stable isotope fractionation in unsaturated zone pore water and vapor (Singleton et al., 2004). The TOUGHREACT program makes use of 'self-documenting' features. It is distributed with a number of input data files for sample problems. Besides providing benchmarks for proper code installation, these can serve as a self-teaching tutorial in the use of TOUGHREACT, and they provide templates to help jump-start new applications. The fluid and heat flow part of TOUGHREACT is derived from TOUGH2 V2, so in addition to the current manual, users must have the manual of the TOUGH2 V2 (Pruess et al., 1999). The present version of TOUGHREACT provides the following TOUGH2 fluid property or 'EOS' (equation-of-state) modules: (1) EOS1 for

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2008-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

282

Trace metal speciation in saline waters affected by geothermal brines. [GEOCHEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A description is given of the chemical equilibrium computer program GEOCHEM, which has been developed to calculate trace element speciation in soil, irrigation, drainage, or Salton Sea waters affected by geothermal brine. GEOCHEM is applied to irrigation water-brine mixtures and to Salton Sea water-brine mixtures in order to compute the chemical speciation of the elements Cd, Cu, Hg, Ni, Pb, and Zn, along with the oxyanions of As and B. The results suggest that the computer simulation can have an important effect on a program for managing brine spills. Appendices include published papers on related research.

Sposito, G.; Page, A.L.

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Experimental Properties of Fluids Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Experimental Properties of Fluids Group, Physical and Chemical Properties Division of the Chemical Science and Technology Laboratory, NIST.

2000-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

284

Supercritical fluid reverse micelle systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

of 1 ) United States Patent 5,158,704 Fulton , et al. October 27, 1992 Supercritical fluid reverse micelle systems

Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Production of MHD fluid  

SciTech Connect

A hot gaseous fluid of low ash content, suitable for use in open-cycle MHD (magnetohydrodynamic) power generation, is produced by means of a three-stage process comprising (1) partial combustion of a fossil fuel to produce a hot gaseous product comprising CO.sub.2 CO, and H.sub.2 O, (2) reformation of the gaseous product from stage (1) by means of a fluidized char bed, whereby CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O are converted to CO and H.sub.2, and (3) combustion of CO and H.sub.2 from stage (2) to produce a low ash-content fluid (flue gas) comprising CO.sub.2 and H.sub.2 O and having a temperature of about 4000.degree. to 5000.degree.F.

Lacey, James J. (Library, PA); Kurtzrock, Roy C. (Bethel Park, PA); Bienstock, Daniel (Pittsburgh, PA)

1976-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

286

2.25 Advanced Fluid Mechanics, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of principal concepts and methods of fluid dynamics. Mass conservation, momentum, and energy equations for continua. Navier-Stokes equation for viscous flows. Similarity and dimensional analysis. Lubrication theory. ...

Sonin, A. A.

287

Geochemical Journal, Vol. 39, pp. 383 to 389, 2005 *Corresponding author (e-mail: ytakaha@hiroshima-u.ac.jp)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

383 Geochemical Journal, Vol. 39, pp. 383 to 389, 2005 *Corresponding author (e-mail: ytakaha@hiroshima,3 1 Department of Earth & Planetary Systems Science, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima 739 for Multiple Isotope Research for Astro-and Geochemical Evolution (MIRAGE), Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima

288

Preclosure Monitoring and Performance Confirmation at Yucca Mountain: Applicability of Geophysical, Geohydrological, and Geochemical Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Monitoring Electrical Resistivity with Surface andthe pore fluid electrical resistivity (inverse of conduc

Tsang, C.F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W[sub o] that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W[sub o] of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions. 27 figures.

Fulton, J.L.; Smith, R.D.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

290

Supercritical fluid reverse micelle separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of separating solute material from a polar fluid in a first polar fluid phase is provided. The method comprises combining a polar fluid, a second fluid that is a gas at standard temperature and pressure and has a critical density, and a surfactant. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid to define the first polar fluid phase. The combined polar and second fluids, surfactant, and solute material dissolved in the polar fluid is maintained under near critical or supercritical temperature and pressure conditions such that the density of the second fluid exceeds the critical density thereof. In this way, a reverse micelle system defining a reverse micelle solvent is formed which comprises a continuous phase in the second fluid and a plurality of reverse micelles dispersed in the continuous phase. The solute material is dissolved in the polar fluid and is in chemical equilibrium with the reverse micelles. The first polar fluid phase and the continuous phase are immiscible. The reverse micelles each comprise a dynamic aggregate of surfactant molecules surrounding a core of the polar fluid. The reverse micelle solvent has a polar fluid-to-surfactant molar ratio W, which can vary over a range having a maximum ratio W.sub.o that determines the maximum size of the reverse micelles. The maximum ratio W.sub.o of the reverse micelle solvent is then varied, and the solute material from the first polar fluid phase is transported into the reverse micelles in the continuous phase at an extraction efficiency determined by the critical or supercritical conditions.

Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Smith, Richard D. (Richland, WA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Fluid bed material transfer method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed apparatus comprising a pair of separated fluid bed enclosures, each enclosing a fluid bed carried on an air distributor plate supplied with fluidizing air from below the plate. At least one equalizing duct extending through sidewalls of both fluid bed enclosures and flexibly engaged therewith to communicate the fluid beds with each other. The equalizing duct being surrounded by insulation which is in turn encased by an outer duct having expansion means and being fixed between the sidewalls of the fluid bed enclosures.

Pinske, Jr., Edward E. (Akron, OH)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Development of New Biphasic Metal Organic Working Fluids for Subcritical  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biphasic Metal Organic Working Fluids for Subcritical Biphasic Metal Organic Working Fluids for Subcritical Geothermal Systems Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Development of New Biphasic Metal Organic Working Fluids for Subcritical Geothermal Systems Project Type / Topic 1 Laboratory Call for Submission of Applications for Research, Development and Analysis of Geothermal Technologies Project Type / Topic 2 Working Fluids for Binary Power Plants Project Description In binary-cycle plants the cycle efficiency improves as pumping energy is reduced and from maximizing the enthalpy gain of the working fluid for a given amount of heat extracted from the geothermal source brine. Enthalpy gain of the working fluid in the heat exchanger occurs principally from sensible heat gained while passing through the heat exchanger in the liquid state and from vaporization of the organic working fluid near the exit of the heat exchanger. Additional heat transfer is limited after the vapor phase transition due the low thermal conductivity and heat capacity of the vapor. Also, operating pressures and temperatures are constrained by the bulk phase behavior and thermodynamic properties of the working fluid (boiling point, latent heat of vaporization, density, heat capacity, etc.). The fundamental underlying goal of this project is to overcome the cycle efficiency limitations imposed by the bulk thermodynamic proper-ties of the working fluid by introducing a metal-organic heat carrier (MOHC) into the system.

293

2D simulation of fluid-structure interaction using finite element method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with pressure-based finite element analysis of fluid-structure systems considering the coupled fluid and structural dynamics. The present method uses two-dimensional fluid elements and structural line elements for the numerical simulation ... Keywords: Finite element, Galerkin weighted residual method, Newmark's predictor-corrector method, Pressure formulation, Sloshing

S. Mitra; K. P. Sinhamahapatra

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Chemie der Erde 65 (2005) 4778 Geochemical and isotopic characteristics and evolution of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemie der Erde 65 (2005) 47­78 Geochemical and isotopic characteristics and evolution) and Pichowiak (1994). ARTICLE IN PRESS W. Kramer et al. / Chemie der Erde 65 (2005) 47­7848 #12;These east (Oficina Viz Fm.) on a wide front to the west (Caleta Ligate Fm.). W. Kramer et al. / Chemie der

Siebel, Wolfgang

295

Modeling of concentrated aqueous solutions: Efficient implementation of Pitzer equations in geochemical and reactive transport models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modeling concentrated solutions demands the use of ion-interaction models such as Pitzer equations, which involve a large number of operations. Implementation of these models in large reactive transport simulations significantly increases the computation ... Keywords: Concentrated solutions, Evaporation of seawater, Geochemical modeling, HMW model, Invariant points, Object-oriented programming, Pitzer, Reactive transport modeling

S. A. Bea; J. Carrera; C. Ayora; F. Batlle

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Geochemical Implications of Gas Leakage Associated with Geologic CO2 Storage - A Qualitative Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is considered the major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of CO2. Different schools of thought exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. We reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of overlying potable aquifers. Results from experimental and modeling studies point to the potential for both beneficial (e.g. contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g. contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion into potable groundwater. However, there are significant discrepancies between studies particularly concerning, what contaminants are of concern and the geochemical processes involved. These discrepancies reflected the lack of a consensus on CO2-induced changes in subsurface geochemical processes and subsequent effects on groundwater chemistry. The development of consistent experimental protocols and the identification of pertinent factors driving CO2-induced geochemical changes in the subsurface were identified as key research needs. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why a standardization of experimental protocols and the consideration of experimental factors such as gas leakage rates, redox status and the influence of co-transported gases are pertinent. The role of analog studies, reactions occurring in the vadose zone, and the influence of organic contaminants are also discussed.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Lee, Gie Hyeon; Amonette, James E.; Brown, Christopher F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Geochemical constraints on the Palaeocene^ Miocene evolution of eastern Azerbaijan, with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical constraints on the Palaeocene^ Miocene evolution of eastern AzerbaijanEarth and Environmental Sciences, University of Texas at Arlington, Arlington,TX, USA zAzerbaijan NationalAcademy of Sciences Geology Institute ^ 29 A. H. Javid Pr., Baku, Azerbaijan ABSTRACT Fine-grained Palaeogene

Johnson, Cari

298

Geochemical modeling of the nuclear-waste repository system. A status report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary objective of the geochemical modeling task is to develop an understanding of the waste-repository geochemical system and provide a valuable tool for estimating future states of that system. There currently exists a variety of computer codes which can be used in geochemical modeling studies. Some available codes contain the framework for simulating a natural chemical system and estimating, within limits, the response of that system to environmental changes. By data-base enhancement and code development, this modeling technique can be even more usefully applied to a nuclear-waste repository. In particular, thermodynamic data on elements not presently in the data base but identified as being of particular hazard in the waste-repository system, need to be incorporated into the code to estimate the near-field as well as the far-field reactions during a hypothetical breach. A reaction-path-simulation code, which estimates the products of specific rock/water reactions, has been tested using basalt and ground water. Results show that the mass-transfer capabilities of the code will be useful in chemical-evolution studies and scenario analyses. The purpose of this report is to explain the status of geochemical modeling as it currently applies to the chemical system of a hypothetical nuclear-waste repository in basalt and to present the plan proposed for further developmet and application.

Deutsch, W.J.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit, Athabasca Basin Natural Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaboration Introduction The Wheeler River Property, host of Denison Mine's Phoenix uranium depositCo Mo Ni UU Geochemical anomalies in soil and sandstone overlying the Phoenix uranium deposit is the most efficient analytical method to detect these anomalies. Athabasca Basin Figure 1: Denison Mine

300

Soil geochemical survey over concealed kimberlites in the Attawapiskat area in northern Canada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lengths of 562 m over the Whiskey kimberlite and 740 m over the Yankee kimberlite pipe. B-horizon soil of the kimberlite pipes. Ammonium acetate leach at pH 5 (AA5) dissolves most of these carbonates, and shows geochemical characteristics of kimberlites in com- parison with peridotites, oceanic basalts (MORB

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Z .Chemical Geology 145 1998 153159 z /Geochemical Earth Reference Model GERM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Z .Chemical Geology 145 1998 153­159 z /Geochemical Earth Reference Model GERM : description on a chemical characterization of the Earth, its major reservoirs, and the fluxes between them. The Z .GERM chemical Z . Z .reservoirs of the present-day Earth, from core to atmosphere; 2 present-day fluxes between

Mcdonough, William F.

302

Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paper #194973 GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF THE RESERVOIR HOSTING SHALE-GAS AND OIL a reservoir for shale-gas and oil. We examined organic-rich black shale, known as Macasty shale, of Upper SHALE-GAS AND OIL in THE SUBSURFACE OF ANTICOSTI ISLAND, CANADA Key Words: Provenance, Anticosti Island

303

Oak Ridge Geochemical Reconnaissance Program. [For National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge reconnaissance program is responsible for the geochemical survey in a 12-state area covering Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, Nebraska, South Dakota, North Dakota, Minnesota, Wisconsin, Michigan, Iowa, Indiana, and Illinois as part of the National Uranium Resource Evaluation Program. The program concept is outlined and the planning and organization of the program is discussed. (JSR)

Arendt, J.W.

1977-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Industrial gear box lubricants typically are hydrocarbon based mineral oils with considerable amounts of additives to overcome the lack of base fluid properties like wear protection, oxidation stability, load carrying capacity, low temperature solidification and drop of viscosity at higher temperatures. For today's wind turbine gearboxes, the requirements are more severe and synthetic hydrocarbon oils are used to improve on this, but all such hydrocarbon based lubricants require significant amounts of Extreme Pressure (EP) additives to meet performance requirements. Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) fluids provide load carrying capacity as an inherent property. During the course of the project with the main tasks of 'Establish a Benchmark', 'Lubricant Evaluation', 'Full Scale Gearbox Trial' and 'Economic Evaluation', the PAO Reference oil exhibited significant changes after laboratory gear testing, in service operation in the field and full scale gearbox trial. Four hydrocarbon base oils were selected for comparison in the benchmarking exercise and showed variation with respect to meeting the requirements for the laboratory micro-pitting tests, while the PFPE fluid exceeded the requirements even with the material taken after the full scale gear box trial. This is remarkable for a lubricant without EP additives. Laboratory bearing tests performed on the PFPE fluids before and after the full scale gear box trial showed the results met requirements for the industry standard. The PFPE fluid successfully completed the full scale gear box test program which included baseline and progressive staged load testing. The evaluation of gears showed no micro-pitting or objectionable wear. By the final stage, lubricant film thickness had been reduced to just 21% of its original value, this was by design and resulted in a lambda ratio of well below 1. This test design scenario of a low lambda ratio is a very undesirable lubrication condition for real world but creates the ability to test the lubricating fluids performance under the most extreme conditions. The PAO Reference oil also passed its testing without any noticeable deterioration of the gear surface. However the PAO Reference oil was replaced midway through the progressive loading, as the lubricant was burned in an attempt to raise the sump temperature to the same levels as for the PFPE. Both materials experienced a decrease of viscosity during their respective run times. The viscosity index decreased for the PAO there while there was a slight increase for the PFPE. FZG laboratory gear tests and measurements of the drive motor's current during the full scale gear box trial were made to characterize the relative efficiency between the PFPE fluid and the PAO Reference oil. In the FZG laboratory efficiency test, the PFPE fluids show much higher churning losses due to their higher viscosity and density. The analysis seems to show that the efficiency correlates better to dynamic viscosity than any other of the measured metrics such as film thickness. In load stages where the load, speed and temperature are similar, the PFPE fluid has a greater film thickness and theoretical gear protection, but requires a larger current for the drive motor than the PAO. However in load stages where the film thickness is the same, the PFPE fluid's reduced dynamic viscosity gives it a slight efficiency advantage relative to the PAO reference oil. Ultimately, many factors such as temperature, rotational speed, and fluid viscosity combine in a complex fashion to influence the results. However, the PFPE's much lower change of viscosity with respect to temperature, allows variations in designing an optimum viscosity to balance efficiency versus gear protection. Economic analysis was done using Cost of Energy calculations. The results vary from 5.3% for a 'Likely Case' to 16.8% for a 'Best Case' scenario as potential cost improvement by using PFPE as the gearbox lubricating fluid. It is important to note the largest portion of savings comes in Levelized Replacement Cost, which is dictated by the assumption on gearb

Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

2012-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

305

Acoustic concentration of particles in fluid flow  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for acoustic concentration of particles in a fluid flow includes a substantially acoustically transparent membrane and a vibration generator that define a fluid flow path therebetween. The fluid flow path is in fluid communication with a fluid source and a fluid outlet and the vibration generator is disposed adjacent the fluid flow path and is capable of producing an acoustic field in the fluid flow path. The acoustic field produces at least one pressure minima in the fluid flow path at a predetermined location within the fluid flow path and forces predetermined particles in the fluid flow path to the at least one pressure minima.

Ward, Michael D. (Los Alamos, NM); Kaduchak, Gregory (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

306

Role of Fluid Pressure in the Production Behavior of Enhanced Geothermal Systems with CO2 as Working Fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Turkey, 24-29 April 2005. Durst, D. Geochemical Modeling ofprecipitation reactions (Durst, 2002; Bchler, 2003; Xu and

Pruess, Karsten

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

It's The Fluids SEG Honorary Lecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

T.P. Water Butane CO2 #12;Fluid ­ Density 800 1000 1200FluidDensity[kg/m3] Brine CO2 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 200 400 600 Fluid Pressure [MPa] FluidDensity[kg/m Butane CO2 #12;Fluid ­ Modulus 2000 2500 3000 FluidModulus[MPa] Brine 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 500 1000 1500 Fluid Pressure [MPa] FluidModulus[MPa] Butane CO2 #12;GENERAL PHASE

308

Soil Iodine Determination in Deccan Syneclise, India: Implications for Near Surface Geochemical Hydrocarbon Prospecting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The association of iodine with organic matter in sedimentary basins is well documented. High iodine concentration in soils overlying oil and gas fields and areas with hydrocarbon microseepage has been observed and used as a geochemical exploratory tool for hydrocarbons in a few studies. In this study, we measure iodine concentration in soil samples collected from parts of Deccan Syneclise in the west central India to investigate its potential application as a geochemical indicator for hydrocarbons. The Deccan Syneclise consists of rifted depositional sites with Gondwana-Mesozoic sediments up to 3.5 km concealed under the Deccan Traps and is considered prospective for hydrocarbons. The concentration of iodine in soil samples is determined using ICP-MS and the values range between 1.1 and 19.3 ppm. High iodine values are characteristic of the northern part of the sampled region. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the soil samples range between 0.1 and 1.3%. The TOC correlates poorly with the soil iodine (r{sup 2} propane-oxidizing bacterial populations in the soil. The integration of geochemical observations show the occurrence of elevated values in the northern part of the study area, which is also coincident with the presence of exposed dyke swarms that probably serve as conduits for hydrocarbon microseepage. The corroboration of iodine with existing geological, geophysical, and geochemical data suggests its efficacy as one of the potential tool in surface geochemical exploration of hydrocarbons. Our study supports Deccan Syneclise to be promising in terms of its hydrocarbon prospects.

Mani, Devleena, E-mail: devleenatiwari@ngri.res.in [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India); Kumar, T. Satish [Oil India Limited (India); Rasheed, M. A.; Patil, D. J.; Dayal, A. M.; Rao, T. Gnaneshwar; Balaram, V. [National Geophysical Research Institute (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (India)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT DYTRAN BENCHMARK ANALYSIS OF SEISMICALLY INDUCED FLUID STRUCTURE INTERACTION IN FLAT TOP TANKS  

SciTech Connect

The work reported in this document was performed in support of a project entitled ''Double-Shell Tank (DST) Integrity Project - DST Thermal and Seismic Analyses''. The overall scope of the project is to complete an up-to-date comprehensive analysis of record of the DST System at Hanford. The work described herein was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the DSTs. The thermal and operating loads analysis of the DSTs is documented in Rinker et al. (2004). The work herein was motivated by review comments from a Project Review Meeting held on March 20-21, 2006. One of the recommendations from that meeting was that the effects of the interaction between the tank liquid and the roof be further studied (Rinker, Deibler, Johnson, Karri, Pilli, Abatt, Carpenter, and Hendrix - Appendix E of RPP-RPT-28968, Rev. 1). The reviewers recommended that solutions be obtained for seismic excitation of flat roof tanks containing liquid with varying headspace between the top of the liquid and the tank roof. It was recommended that the solutions be compared with simple, approximate procedures described in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005). This report documents the results of the requested studies and compares the predictions of Dytran simulations to the approximate procedures in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005) for flat roof tanks. The four cases analyzed all employed a rigid circular cylindrical flat top tank with a radius of 450 in. and a height of 500 in. The initial liquid levels in the tank were 460,480,490, and 500 in. For the given tank geometry and the selected seismic input, the maximum unconstrained slosh height of the liquid is slightly greater than 25 in. Thus, the initial liquid level of 460 in. represents an effectively roofless tank, the two intermediate liquid levels lead to intermittent interaction between the liquid and tank roof, and the 500 in. liquid level represents a completely full tank with no sloshing. Although this work was performed in support of the seismic analysis of the Hanford DSTs, the tank models in this study are for an idealized flat top configuration. Moreover, the liquid levels used in the present models are for study purposes only and are independent of the actual operating levels of the DSTs. The response parameters that are evaluated in this study are the total hydrodynamic reaction forces, the peak convective hydrodynamic forces, the fundamental convective frequencies, the liquid pressures, and peak slosh heights. The results show that the Dytran solutions agree well with the known solutions for the roofless tank and completely full tank. At the two intermediate liquid levels, there are some significant differences between the Dytran results and the approximate estimates. The results show that the estimates of peak hydrodynamic reaction forces appearing in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005) are reasonable and generally conservative relative to the Dytran solutions. At the 460 and 480 in. liquid levels, Dytran underestimates the convective component of the reaction force compared to the estimated in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005), but the convective component of the reaction force is small relative to the total reaction force. At the 490 in. liquid levels, the peak convective reaction force is more than twice as large as predicted by the approximate methods in BNL (1995) and Malhotra (2005). All three methods give similar answers for the fundamental convective frequency at the 460 and 480 in. liquid levels, but the Dytran solution indicates a significant increase in the apparent convective frequency at the 490 in. liquid level that is caused by the interaction with the roof. The peak wall pressures in the tank at the two intermediate liquid levels are essentially the same as for a roofless tank in the lower two-thirds of the tank wall, but diverge from that solution in the upper third of the tank wall. The estimates of peak wall pressures appearing in BNL (1995) are quite conservative lower in the tank, but may underestimate the peak wall pressures closer to the tank roof. Finally, the peak roof pre

MACKEY, T.C.

2007-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

310

Analysis of Mineral Trapping for CO2 Disposal in Deep Aquifers  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Reactive Geochemical Transport Simulation to Study Mineral Trapping Reactive Geochemical Transport Simulation to Study Mineral Trapping for CO 2 Disposal in Deep Saline Arenaceous Aquifers Tianfu Xu, John A. Apps, and Karsten Pruess Earth Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract. A reactive fluid flow and geochemical transport numerical model for evaluating long-term CO 2 disposal in deep aquifers has been developed. Using this model, we performed a number of sensitivity simulations under CO 2 injection conditions for a commonly encountered Gulf Coast sediment to analyze the impact of CO 2 immobilization through carbonate precipitation. Geochemical models are needed because alteration of the predominant host rock aluminosilicate minerals is very slow and is not

311

Microsoft PowerPoint - Development of a Two-Fluid_Gokaltun  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

M., Particle-Fluid Two-Phase Flow: the Energy-Minimization Multi-Scale Method; Metallurgy. Beijing: Industry Press, 1994. (2) Benyahia, S., Analysis of Model Parameters...

312

Effects of Port Geometries on Fluid Flow Patterns in Slab Moulds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Residence Time Distribution (RTD) of Fluid Flows in a Four Strand Delta-shaped Tundish Operating Under Isothermal and Non-isothermal...

313

Study on Fluid Flow in a Twelve-strand Tundish under the Operation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of Residence Time Distribution (RTD) of Fluid Flows in a Four Strand Delta-shaped Tundish Operating Under Isothermal and Non-isothermal...

314

Geochemical Characterization of Chromate Contamination in the 100 Area Vadose Zone at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The major objectives of the proposed study were to: 1.) determine the leaching characteristics of hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] from contaminated sediments collected from 100 Area spill sites; 2.) elucidate possible Cr(VI) mineral and/or chemical associations that may be responsible for Cr(VI) retention in the Hanford Site 100 Areas through the use of i.) macroscopic leaching studies and ii.) microscale characterization of contaminated sediments; and 3.) provide information to construct a conceptual model of Cr(VI) geochemistry in the Hanford 100 Area vadose zone. In addressing these objectives, additional benefits accrued were: (1) a fuller understanding of Cr(VI) entrained in the vadose zone that will that can be utilized in modeling potential Cr(VI) source terms, and (2) accelerating the Columbia River 100 Area corridor cleanup by providing valuable information to develop remedial action based on a fundamental understanding of Cr(VI) vadose zone geochemistry. A series of macroscopic column experiments were conducted with contaminated and uncontaminated sediments to study Cr(VI) desorption patterns in aged and freshly contaminated sediments, evaluate the transport characteristics of dichromate liquid retrieved from old pipelines of the 100 Area; and estimate the effect of strongly reducing liquid on the reduction and transport of Cr(VI). Column experiments used the < 2 mm fraction of the sediment samples and simulated Hanford groundwater solution. Periodic stop-flow events were applied to evaluate the change in elemental concentration during time periods of no flow and greater fluid residence time. The results were fit using a two-site, one dimensional reactive transport model. Sediments were characterized for the spatial and mineralogical associations of the contamination using an array of microscale techniques such as XRD, SEM, EDS, XPS, XMP, and XANES. The following are important conclusions and implications. Results from column experiments indicated that most of contaminant Cr travels fast through the sediments and appears as Cr(VI) in the effluents. The significance of this for groundwater concentrations would, however, depend on the mass flux of recharge to the water table. adsorption of Cr(VI) to sediments from spiked Cr(VI) solution is low; calculated retardation coefficients are close to one. Calcium polysulfide solutions readily reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III) in column experiments. However a significant amount of the Cr(VI) was mobilized ahead of the polysulfide solution front. This has significant implications for in-situ reductive remediation techniques. The experiments suggest that it would be difficult to design a remedial measure using infiltration of liquid phase reductants without increasing transport of Cr(VI) toward the water table. The microscopic characterization results are consistent with the column studies. Cr(VI) is found as ubiquitous coatings on sediment grain surfaces. Small, higher concentration, chromium sites are associated with secondary clay mineral inclusions, with occasional barium chromate minerals, and reduced to Cr(III) in association with iron oxides that are most likely magnetite primary minerals. Within the restricted access domains of sediment matrix, ferrous iron could also diffuse from in situ, high-surface-area minerals to cause the reductive immobilization of chromate. This process may be favored at microscale geochemical zones where ferrous iron could be supplied. Once nucleated, micrometer-scale precipitates are favored as growing locales for further accumulation, causing the formation of discrete zones of Cr(III).

Dresel, P. Evan; Qafoku, Nikolla; McKinley, James P.; Fruchter, Jonathan S.; Ainsworth, Calvin C.; Liu, Chongxuan; Ilton, Eugene S.; Phillips, J. L.

2008-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

315

Ultrasonic fluid quality sensor system  

SciTech Connect

A system for determining the composition of a multiple-component fluid and for determining linear flow comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the multiple-component fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the multiple-component fluid. A system for determining flow uses two of the inventive circuits, one of which is set at an angle that is not perpendicular to the direction of flow.

Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

316

Ultrasonic Fluid Quality Sensor System  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for determining the composition of a multiple-component fluid and for determining linear flow comprising at least one sing-around circuit that determines the velocity of a signal in the multiple-component fluid and that is correlatable to a database for the multiple-component fluid. A system for determining flow uses two of the inventive circuits, one of which is set at an angle that is not perpendicular to the direction of flow.

Gomm, Tyler J. (Meridian, ID); Kraft, Nancy C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Phelps, Larry D. (Pocatello, ID); Taylor, Steven C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

317

MOLTEN SALT HEAT TRANSFER FLUID  

thermal energy storage tanks Sandia has developed a heat transfer fluid (HTF) for use at elevated temperatures that has a lower freezing point

318

Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Documentation Page Documentation Page 1. Report No. DE - FC 21 - 92MC29077 2. 3. Recipient's Accession No. 5. Report Date August 31, 2000 4. Title and Subtitle Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility 6. 7. Author(s) The University of Oklahoma 8. Performing Organization Rept. No. 10. Project/Task/Work Unit No. 9. Performing Organization Name and Address The University of Oklahoma Sarkeys Energy Center T301 100 E Boyd St Norman, OK 73019 11. Contract (C) or Grant (G) No. DOE:DE FC21 92 MC29077 13. Type of Report & Period Covered Final Report 09 30 92 - 03 31 00 12. Sponsoring Organization Name and Address US Dept of Energy - FETL 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26505 14. 15. Supplementary Notes Several technical papers were prepared and presented at various Society of Petroleum Engineers Conferences and US

319

TOURGHREACT: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for modeling fluid and heat flow in fractured porous media.flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media.

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Classical analogous of quantum cosmological perfect fluid models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantization in the mini-superspace of a gravity system coupled to a perfect fluid, leads to a solvable model which implies singularity free solutions through the construction of a superposition of the wavefunctions. We show that such models are equivalent to a classical system where, besides the perfect fluid, a repulsive fluid with an equation of state $p_Q = \\rho_Q$ is present. This leads to speculate on the true nature of this quantization procedure. A perturbative analysis of the classical system reveals the condition for the stability of the classical system in terms of the existence of an anti-gravity phase.

A. B. Batista; J. C. Fabris; S. V. B. Goncalves; J. Tossa

2000-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Geochemical Aspects of the Carbonation of Magnesium Silicates in an Aqueous Medium  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF THE CARBONATION OF MAGNESIUM GEOCHEMICAL ASPECTS OF THE CARBONATION OF MAGNESIUM SILICATES IN AN AQUEOUS MEDIUM George D. Guthrie, Jr. (gguthrie@lanl.gov 505-665-6340) J. William Carey (bcarey@lanl.gov 505-667-5540) Deborah Bergfeld (debberrg@lanl.gov 505-667-1812) Darrin Byler (dbyler@lanl.gov 505-665-9562) Steve Chipera (chipera@lanl.gov 505-667-1110) Hans-Joachim Ziock (ziock@lanl.gov 505-667-7265) Hydrology, Geochemistry, & Geology Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos, NM 87545 Klaus Lackner (ksl@lanl.gov 505-667-5694) Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM and Columbia University, New York, NY KEYWORDS: CO 2 sequestration, magnesium silicate, mineral carbonation INTRODUCTION The volume of carbon dioxide associated with the use of fossil fuels to produce

322

Origin of geochemical heterogeneity in the mantle : constraints from volcanism associated with Hawaiian and Kerguelen mantle plumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lavas derived from long-lived mantle plumes provide important information of mantle compositions and the processes that created the geochemical heterogeneity within the mantle. Kerguelen and Hawaii are two long-lived mantle ...

Xu, Guangping

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Transdisciplinary Fluid Integration Research Center  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environment Reality-Coupled Computation Energy Dynamics Integrated Visual Informatics Super-Real-Time Medical of Fluid Science, Tohoku University, in April 2003. The next generation transdisciplinary research Research focus is to advance utilization of Computer Fluid Dynamics (CFD) for solving engineering problems

Obayashi, Shigeru

324

Evaluation of selected geochemical anomalies in Colorado and the Southeastern US. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This study demonstrates the utility of HSSR geochemical data from stream sediment in exploration for uranium. In the southeastern US, four uraniferous occurrences and associated radiometric anomalies were identified in areas where uranium mineralization has not been previously reported. At two localities, assays of about .01% have been obtained from saprolite. There is some evidence which suggests that uranium may have been leached at these localities and that higher grades of U are likely at depth.

Carpenter, R H

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Proceedings of the second workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop was held to review the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring and scientific drilling in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and techonic processes. Data from a 2400-ft deep core hole completed in June 1986 were presented at the 1986 workshop and participants discussed the need and rationale for siting locations for future scientific drilling in the caldera.

Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A. (eds.)

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Fracturing fluids -- then and now  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fracturing fluid provides the means by which the hydraulic fracturing process can take place. All applications of well stimulation by fracturing must include selection of fracturing fluid in the initial phases of fracture design and treatment planning. Fracturing fluid has two important purposes: (1) to provide sufficient viscosity to suspend and transport proppant deep into the created fracture system and (2) to decompose, or break, chemically to a low viscosity to allow flowback of a major part of the fluid to the surface for fracture cleanup after the treatment is completed. Because of the importance of its rheological properties and behavior in the fracture under reservoir conditions during (and immediately after) the treatment, service company research laboratories have spent millions of dollars on R and D of fracturing fluids.

Jennings, A.R. Jr. [Enhanced Well Stimulation Inc., Plano, TX (United States)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fluid flow monitoring device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention consists of a flow meter and temperature measuring device comprising a tube with a body centered therein for restricting flow and a sleeve at the upper end of the tube to carry several channels formed longitudinally in the sleeve to the appropriate axial location where they penetrate the tube to allow pressure measurements and temperature measurements with thermocouples. The high pressure measurement is made using a channel penetrating the tube away from the body and the low pressure measurement is made at a location at the widest part of the body. An end plug seals the end of the device and holes at its upper end allow fluid to pass from the interior of the tube into a plenum. The channels are made by cutting grooves in the sleeve, the grooves widened at the surface of the sleeve and then a strip of sleeve material is welded to the grooves closing the channels. Preferably the sleeve is packed with powdered graphite before cutting the grooves and welding the strips.

McKay, M.D.; Sweeney, C.E.

1991-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

328

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

Houck, Edward D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention comprises a fluid sampling system which allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped up into a sampling jet of venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to decrease, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodicially leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank.

Houck, E.D.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

Fluid sampling system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An fluid sampling system allows sampling of radioactive liquid without spillage. A feed tank is connected to a liquid transfer jet powered by a pumping chamber pressurized by compressed air. The liquid is pumped upwardly into a sampling jet of a venturi design having a lumen with an inlet, an outlet, a constricted middle portion, and a port located above the constricted middle portion. The liquid is passed under pressure through the constricted portion causing its velocity to increase and its pressure to be decreased, thereby preventing liquid from escaping. A septum sealing the port can be pierced by a two pointed hollow needle leading into a sample bottle also sealed by a pierceable septum affixed to one end. The bottle is evacuated by flow through the sample jet, cyclic variation in the sampler jet pressure periodically leaves the evacuated bottle with lower pressure than that of the port, thus causing solution to pass into the bottle. The remaining solution in the system is returned to the feed tank via a holding tank. 4 figs.

Houck, E.D.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

331

Tracing Geothermal Fluids  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal water must be injected back into the reservoir after it has been used for power production. Injection is critical in maximizing the power production and lifetime of the reservoir. To use injectate effectively the direction and velocity of the injected water must be known or inferred. This information can be obtained by using chemical tracers to track the subsurface flow paths of the injected fluid. Tracers are chemical compounds that are added to the water as it is injected back into the reservoir. The hot production water is monitored for the presence of this tracer using the most sensitive analytic methods that are economically feasible. The amount and concentration pattern of the tracer revealed by this monitoring can be used to evaluate how effective the injection strategy is. However, the tracers must have properties that suite the environment that they will be used in. This requires careful consideration and testing of the tracer properties. In previous and parallel investigations we have developed tracers that are suitable from tracing liquid water. In this investigation, we developed tracers that can be used for steam and mixed water/steam environments. This work will improve the efficiency of injection management in geothermal fields, lowering the cost of energy production and increasing the power output of these systems.

Michael C. Adams; Greg Nash

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Shevenell & Garside, Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Exploration Activity Details Location Salt Wells Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date 2002 - 2002 Usefulness not useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis The objective of the study was to expand knowledge of Nevada's geothermal resource potential by providing new geochemical data from springs in less studied geothermal areas and to refine geochemical data from springs for which only incomplete data were available. This work fills in gaps in publicly available geochemical data, thereby enabling comprehensive evaluation of Nevada's geothermal resource potential.

333

GEOTECHNICAL/GEOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF ADVANCED COAL PROCESS WASTE STREAMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thirteen solid wastes, six coals and one unreacted sorbent produced from seven advanced coal utilization processes were characterized for task three of this project. The advanced processes from which samples were obtained included a gas-reburning sorbent injection process, a pressurized fluidized-bed coal combustion process, a coal-reburning process, a SO{sub x}, NO{sub x}, RO{sub x}, BOX process, an advanced flue desulfurization process, and an advanced coal cleaning process. The waste samples ranged from coarse materials, such as bottom ashes and spent bed materials, to fine materials such as fly ashes and cyclone ashes. Based on the results of the waste characterizations, an analysis of appropriate waste management practices for the advanced process wastes was done. The analysis indicated that using conventional waste management technology should be possible for disposal of all the advanced process wastes studied for task three. However, some wastes did possess properties that could present special problems for conventional waste management systems. Several task three wastes were self-hardening materials and one was self-heating. Self-hardening is caused by cementitious and pozzolanic reactions that occur when water is added to the waste. All of the self-hardening wastes setup slowly (in a matter of hours or days rather than minutes). Thus these wastes can still be handled with conventional management systems if care is taken not to allow them to setup in storage bins or transport vehicles. Waste self-heating is caused by the exothermic hydration of lime when the waste is mixed with conditioning water. If enough lime is present, the temperature of the waste will rise until steam is produced. It is recommended that self-heating wastes be conditioned in a controlled manner so that the heat will be safely dissipated before the material is transported to an ultimate disposal site. Waste utilization is important because an advanced process waste will not require ultimate disposal when it is put to use. Each task three waste was evaluated for utilization potential based on its physical properties, bulk chemical composition, and mineral composition. Only one of the thirteen materials studied might be suitable for use as a pozzolanic concrete additive. However, many wastes appeared to be suitable for other high-volume uses such as blasting grit, fine aggregate for asphalt concrete, road deicer, structural fill material, soil stabilization additives, waste stabilization additives, landfill cover material, and pavement base course construction.

Edwin S. Olson; Charles J. Moretti

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Geochemical Data Package for Performance Assessment Calculations Related to the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site disposes of certain types of radioactive waste within subsurface-engineered facilities. One of the tools used to establish the capacity of a given site to safely store radioactive waste (i.e., that a site does not exceed its Waste Acceptance Criteria) is the Performance Assessment (PA). The objective of this document is to provide the geochemical values for the PA calculations. This work is being conducted as part of the on-going maintenance program that permits the PA to periodically update existing calculations when new data becomes available. Because application of values without full understanding of their original purpose may lead to misuse, this document also provides the geochemical conceptual model, approach used for selecting the values, the justification for selecting data, and the assumptions made to assure that the conceptual and numerical geochemical models are reasonably conservative (i.e., reflect conditions that will tend to predict the maximum risk to the hypothetical recipient). The geochemical parameters describe transport processes for 38 elements (>90 radioisotopes) potentially occurring within eight disposal units (Slit Trenches, Engineered Trenches, Low Activity Waste (LAW) Vault, Intermediate Level (ILV) Vaults, TRU-Pad-1, Naval Reactor Waste Pads, Components-in-Grout Trenches, and Saltstone Facility). This work builds upon well-documented work from previous PA calculations (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). The new geochemical concepts introduced in this data package are: (1) In the past, solubility products were used only in a few conditions (element existing in a specific environmental setting). This has been expanded to >100 conditions. (2) Radionuclide chemistry in cementitious environments is described through the use of both the Kd and apparent solubility concentration limit. Furthermore, the solid phase is assumed to age during the assessment period (thousands of years), resulting in three main types of controlling solid phases, each possessing a unique set of radionuclide sorption parameters (Kd and solubility concentration limit). (3) A large amount of recent site-specific sorption research has been conducted since the last PA (McDowell-Boyer et al. 2000). These new data have replaced previous Kd values derived from literature values, thus reducing uncertainty and improving accuracy. Finally, because this document will be used by future PA calculations and external acceptance of the document will eventually be required, this document was extensively reviewed. The review process, including the internal review, site review, and external review process is described.

Kaplan, D

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

335

Particle sorter comprising a fluid displacer in a closed-loop fluid circuit  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein are methods and devices utilizing a fluid displacer in a closed-loop fluid circuit.

Perroud, Thomas D. (San Jose, CA); Patel, Kamlesh D. (Dublin, CA); Renzi, Ronald F. (Tracy, CA)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

336

Stable isotope investigation of fluids and water-rock interaction in the Roosevelt Hot Springs thermal area, Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon-hydrogen-oxygen isotope compositions have been measured in regional cold waters, geothermal fluids, and hydrothermally altered rocks from the Roosevelt Hot Springs geothermal area. These data have been used, in conjunction with other geological and geochemical data from this geothermal system, to place some limits on the origin of geothermal fluids and reservoir carbon, the fluid recharge area, physical-chemical environment of hydrothermal alteration, and relative permeability of the geothermal system. The similarity of hydrogen isotope compositions of local meteoric water and geothermal reservoir fluid indicate that the geothermal fluids are virtually entirely of surface derivation. An isotopically reasonable source area would be the Mineral Mountains directly to the east of the Roosevelt system. Hydrothermal calcite appears to be in isotopic equilibrium with the deep reservoir fluid. The deltaC/sup 13/ values of deep calcites and T- pH-f0/sub 2/ conditions of the reservoir defined by measured temperature, fluid chemistry, and alteration mineralogy fix the delta/sup 13/C value of the geothermal system to -5 to -6.5% (PDB). These values do not unambiguously define any one source or process, however. There is a relatively small increase in /sup 18/O of geothermal fluids relative to their cold surface water precursors and significant /sup 18/O depletion accompanying hydrothermal alteration of the granitic host rock. These isotopic shifts indicate a high ratio of geothermal fluid to altered rock for the geothermal system, implying relatively rapid (geologically) recirculation rates and significant permeability of the geothermal system.

Bowman, J.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Standardization of Thermo-Fluid Modeling in Modelica.Fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article discusses the Modelica.Fluid library that has been included in the Modelica Standard Library 3.1. Modelica.Fluid provides interfaces and basic components for the device-oriented modeling of onedimensional thermo-fluid flow in networks containing vessels, pipes, fluid machines, valves and fittings. A unique feature of Modelica.Fluid is that the component equations and the media models as well as pressure loss and heat transfer correlations are decoupled from each other. All components are implemented such that they can be used for media from the Modelica.Media library. This means that an incompressible or compressible medium, a single or a multiple substance medium with one or more phases might be used with one and the same model as long as the modeling assumptions made hold. Furthermore, trace substances are supported. Modeling assumptions can be configured globally in an outer System object. This covers in particular the initialization, uni- or bi-directional flow, and dynamic or steady-state formulation of mass, energy, and momentum balance. All assumptions can be locally refined for every component. While Modelica.Fluid contains a reasonable set of component models, the goal of the library is not to provide a comprehensive set of models, but rather to provide interfaces and best practices for the treatment of issues such as connector design and implementation of energy, mass and momentum balances. Applications from various domains are presented.

Rdiger Franke; et al.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Downhole Fluid Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Downhole Fluid Sampling Downhole Fluid Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Downhole Fluid Sampling Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Downhole Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Well Testing Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Well Testing Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Water composition and source of fluids. Gas composition and source of fluids. Thermal: Water temperature. Distinguish magmatic/mantle heat inputs. Can be used to estimate reservoir fluid temperatures. Dictionary.png Downhole Fluid Sampling: Downhole fluid sampling is done to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a surface or subsurface aqueous system. Downhole

339

Intelligent Fluid Infrastructure for Embedded Networking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mobile element into the networking infrastructure.Our fluid infrastructure design saves significant energy inIntelligent Fluid Infrastructure for Embedded Networks Aman

Kansal, Aman; Somasundara, Arun; Jea, David C; Srivastava, Mani B; Estrin, D

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Intelligent Fluid Infrastructure for Embedded Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intelligent Fluid Infrastructure for Embedded Networks Amanto develop a fluid infrastructure: mobile components arebuilt into the system infrastructure for enabling specific

Aman Kansal; Arun Somasundara; David Jea; Mani Srivastava; Deborah Estrin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG GRAPHS Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: DISPLAYING AND INTERPRETING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY ANALYSES ON MUDLOG GRAPHS Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: This is the fourth paper in a series on developing fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) as a logging tool for geothermal bore holes. Here we address methods of displaying analyses and plotting gas ratios used for data interpretation on mudlog plots. The goal is to develop a rapid method of data display and interpretation for the up to 10,000 analyses returned by a geothermal well FIS analysis. Author(s): Norman, D.I.; Dilley, L.M.; McCulloch, J. Published: PROCEEDINGS, Thirtieth Workshop on Geothermal Reservoir

342

Fluid Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Fluid Imaging Jump to: navigation, search Contents 1 Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Fluid Imaging 2 Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Fluid Imaging Geothermal Lab Call Projects for Fluid Imaging Loading map... {"format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"limit":200,"offset":0,"link":"all","sort":[""],"order":[],"headers":"show","mainlabel":"","intro":"","outro":"","searchlabel":"\u2026 further results","default":"","geoservice":"google","zoom":14,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","forceshow":true,"showtitle":true,"hidenamespace":false,"template":false,"title":"","label":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"locations":[{"text":"

343

Visually simulating realistic fluid motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis we investigate various methods for visually simulating fluid flow. The focus is on implementing effective fluid simulation within an interactive animation system. Two implementations have been developed based on derivations and simplifications of the Navier-Stokes' equations. The first implementation is the most accurate and follows the physics of fluid dynamics more closely. However, the high computation times incurred by this implementation make it inappropriate as an interactive method. The second approach is not as accurate as the first one, however it incurs lower computation times. This second method is only able to model a subset of the total fluid behavior. The second method has been integrated into an interactive modeling and animation environment. Several examples are included.

Naithani, Priyanka

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Deferring trust in fluid replication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mobile nodes rely on external services to provide safety, sharing, and additional resources. Unfortunately, as mobile nodes move through the networking infrastructure, the costs of accessing servers change. Fluid replication allows mobile clients to ...

Brian D. Noble; Ben Fleis; Landon P. Cox

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Bio-inspired fluid locomotion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed several novel methods of locomotion at low Reynolds number, for both Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids: Robosnails 1 and 2, which operate on a lubrication layer, and the three-link swimmer which moves ...

Chan, Brian, 1980-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Definition: Composition Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Composition Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Composition Analysis Composition analysis is used to relate surface fluid properties and geologic data to geothermal...

347

Identifying Fracture Types and Relative Ages Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Understanding the life cycle of a fracture in a geothermal system is fundamental to the development of techniques for creating fractures. Recognizing the stage of a fracture, whether it is currently open and transmitting fluids; if it recently has closed; or if it is an ancient fracture would assist in targeting areas for further fracture stimulation. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will also assist in fracture stimulation selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures, and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. Our hypothesis is that fractures over their life cycle have different chemical signatures that we can see in fluid inclusion gas analysis and by using the new method of fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) the different stages of fractures, along with an estimate of fracture size can be identified during the well drilling process. We have shown with this study that it is possible to identify fracture locations using FIS and that different fractures have different chemical signatures however that signature is somewhat dependent upon rock type. Open, active fractures correlate with increase concentrations of CO2, N2, Ar, and to a lesser extent H2O. These fractures would be targets for further enhancement. The usefulness of this method is that it is low cost alternative to current well logging techniques and can be done as a well is being drilled.

Dilley, Lorie M.; Norman, David; Owens, Lara

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Underhood Thermal Management [Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics] - Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Underhood Thermal Underhood Thermal Management Capabilities Engineering Computation and Design Engineering and Structural Mechanics Systems/Component Design, Engineering and Drafting Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Overview Thermal Hydraulic Optimization of Nuclear Systems Underhood Thermal Management Combustion Simulations Advanced Model and Methodology Development Multi-physics Reactor Performance and Safety Simulations Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE on Flickr Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics Bookmark and Share Underhood Thermal Management Hybrid Vehicle Underhood Thermal Analysis Hybrid Vehicle Underhood Thermal Analysis. Click on image to view larger image. In addition to nuclear system applications, the section applies its

349

ADVANCED TECHNOLOGY FOR PREDICTING THE FLUID FLOW ATTRIBUTES OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS FROM QUANTITATIVE GEOLOGIC DATA AND MODELING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work carried out during the period of September 29, 2000 to September 28, 2001 under DOE Research Contract No. DE-FC26-00BC15308. Our goal is to establish an integrated methodology of fractured reservoir characterization and show how that can be incorporated into fluid flow simulation. We have made progress in the characterization of mineral infilling of natural fractures. The main advancement in this regard was to recognize the strong interplay between diagenetic and mechanical processes. We accomplished several firsts in documenting and quantifying these processes, including documenting the range of emergent threshold in several formations and quantifying the internal structures of crack-seal bridges in fractures. These results will be the basis for an appreciation of fracture opening and filling rates that go well beyond our original goals. Looking at geochemical modeling of fracture infilling, our theoretical analysis addressed the problem of calcite precipitation in a fracture. We have built a model for the deposition of calcite within a fracture. The diagenetic processes of dissolution and partial cementation are key controls on the creation and distribution of natural fractures within hydrocarbon reservoirs. Even with extensive data collection, fracture permeability still creates uncertainty in reservoir description and the prediction of well performance. Data on the timing and stages of diagenetic events can provide explanation as to why, when and where natural fractures will be open and permeable. We have been pursuing the fracture mechanics testing of a wide range of rocks, particularly sandstone using a key rock property test that has hitherto not been widely applied to sedimentary rocks. A major accomplishment in this first year has been to identify sample suites available in the core repository at the University of Texas that represent a wide range of diagenetic alteration and to begin to test these samples. The basis for the fluid flow simulations to be carried out in this part of the project is the adequate spatial characterization of fracture networks. Our initial focus has been on the tendency of fracture sets to cluster into highly fracture zones that are often widely separated. Our preliminary modeling work shows the extent of this clustering to be controlled by the subcritical fracture index of the material. With continued progress, we move toward an integrated fracture characterization methodology that will ultimately be applied through detailed reservoir simulation.

Jon E. Olson; Larry W. Lake; Steve E. Laubach

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Data for the geochemical investigation of UMTRAP designated site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the geochemical data and the methods of data collection from the former tailings site at Ambrosia Lake, New Mexico. Data are from a one-time sampling of waters and solid material from the background, the area adjacent to the site, and the site. Selected solid samples are water extracted to remove easily soluble salts and acid extracted to remove carbonates and hydroxides. The waters, extracts, and solid samples were analyzed for selected major and trace elements. 3 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

Markos, G.; Bush, K.J.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Pitch-catch only ultrasonic fluid densitometer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses a material wedge and pitch-catch only ultrasonic transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within the material wedge. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface.

Greenwood, Margaret S. (Richland, WA); Harris, Robert V. (Pasco, WA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Calibration method and apparatus for measuring the concentration of components in a fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A calibration method and apparatus for use in measuring the concentrations of components of a fluid is provided. The measurements are determined from the intensity of radiation over a selected range of radiation wavelengths using peak-to-trough calculations. The peak-to-trough calculations are simplified by compensating for radiation absorption by the apparatus. The invention also allows absorption characteristics of an interfering fluid component to be accurately determined and negated thereby facilitating analysis of the fluid. 7 figures.

Durham, M.D.; Sagan, F.J.; Burkhardt, M.R.

1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ultracentrifuge for separating fluid mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

1. A centrifuge for the separation of fluid mixtures having light and heavy fractions comprising a cylindrical rotor, disc type end-plugs closing the ends of the rotor, means for mounting said rotor for rotation about its cylindrical axis, a housing member enclosing the rotor, a vacuum chamber in said housing about the central portion of the rotor, a collection chamber at each end of the housing, the innermost side of which is substantially formed by the outer face of the end-plug, means for preventing flow of the fluid from the collection chambers to said vacuum chamber, at least one of said end-plugs having a plurality of holes therethrough communicating between the collection chamber adjacent thereto and the inside of the rotor to induce countercurrent flow of the fluid in the centrifuge, means for feeding fluid to be processed into the centrifuge, means communicating with the collection chambers to extract the light and heavy separated fractions of the fluid, and means for rotating the rotor.

Lowry, Ralph A. (Charlottesville, VA)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

DEVELOPMENT OF NEW DRILLING FLUIDS  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the project has been to develop new types of drill-in fluids (DIFs) and completion fluids (CFs) for use in natural gas reservoirs. Phase 1 of the project was a 24-month study to develop the concept of advanced type of fluids usable in well completions. Phase 1 tested this concept and created a kinetic mathematical model to accurately track the fluid's behavior under downhole conditions. Phase 2 includes tests of the new materials and practices. Work includes the preparation of new materials and the deployment of the new fluids and new practices to the field. The project addresses the special problem of formation damage issues related to the use of CFs and DIFs in open hole horizontal well completions. The concept of a ''removable filtercake'' has, as its basis, a mechanism to initiate or trigger the removal process. Our approach to developing such a mechanism is to identify the components of the filtercake and measure the change in the characteristics of these components when certain cleanup (filtercake removal) techniques are employed.

David B. Burnett

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

TOURGHREACT: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive Geochemical Transport in Variably Saturated Geologic Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flows of multiphase fluids in porous and fractured media.multiphase fluid and heat flow. The program is applicable to porous

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

TOUGHREACT User's Guide: A Simulation Program for Non-isothermal Multiphase Reactive geochemical Transport in Variable Saturated Geologic Media  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for modeling fluid and heat flow in fractured porous media:1985) for fluid and heat flow in fractured porous media. The

Xu, Tianfu; Sonnenthal, Eric; Spycher, Nicolas; Pruess, Karsten

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Gas, Water, or Liquid ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Gas, Water, Natural Gas, or Liquid Hydrocarbon Flows Special Tests. Fluid Metrology ...

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

358

Geothermal fluid genesis in the Great Basin  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Early theories concerning geothermal recharge in the Great Basin implied recharge was by recent precipitation. Physical, chemical, and isotopic differences between thermal and non-thermal fluids and global paleoclimatic indicators suggest that recharge occurred during the late Pleistocene. Polar region isotopic studies demonstrate that a depletion in stable light-isotopes of precipitation existed during the late Pleistocene due to the colder, wetter climate. Isotopic analysis of calcite veins and packrat midden megafossils confirm the depletion event occurred in the Great Basin. Isotopic analysis of non-thermal springs is utilized as a proxy for local recent precipitation. Contoured plots of deuterium concentrations from non-thermal and thermal water show a regional, systematic variation. Subtracting contoured plots of non-thermal water from plots of thermal water reveals that thermal waters on a regional scale are generally isotopically more depleted. Isolated areas where thermal water is more enriched than non-thermal water correspond to locations of pluvial Lakes Lahontan and Bonneville, suggesting isotopically enriched lake water contributed to fluid recharge. These anomalous waters also contain high concentrations of sodium chloride, boron, and other dissolved species suggestive of evaporative enrichment. Carbon-age date and isotopic data from Great Basin thermal waters correlate with the polar paleoclimate studies. Recharge occurred along range bounding faults. 151 refs., 62 figs., 15 tabs.

Flynn, T.; Buchanan, P.K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Fluid dynamics of bacterial turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Self-sustained turbulent structures have been observed in a wide range of living fluids, yet no quantitative theory exists to explain their properties. We report experiments on active turbulence in highly concentrated 3D suspensions of Bacillus subtilis and compare them with a minimal fourth-order vector-field theory for incompressible bacterial dynamics. Velocimetry of bacteria and surrounding fluid, determined by imaging cells and tracking colloidal tracers, yields consistent results for velocity statistics and correlations over two orders of magnitude in kinetic energy, revealing a decrease of fluid memory with increasing swimming activity and linear scaling between energy and enstrophy. The best-fit model parameters allow for quantitative agreement with experimental data.

Jrn Dunkel; Sebastian Heidenreich; Knut Drescher; Henricus H. Wensink; Markus Br; Raymond E. Goldstein

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

360

Geochemical Implications of CO2 Leakage Associated with Geologic Storage: A Review  

SciTech Connect

Leakage from deep storage reservoirs is a major risk factor associated with geologic sequestration of carbon dioxide (CO2). Different scientific theories exist concerning the potential implications of such leakage for near-surface environments. The authors of this report reviewed the current literature on how CO2 leakage (from storage reservoirs) would likely impact the geochemistry of near surface environments such as potable water aquifers and the vadose zone. Experimental and modeling studies highlighted the potential for both beneficial (e.g., CO2 re sequestration or contaminant immobilization) and deleterious (e.g., contaminant mobilization) consequences of CO2 intrusion in these systems. Current knowledge gaps, including the role of CO2-induced changes in redox conditions, the influence of CO2 influx rate, gas composition, organic matter content and microorganisms are discussed in terms of their potential influence on pertinent geochemical processes and the potential for beneficial or deleterious outcomes. Geochemical modeling was used to systematically highlight why closing these knowledge gaps are pivotal. A framework for studying and assessing consequences associated with each factor is also presented in Section 5.6.

Harvey, Omar R.; Qafoku, Nikolla; Cantrell, Kirk J.; Brown, Christopher F.

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Trace metal speciation in saline waters affected by geothermal brines. Final technical report. [GEOCHEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The computer program GEOCHEM was developed and applied to calculate the speciation of trace elements, such as Li, B, Mn, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Pb, and As, in mixtures of geothermal brines with soil waters. A typical speciation calculation involved the simultaneous consideration of about 350 inorganic and organic complexes and about 80 possible solid phases that could form among the macro- and microconstituents in the mixtures. The four geothermal brines chosen for study were from the East Mesa, Heber, and Salton Sea KGRA's. Two examples of East Mesa brine were employed in order to illustrate the effect of brine variability within a given KGRA. The soil waters chosen for study were the Holtville, Rosita, and Vint soil solutions and the Vail 4 drain water. These waters were mixed with the four brines to produce 1%, 5%, and 10% brine combinations. The combinations then were analyzed with the help of GEOCHEM and were interpreted in the context of two proposed general contamination scenarios. The results of the speciation calculations pointed to the great importance, in brine, of sulfide as a precipitating agent for trace metals and of borate as a trace metal-complexing ligand. In general, precipitation and/or exchange adsorption in soil were found to reduce the levels of trace metals well below harmful concentrations. The principal exceptions were Li and B, which did not precipitate and which were at or very hear harmful levels in the soil water-brine mixtures.

Sposito, G.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Wellbottom fluid implosion treatment system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for inducing implosion shock forces on perforation traversing earth formations with fluid pressure where an implosion tool is selected relative to a shut in well pressure and a tubing pressure to have a large and small area piston relationship in a well tool so that at a predetermined tubing pressure the pistons move a sufficient distance to open an implosion valve which permits a sudden release of well fluid pressure into the tubing string and produces an implosion force on the perforations. A pressure gauge on the well tool records tubing pressure and well pressure as a function of time.

Brieger, Emmet F. (HC 67 Box 58, Nogal, NM 88341)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Holographic plasma and anyonic fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use alternative quantisation of the $D3/D5$ system to explore properties of a strongly coupled charged plasma and strongly coupled anyonic fluids. The $S$-transform of the $D3/D5$ system is used as a model for charged matter interacting with a U(1) gauge field in the large coupling regime, and we compute the dispersion relationship of the propagating electromagnetic modes as the density and temperature are changed. A more general $SL(2,\\mathbb{Z})$ transformation gives a strongly interacting anyonic fluid, and we study its transport properties as we change the statistics of the anyons and the background magnetic field.

Daniel K. Brattan; Gilad Lifschytz

2013-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

364

Extraction and analysis of pollutant organics from contaminated solids using off-line supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) and on-line SFE-infrared spectroscopy. Task 2. Semiannual report, November 1995--March 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes activities in the following tasks associated with a project on environmental management technology decontamination and commercialization: A commercialized version of a field-portable instrument for performing supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) with on-line Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) detection;pyrolysis of plastic wastes associated with mixtures of radioactive wastes;management and reporting activities; centrifugal membrane filtration with application to tank waste remediation; technology development integration activities associated with remedial action and waste management.

Hawthorne, S.B.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

A Newton method using exact jacobians for solving fluid-structure coupling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper aims at introducing a partitioned Newton based method for solving nonlinear coupled systems arising in the numerical approximation of fluid-structure interaction problems. We provide a method which characteristic lies in the use of exact cross ... Keywords: ALE formulation, Fluid-structure interaction, Full coupled schemes, Haemodynamics, Navier-Stokes equations, Newton methods, Shape sensitivity analysis

Miguel ngel Fernndez; Marwan Moubachir

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Reducing exergy losses of liquid fluid using embedded open parallel microchannels within the surface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an analysis of entropy generation of forced convection heat transfer of liquid fluid over the horizontal surface with embedded open parallel microchannels at constant heat flux boundary conditions. The governing partial differential ... Keywords: constant heat flux, embedded open parallel microchannels, entropy generation, exergy losses, liquid fluid

M. H. Yazdi; S. Abdullah; I. Hashim; K. Sopian

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Directed flow fluid rinse trough  

SciTech Connect

Novel rinse troughs accomplish thorough uniform rinsing. The tanks are suitable for one or more essentially planar items having substantially the same shape. The troughs ensure that each surface is rinsed uniformly. The new troughs also require less rinse fluid to accomplish a thorough rinse than prior art troughs.

Kempka, Steven N. (9504 Lona La., Albuquerque, NM 87111); Walters, Robert N. (11872 LaGrange St., Boise, ID 83709)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Heat Transfer in Complex Fluids  

SciTech Connect

Amongst the most important constitutive relations in Mechanics, when characterizing the behavior of complex materials, one can identify the stress tensor T, the heat flux vector q (related to heat conduction) and the radiant heating (related to the radiation term in the energy equation). Of course, the expression 'complex materials' is not new. In fact, at least since the publication of the paper by Rivlin & Ericksen (1955), who discussed fluids of complexity (Truesdell & Noll, 1992), to the recently published books (Deshpande et al., 2010), the term complex fluids refers in general to fluid-like materials whose response, namely the stress tensor, is 'non-linear' in some fashion. This non-linearity can manifest itself in variety of forms such as memory effects, yield stress, creep or relaxation, normal-stress differences, etc. The emphasis in this chapter, while focusing on the constitutive modeling of complex fluids, is on granular materials (such as coal) and non-linear fluids (such as coal-slurries). One of the main areas of interest in energy related processes, such as power plants, atomization, alternative fuels, etc., is the use of slurries, specifically coal-water or coal-oil slurries, as the primary fuel. Some studies indicate that the viscosity of coal-water mixtures depends not only on the volume fraction of solids, and the mean size and the size distribution of the coal, but also on the shear rate, since the slurry behaves as shear-rate dependent fluid. There are also studies which indicate that preheating the fuel results in better performance, and as a result of such heating, the viscosity changes. Constitutive modeling of these non-linear fluids, commonly referred to as non-Newtonian fluids, has received much attention. Most of the naturally occurring and synthetic fluids are non-linear fluids, for example, polymer melts, suspensions, blood, coal-water slurries, drilling fluids, mud, etc. It should be noted that sometimes these fluids show Newtonian (linear) behavior for a given range of parameters or geometries; there are many empirical or semi-empirical constitutive equations suggested for these fluids. There have also been many non-linear constitutive relations which have been derived based on the techniques of continuum mechanics. The non-linearities oftentimes appear due to higher gradient terms or time derivatives. When thermal and or chemical effects are also important, the (coupled) momentum and energy equations can give rise to a variety of interesting problems, such as instability, for example the phenomenon of double-diffusive convection in a fluid layer. In Conclusion, we have studied the flow of a compressible (density gradient type) non-linear fluid down an inclined plane, subject to radiation boundary condition. The heat transfer is also considered where a source term, similar to the Arrhenius type reaction, is included. The non-dimensional forms of the equations are solved numerically and the competing effects of conduction, dissipation, heat generation and radiation are discussed. It is observed that the velocity increases rapidly in the region near the inclined surface and is slower in the region near the free surface. Since R{sub 7} is a measure of the heat generation due to chemical reaction, when the reaction is frozen (R{sub 7}=0.0) the temperature distributions would depend only on R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}, representing the effects of the pressure force developed in the material due to the distribution, R{sub 3} and R{sub 4} viscous dissipation, R{sub 5} the normal stress coefficient, R{sub 6} the measure of the emissivity of the particles to the thermal conductivity, etc. When the flow is not frozen (RP{sub 7} > 0) the temperature inside the flow domain is much higher than those at the inclined and free surfaces. As a result, heat is transferred away from the flow toward both the inclined surface and the free surface with a rate that increases as R{sub 7} increases. For a given temperature, an increase in {zeta} implies that the activation energy is smaller and thus, the reaction ra

Mehrdad Massoudi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Laboratory and field-based investigations of subsurface geochemical processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis presents the results of four discrete investigations into processes governing the organic and inorganic chemical composition of seafloor hydrothermal fluids in a variety of geologic settings. Though Chapters 2 ...

Reeves, Eoghan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Hydrodynamic modes in a confined granular fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Confined granular fluids, placed in a shallow box that is vibrated vertically, can achieve homogeneous stationary states thanks to energy injection mechanisms that take place throughout the system. These states can be stable even at high densities and inelasticities allowing for a detailed analysis of the hydrodynamic modes that govern the dynamics of granular fluids. Analyzing the decay of the time correlation functions it is shown that there is a crossover between a quasielastic regime in which energy evolves as a slow mode, to a inelastic regime, with energy slaved to the other conserved fields. The two regimes have well differentiated transport properties and, in the inelastic regime, the dynamics can be described by a reduced hydrodynamics with modified longitudinal viscosity and sound speed. The crossover between the two regimes takes place at a wavevector that is proportional to the inelasticity. A two dimensional granular model, with collisions that mimic the energy transfers that take place in a confined system is studied by means of microscopic simulations. The results show excellent agreement with the theoretical framework and allows the validation of hydrodynamic-like models.

Ricardo Brito; Dino Risso; Rodrigo Soto

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

371

Geological, geochemical, and geophysical survey of the geothermal resources at Hot Springs Bay Valley, Akutan Island, Alaska  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An extensive survey was conducted of the geothermal resource potential of Hot Springs Bay Valley on Akutan Island. A topographic base map was constructed, geologic mapping, geophysical and geochemical surveys were conducted, and the thermal waters and fumarolic gases were analyzed for major and minor element species and stable isotope composition. (ACR)

Motyka, R.J.; Wescott, E.M.; Turner, D.L.; Swanson, S.E.; Romick, J.D.; Moorman, M.A.; Poreda, R.J.; Witte, W.; Petzinger, B.; Allely, R.D.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Geochemical records in the South China Sea: implications for East Asian summer monsoon evolution over the last 20 Ma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geochemical records in the South China Sea: implications for East Asian summer monsoon evolution past changes in the East Asian summer monsoon over the last 20 Ma using samples from Ocean Drilling and combined review suggests that the long-term evolution of the East Asian summer monsoon is similar

Clift, Peter

373

Geochemical Data on Waters, gases, scales, and rocks from the Dixie Valley Region, Nevada (1996-1999)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report tabulates an extensive geochemical database on waters, gases, scales, rocks, and hot-spring deposits from the Dixie Valley region, Nevada. The samples from which the data were obtained were collected and analyzed during 1996 to 1999. These data provide useful information for ongoing and future investigations on geothermal energy, volcanism, ore deposits, environmental issues, and groundwater quality in this region.

Goff, Fraser; Bergfeld, Deborah; Janik, C.J.; et al

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

VOLTINT: A Matlab-based program for semi-automated processing of geochemical data acquired by voltammetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent progress has resulted in the development of advanced techniques to acquire geochemical information in situ in aquatic systems. Among these techniques, voltammetry has generated significant interest for its ability to detect several important redox-sensitive ... Keywords: Data processing, Geochemistry, Integration, Matlab, Software, Voltammetry

Gwendolyn Bristow; Martial Taillefert

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Workshop on hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley Caldera: proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A workshop reviewed the results of hydrologic and geochemical monitoring in the Long Valley caldera. Such monitoring is being done to detect changes in the hydrothermal system induced by ongoing magmatic and tectonic processes. Workshop participants discussed the need to instrument sites for continuous measurements of several parameters and to obtain additional hydrologic and chemical information from intermediate and deep drill holes. In addition to seismic and deformation monitoring, programs are currently in progress to monitor changes in the discharge characteristics of hot springs, fumaroles, and soil gases, as well as pressures and temperatures in wells. Some hydrochemical parameters are measured continuously, others are measured monthly or at longer intervals. This report summarizes the information presented at the hydrologic monitoring workshop, following the workshop agenda which was divided into four sessions: (1) overview of the hydrothermal system; (2) monitoring springs, fumaroles, and wells; (3) monitoring gas emissions; and (4) conclusions and recommendations.

Sorey, M.L.; Farrar, C.D.; Wollenberg, H.A.

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

CRITICALITY CURVES FOR PLUTONIUM HYDRAULIC FLUID MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect

This Calculation Note performs and documents MCNP criticality calculations for plutonium (100% {sup 239}Pu) hydraulic fluid mixtures. Spherical geometry was used for these generalized criticality safety calculations and three geometries of neutron reflection are: {sm_bullet}bare, {sm_bullet}1 inch of hydraulic fluid, or {sm_bullet}12 inches of hydraulic fluid. This document shows the critical volume and critical mass for various concentrations of plutonium in hydraulic fluid. Between 1 and 2 gallons of hydraulic fluid were discovered in the bottom of HA-23S. This HA-23S hydraulic fluid was reported by engineering to be Fyrquel 220. The hydraulic fluid in GLovebox HA-23S is Fyrquel 220 which contains phosphorus. Critical spherical geometry in air is calculated with 0 in., 1 in., or 12 inches hydraulic fluid reflection.

WITTEKIND WD

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

377

Environmentally Acceptable Transformer Fluids: An Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report offers information about the physical, dielectric, chemical, and environmental properties of transformer fluids and their operational impacts. Companies can use this information to choose environmentally acceptable green fluids.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

378

Fluid sampling system for a nuclear reactor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system of extracting fluid samples, either liquid or gas, from the interior of a nuclear reactor containment utilizes a jet pump. To extract the sample fluid, a nonradioactive motive fluid is forced through the inlet and discharge ports of a jet pump located outside the containment, creating a suction that draws the sample fluid from the containment through a sample conduit connected to the pump suction port. The mixture of motive fluid and sample fluid is discharged through a return conduit to the interior of the containment. The jet pump and means for removing a portion of the sample fluid from the sample conduit can be located in a shielded sample grab station located next to the containment. A non-nuclear grade active pump can be located outside the grab sampling station and the containment to pump the nonradioactive motive fluid through the jet pump. 1 fig.

Lau, L.K.; Alper, N.I.

1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

379

Geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils at the Savannah River site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Site (SRS), located in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina, is a nuclear production facility operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) by Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC). To facilitate future human health and ecological risk assessments, treatability studies, remedial investigations, and feasibility studies for its wetland areas, SRS needs a database of background geochemical and physical properties of wetland soils. These data are needed for comparison to data collected from wetland soils that may have been affected by SRS operations. SRS contains 36,000 acres of wetlands and an additional 5,000 acres of bottom land soils subject to flooding. Recent studies of wetland soils near various waste units at SRS show that some wetlands have been impacted by releases of contaminants resulting from SRS operations (WSRC, 1992). Waste waters originating from the operations facilities typically have been discharged into seepage basins located in upland soils, direct discharge of waste water to wetland areas has been minimal. This suggests that impacted wetland areas have been affected indirectly as a result of transport mechanisms such as surface runoff, groundwater seeps, fluvial or sediment transport, and leaching. Looney et al. (1990) conducted a study to characterize the geochemical and physical properties of upland soils and shallow sediments on the SRS. A primary objective of the upland study was to collect the data needed to assess the qualitative and quantitative impacts of SRS operations on the environment. By comparing the upland soils data to data collected from waste units located in similar soils, SRS impacts could be assessed. The data were also intended to aid in selection of remediation alternatives. Because waste units at SRS have historically been located in upland areas, wetland soils were not sampled. (Abstract Truncated)

Dixon, K.L; Rogers, V.A.; Conner, S.P.; Cummings, C.L.; Gladden, J.B.; Weber, J.M.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Hydrogeochemical and stream sediment detailed geochemical survey for Edgemont, South Dakota; Wyoming  

SciTech Connect

Results of the Edgemont detailed geochemical survey are reported. Field and laboratory data are presented for 109 groundwater and 419 stream sediment samples. Statistical and areal distributions of uranium and possible uranium-related variables are given. A generalized geologic map of the survey area is provided, and pertinent geologic factors which may be of significance in evaluating the potential for uranium mineralization are briefly discussed. Groundwaters containing greater than or equal to 7.35 ppB uranium are present in scattered clusters throughout the area sampled. Most of these groundwaters are from wells drilled where the Inyan Kara Group is exposed at the surface. The exceptions are a group of samples in the northwestern part of the area sampled and south of the Dewey Terrace. These groundwaters are also produced from the Inyan Kara Group where it is overlain by the Graneros Group and alluvium. The high uranium groundwaters along and to the south of the terrace are characterized by high molybdenum, uranium/specific conductance, and uranium/sulfate values. Many of the groundwaters sampled along the outcrop of the Inyan Kara Group are near uranium mines. Groundwaters have high amounts of uranium and molybdenum. Samples taken downdip are sulfide waters with low values of uranium and high values of arsenic, molybdenum, selenium, and vanadium. Stream sediments containing greater than or equal to 5.50 ppM soluble uranium are concentrated in basins draining the Graneros and Inyan Kara Groups. These values are associated with high values for arsenic, selenium, and vanadium in samples from both groups. Anomalous values for these elements in the Graneros Group may be caused by bentonite beds contained in the rock units. As shown on the geochemical distribution plot, high uranium values that are located in the Inyan Kara Group are almost exclusively draining open-pit uranium mines.

Butz, T.R.; Dean, N.E.; Bard, C.S.; Helgerson, R.N.; Grimes, J.G.; Pritz, P.M.

1980-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

382

Graphene Compositions And Drilling Fluids Derived Therefrom ...  

Drilling fluids comprising graphenes and nanoplatelet additives and methods for production thereof are disclosed. Graphene includes graphite oxide, graphene oxide ...

383

SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID WITHDRAWAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

drilling activity completely ceased. Of these, 65 bores account for about 95 percent of the total fluid

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Water Flow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluid Metrology Calibration Services - Water Flow. Water Flow Calibrations 18020C. ... NIST provides calibration services for water flow meters. ...

2011-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

385

Attrition Resistant Catalyst Materials for Fluid Bed ...  

Biomass and Biofuels Attrition Resistant Catalyst Materials for Fluid Bed Applications National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Contact NREL About This ...

386

Ultrasonic fluid densitometer for process control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an ultrasonic fluid densitometer that uses at least one pair of transducers for transmitting and receiving ultrasonic signals internally reflected within a material wedge. A temperature sensor is provided to monitor the temperature of the wedge material. Density of a fluid is determined by immersing the wedge into the fluid and measuring reflection of ultrasound at the wedge-fluid interface and comparing a transducer voltage and wedge material temperature to a tabulation as a function of density.

Greenwood, Margaret S. (Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Helium measurements of pore-fluids obtained from SAFOD drillcore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ionized water (DI) as drilling fluid. This procedure avoidsbeen contaminated with drilling fluids during recovery ofscheduled drilling phases to enable fluid-only sampling.

Ali, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Analytic fluid theory of beam spiraling in high-intensity cyclotrons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using a two-dimensional fluid description, we investigate the nonlinear radial-longitudinal dynamics of intense beams in isochronous cyclotrons in the nonrelativistic limit. With a multiscale analysis separating the time ...

Cerfon, A. J.

389

Wavelet Turbulence for Fluid Simulation Theodore Kim  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the running time. We instead propose an algorithm that generates small-scale fluid de- tail procedurally. We of the key results of Kolmogorov the- ory is that the energy spectrum of a turbulent fluid approaches a five spectra [Perrier et al. 1995], and the sub- stitution is common in fluid dynamics [Farge et al. 1996

California at Santa Barbara, University of

390

Two Fluid Shear-Free Composites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Shear-free composite fluids are constructed from two Letelier rotated unaligned perfect fluids. The component fluid parameters necessary to construct a shear-free composite are investigated. A metric in the Stephani-Barnes solution family and a simple stationary metric are discussed.

J. P. Krisch; E. N. Glass

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

391

Geochemical assessment of gaseous hydrocarbons: mixing of bacterial and thermogenic methane in the deep subsurface petroleum system, Gulf of Mexico continental slope  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mixtures of bacterial and thermogenic methane are found both at vents at the seafloor and in reservoirs in the deep subsurface of the Gulf of Mexico continental slope. The C1-C5 gas that most recently charged reservoirs of Jolliet (GC 184), Genesis (GC 160/161) and Petronius (VK 786) fields is estimated to include 17%-28%, 31%-51%, 31%-49% bacterial methane, respectively. Geochemical assessment of the reservoir gas in the fields show that the gas may be the product of thermal cracking of Upper Jurassic crude oil before final migration to the reservoirs. The gas from three different fields is of similar thermal maturity levels. In contrast to oil in reservoirs in the fields, which shows biodegradation effects, the C1-C5 reservoir gas is unaltered by biodegradation. Late gas migration may have occurred at or near present burial depth and flushed the reservoir system of previously biodegraded hydrocarbon gas to include any previous bacterial methane. Molecular and isotopic properties of reservoir gas and oil suggest that bacterial methane mixed with thermogenic hydrocarbon gas before entering the reservoirs. Thus the source of the bacterial methane is logically deeper than the present depth (>~4 km) and temperatures of the reservoirs. High sedimentation rate and low geothermal gradient may offer conditions favorable for generation and preservation of bacterial methane in deep subsurface petroleum system of the Gulf slope. Bacterial methane dispersed across the large drainage areas of the deep subsurface petroleum system may have been swept by migrating fluids at >4 km, and then charged both vents (GC 185, GC 233 and GC 286) at the seafloor and reservoirs in the deep subsurface. The volume of bacterial methane from geologically significant depth in rapidly subsiding basins may be underestimated.

Ozgul, Ercin

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Fall 2011 ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics ENG ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fall 2011 ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics ENG ME 542 Advanced Fluid Mechanics Instructor: M. S. Howe EMA 218 mshowe@bu.edu This course is intended to consolidate your knowledge of fluid mechanics specialized courses on fluid mechanics, acoustics and aeroacoustics. Outline syllabus: Equations of motion

393

Method for measuring Particulate and Gaseous Metals in a fluid stream, Device for measuring Particulate and Gaseous Metals in a fluid stream  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for analyzing metal in a fluid is provided comprising maintaining a first portion of a continuous filter media substrate at a temperature coinciding with the phase in which the metal is to be analyzed; contacting the fluid to a first portion of said substrate to retain the metal on the first portion of said substrate; preventing further contact of the fluid to the first portion of substrate; and contacting the fluid to a second portion of said substrate to retain metal on the second portion of the said substrate while simultaneously analyzing the first portion for metal. Also provided is a device for the simultaneous monitoring and analysis of metal in a fluid comprising a continuous filter media substrate; means for maintaining a first portion of said filter media substrate at a temperature coinciding with the phase in which the metal is to be analyzed; a means for contacting the fluid to the first portion of said substrate; a means for preventing further contact of the fluid to the first portion of substrate; a means for contacting the fluid to a second portion of said substrate to retain metal on the second portion of the said substrate; and means for analyzing the first portion for metal.

Farber, Paul S.; Huang, Hann-Shen

1998-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

394

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) comparing water with CO2 as heat transmission fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Vol. 17, pp. 325330, 1993. Durst, D. Geochemical Modelingdevelopment and operation (Durst, 2002; Bchler, 2003; Xu

Pruess, Karsten

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Geochemical equilibrium modeling of the Auburn Thermal Energy Storage Field Test  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the study was to investigate some alternate reservoir damage mechanisms that may have contributed to the loss of well injectivity experienced at the Mobile field site. Specifically, this includes mineral precipitation and/or alteration resulting from: 1) increased temperatures and temperature gradients, 2) presence of oxygen, 3) fluid-fluid incompatibility (mixing of two different aquifer waters), and 4) fluid-rock imcompatibility (introducing foreign groundwaters into storage aquifer sedimentary matrix). The primary investigatory tool used in the study is an Electric Power Research Institute computer program (EQUILIB), which is based on equilibrium chemical thermodynamics. The computer code was utilized to simulate changes in mineralogy and groundwater chemistries due to the interaction of the sediment material and two differing aquifer waters at temperatures of 55/sup 0/C, 100/sup 0/C, and 150/sup 0/C. Conclusions are primarily based on the 55/sup 0/C results since this was the maximum operating temperature for the Auburn experiment.

Stottlemyre, J.A.; Smith, R.P.; Erikson, R.L.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Isotopic Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Structural: Hydrological: Source of fluids, circulation, andor mixing. Thermal: Heat source and general reservoir temperatures Dictionary.png Isotopic Analysis: Isotopes...

397

Hydrogeologic and hydrogeochemical assessment of geothermal fluids in the Pyramid Lake area, Washoe country, Nevada  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper evaluates the hydrogeological and hydrogeochemical characteristics of the geothermal fluids in the Pyramid Lake area using data from existing published and unpublished reports on springs, challow and deep wells in the area. Four geochemical provinces, namely, chloride, bicarbonate, suphate and nixed chloride-bicarbonate have been identified. Chloride waters are found in known geothermal areas. Two subsurface water recharge zones which reed the shallow and deep geothermal systems are proposed. These are the Virginia Mountains and their Northern extension and the Fox and Lake Ranges. Tertiary and Quaternary faulting systems in these mountains and Ranges act as heat conduits for geothermal fluids. The Needle Rocks geothermal system is postulated to be deeper than the San Emidio system. A connection between the Needle Rocks system and the Pyramid and Anaho islands warm springs is not clear from this study because of lack of chemical data from these islands. More systematic measurements of static water levels, temperatures, well lithology, water chemistry and isotopes data are recommended to enable better understanding of the geothermal systems in the area.

Ojiambo, S. Bwire

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Geochemical data package for the Hanford immobilized low-activity tank waste performance assessment (ILAW PA)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lockheed Martin Hanford Company (LMHC) is designing and assessing the performance of disposal facilities to receive radioactive wastes that are stored in single- and double-shell tanks at the Hanford Site. The preferred method of disposing of the portion that is classified as low-activity waste is to vitrify the liquid/slurry and place the solid product in near-surface, shallow-land burial facilities. The LMHC project to assess the performance of these disposal facilities is the Hanford Immobilized Low-Activity Tank Waste (ILAW) Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of this project is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the porewater of the vadose zone. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory assists LMHC in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the disposal facility, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (K{sub d}) and the thermodynamic solubility product (K{sub sp}), respectively. In this data package, the authors approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. In future geochemical data packages, they will determine whether a more rigorous measure of solubility is necessary or warranted based on the dose predictions emanating from the ILAW 2001 PA and reviewers' comments. The K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the ILAW system. In addition to the best-estimate K{sub d}s, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. They assume that K{sub d} values are log normally distributed over the cited ranges. Currently, they do not give estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, they supply different values for both the K{sub d}s and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the ILAW system and supply time-varying K{sub d}s for the concrete zone, should the final repository design include concrete vaults or cement amendments to buffer the system pH.

DI Kaplan; RJ Serne

2000-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

399

Immersible solar heater for fluids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An immersible solar heater comprising a light-absorbing panel attached to a frame for absorbing heat energy from the light and transferring the absorbed heat energy directly to the fluid in which the heater is immersed. The heater can be used to heat a swimming pool, for example, and is held in position and at a preselected angle by a system of floats, weights and tethers so that the panel can operate efficiently. A skid can be used in one embodiment to prevent lateral movement of the heater along the bottom of the pool. Alternative embodiments include different arrangements of the weights, floats and tethers and methods for making the heater.

Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: The Role of Injection-Induced Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at In Salah CO2 Storage Project: Status ReportQuarter end, June 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The In Salah Gas Project (ISG), a joint venture (JV) of BP, Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro, has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 bcfy natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian Central Sahara, and (2) successful minimization of the associated environmental footprint by capture and subsurface isolation of the excess CO{sub 2} extracted from production streams and subsurface isolation in the Krechba sandstone reservoir. The In Salah project provides an opportunity to study key physical and chemical processes in operational deployment of geological carbon sequestration. The objectives of the research are to study two components relevant to storage effectiveness and operational success at In Salah: Reactive chemistry of the brine-CO{sub 2}-reservoir-caprock-wellbore system, and the geomechanical effects of large-scale injection on crustal deformation and fault leakage hazards. Results from this work will enhance predictive capability of field performance, provide a new basis for interpretation of geophysical monitoring at In Salah, and provide additional information relevant to the creation of geological sequestration standards. The Joint Industry Partners (JIP: BP, StatoilHydro, Sonatrach) and LLNL will share data and results to achieve the objectives of the proposed work. The objective of the work performed at LLNL is to integrate LLNL core strengths in geochemistry and geomechanics to better understand and predict the fate of injected CO{sub 2} in the field. The mechanical, chemical and transport properties of the reservoir-caprock system are coupled. We are using LLNL-developed quantitative tools to assess the potential for CO{sub 2} migration/leakage caused by injection-induced deformation. The geomechanical work is focused upon fault activation, fluid induced fracturing of the caprock and permeability field evolution of the fractured reservoir. These results will be used in concert with reactive transport calculations to predict the ultimate fate of the CO{sub 2}. We will integrate laboratory and reactive transport modeling to assess CO{sub 2} plume migration and partitioning between different trapping mechanisms. Geochemical reactive transport modeling will be used to address multiphase flow (supercritical CO{sub 2} and water), CO{sub 2} dissolution, mineral sequestration, and porosity/permeability changes. The reactive transport portion of the work ultimately couples with geomechanical modeling. In particular, the distribution of the pressure perturbation induced by injection drives the geomechanical response. Subsequently, the geochemical work determines if water-rock interactions eventually enhance or suppress fractures. A key focus of this work is to establish the site specific interactions of geomechanics, reactive flow and transport. This involves building and refining models of the reservoir and overburden. The models will undergo continual refinement in response to data collected in the field and experiments performed at LLNL and elsewhere. This project commenced in FY08, with DOE funding starting in April, FY08. We have successfully initiated a cross-disciplinary study of the In Salah CO{sub 2} sequestration project and have met all FY08 and FY09 Q1, Q2 and Q3 milestones. During the reporting period, we continued to acquire and process data from the JIP to import into our own geomechanical and geochemical computational tools. The lab testing program continued using both locally formulated cements and field samples from Krechba. The geomechanical studies indicate that pore fluid pressures induced by injection will lead to significant permeability enhancement of the combination of fracture network and fault network within the reservoir in the vicinity of the injectors. We continued reactive transport calculations for CO{sub 2} rich fluids flowing through fractures. These calculations demonstrate that although porosity and permeability changes are expected in response to CO{sub 2} injection they are not anticipated to have a significant effect upon transport properties within the reservoir or c

Morris, J P; McNab, W W; Carroll, S K; Hao, Y; Foxall, W; Wagoner, J L

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion. 3 figs.

Fincke, J.R.

1982-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

402

Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

Fincke, James R. (Rigby, ID)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Apparatus for unloading pressurized fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus is described for unloading fluid, preferably pressurized gas, from containers in a controlled manner that protects the immediate area from exposure to the container contents. The device consists of an unloading housing, which is enclosed within at least one protective structure, for receiving the dispensed contents of the steel container, and a laser light source, located external to the protective structure, for opening the steel container instantaneously. The neck or stem of the fluid container is placed within the sealed interior environment of the unloading housing. The laser light passes through both the protective structure and the unloading housing to instantaneously pierce a small hole within the stem of the container. Both the protective structure and the unloading housing are specially designed to allow laser light passage without compromising the light's energy level. Also, the unloading housing allows controlled flow of the gas once it has been dispensed from the container. The external light source permits remote operation of the unloading device. 2 figures.

Rehberger, K.M.

1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

404

Geologic, geophysical, and geochemical aspects of site-specific studies of the geopressured-geothermal energy resource of southern Louisiana. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report consists of four sections dealing with progress in evaluating geologic, geochemical, and geophysical aspects of geopressured-geothermal energy resources in Louisiana. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual sections. (ACR)

Pilger, R.H. Jr. (ed.)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Stress and Fluid-Flow Interaction for the Coso Geothermal Field Derived  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stress and Fluid-Flow Interaction for the Coso Geothermal Field Derived Stress and Fluid-Flow Interaction for the Coso Geothermal Field Derived from 3D Numerical Models Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: Stress and Fluid-Flow Interaction for the Coso Geothermal Field Derived from 3D Numerical Models Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: The efficiency of geothermal energy production at the Coso Geothermal Field in eastern California is reliant on the knowledge of fluid flow directions associated with fracture networks. We use finite element analysis to establish the 3D state of stress within the tectonic setting of the Coso Range. The mean and differential stress distributions are used to infer fluid flow vectors and second order fracture likelihood and orientation. The results show that the Coso Range and adjacent areas are

406

Parallel adaptive fluid-structure interaction simulation of explosions impacting on building structures  

SciTech Connect

We pursue a level set approach to couple an Eulerian shock-capturing fluid solver with space-time refinement to an explicit solid dynamics solver for large deformations and fracture. The coupling algorithms considering recursively finer fluid time steps as well as overlapping solver updates are discussed in detail. Our ideas are implemented in the AMROC adaptive fluid solver framework and are used for effective fluid-structure coupling to the general purpose solid dynamics code DYNA3D. Beside simulations verifying the coupled fluid-structure solver and assessing its parallel scalability, the detailed structural analysis of a reinforced concrete column under blast loading and the simulation of a prototypical blast explosion in a realistic multistory building are presented.

Deiterding, Ralf [ORNL; Wood, Stephen L [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the InSalah CO2 Storage Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injection and Reservoir Hazard Injection and Reservoir Hazard Management: Mechanical Deformation and Geochemical Alteration at the In Salah CO 2 Storage Project Background Safe and permanent storage of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) in geologic reservoirs is critical to geologic sequestration. The In Salah Project (joint venture of British Petroleum (BP), Sonatrach, and StatoilHydro) has two fundamental goals: (1) 25-30 years of 9 billion cubic feet per year (bcfy) natural gas production from 8 fields in the Algerian

408

The application of PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, to aid in the management of a wastewater treatment wetland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past decade, constructed wetlands have become popular for treating coal-generated acid mine drainage and leachate from coal-ash disposal areas. The goal of the wetland manager is to design a system in which the pH is neutralized, toxic metals are removed, and wetland discharge meets or exceeds discharge standards for water quality. This is typically accomplished by using a combination of wetlands, ponds, and limestone drains. The treatment capability of a constructed wetland is based on relationships among dissolved oxygen (DO), pH, and metal speciation. The aim of this research was to determine if PHREEQCi, a geochemical computer program, could be used in wetland management and design. The wetland site chosen for this study was at a Texas Municipal Power Agency (TMPA) plant located in Grimes County, Texas and was created to treat leachate from a solid waste disposal area where coal ash and SO? scrubber sludge was deposited. The leachate contains significant concentrations of sulfate, chloride, total dissolved solids (TDS), arsenic, and selenium. Using PHREEQCi, geochemical speciation models were created to study the interrelationships between critical chemical components at the TMPA site in order to establish an optimum set of conditions to improve treatment capability and to avoid wetland failure. The results of the geochemical speciation modeling indicated a challenging situation for a wetland manager because different species precipitate under contrasting environments. In order to apply the geochemical speciation results to the design of the TMPA site, two conditions must be recognized. First, metal removal is best accomplished by generating alkaline and oxidative conditions to promote metal-oxide precipitation. Second, sulfate can be controlled under reducing environments where it is converted to sulfide and metal sulfides precipitate. Chlorides are very soluble and no viable conclusions as to the most appropriate removal method could be postulated. TDS has an ambiguous composition and could not be modeled using PHREEQCi.

Mitzman, Stephanie

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Controlling the fluid-fluid mixing-demixing phase transition with electric fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review recent theoretical advances on controlling the fluid-fluid phase transition with electric fields. Using a mean-field approach, we compare the effects of uniform versus non-uniform electric fields, and show how non-uniform fields are better at altering the phase diagram. Focusing on non-uniform fields, we then discuss the behavior of the fluid concentration profile and the parameters (temperature, fluid concentration, etc.) that control the location of the fluid-fluid interface from both equilibrium and dynamic perspectives.

Jennifer Galanis; Sela Samin; Yoav Tsori

2012-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

410

Geochemical Fingerprinting of Coltan Ores by Machine Learning on Uneven Datasets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two modern machine learning techniques, Linear Programming Boosting (LPBoost) and Support Vector Machines (SVMs), are introduced and applied to a geochemical dataset of niobium-tantalum ('coltan') ores from Central Africa to demonstrate how such information may be used to distinguish ore provenance, i.e., place of origin. The compositional data used include uni- and multivariate outliers and elemental distributions are not described by parametric frequency distribution functions. The 'soft margin' techniques of LPBoost and SVMs can be applied to such data. Optimization of their learning parameters results in an average accuracy of up to c. 92%, if spot measurements are assessed to estimate the provenance of ore samples originating from two geographically defined source areas. A parameterized performance measure, together with common methods for its optimization, was evaluated to account for the presence of uneven datasets. Optimization of the classification function threshold improves the performance, as class importance is shifted towards one of those classes. For this dataset, the average performance of the SVMs is significantly better compared to that of LPBoost.

Savu-Krohn, Christian, E-mail: christian.savu-krohn@unileoben.ac.at; Rantitsch, Gerd, E-mail: gerd.rantitsch@unileoben.ac.at [Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Department of Applied Geosciences and Geophysics (Austria); Auer, Peter, E-mail: auer@unileoben.ac.at [Chair for Information Technology, Montanuniversitaet Leoben (Austria); Melcher, Frank, E-mail: frank.melcher@bgr.de; Graupner, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.graupner@bgr.de [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (Germany)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

Estimating the Impact (Energy, Emissions and Economics) of the US Fluid Power Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this report is to estimate the impact (energy, emissions and economics) of United Fluid power (hydraulic and pneumatic actuation) is the generation, control, and application of pumped or compressed fluids when this power is used to provide force and motion to mechanisms. This form of mechanical power is an integral part of United States (U.S.) manufacturing and transportation. In 2008, according to the U.S. Census Bureau, sales of fluid power components exceeded $17.7B, sales of systems using fluid power exceeded $226B. As large as the industry is, it has had little fundamental research that could lead to improved efficiency since the late 1960s (prior to the 1970 energy crisis). While there have been some attempts to replace fluid powered components with electric systems, its performance and rugged operating condition limit the impact of simple part replacement. Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the National Fluid Power Association (NFPA) collaborated with 31 industrial partners to collect and consolidate energy specific measurements (consumption, emissions, efficiency) of deployed fluid power systems. The objective of this study was to establish a rudimentary order of magnitude estimate of the energy consumed by fluid powered systems. The analysis conducted in this study shows that fluid powered systems consumed between 2.0 and 2.9 Quadrillion (1015) Btus (Quads) of energy per year; producing between 310 and 380 million metric tons (MMT) of Carbon Dioxide (CO2). In terms of efficiency, the study indicates that, across all industries, fluid power system efficiencies range from less than 9% to as high as 60% (depending upon the application), with an average efficiency of 22%. A review of case studies shows that there are many opportunities to impact energy savings in both the manufacturing and transportation sectors by the development and deployment of energy efficient fluid power components and systems.

Love, Lonnie J [ORNL

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Numerical studies of fluid-rock interactions in Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as working fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University, pp. 233238. Durst, D. (2002), GeochemicalFrance (Jacquot, 2000; Durst, 2002; Bchler, 2003; Andr etfrom a Soultz Well GPK1 sample (Durst, 2002). Initial water

Xu, Tianfu; Pruess, Karsten; Apps, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Valve for controlling flow of cryogenic fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A valve is provided for accurately controlling the flow of cryogenic fluids such as liquid nitrogen. The valve comprises a combination of disc and needle valves affixed to a valve stem in such a manner that the disc and needle are free to rotate about the stem, but are constrained in lateral and vertical movements. This arrangement provides accurate and precise fluid flow control and positive fluid isolation.

Knapp, P.A.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

Non-invasive Ultrasonic Fluid Processing Technology ...  

Search PNNL. PNNL Home; About; Research; Publications; Jobs; News; Contacts; Non-invasive Ultrasonic Fluid Processing Technology. Battelle Number(s): ...

415

Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Centers Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture Fluids Shale Gas Development Challenges: Fracture...

416

Universal Fluid Droplet Ejector - Energy Innovation Portal  

... deposition and cell-sorting applications Description A fluid ejector capable of producing micron sized droplets on demand is ... 5,943,075 (USA) ...

417

Universal fluid droplet ejector - Energy Innovation Portal  

A droplet generator comprises a fluid reservoir having a side wall made of glass or quartz, and an end cap made from a silicon plate. The end cap ...

418

Fluid Submersible Sensing Device - Energy Innovation Portal  

The present invention relates to a fluid submersible sensing device and, more particularly, to such a device having sensing structure provided within ...

419

MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE TO GEOTHERMAL FLUID PRODUCTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compaction, computers, geothermal energy, pore-waternot MODELING SUBSIDENCE DUE T GEOTHERMAL FLUID PRODUCTION Opromise f o r developing geothermal energy i n the United

Lippmann, M.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Theory and Modeling of Fluids Group Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Modeling of Fluids Group is working in consort with the University of Colorado and the Division's Cryogenics Group on a DARPA funded project to ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geochemical analysis fluid" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Immersible solar heater for fluids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An immersible solar heater is described comprising a light-absorbing panel attached to a frame for absorbing heat energy from the light and transferring the absorbed heat energy directly to the fluid in which the heater is immersed. The heater can be used to heat a swimming pool, for example, and is held in position and at a preselected angle by a system of floats, weights and tethers so that the panel can operate efficiently. A skid can be used in one embodiment to prevent lateral movement of the heater along the bottom of the pool. Alternative embodiments include different arrangements of the weights, floats and tethers and methods for making the heater. 11 figs.

Kronberg, J.W.

1995-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

422

Immersible solar heater for fluids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An immersible solar heater is described comprising a light-absorbing panel attached to a frame for absorbing heat energy from the light and transferring the absorbed heat energy directly to the fluid in which the heater is immersed. The heater can be used to heat a swimming pool, for example, and is held in position and at a preselected angle by a system of floats, weights and tethers so that the panel can operate efficiently. A skid can be used in one embodiment to prevent lateral movement of the heater along the bottom of the pool. Alternative embodiments include different arrangements of the weights, floats and tethers and methods for making the heater.

Hazen, T.C.; Fliermans, C.B.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Hydrostatic bearings for a turbine fluid flow metering device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A rotor assembly fluid metering device has been improved by development of a hydrostatic bearing fluid system which provides bearing fluid at a common pressure to rotor assembly bearing surfaces. The bearing fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid distribution system produces a uniform film of fluid between bearing surfaces and allows rapid replacement of bearing fluid between bearing surfaces, thereby minimizing bearing wear and corrosion.

Fincke, J.R.

1980-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

424

A Universe with a Ghost Dark Energy and van der Waals fluid interacting with a Fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a model of a Universe with Ghost Dark Energy and van der Waals fluid interacting with a fluid which was born as a result of interaction between original fluid and some other fluid existing in Universe. We suppose that Ghost Dark energy has its contribution to the model by an interaction term $Q$ and we suppose that $Q=3Hb(\\rho_{\\small{tot}}-\\rho_{GDe})$.

Martiros Khurshudyan

2013-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

425

Magnetohydrodynamic pump with a system for promoting flow of fluid in one direction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetohydrodynamic pump for pumping a fluid. The pump includes a microfluidic channel for channeling the fluid, a MHD electrode/magnet system operatively connected to the microfluidic channel, and a system for promoting flow of the fluid in one direction in the microfluidic channel. The pump has uses in the medical and biotechnology industries for blood-cell-separation equipment, biochemical assays, chemical synthesis, genetic analysis, drug screening, an array of antigen-antibody reactions, combinatorial chemistry, drug testing, medical and biological diagnostics, and combinatorial chemistry. The pump also has uses in electrochromatography, surface micromachining, laser ablation, inkjet printers, and mechanical micromilling.

Lemoff, Asuncion V. (Union City, CA); Lee, Abraham P. (Irvine, CA)

2010-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

426

A model for the ATW target region fluid dynamics  

SciTech Connect

In the Los Alamos National Laboratory's concept for the accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW), a lead-bismuth eutectic has been chosen as a spallation target for the proton beam. Because of the high local heat fluxes anticipated, the target is in liquid form to facilitate heat removal. The upper boundary of the target region is a hard vacuum. The primary purpose of the analysis is to determine the location of the flow boundary based on the target design parameters. This method of analysis should prove to be useful for performing preliminary scoping and design of the ATW target region's fluid dynamics. Eventually, this model should be tested against experimental data.

Rider, W.J.; Cappiello, M.W. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Generation of energy by means of a working fluid, and regeneration of a working fluid  

SciTech Connect

A method is provided of optimizing, within limits imposed by a heating medium from the surface of an ocean and a cooling medium from an ocean depth, the energy supply capability of a gaseous working fluid which is expanded from a charged high pressure level to a spent low pressure level to provide available energy, the method comprising expanding the gaseous working fluid to a spent low pressure level where the condensation temperature of the working fluid is below the minimum temperature of the cold water, and regenerating the spent working fluid by, in at least one regeneration stage, absorbing the working fluid being regenerated in an absorption stage by dissolving it in a solvent solution while cooling with the cold water, the solvent solution comprising a solvent having an initial working fluid concentration which is sufficient to provide a solution having a boiling point, after dissolving the working fluid being regenerated, which is above the minimum temperature of the cold water to permit effective absorption of the working fluid being regenerated, increasing the pressure and then evaporating the working fluid being regenerated by heating in an evaporation stage with the available hot water, feeding the evaporated working fluid and the solvent solution to a separator stage for separating the evaporated working fluid and the solvent solution, recovering the evaporated, separated working fluid, and recycling the balance of the solvent solution from the separator stage to constitute the solvent solution for the absorption stage; and an apparatus for carrying out the method.

Kalina, A.I.

1982-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

428

Use of TOUGHREACT to Simulate Effects of Fluid Chemistry onInjectivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs with High Ionic StrengthFluids  

SciTech Connect

Recent studies suggest that mineral dissolution/precipitation and clay swelling effects could have a major impact on the performance of hot dry rock (HDR) and hot fractured rock (HFR) reservoirs. A major concern is achieving and maintaining adequate injectivity, while avoiding the development of preferential short-circuiting flow paths. A Pitzer ionic interaction model has been introduced into the publicly available TOUGHREACT code for solving non-isothermal multi-phase reactive geochemical transport problems under conditions of high ionic strength, expected in typical HDR and HFR systems. To explore chemically-induced effects of fluid circulation in these systems, we examine ways in which the chemical composition of reinjected waters can be modified to improve reservoir performance. We performed a number of coupled thermo-hydrologic-chemical simulations in which the fractured medium was represented by a one-dimensional MINC model (multiple interacting continua). Results obtained with the Pitzer activity coefficient model were compared with those using an extended Debye-Hueckel equation. Our simulations show that non-ideal activity effects can be significant even at modest ionic strength, and can have major impacts on permeability evolution in injection-production systems. Alteration of injection water chemistry, for example by dilution with fresh water, can greatly alter precipitation and dissolution effects, and can offer a powerful tool for operating hot dry rock and hot fractured rock reservoirs in a sustainable manner.

Xu, Tianfu; Zhang, Guoxiang; Pruess, Karsten

2005-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

429

Geochemical Data Package for the 2005 Hanford Integrated Disposal Facility Performance Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. (CH2M HILL) is designing and assessing the performance of an integrated disposal facility (IDF) to receive low-level waste (LLW), mixed low-level waste (MLLW), immobilized low-activity waste (ILAW), and failed or decommissioned melters. The CH2M HILL project to assess the performance of this disposal facility is the Hanford IDF Performance Assessment (PA) activity. The goal of the Hanford IDF PA activity is to provide a reasonable expectation that the disposal of the waste is protective of the general public, groundwater resources, air resources, surface-water resources, and inadvertent intruders. Achieving this goal will require prediction of contaminant migration from the facilities. This migration is expected to occur primarily via the movement of water through the facilities, and the consequent transport of dissolved contaminants in the vadose zone to groundwater where contaminants may be re-introduced to receptors via drinking water wells or mixing in the Columbia River. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) assists CH2M HILL in their performance assessment activities. One of the PNNL tasks is to provide estimates of the geochemical properties of the materials comprising the IDF, the disturbed region around the facility, and the physically undisturbed sediments below the facility (including the vadose zone sediments and the aquifer sediments in the upper unconfined aquifer). The geochemical properties are expressed as parameters that quantify the adsorption of contaminants and the solubility constraints that might apply for those contaminants that may exceed solubility constraints. The common parameters used to quantify adsorption and solubility are the distribution coefficient (Kd) and the thermodynamic solubility product (Ksp), respectively. In this data package, we approximate the solubility of contaminants using a more simplified construct, called the solution concentration limit, a constant value. The Kd values and solution concentration limits for each contaminant are direct inputs to subsurface flow and transport codes used to predict the performance of the IDF system. In addition to the best-estimate Kd values, a reasonable conservative value and a range are provided. The data package does not list estimates for the range in solubility limits or their uncertainty. However, the data package does provide different values for both the Kd values and solution concentration limits for different spatial zones in the IDF system and does supply time-varying Kd values for the cement solidified waste. The Kd values and solution concentration limits presented for each contaminant were previously presented in a report prepared by Kaplan and Serne (2000) for the 2001 ILAW PA, and have been updated to include applicable data from investigations completed since the issuance of that report and improvements in our understanding of the geochemistry specific to Hanford. A discussion is also included of the evolution of the Kd values recommended from the original 1999 ILAW PA through the 2001 ILAW and 2003 Supplement PAs to the current values to be used for the 2005 IDF PA for the key contaminants of concern: Cr(VI), nitrate, 129I, 79Se, 99Tc, and U(VI). This discussion provides the rationale for why certain Kd have changed with time.

Krupka, Kenneth M.; Serne, R JEFFREY.; Kaplan, D I.

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

Evaluating water-based drill-in fluids for horizontal completions. Part 1: Results of eight extensive lab tests are presented for use when assessing and selecting these special fluids  

SciTech Connect

The use of horizontal wells to obtain more cost-effective production from unconsolidated sandstones has become very popular. Since these wells employ open hole completions, success often depends on the fluid system used during drilling and completion. A lab study of three drill-in fluid systems was performed to determine the advantages and disadvantages of each. Intent of the study was not to recommend one fluid over another, but to make available the data necessary for picking the optimum fluid for a particular application. Parameters evaluated and discussed in Part 1 include rheology, lubricity, size distribution of bridging particles, API fluid loss, high-temperature fluid loss, filter cake characteristics, SEM analysis of filter cake and static breaker tests. Part 2 will describe return permeability tests. All were evaluated with 9, 10.5 and 14 ppg muds.

Ali, S.A. [Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., New Orleans, LA (United States); Dearing, H.L. [Chevron U.S.A. Production Co., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Electrohydraulic Control Fluid and Elastomer Compatibility Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electrohydraulic Control Fluid and Elastomer Compatibility Guide provides power plant personnel with current information on the compatibility of turbine-generator electrohydraulic control (EHC) fluids and various elastomers, such as hoses, seals, and gaskets. The information in the guide should assist plant personnel in improving the reliability and performance of the EHC system.

2005-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

432

Joint Distributions for Interacting Fluid Queues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivated by recent traffic control models in ATM systems, we analyse three closely related systems of fluid queues, each consisting of two consecutive reservoirs, in which the first reservoir is fed by a two-state (on and off) Markov source. The first ... Keywords: feedback, fluid queue, joint distribution, stationary distribution, tandem queue, traffic shaper

Dirk P. Kroese; Werner R. W. Scheinhardt

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Radiation stability of biocompatibile magnetic fluid  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The radiation stability of biocompatibile magnetic fluid used in nanomedicine after electron irradiation was studied. Two types of the water-based magnetic fluids were prepared. The first one was based on the magnetite nanoparticles stabilized by one surfactant natrium oleate. The second one was biocompatibile magnetic fluid stabilized with two surfactants, natrium oleate as a first surfactant and Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) as a second surfactant. The magnetization measurements showed that electron irradiation up to 1000Gy caused 50% reduction of saturation magnetization in the case of the first sample with only one surfactant while in the case of the second biocompatibile magnetic fluid, only 25% reduction of saturation magnetization was observed. In the first magnetic fluid the radiation caused the higher sedimentation of the magnetic particles than in the second case, when magnetic particles are covered also with PEG. The obtained results show that PEG behave as a protective element.

Natalia Tomasovicova; Ivan Haysak; Martina Koneracka; Jozef Kovac; Milan Timko; Vlasta Zavisova; Alexander Okunev; Alexander Parlag; Alexey Fradkin; Peter Kopcansky

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

434

Fluid permeability measurement system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for measuring the permeance of a material. The permeability of the material may also be derived. The system provides a liquid or high concentration fluid bath on one side of a material test sample, and a gas flow across the opposing side of the material test sample. The mass flow rate of permeated fluid as a fraction of the combined mass flow rate of gas and permeated fluid is used to calculate the permeance of the material. The material test sample may be a sheet, a tube, or a solid shape. Operational test conditions may be varied, including concentration of the fluid, temperature of the fluid, strain profile of the material test sample, and differential pressure across the material test sample.

Hallman, Jr., Russell Louis (Knoxville, TN); Renner, Michael John (Oak Ridge, TN)

2008-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

435

Selection of fracture fluid for stimulating tight gas reservoirs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Essentially all producing wells drilled in tight gas sands and shales are stimulated using hydraulic fracture treatments. The development of optimal fracturing procedures, therefore, has a large impact on the long-term economic viability of the wells. The industry has been working on stimulation technology for more than 50 years, yet practices that are currently used may not always be optimum. Using information from the petroleum engineering literature, numerical and analytical simulators, surveys from fracturing experts, and statistical analysis of production data, this research provides guidelines for selection of the appropriate stimulation treatment fluid in most gas shale and tight gas reservoirs. This study takes into account various parameters such as the type of formation, the presence of natural fractures, reservoir properties, economics, and the experience of experts we have surveyed. This work provides a guide to operators concerning the selection of an appropriate type of fracture fluid for a specific set of conditions for a tight gas reservoir.

Malpani, Rajgopal Vijaykumar

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z