National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for geo thermal non

  1. Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal 21st August - 2nd September 2011 on the principles of solar energy conversion. Theoretical knowledge will be complemented with practical workshops of solar energy conversion. Theoretical knowledge will be comple- mented with practical workshops

  2. Green Energy Ohio- GEO Solar Thermal Rebate Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    There are two parts to the application. PART I of the application collects information on the applicant, the installer (which must be from a list of GEO-approved installers), proposed equipment...

  3. Geo-neutrinos as indicators of the origin and thermal history of the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dye, Steve

    2011-01-01

    Geological models are at odds over the radioactive power of the earth, predicting anywhere from 16 to 42 TW. The actual value constrains the thermal evolution and indicates the meteoritic origin of the planet. An estimated 20% of this radioactive power escapes to space in the form of geo-neutrinos. The remaining portion heats the planet with significant geo-dynamical consequences. The amount of radiogenic heating, conveniently expressed as a fraction of the 47-TW surface heat flow, discriminates earth models and characterizes the rate of planetary temperature change. A fraction greater than one means the earth is heating up; a fraction less than one means the earth is cooling down. Radiogenic heating in the planet primarily springs from unstable nuclides of uranium, thorium, and potassium. Closely associated with radiogenic heating is the production of geo-neutrinos. Large sub-surface detectors efficiently record the infrequent interactions of the highest energy geo-neutrinos, which originate from uranium and...

  4. Learning Geo-Temporal Non-Stationary Failure and Recovery of Power Distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Yun; Galvan, Floyd; Couvillon, Stephen; Orellana, George; Momoh, James

    2013-01-01

    Smart energy grid is an emerging area for new applications of machine learning in a non-stationary environment. Such a non-stationary environment emerges when large-scale failures occur at power distribution networks due to external disturbances such as hurricanes and severe storms. Power distribution networks lie at the edge of the grid, and are especially vulnerable to external disruptions. Quantifiable approaches are lacking and needed to learn non-stationary behaviors of large-scale failure and recovery of power distribution. This work studies such non-stationary behaviors in three aspects. First, a novel formulation is derived for an entire life cycle of large-scale failure and recovery of power distribution. Second, spatial-temporal models of failure and recovery of power distribution are developed as geo-location based multivariate non-stationary GI(t)/G(t)/Infinity queues. Third, the non-stationary spatial-temporal models identify a small number of parameters to be learned. Learning is applied to two ...

  5. Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz

    2005-03-03

    The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of non-thermal energy to hot flare plasma.

  6. Geo-neutrino Observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dye, S. T.; Alderman, M.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Mahoney, J. M.; Pakvasa, S.; Rosen, M.; Smith, S.; Varner, G.; McDonough, W. F.

    2009-12-17

    Observations of geo-neutrinos measure radiogenic heat production within the earth, providing information on the thermal history and dynamic processes of the mantle. Two detectors currently observe geo-neutrinos from underground locations. Other detection projects in various stages of development include a deep ocean observatory. This paper presents the current status of geo-neutrino observation and describes the scientific capabilities of the deep ocean observatory, with emphasis on geology and neutrino physics.

  7. Thermal sensation and comfort in transient non-uniform thermal environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui; Huizenga, Charlie; Arens, Edward; Wang, Danni

    2004-01-01

    for assessing complex thermal environments. Building andand non-uniform thermal environment. ” Ph.D. thesis,Non-Uniform Thermal Environments Hui Zhang, Charlie

  8. Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System Under Transient and Steady State Conditions Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System Under Transient and...

  9. Visual geo-localization of non-photographic depictions via 2D-3D alignment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Josef Sivic Fig. 1 Our system automatically geo-localizes paintings, drawings, and historical, paintings and historical pho- tographs. This is achieved by aligning the input depiction with a 3D model of several scenes are represented by a set of discrim- inative visual elements that are automatically learnt

  10. Non-thermal phenomena in galaxies clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gianfranco Brunetti

    2004-04-26

    The discovery of diffuse synchrotron radio emission and, more recently, of the hard X-ray (HXR) tails have triggered a growing interest about non-thermal phenomena in galaxy clusters. After a brief review of the most important evidences for non-thermal emission, I will focus on the origin of the emitting particles and of the hadronic component. In particular I will describe the particle-injection and -acceleration mechanisms at work in the intra-cluster medium (ICM) and, at the same time, discuss the possibility to test current modellings of these phenomena with future radio, HXR, and gamma rays observatories.

  11. Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment of diesel exhaust particulates and NOx Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment of diesel exhaust...

  12. THERMALLY ACTIVATED MARTENSITE: ITS RELATIONSHIP TO NON-THERMALLY ACTIVATED (ATHERMAL) MARTENSITE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laughlin, David E.

    THERMALLY ACTIVATED MARTENSITE: ITS RELATIONSHIP TO NON-THERMALLY ACTIVATED (ATHERMAL) MARTENSITE Keywords: Thermal Activation, Isothermal, Athermal, Activation Energy Abstract The classification of no thermal activation. Processes with no thermal activation do not depend on time, as there is no need

  13. Fuel injector utilizing non-thermal plasma activation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Rosocha, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-12-01

    A non-thermal plasma assisted combustion fuel injector that uses an inner and outer electrode to create an electric field from a high voltage power supply. A dielectric material is operatively disposed between the two electrodes to prevent arcing and to promote the formation of a non-thermal plasma. A fuel injector, which converts a liquid fuel into a dispersed mist, vapor, or aerosolized fuel, injects into the non-thermal plasma generating energetic electrons and other highly reactive chemical species.

  14. Non-thermal plasmas in flames and other inhomogeneous environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerra García, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Non-thermal plasmas in non-uniform gases appear in several technological applications (plasma assisted combustion and aerodynamics, and plasma jets), as well as in natural phenomena (sprites). Whereas in the case of plasma ...

  15. Non-thermal emission processes in massive binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. De Becker

    2007-09-26

    In this paper, I present a general discussion of several astrophysical processes likely to play a role in the production of non-thermal emission in massive stars, with emphasis on massive binaries. Even though the discussion will start in the radio domain where the non-thermal emission was first detected, the census of physical processes involved in the non-thermal emission from massive stars shows that many spectral domains are concerned, from the radio to the very high energies. First, the theoretical aspects of the non-thermal emission from early-type stars will be addressed. The main topics that will be discussed are respectively the physics of individual stellar winds and their interaction in binary systems, the acceleration of relativistic electrons, the magnetic field of massive stars, and finally the non-thermal emission processes relevant to the case of massive stars. Second, this general qualitative discussion will be followed by a more quantitative one, devoted to the most probable scenario where non-thermal radio emitters are massive binaries. I will show how several stellar, wind and orbital parameters can be combined in order to make some semi-quantitative predictions on the high-energy counterpart to the non-thermal emission detected in the radio domain. These theoretical considerations will be followed by a census of results obtained so far, and related to this topic... (see paper for full abstract)

  16. Non-thermal Aftertreatment of Particulates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, S.E.

    2000-08-20

    Modern diesel passenger vehicles employing common rail, high speed direct injection engines are capable of matching the drivability of gasoline powered vehicles with the additional benefit of providing high torque at low engine speed [1]. The diesel engine also offers considerable fuel economy and CO2 emissions advantages. However, future emissions standards [2,3] present a significant challenge for the diesel engine, as its lean exhaust precludes the use of aftertreatment strategies employing 3- way catalytic converters, which operate under stoichiometric conditions. In recent years significant developments by diesel engine manufacturers have greatly reduced emissions of both particulates (PM) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) [4,5]. However to achieve compliance with future legislative limits it has been suggested that an integrated approach involving a combination of engine modifications and aftertreatment technology [1] will be required. A relatively new approach to exhaust aftertreatment is the application of non-thermal plasma (NTP) or plasma catalyst hybrid systems. These have the potential for treatment of both NOx and PM emissions [6- 8]. The primary focus of recent plasma aftertreatment studies [9-12] has concentrated on the removal of NOx. It has been shown that by combining plasmas with catalysts it is possible to chemically reduce NOx. The most common approach is to use a 2- stage system relying upon the plasma oxidation of hydrocarbons to promote NO to NO2 conversion as a precursor to NO2 reduction over a catalyst. However, relatively little work has yet been published on the oxidation of PM by plasma [ 8,13]. Previous investigations [8] have reported that a suitably designed NTP reactor containing a packing material designed to filter and retain PM can effect the oxidation of PM in diesel exhausts at low temperatures. It has been suggested that the retained PM competes with hydrocarbons for O, and possibly OH, radicals. This is an important consideration in plasma - catalyst hybrid schemes for the removal of NOx employing an NO2 selective catalyst, as the oxidation of PM may deplete the key radicals necessary for NO to NO2 conversion. It was also suggested that where simultaneous NOx and PM removal are required, alternative catalyst formulations may be needed which may be selective to NO rather than NO2.

  17. Equilibration and thermalization of the dissipative quantum harmonic oscillator in a non-thermal environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Pagel; A. Alvermann; H. Fehske

    2013-01-24

    We study the dissipative quantum harmonic oscillator with general non-thermal preparations of the harmonic oscillator bath. The focus is on equilibration of the oscillator in the long-time limit and the additional requirements for thermalization. Our study is based on the exact solution of the microscopic model obtained by means of operator equations of motion, which provides us with the time evolution of the central oscillator density matrix in terms of the propagating function. We find a hierarchy of conditions for thermalization, together with the relation of the asymptotic temperature to the energy distribution in the initial bath state. We discuss the presence and absence of equilibration for the example of an inhomogeneous chain of harmonic oscillators, and illustrate the general findings about thermalization for the non-thermal environment that results from a quench.

  18. Geo-neutrinos and the Radioactive Power of the Earth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steve Dye

    2012-09-11

    Chemical and physical Earth models agree little as to the radioactive power of the planet. Each predicts a range of radioactive powers, overlapping slightly with the other at about 24 TW, and together spanning 14-46 TW. Approximately 20 % of this radioactive power (3-8 TW) escapes to space in the form of geo-neutrinos. The remaining 11-38 TW heats the planet with significant geo-dynamical consequences, appearing as the radiogenic component of the 43-49 TW surface heat flow. The non-radiogenic component of the surface heat flow (5-38 TW) is presumably primordial, a legacy of the formation and early evolution of the planet. A constraining measurement of radiogenic heating provides insights to the thermal history of the Earth and potentially discriminates chemical and physical Earth models. Radiogenic heating in the planet primarily springs from unstable nuclides of uranium, thorium, and potassium. The paths to their stable daughter nuclides include nuclear beta decays, producing geo-neutrinos. Large sub-surface detectors efficiently record the energy but not the direction of the infrequent interactions of the highest energy geo-neutrinos, originating only from uranium and thorium. The measured energy spectrum of the interactions estimates the relative amounts of these heat-producing elements, while the intensity estimates planetary radiogenic power. Recent geo-neutrino observations in Japan and Italy find consistent values of radiogenic heating. The combined result mildly excludes the lowest model values of radiogenic heating and, assuming whole mantle convection, identifies primordial heat loss. Future observations have the potential to measure radiogenic heating with better precision, further constraining geological models and the thermal evolution of the Earth.

  19. Thermal photons in QGP and non-ideal effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Jitesh R; Sreekanth, V

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the thermal photon production-rates using one dimensional boost-invariant second order relativistic hydrodynamics to find proper time evolution of the energy density and the temperature. The effect of bulk-viscosity and non-ideal equation of state are taken into account in a manner consistent with recent lattice QCD estimates. It is shown that the \\textit{non-ideal} gas equation of state i.e $\\epsilon-3\\,P\\,\

  20. Thermal photons in QGP and non-ideal effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jitesh R. Bhatt; Hiranmaya Mishra; V. Sreekanth

    2010-11-09

    We investigate the thermal photon production-rates using one dimensional boost-invariant second order relativistic hydrodynamics to find proper time evolution of the energy density and the temperature. The effect of bulk-viscosity and non-ideal equation of state are taken into account in a manner consistent with recent lattice QCD estimates. It is shown that the \\textit{non-ideal} gas equation of state i.e $\\epsilon-3\\,P\\,\

  1. Thermal photons in QGP and non-ideal effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatt, Jitesh R; Sreekanth, V

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the thermal photon production-rates using one dimensional boost-invariant second order relativistic hydrodynamics to find proper time evolution of the energy density and the temperature. The effect of bulk-viscosity and non-ideal equation of state are taken into account in a manner consistent with recent lattice QCD estimates. It is shown that the \\textit{non-ideal} gas equation of state i.e $\\epsilon-3 P \

  2. Removal of Pollutants by Atmospheric Non Thermal Plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khacef, Ahmed; Pouvesle, Jean Michel; Van, Tiep Le

    2008-01-01

    Results on the application of non thermal plasmas in two environmentally important fields: oxidative removal of VOC and NOx in excess of oxygen were presented. The synergetic application of a plasma-catalytic treatment of NOx in excess of oxygen is also described.

  3. Thermal non-equilibrium transport in colloids Alois Wrger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Thermal non-equilibrium transport in colloids Alois Würger Laboratoire Ondes et Matičre d like an external field on colloidal suspensions and drives the solute particles to the cold or to the warm, depending on interfacial and solvent properties. We dis- cuss different transport mechanisms

  4. Pressure Balance between Thermal and Non-Thermal Plasmas in the 3C129 Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. E. Harris; H. Krawczynski

    2003-02-10

    With new Chandra observations of the cluster containing the two radio galaxies 3C129 and 3C129.1, we have made a fit to the X-ray surface brightness to obtain thermal pressures. VLA data at 1.4 GHz have been obtained to complement previous maps at 0.33 GHz and at 5 and 8 GHz. From these radio data, we are able to derive the minimum non-thermal pressure of various emitting volumes along the tail of 3C129 and in the lobes of 3C129.1. Under the assumption that the non-thermal plasma excludes significant thermal plasma, we may expect pressure balance for most features since ram pressure should be important only close to the cores of the galaxies. Since we find that the minimum non-thermal pressures are generally only a factor of a few below estimates of the ambient thermal pressure, we conclude that it is unlikely that relativistic protons contribute significantly to the total pressure. Reasonable contributions from low energy electrons and filling factors in the range 0.1 to 1 suffice to achieve pressure balance. Although we do not find strong signatures for the exclusion of hot gas from the radio structures, we find soft features near the cores of both galaxies suggestive of cool gas stripping and hard features associated with radio jets and possibly a leading bow shock.

  5. Non-linear and Non-planar Free Thermal Vibration of SWNT in Molecular Dynamic Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Non-linear and Non-planar Free Thermal Vibration of SWNT in Molecular Dynamic Simulation Heeyuen Koh, James Cannon, Shohei Chiashi, Junichiro Shiomi and Shigeo Maruyama Department of Mechanical-mail: maruyama@photon.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp 1. Introduction Vibration of suspended and cantilevered nanotubes

  6. AN OBSERVED CORRELATION BETWEEN THERMAL AND NON-THERMAL EMISSION IN GAMMA-RAY BURSTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Burgess, J.; Preece, Robert D. [Department of Space Science, University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Ryde, Felix; Axelsson, Magnus [Department of Physics, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Veres, Peter; Mészáros, Peter [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Connaughton, Valerie; Briggs, Michael; Bhat, P. N.; Pelassa, Veronique [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), University of Alabama in Huntsville, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Pe'er, Asaf [Physics Department, University College Cork, Cork (Ireland); Iyyani, Shabnam [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Goldstein, Adam [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Baring, Matthew G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Byrne, David; Fitzpatrick, Gerard; Foley, Suzanne [University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Kocevski, Daniel; Omodei, Nicola [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Paciesas, William S., E-mail: jmichaelburgess@gmail.com, E-mail: rob.preece@nasa.gov, E-mail: felix@particle.kth.se, E-mail: veres@gwu.edu, E-mail: npp@astro.psu.edu [Universities Space Research Association, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); and others

    2014-04-01

    Recent observations by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope have confirmed the existence of thermal and non-thermal components in the prompt photon spectra of some gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Through an analysis of six bright Fermi GRBs, we have discovered a correlation between the observed photospheric and non-thermal ?-ray emission components of several GRBs using a physical model that has previously been shown to be a good fit to the Fermi data. From the spectral parameters of these fits we find that the characteristic energies, E {sub p} and kT, of these two components are correlated via the relation E {sub p}?T {sup ?} which varies from GRB to GRB. We present an interpretation in which the value of the index ? indicates whether the jet is dominated by kinetic or magnetic energy. To date, this jet composition parameter has been assumed in the modeling of GRB outflows rather than derived from the data.

  7. Non-thermal quantum channels as a thermodynamical resource

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miguel Navascués; Luis Pedro García-Pintos

    2015-06-15

    Quantum thermodynamics can be understood as a resource theory, whereby thermal states are free and the only allowed operations are unitary transformations commuting with the total Hamiltonian of the system. Previous literature on the subject has just focused on transformations between different state resources, overlooking the fact that quantum operations which do not commute with the total energy also constitute a potentially valuable resource. In this Letter, given a number of non-thermal quantum channels, we study the problem of how to integrate them in a thermal engine so as to distill a maximum amount of work. We find that, in the limit of asymptotically many uses of each channel, the distillable work is an additive function of the considered channels, computable for both finite dimensional quantum operations and bosonic channels. We apply our results to bound the amount of distillable work due to the natural non-thermal processes postulated in the Ghirardi-Rimini-Weber (GRW) collapse model. We find that, although GRW theory predicts the possibility to extract work from the vacuum at no cost, the power which a \\emph{collapse engine} could in principle generate is extremely low.

  8. MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 2 2002deerhughes2.pdf More Documents & Publications MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal...

  9. Thermal creep of a rarefied gas on the basis of non-linear Korteweg-theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Yong Jung

    Thermal creep of a rarefied gas on the basis of non-linear Korteweg-theory Yong-Jung Kim1, Mingi to the memory of James B. Serrin Abstract. The study of thermal transpiration or more commonly called thermal of ordinary differential equations. Key words. thermal creep, thermal transpiration, rarefied gas, Boltz- mann

  10. Emission of non-thermal microwave radiation by a Martian dust storm Christopher Ruf,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    #12;Emission of non-thermal microwave radiation by a Martian dust storm Christopher Ruf,1 Nilton O report evidence for the emission of non-thermal microwave radiation by a deep Martian dust storm, S. Gross, L. Skjerve, and B. Cantor (2009), Emission of non-thermal microwave radiation by a Martian

  11. Simbol-X capability of detecting the non-thermal emission of stellar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Argiroffi; G. Micela; A. Maggio

    2008-01-16

    We investigate the capability of detecting, with Simbol-X, non-thermal emission during stellar flares, and distinguishing it from hot thermal emission. We find that flare non-thermal emission is detectable when at least ~20 cts are detected with the CZT detector in the 20-80 keV band. Therefore Simbol-X will detect the non-thermal emission from some of the X-ray brightest nearby stars, whether the thermal vs. non-thermal relation, derived for solar flares, holds.

  12. Thermal sensation and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments: Part III: whole-body sensation and comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Huizenga, Charlie; Han, Taeyoung

    2009-01-01

    and non-uniform thermal environments. Ph.D. thesis,ISO 7730 - Moderate thermal environments - determination ofwere exposed to uniform thermal environments, but because

  13. Thermal sensation and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments: Part I: local sensation of individual body parts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Huizenga, Charlie; Han, Taeyoung

    2009-01-01

    comfort and office thermal environment in rooms withand non-uniform thermal environments, Ph. D. Thesis,1. Introduction Thermal environments are often asymmetrical,

  14. Thermal transport through non-ideal Andreev quantum dots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedro Vidal

    2015-01-07

    We consider the scenario of thermal transport through two types of Andreev quantum dots which are coupled to two leads, belonging to the Class D and Class C symmetry classes. Using the random matrix description we derive the joint probability density function (j.p.d.f.) in term of Hypergeometric Function of Matrix Arguments when we consider one lead to be attached ideally and one lead non ideally. For the class C ensemble we derive a more explicit representation of the j.p.d.f. which results in a new type of random matrix model.

  15. Syngas Production from Propane Using Atmospheric Non-thermal Plasma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ouni, Fakhreddine; Cormier, Jean Marie; 10.1007/s11090-009-9166-2

    2009-01-01

    Propane steam reforming using a sliding discharge reactor was investigated under atmospheric pressure and low temperature (420 K). Non-thermal plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen was formed as a main product (H2 concentration up to 50%). By-products (C2-hydrocarbons, methane, carbon dioxide) were measured with concentrations lower than 6%. The mean electrical power injected in the discharge is less than 2 kW. The process efficiency is described in terms of propane conversion rate, steam reforming and cracking selectivity, as well as by-products production. Chemical processes modelling based on classical thermodynamic equilibrium reactor is also proposed. Calculated data fit quiet well experimental results and indicate that the improvement of C3H8 conversion and then H2 production can be achieved by increasing the gas fraction through the discharge. By improving the reactor design, the non-thermal plasma has a potential for being an effective way for supplying hydrogen or synthesis gas.

  16. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    heat source can be solar thermal energy, biological thermaland concentrated solar thermal energy farms. They demandsources include solar thermal energy, geo-thermal energy,

  17. Estimations of local thermal impact on living organisms irradiated by non-thermal microwaves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shatalov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Pennes' differential equation for bioheat transfer and the heat transfer equation are solved for the temperature distribution in a living tissue with spherical inclusions, irradiated by microwave power. It is shown that relative temperature excess in a small inclusion in the tissue in some cases is inversely proportional to its radius and does not depend on the applied power. In pulsing RF fields the effect is amplified proportionally to the ratio of the pulse period to the pulse duration. The local temperature rise significantly outpaces the averaged one and therefore the Watt to Weight SAR limits may be insufficient to estimate the safety of RF radiation and the conventional division of the biological effects of electromagnetic fields on the thermal and non-thermal needs to be revised.

  18. Human thermal sensation and comfort in transient and non-uniform thermal environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, H.

    2003-01-01

    the Human and the Thermal Environment." ASHRAE TransactionA field Study of Thermal Environment and Comfort in OfficeISO 7730 - Moderate Thermal Environments - Determination of

  19. Thermal radiation in non-static curved spacetimes: quantum mechanical path integrals and configuration space topology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. E. Ortiz; F. Vendrell

    1998-06-19

    A quantum mechanical path integral derivation is given of a thermal propagator in non-static Gui spacetime. The thermal nature of the propagator is understood in terms of homotopically non-trivial paths in the configuration space appropriate to tortoise coordinates. The connection to thermal emission from collapsing black holes is discussed.

  20. Geo-InformatieNederland GEO-INFO 2005-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    administration; · natural resources management; · water resources and environmental management; · applied earth48 Geo-InformatieNederland GEO-INFO 2005-1 gegevens te verwerken ten behoeve van ruimtelijke opleidingen aan zowel buitenlandse als Nederlandse studenten. #12;GEO-INFO 2005-1 49 dat geo

  1. Hawking Non-thermal and Thermal Radiations of Schwarzschild Anti-de Sitter Black Hole by Hamilton-Jacobi method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Atiqur Rahman; M. Ilias Hossain

    2012-05-07

    The massive particles tunneling method has been used to investigate the Hawking non-thermal and purely thermal radiations of Schwarzschild Anti-de Sitter (SAdS) black hole. Considering the spacetime background to be dynamical, incorporate the self-gravitation effect of the emitted particles the imaginary part of the action has been derived from Hamilton-Jacobi equation. Using the conservation laws of energy and angular momentum we have showed that the non-thermal and purely thermal tunneling rates are related to the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy and the derived emission spectrum deviates from the pure thermal spectrum. The result obtained for SAdS black hole is also in accordance with Parikh and Wilczek\\rq s opinion and gives a correction to the Hawking radiation of SAdS black hole.

  2. Non-Thermal Continuum toward SGRB2(N-LMH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. Hollis; P. R. Jewell; Anthony J. Remijan; F. J. Lovas

    2007-03-15

    An analysis of continuum antenna temperatures observed in the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) spectrometer bandpasses is presented for observations toward SgrB2(N-LMH). Since 2004, we have identified four new prebiotic molecules toward this source by means of rotational transitions between low energy levels; concurrently, we have observed significant continuum in the GBT spectrometer bandpasses centered at 85 different frequencies in the range of 1 to 48 GHz. The continuum heavily influences the molecular spectral features since we have observed far more absorption lines than emission lines for each of these new molecular species. Hence, it is important to understand the nature, distribution, and intensity of the underlying continuum in the GBT bandpasses for the purposes of radiative transfer, i.e. the means by which reliable molecular abundances are estimated. We find that the GBT spectrometer bandpass continuum is consistent with optically-thin, non thermal (synchrotron) emission with a flux density spectral index of -0.7 and a Gaussian source size of ~143" at 1 GHz that decreases with increasing frequency as nu^(-0.52). Some support for this model is provided by high frequency Very Large Array (VLA) observations of SgrB2.

  3. Efficiency bounds for quantum engines powered by non-thermal baths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wolfgang Niedenzu; David Gelbwaser-Klimovsky; Abraham G. Kofman; Gershon Kurizki

    2015-08-26

    We analyse the operation principles and performance bounds of quantum engines whose working fluid (WF) is energised by a non-thermal bath. We show that such a bath (e.g., a squeezed or coherently displaced thermal bath) can render the WF state non-passive, i.e., capable of storing and delivering work. This non-passivity converts the heat engine into a thermo-mechanical machine that is powered by mechanical work, as well as heat, from the non-thermal bath. Its efficiency is unrestricted by the Carnot bound, which only applies to heat engines. By contrast, for certain WF--bath interactions and non-thermal bath states the WF thermalises. The machine then operates as a heat engine, but its Carnot bound may correspond to a higher temperature than its thermal-bath counterpart.

  4. Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lim, Hyuck

    2011-01-01

    and nuclear power plants, solar thermal energy, geothermalpower plants, distributed solar thermal energy, geo/ocean-power plants and concentrated solar thermal energy farms.

  5. Development of a Non Air-assisted Thermal Regenerator

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    A thermal regenerator can be used in vehicles without high-pressure air and results in low hydrocarbon emissions, good ignitability, and nozzle durability

  6. Non-Thermal Plasma System Development for CIDI Exhaust Aftertreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balmer, M. Lou (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)); Tonkyn, Russell (Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BPNL)); Maupin, Gary; Yoon, Steven; Kolwaite, Ana (PNNL); Barlow, Stephen (BPNL); Domingo, Norberto; Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Hoard, John Wm. (Ford Research Laboratory); Howden, Ken (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

    2000-04-01

    There is a need for an efficient, durable technology to reduce NOx emissions from oxidative exhaust streams such as those produced by compression-ignition, direct injection (CIDI) diesel or lean-burn gasoline engines. A partnership formed between the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technology, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the USCAR Low Emission Technologies Research and Development Partnership is evaluating the effectiveness of a non-thermal plasma in conjunction with catalytic materials to mediate NOx and particulate emissions from diesel fueled light duty (CIDI) engines. Preliminary studies showed that plasma-catalyst systems could reduce up to 70% of NOx emissions at an equivalent cost of 3.5% of the input fuel in simulated diesel exhaust. These studies also showed that the type and concentration of hydrocarbon play a key role in both the plasma gas phase chemistry and the catalyst surface chemistry. More recently, plasma/catalyst systems have been evaluated for NOx reduction and particulate removal on a CIDI engine. Performance results for select plasma-catalyst systems for both simulated and actual CIDI exhaust will be presented. The effect of NOx and hydrocarbon concentration on plasma-catalyst performance will also be shown. SAE Paper SAE-2000-01-1601 {copyright} 2000 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.

  7. Hawking non-thermal and Purely thermal radiations of Kerr-de Sitter black hole by Hamilton-Jacobi method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Ilias Hossain; M. Atiqur Rahman

    2013-08-31

    Incorporating Parikh and Wilczek's opinion to the Kerr de-Sitter (KdS) black hole Hawking non-thermal and purely thermal radiations have been investigated using Hamilton-Jacobi method. We have taken the background spacetime of KdS black hole as dynamical, involving the self-gravitation effect of the emitted particles, energy and angular momentum has been taken as conserved and show that the tunneling rate is related to the change of Bekenstein-Hawking entropy and the derived emission spectrum deviates from the pure thermal spectrum. The explored results gives a correction to the Hawking radiation of KdS black hole.

  8. StressCam: Non-contact Measurement of Users' Emotional States through Thermal Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    states of computer users. The method is based on thermal imaging of the face. To the user, the imaging of Energy Expenditure (EE). The new method is highly correlated with the established, but awkward EEStressCam: Non-contact Measurement of Users' Emotional States through Thermal Imaging Colin Puri1

  9. Rejuvenation of metallic glasses by non-affine thermal strain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ketov, S. V.; Sun, Y. H.; Nachum, S.; Lu, Z.; Checchi, A.; Beraldin, A. R.; Bai, H. Y.; Wang, W. H.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Carpenter, M. A.; Greer, A. L.

    2015-08-12

    be compared with the property improvements (hardness, wear resistance) obtained by deep cryogenic treatment (DCT) of steels22. DCT, however, works through phase changes (transformation of residual austenite, precipitation of fine carbides) on holding at low... treatment on the thermal decomposition of Fe–C martensite. J. Mater. Sci. 49, 8183–8191 (2014). 23. Ma, B. M. Nuclear Reactor Materials and Applications, Sect. 6.7.2. Thermal-cycling growth, pp. 149?151 (Van Nostrand, New York, 1983). 24. Yuan, C., Wang...

  10. Applicability of whole-body heat balance models for evaluating thermal sensation under non-uniform air movement in warm environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Li; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Zhu, Yingxin

    2014-01-01

    of complex dynamic thermal environments. Energy Conservationresponse to the thermal environment. ASHRAE Transactions,transient and non-uniform thermal environments, in CEDR2003,

  11. Preparation of Non Oxide Ceramics in Thermal Plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, S. K.

    2008-10-23

    Titanium carbonitride (TiCN) and ultrafine SiC have been prepared in extended arc thermal plasma reactors using graphite electrodes. The prepared materials have been characterized by a variety of analytical methods. It has been possible to produce the materials in a very short time period.

  12. Thermally Activated Martensite: Its Relationship to Non-Thermally Activated (Athermal) Martensite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laughlin, D E; Jones, N J; Schwartz, A J; Massalski, T B

    2008-10-21

    The classification of martensitic displacive transformations into athermal, isothermal or anisothermal is discussed. Athermal does not mean 'no temperature dependence' as is often thought, but is best considered to be short for the notion of no thermal activation. Processes with no thermal activation do not depend on time, as there is no need to wait for sufficient statistical fluctuations in some specific order parameter to overcome an activation barrier to initiate the process. Clearly, this kind of process contrasts with those that are thermally activated. In the literature, thermally activated martensites are usually termed isothermal martensites, suggesting a constant temperature. Actually such martensites also typically occur with continuous cooling. The important distinctive feature of these martensites is that they are thermally activated and hence are distinguishable in principle from athermal martensites. A third type of process, anisothermal, has been introduced to account for those transformations which are thought to be thermally activated but which occur on continuous cooling. They may occur so rapidly that they do not appear to have an incubation time, and hence could be mistakenly called an athermal transformation. These designations will be reviewed and discussed in terms of activation energies and kinetic processes of the various martensitic transformations.

  13. Transient Non-linear Thermal FEM Simulation of Smart Power Switches and Verification by Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Kosel; R. Sleik; M. Glavanovics

    2008-01-07

    Thermal FEM (Finite Element Method) simulations can be used to predict the thermal behavior of power semiconductors in application. Most power semiconductors are made of silicon. Silicon thermal material properties are significantly temperature dependent. In this paper, validity of a common non-linear silicon material model is verified by transient non-linear thermal FEM simulations of Smart Power Switches and measurements. For verification, over-temperature protection behavior of Smart Power Switches is employed. This protection turns off the switch at a pre-defined temperature which is used as a temperature reference in the investigation. Power dissipation generated during a thermal overload event of two Smart Power devices is measured and used as an input stimulus to transient thermal FEM simulations. The duration time of the event together with the temperature reference is confronted with simulation results and thus the validity of the silicon model is proved. In addition, the impact of non-linear thermal properties of silicon on the thermal impedance of power semiconductors is shown.

  14. Assessment of optical performance of three non-tracking, non-imaging, external compound parabolic concentrators designed for high temperature solar thermal collector units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cisneros, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    a motorized sun-tracker to the collectors, designing a non-the sun onto each of the three solar thermal collectors. ix

  15. NON-DESTRUCTIVE THERMAL BARRIER COATING SPALLATION PREDICTION BY A LOADBASED MICRO-INDENTATION TECHNIQUE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. M. Tannenbaum; K. Lee; B. S.-J. Kang; M.A. Alvin

    2010-11-18

    Currently, the durability and life cycle of thermal barrier coatings (TBC) applied to gas turbine blades and combustor components are limiting the maximum temperature and subsequent efficiency at which gas turbine engines operate. The development of new materials, coating technologies and evaluation techniques is required if enhanced efficiency is to be achieved. Of the current ceramic coating materials used in gas turbine engines, yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) is most prevalent, its low thermal conductivity, high thermal expansion coefficient and outstanding mechanical strength make it ideal for use in TBC systems. However, residual stresses caused by coefficients of thermal expansion mismatches within the TBC system and unstable thermally grown oxides are considered the primary causes for its premature and erratic spallation failure. Through finite element simulations, it is shown that the residual stresses generated within the thermally grown oxide (TGO), bond coat (BC), YSZ and their interfaces create slight variations in indentation unloading surface stiffness response prior to spallation failure. In this research, seven air plasma sprayed and one electron beam physical vapor deposition yttria partially stabilized zirconia TBCs were subjected to isothermal and cyclic loadings at 1100°C. The associated coating degradation was evaluated using a non-destructive multiple partial unloading micro-indentation procedure. The results show that the proposed non-destructive micro-indentation evaluation technique can be an effective and specimenindependent TBC failure prediction tool capable of determining the location of initial spallation failure prior to its actual occurrence.

  16. Energetic electron propagation in the decay phase of non-thermal flare emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Jing; Yan, Yihua; Tsap, Yuri T.

    2014-06-01

    On the basis of the trap-plus-precipitation model, the peculiarities of non-thermal emission in the decay phase of solar flares have been considered. The calculation formulas for the escape rate of trapped electrons into the loss cone in terms of time profiles of hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) emission have been obtained. It has been found that the evolution of the spectral indices of non-thermal emission depend on the regimes of the pitch angle diffusion of trapped particles into the loss cone. The properties of non-thermal electrons related to the HXR and MW emission of the solar flare on 2004 November 3 are studied with Nobeyama Radioheliograph, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeters, RHESSI, and Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite observations. The spectral indices of non-thermal electrons related to MW and HXR emission remained constant or decreased, while the MW escape rate as distinguished from that of the HXRs increased. This may be associated with different diffusion regimes of trapped electrons into the loss cone. New arguments in favor of an important role of the superstrong diffusion for high-energy electrons in flare coronal loops have been obtained.

  17. Measurements of Non-Thermal Line Widths in Solar Active Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brooks, David H

    2015-01-01

    Spectral line widths are often observed to be larger than can be accounted for by thermal and instrumental broadening alone. This excess broadening is a key observational constraint for both nanoflare and wave dissipation models of coronal heating. Here we present a survey of non-thermal velocities measured in the high temperature loops (1--5MK) often found in the cores of solar active regions. This survey of $\\textit{Hinode}$ Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) observations covers 15 non-flaring active regions that span a wide range of solar conditions. We find relatively small non-thermal velocities, with a mean value of 17km s$^{-1}$, and no significant trend with temperature or active region magnetic flux. These measurements appear to be inconsistent with those expected from reconnection jets in the corona, chromospheric evaporation induced by coronal nanoflares, and Alfv\\'en wave turbulence models. Furthermore, because the observed non-thermal widths are generally small their measurements are ...

  18. Unraveling the mysteries of the non-thermal universe using -ray observations of Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Unraveling the mysteries of the non-thermal universe using -ray observations of Active Galactic hole at the center (~106 to 109 x solar mass) At least 5% of all galaxies are active galaxies Active galaxies: small ''bright'' core of emission in otherwise typical galaxy AGN = Active Galactic Nucleus (i

  19. Title: StressCam: Non-contact Measurement of Users' Emotional States through Thermal Imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and compared against real-time measurements of Energy Expenditure (EE). The new method is highly correlatedTitle: StressCam: Non-contact Measurement of Users' Emotional States through Thermal Imaging: We present a novel methodology for monitoring the affective state of computer users. The method

  20. CLASSIFICATION OF NON-HEAT GENERATING OUTDOOR OBJECTS IN THERMAL SCENES FOR AUTONOMOUS ROBOTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Leah B.

    Evaluation, Degree: PhD Advisor: Mark Hinders, Professor of Applied Science Abstract This dissertation describes a physics-based adaptive Bayesian pattern classification model that uses a passive thermal infrared imaging system to automatically characterize non-heat generating objects in unstructured outdoor

  1. Non-thermal calcination by ultraviolet irradiation in the synthesis of microporous materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Atul N.

    Non-thermal calcination by ultraviolet irradiation in the synthesis of microporous materials Atul N-directing agents in the synthesis of microporous materials. The method relies on the exposure of the sample. This method is applicable in making new materials from organic­inorganic pre- cursors and holds promise

  2. Non-Thermal Production of Dangerous Relics in the Early Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. F. Giudice; A. Riotto; I. Tkachev

    1999-07-27

    Many models of supersymmetry breaking, in the context of either supergravity or superstring theories, predict the presence of particles with weak scale masses and Planck-suppressed couplings. Typical examples are the scalar moduli and the gravitino. Excessive production of such particles in the early Universe destroys the successful predictions of nucleosynthesis. In particular, the thermal production of these relics after inflation leads to a bound on the reheating temperature, T_{RH} dangerous relics may be much more efficient than the thermal production after inflation. Scalar moduli fields may be copiously created by the classical gravitational effects on the vacuum state. Consequently, the new upper bound on the reheating temperature is shown to be, in some cases, as low as 100 GeV. We also study the non-thermal production of gravitinos in the early Universe, which can be extremely efficient and overcome the thermal production by several orders of magnitude, in realistic supersymmetric inflationary models.

  3. Plasma motions and non-thermal line broadening in flaring twisted coronal loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordovskyy, Mykola; Browning, Philippa

    2015-01-01

    Observation of coronal EUV spectral lines offers an opportunity to evaluate the thermal structure and flows in flaring atmospheres. This, in turn, can be used to estimate the partitioning between the thermal and kinetic energies released in flares. Our aim is to forward-model large-scale (50-10000 km) velocity distributions in order to interpret non-thermal broadening of different spectral EUV lines observed in flares. The developed models allow us to understand the origin of the observed spectral line shifts and broadening, and link these features to particular physical phenomena in flaring atmospheres. We use ideal MHD to derive unstable twisted magnetic fluxtube configurations in a gravitationally-stratified atmosphere. The evolution of these twisted fluxtubes is followed using resistive MHD, with anomalous resistivity depending on the local density and temperature. The model also takes into account the thermal conduction and radiative losses. The model allows us to evaluate average velocities and velocity...

  4. Heat Transfer and Fluid Transport of Supercritical CO2 in Enhanced Geothermal System with Local Thermal Non-equilibrium Model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Le; Luo, Feng; Xu, Ruina; Jiang, Peixue; Liu, Huihai

    2014-12-31

    The heat transfer and fluid transport of supercritical CO2 in enhanced geothermal system (EGS) is studied numerically with local thermal non-equilibrium model, which accounts for the temperature difference between solid matrix and fluid components in porous media and uses two energy equations to describe heat transfer in the solid matrix and in the fluid, respectively. As compared with the previous results of our research group, the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium mainly depends on the volumetric heat transfer coefficient ah, which has a significant effect on the production temperature at reservoir outlet and thermal breakthrough time. The uniformity of volumetricmore »heat transfer coefficient ah has little influence on the thermal breakthrough time, but the temperature difference become more obvious with time after thermal breakthrough with this simulation model. The thermal breakthrough time reduces and the effect of local thermal non-equilibrium becomes significant with decreasing ah.« less

  5. GeoPowering the West

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2007-02-01

    Summary brochure of GeoPowering the West (GPW) activities, and areas of technology transfer and market transformation. It also provides current contact information for key DOE and national laboratory staff representing the GPW program.

  6. Non-Thermal Plasmas for NOx Treatment Y.N. Jaffre, T. Aka-Ngnui and A. Beroual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) processes can be improved for NOx reduction by a Non- Thermal Plasma. European norm (standard specification) EURO 6 im- poses a reduction of 50% on automotive NOx emissionsNon-Thermal Plasmas for NOx Treatment Y.N. Jaffr´e, T. Aka-Ngnui and A. Beroual Ecole Centrale de

  7. Theoretical study of Diesel fuel reforming by a non-thermal arc discharge A. Lebouvier1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Theoretical study of Diesel fuel reforming by a non-thermal arc discharge A. Lebouvier1,2 , G anti-pollution norm namely for Diesel powered vehicles. NOx (NO, NO2,...) are very irritant pollutants- nologies purge is the use of non-thermal plasma. Plasma reforming of diesel fuel and exhaust gas mix- ture

  8. Thermally-activated non-local amplification in quantum energy transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno Leggio; Riccardo Messina; Mauro Antezza

    2015-11-18

    We study energy-transport efficiency in light-harvesting planar and 3D complexes of two-level atomic quantum systems, embedded in a common thermal blackbody radiation. We show that the collective non-local dissipation induced by the thermal bath plays a fundamental role in energy transport. It gives rise to a dramatic enhancement of the energy-transport efficiency, which may largely overcome $100\\%$. This effect, which improves the understanding of transport phenomena in experimentally relevant complexes, suggests a particularly promising mechanism for quantum energy management.

  9. Thermally-activated non-local amplification in quantum energy transport

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno Leggio; Riccardo Messina; Mauro Antezza

    2015-05-13

    We study energy-transport efficiency in light-harvesting planar and 3D complexes of two-level atomic quantum systems, embedded in a common thermal blackbody radiation. We show that the collective non-local dissipation induced by the thermal bath plays a fundamental role in energy transport. It gives rise to a dramatic enhancement of the energy-transport efficiency, which may largely overcome $100\\%$. This effect, which improves the understanding of transport phenomena in experimentally relevant complexes, suggests a particularly promising mechanism for quantum energy management.

  10. Application of Non-Thermal Plasma Assisted Catalyst Technology for Diesel Engine Emission Reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herling, Darrell R.; Smith, Monty R.; Baskaran, Suresh; Kupe, J.

    2000-12-31

    This paper presents an overview of a non-thermal plasma assisted catalyst system as applied to a small displacement diesel powered vehicle. In addition to effectively reducing NOx emissions, it has been found that a non-thermal plasma can also destroy a portion of the particulate matter (PM) that is emitted from diesel engines. Delphi Automotive Systems in conjunction with Pacific Northwest National Laboratories has been developing such an exhaust aftertreatment system to reduce emissions form diesel vehicles. The results of testing and system evaluation will be discussed in general, and the effectiveness on reducing oxides of nitrogen and particulate matter emissions from diesel vehicles. Published in Future Engines-SP1559, SAW, Warrendale, PA

  11. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coating Interface Quality By Eddy Current Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Mi; G. Zhao; R. Bayles

    2006-08-10

    Thermal spray coating is usually applied through directing molten or softened particles at very high velocities onto a substrate. An eddy current non-destructive inspection technique is presented here for thermal spray coating interface quality characterization. Several high-velocity-oxy-fuel (HVOF) coated steel plates were produced with various surface preparation conditions or spray process parameters. A quad-frequency eddy current probe was used to manually scan over the coating surface to evaluate the bonding quality. Experimental results show that different surface preparation conditions and varied process parameters can be successfully differentiated by the impedance value observed from the eddy current probe. The measurement is fairly robust and consistent. This non-contact, nondestructive, easy-to-use technique has the potential for evaluating the coating quality immediately after its application so that any defects can be corrected immediately.

  12. Numerical Study of a Propagating Non-Thermal Microwave Feature in a Solar Flare Loop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Minoshima; T. Yokoyama

    2008-06-24

    We analytically and numerically study the motion of electrons along a magnetic loop, to compare with the observation of the propagating feature of the non-thermal microwave source in the 1999 August 28 solar flare reported by Yokoyama et al. (2002). We model the electron motion with the Fokker-Planck equation and calculate the spatial distribution of the gyrosynchrotron radiation. We find that the microwave propagating feature does not correspond to the motion of electrons with a specific initial pitch angle. This apparent propagating feature is a consequence of the motion of an ensemble of electrons with different initial pitch angles, which have different time and position to produce strong radiation in the loop. We conclude that the non-thermal electrons in the 1999 August 28 flare were isotropically accelerated and then are injected into the loop.

  13. Heating of thermal non-equilibrium ions by Alfvén wave via nonresonant interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Hai-Feng; Wang, Shi-Qing [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China) [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); The Engineering and Technical College of Chengdu University of Technology, Leshan 614000 (China); Li, Ke-Hua [The Engineering and Technical College of Chengdu University of Technology, Leshan 614000 (China)] [The Engineering and Technical College of Chengdu University of Technology, Leshan 614000 (China)

    2013-10-15

    Pickup of thermal non-equilibrium ions by Alfvén wave via nonresonant wave-particle interaction is investigated by means of analytical test-particle theory. Some interesting and new results are found. No matter what the initial velocity distribution is, if the background magnetic field, the Alfvén speed, and the Alfvén magnetic field are fixed, the average parallel velocity never changes when t??. Heating effects in the perpendicular and parallel direction just depend on the initial temperature, and the perpendicular temperature increase is more prominent. It is noted that the heating effect of thermal non-equilibrium ions (Kappa ions) is weaker than that of the Maxwellian. This phenomenon may be relative to the heating of ions in the solar corona as well as in some toroidal confinement fusion devices.

  14. Thermal Action and Specific Heat of the Five-Dimensional Non-Extremal Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shijong Ryang

    1997-01-28

    We construct the Euclidean on-shell action for the five-dimensional non-extremal black hole with multiple electric charges. We show that this thermal action agrees with one half of the entropy. This agreement is argued to be related to the generalized Smarr formula of the five-dimensional black hole mass. Through the calculation of the specific heat far off extremality we observe that a phase transition occurs.

  15. DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coyner, Aaron J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: aaron.j.coyner@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-12-01

    Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

  16. Non-thermal Plasma - Nanometer TiO2 Photocatalysis for Formaldehyde Decomposition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, Q.; Feng, G.; Guang, X.

    2006-01-01

    for the carcinogenicity, the allergy source which is commonly recognized, and one of the latent sudden-change leading matters by the World Health Organization. Therefore, indoor pollutant purification is imperative. At present, the indoor pollutant purification... is more promising. Key words: Air cleaning Techonlogy; Non-thermal Plasma; TiO2 Photocatalysis 1. INTRODUCTION The volatile organic matter (VOCs) [ 1 ]is the main pollution source of indoor air, also the toxicity is extremely big, can lead...

  17. Lab 3 GEO 465/565 Storm Water Pollution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    1 Lab 3 ­ GEO 465/565 Storm Water Pollution The Nation's Most Significant Water Quality Problem our rivers, lakes and coastal waters by controlling pollution from industry and sewage treatment, is that we have not done enough to stop storm water pollution, or non-point source pollution, that runs off

  18. Geography with Geo-Informatics Is Geography with Geo-Informatics right for me?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Ralph R.

    Geography with Geo-Informatics Is Geography with Geo-Informatics right for me? Geo, and GIS, to study Physical and Human Geography. This degree brings together aspects of Geography, Computer will develop from a degree in Geography with Geo-Informatics are wide-ranging and include excellent time

  19. GEO 101N General geology Kathleen M. Harper (Pre or co) with any geo course below 130 GEO 101N General geology TBA Pre or co with any geo course below 131

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vonessen, Nikolaus

    W. or GEO 101N General geology Kathleen M. Harper (Pre or co) with any geo course below 130 GEO 101N General geology TBA Pre or co with any geo course below 131 GEO 102N General geology Laboratory TA TBA none GEO 207 Geological Hazards and Disasters Pre - min C in any 100-level geosciences course

  20. UBIQUITOUS NON-THERMALS IN ASTROPHYSICAL PLASMAS: RESTATING THE DIFFICULTY OF MAINTAINING MAXWELLIANS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scudder, J. D.; Karimabadi, H.

    2013-06-10

    This paper outlines the rather narrow conditions on a radiatively decoupled plasma where a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution can be assumed with confidence. The complementary non-thermal distribution with non-perturbative kurtosis is argued to have a much broader purview than has previously been accepted. These conditions are expressed in terms of the electron Knudsen number, K{sub e} , the ratio of the electron mean free path to the scale length of electron pressure. Rather generally, f(v < v{sub 2}(K{sub e} )) will be Gaussian, so that MB atomic or wave particle effects controlled by speeds v < v{sub 2} {identical_to} w(15/8K{sub e} ){sup 1/4} will remain defensible, where w is the most probable speed. The sufficient condition for Spitzer-Braginskii plasma fluid closure at the energy equation requires globally K{sub e} (s) {<=} 0.01; this global condition pertains to the maximum value of K{sub e} along the arc length s of the magnetic field (to its extremities) provided that contiguous plasma remains uncoupled from the radiation field. The non-thermal regime K{sub e} > 0.01 is common in all main-sequence stellar atmospheres above approximately 0.05 stellar radii from the surface. The entire solar corona and wind are included in this regime where non-thermal distributions with kurtosis are shown to be ubiquitous, heat flux is not well modeled by Spitzer-Braginskii closure, and fluid modeling is qualitative at best.

  1. Preradiation studies for non-thermal Z-pinch wire load experiments on Saturn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, T.W.L.; Humphreys, D.R.; Poukey, J.W.; Marder, B.M.; Halbleib, J.A.; Crow, J.T.; Spielman, R.B.; Mock, R.C.

    1994-06-01

    The implosion dynamics of compact wire arrays on Saturn are explored as a function of wire mass m, wire length {ell}, wire radii R, and radial power-flow feed geometry using the ZORK code. Electron losses and the likelihood of arcing in the radial feed adjacent the wire load are analyzed using the TWOQUICK and CYLTRAN codes. The physical characteristics of the implosion and subsequent thermal radiation production are estimated using the LASNEX code in one dimension. These analyses show that compact tungsten wire arrays with parameters suggested by D. Mosher and with a 21-nH vacuum feed geometry satisfy the empirical scaling criterion I/(M/{ell}) {approximately} 2 MA/(mg/cm) of Mosher for optimizing non-thermal radiation from z pinches, generate low electron losses in the radial feeds, and generate electric fields at the insulator stack below the Charlie Martin flashover limit thereby permitting full power to be delivered to the load. Under such conditions, peak currents of {approximately}5 MA can be delivered to wire loads {approximately}20 ns before the driving voltage reverses at the insulator stack, potentially allowing the m = 0 instability to develop with the subsequent emission of non-thermal radiation as predicted by the Mosher model.

  2. GEO Secretariat Global Earth Observing System of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Epidemiology 3. Energy Management 4. Climate Variability & Change 5. Water Management 6. Weather Forecasting 7© GEO Secretariat Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS): Biodiversity, Ecosystems and GEO BON GEO Forest Monitoring Symposium 4 November 2008 Douglas M. Muchoney, Ph.D. U.S. Geological

  3. Thermal engineering of non-local resistance in lateral spin valves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasai, S. Takahashi, Y. K.; Hirayama, S.; Mitani, S.; Hono, K.; Adachi, H.; Ieda, J.; Maekawa, S.

    2014-04-21

    We study the non-local spin transport in Permalloy/Cu lateral spin valves (LSVs) fabricated on thermally oxidized Si and MgO substrates. While these LSVs show the same magnitude of spin signals, significant substrate dependence of the baseline resistance was observed. The baseline resistance shows much weaker dependence on the inter-electrode distance than that of the spin transport observed in the Cu wires. A simple analysis of voltage-current characteristics in the baseline resistance indicates the observed result can be explained by a combination of the Peltier and Seebeck effects at the injector and detector junctions, suggesting the usage of high thermal conductivity substrate (or under-layer) is effective to reduce the baseline resistance.

  4. Thermalized Non-Equilibrated Matter against Random Matrix Theory, Quantum Chaos and Direct Interaction: Warming up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kun, S; Zhao, M H; Huang, M R

    2013-01-01

    The idea of a thermalized non-equilibrated state of matter offers a conceptually new understanding of the strong angular asymmetry. In this compact review we present some clarifications, corrections and further developments of the approach, and provide a brief account of results previously discussed but not reported in the literature. The cross symmetry compound nucleus $S$-matrix correlations are obtained (i) starting from the unitary $S$-matrix representation, (ii) by explicitly taking into account a process of energy equilibration, and (iii) without taking the thermodynamic limit of an infinite number of particles in the thermalized system. It is conjectured that the long phase memory is due to the exponentially small total spin off-diagonal resonance intensity correlations. This manifestly implies that the strong angular asymmetry intimately relates to extremely small deviations of the eigenfunction distribution from Gaussian law. The spin diagonal resonance intensity correlations determine a new time/ene...

  5. Performance analysis of medium temperature non-tracking solar thermal concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balkoski, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Solar Thermal Energy 1.1.1. Physics of Solar Thermal Energy Blackbody Radiation3]. SunTherm Energy, Inc. Solar Thermal Market Research.

  6. Performance analysis of medium temperature non-tracking solar thermal concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balkoski, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    SunTherm Energy, Inc. Solar Thermal Market Research. Oct.Low-Cost High Temperature Solar Thermal Collector." Thesis.solar thermal .. 1

  7. Performance analysis of medium temperature non-tracking solar thermal concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balkoski, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Temperature Solar Thermal Collector." Thesis. University ofSolar Thermal Collectors ..by the sun [1]. A solar thermal collector is a device that

  8. A Study on Zoning Regulations' Impact on Thermal Comfort Conditions in Non-conditioned Apartment Buildings in Dhaka City 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, Saiful

    2012-02-14

    of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2011 Major Subject: Architecture A STUDY ON ZONING REGULATIONS? IMPACT ON THERMAL COMFORT CONDITIONS IN NON-CONDITIONED APARTMENT BUILDINGS IN DHAKA CITY A Dissertation... Culp Liliana Beltran Shannon Smith Van Zandt Head of Department, Ward Wells December 2011 Major Subject: Architecture iii ABSTRACT A Study on Zoning Regulations? Impact on Thermal Comfort Conditions in Non- conditioned...

  9. Non-Destructive Evaluation of Thermal Spray Coating Interface Quality by Eddy Current Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.Mi; X. Zhao; R. Bayles

    2006-05-26

    Thermal spray coating is usually applied through directing molten or softened particles at very high velocities onto a substrate. An eddy current non-destructive inspection technique is presented here for thermal spray coating interface quality characterization. Several high-velocity-oxy-fuel (HVOF) coated steel plates were produced with different surface preparation conditions before applying the coating, e.g., grit-blasted surface, wire-brush cleaned surface, and a dirty surface. A quad-frequency eddy current probe was used to manually scan over the coating surface to evaluate the bonding quality. Experimental results show that the three surface preparation conditions can be successfully differentiated by looking into the impedance difference observed from the eddy current probe. The measurement is fairly robust and consistent. More specimens are also prepared with variations of process parameters, such as spray angle, stand-off distance, and application of corrosion protective sealant, etc. They are blindly tested to evaluate the reliability of the eddy current system. Quantitative relations between the coating bond strength and the eddy current response are also established with the support of destructive testing. This non-contact, non-destructive, easy to use technique has the potential for evaluating the coating quality immediately after its application so that any defects can be corrected immediately.

  10. Quantum corrected non-thermal radiation spectrum from the tunnelling mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subenoy Chakraborty; Subhajit Saha; Christian Corda

    2015-05-28

    Tunnelling mechanism is today considered a popular and widely used method in describing Hawking radiation. However, in relation to black hole (BH) emission, this mechanism is mostly used to obtain the Hawking temperature by comparing the probability of emission of an outgoing particle with the Boltzmann factor. On the other hand, Banerjee and Majhi reformulated the tunnelling framework deriving a black body spectrum through the density matrix for the outgoing modes for both the Bose-Einstein distribution and the Fermi-Dirac distribution. In contrast, Parikh and Wilczek introduced a correction term performing an exact calculation of the action for a tunnelling spherically symmetric particle and, as a result, the probability of emission of an outgoing particle corresponds to a non-strictly thermal radiation spectrum. Recently, one of us (C. Corda) introduced a BH effective state and was able to obtain a non-strictly black body spectrum from the tunnelling mechanism corresponding to the probability of emission of an outgoing particle found by Parikh and Wilczek. The present work introduces the quantum corrected effective temperature and the corresponding quantum corrected effective metric is written using Hawking's periodicity arguments. Thus, we obtain further corrections to the non-strictly thermal BH radiation spectrum as the final distributions take into account both the BH dynamical geometry during the emission of the particle and the quantum corrections to the semiclassical Hawking temperature.

  11. Gravity as the main driver of non-thermal motions in massive star formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traficante, A; Smith, R; Billot, N; Duarte-Cabral, A; Peretto, N; Molinari, S; Pineda, J E

    2015-01-01

    The origin of non-thermal motions in massive star forming regions can be ascribed to turbulence acting against the gravitational collapse, or to the self-gravity itself driving the rapid global collapse. The dependence between velocity dispersion, radius and clouds surface density found by Heyer et al. (2009), $\\sigma/R^{1/2}\\propto \\Sigma^{1/2}$, has been interpreted in terms of global collapse of clouds. In this work we demonstrate that this relation is an expression of a more general relation between accelerations. We introduce the gravo-turbulent acceleration, a$_k$, which describe the non-thermal motions in each region, and the acceleration generated by the gravitational field a$_G$, which is proportional to $\\Sigma$. We also introduce a new coefficient, the force partition coefficient $\\alpha_{for}$ which is equivalent to the virial parameter but does not distinguish between collapsing and non-collapsing regions. In this work we use the a$_k$ - a$_G$ formalism in the analysis of a new sample of 16 massi...

  12. Field-enhanced electrodes for additive-injection non-thermal plasma (NTP) processor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rosocha, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ferreri, Vincent (Westminster, CO); Kim, Yongho (Los Alamos, NM)

    2009-04-21

    The present invention comprises a field enhanced electrode package for use in a non-thermal plasma processor. The field enhanced electrode package includes a high voltage electrode and a field-enhancing electrode with a dielectric material layer disposed in-between the high voltage electrode and the field-enhancing electrode. The field-enhancing electrode features at least one raised section that includes at least one injection hole that allows plasma discharge streamers to occur primarily within an injected additive gas.

  13. Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a Non-Thermal Plasma Device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles Mones

    2006-12-01

    Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of non-thermal, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a non-thermal, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a non-thermal plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that non-thermal plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the application of this technology for removing elemental mercury from flue gas streams generated by utility boilers. On an absolute basis, the quantity of reagent required to accomplish the oxidation was small. For example, complete oxidation of mercury was accomplished using a 1% volume fraction of oxygen in a nitrogen stream. Overall, the tests with mercury validated the most useful aspect of the CR&E technology: Providing a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by employing a specific plasma reagent to either increase reaction kinetics or promote reactions that would not have occurred under normal circumstances.

  14. Performance analysis of medium temperature non-tracking solar thermal concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balkoski, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Solar Thermal Designs .temperatures. Solar Thermal Designs As stated earlier, mostperformance of any solar concentrator design. Two different

  15. Non-Hamiltonian modeling of squeezing and thermal disorder in driven oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sashwin Sewran; Konstantin G. Zloshchastiev; Alessandro Sergi

    2015-01-08

    Recently, model systems with quadratic Hamiltonians and time-dependent interactions were studied by Briegel and Popescu and by Galve et al. in order to consider the possibility of both quantum refrigeration in enzymes [Proc. R. Soc. 469 20110290 (2013)] and entanglement in the high temperature limit [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105 180501 (2010); Phys. Rev. A 81 062117 (2010)]. Following this line of research, we studied a model comprising two quantum harmonic oscillators driven by a time-dependent harmonic coupling. Such a system was embedded in a thermal bath represented in two different ways. In one case, the bath was composed of a finite but great number of independent harmonic oscillators with an Ohmic spectral density. In the other case, the bath was more efficiently defined in terms of a single oscillator coupled to a non-Hamiltonian thermostat. In both cases, we simulated the effect of the thermal disorder on the generation of the squeezed states in the two-oscillators relevant system. We found that, in our model, the thermal disorder of the bath determines the presence of a threshold temperature, for the generation of squeezed states, equal to T=311.13 K. Such a threshold is estimated to be within temperatures where chemical reactions and biological activity comfortably take place.

  16. Non-thermal Electrons at the Earth's Bow Shock: A `Gradual' Event

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Oka; T. Terasawa; M. Fujimoto; H. Matsui; Y. Kasaba; Y. Saito; H. Kojima; H. Matsumoto; T. Mukai

    2008-10-24

    Earth's bow shock is known to produce non-thermal electrons which are generally observed as a `spike' in their flux profile. Here, in this paper, we present an analysis of electron and whistler wave properties for a quasi-perpendicular shock crossing that is supercritical, but subcritical to the so-called whistler critical Mach number, M$^w_{\\rm crit}$, above which whistler waves cannot propagate upstream. We have found that the amplitudes of whistler waves increased exponentially as a function of time prior to the shock encounter, while the suprathermal ($>$ 2 keV) electron flux similarly increased with time, although with differing $e$-folding time scales. Comparison of the electron energy spectrum measured within the ramp with predictions from diffusive shock acceleration theory was poor, but the variation of pitch angle distribution showed scattering of non-thermal electrons in the upstream region. While not finding a specific mechanism to account for the electron diffusion, we suggest that the whistlers seen probably account for the differences observed between this `gradual' event and the `spike' events seen at shocks with no upstream whistlers.

  17. Wave theories of non-laminar charged particle beams: from quantum to thermal regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renato Fedele; Fatema Tanjia; Dusan Jovanovic; Sergio De Nicola; Concetta Ronsivalle

    2013-04-01

    The standard classical description of non-laminar charge particle beams in paraxial approximation is extended to the context of two wave theories. The first theory is the so-called Thermal Wave Model (TWM) that interprets the paraxial thermal spreading of the beam particles as the analog of the quantum diffraction. The other theory, hereafter called Quantum Wave Model (QWM), that takes into account the individual quantum nature of the single beam particle (uncertainty principle and spin) and provides the collective description of the beam transport in the presence of the quantum paraxial diffraction. QWM can be applied to beams that are sufficiently cold to allow the particles to manifest their individual quantum nature but sufficiently warm to make overlapping-less the single-particle wave functions. In both theories, the propagation of the beam transport in plasmas or in vacuo is provided by fully similar set of nonlinear and nonlocal governing equations, where in the case of TWM the Compton wavelength (fundamental emittance) is replaced by the beam thermal emittance. In both models, the beam transport in the presence of the self-fields (space charge and inductive effects) is governed by a suitable nonlinear nonlocal 2D Schroedinger equation that is used to obtain the envelope beam equation in quantum and quantum-like regimes, respectively. An envelope equation is derived for both TWM and QWM regimes. In TWM we recover the well known Sacherer equation whilst, in QWM we obtain the evolution equation of the single-particle spot size, i.e., single quantum ray spot in the transverse plane (Compton regime). We show that such a quantum evolution equation contains the same information carried out by an evolution equation for the beam spot size (description of the beam as a whole). This is done by defining the lowest QWM state reachable by a system of overlapping-less Fermions.

  18. Non-thermal Cosmic Backgrounds and prospects for future high-energy observations of blazars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Giommi; S. Colafrancesco

    2006-02-10

    We discuss the contribution of the blazar population to the extragalactic background radiation across the electromagnetic (e.m.) spectrum with particular reference to the microwave, hard-X-ray and gamma-ray bands. Our estimates are based on a recently derived blazar radio LogN-LogS that was built by combining several radio and multi-frequency surveys. We show that blazar emission integrated over cosmic time gives rise to a considerable broad-band non-thermal cosmic background that dominates the extragalactic brightness in the high-energy part of the e.m. spectrum. We also estimate the number of blazars that are expected to be detected by future planned or hypothetical missions operating in the X-ray and gamma-ray energy bands.

  19. EVIDENCE OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM HH 80

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    López-Santiago, J.; Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P.; Bonito, R.; Miceli, M.; Albacete-Colombo, J. F.; De Castro, E.

    2013-10-20

    Protostellar jets appear at all stages of star formation when the accretion process is still at work. Jets travel at velocities of hundreds of km s{sup –1}, creating strong shocks when interacting with the interstellar medium. Several cases of jets have been detected in X-rays, typically showing soft emission. For the first time, we report evidence of hard X-ray emission possibly related to non-thermal processes not explained by previous models of the post-shock emission predicted in the jet/ambient interaction scenario. HH 80 is located at the south head of the jet associated with the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048. It shows soft and hard X-ray emission in regions that are spatially separated, with the soft X-ray emission region situated behind the region of hard X-ray emission. We propose a scenario for HH 80 where soft X-ray emission is associated with thermal processes from the interaction of the jet with denser ambient matter and hard X-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation at the front shock.

  20. Thermal history sensors for non-destructive temperature measurements in harsh environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilgrim, C. C.; Heyes, A. L.; Feist, J. P.

    2014-02-18

    The operating temperature is a critical physical parameter in many engineering applications, however, can be very challenging to measure in certain environments, particularly when access is limited or on rotating components. A new quantitative non-destructive temperature measurement technique has been proposed which relies on thermally induced permanent changes in ceramic phosphors. This technique has several distinct advantages over current methods for many different applications. The robust ceramic material stores the temperature information allowing long term thermal exposures in harsh environment to be measured at a convenient time. Additionally, rare earth dopants make the ceramic phosphorescent so that the temperature information can be interpreted by automated interrogation of the phosphorescent light. This technique has been demonstrated by application of YAG doped with dysprosium and europium as coatings through the air-plasma spray process. Either material can be used to measure temperature over a wide range, namely between 300°C and 900°C. Furthermore, results show that the material records the peak exposure temperature and prolonged exposure at lower temperatures would have no effect on the temperature measurement. This indicates that these materials could be used to measure peak operating temperatures in long-term testing.

  1. Thermalized Non-Equilibrated Matter against Random Matrix Theory, Quantum Chaos and Direct Interaction: Warming up

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Kun; Y. Li; M. H. Zhao; M. R. Huang

    2013-07-17

    The idea of a thermalized non-equilibrated state of matter offers a conceptually new understanding of the strong angular asymmetry. In this compact review we present some clarifications, corrections and further developments of the approach, and provide a brief account of results previously discussed but not reported in the literature. The cross symmetry compound nucleus $S$-matrix correlations are obtained (i) starting from the unitary $S$-matrix representation, (ii) by explicitly taking into account a process of energy equilibration, and (iii) without taking the thermodynamic limit of an infinite number of particles in the thermalized system. It is conjectured that the long phase memory is due to the exponentially small total spin off-diagonal resonance intensity correlations. This manifestly implies that the strong angular asymmetry intimately relates to extremely small deviations of the eigenfunction distribution from Gaussian law. The spin diagonal resonance intensity correlations determine a new time/energy scale for a validity of random matrix theory. Its definition does not involve overlaps of the many-body interacting configurations with shell model non-interacting states and thus is conceptually different from the physical meaning (inverse energy relaxation time) of the spreading widths introduced by Wigner. Exact Gaussian distribution of the resonance wave functions corresponds to the instantaneous phase relaxation. We invite the nuclear reaction community for the competition to describe, as the first challenge, the strong forward peaking in the typically evaporation part of the proton spectra. This is necessary to initiate revealing long-term misconduct in the heavily cross-disciplinary field, also important for nuclear industry applications.

  2. GRB 131014A: a Laboratory to Study the Thermal-Like and Non-Thermal Emissions in Gamma-Ray Bursts, and the new L$_\\mathrm{i}^\\mathrm{nTh}$-E$_\\mathrm{peak,i}^\\mathrm{nTh,rest}$ relation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guiriec, S; Piran, T; Daigne, F; Kouveliotou, C; Racusin, J; Gehrels, N; McEnery, J

    2015-01-01

    Evidence has been accumulated on the existence of a thermal-like component during the prompt phase of GRBs. This component, often associated with the GRB jet's photosphere, is usually subdominant compared to a much stronger non-thermal one. The prompt emission of Fermi GRB 131014A provides a unique opportunity to study this thermal-like component. Indeed, the thermal emission in GRB 131014A is much more intense than in other GRBs and a pure thermal episode is observed during the initial 0.16 s. The thermal-like component cools monotonically during the first second while the non-thermal emission kicks off. The intensity of the non-thermal component progressively increases until being energetically dominant at late time. This is a perfect scenario to disentangle the thermal component from the non-thermal one. A low-energy spectral index of +0.6 better fit the thermal component than the typical index value +1 corresponding to a pure Planck function. The non-thermal component is adequately fitted with a Band func...

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/Geo | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geo < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap GRR-logo.png Map of GRR states.jpg Since April 2012, the...

  4. Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the after-treatment of automotive exhaust particulates and marine diesel exhaust NOx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAdams, R; Beech, P; Gillespie, R; Guy, C; Jones,S; Liddell, T; Morgan, R; Shawcross, J; Weeks, D; Hughes, D; Oesterle, J; Eberspdcher,

    2003-08-24

    The trend in environmental legislation is such that primary engine modifications will not be sufficient to meet all future emissions requirements and exhaust aftertreatment technologies will need to be employed. One potential solution that is well placed to meet those requirements is non-thermal plasma technology. This paper will describe our work with some of our partners in the development of a plasma based diesel particulate filter (DPF) and plasma assisted catalytic reduction (PACR) for NOx removal. This paper describes the development of non-thermal plasma technology for the aftertreatment of particulates from a passenger car engine and NOx from a marine diesel exhaust application.

  5. Production of stable, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive plasmas using gases other than helium or neon

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Park, Jaeyoung; Henins, Ivars

    2005-06-21

    The present invention enables the production of stable, steady state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf capacitive .alpha.-mode plasmas using gases other than helium and neon. In particular, the current invention generates and maintains stable, steady-state, non-thermal atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas using pure argon or argon with reactive gas mixtures, pure oxygen or air. By replacing rare and expensive helium with more readily available gases, this invention makes it more economical to use atmospheric pressure rf .alpha.-mode plasmas for various materials processing applications.

  6. Rarefactive and compressive soliton waves in unmagnetized dusty plasma with non-thermal electron and ion distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eslami, Esmaeil Baraz, Rasoul

    2014-02-15

    Sagdeev's pseudo potential method is employed to study dust acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized plasma containing negatively charged dusts with non-thermal electron and ion. The range of parameters for the existence of solitary waves using the analytical expression of the Sagdeev potential has been found. It is observed that, depending on the values of the plasma parameters like ion to electron temperature ratio ?, non-thermal parameters ? and ?, electron to ion density ratio ?, and the value of the Mach number M, both rarefactive and compressive solitary waves may exist.

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/Geo/Sections | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon RAPIDRoadmapGeoSections < RAPID | Roadmap | Geo Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png...

  8. Geo-Engineering through Internet Informatics (GEMINI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doveton, John H.; Watney, W. Lynn

    2003-03-06

    The program, for development and methodologies, was a 3-year interdisciplinary effort to develop an interactive, integrated Internet Website named GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through Internet Informatics) that would build real-time geo-engineering reservoir models for the Internet using the latest technology in Web applications.

  9. Non-thermal high-energy emission from colliding winds of massive stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Reimer; M. Pohl; O. Reimer

    2005-10-25

    Colliding winds of massive star binary systems are considered as potential sites of non-thermal high-energy photon production. This is motivated merely by the detection of synchrotron radio emission from the expected colliding wind location. Here we investigate the properties of high-energy photon production in colliding winds of long-period WR+OB-systems. We found that in the dominating leptonic radiation process anisotropy and Klein-Nishina effects may yield spectral and variability signatures in the gamma-ray domain at or above the sensitivity of current or upcoming gamma-ray telescopes. Analytical formulae for the steady-state particle spectra are derived assuming diffusive particle acceleration out of a pool of thermal wind particles, and taking into account adiabatic and all relevant radiative losses. For the first time we include their advection/convection in the wind collision zone, and distinguish two regions within this extended region: the acceleration region where spatial diffusion is superior to convective/advective motion, and the convection region defined by the convection time shorter than the diffusion time scale. The calculation of the Inverse Compton radiation uses the full Klein-Nishina cross section, and takes into account the anisotropic nature of the scattering process. This leads to orbital flux variations by up to several orders of magnitude which may, however, be blurred by the geometry of the system. The calculations are applied to the typical WR+OB-systems WR 140 and WR 147 to yield predictions of their expected spectral and temporal characteristica and to evaluate chances to detect high-energy emission with the current and upcoming gamma-ray experiments. (abridged)

  10. Exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by non-thermal arc discharge for NOx trap regeneration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , coming into force in September 2014, set a 56 % reduction of NOx emissions compared to Euro stage V (80 trap technology, also called NOx Storage and Reduction (NSR), was first developed by Toyota in 199411 Exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by non- thermal arc discharge for NOx trap regeneration

  11. Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature and by-products formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature efficiency together with the catalyst activation temperature when a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) is placed downstream to a multi-plans Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) reactor. In order to simulate Diesel engine

  12. A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia. Abstract The constitutive thermo-hydro-mechanical equations is next applied to simulate circulation tests at the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir. The finer thermo-hydro

  13. Thermal Performance of Poly Alpha Olefin Nanofluid with Spherical and Non-spherical Nanoparticles 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Chan Hyun

    2012-07-16

    Research on nanofluids has been undertaken for several years because of the reported enhancements of thermal properties such as thermal conductivity and enhanced heat transfer performance in laminar flow. Nanofluid is the fluid where nanoparticles...

  14. Entanglement distillation for continuous-variables under a thermal environment: Effectiveness of a non-Gaussian operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaehak Lee; Hyunchul Nha

    2013-03-31

    We study the task of distilling entanglement by a coherent superposition operation $t\\hat{a}+r\\hat{a}^\\dagger$ applied to a continuous-variable state under a thermal noise. In particular, we compare the performances of two different strategies, i.e., the non-Gaussian operation $t\\hat{a}+r\\hat{a}^\\dagger$ is applied before or after the noisy Gaussian channel. This is closely related to a fundamental problem of whether Gaussian or non-Gaussian entanglement can be more robust under a noisy channel and also provides a useful insight into the practical implementation of entanglement distribution for a long-distance quantum communication. We specifically look into two entanglement characteristics, the logarithmic negativity as a measure of entanglement and the teleportation fidelity as a usefulness of entanglement, for each distilled state. We find that the non-Gaussian operation after (before) the thermal noise becomes more effective in the low (high) temperature regime.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Non-thermal Emissions and Study of Electron Transport in a Solar Flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Minoshima; T. Yokoyama; N. Mitani

    2007-10-02

    We study the non-thermal emissions in a solar flare occurring on 2003 May 29 by using RHESSI hard X-ray (HXR) and Nobeyama microwave observations. This flare shows several typical behaviors of the HXR and microwave emissions: time delay of microwave peaks relative to HXR peaks, loop-top microwave and footpoint HXR sources, and a harder electron energy distribution inferred from the microwave spectrum than from the HXR spectrum. In addition, we found that the time profile of the spectral index of the higher-energy ($\\gsim 100$ keV) HXRs is similar to that of the microwaves, and is delayed from that of the lower-energy ($\\lsim 100$ keV) HXRs. We interpret these observations in terms of an electron transport model called {\\TPP}. We numerically solved the spatially-homogeneous {\\FP} equation to determine electron evolution in energy and pitch-angle space. By comparing the behaviors of the HXR and microwave emissions predicted by the model with the observations, we discuss the pitch-angle distribution of the electrons injected into the flare site. We found that the observed spectral variations can qualitatively be explained if the injected electrons have a pitch-angle distribution concentrated perpendicular to the magnetic field lines rather than isotropic distribution.

  16. First report on non-thermal plasma reactor scaling criteria and optimization models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosocha, L.A.; Korzekwa, R.A.

    1998-01-13

    The purpose of SERDP project CP-1038 is to evaluate and develop non-thermal plasma (NTP) reactor technology for Department of Defense (DoD) air emissions control applications. The primary focus is on oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and a secondary focus on hazardous air pollutants (HAPs), especially volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Example NO{sub x} sources are jet engine test cells (JETCs) and diesel engine powered electrical generators. Example VOCs are organic solvents used in painting, paint stripping, and parts cleaning. To design and build NTP reactors that are optimized for particular DoD applications, one must understand the basic decomposition chemistry of the target compound(s) and how the decomposition of a particular chemical species depends on the air emissions stream parameters and the reactor operating parameters. This report is intended to serve as an overview of the subject of reactor scaling and optimization and will discuss the basic decomposition chemistry of nitric oxide (NO) and two representative VOCs, trichloroethylene and carbon tetrachloride, and the connection between the basic plasma chemistry, the target species properties, and the reactor operating parameters (in particular, the operating plasma energy density). System architecture, that is how NTP reactors can be combined or ganged to achieve higher capacity, will also be briefly discussed.

  17. Assessment of optical performance of three non-tracking, non-imaging, external compound parabolic concentrators designed for high temperature solar thermal collector units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cisneros, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    S. A. (2004). "Solar thermal collectors and applications".for High Temperature Solar Thermal Collector Units A thesisfor Solar Thermal Collectors……………………………..7 Solar Thermal

  18. The role of higher-order modes on the electromagnetic whistler-cyclotron wave fluctuations of thermal and non-thermal plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vińas, Adolfo F.; Moya, Pablo S.; Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, District of Columbia 20064 ; Navarro, Roberto; Araneda, Jaime A.

    2014-01-15

    Two fundamental challenging problems of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas are the understanding of the relaxation of a collisionless plasmas with nearly isotropic velocity distribution functions and the resultant state of nearly equipartition energy density with electromagnetic plasma turbulence. Here, we present the results of a study which shows the role that higher-order-modes play in limiting the electromagnetic whistler-like fluctuations in a thermal and non-thermal plasma. Our main results show that for a thermal plasma the magnetic fluctuations are confined by regions that are bounded by the least-damped higher order modes. We further show that the zone where the whistler-cyclotron normal modes merges the electromagnetic fluctuations shifts to longer wavelengths as the ?{sub e} increases. This merging zone has been interpreted as the beginning of the region where the whistler-cyclotron waves losses their identity and become heavily damped while merging with the fluctuations. Our results further indicate that in the case of nonthermal plasmas, the higher-order modes do not confine the fluctuations due to the effective higher-temperature effects and the excess of suprathermal plasma particles. The analysis presented here considers the second-order theory of fluctuations and the dispersion relation of weakly transverse fluctuations, with wave vectors parallel to the uniform background magnetic field, in a finite temperature isotropic bi-Maxwellian and Tsallis-kappa-like magnetized electron–proton plasma. Our results indicate that the spontaneously emitted electromagnetic fluctuations are in fact enhanced over these quasi modes suggesting that such modes play an important role in the emission and absorption of electromagnetic fluctuations in thermal or quasi-thermal plasmas.

  19. Non-Thermal X-ray Properties of Rotation Powered Pulsars and Their Wind Nebulae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiang-Hua Li; Fang-Jun Lu; Zhuo Li

    2008-03-27

    We present a statistical study of the non-thermal X-ray emission of 27 young rotation powered pulsars (RPPs) and 24 pulsar wind nebulae (PWNe) by using the Chandra and the XMM-Newton observations, which with the high spatial resolutions enable us to spatially resolve pulsars from their surrounding PWNe. We obtain the X-ray luminosities and spectra separately for RPPs and PWNe, and then investigate their distribution and relation to each other as well as the relation with the pulsar rotational parameters. In the pair-correlation analysis we find that: (1) the X-ray (2-10 keV) luminosities of both pulsar and PWN (L_{psr} and L_{pwn}) display a strong correlation with pulsar spin down power Edot and characteristic age, and the scalings resulting from a simple linear fit to the data are L_{psr} \\propto Edot^{0.92 \\pm 0.04} and L_{pwn} \\propto Edot^{1.45 \\pm 0.08} (68% confidence level), respectively, however, both the fits are not statistically acceptable; (2) L_{psr} also shows a possible weak correlation with pulsar period P and period derivative Pdot, whereas L_{pwn} manifests a similar weak correlation with Pdot only; (3) The PWN photon index Gamma_{pwn} is positively correlated with L_{pwn} and L_{pwn}/Edot. We also found that the PWN X-ray luminosity is typically 1 to 10 times larger than that from the underlying pulsar, and the PWN photon indices span a range of ~1.5 to ~2. The statistic study of PWN spectral properties supports the particle wind model in which the X-ray emitting electrons are accelerated by the termination shock of the wind.

  20. Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schaefer, J.; Foest, R.; Reuter, S.; Weltmann, K.-D.; Kewitz, T.; Sperka, J.

    2012-10-15

    The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle, that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive index n in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However, the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that, the temperature profile, specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core, the FWHM, and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament, the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore, the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 {+-} 0.2) mm, which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 {+-} 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics, e.g., the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organized plasma studied here. Instead, it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable gradients of refractive index by local gas heating and opens new diagnostics prospects particularly for microplasmas.

  1. Anomalously Slow Cross Symmetry Phase Relaxation, Thermalized Non-Equilibrated Matter and Quantum Computing Beyond the Quantum Chaos Border

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bienert; J. Flores; S. Yu. Kun; T. H. Seligman

    2006-02-27

    Thermalization in highly excited quantum many-body system does not necessarily mean a complete memory loss of the way the system was formed. This effect may pave a way for a quantum computing, with a large number of qubits $n\\simeq 100$--1000, far beyond the quantum chaos border. One of the manifestations of such a thermalized non-equilibrated matter is revealed by a strong asymmetry around 90$^\\circ $ c.m. of evaporating proton yield in the Bi($\\gamma$,p) photonuclear reaction. The effect is described in terms of anomalously slow cross symmetry phase relaxation in highly excited quantum many-body systems with exponentially large Hilbert space dimensions. In the above reaction this phase relaxation is about eight orders of magnitude slower than energy relaxation (thermalization).

  2. Anomalously Slow Cross Symmetry Phase Relaxation, Thermalized Non-Equilibrated Matter and Quantum Computing Beyond the Quantum Chaos Border

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bienert, M; Kun, S Yu; Seligman, T H

    2006-01-01

    Thermalization in highly excited quantum many-body system does not necessarily mean a complete memory loss of the way the system was formed. This effect may pave a way for a quantum computing, with a large number of qubits $n\\simeq 100$--1000, far beyond the quantum chaos border. One of the manifestations of such a thermalized non-equilibrated matter is revealed by a strong asymmetry around 90$^\\circ $ c.m. of evaporating proton yield in the Bi($\\gamma$,p) photonuclear reaction. The effect is described in terms of anomalously slow cross symmetry phase relaxation in highly excited quantum many-body systems with exponentially large Hilbert space dimensions. In the above reaction this phase relaxation is about eight orders of magnitude slower than energy relaxation (thermalization).

  3. GEOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING combines geotechnics, geomaterials, geo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storici, Francesca

    GEOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING combines geotechnics, geomaterials, geo- physics, geochemistry, geomechanics Geotechnics Environmental Geotechnics Experimental Methods in Research Foundation Systems Geomechanics Theoretical Geomechanics Wave-based Characterization of Particulate Materials FACULTY Glenn J. Rix, Ph

  4. GEOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING combines geotechnics, geomaterials, geo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuhang

    GEOSYSTEMS ENGINEERING combines geotechnics, geomaterials, geo- physics, geochemistry, geomechanics, and the Geor- gia Department of Transportation, as well as private companies in the mining, petroleum Geotechnics Environmental Geotechnics Experimental Methods in Research Foundation Systems Geomechanics

  5. A non-contact, thermal noise based method for the calibration of lateral deflection sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullin, Nic Hobbs, Jamie K.

    2014-11-15

    Calibration of lateral forces and displacements has been a long standing problem in lateral force microscopies. Recently, it was shown by Wagner et al. that the thermal noise spectrum of the first torsional mode may be used to calibrate the deflection sensitivity of the detector. This method is quick, non-destructive and may be performed in situ in air or liquid. Here we make a full quantitative comparison of the lateral inverse optical lever sensitivity obtained by the lateral thermal noise method and the shape independent method developed by Anderson et al. We find that the thermal method provides accurate results for a wide variety of rectangular cantilevers, provided that the geometry of the cantilever is suitable for torsional stiffness calibration by the torsional Sader method, in-plane bending of the cantilever may be eliminated or accounted for and that any scaling of the lateral deflection signal between the measurement of the lateral thermal noise and the measurement of the lateral deflection is eliminated or corrected for. We also demonstrate that the thermal method may be used to characterize the linearity of the detector signal as a function of position, and find a deviation of less than 8% for the instrument used.

  6. Assessment of optical performance of three non-tracking, non-imaging, external compound parabolic concentrators designed for high temperature solar thermal collector units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cisneros, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    and future of solar thermal energy as a primary source ofon harnessing solar thermal energy for water desalinationas an alternative. Solar thermal energy has the potential to

  7. Performance analysis of medium temperature non-tracking solar thermal concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balkoski, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    For stationary collectors, one must understand sun-Earthby the sun [1]. A solar thermal collector is a device thatthe collector due south and tilted to be normal to the sun

  8. Experimental Evidence of Non-Diffusive Thermal Transport in Si and GaAs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Jeremy A.

    The length-scales at which thermal transport crosses from the diffusive to ballistic regime are of much interest particularly in the design and improvement of nano-structured materials. In this work, we demonstrate that ...

  9. Removal of Pollutants by Atmospheric Non Thermal Plasmas Ahmed Khacef 1*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    difficult to handle with conventional removal technologies like thermal and catalytic oxidation examples are hydrocarbons, chlorocarbons and chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs). Contamination of exhaust air streams with gaseous hydrocarbons or organic solvent vapours occurs in many industrial processes, e. g

  10. Thermal non-equilibrium in dispersed flow film boiling in a vertical tube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forslund, Robert Paul

    1966-01-01

    The departure from thermal equilibrium between a dispersed liquid phase and its vapor at high quality during film boiling is investigated, The departure from equilibruim is manifested by the high resistance to heat transfer ...

  11. Non-thermal electron acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks. I. Particle energy spectra and acceleration mechanism

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2014-10-20

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies in low Mach number (M{sub s} ? 5) shocks is revealed by radio and X-ray observations of galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Diffusive shock acceleration, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration, cannot be directly invoked to explain the acceleration of electrons. Rather, an additional mechanism is required to pre-accelerate the electrons from thermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with M{sub s} = 3 and a quasi-perpendicular pre-shock magnetic field. We find that about 15% of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a non-thermal power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p ? 2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift acceleration (SDA). The accelerated electrons are then reflected back upstream where their interaction with the incoming flow generates magnetic waves. In turn, the waves scatter the electrons propagating upstream back toward the shock for further energization via SDA. In summary, the self-generated waves allow for repeated cycles of SDA, similarly to a sustained Fermi-like process. This mechanism offers a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  12. M. Baumgartner -9 December 2011 www.mfb-geo.com Intelligent Geo-Data Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    ERDAS IMAGINE LPS ERM Pro AuthoringSystems TITAN GeoHub Data Web Services OGC ERM Compressor Web Services TITAN GeoHub "Apollo" Geospatial Enterprise Platform Discover Describe Catalog Exploit Serve ERM Compressor ERDAS IMAGINE LPS ERM Pro Data AuthoringSystems OGC Market Place Website Leica Broker (Register

  13. EuroGeo4 Paper number 203 ANALYSIS OF MECHANICAL AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES ON GEOTEXTILES AFTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    EuroGeo4 Paper number 203 1 ANALYSIS OF MECHANICAL AND PHYSICAL PROPERTIES ON GEOTEXTILES AFTER-mail: nataliacorreia@uol.com.br) Abstract: When geotextiles are exposed to solar rays for a short or long period and physical properties on 3 polyester PET non-woven geotextiles that were exposed to weathering for 720

  14. A method for measuring non-linear elastic properties of thermal barrier coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.A.; Ruud, J.A.; Kaya, A.C.; deLorenzi, H.G.

    1995-06-01

    Accurate characterization of the elastic properties of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) is important for failure prediction. Thermally sprayed coatings often exhibit anisotropic and nonlinear elastic properties due to the coating microstructure that results from the thermal spray process. A method was developed for determining the elastic behavior of TBC`s on substrates by measuring the in-plane modulus as a function of residual coating stress. The in-plane modulus was determined by resonant frequency measurement, and the residual stress was measured from the substrate curvature. The residual stress was varied both by increasing the temperature of the TBC and substrate and by applying compressive plastic strain to the metal substrate. The stress-strain behavior of the TBC was derived from the data for modulus versus residual stress, and significant nonlinear elastic behavior was observed.

  15. Elliptic flow of thermal photons in chemically non-equilibrated QCD medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akihiko Monnai

    2014-10-31

    Heavy-ion experiments have recently revealed that azimuthal momentum anisotropy -- elliptic flow -- of direct photons from a QCD medium is a few times larger than hydrodynamic predictions. I present a possible explanation for the enhancement based on late quark chemical equilibration. The color glass theory indicates that the medium is initially gluon-rich. Thermal photons are then mainly produced after quarks are produced, at which point large flow anisotropy is developed. The numerical estimations indicate that slow chemical equilibration visibly enhances the elliptic flow of thermal photons.

  16. Thermal imaging measurement of lateral diffusivity and non-invasive material defect detection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sun, Jiangang (Westmont, IL); Deemer, Chris (Downers Grove, IL)

    2003-01-01

    A system and method for determining lateral thermal diffusivity of a material sample using a heat pulse; a sample oriented within an orthogonal coordinate system; an infrared camera; and a computer that has a digital frame grabber, and data acquisition and processing software. The mathematical model used within the data processing software is capable of determining the lateral thermal diffusivity of a sample of finite boundaries. The system and method may also be used as a nondestructive method for detecting and locating cracks within the material sample.

  17. Effect of Using Inert and Non-Inert Gases on the Thermal Degradation and Fuel Properties of Biomass in the Torrefaction and Pyrolysis Region 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eseltine, Dustin E.

    2012-02-14

    OF USING INERT AND NON-INERT GASES ON THE THERMAL DEGRADATION AND FUEL PROPERTIES OF BIOMASS IN THE TORREFACTION AND PYROLYSIS REGION A Thesis by DUSTIN E. ESELTINE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University... and Fuel Properties of Biomass in the Torrefaction and Pyrolysis Region Copyright 2011 Dustin E. Eseltine EFFECT OF USING INERT AND NON-INERT GASES ON THE THERMAL DEGRADATION AND FUEL PROPERTIES OF BIOMASS IN THE TORREFACTION AND PYROLYSIS...

  18. GeoMelt{sup R} ICV{sup TM} Treatment of Sellafield Pond Solids Waste - 13414

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Witwer, Keith; Woosley, Steve; Campbell, Brett [Kurion, Inc., GeoMelt Division, 3015 Horn Rapids Road, Richland, Washington (United States)] [Kurion, Inc., GeoMelt Division, 3015 Horn Rapids Road, Richland, Washington (United States); Wong, Martin; Hill, Joanne [AMEC Inc., Birchwood Park, 601 Faraday Street, Birchwood, Warrington, WA3 6GN (United Kingdom)] [AMEC Inc., Birchwood Park, 601 Faraday Street, Birchwood, Warrington, WA3 6GN (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-01

    Kurion, Inc., in partnership with AMEC Ltd., is demonstrating its GeoMelt{sup R} In-Container Vitrification (ICV){sup TM} Technology to Sellafield Ltd. (SL). SL is evaluating the proposition of directly converting a container (skip/box/drum) of raw solid ILW into an immobilized waste form using thermal treatment, such that the resulting product is suitable for interim storage at Sellafield and subsequent disposal at a future Geological Disposal Facility. Potential SL feed streams include sludges, ion-exchange media, sand, plutonium contaminated material, concrete, uranium, fuel cladding, soils, metals, and decommissioning wastes. The solid wastes have significant proportions of metallic constituents in the form of containers, plant equipment, structural material and swarf arising from the nuclear operations at Sellafield. GeoMelt's proprietary ICV process was selected for demonstration, with the focus being high and reactive metal wastes arising from solid ILW material. A composite surrogate recipe was used to demonstrate the technology towards treating waste forms of diverse types and shapes, as well as those considered difficult to process; all the while requiring few (if any) pre-treatment activities. Key strategic objectives, along with their success criterion, were established by SL for this testing, namely: 1. Passivate and stabilize the raw waste simulant, as demonstrated by the entire quantity of material being vitrified, 2. Immobilize the radiological and chemo-toxic species, as demonstrated via indicative mass balance using elemental analyses from an array of samples, 3. Production of an inert and durable product as evidenced by transformation of reactive metals to their inert oxide forms and satisfactory leachability results using PCT testing. Two tests were performed using the GeoMelt Demonstration Unit located at AMEC's Birchwood Park Facilities in the UK. Post-melt examination of the first test indicated some of the waste simulant had not fully processed, due to insufficient processing time and melt temperature. A second test, incorporating operational experience from the first test, was performed and resulted in all of the 138 kg of feed material being treated. The waste simulant portion, at 41 kg, constituted 30 wt% of the total feed mass, with over 90% of this being made up of various reactive and non-reactive metals. The 95 liters of staged material was volume reduced to 41 liters, providing a 57% overall feed to product volume reduction in a fully passivated two-phase glass/metal product. The GeoMelt equipment operated as designed, vitrifying the entire batch of waste simulant. Post-melt analytical testing verified that 91-99+% of the radiological tracer metals were uniformly distributed within the glass/cast refractory/metal product, and the remaining fraction was captured in the offgas filtration systems. PCT testing of the glass and inner refractory liner showed leachability results that outperform the DOE regulatory limit of 2 g/m{sup 2} for the radiological species of interest (Sr, Ru, Cs, Eu, Re), and by more than an order of magnitude better for standard reference analytes (B, Na, Si). (authors)

  19. Performance analysis of medium temperature non-tracking solar thermal concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balkoski, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    normal to the sun at solar noon (not tracking) and recordingSun-Earth Geometry To understand the design of a non-tracking

  20. EUV Non-thermal Line Broadening and High-energy particles during Solar Flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kawate, Tomoko

    2013-01-01

    We have studied the relationship between the location of EUV nonthermal broadening and high-energy particles during the large flares by using EUV imaging spectrometer onboard {\\it Hinode}, Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and Atmospheric Imaging Assembly onboard {\\it Solar Dynamic Observatory}. We have analyzed the five large flare events which contain thermal rich, intermediate, and thermal poor flares classified by the definition discussed in the paper. We found that, in the case of thermal rich flares, the nonthermal broadening of \\ion{Fe}{24} occurred at the top of the flaring loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of the 17 GHz microwave is located at the footpoint of the flare loop. On the other hand, in the case of intermediate/thermal poor flares, the nonthermal broadening of \\ion{Fe}{24} occurred at the footpoint of the flare loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of the 17 GHz microwave is located at the top of the flaring loop. We discussed the difference betw...

  1. NON-THERMAL RESPONSE OF THE CORONA TO THE MAGNETIC FLUX DISPERSAL IN THE PHOTOSPHERE OF A DECAYING ACTIVE REGION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harra, L. K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Abramenko, V. I. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 N. Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)

    2012-11-10

    We analyzed Solar Dynamics Observatory line-of-sight magnetograms for a decaying NOAA active region (AR) 11451 along with co-temporal Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) data from the Hinode spacecraft. The photosphere was studied via time variations of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity coefficient, {eta}(t), and the magnetic power spectrum index, {alpha}, through analysis of magnetogram data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). These measure the intensity of the random motions of magnetic elements and the state of turbulence of the magnetic field, respectively. The time changes of the non-thermal energy release in the corona was explored via histogram analysis of the non-thermal velocity, v {sub nt}, in order to highlight the largest values at each time, which may indicate an increase in energy release in the corona. We used the 10% upper range of the histogram of v {sub nt} (which we called V {sup upp} {sub nt}) of the coronal spectral line of Fe XII 195 A. A 2 day time interval was analyzed from HMI data, along with the EIS data for the same field of view. Our main findings are the following. (1) The magnetic turbulent diffusion coefficient, {eta}(t), precedes the upper range of the v {sub nt} with the time lag of approximately 2 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.76. (2) The power-law index, {alpha}, of the magnetic power spectrum precedes V {sup upp} {sub nt} with a time lag of approximately 3 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.5. The data show that the magnetic flux dispersal in the photosphere is relevant to non-thermal energy release dynamics in the above corona. The results are consistent with the nanoflare mechanism of the coronal heating, due to the time lags being consistent with the process of heating and cooling the loops heated by nanoflares.

  2. Thermal analysis of an indirectly heat pulsed non-volatile phase change material microwave switch

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Robert M., E-mail: rm.young@ngc.com; El-Hinnawy, Nabil; Borodulin, Pavel; Wagner, Brian P.; King, Matthew R.; Jones, Evan B.; Howell, Robert S.; Lee, Michael J. [Northrop Grumman Corp., Electronic Systems, P.O. Box 1521, Baltimore, Maryland 21203 (United States)

    2014-08-07

    We show the finite element simulation of the melt/quench process in a phase change material (GeTe, germanium telluride) used for a radio frequency switch. The device is thermally activated by an independent NiCrSi (nickel chrome silicon) thin film heating element beneath a dielectric separating it electrically from the phase change layer. A comparison is made between the predicted and experimental minimum power to amorphize (MPA) for various thermal pulse powers and pulse time lengths. By including both the specific heat and latent heat of fusion for GeTe, we find that the MPA and the minimum power to crystallize follow the form of a hyperbola on the power time effect plot. We also find that the simulated time at which the entire center GeTe layer achieves melting accurately matches the MPA curve for pulse durations ranging from 75–1500?ns and pulse powers from 1.6–4?W.

  3. Thermal right-handed neutrino self-energy in the non-relativistic regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Laine

    2012-09-13

    Recently the issue of radiative corrections to leptogenesis has been raised. Considering the "strong washout" regime, in which OPE-techniques permit to streamline the setup, we report the thermal self-energy matrix of heavy right-handed neutrinos at NLO (resummed 2-loop level) in Standard Model couplings. The renormalized expression describes flavour transitions and "inclusive" decays of chemically decoupled right-handed neutrinos. Although CP-violation is not addressed, the result may find use in existing leptogenesis frameworks.

  4. FACULTY OF GEO-INFORMATION SCIENCE AND EARTH OBSERVATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FACULTY OF GEO-INFORMATION SCIENCE AND EARTH OBSERVATION ITC research Space for global development. At the Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC) of the University of Twente, knowledge;2 At the Faculty of Geo-Information Science and Earth Observation (ITC) of the University of Twente, research

  5. ARCHITECTING DISTRIBUTED GEO-INFORMATION SERVICES: BEYOND DATA INFRASTRUCTURES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    decade technological developments have facilitated the access to geo-information and have made it easier decade technological developments have facilitated the access to geo-information and have made it easier on the cur- rent forms and shapes of markets and technology, which make these requirements very dynamic. Geo-information

  6. Performance analysis of medium temperature non-tracking solar thermal concentrators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balkoski, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    take advantage of solar energy, one must first understanda non-tracking solar concentrator, one must first understandOne provides the reader with some of the fundamentals of solar

  7. Studies of non-diffusive heat conduction through spatially periodic and time-harmonic thermal excitations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Kimberlee C. (Kimberlee Chiyoko)

    2015-01-01

    Studies of non-diffusive heat conduction provide insight into the fundamentals of heat transport in condensed matter. The mean free paths (MFPs) of phonons that are most important for conducting heat are well represented ...

  8. Assessment of optical performance of three non-tracking, non-imaging, external compound parabolic concentrators designed for high temperature solar thermal collector units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cisneros, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    Cost Distributed Solar- Thermal-Electric Power Generation.S. A. (2004). "Solar thermal collectors and applications".The present and future of solar thermal energy as a primary

  9. The detection of non-thermal radio continuum spokes and the study of star formation in the Cartwheel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. D. Mayya; D. Bizyaev; R. Romano; J. A. Garcia-Barreto; E. I. Vorobyov

    2005-01-14

    New sensitive Very Large Array 20 cm continuum observations of the Cartwheel, the prototypical collisional ring galaxy, were carried out with the principal aim of tracing supernova remnants that are expected to lie in the wake of the expanding ring and in the ring itself. We detect predominantly non-thermal radio continuum emission from regions associated with 13 ring HII complexes. The emission interior to the ring is confined to structures that resemble spokes of the wheel. The spokes start near bright HII complexes, and extend to around 6 arcsec (4 kpc) inward in the direction of the geometrical center of the ring. There is no apparent positional coincidence between the radio continuum and optical spokes. Radial distribution of intensity along the spokes suggests that the past star formation rate (SFR) in the Cartwheel was much lower than the current SFR. New Halpha observations were used to revise the current SFR in the Cartwheel. The revised value is 18 Msun/yr, which is a factor of 4 lower than the value reported previously, but is in good agreement with the SFR estimated from far infrared luminosity. About 30% of the observed 20 cm continuum non-thermal emission seems to originate in processes that are not related to star formation. Revised SFR in the Cartwheel is comparable to that in the rest of the ring galaxies.

  10. Three-dimensional simulations of the non-thermal broadband emission from young supernova remnants including efficient particle acceleration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrand, Gilles; Safi-Harb, Samar [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Decourchelle, Anne, E-mail: gferrand@physics.umanitoba.ca, E-mail: samar@physics.umanitoba.ca, E-mail: anne.decourchelle@cea.fr [Laboratoire AIM (CEA/Irfu, CNRS/INSU, Université Paris VII), CEA Saclay, bât. 709, F-91191 Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2014-07-01

    Supernova remnants are believed to be major contributors to Galactic cosmic rays. In this paper, we explore how the non-thermal emission from young remnants can be used to probe the production of energetic particles at the shock (both protons and electrons). Our model couples hydrodynamic simulations of a supernova remnant with a kinetic treatment of particle acceleration. We include two important back-reaction loops upstream of the shock: energetic particles can (1) modify the flow structure and (2) amplify the magnetic field. As the latter process is not fully understood, we use different limit cases that encompass a wide range of possibilities. We follow the history of the shock dynamics and of the particle transport downstream of the shock, which allows us to compute the non-thermal emission from the remnant at any given age. We do this in three dimensions, in order to generate projected maps that can be compared with observations. We observe that completely different recipes for the magnetic field can lead to similar modifications of the shock structure, although to very different configurations of the field and particles. We show how this affects the emission patterns in different energy bands, from radio to X-rays and ?-rays. High magnetic fields (>100 ?G) directly impact the synchrotron emission from electrons, by restricting their emission to thin rims, and indirectly impact the inverse Compton emission from electrons and also the pion decay emission from protons, mostly by shifting their cut-off energies to respectively lower and higher energies.

  11. GEO 600 and the GEO-HF upgrade program: successes and challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dooley, K L; Adams, T; Affeldt, C; Bisht, A; Bogan, C; Degallaix, J; Gräf, C; Hild, S; Hough, J; Khalaidovski, A; Lastzka, N; Lough, J; Lück, H; Macleod, D; Nuttall, L; Prijatelj, M; Schnabel, R; Schreiber, E; Slutsky, J; Sorazu, B; Strain, K A; Vahlbruch, H; Was, M; Willke, B; Wittel, H; Danzmann, K; Grote, H

    2015-01-01

    The German-British laser-interferometric gravitational wave detector GEO 600 is in its 14th year of operation since its first lock in 2001. After GEO 600 participated in science runs with other first-generation detectors, a program known as GEO-HF began in 2009. The goal was to improve the detector sensitivity at high frequencies with technologically advanced yet minimally invasive upgrades. Simultaneously, the detector would record science quality data in between commissioning activities. As of early 2014, all of the planned upgrades have been carried out and sensitivity improvements of up to a factor of four at the high-frequency end of the observation band have been achieved. Besides science data collection, an experimental program is ongoing with the goal to further improve the sensitivity and evaluate future detector technologies. We summarize the results of the GEO-HF program to date and discuss its successes and challenges.

  12. Geo-locked Photo Sharing on Mobile We introduce the idea of geo-locking through a mobile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Theune, Mariët

    Geo-locked Photo Sharing on Mobile Devices Abstract We introduce the idea of geo-locking through a mobile phone based photo sharing application called Picalilly (figure 1). Using its geo-locking feature, Picalilly allows its users to manually define geographical boundaries for sharing photos ­ limiting sharing

  13. Non-Thermal Radio Emission from Colliding Flows in Classical Nova V1723 Aql

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Jennifer H S; Metzger, Brian D; Zheng, Yong; Chomiuk, Laura; Krauss, Miriam I; Linford, Justin; Nelson, Thomas; Mioduszewski, Amy; Rupen, Michael P; Finzell, Tom; Mukai, Koji

    2015-01-01

    The importance of shocks in nova explosions has been highlighted by the recent discovery of \\gamma-ray producing novae by Fermi. We use over three years of multi-band radio observations of nova V1723 Aql with the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array (VLA) to show that shocks between fast and slow flows within the ejecta led to the acceleration of particles and the production of synchrotron radiation. Approximately one month after the start of V1723 Aql's eruption in 2010 September, shocks in the ejecta produced an unexpected radio flare, ultimately resulting in a radio light curve with a multi-peaked structure. More than a year after the start of the eruption, the radio emission became consistent with emanating from an expanding thermal remnant with a mass of $2\\times10^{-4}$ M$_\\odot$ and a temperature of $10^4$ K. However, the brightness temperature of greater than $10^6$ K at low frequencies during the first two months was too high to be due to thermal emission from the small amount of X-ray producing shock-hea...

  14. OM300-GeoThermal MWD Navigation Instrument

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Develop a 300°C capable directional drilling navigation tool using Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers and flux-gate magnetometers.

  15. Thermal neutron steady-state spectra in light water reactor fuel assemblies poisoned with various non-1/v absorbers of different concentrations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swaminathan, K.; Chandra, S.; Jha, R.C.; Tewari, S.P. )

    1991-07-01

    This paper reports on the thermal neutron scattering kernel that explicitly incorporates the presence of chemical binding energy and the collective oscillations in the dynamics of water, the steady-state thermal neutron spectra in light water reactor fuel assemblies poisoned with non-1/v absorbers, such as cadmium, samarium, erbium, and gadolinium, in various concentrations have been computed at 298 K. The calculated spectra are in reasonable agreement with the corresponding experimental spectra for realistic source terms.

  16. Enhancement of the helium resonance lines in the solar atmosphere by suprathermal electron excitation I: non-thermal transport of helium ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. R. Smith; C. Jordan

    2002-08-16

    Models of the solar transition region made from lines other than those of helium cannot account for the strength of the helium lines. However, the collisional excitation rates of the helium resonance lines are unusually sensitive to the energy of the exciting electrons. Non-thermal motions in the transition region could drive slowly-ionizing helium ions rapidly through the steep temperature gradient, exposing them to excitation by electrons characteristic of higher temperatures than those describing their ionization state. We present the results of calculations which use a more physical representation of the lifetimes of the ground states of He I and He II than was adopted in earlier work on this process. New emission measure distributions are used to calculate the temperature variation with height. The results show that non-thermal motions can lead to enhancements of the He I and He II resonance line intensities by factors that are comparable with those required. Excitation by non-Maxwellian electron distributions would reduce the effects of non-thermal transport. The effects of non-thermal motions are more consistent with the observed spatial distribution of helium emission than are those of excitation by non-Maxwellian electron distributions alone. In particular, they account better for the observed line intensity ratio I(537.0 A)/I(584.3 A), and its variation with location.

  17. Acceleration of relativistic electrons by magnetohydrodynamic turbulence: Implications for non-thermal emission from black hole accretion disks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynn, Jacob W.; Quataert, Eliot; Chandran, Benjamin D. G.; Parrish, Ian J.

    2014-08-10

    We use analytic estimates and numerical simulations of test particles interacting with magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence to show that subsonic MHD turbulence produces efficient second-order Fermi acceleration of relativistic particles. This acceleration is not well described by standard quasi-linear theory but is a consequence of resonance broadening of wave-particle interactions in MHD turbulence. We provide momentum diffusion coefficients that can be used for astrophysical and heliospheric applications and discuss the implications of our results for accretion flows onto black holes. In particular, we show that particle acceleration by subsonic turbulence in radiatively inefficient accretion flows can produce a non-thermal tail in the electron distribution function that is likely important for modeling and interpreting the emission from low-luminosity systems such as Sgr A* and M87.

  18. Discovery of Non-Thermal X-Rays from the Shell of RCW86

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aya Bamba; Katsuji Koyama; Hiroshi Tomida

    2000-08-16

    We report the ASCA (Advanced Satellite for Cosmology and Astrophysics) results of RCW 86, a shell-like supernova remnant (SNR). The bright region in the X-ray band traces the radio clumpy shell, although details of the structure are different. The X-ray spectrum from each part of the shell can not be fitted to a thin thermal plasma model, but requires, at least three components: a low temperature plasma of 0.3 keV, high temperature plasma of > several keV, and a power-law component with a photon index = 3. The abundances of O, Ne, Mg and Si are significantly higher than that of Fe, indicating that RCW 86 is a type II SNR. The absorption column of 3e21 H cm^-2 indicates the distance to the SNR to be several kpc. The power-law component can be interpreted to be synchrotron radiation of high energy electrons. Assuming energy density equipartition between the magnetic field and the electrons, and using the radio and X-ray spectra, we argue that high energy electrons are accelerated up to 20 TeV. The acceleration efficiency is, however, different from shell to shell.

  19. Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectroscopy diagnostic system for the study of non-thermal electrons at Aditya tokamak

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purohit, S., E-mail: pshishir@ipr.res.in; Joisa, Y. S.; Raval, J. V.; Ghosh, J.; Tanna, R.; Shukla, B. K.; Bhatt, S. B. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

    2014-11-15

    Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectrometer diagnostic was developed to study the non-thermal electron for Aditya tokamak plasma. The diagnostic was mounted on a radial mid plane port at the Aditya. The objective of diagnostic includes the estimation of the non-thermal electron temperature for the ohmically heated plasma. Bi-Maxwellian plasma model was adopted for the temperature estimation. Along with that the study of high Z impurity line radiation from the ECR pre-ionization experiments was also aimed. The performance and first experimental results from the new X-ray spectrometer system are presented.

  20. Assessment of optical performance of three non-tracking, non-imaging, external compound parabolic concentrators designed for high temperature solar thermal collector units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cisneros, Jesus

    2010-01-01

    et al. (2003). Low-Cost Distributed Solar- Thermal-Electriccooling with solar energy, leading to a more cost effectiveSolar Thermal Collector Units Introduction Increased production costs

  1. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    storage in solar thermal applications," Applied Energy, pp.of Non-Tracking Solar Thermal Technology," 2011. [26] R.C. Y. Zhao, "A review of solar collectors and thermal energy

  2. GeoComputational Intelligence and High-Performance Geospatial Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guan, Qingfeng

    2011-11-16

    GeoComputational Intelligence and High-performance Geospatial Computing Qingfeng (Gene) Guan, Ph.D Center for Advanced Land Management Information Technologies School of Natural Resources University of Nebraska - Lincoln GIS Day @ University... of Kansas Nov. 16th, 2011 Contents 1. Computational Science and GeoComputation 2. GeoComputational Intelligence - ANN-based Urban-CA model 3. High-performance Geospatial Computing - Parallel Geostatistical Areal Interpolation - pRPL and pSLEUTH 4. Conclusion...

  3. Angelica Garcia Gutierrez, Peter Baumann Modeling Fundamental Geo-Raster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Peter

    Angelica Garcia Gutierrez, Peter Baumann Modeling Fundamental Geo-Raster Operations with Array Angelica Garcia Gutierrez Peter Baumann School of Engineering and Science Jacobs University Bremen g

  4. Non-contact, Wavelet-based Measurement of Vital Signs using Thermal Imaging S. Yu. Chekmenev, H. Rara, and Aly A. Farag

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louisville, University of

    Non-contact, Wavelet-based Measurement of Vital Signs using Thermal Imaging S. Yu. Chekmenev, H of human vital signs. Breathing causes noticeable changes in temperature at the nasal area, which appear-contact vital signs monitoring and intent identification at a distance. Keywords: Wavelets, Thermogram images

  5. American Society of Civil Engineers Geo-Institute Geo-Trans 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horvath, John S.

    on transportation- related projects with an emphasis on new trends and developments. INTRODUCTION Materials.E., Member, Geo-Institute ABSTRACT: Cellular geosynthetics is the generic term for geosynthetic materials such as geogrids, geomembranes and geotextiles. This paper summarizes the geofoam and geocomb materials

  6. Universal GeoPower | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York:Power Company JumpGeoPower Jump to: navigation, search

  7. GEO LEASE NONCOMPETITI | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistarFuelCellsEtcSilicon Co LtdGEO LEASE NONCOMPETITI

  8. GEO SOURCE ONE, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistarFuelCellsEtcSilicon Co LtdGEO LEASEGEO LSESOURCE

  9. GEO UNIT AGREEMENT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistarFuelCellsEtcSilicon Co LtdGEO LEASEGEO

  10. Geo Energy Technology | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: EnergyGateway EditOpen EnergyNewGenoa, Ohio:Gentivity,Geo

  11. Non-thermal plasma-assisted NOx reduction over Na-Y zeolites: The promotional effect of acid sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Peden, Charles HF; Szanyi, Janos

    2006-06-01

    The effect of acid sites on the catalytic activities of a series of H+-modified Na-Y zeolites was investigated in the non-thermal plasma assisted NOx reduction reaction using a simulated diesel engine exhaust gas mixture. The acid sites were formed by NH4+ ion exchange and subsequent heat treatment of a NaY zeolite. The catalytic activities of these H+-modified NaY zeolites significantly increased with the number of acid sites. This NOx conversion increase was correlated with the decrease in the amount of unreacted NO2. The increase in the number of acid sites did not change the NO level, it stayed constant. Temperature programmed desorption following NO2 adsorption showed the appearance of a high temperature desorption peak at 453 K in addition to the main desorption feature of 343 K observed for the base Na-Y. The results of both the IR and TPD experiments revealed the formation of crotonaldehyde, resulting from condensation reaction of adsorbed acetaldehyde. Strong adsorptions of both NOx and hydrocarbon species are proposed to be responsible for the higher catalytic activity of H+-modified Na-Y zeolites in comparison to the base NaY material

  12. Building a Scalable GeoSpatial DBMS: Technology, Implementation, and Evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertini, Robert L.

    Building a Scalable Geo­Spatial DBMS: Technology, Implementation, and Evaluation Jignesh Patel, Jie describe new techniques for building a parallel geo­ spatial DBMS, discuss our implementation

  13. REPRESENTING GEO-SCIENTIFIC DOMAIN CONCEPTS Boyan Brodaric

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bennett, Brandon

    1 REPRESENTING GEO-SCIENTIFIC DOMAIN CONCEPTS Boyan Brodaric Penn State Geography and Geological Survey of Canada brodaric@NRCan.gc.ca 1. Introduction The geo-sciences, including geology, ecology, soil accumulate and change, and (3) are characterized by degrees of uncertainty and granularity. This suggests

  14. Temperature Aware Workload Management in Geo-distributed Datacenters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Temperature Aware Workload Management in Geo-distributed Datacenters Hong Xu, Chen Feng, Baochun Li}@eecg.toronto.edu ABSTRACT Datacenters consume an enormous amount of energy with signif- icant financial and environmental propose to make workload management for geo-distributed datacenters temperature aware. We formulate

  15. Non-thermal Plasma-Assisted Catalytic NOx Reduction over Ba-Y,FAU: The Effect of Catalyst Preparation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kwak, Ja Hun; Szanyi, Janos; Peden, Charles HF

    2003-12-10

    The effects of catalyst preparation on the NOx reduction activity of a series of Ba-Y,FAU zeolites were investigated using a simulated exhaust gas mixture. The introduction of Ba˛?ions into Na-Y,FAU results in a large increase in their non-thermal plasma-assisted NOx reduction activity. The NOx reduction activities of Ba-Y,FAU catalysts were found to increase with increasing Ba˛? concentration in the aqueous ion exchange solutions, which translated into increased Ba˛?/Na˛ ratios in the resulting materials. Consecutive ion exchange procedures at a given Ba˛?concentration in the aqueous solution, however, did not improve the NOx reduction activities of Ba-Y,FAU catalysts, i.e. the activity of the four times ion exchanged material was the same as that of the one that was ion exchanged only once. The reaction profiles for all of these Ba-Y,FAU catalysts were the same. In contrast, a significant increase in NOx reduction activity was observed when a 773K calcination step was implemented after each solution ion exchange. The reaction profile was also altered as a result of the ion exchange/calcination cycles. Calcination that followed each ion exchange step seems to further increase the Ba˛?/Na? ratio in the zeolite, and in turn increases the NOx reduction activities of the catalysts prepared this way. Key differences in Na-, and Ba-Y catalysts were found in NO? adsorption and TPD experiments. The amount of chemisorbed NO? is about twice as high in Ba-Y than in Na-Y, and Ba-Y holds NOx much stronger than Na-Y.

  16. Modeling thermal comfort in stratified environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, H.; Huizenga, C.; Arens, Edward A; Yu, T.

    2005-01-01

    non-uniform thermal environments", European Journal of7730, 1994, Moderate Thermal Environments – Determination offor assessing complex thermal environments,” Building and

  17. Evolving opportunities for providing thermal comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward

    2015-01-01

    field measurement of thermal environment and questionnaireand non-uniform thermal environments, PhD Thesis, Center forPerception of transient thermal environments: Pleasure and

  18. Thermal Transport in Graphene Multilayers and Nanoribbons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subrina, Samia

    2011-01-01

    1 CHAPTER 2 Thermal transport atvalues of graphene’s thermal conductivity and different1 Thermal conductivity : metals and non - metallic

  19. Warm Dark Matter via Ultra-Violet Freeze-In: Reheating Temperature and Non-Thermal Distribution for Fermionic Higgs Portal Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John McDonald

    2015-12-20

    Warm dark matter (WDM) of order keV mass may be able to resolve the disagreement between structure formation in cold dark matter simulations and observations. The detailed properties of WDM will depend upon its energy distribution, in particular how it deviates from the thermal distribution usually assumed in WDM simulations. Here we focus on WDM production via the Ultra-Violet (UV) freeze-in mechanism, for the case of fermionic Higgs portal dark matter $\\psi$ produced the portal interaction $\\overline{\\psi}\\psi H^{\\dagger}H/\\Lambda$. We show that the reheating temperature must satisfy $T_{R} \\gtrsim 0.3 $ TeV in order to account for the observed dark matter density when $m_{\\psi} \\approx 2 $ keV, where the lower bound on $T_{R}$ corresponds to the limit where the fermion mass is entirely due to electroweak symmetry breaking via the portal interaction. The corresponding bound on the interaction scale is $\\Lambda \\gtrsim 1.5 \\times 10^{10}$ GeV. We introduce a new method to simplify the computation of the non-thermal energy distribution of dark matter from freeze-in. We show that the non-thermal energy distribution from UV freeze-in is much broader and flatter than the corresponding thermal distribution.

  20. GeoDaze 2008 The University of Arizona Department of Geosciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    . Montgomery & Associates Exxon Mobil Corporation GeoMark Research Ltd. Golder Associates Inc. Hydrogeophysics

  1. GeoPowering the West: Hawaii; Why Geothermal?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-04-01

    This fact sheets provides a summary of geothermal potential, issues, and current development in Hawaii. This fact sheet was developed as part of DOE's GeoPowering the West initiative, part of the Geothermal Technologies Program.

  2. GEOS26400/GEOS36400/BIOS23255/EVOL32300: Principles of Paleontology 1 Instructor: Michael Foote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Paleoecology Chapter 9; Chapter 10: sections on Pleistocene Extinctions, Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

  3. Non-smooth Chemical Freeze-out and Apparent Width of Wide Resonances and Quark Gluon Bags in a Thermal Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. A. Bugaev; A. I. Ivanytskyi; D. R. Oliinychenko; E. G. Nikonov; V. V. Sagun; G. M. Zinovjev

    2014-05-06

    Here we develop the hadron resonance gas model with the Gaussian width of hadron resonances. This model allows us to treat the usual hadrons and the quark gluon bags on the same footing and to study the stability of the results obtained within different formulations of the hadron resonance gas model. In this work we perform a successful fit of 111 independent hadronic multiplicity ratios measured for $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} $= 2.7- 200 GeV. We demonstrate that in a narrow range of collision energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 4.3-4.9 GeV there exist peculiar irregularities in various thermodynamic quantities found at chemical freeze-out. The most remarkable irregularity is an unprecedented jump of the number of effective degrees of freedom observed in this narrow energy range which is seen in all realistic versions of the hadron resonance gas model. Therefore, the developed concept is called the non-smooth chemical freeze-out. We are arguing that these irregularities evidence for the possible formation of quark gluon bags. In order to develop other possible signals of their formation here we study the apparent width of wide hadronic resonances and quark gluon bags in a thermal environment. Two new effects generated for the wide resonances and quark gluon bags by a thermal medium are discussed here: the near threshold thermal resonance enhancement and the near threshold thermal resonance sharpening. On the basis of the new effects we argue that the most optimistic chance to find experimentally the quark gluon bags may be related to their sharpening and enhancement in a thermal medium. In this case the wide quark gluon bags may appear directly or in decays as narrow resonances that are absent in the tables of elementary particles and that have the apparent width about 50-120 MeV and the mass about or above 2.5 GeV.

  4. Electron density measurements of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal N{sub 2} plasma jet by Stark broadening and irradiance intensity methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Dezhi; Shen, Jie; Lan, Yan; Xie, Hongbing; Shu, Xingsheng; Meng, Yuedong; Li, Jiangang; Cheng, Cheng E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-05-15

    An atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma jet excited by high frequency alternating current using nitrogen is developed and the electron density in the active region of this plasma jet is investigated by two different methods using optical emission spectroscopy, Stark broadening, and irradiance intensity method. The irradiance intensity method shows that the average electron density is about 10{sup 20}/m{sup 3} which is slightly smaller than that by the Stark broadening method. However, the trend of the change in the electron density with input power obtained by these two methods is consistent.

  5. Method and system for the combination of non-thermal plasma and metal/metal oxide doped .gamma.-alumina catalysts for diesel engine exhaust aftertreatment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aardahl, Christopher L. (Richland, WA); Balmer-Miller, Mari Lou (West Richland, WA); Chanda, Ashok (Peoria, IL); Habeger, Craig F. (West Richland, WA); Koshkarian, Kent A. (Peoria, IL); Park, Paul W. (Peoria, IL)

    2006-07-25

    The present disclosure pertains to a system and method for treatment of oxygen rich exhaust and more specifically to a method and system that combines non-thermal plasma with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina catalyst. Current catalyst systems for the treatment of oxygen rich exhaust are capable of achieving only approximately 7 to 12% NO.sub.x reduction as a passive system and only 25 40% reduction when a supplemental hydrocarbon reductant is injected into the exhaust stream. It has been found that treatment of an oxygen rich exhaust initially with a non-thermal plasma and followed by subsequent treatment with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina prepared by the sol gel method is capable of increasing the NO.sub.x reduction to a level of approximately 90% in the absence of SO.sub.2 and 80% in the presence of 20 ppm of SO.sub.2. Especially useful metals have been found to be indium, gallium, and tin.

  6. COURSE SYLLABUS GEO 6600/7600 Geodynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowry, Anthony R.

    :30--4:00pm (or by appt) COURSE DESCRIPTION This course will introduce (and survey current literature on as thermal boundary layer: Conductive heat transfer; radiogenic heating T&S 132-147 7 Sep Time-dependence (cooling & heating) T&S 147-162 9 Sep Temperature and density T&S 171-177 Roy & al (2009) 14 Sep Advective

  7. The 2d International Symposium on Computational Geomechanics (ComGeo II) 1 INTRODUCTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    The 2d International Symposium on Computational Geomechanics (ComGeo II) 1 1 INTRODUCTION Last at the contacts is studied. #12;The 2d International Symposium on Computational Geomechanics (ComGeo II) 2 complex

  8. Toward Geo-social Information Systems: Methods and Algorithms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Zhiyuan

    2014-01-16

    gazetteer from web content to identify the associated geographical scope of web pages and blogs. Serdyukov et al. [105] generate probabilistic language models based on the tags 14 that photos are labeled with by Flickr users. Based on these models... and Bayesian inference, they show how to estimate the location for a photo. In terms of the intention, their method is similar to our work. However, they use a GeoNames database to decide whether a user-submitted tag is a geo-related tag, which can overlook...

  9. GeoWeb Pr. Robert Laurini Capitolo 5 Venezia aprile 2010 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laurini, Robert

    testo in mappa ­ Meteorologia ­ Racconti di esploratori · Ecc. #12;GeoWeb Pr. Robert Laurini Capitolo 5

  10. Multiwavelength Thermal Emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

  11. Mission analysis for hybrid thermionic nuclear reactor LEO-to-GEO transfer applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widman, F.W. Jr.; North, D.M. (Rockwell International/Rocketdyne Division, 6633 Canoga Avenue, Canoga Park, California 91303 (United States)); Choong, P.T.; Teofilo, V.L. (Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc., 1111 Lockheed Way, Synnyvale, California 94088 (United States))

    1993-01-10

    This paper details the results of mission analyses concerning a hybrid STAR-C based system, which is based on a safe solid fuel form for high-temperature reactor core operation and a rugged planar thermionic energy converter for long-life steady-state electric power production. Hybrid power/propulsion system concepts are shown to offer superior performance capabilities for Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) to Geosynchronous-Earth-Orbit (GEO) orbital transfer applications over chemical propulsion systems. A key feature of the hybrid power/propulsion system is that the propulsion system uses the on-board payload power system. Mission results for hybrid concepts using Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP), Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), and combination of NTP and NEP are discussed.

  12. Non-touch thermal air-bearing shaping of x-ray telescope optics Edward Sung*a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .com; phone 1 617 308-8287; fax 1 617 452-2888; snl.mit.edu ABSTRACT Molding glass by using air bearings±0.5 arcsec. Keywords: slumping, molding, glass, wafer, shear force, non-contact, air bearing 1. INTRODUCTION cause surface defects and perturbation to the overall glass sheet. [3] For the above reasons, the fusion

  13. INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR GEO-INFORMATION SCIENCE AND EARTH OBSERVATION CampusMapper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köbben, Barend

    INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR GEO-INFORMATION SCIENCE AND EARTH OBSERVATION CampusMapper a light Sciences and Earth Observation (ITC)International Institute for Geo-information Sciences and Earth://geoserver.itc.nl/campusmapper/http://geoserver.itc.nl/campusmapper/ Barend KBarend Kööbben, Stephanie Kranebben, Stephanie Krane International Institute for Geo-information

  14. TOWARDS A NATIONAL ATLAS -GEO WEB SERVICE Bormy Chanthong (Royal University of Phnom Penh)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köbben, Barend

    TOWARDS A NATIONAL ATLAS - GEO WEB SERVICE Bormy Chanthong (Royal University of Phnom Penh) Drs. B is to formulate and design a conceptual model of the National Atlas - Geo Web service. The National Atlas - Geo Web service is designed as a loosely coupled system. As an interoperable node, the National Atlas

  15. PCH 6934/CNG 6933/GEO 6119 Page 1 of 3 Spring 2009 Sustainability Concepts and Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Amy L.

    PCH 6934/CNG 6933/GEO 6119 Page 1 of 3 Spring 2009 Syllabus Sustainability Concepts and Methods: Mercury in Guyana PHC 6934 (ref# 18035) / CNG 6933(ref# 12678) / GEO 6119 (ref # 18740) Spring 2009 Course. Reply times may vary up to several days. #12;PCH 6934/CNG 6933/GEO 6119 Page 2 of 3 Spring 2009 Course

  16. Non-thermal gamma-ray emission from delayed pair breakdown in a magnetized and photon-rich outflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gill, Ramandeep; Thompson, Christopher, E-mail: rgill@cita.utoronto.ca [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2014-12-01

    We consider delayed, volumetric heating in a magnetized outflow that has broken out of a confining medium and expanded to a high Lorentz factor (? ? 10{sup 2}-10{sup 3}) and low optical depth to scattering (? {sub T} ? 10{sup –3}-10{sup –2}). The energy flux at breakout is dominated by the magnetic field, with a modest contribution from quasi-thermal gamma rays whose spectrum was calculated in Paper I. We focus on the case of extreme baryon depletion in the magnetized material, but allow for a separate baryonic component that is entrained from a confining medium. Dissipation is driven by relativistic motion between these two components, which develops once the photon compactness drops below 4 × 10{sup 3}(Y{sub e} /0.5){sup –1}. We first calculate the acceleration of the magnetized component following breakout, showing that embedded MHD turbulence provides significant inertia, the neglect of which leads to unrealistically high estimates of flow Lorentz factor. After reheating begins, the pair and photon distributions are evolved self-consistently using a one-zone kinetic code that incorporates an exact treatment of Compton scattering, pair production and annihilation, and Coulomb scattering. Heating leads to a surge in pair creation, and the scattering depth saturates at ? {sub T} ? 1-4. The plasma maintains a very low ratio of particle to magnetic pressure, and can support strong anisotropy in the charged particle distribution, with cooling dominated by Compton scattering. High-energy power-law spectra with photon indices in the range observed in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs; –3 < ? < –3/2) are obtained by varying the ratio of heat input to the seed energy in quasi-thermal photons. We contrast our results with those for continuous heating across an expanding photosphere, and show that the latter model produces soft-to-hard evolution that is inconsistent with observations of GRBs.

  17. Bachelor-/ Masterarbeiten: Themenbereich: Geo-planning of Renewable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damm, Werner

    Bachelor- / Masterarbeiten: Themenbereich: Geo-planning of Renewable Energies Abteilung Oldenburg Motivation Im Rahmen der Energiewende und einer dezentraleren Energieversorgung wird die Planung Motivation ein konkretes Thema f¨ur die Arbeit gemeinsam entwickelt wurde, sollen im Rahmen der Bachelor- bzw

  18. GeoVSM: An Integrated Retrieval Model For Geographical Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klippel, Alexander

    maps, images, and texts. Effective retrieval systems for geographical information are currently studied retrieval (IR) systems in dealing with multimedia geographical information, and proposes a new retrievalGeoVSM: An Integrated Retrieval Model For Geographical Information Guoray Cai School of Information

  19. Toward Urban Model Acquisition from Geo-Located Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teller, Seth

    a novel sensor, and as- sociated geometric algorithms, to achieve fully automated reconstruction from close-range color images of textured geometric models representing built urban structures. The sensor is a geo-located camera, which annotates each acquired digital image with metadata recording the date

  20. Geo-Marine Letters An International Journal of Marine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    of Geo-Marine Letters, pre- senting contributions from the 10th International Conference on Gas in Marine Sediments (September 2010, Lake Baikal, Russia), to the memory of Mikhail Konstantinovich Ivanov. The author professor and simply a great man. He built such a fantastic program (TTR) when Russia was facing so many

  1. Lindsay Millert GEOS 206--Renewable Energy and the Sustainable Campuses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    Millert 1 Lindsay Millert GEOS 206--Renewable Energy and the Sustainable Campuses Final Paper--Green Renovation/Design May 13, 2008 Greening Garfield: the Issues and the Solutions Aldo Leopold writes in his and the natural world. Sustainability is the intersection of these realms, the ultimate goal. The Renewable Energy

  2. GEO 518: Professional Seminar in Geography Winter Term

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    1 GEO 518: Professional Seminar in Geography Winter Term Mondays 3:00-5:20 pm, Wilkinson 231 geography, and thus will emphasize three objectives: (1) reaching an improved understanding of geography as a discipline and, in particular, the specialty areas of the OSU Geography Program (resource geography, physical

  3. Effect of Landau damping on alternative ion-acoustic solitary waves in a magnetized plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions and non-thermal electrons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Jayasree; Das, K P

    2015-01-01

    Bandyopadhyay and Das [Phys. Plasmas, 9, 465-473, 2002] have derived a nonlinear macroscopic evolution equation for ion acoustic wave in a magnetized plasma consisting of warm adiabatic ions and non-thermal electrons including the effect of Landau damping. In that paper they have also derived the corresponding nonlinear evolution equation when coefficient of the nonlinear term of the above mentioned macroscopic evolution equation vanishes, the nonlinear behaviour of the ion acoustic wave is described by a modified macroscopic evolution equation. But they have not considered the case when the coefficient is very near to zero. This is the case we consider in this paper and we derive the corresponding evolution equation including the effect of Landau damping. Finally, a solitary wave solution of this macroscopic evolution is obtained, whose amplitude is found to decay slowly with time.

  4. A Chandra view of non-thermal emission in the northwestern region of supernova remnant RCW 86: Particle acceleration and magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Castro, Daniel; Lopez, Laura A.; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali [MIT-Kavli Center for Astrophysics and Space Research, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Slane, Patrick O.; Yamaguchi, Hiroya [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Ramirez-Ruiz, Enrico [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95060 (United States)

    2013-12-10

    The shocks of supernova remnants are believed to accelerate particles to cosmic ray (CR) energies. The amplification of the magnetic field due to CRs propagating in the shock region is expected to have an impact on both the emission from the accelerated particle population as well as the acceleration process itself. Using a 95 ks observation with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer on board the Chandra X-Ray Observatory, we map and characterize the synchrotron emitting material in the northwest region of RCW 86. We model spectra from several different regions, both filamentary and diffuse, where emission appears to be dominated by synchrotron radiation. The fine spatial resolution of Chandra allows us to obtain accurate emission profiles across three different non-thermal rims in this region. The narrow width (l ? 10''-30'') of these filaments constrains the minimum magnetic field strength at the post-shock region to approximately 80 ?G.

  5. Coral Thermal Tolerance: Tuning Gene Expression to Resist Thermal Stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coral Thermal Tolerance: Tuning Gene Expression to Resist Thermal Stress Anthony J. Bellantuono1 thermal tolerance in the scleractinian coral Acropora millepora, corals preconditioned to a sub under which non-preconditioned corals bleached and preconditioned corals (thermal-tolerant) maintained

  6. Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} gas mixture plasma jet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Dezhi; Shen, Jie; Lan, Yan; Xie, Hongbing; Shu, Xingsheng; Meng, Yuedong; Li, Jiangang; Cheng, Cheng E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk; Chu, Paul K. E-mail: paul.chu@cityu.edu.hk

    2014-01-21

    An atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma jet driven by high frequency alternating current and operating on N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}/O{sub 2} gas mixture is investigated. The plasma jet can reach 55?mm in length at a gas flow rate of 2500?l/h. The gas temperature at a distance of 4?mm from the nozzle is close to room temperature. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to investigate the important plasma parameters such as the excited species, rotational temperature, vibrational temperature, and excitation temperature under different discharge conditions. The results show that the plasma source operates under non-equilibrium conditions. The absolute irradiance intensity of the vibrational band N{sub 2}(C-B) in the active region is measured. Taking into account the irradiance intensity of N{sub 2}(C-B,0-0) and N{sub 2}(B-X,0-0) as well as measured current, the electron density, which is determined by considering direct and step-wise electron impact excitation of nitrogen emission, reaches a maximum value of 5.6?×?10{sup 20}/m{sup 3}.

  7. Geo-Information Systems for the Middle EastGeoArabia, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2000 Gulf PetroLink, Bahrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    295 Geo-Information Systems for the Middle EastGeoArabia, Vol. 5, No. 2, 2000 Gulf PetroLink, Bahrain Design and Development of Information Systems for the Geosciences: An Application to the Middle are developing a comprehensive Solid Earth Information System (SEIS). The complex nature of the solid earth

  8. Potential of Geo-neutrino Measurements at JUNO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ran Han; Yu-Feng Li; Liang Zhan; William F. McDonough; Jun Cao

    2015-10-07

    The flux of geoneutrinos at any point on the Earth is a function of the abundance and distribution of radioactive elements within our planet. This flux has been successfully detected by the 1-kt KamLAND and 0.3-kt Borexino detectors with these measurements being limited by their low statistics. The planned 20-kt JUNO detector will provide an exciting opportunity to obtain a high statistics measurement, which will provide data to address several questions of geological importance. This paper presents the JUNO detector design concept, the expected geo-neutrino signal and corresponding backgrounds. The precision level of geo-neutrino measurements at JUNO is obtained with the standard least-squares method. The potential of the Th/U ratio and mantle measurements is also discussed.

  9. Potential of Geo-neutrino Measurements at JUNO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Ran; Zhan, Liang; McDonough, William F; Cao, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The flux of geoneutrinos at any point on the Earth is a function of the abundance and distribution of radioactive elements within our planet. This flux has been successfully detected by the 1-kt KamLAND and 0.3-kt Borexino detectors with these measurements being limited by their low statistics. The planned 20-kt JUNO detector will provide an exciting opportunity to obtain a high statistics measurement, which will provide data to address several questions of geological importance. This paper presents the JUNO detector design concept, the expected geo-neutrino signal and corresponding backgrounds. The precision level of geo-neutrino measurements at JUNO is obtained with the standard least-squares method. The potential of the Th/U ratio and mantle measurements is also discussed.

  10. GS-Lab Report 2012 by J.B. de Smeth, 1 GeoScience-Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GS-Lab Report 2012 by J.B. de Smeth, 1 GeoScience-Laboratory Activity Report 2012 J.B. de Smeth, Head GS-Lab. January 2013 #12;GS-Lab Report 2012 by J.B. de Smeth, 2 GeoScience Laboratory activity report 2012 J.B. de Smeth, Head GS-lab. 1. Introduction The function of the GeoScience Laboratory

  11. GS-Lab Report 2014 by J.B. de Smeth, 1 GeoScience-Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GS-Lab Report 2014 by J.B. de Smeth, 1 GeoScience-Laboratory Activity Report 2014 J.B. de Smeth, Head GS-Lab. January 2015 #12;GS-Lab Report 2014 by J.B. de Smeth, 2 GeoScience Laboratory activity report 2014 J.B. de Smeth, Head GS-lab. 1. Introduction The function of the GeoScience Laboratory

  12. GS-Lab Report 2013 by J.B. de Smeth, 1 GeoScience-Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GS-Lab Report 2013 by J.B. de Smeth, 1 GeoScience-Laboratory Activity Report 2013 J.B. de Smeth, Head GS-Lab. February 2014 #12;GS-Lab Report 2013 by J.B. de Smeth, 2 GeoScience Laboratory activity report 2013 J.B. de Smeth, Head GS-lab. 1. Introduction The function of the GeoScience Laboratory

  13. GS-Lab Report 2010 by J.B. de Smeth, 1 GeoScience-Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GS-Lab Report 2010 by J.B. de Smeth, 1 GeoScience-Laboratory Activity Report 2010 J.B. de Smeth, Head GS-Lab. July 2011 #12;GS-Lab Report 2010 by J.B. de Smeth, 2 GeoScience Laboratory activity report 2010 J.B. de Smeth, Head GS-lab. 1. Introduction The function of the GeoScience Laboratory

  14. Utility of geo-informatics for disaster risk management: linking structural damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utility of geo-informatics for disaster risk management: linking structural damage assessment/ Volcano remote sensing (Uni Cambridge) Geoinformatics for disaster risk management (hazard

  15. lgebra de Geo-Campos e suas Aplicaes1 JOO PEDRO CORDEIRO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camara, Gilberto

    (figura 2). Le Li Aq Ls Figura 1 - Exemplo de geo-campo tematico (Mapa de Solos) Figura 2 - Exemplo de

  16. FirstGeoTherm GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport Jump to: navigation,FirstGeoTherm GmbH Jump to:

  17. GEO LSE COMP POST 2005 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistarFuelCellsEtcSilicon Co LtdGEO LEASE

  18. GEO LSE COMP PRE 2005 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistarFuelCellsEtcSilicon Co LtdGEO LEASEGEO LSE COMP

  19. GEO LSE NONCOMP PRE 2005 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistarFuelCellsEtcSilicon Co LtdGEO LEASEGEO LSE

  20. Property:GeoNames URL | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to: navigation, search This is a propertyGenDelToGrid JumpGeoNames

  1. Property:AvgGeoFluidTemp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2,Information PromotingPropertyAvgGeoFluidTemp Jump

  2. GeoSprings Hybrid Water Heater - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journalvivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing Radiation Exposure:diseaseGeoSprings

  3. Non-thermal electron acceleration in low Mach number collisionless shocks. II. Firehose-mediated Fermi acceleration and its dependence on pre-shock conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh; Sironi, Lorenzo

    2014-12-10

    Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies is known to occur in low Mach number (M{sub s} ? 5) shocks in galaxy clusters and solar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Using two-dimensional (2D) particle-in-cell (PIC) plasma simulations, we showed in Paper I that electrons are efficiently accelerated in low Mach number (M{sub s} = 3) quasi-perpendicular shocks via a Fermi-like process. The electrons bounce between the upstream region and the shock front, with each reflection at the shock resulting in energy gain via shock drift acceleration. The upstream scattering is provided by oblique magnetic waves that are self-generated by the electrons escaping ahead of the shock. In the present work, we employ additional 2D PIC simulations to address the nature of the upstream oblique waves. We find that the waves are generated by the shock-reflected electrons via the firehose instability, which is driven by an anisotropy in the electron velocity distribution. We systematically explore how the efficiency of wave generation and of electron acceleration depend on the magnetic field obliquity, the flow magnetization (or equivalently, the plasma beta), and the upstream electron temperature. We find that the mechanism works for shocks with high plasma beta (? 20) at nearly all magnetic field obliquities, and for electron temperatures in the range relevant for galaxy clusters. Our findings offer a natural solution to the conflict between the bright radio synchrotron emission observed from the outskirts of galaxy clusters and the low electron acceleration efficiency usually expected in low Mach number shocks.

  4. Geo-Logical Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks* Dulanjalie C. Dhanapala and Anura P. Jayasumana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayasumana, Anura P.

    Geo-Logical Routing in Wireless Sensor Networks* Dulanjalie C. Dhanapala and Anura P. Jayasumana Abstract-- Geo-Logical Routing (GLR) is a novel technique that combines the advantages of geographic. In logical domain, a node is characterized by a VC vector consisting of minimum number of hops to a set

  5. Bellini: Ferrying Application Traffic Flows through Geo-distributed Datacenters in the Cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Bellini: Ferrying Application Traffic Flows through Geo-distributed Datacenters in the Cloud Zimu. To take full advantage of superior connectivities between geo-distributed datacenters, application traffic, implementing and deploying such inter- datacenter protocols for various applications, such as messaging

  6. SVG and Geo Web Services for visualization of time series data of flood risk Barend Kbben

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köbben, Barend

    SVG and Geo Web Services for visualization of time series data of flood risk Barend Köbben. The Open Geospatial Consortiums Web Map Service (WMS) specification is no doubt the most widely implemented webservices Open Web Services specifications Time series in WMS RIMapperWMS: SVG from WMS SVG animation of Geo-WebServices

  7. PCH 6934/CNG 6933/GEO 6119 Page 1 of 5 Spring 2008 Sustainability Concepts and Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Amy L.

    PCH 6934/CNG 6933/GEO 6119 Page 1 of 5 Spring 2008 Syllabus Sustainability Concepts and Methods: Mercury in Tampa Bay PHC 6934 (ref# 15933) / CNG 6933(ref# 11277) / Geog 6119 (ref # 18993) Spring 2008 vary up to several days. #12;PCH 6934/CNG 6933/GEO 6119 Page 2 of 5 Spring 2008 Course Outline

  8. FTIR Emission Spectra, Molecular Constants, and Potential Curve of Ground State GeO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    FTIR Emission Spectra, Molecular Constants, and Potential Curve of Ground State GeO Edward G. Lee-resolution FTIR emission spectroscopy measurements for the five common isoto- pomers of GeO are combined­9), photoelectron spectroscopy (10), electronic absorption (11­13), and emission (14) spectroscopy, and in matrix

  9. GEO-ENGINEERING TO CONFINE CLIMATE CHANGE: IS IT AT ALL FEASIBLE?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Begstsson, Lennart

    of the acceleration of global warming in recent years (Andreae et al., 2005). However, recent model experimentsGEO-ENGINEERING TO CONFINE CLIMATE CHANGE: IS IT AT ALL FEASIBLE? An Editorial Comment 1 before any geo-engineering of climate could be considered, if at all. The three issues are (i) the lack

  10. Implementing marine organic aerosols into the GEOS-Chem model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meskhidze, N.

    2015-03-17

    Marine-sourced organic aerosols (MOAs) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem (Global Earth Observing System Chemistry) model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large underprediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Modelmore »predictions were also in good agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOAs observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOAs have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having >10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.« less

  11. Implementing marine organic aerosols into the GEOS-Chem model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Crippa, M.; Prévôt, A. S. H.; Meskhidze, N.

    2014-09-09

    Marine organic aerosols (MOA) have been shown to play an important role in tropospheric chemistry by impacting surface mass, cloud condensation nuclei, and ice nuclei concentrations over remote marine and coastal regions. In this work, an online marine primary organic aerosol emission parameterization, designed to be used for both global and regional models, was implemented into the GEOS-Chem model. The implemented emission scheme improved the large underprediction of organic aerosol concentrations in clean marine regions (normalized mean bias decreases from -79% when using the default settings to -12% when marine organic aerosols are added). Model predictions were also in goodmore »agreement (correlation coefficient of 0.62 and normalized mean bias of -36%) with hourly surface concentrations of MOA observed during the summertime at an inland site near Paris, France. Our study shows that MOA have weaker coastal-to-inland concentration gradients than sea-salt aerosols, leading to several inland European cities having > 10% of their surface submicron organic aerosol mass concentration with a marine source. The addition of MOA tracers to GEOS-Chem enabled us to identify the regions with large contributions of freshly-emitted or aged aerosol having distinct physicochemical properties, potentially indicating optimal locations for future field studies.« less

  12. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01

    SA Kalogirou, "Solar thermal collectors and applications,"axis concentrating solar thermal (collectors such as linearof non- concentrated solar thermal collectors also operate

  13. GEO-SEQ Best Practices Manual. Geologic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: Site Evaluation to Implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benson, Sally M.; Myer, Larry R.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Doughty, Christine A.; Pruess, Karsten; Lewicki, Jennifer; Hoversten, Mike; Gasperikova, Erica; Daley, Thomas; Majer, Ernie; Lippmann, Marcelo; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Knauss, Kevin; Johnson, James; Foxall, William; Ramirez, Abe; Newmark, Robin; Cole, David; Phelps, Tommy J.; Parker, J.; Palumbo, A.; Horita, J.; Fisher, S.; Moline, Gerry; Orr, Lynn; Kovscek, Tony; Jessen, K.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, J.; Cakici, M.; Hovorka, Susan; Holtz, Mark; Sakurai, Shinichi; Gunter, Bill; Law, David; van der Meer, Bert

    2004-10-23

    The first phase of the GEO-SEQ project was a multidisciplinary effort focused on investigating ways to lower the cost and risk of geologic carbon sequestration. Through our research in the GEO-SEQ project, we have produced results that may be of interest to the wider geologic carbon sequestration community. However, much of the knowledge developed in GEO-SEQ is not easily accessible because it is dispersed in the peer-reviewed literature and conference proceedings in individual papers on specific topics. The purpose of this report is to present key GEO-SEQ findings relevant to the practical implementation of geologic carbon sequestration in the form of a Best Practices Manual. Because our work in GEO-SEQ focused on the characterization and project development aspects, the scope of this report covers practices prior to injection, referred to as the design phase. The design phase encompasses activities such as selecting sites for which enhanced recovery may be possible, evaluating CO{sub 2} capacity and sequestration feasibility, and designing and evaluating monitoring approaches. Through this Best Practices Manual, we have endeavored to place our GEO-SEQ findings in a practical context and format that will be useful to readers interested in project implementation. The overall objective of this Manual is to facilitate putting the findings of the GEO-SEQ project into practice.

  14. Energy, Exergy and Uncertainty Analyses of the Thermal Response Test for a Ground Heat Exchanger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Shayea, Naser Abdul-Rahman

    response test of a ground heat exchanger. In this study, a vertical U-shaped ground heat exchanger with 80 understanding of the overall performance of vertical ground heat exchangers, verifies the thermal response test from the hydraulic section #12;3 1. Introduction Geothermal energy (geo-exchange) systems have been

  15. GeoEnergy is Beautiful 2014 – Apply by April 5th!

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    GeoEnergy Is Beautiful 2014 is a student competition promoting awareness of geothermal energy as a key player in the nation's renewable energy mix. Student teams from leading colleges and...

  16. Periodic Measurement of Advertising Effectiveness Using Multiple-Test-Period Geo Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortes, Corinna

    of ad effectiveness measurements across time. Additionally, the experimental units should rotate betweenPeriodic Measurement of Advertising Effectiveness Using Multiple-Test-Period Geo Experiments Jon experiments to the measurement of advertising effectiveness. One reason this method of measurement

  17. Application of time reverse modeling on ultrasonic non-destructive testing of concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Application of time reverse modeling on ultrasonic non-destructive testing of concrete Erik H-differences Wave propagation Source localization Non-destructive testing a b s t r a c t Time reverse modeling (TRM is to transform a method within exploration geo- physics to non-destructive testing. In contrast to previous time

  18. Impact of the Geo-synchronous Orbit Radiation Environment on the Design of Astronomical Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kruk, Jeffrey W; Armani, Nerses; Stauffer, Craig; Hirata, Christopher M

    2015-01-01

    Geo-Synchronous orbits are appealing for Solar or astrophysical observatories because they permit continuous data downlink at high rates. The radiation environment in these orbits presents unique challenges, however. This paper describes the characteristics of the radiation environment in Geo-Synchronous orbit and the implications for instrument design. Radiation-induced background event rates are given for some simplified shielding models, and for a detailed model of the proposed Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope observatory.

  19. Second Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition GeoAmericas 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    tests were conducted using a polyester non-woven geotextile to evaluate the new equipment. Afterwards

  20. Thermal engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karnes, T.E.; Trupin, R.J.

    1984-01-03

    A thermal engine utilizing a strip of nitinol material or other thermally responsive shape memory effect material to drive a reciprocating output shaft, said strip of material forming a common wall between two different alternating temperature sources which thermally cycle the material.

  1. A review of the corrective power of personal comfort systems in non-neutral ambient environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward; Zhai, Yongchao

    2015-01-01

    7730: 2005. Ergonomics of the thermal environment–Analyticalfor assessing complex thermal environments. ” Building andand non-uniform thermal environment, 2003, Ph. D. Thesis,

  2. Organization of Data in Non-Convex Spatial Domains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazhdan, Michael

    discovery and analysis of the observational and model data sets of the Chesapeake Bay Environmental are long and skinny with a large number of winding, tendril-like tributaries. Non- convexity arises in many scientific databases [1, 2] and geo-spatial services, such as geotagging, urban computing [3

  3. GEO-ENGINEERING MODELING THROUGH INTERNET INFORMATICS (GEMINI)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Lynn Watney; John H. Doveton

    2004-05-13

    GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through Internet Informatics) is a public-domain web application focused on analysis and modeling of petroleum reservoirs and plays (http://www.kgs.ukans.edu/Gemini/index.html). GEMINI creates a virtual project by ''on-the-fly'' assembly and analysis of on-line data either from the Kansas Geological Survey or uploaded from the user. GEMINI's suite of geological and engineering web applications for reservoir analysis include: (1) petrofacies-based core and log modeling using an interactive relational rock catalog and log analysis modules; (2) a well profile module; (3) interactive cross sections to display ''marked'' wireline logs; (4) deterministic gridding and mapping of petrophysical data; (5) calculation and mapping of layer volumetrics; (6) material balance calculations; (7) PVT calculator; (8) DST analyst, (9) automated hydrocarbon association navigator (KHAN) for database mining, and (10) tutorial and help functions. The Kansas Hydrocarbon Association Navigator (KHAN) utilizes petrophysical databases to estimate hydrocarbon pay or other constituent at a play- or field-scale. Databases analyzed and displayed include digital logs, core analysis and photos, DST, and production data. GEMINI accommodates distant collaborations using secure password protection and authorized access. Assembled data, analyses, charts, and maps can readily be moved to other applications. GEMINI's target audience includes small independents and consultants seeking to find, quantitatively characterize, and develop subtle and bypassed pays by leveraging the growing base of digital data resources. Participating companies involved in the testing and evaluation of GEMINI included Anadarko, BP, Conoco-Phillips, Lario, Mull, Murfin, and Pioneer Resources.

  4. A New Model for Mixing By Double-Diffusive Convection (Semi-Convection). III. Thermal and Compositional Transport Through Non-Layered ODDC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moll, Ryan; Stellmach, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Oscillatory double-diffusive convection (ODDC) (also known as semi- convection) refers to a type of double diffusive instability that occurs in regions of planetary and stellar interiors which have a destabilizing thermal stratification and a stabilizing mean molecular weight stratification. In this series of papers, we use an extensive suite of three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulations to quantify the transport of heat and chemical species by ODDC. Rosenblum et al. (2011) first showed that ODDC can either spontaneously form layers, which significantly enhance the transport of heat and chemical species compared to mi- croscopic transport, or remain in a state dominated by large scale gravity waves, in which there is a more modest enhancement of the turbulent transport rates. Subsequent studies in this series have focused on identifying under what condi- tions layers form (Mirouh et al. 2012), and quantifying transport through layered systems (Wood et al. 2013). Here we proceed to characterize transport thr...

  5. Canted Undulator Upgrade for GeoSoilEnviroCARS Sector 13 at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, Stephen

    2013-02-02

    Support for the beamline component of the canted undulator upgrade of Sector 13 (GeoSoilEnviroCARS; managed and operated by the University of Chicago) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS; Argonne National Laboratory) was received from three agencies (equally divided): NASA-SRLIDAP (now LARS), NSF-EAR-IF (ARRA) and DOE-Single Investigator Small Group (SISGR). The associated accelerator components (undulators, canted front end) were provided by the APS using DOE-ARRA funding. The intellectual merit of the research enabled by the upgrade lies in advancing our knowledge of the composition, structure and properties of earth materials; the processes they control; and the processes that produce them. The upgrade will facilitate scientific advances in the following areas: high pressure mineral physics and chemistry, non-crystalline and nano-crystalline materials at high pressure, chemistry of hydrothermal fluids, reactions at mineral-water interfaces, biogeochemistry, oxidation states of magmas, flow dynamics of fluids and solids, and cosmochemistry. The upgrade, allowing the microprobe to operate 100% of the time and the high pressure and surface scattering and spectroscopy instruments to receive beam time increases, will facilitate much more efficient use of the substantial investment in these instruments. The broad scientific community will benefit by the increase in the number of scientists who conduct cutting-edge research at GSECARS. The user program in stations 13ID-C (interface scattering) and 13ID-D (laser heated diamond anvil cell and large volume press) recommenced in June 2012. The operation of the 13ID-E microprobe station began in the Fall 2012 cycle (Oct.-Dec 2012). The upgraded canted beamlines double the amount of undulator beam time at Sector 13 and provide new capabilities including extended operations of the X-ray microprobe down to the sulfur K edge and enhanced brightness at high energy. The availability of the upgraded beamlines will advance the research being conducted at Sector 13.

  6. Real-time geo-registration of imagery using COTS graphics processors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Flath, Laurence M. (Livermore, CA); Kartz, Michael W. (Tracy, CA)

    2009-06-30

    A method of performing real-time geo-registration of high-resolution digital imagery using existing graphics processing units (GPUs) already found in current personal computers, rather than the main central processing unit (CPU). Digital image data captured by a camera (along with inertial navigation system (INS) data associated with the image data) is transferred to and processed by the GPU to perform the calculations involved in transforming the captured image into a geo-rectified, nadir-looking image. By using the GPU, the order-of-magnitude increase in throughput over conventional software techniques makes real-time geo-registration possible without the significant cost of custom hardware solutions.

  7. Flows and Non-thermal Velocities in Solar Active Regions Observed with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode: A Tracer of Active Region Sources of Heliospheric Magnetic Fields?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Doschek; H. P. Warren; J. T. Mariska; K. Muglach; J. L. Culhane; H. Hara; T Watanabe

    2008-07-17

    From Doppler velocity maps of active regions constructed from spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft we observe large areas of outflow (20-50 km/s) that can persist for at least a day. These outflows occur in areas of active regions that are faint in coronal spectral lines formed at typical quiet Sun and active region temperatures. The outflows are positively correlated with non-thermal velocities in coronal plasmas. The bulk mass motions and non-thermal velocities are derived from spectral line centroids and line widths, mostly from a strong line of Fe XII at 195.12 Angstroms. The electron temperature of the outflow regions estimated from an Fe XIII to Fe XII line intensity ratio is about 1.2-1.4 MK. The electron density of the outflow regions derived from a density sensitive intensity ratio of Fe XII lines is rather low for an active region. Most regions average around 7E10+8 cm(-3), but there are variations on pixel spatial scales of about a factor of 4. We discuss results in detail for two active regions observed by EIS. Images of active regions in line intensity, line width, and line centroid are obtained by rastering the regions. We also discuss data from the active regions obtained from other orbiting spacecraft that support the conclusions obtained from analysis of the EIS spectra. The locations of the flows in the active regions with respect to the longitudinal photospheric magnetic fields suggest that these regions might be tracers of long loops and/or open magnetic fields that extend into the heliosphere, and thus the flows could possibly contribute significantly to the solar wind.

  8. Documentation of the Multitasked Tangent Linear and Adjoint Models of the Adiabatic Version of the NASA GEOS-2 GCM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the NASA GEOS-2 GCM (Version 6.5) Yan Yangy, I. Michael Navon* and Ricardo Todlingz y and Supercomputer Computations Research Institute Florida State University zNASA/Data Assimilation OĆce General of the NASA GEOS-2 GCM 1 2.1 Atmospheric dynamic equations

  9. GIFT: A GEOSPATIAL IMAGE AND VIDEO FILTERING TOOL FOR COMPUTER VISION APPLICATIONS WITH GEO-TAGGED MOBILE VIDEOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    of geo-tagged videos or sensor-rich videos [1, 2]. Many studies focused on extracting geospatial metadata- tagged mobile videos. GIFT tightly couples mobile medi- a content and their geospatial metadata for fine, improved efficiency, ac- curacy and scalability. Index Terms-- geo-tagged, geospatial metadata, video

  10. GeoComputation in context by Helen Couclelis, Professor of Geography, Department of Geography and National Center for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clarke, Keith

    GeoComputation in context by Helen Couclelis, Professor of Geography, Department of Geography three groups of questions: (a) the place of GeoComputation within geography, in particular in connection'. This paraphrases Dobson's (1983) early attempt to define `Automated Geography', a concept we would now readily

  11. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    Solar Thermal Collectors .is solar energy. Solar thermal collector arrays can be usedon integrating solar thermal collectors with desalination

  12. Understanding of interface structures and reaction mechanisms induced by Ge or GeO diffusion in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ge structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shibayama, Shigehisa [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan) [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); JSPS, 5-3-1 Kojimachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0083 (Japan); Kato, Kimihiko; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Wakana; Taoka, Noriyuki; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)] [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2013-08-19

    The reaction mechanisms at Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ge interfaces with thermal oxidation through the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer have been investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that an Al{sub 6}Ge{sub 2}O{sub 13} layer is formed near the interface, and a GeO{sub 2} layer is formed on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface, suggesting Ge or GeO diffusion from the Ge surface. It is also clarified that the Al{sub 6}Ge{sub 2}O{sub 13} layer is formed by the different mechanism with a small activation energy of 0.2 eV, compared with the GeO{sub 2} formation limited by oxygen diffusion. Formation of Al-O-Ge bonds due to the AlGeO formation could lead appropriate interface structures with high interface qualities.

  13. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  14. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

    1991-01-01

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  15. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    and thermal energy storage in solar thermal applications,"aided or powered by solar thermal energy. A section is alsoexhaustive review of solar thermal energy systems has been

  16. Advanced Thermal Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    thermal models power density cost lifetime Advanced Thermal Interface Materials Advanced Heat Transfer Technologies Air Cooling Thermal System Performance and Integration Thermal...

  17. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-11-24

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  18. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2009-09-29

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments or the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  19. Thermally cleavable surfactants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McElhanon, James R. (Manteca, CA); Simmons, Blake A. (San Francisco, CA); Zifer, Thomas (Manteca, CA); Jamison, Gregory M. (Albuquerque, NM); Loy, Douglas A. (Albuquerque, NM); Rahimian, Kamyar (Albuquerque, NM); Long, Timothy M. (Urbana, IL); Wheeler, David R. (Albuquerque, NM); Staiger, Chad L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-04-04

    Two new surfactant molecules are reported which contain thermally labile Diels-Alder adducts connecting the polar and non-polar sections of each molecule. The two surfactants possess identical non-polar dodecyl tail segments but exhibit different polar headgroups. The surfactants become soluble in water when anionic salts are formed through the deprotonation of the surfactant headgroups by the addition of potassium hydroxide. When either surfactant is exposed to temperature above about 60.degree. C., the retro Diels-Alder reaction occurs, yielding hydrophilic and hydrophobic fragments and the aqueous solutions of the surfactants subsequently exhibit loss of all surface-active behavior.

  20. Syllabus: GEO 577 Algorithms for Geographic Information Science August 6, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenny, Bernhard

    1/2 Syllabus: GEO 577 Algorithms for Geographic Information Science August 6, 2014 Instructor to algorithms and data models for the manipulation and visualization of geospatial data. Students are introduced teaches essential methods, algorithms, and data models for building geospatial software. Students

  1. Utility of geo-informatics for disaster risk management: linking structural damage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utility of geo-informatics for disaster risk management: linking structural damage assessment) Geoinformatics for disaster risk management (hazard/risk/vulnerability/damage) www.unu-drm.nl Training of disaster risk management (my focus is on post-disaster response/ recovery) Use of object-oriented image

  2. SpiritTagger: A Geo-Aware Tag Suggestion Tool Mined from Flickr

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    , of a city or region. Experiments on a data set consisting of over 100,000 Flickr photos in Los Angeles, Santa Barbara manj@ece.ucsb.edu ABSTRACT Geographically referenced, or "geo-tagged," photo data sets based on ge- ographic context with content-based image analysis we are able to suggest geographically

  3. geoPOM: A Heterogeneous Geoscientific Persistent Object System Silvia Nittel, Richard R. Muntz, Edmond Mesrobian

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nittel, Silvia

    . The geoPOM data model is based on the ODMG- 93 standard for object-oriented data models, and the Open, Edmond Mesrobian Computer Science Department University of California, Los Angeles Los Angeles, CA 90024 fsilvia, muntz, edmondg@cs.ucla.edu Abstract Lately, a need for uniform access to and integration of data

  4. GIS&T Professional Ethics Project GEO 599 Initial Student Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    1 GIS&T Professional Ethics Project GEO 599 Initial Student Survey A. Personal Information 1. Name familiar with the Code of Ethics by the GIS Certification Institute. 2. I am familiar with the Rules of Conduct by the GIS Certification Institute. 3. To what extent should ethics education be a required

  5. ORIGINAL ARTICLE GeoChip 3.0 as a high-throughput tool for analyzing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    significantly changed with the plant species diversity. As expected, GeoChip 3.0 is a high-throughput powerful Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA and 8 Virtual Institute in microbial ecology Keywords: microarray; functional genes; microbial community; plant diversity Introduction

  6. ORIGINAL ARTICLE GeoChip 3.0 as a high-throughput tool for analyzing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry

    significantly changed with the plant species diversity. As expected, GeoChip 3.0 is a high-throughput powerful Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA and 8 Virtual Institute Keywords: microarray; functional genes; microbial community; plant diversity Introduction Microorganisms

  7. GRC Transactions, Vol. 37, 2013 MultiGAS, gas emissions, exploration, Peru, Italy, gas geo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams-Jones, Glyn

    , SO2 and H2S. In geothermal systems, surface manifestations are often com- prised of gas emissions geochemistry is used to help define the geometry of the geothermal system at depth (e.g., zones of upflow geo- chemistry, real-time ABSTRACT Geothermal exploration relies in part on the gas geochemis- try

  8. When Smart Grid Meets Geo-distributed Cloud: An Auction Approach to Datacenter Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zongpeng

    When Smart Grid Meets Geo-distributed Cloud: An Auction Approach to Datacenter Demand Response Zhi--Datacenter demand response is envisioned as a promising tool for mitigating operational stability issues faced in escalating electricity cost. However, the current demand response paradigm is inefficient towards

  9. EuroGeo4 Paper number 226 INSTALLATION AND ULTRAVIOLET EXPOSURE DAMAGE OF GEOTEXTILES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    EuroGeo4 Paper number 226 1 INSTALLATION AND ULTRAVIOLET EXPOSURE DAMAGE OF GEOTEXTILES Benjamim, C-mail: zornberg@mail.utexas.edu) Abstract: A better understanding on the behavior of geotextile-reinforced soil material characterization program. Accordingly, eight prototype geotextile-reinforced soil structures were

  10. SEI 03 GeoNet: A Platform for Rapid Distributed Geophysical Sensing Team Members

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    digital acquisition system (DAS) based on the CENS-developed LEAP (low-power energy aware processing) system and a newly developed low-power A/D converter from Texas Instruments (TI). In preparation for GeoNet, we have used the Peru networks to test the software including improving Disruption Tolerant Shell

  11. Mark Wilkinson $ School of GeoSciences, Grant Institute, University of Edinburgh,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    with many companies to research on hydro- carbon reservoir quality, radioactive waste dis- posal, and coal responsible for producing. R. Stuart Haszeldine $ School of Geo- Sciences, Grant Institute, University of Edin resources. He currently heads the United Kingdom's largest group investigating carbon dioxide sequestration

  12. Geos 223 Introductory Paleontology Spring 2006 Lab 9: Paleobiology and Paleoecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Geos 223 Introductory Paleontology Spring 2006 Lab 9: Paleobiology and Paleoecology Name: Section.) and reconstructing the paleoecology of this ancient community. In Part C of this lab you will undertake should have an understanding of how paleoecological analyses are conducted, and an appreciation

  13. RECOMMENDED TEMPLATE FOR GRADUATE ASSISTANT (GA) (POSITIONS COVERED BY THE GEO) OFFER LETTERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Tonghun

    RECOMMENDED TEMPLATE FOR GRADUATE ASSISTANT (GA) (POSITIONS COVERED BY THE GEO) OFFER LETTERS to offer you a Graduate Assistantship for [insert period of appointment and service dates, e.g. fall. The current wage for the assistantship we are offering you will be at least $ [insert amount] per month

  14. Fuel Cell Generation in Geo-Distributed Cloud Services: A Quantitative Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Baochun

    Fuel Cell Generation in Geo-Distributed Cloud Services: A Quantitative Study Zhi Zhou1 Fangming Liu of fuel cell energy in cloud computing, yet it is unclear what and how much benefit it may bring. This paper, for the first time, attempts to quantitatively examine the benefits brought by fuel cell

  15. INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR GEO-INFORMATION SCIENCE AND EARTH OBSERVATION Tsunami ramp Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hack, Robert

    INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR GEO-INFORMATION SCIENCE AND EARTH OBSERVATION Tsunami ramp Asia 26 december 2004 Het onstaan van tsunamis Robert Hack (met dank aan van Mark van der Meijde en Colin Reeves cause for tsunami #12;Worldwide plate boundaries Source: USGS #12;Tectonic Setting Source: USGS Breuk

  16. High Accuracy Ground Target Geo-location Using Autonomous Micro Aerial Vehicle Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doherty, Patrick

    Wing developed in-house (Figure 1). The PingWing won the 3rd US-European Micro Aerial Vehicle Competition (MAV07 used to geo-locate ground objects from a MAV platform are passive video cameras. The reason is that su

  17. Treatment of Asbestos Wastes Using the GeoMelt Vitrification Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finucane, K.G. [AMEC Nuclear Holdings Ltd., GeoMelt Div., Richland, WA (United States); Thompson, L.E. [Capto Group LLC, Dallas, TX (United States); Abuku, T. [ISV Japan Ltd., Yokohama-city (Japan); Nakauchi, H. [Mie Chuo Kaihatsu Co. Ltd., Hachiya, Iga City (Japan)

    2008-07-01

    The disposal of waste asbestos from decommissioning activities is becoming problematic in countries which have limited disposal space. A particular challenge is the disposal of asbestos wastes from the decommissioning of nuclear sites because some of it is radioactively contaminated or activated and disposal space for such wastes is limited. GeoMelt{sup R} vitrification is being developed as a treatment method for volume and toxicity minimization and radionuclide immobilization for UK radioactive asbestos mixed waste. The common practice to date for asbestos wastes is disposal in licensed landfills. In some cases, compaction techniques are used to minimize the disposal space requirements. However, such practices are becoming less practical. Social pressures have resulted in changes to disposal regulations which, in turn, have resulted in the closure of some landfills and increased disposal costs. In the UK, tens of thousands of tonnes of asbestos waste will result from the decommissioning of nuclear sites over the next 20 years. In Japan, it is estimated that over 40 million tonnes of asbestos materials used in construction will require disposal. Methods for the safe and cost effective volume reduction of asbestos wastes are being evaluated for many sites. The GeoMelt{sup R} vitrification process is being demonstrated at full-scale in Japan for the Japan Ministry of Environment and plans are being developed for the GeoMelt treatment of UK nuclear site decommissioning-related asbestos wastes. The full-scale treatment operations in Japan have also included contaminated soils and debris. The GeoMelt{sup R} vitrification process result in the maximum possible volume reduction, destroys the asbestos fibers, treats problematic debris associated with asbestos wastes, and immobilizes radiological contaminants within the resulting glass matrix. Results from recent full-scale treatment operations in Japan are discussed and plans for GeoMelt treatment of UK nuclear site decommissioning-related asbestos wastes are outlined. (authors)

  18. Underground Coal Thermal Treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

    2011-10-30

    The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?˘ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?˘ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?˘ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?˘ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

  19. Second Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition GeoAmericas 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    HYDRAULIC CLASSIFICATION OF UNSATURATED NONWOVEN GEOTEXTILES FOR USE IN CAPILLARY BARRIERS C.B. Pickles different non-woven geotextile properties and the materials performance under unsaturated conditions function. Due to the low water entry suction of all nonwoven geotextiles it was found that when

  20. AN OBSERVED CORRELATION BETWEEN THERMAL AND NON-THERMAL EMISSION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    10 ; Paciesas, William S., E-mail: jmichaelburgess@gmail.com, E-mail: rob.preece@nasa.gov, E-mail: felix@particle.kth.se, E-mail: veres@gwu.edu, E-mail: npp@astro.psu.edu...

  1. Rapid thermal processing by stamping

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stradins, Pauls; Wang, Qi

    2013-03-05

    A rapid thermal processing device and methods are provided for thermal processing of samples such as semiconductor wafers. The device has components including a stamp (35) having a stamping surface and a heater or cooler (40) to bring it to a selected processing temperature, a sample holder (20) for holding a sample (10) in position for intimate contact with the stamping surface; and positioning components (25) for moving the stamping surface and the stamp (35) in and away from intimate, substantially non-pressured contact. Methods for using and making such devices are also provided. These devices and methods allow inexpensive, efficient, easily controllable thermal processing.

  2. THERMAL ANALYSIS OF AIR-COOLED FUEL CELLS Setareh Shahsavari

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    - cooled proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC). In the modeled fuel cell stack, forced air flow for thermal analysis of air-cooled PEMFC stacks, where temperature non-uniformity is high and thermal

  3. INDIANA UNIVERSITY GEO-PALEOANTHROPOLOGY FIELD COURSE IN TANZANIA G349/549 2015 APPLICATION FOR ADMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    INDIANA UNIVERSITY GEO-PALEOANTHROPOLOGY FIELD COURSE IN TANZANIA G349/549 2015 APPLICATION OF GEOLOGICAL SCIENCES INDIANA UNIVERSITY TANZANIA FIELD COURSE 1001 E. 10 th ST. BLOOMINGTON, IN 47405 USA #12;

  4. GEO/01 PALEONTOLOGIA E PALEOECOLOGIA 1) La paleontologia e le sue principali applicazioni nelle Scienze della Terra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    materiali lapidei GEO/10 GEOFISICA DELLA TERRA SOLIDA 1) Tomografia sismica: il Candidato illustri principi discuta possibili integrazioni tra tecniche di sismica a riflessione ed a rifrazione attraverso l

  5. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    varying solar energy inputs and thermal or power demands. Itusing aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"

  6. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    of solar collectors and thermal energy storage in solaraided or powered by solar thermal energy. A section is alsobesides MVC require thermal energy as their primary energy

  7. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    15] O. A. Hamed, "THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF MULTISTAGE FLASHdesa4.aspx. [18] Encon, "Thermal Evaporators," June 2013. [http://www.evaporator.com/thermal-evaporator. [19] Y. Tian

  8. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    of such an aquifer thermal storage system were studied andusing aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"

  9. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    This requires no thermal storage tanks, but can have athe need for large thermal storage equipment, the evaporatorinclude analysis of thermal storage. A way of keeping the

  10. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

  11. Mixed Waste Treatment Cost Analysis for a Range of GeoMelt Vitrification Process Configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, L. E.

    2002-02-27

    GeoMelt is a batch vitrification process used for contaminated site remediation and waste treatment. GeoMelt can be applied in several different configurations ranging from deep subsurface in situ treatment to aboveground batch plants. The process has been successfully used to treat a wide range of contaminated wastes and debris including: mixed low-level radioactive wastes; mixed transuranic wastes; polychlorinated biphenyls; pesticides; dioxins; and a range of heavy metals. Hypothetical cost estimates for the treatment of mixed low-level radioactive waste were prepared for the GeoMelt subsurface planar and in-container vitrification methods. The subsurface planar method involves in situ treatment and the in-container vitrification method involves treatment in an aboveground batch plant. The projected costs for the subsurface planar method range from $355-$461 per ton. These costs equate to 18-20 cents per pound. The projected cost for the in-container method is $1585 per ton. This cost equates to 80 cents per pound. These treatment costs are ten or more times lower than the treatment costs for alternative mixed waste treatment technologies according to a 1996 study by the US Department of Energy.

  12. Canada's Deep Geological Repository for Used Nuclear Fuel - Geo-scientific Site Evaluation Process - 13117

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blyth, Alec; Ben Belfadhel, Mahrez; Hirschorn, Sarah; Hamilton, Duncan; McKelvie, Jennifer

    2013-07-01

    The Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) is responsible for implementing Adaptive Phased Management (APM), the approach selected by the Government of Canada for long-term management of used nuclear fuel generated by Canadian nuclear reactors. The ultimate objective of APM is the centralized containment and isolation of Canada's used nuclear fuel in a Deep Geological Repository in a suitable rock formation at a depth of approximately 500 meters (m) (1,640 feet [ft]). In May 2010, the NWMO published a nine-step site selection process that serves as the road map to decision-making on the location for the deep geological repository. The safety and appropriateness of any potential site will be assessed against a number of factors, both technical and social in nature. The selected site will be one that can be demonstrated to be able to safely contain and isolate used nuclear fuel, protecting humans and the environment over the very long term. The geo-scientific suitability of potential candidate sites will be assessed in a stepwise manner following a progressive and thorough site evaluation process that addresses a series of geo-scientific factors revolving around five safety functions. The geo-scientific site evaluation process includes: Initial Screenings; Preliminary Assessments; and Detailed Site Evaluations. As of November 2012, 22 communities have entered the site selection process (three in northern Saskatchewan and 18 in northwestern and southwestern Ontario). (authors)

  13. Thermally switchable dielectrics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dirk, Shawn M.; Johnson, Ross S.

    2013-04-30

    Precursor polymers to conjugated polymers, such as poly(phenylene vinylene), poly(poly(thiophene vinylene), poly(aniline vinylene), and poly(pyrrole vinylene), can be used as thermally switchable capacitor dielectrics that fail at a specific temperature due to the non-conjugated precursor polymer irreversibly switching from an insulator to the conjugated polymer, which serves as a bleed resistor. The precursor polymer is a good dielectric until it reaches a specific temperature determined by the stability of the leaving groups. Conjugation of the polymer backbone at high temperature effectively disables the capacitor, providing a `built-in` safety mechanism for electronic devices.

  14. Thermal Transport in Nanoporous Materials for Energy Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Thermal Conductivity Measurement . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thermal ConductivityThermal Conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Thermal

  15. High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production This...

  16. Non-basaltic asteroidal magmatism during the earliest stages of solar system evolution: A view from Antarctic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Non-basaltic asteroidal magmatism during the earliest stages of solar system evolution: A view from Sciences, Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131, USA b Dept. of Civil Eng. and Geo. Sci., Univ. of Notre Dame, IN 46556, USA c Dept. of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM

  17. Partially Crystalline Zn2GeO4 Nanorod/Graphene Composites as Anode Materials for High Performance Lithium Ion Batteries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Zhiqun

    Partially Crystalline Zn2GeO4 Nanorod/Graphene Composites as Anode Materials for High Performance-step hydrothermal processing. Crystalline and amorphous regions were found to coexist in a single Zn2GeO4 nanorod then utilized as anodes for lithium ion batteries (LIBs). Intriguingly, partially crystalline ZGC containing 10

  18. Using PGI Compilers on GPU http://geo.mff.cuni.cz/~lh Using PGI compilers to solve initial value problems on GPU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Using PGI Compilers on GPU http://geo.mff.cuni.cz/~lh 1 Using PGI compilers to solve initial value 4. Initial value solvers with PGI compilers 5. PGI compilers on the Cascade system, a performance benchmark #12;Using PGI Compilers on GPU http://geo.mff.cuni.cz/~lh 2 1. NVIDIA GPUs CUDA: Compute Unified

  19. 11/7/2004 Prashant and Penumadu. Geo-Quebec 2004 1 INFLUENCE OF SPECIMEN SHAPE ANDINFLUENCE OF SPECIMEN SHAPE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prashant, Amit

    11/7/2004 Prashant and Penumadu. Geo-Quebec 2004 1 INFLUENCE OF SPECIMEN SHAPE ANDINFLUENCE are those of authors and do not necessarily reflect the views of NSF. #12;11/7/2004 Prashant and Penumadu. Geo-Quebec 2004 2 Presentation outlinePresentation outline The need of laboratory testing

  20. Effects of thermal fluctuations on thermal inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Hiramatsu; Yuhei Miyamoto; Jun'ichi Yokoyama

    2014-12-25

    The mechanism of thermal inflation, a relatively short period of accelerated expansion after primordial inflation, is a desirable ingredient for a certain class of particle physics models if they are not to be in contention with the cosmology of the early Universe. Though thermal inflation is most simply described in terms of a thermal effective potential, a thermal environment also gives rise to thermal fluctuations that must be taken into account. We numerically study the effects of these thermal fluctuations using lattice simulations. We conclude that though they do not ruin the thermal inflation scenario, the phase transition at the end of thermal inflation proceeds through phase mixing and is therefore not accompanied by the formations of bubbles nor appreciable amplitude of gravitational waves.

  1. A new Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) experiment designed for climate and chemistry models

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Tilmes, S.; Mills, Mike; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Robock, Alan; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Lamarque, J. F.; Pitari, G.; English, J. M.

    2015-01-15

    A new Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) experiment "G4 specified stratospheric aerosols" (short name: G4SSA) is proposed to investigate the impact of stratospheric aerosol geoengineering on atmosphere, chemistry, dynamics, climate, and the environment. In contrast to the earlier G4 GeoMIP experiment, which requires an emission of sulfur dioxide (SO?) into the model, a prescribed aerosol forcing file is provided to the community, to be consistently applied to future model experiments between 2020 and 2100. This stratospheric aerosol distribution, with a total burden of about 2 Tg S has been derived using the ECHAM5-HAM microphysical model, based on a continuous annualmore »tropical emission of 8 Tg SO? yr?ą. A ramp-up of geoengineering in 2020 and a ramp-down in 2070 over a period of 2 years are included in the distribution, while a background aerosol burden should be used for the last 3 decades of the experiment. The performance of this experiment using climate and chemistry models in a multi-model comparison framework will allow us to better understand the impact of geoengineering and its abrupt termination after 50 years in a changing environment. The zonal and monthly mean stratospheric aerosol input data set is available at https://www2.acd.ucar.edu/gcm/geomip-g4-specified-stratospheric-aerosol-data-set.« less

  2. The Treatment of Mixed Waste with GeoMelt In-Container Vitrification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Finucane, K.G.; Campbell, B.E.

    2006-07-01

    AMEC's GeoMelt{sup R} In-Container Vitrification (ICV){sup TM} has been used to treat diverse types of mixed low-level radioactive waste. ICV is effective in the treatment of mixed wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other semi-volatile organic compounds, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and heavy metals. The GeoMelt vitrification process destroys organic compounds and immobilizes metals and radionuclides in an extremely durable glass waste form. The process is flexible allowing for treatment of aqueous, oily, and solid mixed waste, including contaminated soil. In 2004, ICV was used to treat mixed radioactive waste sludge containing PCBs generated from a commercial cleanup project regulated by the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and to treat contaminated soil from Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. The Rocky Flats soil contained cadmium, PCBs, and depleted uranium. In 2005, AMEC completed a treatability demonstration of the ICV technology on Mock High Explosive from Sandia National Laboratories. This paper summarizes results from these mixed waste treatment projects. (authors)

  3. A new Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) experiment designed for climate and chemistry models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilmes, S. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Mills, Mike [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Niemeier, Ulrike [Max Planck Inst. for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); Schmidt, Hauke [Max Planck Inst. for Meteorology, Hamburg (Germany); Robock, Alan [Rutgers Univ., New Brunswick, NJ (United States). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Kravitz, Benjamin S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lamarque, J. F. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States); Pitari, G. [Univ. L'Aquila (Italy). Dept. of Physical and Chemical Sciences; English, J. M. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2015-01-01

    A new Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) experiment "G4 specified stratospheric aerosols" (short name: G4SSA) is proposed to investigate the impact of stratospheric aerosol geoengineering on atmosphere, chemistry, dynamics, climate, and the environment. In contrast to the earlier G4 GeoMIP experiment, which requires an emission of sulfur dioxide (SO?) into the model, a prescribed aerosol forcing file is provided to the community, to be consistently applied to future model experiments between 2020 and 2100. This stratospheric aerosol distribution, with a total burden of about 2 Tg S has been derived using the ECHAM5-HAM microphysical model, based on a continuous annual tropical emission of 8 Tg SO? yr?ą. A ramp-up of geoengineering in 2020 and a ramp-down in 2070 over a period of 2 years are included in the distribution, while a background aerosol burden should be used for the last 3 decades of the experiment. The performance of this experiment using climate and chemistry models in a multi-model comparison framework will allow us to better understand the impact of geoengineering and its abrupt termination after 50 years in a changing environment. The zonal and monthly mean stratospheric aerosol input data set is available at https://www2.acd.ucar.edu/gcm/geomip-g4-specified-stratospheric-aerosol-data-set.

  4. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    Evaporator Powered By Solar Thermal Energy 10:00 AM 10:00 AMaided or powered by solar thermal energy. A section is alsoexhaustive review of solar thermal energy systems has been

  5. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    and thermal energy storage in solar thermal applications,"Solar infrastructure should include analysis of thermal storage.storage equipment, the evaporator can be integrated into the current solar

  6. Thermal Control & System Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

  7. DNA Engine Thermal Cycler

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raizada, Manish N.

    ® Peltier Thermal Cycler PTC-0200 DNA Engine Cycler Operations Manual Version 4.0 #12;ii Tech Support: 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .vi The DNA Engine® Peltier Thermal Cycler Introduction

  8. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    and C. Y. Zhao, "A review of solar collectors and thermalenergy storage in solar thermal applications," Appliedon photovoltaic/thermal hybrid solar technology," Applied

  9. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    thermal energy becomes apparent with the development of solarsolar energy systems, aquifer energy storage provides a buffer between time-varying solar energy inputs and thermal

  10. Page 330 Courses: Geology (GEOL) Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog geoL 301 nAturAL HiStory of tHe HAWAiiAn iSLAndS (3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravikumar, B.

    Page 330 Courses: Geology (GEOL) Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog geoL 301 nAturAL Hi isolated archipelago in the world; geologic history and context of volcanic oceanic islands; conservation in Natural Sciences). Prerequisite: BIOL 115 or 121/122. geoL 302 geoLogy of CLiMAte CHAnge (3) Lecture, 3

  11. Thermal Dynamics in General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. S. Lopez-Monsalvo; N. Andersson

    2010-06-15

    We discuss a relativistic model for heat conduction, building on a convective variational approach to multi-fluid systems where the entropy is treated as a distinct dynamical entity. We demonstrate how this approach leads to a relativistic version of the Cattaneo equation, encoding the finite thermal relaxation time that is required to satisfy causality. We also show that the model naturally includes the non-equilibrium Gibbs relation that is a key ingredient in most approaches to extended thermodynamics. Focussing on the pure heat conduction problem, we compare the variational results to the second-order model developed by Israel and Stewart. The comparison shows that, despite the very different philosophies behind the two approaches, the two models are equivalent at first order deviations from thermal equilibrium. Finally, we complete the picture by working out the non-relativistic limit of our results, making contact with recent work in that regime.

  12. GEOSO A Geo-Social Model: From Real-World Co-occurrences to Social Connections1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahabi, Cyrus

    model that derives social activities from the history of people's movements in the real world, i.e., whoGEOSO ­ A Geo-Social Model: From Real-World Co-occurrences to Social Connections1 Huy Pham, Ling Hu, California, USA {huyvpham, lingh, shahabi}@usc.edu Abstract. As the popularity of social networks

  13. global warming itself. Moreover, the mere prospect of geo-engineering is a profound indictment of decades of failed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winickoff, David

    global warming itself. Moreover, the mere prospect of geo- engineering is a profound indictment as solar radiation manage- ment (SRM), would aim to reduce global warming by spray- ing aerosols of geoengineering research acknowledge the many risks involved. The physical risks include possible shifts in global

  14. A sensitivity study for full-field inversion of geo-acoustic data with a towed array in shallow water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jesus, SĂ©rgio M.

    .1. Background The solution to the wave equation for an harmonic source exciting a range-independent environmentA sensitivity study for full-field inversion of geo-acoustic data with a towed array in shallow in general small influence on the acoustic field structure and are therefore difficult to estimate

  15. GeoArabia, 2013, v. 18, no. 2, p. 141-176 Gulf PetroLink, Bahrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Mohammed

    as representing the deeply weathered top of a salt diapir, whose emplacement had a strong tectonic fault141 GeoArabia, 2013, v. 18, no. 2, p. 141-176 Gulf PetroLink, Bahrain Salt intrusions in Jabal, is attributed to deep weathering and dissolution similar to that seen at the surface-piercing salt domes

  16. SEI 05 GeoNet: A Platform for Rapid Distributed Geophysical Sensing SEI 05.1 Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    on the CENS-developed LEAP (low-power energy aware processing) system and a newly developed low-power A the UCLA LEAP (Low Energy Aware Processors) board modules to the GeoNet boxes. · Field tests of the new in Electrical Engineering, Computer Science, Structural Engineering and Earth and Space Sciences. SEI 05

  17. Today's geophysicists work ever more closely with reser-voir engineers and geologists due to the advent of geo-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta-Gupta, Akhil

    data consist of time-invariant information such as cores, well-logs, 3-D seismic, and geo- logic-wave propagation are distinct, many shared concepts are extremely useful in reservoir characterization characterization based on field production data. Computational challenges in reservoir characterization. Reservoir

  18. A prototype system for geo-based, cryptographically-enforced access control for miniature drones' video feeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arce, Nathaniel A

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, we design and implement a robust proof-of-concept system for demonstrating the concept of usable, geo-based access control and agile, dynamic key management. The system utilizes a Parrot AR Drone 2.0 to ...

  19. Human health impacts for Renewable Energy scenarios from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated Assessment (PIA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Human health impacts for Renewable Energy scenarios from the EnerGEO Platform of Integrated of renewable energy, affect concentrations of air pollutants and as a consequence affect human health. PM2 as a reference and the Maximum renewable power scenario. 1. Introduction People exposure to fine particulate

  20. User requirements for geo-collaborative work with spatio-temporal data in a web-based virtual globe environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Köbben, Barend

    User requirements for geo-collaborative work with spatio-temporal data in a web-based virtual globe 2011 Accepted 26 October 2012 Keywords: User-centered design Cartographic animation Google Earth, as the application designer has to take into account domain- specific issues, not discussed by traditional Humane

  1. Thermal Regimes of Northeast Streams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thermal Loading (USGS) Stormwater and Streams ­ Optimizing Stormwater Management to Protect the Thermal

  2. GeoChip 3.0: A High Throughput Tool for Analyzing Microbial Community, Composition, Structure, and Functional Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Zhili; Deng, Ye; Nostrand, Joy Van; Tu, Qichao; Xu, Meiying; Hemme, Chris; Wu, Liyou; Hazen, Terry; Zhou, Jizhong; Li, Xingyuan; Gentry, Terry; Yin, Yifeng; Liebich, Jost

    2010-05-17

    Microarray-based genomic technology has been widely used for microbial community analysis, and it is expected that microarray-based genomic technologies will revolutionize the analysis of microbial community structure, function and dynamics. A new generation of functional gene arrays (GeoChip 3.0) has been developed, with 27,812 probes covering 56,990 gene variants from 292 functional gene families involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycles, energy metabolism, antibiotic resistance, metal resistance, and organic contaminant degradation. Those probes were derived from 2,744, 140, and 262 species for bacteria, archaea, and fungi, respectively. GeoChip 3.0 has several other distinct features, such as a common oligo reference standard (CORS) for data normalization and comparison, a software package for data management and future updating, and the gyrB gene for phylogenetic analysis. Our computational evaluation of probe specificity indicated that all designed probes had a high specificity to their corresponding targets. Also, experimental analysis with synthesized oligonucleotides and genomic DNAs showed that only 0.0036percent-0.025percent false positive rates were observed, suggesting that the designed probes are highly specific under the experimental conditions examined. In addition, GeoChip 3.0 was applied to analyze soil microbial communities in a multifactor grassland ecosystem in Minnesota, USA, which demonstrated that the structure, composition, and potential activity of soil microbial communities significantly changed with the plant species diversity. All results indicate that GeoChip 3.0 is a high throughput powerful tool for studying microbial community functional structure, and linking microbial communities to ecosystem processes and functioning. To our knowledge, GeoChip 3.0 is the most comprehensive microarrays currently available for studying microbial communities associated with geobiochemical cycling, global climate change, bioenergy, agricuture, land use, ecosystem management, environmental cleanup and restoration, bioreactor systems, and human health.

  3. A boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loh, G. C., E-mail: jgloh@mtu.edu [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Baillargeat, D. [CNRS-International-NTU-Thales Research Alliance (CINTRA), 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

    2014-06-28

    The precise guidance of heat from one specific location to another is paramount in many industrial and commercial applications, including thermal management and thermoelectric generation. One of the cardinal requirements is a preferential conduction of thermal energy, also known as thermal rectification, in the materials. This study introduces a novel nanomaterial for rectifying heat—the boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier. Classical non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed on this nanomaterial, and interestingly, the strength of the rectification phenomenon is dissimilar at different operating temperatures. This is due to the contingence of the thermal flux on the conductance at the localized region around the scatterer, which varies with temperature. The rectification performance of the peapod rectifier is inherently dependent on its asymmetry. Last but not least, the favourable rectifying direction in the nanomaterial is established.

  4. On the origin of thermality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernard S. Kay

    2012-12-04

    It is well-known that a small system weakly coupled to a large energy bath in a total microcanonical ensemble will find itself in an (approximately) thermal state and, recently, it has been shown that, if the total state is, instead, a random pure state with energy in a narrow range, then the small system will still be approximately thermal with a high probability (wrt `Haar measure'). We ask what conditions are required for something resembling these 'traditional' and 'modern' thermality results to still hold when system and energy bath are of comparable size. In Part 1, we show that, for given system and energy-bath densities of states, s_S(e) and s_B(e), thermality does not hold in general, as we illustrate when both increase as powers of energy, but that it does hold in certain approximate senses, in both traditional and modern frameworks, when both grow as exp(be) or as exp(qe^2) and we calculate the system entropy in these cases. In their 'modern' version, our results rely on new quantities, which we introduce and call the S and B 'modapprox' density operators, which, we claim, will, with high probability, give a close approximation to the reduced density operator for the system and energy bath when the total state of system plus energy bath is a random pure state with energy in a narrow range. In Part 2 we clarify the meaning of these modapprox density operators and give arguments for our claim. The prime examples of non-small thermal systems are quantum black holes. Here and in two companion papers, we argue that current string-theoretic derivations of black hole entropy and thermal properties are incomplete and, on the question of information loss, inconclusive. However, we argue that these deficiencies are remedied with a modified scenario which relies on the modern strand of our methods and results here and is based on our previous 'matter-gravity entanglement hypothesis'.

  5. HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-01-01

    HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

  6. Thermal and Electrical Transport in Oxide Heterostructures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravichandran, Jayakanth

    2011-01-01

    of thermal conductivity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4.4 Thermal transport in2.3.2 Thermal transport . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  7. Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutberg, Michael; Hastbacka, Mildred; Cooperman, Alissa; Bouza, Antonio

    2013-06-05

    The article discusses thermal energy storage technologies. This article addresses benefits of TES at both the building site and the electricity generation source. The energy savings and market potential of thermal energy store are reviewed as well.

  8. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    phonon transmission and interface thermal conductance acrossF. Miao, et al. , "Superior Thermal Conductivity of Single-Advanced Materials for Thermal Management of Electronic

  9. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    time-varying solar energy inputs and thermal or powerthermal energy becomes apparent with the development of solar

  10. Thermal neutron detection system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

  11. Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreno, G.

    2014-11-01

    This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

  12. SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edwards, Lloyd A. [Leading Solutions, LLC.; Paresol, Bernard [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR.

    2014-09-01

    This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report “SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report”, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

  13. EPR investigation of defects in Bi12GeO20:Cr single crystal irradiated by high energy uranium ions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefaniuk, I; Rogalska, I; Wróbel, D

    2013-01-01

    The results of investigations of EPR spectra of chromium doped $Bi_{12} GeO_{20} (BGO)$ single crystals are presented. The crystals were studied before and after irradiation by the $^{235}U$ ions with energy 9.47 MeV/u and fluency $5 \\cdot 10^{2} cm^{-2}$. The effect of heating irradiated samples in air on the EPR spectra is also studied.

  14. Phase change thermal energy storage material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

    1987-01-01

    A thermal energy storge composition is disclosed. The composition comprises a non-chloride hydrate having a phase change transition temperature in the range of 70.degree.-95.degree. F. and a latent heat of transformation of at least about 35 calories/gram.

  15. On Axion Thermalization in the Early Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eduard Masso; Francesc Rota; Gabriel Zsembinszki

    2002-05-24

    We reanalyze the conditions under which we have a primordial thermal population of axions. Compared with previous studies, we find other processes, involving gluons and quarks, that dominate at high temperatures. We conclude that if the Peccei-Quinn scale fulfills $F_a < 1.2 \\times 10^{12} \\GeV$ there is thermal axion production. In this case, a period in the early universe exists where axions interact with the QCD plasma and we point out that non-thermal axions produced before the end of this period will thermalize. This could lead to a reduction of the expected density of axions from string decay in models with $F_a < 1.2 \\times 10^{12} \\GeV$.

  16. Thermal Transport Measurement of Silicon-Germanium Nanowires 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gwak, Yunki

    2010-10-12

    Thermal properties of one dimensional nanostructures are of interest for thermoelectric energy conversion. Thermoelectric efficiency is related to non dimensional thermoelectric figure of merit, ZT=S^2 o T/k, where S ,o , k and T are Seebeck...

  17. Numerical simulations of supercell interactions with thermal boundaries 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kay, Michael Paul

    1999-01-01

    to examine the effects of the interaction of simulated supercede thunderstorms with thermal boundaries on storm morphology and low-level rotation. This study differs from previous supercede modeling studies that use homogeneous initial conditions. A non...

  18. Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ho, Tony

    2012-01-01

    such as nuclear, Concentrated Solar Power (CSP), and coal,energies, such as concentrated solar power (CSP) [165]. CSPand non- concentrated solar thermal, vapor power cycles

  19. Catalytic thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kulkarni, Anand A. (Orlando, FL); Campbell, Christian X. (Orlando, FL); Subramanian, Ramesh (Oviedo, FL)

    2009-06-02

    A catalyst element (30) for high temperature applications such as a gas turbine engine. The catalyst element includes a metal substrate such as a tube (32) having a layer of ceramic thermal barrier coating material (34) disposed on the substrate for thermally insulating the metal substrate from a high temperature fuel/air mixture. The ceramic thermal barrier coating material is formed of a crystal structure populated with base elements but with selected sites of the crystal structure being populated by substitute ions selected to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a higher rate than would the base compound without the ionic substitutions. Precious metal crystallites may be disposed within the crystal structure to allow the ceramic thermal barrier coating material to catalytically react the fuel-air mixture at a lower light-off temperature than would the ceramic thermal barrier coating material without the precious metal crystallites.

  20. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.-F.

    2011-01-01

    aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined abovean Aquifer Used for Hot Water Storage: Digital Simulation ofof Aquifer Systems for Cyclic Storage of Water," of the Fall

  1. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    sunshot DOEGO-102012-3669 * September 2012 MOTIVATION All thermal concentrating solar power (CSP) systems use solar tracking, which involves moving large mirror surfaces...

  2. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    pp. 67-73, 2003. [17] "Energy Requirements of Desalinationof solar collectors and thermal energy storage in solarapplications," Applied Energy, pp. 538-553, 2013. [20] P. G.

  3. Solar Thermal Powered Evaporators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moe, Christian Robert

    2015-01-01

    C. Y. Zhao, "A review of solar collectors and thermal energya Passive Flat-Plate Solar Collector," International Journalof Flat Plate Solar Collector Equipped with Rectangular Cell

  4. A miniature shock-activated thermal battery for munitions applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, R.A.; Kirby, D.L.; Reinhardt, F.W.

    1998-04-01

    The feasibility of a small, fast-rise thermal battery for non-spinning munitions applications was examined by studying the response of conventional thermal cells to impact (mechanical) energy to simulate a setback environment. This is an extension of earlier work that demonstrated that shock activation could be used to produce power from a conventional thermal-battery cell. The results of tests with both single and multiple cells are presented, along with data for a 5-cell miniature (5-mm diameter) thermal battery. The issues needing to be resolved before such a device can become a commercial reality are also discussed.

  5. The Hydrological Impact of Geoengineering in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tilmes, S.; Fasullo, John; Lamarque, J.-F.; Marsh, D.; Mills, Mike; Alterskjaer, Kari; Muri, Helene O.; Kristjansson, Jon E.; Boucher, Olivier; Schulz, M.; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Jones, A.; Haywood, J.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Moore, John; Bou Karam, Diana; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rasch, Philip J.; Singh, Balwinder; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Robock, Alan; Yang, Shuting; Watanabe, Shingo

    2013-10-14

    Abstract: The hydrologic impact of enhancing Earth’s albedo due to solar radiation management (SRM) is investigated using simulations from 12 models contributing to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). An artificial experiment is investigated, where global mean temperature is preserved at pre-industrial conditions, while atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are quadrupled. The associated reduction of downwelling surface solar radiation in a high CO2 environment leads to a reduction of global evaporation of 10% and 4% and precipitation of 6.1% and 6.3% over land and ocean, respectively. An initial reduction of latent heat flux at the surface is largely driven by reduced evapotranspiration over land with instantly increasing CO2 concentrations in both experiments. A warming surface associated with the transient adjustment in the 4xCO2 experiment further generates an increase of global precipitation, with considerable regional changes, such as a significant precipitation reduction of 7% for the North American summer monsoon. Reduced global precipitation persists in the geoengineered experiment where temperatures are stabilized, with considerable regional rainfall deficits. Precipitation reductions that are consistent in sign across models are identified in the geoengineered experiment over monsoonal land regions of East Asia (6%), North America (7%), South America (6%) and South Africa (5%). In contrast to the 4xCO2 experiment, where the frequency of months with heavy precipitation intensity is increased by over 50%, it is reduced by up to 20% in the geoengineering scenario . The reduction in heavy precipitation is more pronounced over land than over the ocean, and accompanies a stronger reduction in evaporation over land. For northern mid-latitudes, maximum precipitation reduction over land ranges from 1 to 16% for individual models. For 45-65°N, the frequency of median to high intensity precipitation in summer is strongly reduced. These changes in precipitation in both total amount and frequency of extremes, point to a considerable weakening of the hydrological cycle in a geoengineered world.

  6. Fast Thermal Simulation for Architecture Level Dynamic Thermal Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Sheldon X.-D.

    Fast Thermal Simulation for Architecture Level Dynamic Thermal Management Pu Liu, Zhenyu Qi, Hang temperature by dynamic thermal managements becomes necessary. This paper proposes a novel approach to the thermal analysis at chip architecture level for efficient dynamic thermal management. Our new approach

  7. Quantum thermal machines with single nonequilibrium environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno Leggio; Bruno Bellomo; Mauro Antezza

    2015-01-08

    We propose a scheme for a quantum thermal machine made by atoms interacting with a single non-equilibrium electromagnetic field. The field is produced by a simple configuration of macroscopic objects held at thermal equilibrium at different temperatures. We show that these machines can deliver all thermodynamic tasks (cooling, heating and population inversion), and this by establishing quantum coherence with the body on which they act. Remarkably, this system allows to reach efficiencies at maximum power very close to the Carnot limit, much more than in existing models. Our findings offer a new paradigm for efficient quantum energy flux management, and can be relevant for both experimental and technological purposes.

  8. A Thermal Infrared Video Benchmark for Visual Analysis The Mathworks Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Zheng

    for a comprehensive benchmark for a now popular non-visible range sensor, the thermal infrared camera. This passive sensor captures the infrared radiation emitted from the scene and its objects. Thermal imaging quantitative evaluations and comparisons of detection and tracking algorithms. A few of thermal infrared

  9. Fast Poisson Solvers for Thermal Analysis HAIFENG QIAN, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    Fast Poisson Solvers for Thermal Analysis HAIFENG QIAN, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center SACHIN S thermal analysis for a VLSI chip is crucial, both for sign-off reliability verification and for design together with its thermal mounts: this requires solving Poisson's equation on a non- rectangular 3D domain

  10. Dynamics of oscillating scalar field in thermal environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyohei Mukaida; Kazunori Nakayama

    2013-04-24

    There often appear coherently oscillating scalar fields in particle physics motivated cosmological scenarios, which may have rich phenomenological consequences. Scalar fields should somehow interact with background thermal bath in order to decay into radiation at an appropriate epoch, but introducing some couplings to the scalar field makes the dynamics complicated. We investigate in detail the dynamics of a coherently oscillating scalar field, which has renormalizable couplings to another field interacting with thermal background. The scalar field dynamics and its resultant abundance are significantly modified by taking account of following effects : (1) thermal correction to the effective potential, (2) dissipation effect on the scalar field in thermal bath, (3) non-perturbative particle production events and (4) formation of non-topological solitons. There appear many time scales depending on the scalar mass, amplitude, couplings and the background temperature, which make the efficiencies of these effects non-trivial.

  11. ICHNOFOSSILS OF THE PALEOGENE WILLWOOD FORMATION AND THE PALEOCENE-EOCENE THERMAL MAXIMUM (PETM): RESPONSE OF AN ANCIENT SOIL ECOSYSTEM TO TRANSIENT GLOBAL WARMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Jon Jay

    2007-12-17

    of the IchnoBioGeoScience (IBGS) Research Group—Aisha Al-Suwaidi, Kenny Bader, John Counts, Debra Jennings, David LaBoue, Kim Montague, and Emily Tremain—have been great friends and colleagues over the years. I especially thank Brian Platt, Julie Retrum... thin, tightly spaced menisci subparallel to the bounding packet. Menisci are non-pelleted and texturally homogeneous with each other and the surrounding matrix. AMB were constructed most likely by burrower bugs (Hemiptera: Cydnidae), cicada nymphs...

  12. Thermal protection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, G.A.; Elder, M.G.; Kemme, J.E.

    1984-03-20

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for thermally protecting sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components such as electronics to a heat sink such as ice.

  13. Thermal protection apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Elder, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus which thermally protects sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components to a heat sink such as ice.

  14. Thermal radiation Ron Zevenhoven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    .00032, similarly for 2·T = 0.7·2500 = 1750 µmK4 this gives f0-2 = 0.03392. Thus for 0.4 - 0.7 µm, f1-2 = 0Thermal radiation revisited Ron Zevenhoven Ĺbo Akademi University Thermal and Flow Engineering Laboratory / Värme- och strömningsteknik tel. 3223 ; ron.zevenhoven@abo.fi Process Engineering

  15. Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    LASP's mechanical analysts also lead mechanical verification testing including: random vibration, forceMechanical Engineering & Thermal Group The Mechanical Engineering (ME) & Thermal Group at LASP has, and ground- based mechanical systems. Instrument Design Building on decades of design experience that has

  16. Thermal treatment wall

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01

    A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

  17. Tunable thermal link

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Majumdar, Arunava; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2014-07-15

    Disclosed is a device whereby the thermal conductance of a multiwalled nanostructure such as a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) can be controllably and reversibly tuned by sliding one or more outer shells with respect to the inner core. As one example, the thermal conductance of an MWCNT dropped to 15% of the original value after extending the length of the MWCNT by 190 nm. The thermal conductivity returned when the tube was contracted. The device may comprise numbers of multiwalled nanotubes or other graphitic layers connected to a heat source and a heat drain and various means for tuning the overall thermal conductance for applications in structure heat management, heat flow in nanoscale or microscale devices and thermal logic devices.

  18. Solar thermal aircraft

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-09-18

    A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

  19. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01

    and Background Solar thermal energy collection is anThermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal PowerThermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power

  20. Boundary Creek thermal areas of Yellowstone National Park: II, thermal water analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, J.M. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA); Hutchinson, R.A.

    1980-09-01

    Water samples from 28 thermal springs, 2 non-thermal springs, and 2 creeks from the Boundary Creek Thermal Areas (BCTA) in the southwestern corner of Yellowstone National Park were analyzed to help establish a chemical water-quality base line prior to possible geothermal exploitation of the Island Park Geothermal Area (IPGA). The springs, situated at the southwestern end of the Madison Plateau, are the Yellowstone Park thermal waters nearest to the IPGA and might respond to geothermal exploitation in the IPGA. Water temperatures ranging from 50/sup 0/ to 90/sup 0/C and low Cl concentrations (< 110 mgL/sup -1/) characterize spring waters in the BCTA. They are chemically distinct from the major geysers and hot springs in Yellowstone Park. The Na-K-Ca and silica geothermometers are in general agreement, usually within 10/sup 0/C, and indicate reservoir temperatures of 150 to 170/sup 0/C.

  1. Method of operating a thermal engine powered by a chemical reaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ross, J.; Escher, C.

    1988-06-07

    The invention involves a novel method of increasing the efficiency of a thermal engine. Heat is generated by a non-linear chemical reaction of reactants, said heat being transferred to a thermal engine such as Rankine cycle power plant. The novel method includes externally perturbing one or more of the thermodynamic variables of said non-linear chemical reaction. 7 figs.

  2. Method of operating a thermal engine powered by a chemical reaction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ross, John (Stanford, CA); Escher, Claus (Nieder-Ronstadt, DE)

    1988-01-01

    The invention involves a novel method of increasing the efficiency of a thermal engine. Heat is generated by a non-linear chemical reaction of reactants, said heat being transferred to a thermal engine such as Rankine cycle power plant. The novel method includes externally perturbing one or more of the thermodynamic variables of said non-linear chemical reaction.

  3. Thermally-related safety issues associated with thermal batteries.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guidotti, Ronald Armand

    2006-06-01

    Thermal batteries can experience thermal runaway under certain usage conditions. This can lead to safety issues for personnel and cause damage to associated test equipment if the battery thermally self destructs. This report discusses a number of thermal and design related issues that can lead to catastrophic destruction of thermal batteries under certain conditions. Contributing factors are identified and mitigating actions are presented to minimize or prevent undesirable thermal runaway.

  4. Bernstein instability driven by thermal ring distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Peter H.; Hadi, Fazal; Qamar, Anisa

    2014-07-15

    The classic Bernstein waves may be intimately related to banded emissions detected in laboratory plasmas, terrestrial, and other planetary magnetospheres. However, the customary discussion of the Bernstein wave is based upon isotropic thermal velocity distribution function. In order to understand how such waves can be excited, one needs an emission mechanism, i.e., an instability. In non-relativistic collision-less plasmas, the only known Bernstein wave instability is that associated with a cold perpendicular velocity ring distribution function. However, cold ring distribution is highly idealized. The present Brief Communication generalizes the cold ring distribution model to include thermal spread, so that the Bernstein-ring instability is described by a more realistic electron distribution function, with which the stabilization by thermal spread associated with the ring distribution is demonstrated. The present findings imply that the excitation of Bernstein waves requires a sufficiently high perpendicular velocity gradient associated with the electron distribution function.

  5. Thermal Giant Gravitons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armas, Jay; Obers, Niels A; Orselli, Marta; Pedersen, Andreas Vigand

    2012-01-01

    We study the giant graviton solution as the AdS_5 X S^5 background is heated up to finite temperature. The analysis employs the thermal brane probe technique based on the blackfold approach. We focus mainly on the thermal giant graviton corresponding to a thermal D3-brane probe wrapped on an S^3 moving on the S^5 of the background at finite temperature. We find several interesting new effects, including that the thermal giant graviton has a minimal possible value for the angular momentum and correspondingly also a minimal possible radius of the S^3. We compute the free energy of the thermal giant graviton in the low temperature regime, which potentially could be compared to that of a thermal state on the gauge theory side. Moreover, we analyze the space of solutions and stability of the thermal giant graviton and find that, in parallel with the extremal case, there are two available solutions for a given temperature and angular momentum, one stable and one unstable. In order to write down the equations of mot...

  6. Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

  7. Optical properties of bismuth-doped SiO2- or GeO2-based glass core optical fibers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firstova, Elena G

    2015-01-01

    A detailed study of optical properties of bismuth-doped fibers based on SiO2 and GeO2 glasses containing no other dopants has been carried out. To provide important information about spectroscopic properties of IR bismuth-related active centers (BAC) the excitation-emission fluorescence spectra for a spectral region of 220-2000 nm have been measured. The obtained three-dimensional spectra have been presented for different host glass compositions: silicate, germanate, aluminosilicate and phosphosilicate. Energy-level configuration and main radiative transitions associated with BACs in GeO2 and SiO2 glasses have been revealed. Fluorescence lifetime analysis of the basic radiative transitions of BAC have been carried out. It has been shown that the energy-level schemes of BAC-Si and BAC-Ge (BAC associated with silicon and germanium, respectively) are similar, corresponding BAC-Ge energy levels lying 10-16% lower than those of BAC-Si. It has been determined that BAC-Si, BAC-Ge and BAC-Si, BAC-P can exist simultan...

  8. Thermally Polymerized Rylene Nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew, Trisha Lionel

    Rylene dyes functionalized with varying numbers of phenyl trifluorovinyl ether (TFVE) moieties were subjected to a thermal emulsion polymerization to yield shape-persistent, water-soluble chromophore nanoparticles. Perylene ...

  9. Thermal Insulation Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, T. F.

    1982-01-01

    Thermal insulation systems are receiving a high degree of attention in view of increasing energy cost. Industrial, commercial and residential energy users are all well aware of energy cost increases and great emphasis is being directed to energy...

  10. Contact thermal lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Aaron Jerome, 1979-

    2004-01-01

    Contact thermal lithography is a method for fabricating microscale patterns using heat transfer. In contrast to photolithography, where the minimum achievable feature size is proportional to the wavelength of light used ...

  11. A Note on Thermal Activation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel Boyanovsky; Richard Holman; Da-Shin Lee; Joăo P. Silva

    1994-03-10

    Thermal activation is mediated by field configurations that correspond to saddle points of the energy functional. The rate of probability flow along the unstable functional directions, i.e the activation rate, is usually obtained from the imaginary part of a suitable analytic continuation of the equilibrium free energy. In this note we provide a real-time, non-equilibrium interpretation of this imaginary part which is analogous to the real-time interpretation of the imaginary part of the one-loop effective potential in theories with symmetry breaking. We argue that in situations in which the system is strongly out of equilibrium the rate will be time dependent and illustrate this with an example.

  12. Thermal hydraulics development for CASL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowrie, Robert B

    2010-12-07

    This talk will describe the technical direction of the Thermal-Hydraulics (T-H) Project within the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) Department of Energy Innovation Hub. CASL is focused on developing a 'virtual reactor', that will simulate the physical processes that occur within a light-water reactor. These simulations will address several challenge problems, defined by laboratory, university, and industrial partners that make up CASL. CASL's T-H efforts are encompassed in two sub-projects: (1) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), (2) Interface Treatment Methods (ITM). The CFD subproject will develop non-proprietary, scalable, verified and validated macroscale CFD simulation tools. These tools typically require closures for their turbulence and boiling models, which will be provided by the ITM sub-project, via experiments and microscale (such as DNS) simulation results. The near-term milestones and longer term plans of these two sub-projects will be discussed.

  13. Photovoltaic-thermal collectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cox, III, Charles H. (Carlisle, MA)

    1984-04-24

    A photovoltaic-thermal solar cell including a semiconductor body having antireflective top and bottom surfaces and coated on each said surface with a patterned electrode covering less than 10% of the surface area. A thermal-absorbing surface is spaced apart from the bottom surface of the semiconductor and a heat-exchange fluid is passed between the bottom surface and the heat-absorbing surface.

  14. Thermal Resonance Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bao-Guo Dong

    2015-07-07

    We first show a possible mechanism to create a new type of nuclear fusion, thermal resonance fusion, i.e. low energy nuclear fusion with thermal resonance of light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium or tritium. The fusion of two light nuclei has to overcome the Coulomb barrier between these two nuclei to reach up to the interacting region of nuclear force. We found nuclear fusion could be realized with thermal vibrations of crystal lattice atoms coupling with light atoms at low energy by resonance to overcome this Coulomb barrier. Thermal resonances combining with tunnel effects can greatly enhance the probability of the deuterium fusion to the detectable level. Our low energy nuclear fusion mechanism research - thermal resonance fusion mechanism results demonstrate how these light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium, can be fused in the crystal of metal, such as Ni or alloy, with synthetic thermal vibrations and resonances at different modes and energies experimentally. The probability of tunnel effect at different resonance energy given by the WKB method is shown that indicates the thermal resonance fusion mode, especially combined with the tunnel effect, is possible and feasible. But the penetrating probability decreases very sharply when the input resonance energy decreases less than 3 keV, so for thermal resonance fusion, the key point is to increase the resonance peak or make the resonance sharp enough to the acceptable energy level by the suitable compound catalysts, and it is better to reach up more than 3 keV to make the penetrating probability larger than 10^{-10}.

  15. Thermal Resonance Fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dong, Bao-Guo

    2015-01-01

    We first show a possible mechanism to create a new type of nuclear fusion, thermal resonance fusion, i.e. low energy nuclear fusion with thermal resonance of light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium or tritium. The fusion of two light nuclei has to overcome the Coulomb barrier between these two nuclei to reach up to the interacting region of nuclear force. We found nuclear fusion could be realized with thermal vibrations of crystal lattice atoms coupling with light atoms at low energy by resonance to overcome this Coulomb barrier. Thermal resonances combining with tunnel effects can greatly enhance the probability of the deuterium fusion to the detectable level. Our low energy nuclear fusion mechanism research - thermal resonance fusion mechanism results demonstrate how these light nuclei or atoms, such as deuterium, can be fused in the crystal of metal, such as Ni or alloy, with synthetic thermal vibrations and resonances at different modes and energies experimentally. The probability of tunnel effect at dif...

  16. Geo-chemical and optical characterizations of suspended matter in European coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , generally, for the non- carbonatic inorganic matter (NCIM) because of the good correlation displayed are generally lacking in real data relative to the different coastal areas. Partic- ulate inorganic carbon (PIC

  17. This paper has been downloaded from the website of the Building and Environmental Thermal Systems Research Group at Oklahoma State University (http://www.hvac.okstate.edu).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -term and longer-term responses. The model labeled "GeoStar" is part of the GeoStar software package. (Cui, et al

  18. Thermal Lens Spectroscopy Mladen Franko

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Scott A.

    Thermal Lens Spectroscopy Mladen Franko Laboratory of Environmental Research, University of Nova-beam Instruments 5 3.3 Differential Thermal Lens Instruments 7 3.4 Multiwavelength and Tunable Thermal Lens Spectrometers 8 3.5 Circular Dichroism TLS Instruments 9 3.6 Miniaturization of Thermal Lens Instruments 9 4

  19. Center For Theoretical Geo/Cosmo Plasma Physics Dr. Tom Chang is internationally known for his contributions in space plasma physics,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    honors. He has an outstanding record at MIT including a top grade in the physics general examinationCenter For Theoretical Geo/Cosmo Plasma Physics Personnel Dr. Tom Chang is internationally known for his contributions in space plasma physics, condensed matter physics, complexity, and the theory

  20. 4 Cai: Extending Distributed GIS to Support Geo-Collaborative Crisis Management EExxtteennddiinngg DDiissttrriibbuutteedd GGIISS ttoo SSuuppppoorrtt GGeeoo--CCoollllaabboorraattiivvee CCrriissiiss MMaannaaggeemmeenntt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klippel, Alexander

    4 Cai: Extending Distributed GIS to Support Geo-Collaborative Crisis Management EExxtteennddiinngg. Towards the goal of making GIS "collaboration-friendly," this paper explores the potentials of extending distributed GIS with groupware and intelligent communication agents to support geocollaborative crisis

  1. Methods and results of a search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts using the GEO 600, LIGO, and Virgo detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aggarwal, Nancy

    In this paper we report on a search for short-duration gravitational wave bursts in the frequency range 64 Hz–1792 Hz associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), using data from GEO 600 and one of the LIGO or Virgo detectors. ...

  2. Tectonic subsidence and uplift history of UAE foreland basinGeoArabia, vol. 14, no. 2, 2009, p. 17-44 Gulf PetroLink, Bahrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali, Mohammed

    17 Tectonic subsidence and uplift history of UAE foreland basinGeoArabia, vol. 14, no. 2, 2009, p extension, and the flexural effects of ophiolite load emplacement. The tectonic subsidence and uplift for the general exponential decrease that is observed in the tectonic subsidence and uplift between 210 Ma and 95

  3. GeoSTAR A Microwave Sounder for Geostationary Bjorn Lambrigtsen (818-354-8932, lambrigtsen@jpl.nasa.gov), William Wilson, Alan Tanner, Todd Gaier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruf, Christopher

    GeoSTAR ­ A Microwave Sounder for Geostationary Satellites Bjorn Lambrigtsen (818 to microwave atmospheric sounding that is now under development. It has capabilities similar to sensors aperture system ­ this is the reason why it has until now not been possible to put a microwave sounder

  4. GeoChip 3.0 as a high-thoughput tool for analyzing microbial community composition, structure, and functional activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    He, Z.; Deng, Y.; Van Nostrand, J.D.; Tu, Q.; Xu, M.; Hemme, C.L.; Li, X.; Wu, L.; Gentry, T.J.; Yin, Y.; Liebich, J.; Hazen, T.C.; Zhou, J.

    2010-04-01

    A new generation of functional gene arrays (FGAs; GeoChip 3.0) has been developed, with {approx}28,000 probes covering approximately 57,000 gene variants from 292 functional gene families involved in carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur cycles, energy metabolism, antibiotic resistance, metal resistance and organic contaminant degradation. GeoChip 3.0 also has several other distinct features, such as a common oligo reference standard (CORS) for data normalization and comparison, a software package for data management and future updating and the gyrB gene for phylogenetic analysis. Computational evaluation of probe specificity indicated that all designed probes would have a high specificity to their corresponding targets. Experimental analysis with synthesized oligonucleotides and genomic DNAs showed that only 0.0036-0.025% false-positive rates were observed, suggesting that the designed probes are highly specific under the experimental conditions examined. In addition, GeoChip 3.0 was applied to analyze soil microbial communities in a multifactor grassland ecosystem in Minnesota, USA, which showed that the structure, composition and potential activity of soil microbial communities significantly changed with the plant species diversity. As expected, GeoChip 3.0 is a high-throughput powerful tool for studying microbial community functional structure, and linking microbial communities to ecosystem processes and functioning.

  5. Parameterization of meander-belt elements in high-resolution three-dimensional seismic data using the GeoTime cube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Vliet, Lucas J.

    the meander belt in the up- and downstream direction. High-resolution three-dimensional seismic (3D HRS) data caused by post-depositional processes. A method called GeoTime cube is presented that over- comes study of a fluvio-estuarine reservoir from Suriname demonstrates how fluvial point bars, channel fills

  6. A concept for marine shallow drilling Drill test from R/V Hkom Mosby in Nov. 1995 Commercial rig built by GeoDrilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoffersen, Yngve

    built by GeoDrilling BACKGROUND There is a quantum leap between the costs of marine operations usingA concept for marine shallow drilling Drill test from R/V Hĺkom Mosby in Nov. 1995 Commercial rig conventional sediment coring devices with or without piston for 10-15 m of core recovery and drilling from

  7. Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant- Residential and Non-Profit Weatherization Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant (TMLP) offers the 'House N Home' Thermal Rebate Program which provides financial incentives to residential and non-Profit customers for making buildings more...

  8. Article for thermal energy storage

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

    2000-06-27

    A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

  9. Thermal noise driven computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laszlo B. Kish

    2006-10-28

    The possibility of a new type of computing, where thermal noise is the information carrier and the clock in a computer, is studied. The information channel capacity and the lower limit of energy requirement/dissipation are studied in a simple digital system with zero threshold voltage, for the case of error probability close to 0.5, when the thermal noise is equal to or greater than the digital signal. In a simple hypothetical realization of a thermal noise driven gate, the lower limit of energy needed to generate the digital signal is 1.1*kT/bit. The arrangement has potentially improved energy efficiency and it is free of leakage current, crosstalk and ground plane electromagnetic interference problems. Disadvantage is the large number of redundancy elements needed for low-error operation.

  10. Thermal trim for luminaire

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel; Harrison, Robert; Jeswani, Anil

    2013-11-19

    A luminaire with a thermal pathway to reduce the junction temperature of the luminaire's light source, and methods for so doing, are disclosed. The luminaire includes a can, a light engine, and a trim, that define a substantially continuous thermal pathway from the light engine to a surrounding environment. The can defines a can cavity and includes a can end region. The light engine is within the can cavity and includes a light source and a heat sink, including a heat sink end region, coupled thereto. The trim is at least partially disposed within the can cavity and includes a first trim end region coupled to the heat sink end region and a second trim end region coupled to the can end region. Thermal interface material may be located between: the heat sink and the trim, the trim and the can, and/or the heat sink and the light source.

  11. Highly directional thermal emitter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  12. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamo, Roy (Columbus, IN); Kakwani, Ramesh M. (Columbus, IN); Valdmanis, Edgars (Columbus, IN); Woods, Melvins E. (Columbus, IN)

    1988-01-01

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m.degree. C. and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg.degree. C. with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

  13. Thermal ignition combustion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

    1988-04-19

    The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

  14. Cermet fuel thermal conductivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvis, John Mark

    1988-01-01

    VITA 36 37 40 40 40 40 44 45 47 48 LIST OF FIGURES Figure Unit cell for derivation of model Page Heat Conduction Solution 22 3 Fission Gas Release Model 26 4A Metal Matrix Thermal Conductivity 4B Ceramic Fuel Thermal Conductivity 5... is based on the simple heat conduction equation. It is assumed that there is a uniform distribution of fuel particles in a regular array. A unit cell consists of a cube of matrix material of side length L, containing a spherical fuel particle of radius, r...

  15. Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    "This fact sheet describes a scattering solar thermal concentrators project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by the Pennsylvania State University, is working to demonstrate a new, scattering-based approach to concentrating sunlight that aims to improve the overall performance and reliability of the collector field. The research team aims to show that scattering solar thermal collectors are capable of achieving optical performance equal to state-of-the-art parabolic trough systems, but with the added benefits of immunity to wind-load tracking error, more efficient land use, and utilization of stationary receivers."

  16. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01

    and Background Solar thermal energy collection is anCHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWERfor Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal

  17. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01

    ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,”Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal PowerThermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power

  18. Non-thermal X-ray Emission from Supernova Remnants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacco Vink

    2004-09-21

    Recent studies of narrow, X-ray synchrotron radiating filaments surrounding young supernova remnants indicate that magnetic fields strengths are relatively high, B ~ 0.1 mG, or even higher, and that diffusion is close to the Bohm limit. I illustrate this using Cas A as an example. Also older remnants such as RCW 86 appear to emit X-ray synchrotron radiation, but the emission is more diffuse, and not always confined to a region close to the shock front. I argue that for RCW 86 the magnetic field is likely to be low (B ~ 17 microGauss), and at the location where the shell emits X-ray synchrotron radiation the shock velocity is much higher than the average shock velocity of ~600 km/s.

  19. Modelling the non-thermal emission from galaxy clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Brunetti

    2002-08-03

    We discuss the relevant processes for the relativistic electrons in the ICM and the possible mechanisms responsible for the production of these electrons. We focus on the origin of the radio halos giving some of the observational diagnostics which may help in discriminating among the different models proposed so far. Finally, we briefly discuss the discrepancy between the value of the magnetic field assuming an inverse Compton (IC) origin of the hard X-ray emission (HXR) and that obtained from Faraday Rotation Measurements (RM).

  20. Thermal contact resistance in a non-ideal joint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roca, Richard T.

    1971-01-01

    The contact conductance at an interface can be determined by knowing the material and surface properties and the interfacial pressure distribution. This pressure distribution can be influenced strongly by the roughness of ...

  1. Low thermal distortion extreme-UV lithography reticle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gianoulakis, Steven E. (Albuquerque, NM); Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA)

    2001-01-01

    Thermal distortion of reticles or masks can be significantly reduced by emissivity engineering, i.e., the selective placement or omission of coatings on the reticle. Reflective reticles so fabricated exhibit enhanced heat transfer thereby reducing the level of thermal distortion and ultimately improving the quality of the transcription of the reticle pattern onto the wafer. Reflective reticles include a substrate having an active region that defines the mask pattern and non-active region(s) that are characterized by a surface that has a higher emissivity than that of the active region. The non-active regions are not coated with the radiation reflective material.

  2. Low thermal distortion extreme-UV lithography reticle

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gianoulakis, Steven E. (Albuquerque, NM); Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Thermal distortion of reticles or masks can be significantly reduced by emissivity engineering, i.e., the selective placement or omission of coatings on the reticle. Reflective reticles so fabricated exhibit enhanced heat transfer thereby reducing the level of thermal distortion and ultimately improving the quality of the transcription of the reticle pattern onto the wafer. Reflective reticles include a substrate having an active region that defines the mask pattern and non-active region(s) that are characterized by a surface that has a higher emissivity than that of the active region. The non-active regions are not coated with the radiation reflective material.

  3. Low thermal distortion Extreme-UV lithography reticle and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gianoulakis, Steven E. (Albuquerque, NM); Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    Thermal distortion of reticles or masks can be significantly reduced by emissivity engineering, i.e., the selective placement or omission of coatings on the reticle. Reflective reticles so fabricated exhibit enhanced heat transfer thereby reducing the level of thermal distortion and ultimately improving the quality of the transcription of the reticle pattern onto the wafer. Reflective reticles include a substrate having an active region that defines the mask pattern and non-active region(s) that are characterized by a surface that has a higher emissivity than that of the active region. The non-active regions are not coated with the radiation reflective material.

  4. Thermal Reactor Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

  5. Solar thermal financing guidebook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, T.A.; Cole, R.J.; Brown, D.R.; Dirks, J.A.; Edelhertz, H.; Holmlund, I.; Malhotra, S.; Smith, S.A.; Sommers, P.; Willke, T.L.

    1983-05-01

    This guidebook contains information on alternative financing methods that could be used to develop solar thermal systems. The financing arrangements discussed include several lease alternatives, joint venture financing, R and D partnerships, industrial revenue bonds, and ordinary sales. In many situations, alternative financing arrangements can significantly enhance the economic attractiveness of solar thermal investments by providing a means to efficiently allocate elements of risk, return on investment, required capital investment, and tax benefits. A net present value approach is an appropriate method that can be used to investigate the economic attractiveness of alternative financing methods. Although other methods are applicable, the net present value approach has advantages of accounting for the time value of money, yielding a single valued solution to the financial analysis, focusing attention on the opportunity cost of capital, and being a commonly understood concept that is relatively simple to apply. A personal computer model for quickly assessing the present value of investments in solar thermal plants with alternative financing methods is presented in this guidebook. General types of financing arrangements that may be desirable for an individual can be chosen based on an assessment of his goals in investing in solar thermal systems and knowledge of the individual's tax situation. Once general financing arrangements have been selected, a screening analysis can quickly determine if the solar investment is worthy of detailed study.

  6. Thermal barrier coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

    2001-01-01

    A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

  7. Application of Advanced Laser and Optical Diagnostics Towards Non-Thermochemical Equilibrium Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Andrea G.

    2010-07-14

    The Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative (MURI) research at Texas A and M University is concerned with the experimental characterization of non-thermal and non-chemical equilibrium systems in hypersonic (Mach greater than 5) flowfields...

  8. Thermal Profiling of Residential Energy Use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert, A; Rajagopal, R

    2015-03-01

    This work describes a methodology for informing targeted demand-response (DR) and marketing programs that focus on the temperature-sensitive part of residential electricity demand. Our methodology uses data that is becoming readily available at utility companies-hourly energy consumption readings collected from "smart" electricity meters, as well as hourly temperature readings. To decompose individual consumption into a thermal-sensitive part and a base load (non-thermally-sensitive), we propose a model of temperature response that is based on thermal regimes, i.e., unobserved decisions of consumers to use their heating or cooling appliances. We use this model to extract useful benchmarks that compose thermal profiles of individual users, i.e., terse characterizations of the statistics of these users' temperature-sensitive consumption. We present example profiles generated using our model on real consumers, and show its performance on a large sample of residential users. This knowledge may, in turn, inform the DR program by allowing scarce operational and marketing budgets to be spent on the right users-those whose influencing will yield highest energy reductions-at the right time. We show that such segmentation and targeting of users may offer savings exceeding 100% of a random strategy.

  9. The Bulk Channel in Thermal Gauge Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harvey B. Meyer

    2010-02-17

    We investigate the thermal correlator of the trace of the energy-momentum tensor in the SU(3) Yang-Mills theory. Our goal is to constrain the spectral function in that channel, whose low-frequency part determines the bulk viscosity. We focus on the thermal modification of the spectral function, $\\rho(\\omega,T)-\\rho(\\omega,0)$. Using the operator-product expansion we give the high-frequency behavior of this difference in terms of thermodynamic potentials. We take into account the presence of an exact delta function located at the origin, which had been missed in previous analyses. We then combine the bulk sum rule and a Monte-Carlo evaluation of the Euclidean correlator to determine the intervals of frequency where the spectral density is enhanced or depleted by thermal effects. We find evidence that the thermal spectral density is non-zero for frequencies below the scalar glueball mass $m$ and is significantly depleted for $m\\lesssim\\omega\\lesssim 3m$.

  10. Giant Thermal Rectification from Polyethylene Nanofiber Thermal Diodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Teng

    2015-01-01

    The realization of phononic computing is held hostage by the lack of high performance thermal devices. Here we show through theoretical analysis and molecular dynamics simulations that unprecedented thermal rectification factors (as large as 1.20) can be achieved utilizing the phase dependent thermal conductivity of polyethylene nanofibers. More importantly, such high thermal rectifications only need very small temperature differences (< 20 oC) across the device, which is a significant advantage over other thermal diodes which need temperature biases on the order of the operating temperature. Taking this into consideration, we show that the dimensionless temperature-scaled rectification factors of the polymer nanofiber diodes range from 12 to 25 - much larger than other thermal diodes (< 8). The polymer nanofiber thermal diode consists of a crystalline portion whose thermal conductivity is highly phase-sensitive and a cross-linked portion which has a stable phase. Nanoscale size effect can be utilized t...

  11. Thermal Degradation Studies of Polyurethane/POSS Nanohybrid Elastomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewicki, J P; Pielichowski, K; TremblotDeLaCroix, P; Janowski, B; Todd, D; Liggat, J J

    2010-03-05

    Reported here is the synthesis of a series of Polyurethane/POSS nanohybrid elastomers, the characterization of their thermal stability and degradation behavior at elevated temperatures using a combination of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Thermal Volatilization Analysis (TVA). A series of PU elastomers systems have been formulated incorporating varying levels of 1,2-propanediol-heptaisobutyl-POSS (PHIPOSS) as a chain extender unit, replacing butane diol. The bulk thermal stability of the nanohybrid systems has been characterized using TGA. Results indicate that covalent incorporation of POSS into the PU elastomer network increase the non-oxidative thermal stability of the systems. TVA analysis of the thermal degradation of the POSS/PU hybrid elastomers have demonstrated that the hybrid systems are indeed more thermally stable when compared to the unmodified PU matrix; evolving significantly reduced levels of volatile degradation products and exhibiting a {approx}30 C increase in onset degradation temperature. Furthermore, characterization of the distribution of degradation products from both unmodified and hybrid systems indicate that the inclusion of POSS in the PU network is directly influencing the degradation pathways of both the soft and hard block components of the elastomers: The POSS/PU hybrid systems show reduced levels of CO, CO2, water and increased levels of THF as products of thermal degradation.

  12. Thermal Modeling of Lundell Alternators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tang, Sai Chun

    Thermal analysis of Lundell alternators used in automobiles is presented. An analytical thermal model for Lundell alternators is proposed, and procedures for acquiring the model parameters are elucidated. Based on the ...

  13. Thermal dilepton rates from quenched lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. -T. Ding; A. Francis; O. Kaczmarek; F. Karsch; E. Laermann; S. Mukherjee; M. Müller; W. Soeldner

    2013-01-30

    We present new lattice results on the continuum extrapolation of the vector current correlation function. Lattice calculations have been carried out in the deconfined phase at a temperature of 1.1 Tc, extending our previous results at 1.45 Tc, utilizing quenched non-perturbatively clover-improved Wilson fermions and light quark masses. A systematic analysis on multiple lattice spacings allows to perform the continuum limit of the correlation function and to extract spectral properties in the continuum limit. Our current analysis suggests the results for the electrical conductivity are proportional to the temperature and the thermal dilepton rates in the quark gluon plasma are comparable for both temperatures. Preliminary results of the continuum extrapolated correlation function at finite momenta, which relates to thermal photon rates, are also presented.

  14. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

  15. Harvesting nanoscale thermal radiation using pyroelectric materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Jin; Frederich, Hugo; Pilon, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    the other hand, energy transfer by thermal radiation betweenit was shown that energy transfer by thermal radi- ationpyroelectric energy conversion and nanoscale thermal

  16. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01

    1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

  17. Evolving opportunities for providing thermal comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brager, Gail; Zhang, Hui; Arens, Edward

    2015-01-01

    control in offices for thermal comfort and energy savings.ANSI/ASHRAE 55-2013: Thermal environmental conditions forA global database of thermal comfort field experiments.

  18. Thermal Conductivity of Polycrystalline Semiconductors and Ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhaojie

    2012-01-01

    35, (3-6), Dames, C. ; Chen, G. , Thermal Conductivity ofProperties of Matter: Thermal conductivity: nonmetallicSociety), Dames, C. ; Chen, G. , Thermal Conductivity of

  19. Thermal Conduction in Graphene and Graphene Multilayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghosh, Suchismita

    2009-01-01

    1 1.2 Thermal transport atxv Introduction xii 1.1 Thermal conductivity and65 4.13 Thermal conductivity of graphene as a function of

  20. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Energy can be saved and thermal pollution reduced if a totalnatural flow, and thermal pollution caused by simultaneousStored Heat Energy and Thermal Pollution Daily stored heat

  1. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01

    Reduction of air and thermal pollution are additionalsubsidence or upliftu thermal pollution, water chemistry,or ponds to avoid thermal pollution. Because periods of heat

  2. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    the possibility of thermal stratification, i.e. the tendencyratio is very large. Thermal stratification A simple model (ef- fects of thermal stratification. This ideal- ized model

  3. Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Motor Thermal Control Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management...

  4. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01

    the prob- lem of seasonal storage of thermal energy (Matheyto study seasonal storage of thermal energy: winter storagewithin the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program managed

  5. AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    2012-01-01

    High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

  6. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak Ridgefor Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of the DOE-

  7. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Scale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solarsolar captors, thermal effluents, low cost energy duringSeale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar

  8. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

  9. Liquid metal thermal electric converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01

    A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

  10. ,{ MO. REV. NO. THERMAL DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    ,{ MO. REV. NO. LRRR 300 THERMAL DESIGN FINAL REPORT ATM-931 PAGE i OF iv DATE 1 S Dec 1970 The results of thermal design/analyses performed on the 300 corner Laser Ranging Retro-Reflector (LRRR 300 performance profiles are contained herein, The entire LRRR thermal design effort is des- cribed commendng

  11. Cavitation and thermal photon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jitesh R. Bhatt; Hiranmaya Mishra; V. Sreekanth

    2010-11-08

    We investigate the thermal photon production-rates using one dimensional boost-invariant second order relativistic hydrodynamics to find proper time evolution of the energy density and the temperature. The effect of bulk-viscosity and non-ideal equation of state are taken into account in a manner consistent with recent lattice QCD estimates. It is shown that the \\textit{non-ideal} gas equation of state i.e $\\epsilon-3 P \

  12. Thermal synthesis apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-08-18

    An apparatus for thermal conversion of one or more reactants to desired end products includes an insulated reactor chamber having a high temperature heater such as a plasma torch at its inlet end and, optionally, a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. In a thermal conversion method, reactants are injected upstream from the reactor chamber and thoroughly mixed with the plasma stream before entering the reactor chamber. The reactor chamber has a reaction zone that is maintained at a substantially uniform temperature. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle, which "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage, or is discharged through an outlet pipe without the convergent-divergent nozzle. The desired end products are then separated from the gaseous stream.

  13. Thermally stable diamond brazing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Radtke, Robert P. (Kingwood, TX)

    2009-02-10

    A cutting element and a method for forming a cutting element is described and shown. The cutting element includes a substrate, a TSP diamond layer, a metal interlayer between the substrate and the diamond layer, and a braze joint securing the diamond layer to the substrate. The thickness of the metal interlayer is determined according to a formula. The formula takes into account the thickness and modulus of elasticity of the metal interlayer and the thickness of the TSP diamond. This prevents the use of a too thin or too thick metal interlayer. A metal interlayer that is too thin is not capable of absorbing enough energy to prevent the TSP diamond from fracturing. A metal interlayer that is too thick may allow the TSP diamond to fracture by reason of bending stress. A coating may be provided between the TSP diamond layer and the metal interlayer. This coating serves as a thermal barrier and to control residual thermal stress.

  14. NON-METALLIC MATE!UALS LIST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    LIST INDEX CLASSIFICATION OF NON-METALLIC MATERIAL ADHESIVES ELASTOMERS ELECTRICAL INSULATION FINISHES MOLDING POTTING COMPOUNDS, SEALANTS, ENCAPSULANTS WIRE & CABLE, INSULATED, & COAXIAL MISCELLANEOUS lti AND THERMAL COMPONENTS- A. D. LITTLE GRAVlMETER SENSOR - LACOSTE lc ROMBERG SEISMIC PROFILE EXPER. -BENDIX

  15. Thermal reactor safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

  16. Thermally actuated thermionic switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

    1982-09-30

    A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

  17. Methods of forming thermal management systems and thermal management methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

    2012-06-05

    A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

  18. Thermal and non-thermal emission from reconnecting twisted coronal loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinto, R; Browning, P K; Vilmer, N

    2015-01-01

    Twisted magnetic fields should be ubiquitous in the solar corona. The magnetic energy contained in such twisted fields can be released during solar flares and other explosive phenomena. Reconnection in helical magnetic coronal loops results in plasma heating and particle acceleration distributed within a large volume, including the lower coronal and chromospheric sections of the loops, and can be a viable alternative to the standard flare model, where particles are accelerated only in a small volume located in the upper corona. The goal of this study is to investigate the observational signatures of plasma heating and particle acceleration in kink-unstable twisted coronal loops using combination of MHD simulations and test-particle methods. The simulations describe the development of kink instability and magnetic reconnection in twisted coronal loops using resistive compressible MHD, and incorporate atmospheric stratification and large-scale loop curvature. The resulting distributions of hot plasma let us est...

  19. Thermal and non-thermal production of dark matter via Z'-portal(s)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chu, Xiaoyong; Mambrini, Yann; Quevillon, Jérémie; Zaldívar, Bryan E-mail: yann.mambrini@th.u-psud.fr E-mail: b.zaldivar.m@csic.es

    2014-01-01

    We study the genesis of dark matter in the primordial Universe for representative classes of Z'-portals models. For weak-scale Z' mediators we compute the range of values of the kinetic mixing allowed by WMAP/PLANCK experiments corresponding to a FIMP regime. We show that very small values of ? (10{sup ?12}?

  20. Thermal recovery from a fractured medium in local thermal non-equilibrium Rachel Geleta,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics August 3, 2012 hal-00919449,version1-16Dec2013 Author manuscript, published in "International Journal for Numerical and Analytical Methods in Geomechanics 37, 15

  1. AN OBSERVED CORRELATION BETWEEN THERMAL AND NON-THERMAL EMISSION IN

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

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  2. Multiscale thermal transport.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graham, Samuel Jr. (; .); Wong, C. C.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

    2004-02-01

    A concurrent computational and experimental investigation of thermal transport is performed with the goal of improving understanding of, and predictive capability for, thermal transport in microdevices. The computational component involves Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport. In these simulations, all acoustic modes are included and their properties are drawn from a realistic dispersion relation. Phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering events are treated independently. A new set of phonon-phonon scattering coefficients are proposed that reflect the elimination of assumptions present in earlier analytical work from the simulation. The experimental component involves steady-state measurement of thermal conductivity on silicon films as thin as 340nm at a range of temperatures. Agreement between the experiment and simulation on single-crystal silicon thin films is excellent, Agreement for polycrystalline films is promising, but significant work remains to be done before predictions can be made confidently. Knowledge gained from these efforts was used to construct improved semiclassical models with the goal of representing microscale effects in existing macroscale codes in a computationally efficient manner.

  3. Thermal control structure and garment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Klett, James W. (Knoxville, TN); Cameron, Christopher Stan (Sanford, NC)

    2012-03-13

    A flexible thermally conductive structure. The structure generally includes a plurality of thermally conductive yarns, at least some of which are at least partially disposed adjacent to an elastomeric material. Typically, at least a portion of the plurality of thermally conductive yarns is configured as a sheet. The yarns may be constructed from graphite, metal, or similar materials. The elastomeric material may be formed from urethane or silicone foam that is at least partially collapsed, or from a similar material. A thermal management garment is provided, the garment incorporating a flexible thermally conductive structure.

  4. Thermal fluctuations of free standing graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. L. Braghin; N. Hasselmann

    2010-06-22

    We use non-perturbative renormalization group techniques to calculate the momentum dependence of thermal fluctuations of graphene, based on a self-consistent calculation of the momentum dependent elastic constants of a tethered membrane. We find a sharp crossover from the perturbative to the anomalous regime, in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo results for graphene, and give an accurate value for the crossover scale. Our work strongly supports the notion that graphene is well described as a tethered membrane. Ripples emerge naturally from our analysis.

  5. Real-Time Task Scheduling under Thermal Constraints 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Youngwoo

    2010-10-12

    periodic tasks and non-real-time, but latency-sensitive, aperiodic jobs. We first introduce the Transient Overclocking Server, which safely reduces the response time of aperiodic jobs in the presence of hard real-time periodic tasks and thermal constraints...

  6. The effective pyroelectric and thermal expansion coefficients of ferroelectric ceramics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiangyu

    The effective pyroelectric and thermal expansion coefficients of ferroelectric ceramics JiangYu Li ceramics in terms of their microstructural information. The overall behaviors of ferroelectric ceramics be induced in an originally isotropic, thus non-pyroelectric ceramic composed of randomly oriented

  7. Thermal and Magnetic Quantum Discord in Heisenberg models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Werlang; Gustavo Rigolin

    2010-04-01

    We investigate how the quantum correlations (quantum discord) of a two-qubit one dimensional XYZ Heisenberg chain in thermal equilibrium depends on the temperature (T) of the bath and also on an external magnetic field B. We show that the behavior of the thermal quantum discord (QD) differs in many unexpected ways from the thermal entanglement. For example, we show situations where QD increases with T when entanglement decreases, cases where QD increases with T even in regions with zero entanglement, and that QD signals a quantum phase transition even at finite T. We also show that by properly tuning B or the interaction between the qubits we get non-zero QD for any T and we present a new effect not seen for entanglement, the regrowth of thermal QD.

  8. Mathematical model of testing of pipeline integrity by thermal fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaganova, Nataliia

    2014-11-18

    Thermal fields testing at the ground surface above a pipeline are considered. One method to obtain and investigate an ideal thermal field in different environments is a direct numerical simulation of heat transfer processes taking into account the most important physical factors. In the paper a mathematical model of heat propagation from an underground source is described with accounting of physical factors such as filtration of water in soil and solar radiation. Thermal processes are considered in 3D origin where the heat source is a pipeline with constant temperature and non-uniform isolated shell (with 'damages'). This problem leads to solution of heat diffusivity equation with nonlinear boundary conditions. Approaches to analysis of thermal fields are considered to detect damages.

  9. Thermal and Optical Characterization of Photonic Integrated Circuits by Thermoreflectance Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hudgings, Janice A.

    We report high resolution, non-invasive, thermal and optical characterization of semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) and SOA-based photonic integrated circuits (PICs) using thermoreflectance microscopy. Chip-scale ...

  10. Making Record-efficiency SnS Solar Cells by Thermal Evaporation and Atomic Layer Deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaramillo, Rafael

    Tin sulfide (SnS) is a candidate absorber material for Earth-abundant, non-toxic solar cells. SnS offers easy phase control and rapid growth by congruent thermal evaporation, and it absorbs visible light strongly. However, ...

  11. Thermal management systems and methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

    2006-12-12

    A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

  12. Cyanophycin Mediates the Accumulation and Storage of Fixed Carbon in Non-Heterocystous Filamentous Cyanobacteria from Coniform Mats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Biqing

    Thin, filamentous, non-heterocystous, benthic cyanobacteria (Subsection III) from some marine, lacustrine and thermal environments aggregate into macroscopic cones and conical stromatolites. We investigate the uptake and ...

  13. Molecular Rotation and Polarization under Thermal Gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpha A Lee

    2015-10-21

    Recent molecular dynamics simulations show that a thermal gradient induces an electric field in water that is comparable to that seen in ionic thin films and biomembranes. This counterintuitive phenomena of thermo-orientation is also observed more generally in simulations of polar and non-polar size-assymetric dumbbell fluids. However, a microscopic theory for this novel non-equilibrium phenomenon is yet unknown. We develop a microscopic theory of thermo-orientation using a mean-field, local equilibrium approach. Our theory reveals analytically how thermo-orientation depends on the molecular volume, size anisotropy, and dipole moment. Predictions of the theory agree quantitatively with molecular dynamics simulations. Crucially, our framework shows how thermo-orientation can be controlled and maximised by tuning microscopic molecular properties.

  14. Molecular Rotation and Polarization under Thermal Gradients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Alpha A

    2015-01-01

    Recent molecular dynamics simulations show that a thermal gradient induces an electric field in water that is comparable to that seen in ionic thin films and biomembranes. This counterintuitive phenomena of thermo-orientation is also observed more generally in simulations of polar and non-polar size-assymetric dumbbell fluids. However, a microscopic theory for this novel non-equilibrium phenomenon is yet unknown. We develop a microscopic theory of thermo-orientation using a mean-field, local equilibrium approach. Our theory reveals analytically how thermo-orientation depends on the molecular volume, size anisotropy, and dipole moment. Predictions of the theory agree quantitatively with molecular dynamics simulations. Crucially, our framework shows how thermo-orientation can be controlled and maximised by tuning microscopic molecular properties.

  15. GEOS RR Lyr Survey: Blazhko Period Measurement of Three RRab Stars - CX Lyrae, NU Aurigae and VY Corona Borealis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Ponthiere, Pierre; Fumagalli, F; Hambsch, Franz-Josef; Krajci, Tom; Llapasset, J-M; Menzies, Kenneth; Nobile, Marco; Sabo, Richard

    2012-01-01

    We present the results of collaborative observations of three RR Lyrae stars (CX Lyr, NU Aur and VY CrB) which have a strong Blazhko effect. This work has been initiated and performed in the framework of the GEOS RR Lyr Survey (Groupe Europ\\'een d'Observations Stellaires). From the measured light curves, we have determined the times and the magnitudes at maximum. The times of maxima have been compared to ephemerides to obtain the (O-C) values and from a period analysis of these (O-C) values, the Blazhko period is derived. The Blazhko periods of NU Aur (114.8 days) and VY CrB (32.3 days) are reported here for the first time and a more accurate period for CX Lyr (68.3 days) has been obtained. The three stars are subject to strong Blazhko effect, but this effect has different characteristics for each of them. When we compare the variations of magnitude at maximum and variations of (O-C) values with respect to the Blazhko phase, these variations are either in phase, in opposition, or even in quadrature.

  16. Tuning Interfacial Thermal Conductance of Graphene Embedded in Soft Materials by Vacancy Defects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ying [Clemson University; Hu, Chongze [Clemson University; Huang, Jingsong [ORNL; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL; Qiao, Rui [Engineering Science and Mechanics Department, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA, USA

    2015-01-01

    Nanocomposites based on graphene dispersed in matrices of soft materials are promising thermal management materials. Their effective thermal conductivity depends on both the thermal conductivity of graphene and the conductance of the thermal transport across graphene-matrix interfaces. Here we report on molecular dynamics simulations of the thermal transport across the interfaces between defected graphene and soft materials in two different modes: in the across mode, heat enters graphene from one side of its basal plane and leaves through the other side; in the non-across mode, heat enters or leaves a graphene simultaneously from both sides of its basal plane. We show that, as the density of vacancy defects in graphene increases from 0 to 8%, the conductance of the interfacial thermal transport in the across mode increases from 160.4 16 to 207.8 11 MW/m2K, while that in the non-across mode increases from 7.2 0.1 to 17.8 0.6 MW/m2K. The molecular mechanisms for these variations of thermal conductance are clarified by using the phonon density of states and structural characteristics of defected graphenes. On the basis of these results and effective medium theory, we show that it is possible to enhance the effective thermal conductivity of thermal nanocomposites by tuning the density of vacancy defects in graphene despite the fact that graphene s thermal conductivity always decreases as vacancy defects are introduced.

  17. MULTISPECTRAL THERMAL IMAGER - OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. WEBER

    2001-03-01

    The Multispectral Thermal Imager satellite fills a new and important role in advancing the state of the art in remote sensing sciences. Initial results with the full calibration system operating indicate that the system was already close to achieving the very ambitious goals which we laid out in 1993, and we are confident of reaching all of these goals as we continue our research and improve our analyses. In addition to the DOE interests, the satellite is tasked about one-third of the time with requests from other users supporting research ranging from volcanology to atmospheric sciences.

  18. Response microcantilever thermal detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cunningham, Joseph P.; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panagiotis G.; Evans III, Boyd M.

    2004-10-19

    A "folded leg" thermal detector microcantilever constructed of a substrate with at least one leg interposed between a fixed end and a deflective end, each leg having at least three essentially parallel leg segments interconnected on alternate opposing ends and aligned in a serpentine pattern with only the first leg segment attached to the fixed end and only the last leg segment attached to the deflective end. Alternate leg segment are coated on the pentalever with coating applied to the top of the first, third, and fifth leg segments of each leg and to the bottom of the second and fourth leg segments of each leg.

  19. Thermal network reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    A method is presented for reducing the number of elements required in a thermal network representation of a building. The method is based on matching the actual building response at two frequencies, the diurnal response and 3-day response. The procedure provides a straightforward methodology for combining all the various materials inside a discrete building zone into a few nodes while retaining a high degree of accuracy in the dynamic response. An example is given showing a comparison between a large network and the reduced network.

  20. Thermal network reduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balcomb, J.D.

    1983-06-01

    A method is presented for reducing the number of elements required in a thermal network representation of a building. The method is based on matching the actual building response at two frequencies, the diurnal response and 3-day response. The procedure provides a straightforward methodology for combining all the various materials inside a discrete building zone into a few nodes while retaining a high degree of accuracy in the dynamic response. An example is given showing a comparison between a large network and the reduced network.

  1. Thermal indicator for wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

    1983-01-01

    Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

  2. Solid state thermal engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wayman, C.M.

    1981-01-27

    An improved solid state thermal engine utilizes as a drive member a braided belt fabricated from a memory alloy such as nickel-titanium and nickel-titanium ternary alloys, copper-zinc and copper-zinc ternary alloys, and the like. The braided belt is mounted on a set of pulleys to provide passage through a hot zone where the belt contracts and develops tension, and through a cold zone where it relaxes and stretches. Since more energy is delivered by contraction than is required for relaxation, positive work output results with an efficiency of between onefifth and one-third of the carnot cycle.

  3. Thermally Oxidized Silicon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr. JeffreyThermal Multi-layer4 Anneli Munkholm

  4. Frequency dependent thermal expansion in binary viscoelasticcomposites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, James G.

    2007-12-01

    The effective thermal expansion coefficient beta* of abinary viscoelastic composite is shown to be frequency dependent even ifthe thermal expansion coefficients beta A and beta B of both constituentsare themselves frequency independent. Exact calculations for binaryviscoelastic systems show that beta* is related to constituent valuesbeta A, beta B, volume fractions, and bulk moduli KA, KB, as well as tothe overall bulk modulus K* of the composite system. Then, beta* isdetermined for isotropic systems by first bounding (or measuring) K* andtherefore beta*. For anisotropic systems with hexagonal symmetry, theprincipal values of the thermal expansion beta*perp and beta*para can bedetermined exactly when the constituents form a layered system. In allthe examples studied, it is shown explicitly that the eigenvectors of thethermoviscoelastic system possess non-negative dissipation -- despite thecomplicated analytical behavior of the frequency dependent thermalexpansivities themselves. Methods presented have a variety ofapplications from fluid-fluid mixtures to fluid-solid suspensions, andfrom fluid-saturated porous media to viscoelastic solid-solidcomposites.

  5. Electric Vehicle Battery Thermal Issues and Thermal Management Techniques (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rugh, J. P.; Pesaran, A.; Smith, K.

    2013-07-01

    This presentation examines the issues concerning thermal management in electric drive vehicles and management techniques for improving the life of a Li-ion battery in an EDV.

  6. Solar thermal power system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Charles L.

    2010-06-15

    A solar thermal power generator includes an inclined elongated boiler tube positioned in the focus of a solar concentrator for generating steam from water. The boiler tube is connected at one end to receive water from a pressure vessel as well as connected at an opposite end to return steam back to the vessel in a fluidic circuit arrangement that stores energy in the form of heated water in the pressure vessel. An expander, condenser, and reservoir are also connected in series to respectively produce work using the steam passed either directly (above a water line in the vessel) or indirectly (below a water line in the vessel) through the pressure vessel, condense the expanded steam, and collect the condensed water. The reservoir also supplies the collected water back to the pressure vessel at the end of a diurnal cycle when the vessel is sufficiently depressurized, so that the system is reset to repeat the cycle the following day. The circuital arrangement of the boiler tube and the pressure vessel operates to dampen flow instabilities in the boiler tube, damp out the effects of solar transients, and provide thermal energy storage which enables time shifting of power generation to better align with the higher demand for energy during peak energy usage periods.

  7. Characterization and modeling of thermal diffusion and aggregation in nanofluids.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Goodson, Kenneth E.

    2010-05-01

    Fluids with higher thermal conductivities are sought for fluidic cooling systems in applications including microprocessors and high-power lasers. By adding high thermal conductivity nanoscale metal and metal oxide particles to a fluid the thermal conductivity of the fluid is enhanced. While particle aggregates play a central role in recent models for the thermal conductivity of nanofluids, the effect of particle diffusion in a temperature field on the aggregation and transport has yet to be studied in depth. The present work separates the effects of particle aggregation and diffusion using parallel plate experiments, infrared microscopy, light scattering, Monte Carlo simulations, and rate equations for particle and heat transport in a well dispersed nanofluid. Experimental data show non-uniform temporal increases in thermal conductivity above effective medium theory and can be well described through simulation of the combination of particle aggregation and diffusion. The simulation shows large concentration distributions due to thermal diffusion causing variations in aggregation, thermal conductivity and viscosity. Static light scattering shows aggregates form more quickly at higher concentrations and temperatures, which explains the increased enhancement with temperature reported by other research groups. The permanent aggregates in the nanofluid are found to have a fractal dimension of 2.4 and the aggregate formations that grow over time are found to have a fractal dimension of 1.8, which is consistent with diffusion limited aggregation. Calculations show as aggregates grow the viscosity increases at a faster rate than thermal conductivity making the highly aggregated nanofluids unfavorable, especially at the low fractal dimension of 1.8. An optimum nanoparticle diameter for these particular fluid properties is calculated to be 130 nm to optimize the fluid stability by reducing settling, thermal diffusion and aggregation.

  8. Thermal amplification of field-correlation harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eric G. Brown

    2014-01-08

    We study the harvesting of quantum and classical correlations from a hot scalar field in a periodic cavity by a pair of spatially separated oscillator-detectors. Specifically, we utilize non-perturbative and exact (non-numerical) techniques to solve for the evolution of the detectors-field system and then we examine how the entanglement, Gaussian quantum discord, and mutual information obtained by the detectors change with the temperature of the field. While (as expected) the harvested entanglement rapidly decays to zero as temperature is increased, we find remarkably that both the mutual information and the discord can actually be increased by multiple orders of magnitude via increasing the temperature. We go on to explain this phenomenon by taking advantage of the translational invariance of the field and use this to make accurate predictions of the behavior of thermal amplification; by this we also introduce a new perspective on field-correlation harvesting that we feel is worthy of consideration in its own right. The thermal amplification of discord harvesting represents an exciting prospect for discord-based quantum computation, including its use in entanglement activation.

  9. Thermal Flipping of Interstellar Grains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph C. Weingartner

    2008-08-27

    In interstellar dust grains, internal processes dissipate rotational kinetic energy. The dissipation is accompanied by thermal fluctuations, which transfer energy from the vibrational modes to rotation. Together, these processes are known as internal relaxation. For the past several years, internal relaxation has been thought to give rise to thermal flipping, with profound consequences for grain alignment theory. I show that thermal flipping is not possible in the limit that the inertia tensor does not vary with time.

  10. Thermal desorption for passive dosimeter 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Wen-Chen

    1981-01-01

    recovery of styrene and improved precision when compared with thermal desorption. In addition, thermal desorption tended to breakdown sty- rene, which is vulnerable to heat. The breakdown product may interfere with the analysis results if thermal desorp... of the activation processes. (12, 1&) The first step in the production of activated carbon is carbonization, which is the formation of a char from a source material. The source materials may be coconut shells, peach pits, sawdust, wood char, etc ~ Carbonization...

  11. Thermal Management of Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

    2013-01-01

    cell. The solar cell’s power conversion efficiency, ? is theEfficiency ..5 Thermal Managements of SolarTemperature on Efficiency Photons incident on a solar cell

  12. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  13. Overview of solar thermal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    The solar-thermal overview section of the Renewable Energy Technology Characterizations describes the technical and economic status of this emerging renewable energy option for electricity supply.

  14. Underfloor air distribution: thermal stratification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Webster, T.; Bauman, Fred; Reese, J.

    2002-01-01

    Air Distribution: Thermal Stratification By Tom Webster, Pthermal bypassing of convective loads that occurs above the stratificationthermal plumes that develop over heat sources in the room. A stratification

  15. Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Regnier, Cindy

    2014-01-01

    including cost, energy and thermal comfort analysis, whichfor greatest energy benefits, prioritize thermal comfortMinimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort Cindy

  16. Evaluating thermal environments by using a thermal manikin with controlled skin surface temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanabe, S.; Arens, Edward A; Bauman, Fred; Zhang, H.; Madsen, T.

    1994-01-01

    betweenhumans their thermal and environment. WinslowandErgonomics of the thermal environment--Estimation of theSymposium on Man-Thermal Environment System, Tokyo. Olesen,

  17. Thermal Properties of Graphene and Applications for Thermal Management of High-Power Density Electronics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Raman Spectroscopy and Thermal Properties of Graphenegraphite heat spreaders for thermal management of high-powerthe Raman spectroscopy and thermal properties of a novel

  18. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01

    well a molten salt thermal storage system could be utilizedof Solar Two [2] Thermal storage in these plants is anper kilowatt goes towards thermal storage[3]. Considering a

  19. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardin, Corey Lee

    2011-01-01

    Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A ThesisStorage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants by Coreysystems for concentrated solar thermal power (CSP) systems.

  20. Thermally stabilized heliostat

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Alfred J. (Littleton, CO)

    1983-01-01

    An improvement in a heliostat having a main support structure and pivoting and tilting motors and gears and a mirror module for reflecting solar energy onto a collector, the improvement being characterized by an internal support structure within each mirror module and front and back sheets attached to the internal support structure, the front and back sheets having the same coefficient of thermal expansion such that no curvature is induced by temperature change, and a layer of adhesive adhering the mirror to the front sheet. The adhesive is water repellent and has adequate set strength to support the mirror but has sufficient shear tolerance to permit the differential expansion of the mirror and the front sheet without inducing stresses or currature effect. The adhesive also serves to dampen fluttering of the mirror and to protect the mirror backside against the adverse effects of weather. Also disclosed are specific details of the preferred embodiment.

  1. Thermal barrier coatings

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

    2010-06-22

    This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

  2. On the thermal expansion of composite materials and cross-property connection between thermal expansion and thermal conductivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sevostianov, Igor

    On the thermal expansion of composite materials and cross-property connection between thermal expansion and thermal conductivity Igor Sevostianov Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, New: Composite material Thermal expansion Cross-property Microstructure Thermal conductivity a b s t r a c

  3. Random free fermions: An analytical example of eigenstate thermalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magan, Javier M

    2015-01-01

    Having analytical instances of the Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis (ETH) is of obvious interest, both for fundamental and applied reasons. This is generically a hard task, due to the belief that non-linear interactions are basic ingredients of the thermalization mechanism. In this article we proof that random gaussian free fermions satisfy ETH in the multiparticle sector, by analytically computing the correlations and entanglement entropies of the theory. With the explicit construction at hand, we finally comment on the differences between fully random Hamiltonians and random Gaussian systems, and on the connection between chaotic energy spectra and ETH.

  4. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. 40, 43984403, doi:10.1002/grl.50796, 2013 Influence of entrainment on the thermal stratification in simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Gorman, Paul

    of entrainment on the thermal stratification in simulations of radiative-convective equilibrium Martin S. Singh1 in CAPE implies a systematic deviation of the thermal stratification from moist adiabatic that is non entrainment plays a role in determining the thermal stratification of the tropical atmo- sphere. Citation

  5. THERMAL ANALYSIS OF GEOLOGIC HIGH-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hensel, S.; Lee, S.

    2010-04-20

    The engineering design of disposal of the high level waste (HLW) packages in a geologic repository requires a thermal analysis to provide the temperature history of the packages. Calculated temperatures are used to demonstrate compliance with criteria for waste acceptance into the geologic disposal gallery system and as input to assess the transient thermal characteristics of the vitrified HLW Package. The objective of the work was to evaluate the thermal performance of the supercontainer containing the vitrified HLW in a non-backfilled and unventilated underground disposal gallery. In order to achieve the objective, transient computational models for a geologic vitrified HLW package were developed by using a computational fluid dynamics method, and calculations for the HLW disposal gallery of the current Belgian geological repository reference design were performed. An initial two-dimensional model was used to conduct some parametric sensitivity studies to better understand the geologic system's thermal response. The effect of heat decay, number of co-disposed supercontainers, domain size, humidity, thermal conductivity and thermal emissivity were studied. Later, a more accurate three-dimensional model was developed by considering the conduction-convection cooling mechanism coupled with radiation, and the effect of the number of supercontainers (3, 4 and 8) was studied in more detail, as well as a bounding case with zero heat flux at both ends. The modeling methodology and results of the sensitivity studies will be presented.

  6. Nonlocal probes of thermalization in holographic quenches with spectral methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Buchel; Robert C. Myers; Anton van Niekerk

    2015-04-22

    We describe the application of pseudo-spectral methods to problems of holographic thermal quenches of relevant couplings in strongly coupled gauge theories. We focus on quenches of a fermionic mass term in a strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma, and the subsequent equilibration of the system. From the dual gravitational perspective, we study the gravitational collapse of a massive scalar field in asymptotically anti-de Sitter geometry with a prescribed boundary condition for its non-normalizable mode. Access to the full background geometry of the gravitational collapse allows for the study of nonlocal probes of the thermalization process. We discuss the evolution of the apparent and the event horizons, the two-point correlation functions of operators of large conformal dimensions, and the evolution of the entanglement entropy of the system. We compare the thermalization process from the viewpoint of local (the one-point) correlation functions and these nonlocal probes, finding that the thermalization time as measured by the probes is length dependent, and approaches the thermalization time of the one-point function for longer probes. We further discuss how the different energy scales of the problem contribute to its thermalization.

  7. Thermal Evolution of Strange Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou Xia; Wang Lingzhi; Zhou Aizhi

    2007-09-03

    We investigated the thermal evolution of rotating strange stars with the deconfinement heating due to magnetic braking. We consider the stars consisting of either normal quark matter or color-flavor-locked phase. Combining deconfinement heating with magnetic field decay, we find that the thermal evolution curves are identical to pulsar data.

  8. Thermal entanglement of bosonic modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Asoudeh

    2006-07-21

    We study the change of entanglement under general linear transformation of modes in a bosonic system and determine the conditions under which entanglement can be generated under such transformation. As an example we consider the thermal entanglement between the vibrational modes of two coupled oscillators and determine the temperature above which quantum correlations are destroyed by thermal fluctuations.

  9. Peg supported thermal insulation panel

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

    1985-04-30

    A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprises high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 2 figs.

  10. LMFBR thermal-striping evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brunings, J.E.

    1982-10-01

    Thermal striping is defined as the fluctuating temperature field that is imposed on a structure when fluid streams at different temperatures mix in the vicinity of the structure surface. Because of the uncertainty in structural damage in LMFBR structures subject to thermal striping, EPRI has funded an effort for the Rockwell International Energy Systems Group to evaluate this problem. This interim report presents the following information: (1) a Thermal Striping Program Plan which identifies areas of analytic and experimental needs and presents a program of specific tasks to define damage experienced by ordinary materials of construction and to evaluate conservatism in the existing approach; (2) a description of the Thermal Striping Test Facility and its operation; and (3) results from the preliminary phase of testing to characterize the fluid environment to be applied in subsequent thermal striping damage experiments.

  11. 303:20130618.1036 Thermal Engineering Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    303:20130618.1036 Thermal Engineering Group LASP's Thermal Engineering Group is involved in all of the component, as well as on-orbit trending and operations planning. Design Experience The Thermal Engineering Systems Engineering The group has formulated general thermal design and thermal interface requirements

  12. Ultrasound-Stimulated Acoustic Emission in Thermal Image-Guided HIFU Therapy: A Phantom Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jiang, C. P.; Lin, W. T. [Biomedical Engineering Center, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Chen, W. S. [Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, National Taiwan University Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan (China)

    2006-05-08

    Magnetic resonance image (MRI) is a promising monitoring tool for non-invasive real-time thermal guidance in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) during thermal ablation surgery. However, this approach has two main drawbacks: 1) majority of components need to be redesigned to be MR compatible in order to avoid effecting MR images, and 2) the cost of operating MRI facilities is high. Alternately, ultrasound-stimulated acoustic emission (USAE) method has been applied for detecting thermal variations in tissues. An optical transparent phantom, made from polyacrylamide, containing thermal sensitive indicator protein (Bovine Serum Albumin), was prepared for observing the HIFU-induced denaturalization. A thermal-couple was set up for validation of temperature distribution. Experimental results show that thermal image can be captured clearly under stationary conditions.

  13. Grain-Boundary Grooving of Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trice, Rodney W.

    Grain-Boundary Grooving of Plasma-Sprayed Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Thermal Barrier Coatings as t0 -ZrO2.8,9 Non-transform- able zirconia is a non-equilibrium phase as the concentration of yttrium cations in the zirconia lattice is greater than the con- centration predicted by the ZrO2­Y2O3 phase

  14. Thermal to electricity conversion using thermal magnetic properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    West, Phillip B [Idaho Falls, ID; Svoboda, John [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-04-27

    A system for the generation of Electricity from Thermal Energy using the thermal magnetic properties of a Ferromagnetic, Electrically Conductive Material (FECM) in one or more Magnetic Fields. A FECM is exposed to one or more Magnetic Fields. Thermal Energy is applied to a portion of the FECM heating the FECM above its Curie Point. The FECM, now partially paramagnetic, moves under the force of the one or more Magnetic Fields. The movement of the FECM induces an electrical current through the FECM, generating Electricity.

  15. Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Thermal...

  16. Solar Thermal Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biesinger, K.; Cuppett, D.; Dyer, D.

    2012-01-30

    HVAC Retrofit and Energy Efficiency Upgrades at Clark High School, Las Vegas, Nevada The overall objectives of this project are to increase usage of alternative/renewable fuels, create a better and more reliable learning environment for the students, and reduce energy costs. Utilizing the grant resources and local bond revenues, the District proposes to reduce electricity consumption by installing within the existing limited space, one principal energy efficient 100 ton adsorption chiller working in concert with two 500 ton electric chillers. The main heating source will be primarily from low nitrogen oxide (NOX), high efficiency natural gas fired boilers. With the use of this type of chiller, the electric power and cost requirements will be greatly reduced. To provide cooling to the information technology centers and equipment rooms of the school during off-peak hours, the District will install water source heat pumps. In another measure to reduce the cooling requirements at Clark High School, the District will replace single pane glass and metal panels with â??Kalwallâ?? building panels. An added feature of the â??Kalwallâ?ť system is that it will allow for natural day lighting in the student center. This system will significantly reduce thermal heat/cooling loss and control solar heat gain, thus delivering significant savings in heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) costs.

  17. Microelectromechanical (MEM) thermal actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Ernest J. (Albuquerque, NM); Fulcher, Clay W. G. (Sandia Park, NM)

    2012-07-31

    Microelectromechanical (MEM) buckling beam thermal actuators are disclosed wherein the buckling direction of a beam is constrained to a desired direction of actuation, which can be in-plane or out-of-plane with respect to a support substrate. The actuators comprise as-fabricated, linear beams of uniform cross section supported above the substrate by supports which rigidly attach a beam to the substrate. The beams can be heated by methods including the passage of an electrical current through them. The buckling direction of an initially straight beam upon heating and expansion is controlled by incorporating one or more directional constraints attached to the substrate and proximal to the mid-point of the beam. In the event that the beam initially buckles in an undesired direction, deformation of the beam induced by contact with a directional constraint generates an opposing force to re-direct the buckling beam into the desired direction. The displacement and force generated by the movement of the buckling beam can be harnessed to perform useful work, such as closing contacts in an electrical switch.

  18. Thermal energy storage apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thoma, P.E.

    1980-04-22

    A thermal energy storage apparatus and method employs a container formed of soda lime glass and having a smooth, defectfree inner wall. The container is filled substantially with a material that can be supercooled to a temperature greater than 5* F., such as ethylene carbonate, benzophenone, phenyl sulfoxide, di-2-pyridyl ketone, phenyl ether, diphenylmethane, ethylene trithiocarbonate, diphenyl carbonate, diphenylamine, 2benzoylpyridine, 3-benzoylpyridine, 4-benzoylpyridine, 4methylbenzophenone, 4-bromobenzophenone, phenyl salicylate, diphenylcyclopropenone, benzyl sulfoxide, 4-methoxy-4prmethylbenzophenone, n-benzoylpiperidine, 3,3pr,4,4pr,5 pentamethoxybenzophenone, 4,4'-bis-(Dimethylamino)-benzophenone, diphenylboron bromide, benzalphthalide, benzophenone oxime, azobenzene. A nucleating means such as a seed crystal, a cold finger or pointed member is movable into the supercoolable material. A heating element heats the supercoolable material above the melting temperature to store heat. The material is then allowed to cool to a supercooled temperature below the melting temperature, but above the natural, spontaneous nucleating temperature. The liquid in each container is selectively initiated into nucleation to release the heat of fusion. The heat may be transferred directly or through a heat exchange unit within the material.

  19. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    the arrival Stored Heat Energy and Thermal Pollution DailyAn Answer to Energy Conservation and Thermal validity of ourWells for Conserving Energy and Reducing Thermal Pollution,"

  20. THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Resources Res. 14: 273-280. THERMAL STORAGE OF COLD WATER INR.C. HARE, 1972. Thermal Storage for Eco-Energy Utilities,W.J. MASICA, 1977. "Thermal Storage for Electric Utilities,"