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1

Green Energy Ohio - GEO Solar Thermal Rebate Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ohio - GEO Solar Thermal Rebate Program Ohio - GEO Solar Thermal Rebate Program Green Energy Ohio - GEO Solar Thermal Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Program Info Start Date 04/01/2009 State Ohio Program Type Non-Profit Rebate Program Provider Green Energy Ohio With funding from The Sierra Club, Green Energy Ohio (GEO) is offering rebates on residential properties in Ohio for solar water heating systems purchased after April 1, 2009. The rebates are based on the projected energy output from the solar collectors and are calculated at $30 per kBtu/day (based on SRCC rating for "Clear Day/C Interval"). The maximum amount is $2,400 per applicant. There are two parts to the application. PART I of the application collects

2

Non-thermal Plasma Chemistry Non-thermal Thermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

automotive industry optics biomedical technology environmental technology Plasma Technology Quote from: Pla-thermal Plasma Chemical Flow Reactor #12;Werner von Siemens ,, ... construction of an apparatus generation (1857) pollution control volatile organic components, NOx reforming, ... radiation sources excimer

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

3

Non-thermal radio astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This presentation starts with Karl Jansky’s discovery of cosmic radio emission in 1933 and notes the striking similarities to Hess’s discovery of cosmic-rays in 1912. At first it was assumed that this radio emission was thermal but in 1939 Grote Reber discovered that it was stronger at longer wavelengths, requiring a non-thermal emission process. These discoveries had a revolutionary impact on astronomy and radio astronomy was born. The interpretation of this non-thermal radiation as synchrotron emission from high energy particles in the interstellar medium did not occur until the late 1940s but then it provided the link between radio astronomy and cosmic-ray research. Ginzburg, in particular, saw that cosmic-ray astrophysics was now possible using radio waves to trace sources of cosmic-rays. We discuss the discovery of extragalactic active galactic nuclei leading to the discovery of quasars and the first evidence for black holes in the nuclei of galaxies. We summarise the present status and future of some of the main radio telescopes used to image the non-thermal emission from external galaxies. Finally, we include a short description of the use of radio signals for the direct detection of cosmic-rays and UHE neutrinos.

R.D. Ekers

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of non-thermal energy to hot flare plasma.

Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

5

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same m...

Saint-Hilaire, P; Saint-Hilaire, Pascal; Benz, Arnold O.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Geo-neutrinos: recent developments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiogenic heating is a key component of the energy balance and thermal evolution of the Earth. It contributes to mantle convection, plate tectonics, volcanoes, and mountain building. Geo-neutrino observations estimate the present radiogenic power of our planet. This estimate depends on the quantity and distribution of heat-producing elements in various Earth reservoirs. Of particular geological importance is radiogenic heating in the mantle. This quantity informs the origin and thermal evolution of our planet. Here we present: currently reported geo-neutrino observations; estimates of the mantle geo-neutrino signal, mantle radiogenic heating, and mantle cooling; a comparison of chemical Earth model predictions of the mantle geo-neutrino signal and mantle radiogenic heating; a brief discussion of radiogenic heating in the core, including calculations of geo-neutrino signals per pW/kg; and finally a discussion of observational strategy.

Dye, Steve

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Kinetics of Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kinetics of Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasmas Alexander Fridman · Microdischarge Interaction and Structuring in Dielectric Barrier Discharges · Kinetics of Blood Coagulation in Plasma · Surface Wound wire Area of DBD plasma region: ~104cm2 #12;7 Microdischarge Patterning (2D) R22 R23 R24 R26 R27 R28

Kaganovich, Igor

8

Minorities and air quality non-attainment areas: A preliminary geo-demographic analysis  

SciTech Connect

A major section of the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) focuses on reducing air pollution through extending and modifying the provisions for states and localities with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)-designated non-attainment areas. Specifically, Title 1 of the CAAA is concerned with non-attainment areas, as defined relative to the National Ambient Air Quality Standards for atmospheric ozone, carbon monoxide, and particulate matter; Title 2 is concerned with mobile sources or air pollution, which produce carbon monoxide, contribute to ozone concentrations, and in the past have been a major source of airborne lead; and Title 4 is concerned with acid deposition, mainly due to sulfur dioxide emissions. This paper has its origin in the question of the potential benefits for minorities--relative to the majority non-Black, non-Hispanic population--of reductions in air pollution that may result from these amendments. It is part of a larger effort to identify and assess the costs and benefits of the CAAA for minorities, relative to the majority population. The focus of this paper centers on comparing Black and Hispanic populations to White, non-Hispanic populations living in EPA-designated non-attainment area counties in the contiguous United States, which excludes Alaska and Hawaii. Subsequent comparisons of majority populations with Native Americans and Asian-Americans will include these two states.

Wernette, D.; Nieves, L.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Applications of Non Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma in Medicine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma is now being developed for use in ... a lot of clinical applications of non-thermal plasma have been tested and the results show promising potential for Plasma Medicine. In...

S. Kalghatgi; D. Dobrynin; G. Fridman…

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Ceramics in non-thermal plasma discharge for hydrogen generation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recent interest in hydrogen as an energy source has resulted in development of new technologies such as non-thermal plasma processing of natural gas. We report… (more)

Vintila, Ramona Roxana

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Thermal recovery from a fractured medium in local thermal non-equilibrium Rachel Geleta,b,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

effective stress is tensile near the injection well, illustrating the thermal contraction of the rock, whileThermal recovery from a fractured medium in local thermal non-equilibrium Rachel Geleta, Australia Abstract Thermal recovery from a hot dry rock reservoir viewed as a deformable fractured medium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

12

Multiple Non-Thermal Reaction Steps for the Photooxidation CO...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Non-Thermal Reaction Steps for the Photooxidation CO to CO2 on Reduced TiO2(110). Multiple Non-Thermal Reaction Steps for the Photooxidation CO to CO2 on Reduced TiO2(110)....

13

Geo-neutrinos and the Radioactive Power of the Earth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chemical and physical Earth models agree little as to the radioactive power of the planet. Each predicts a range of radioactive powers, overlapping slightly with the other at about 24 TW, and together spanning 14-46 TW. Approximately 20 % of this radioactive power (3-8 TW) escapes to space in the form of geo-neutrinos. The remaining 11-38 TW heats the planet with significant geo-dynamical consequences, appearing as the radiogenic component of the 43-49 TW surface heat flow. The non-radiogenic component of the surface heat flow (5-38 TW) is presumably primordial, a legacy of the formation and early evolution of the planet. A constraining measurement of radiogenic heating provides insights to the thermal history of the Earth and potentially discriminates chemical and physical Earth models. Radiogenic heating in the planet primarily springs from unstable nuclides of uranium, thorium, and potassium. The paths to their stable daughter nuclides include nuclear beta decays, producing geo-neutrinos. Large sub-surface detectors efficiently record the energy but not the direction of the infrequent interactions of the highest energy geo-neutrinos, originating only from uranium and thorium. The measured energy spectrum of the interactions estimates the relative amounts of these heat-producing elements, while the intensity estimates planetary radiogenic power. Recent geo-neutrino observations in Japan and Italy find consistent values of radiogenic heating. The combined result mildly excludes the lowest model values of radiogenic heating and, assuming whole mantle convection, identifies primordial heat loss. Future observations have the potential to measure radiogenic heating with better precision, further constraining geological models and the thermal evolution of the Earth.

Steve Dye

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

14

Non-thermal Aftertreatment of Particulates  

SciTech Connect

Modern diesel passenger vehicles employing common rail, high speed direct injection engines are capable of matching the drivability of gasoline powered vehicles with the additional benefit of providing high torque at low engine speed [1]. The diesel engine also offers considerable fuel economy and CO2 emissions advantages. However, future emissions standards [2,3] present a significant challenge for the diesel engine, as its lean exhaust precludes the use of aftertreatment strategies employing 3- way catalytic converters, which operate under stoichiometric conditions. In recent years significant developments by diesel engine manufacturers have greatly reduced emissions of both particulates (PM) and oxides of nitrogen (NOx) [4,5]. However to achieve compliance with future legislative limits it has been suggested that an integrated approach involving a combination of engine modifications and aftertreatment technology [1] will be required. A relatively new approach to exhaust aftertreatment is the application of non-thermal plasma (NTP) or plasma catalyst hybrid systems. These have the potential for treatment of both NOx and PM emissions [6- 8]. The primary focus of recent plasma aftertreatment studies [9-12] has concentrated on the removal of NOx. It has been shown that by combining plasmas with catalysts it is possible to chemically reduce NOx. The most common approach is to use a 2- stage system relying upon the plasma oxidation of hydrocarbons to promote NO to NO2 conversion as a precursor to NO2 reduction over a catalyst. However, relatively little work has yet been published on the oxidation of PM by plasma [ 8,13]. Previous investigations [8] have reported that a suitably designed NTP reactor containing a packing material designed to filter and retain PM can effect the oxidation of PM in diesel exhausts at low temperatures. It has been suggested that the retained PM competes with hydrocarbons for O, and possibly OH, radicals. This is an important consideration in plasma - catalyst hybrid schemes for the removal of NOx employing an NO2 selective catalyst, as the oxidation of PM may deplete the key radicals necessary for NO to NO2 conversion. It was also suggested that where simultaneous NOx and PM removal are required, alternative catalyst formulations may be needed which may be selective to NO rather than NO2.

Thomas, S.E.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

15

Dental Applications of Atmospheric-Pressure Non-Thermal Plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This chapter presents a summary of selected recent research efforts devoted to the use of low-temperature (or non-thermal) atmospheric-pressure plasmas in various dental applications. Areas of application ... fun...

WeiDong Zhu; Kurt Becker; Jie Pan; Jue Zhang; Jing Fang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Syngas Production from Propane Using Atmospheric Non-thermal Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Propane steam reforming using a sliding discharge reactor was investigated under atmospheric pressure and low temperature (420 K). Non-thermal plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen was...2 con...

F. Ouni; A. Khacef; J. M. Cormier

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Direct Non-oxidative Methane Conversion by Non-thermal Plasma: Experimental Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The direct non-oxidative conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons in non-thermal plasma, namely dielectric barrier discharge and corona discharge, has been investigated experimentally at atmospheric pressure....

Yun Yang

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Non-thermal dielectric barrier discharge plasma induces angiogenesis through reactive oxygen species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...treatment [56]. Non-thermal plasma devices, specifically...generated at atmospheric pressure in...58]. DBD plasma characteristics...distance [58]. Non-thermal DBD plasma...effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma on bacteria...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Non-Boussinesq effects in free thermal convection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-Boussinesq effects in a Rayleigh-Bénard convection system lead to a symmetry breaking between the top and the bottom boundary layers. We have found that the two layers adjust their temperature drops and the thicknesses ? such that their temperature scales ??/g??3 are equal, where ? is the thermal expansion coefficient, g is the gravitational acceleration, and ? and ? are the kinematic viscosity and thermal diffusivity, respectively.

Xiao-Zhong Wu and Albert Libchaber

1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

Development of Non?Tracking Solar Thermal Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aims of this research is to develop high temperature solar thermal collectors that do not require complex solar tracking devices to maintain optimal performance. The collector technology developed through these efforts uses non?imaging optics and is referred to as an external compound parabolic concentrator. It is able to operate with a solar thermal efficiency of approximately 50% at a temperature of 200?°?C and can be readily manufactured at a cost between $15 and $18 per square foot.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

GEO Imperial Valley activities  

SciTech Connect

Geothermal Resources International, Inc. (GEO) in San Mateo, California, and PacifiCorp Credit, a subsidiary of PacifiCorp in Portland, Oregon, announced that since July 1987, the company has raised about $21 million to fund the initial development of GEO's East Mesa project. GEO will use a portion of the funds to meet its commitment to share in the cost of a $50 million, 230-kilovolt transmission line. The line will carry electricity generated from geothermal power plants in the Imperial Valley to a Southern California Edison substation in Riverside County, California. In September 1987, two GEO geothermal wells at East Mesa were completed, and GEO was drilling its third and fourth wells in the field. Test data results from these wells will be analyzed to decide whether GEO will construct a dual-flash or binary power plant. GEO has the geothermal rights on about 300,000 acres in five western states. In addition to its operations and development projects in The Geysers and the Imperial Valley, the company is continuing exploration projects on the flanks of the Newberry Crater in Central Oregon and in Hokkaido, Japan. GEO also has an international geotechnical service group in the United Kingdom, GeoScience Ltd., which provides geotechnical services to clients around the world and to the company's geothermal operations.

Not Available

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Pressure Balance between Thermal and Non-Thermal Plasmas in the 3C129 Cluster  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With new Chandra observations of the cluster containing the two radio galaxies 3C129 and 3C129.1, we have made a fit to the X-ray surface brightness to obtain thermal pressures. VLA data at 1.4 GHz have been obtained to complement previous maps at 0.33 GHz and at 5 and 8 GHz. From these radio data, we are able to derive the minimum non-thermal pressure of various emitting volumes along the tail of 3C129 and in the lobes of 3C129.1. Under the assumption that the non-thermal plasma excludes significant thermal plasma, we may expect pressure balance for most features since ram pressure should be important only close to the cores of the galaxies. Since we find that the minimum non-thermal pressures are generally only a factor of a few below estimates of the ambient thermal pressure, we conclude that it is unlikely that relativistic protons contribute significantly to the total pressure. Reasonable contributions from low energy electrons and filling factors in the range 0.1 to 1 suffice to achieve pressure balance. Although we do not find strong signatures for the exclusion of hot gas from the radio structures, we find soft features near the cores of both galaxies suggestive of cool gas stripping and hard features associated with radio jets and possibly a leading bow shock.

D. E. Harris; H. Krawczynski

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

23

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power plants, solar thermal energy, geothermal energy, oceanpower plants, distributed solar thermal energy, geo/ocean-power plants [59]. Other LGH sources include solar thermal energy, geo-thermal energy, ocean

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Generalized Elastic Model: thermal vs non-thermal initial conditions. Universal scaling, roughening, ageing and ergodicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study correlation properties of the generalized elastic model which accounts for the dynamics of polymers, membranes, surfaces and fluctuating interfaces, among others. We develop a theoretical framework which leads to the emergence of universal scaling laws for systems starting from thermal (equilibrium) or non-thermal (non-equilibrium) initial conditions. Our analysis incorporates and broadens previous results such as observables' double scaling regimes, (super)roughening and anomalous diffusion, and furnishes a new scaling behavior for correlation functions at small times (long distances). We discuss ageing and ergodic properties of the generalized elastic model in non-equilibrium conditions, providing a comparison with the situation occurring in continuous time random walk. Our analysis also allows to assess which observable is able to distinguish whether the system is in or far from equilibrium conditions in an experimental set-up.

Taloni, Alessandro; Klafter, Joseph; 10.1209/0295-5075/97/30001

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Application of Atmospheric Non Thermal Plasma-Catalysis Hybrid System for Air Pollution Control: Toluene removal.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Application of Atmospheric Non Thermal Plasma-Catalysis Hybrid System for Air Pollution Control for these technologies. As an alternative to conventional VOCs abatement techniques, atmospheric non-thermal plasma (NTP rue d'Issoudun, BP 6744, 45067 Orléans Cedex 02, France. Keywords: Non thermal Plasma, Catalysis

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

26

Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef* and J. M and low temperature (420 K). Non-thermal plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen by increasing the gas fraction through the discharge. By improving the reactor design, the non-thermal plasma

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

27

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat source can be solar thermal energy, biological thermaland concentrated solar thermal energy farms. They demandsources include solar thermal energy, geo-thermal energy,

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Simbol-X capability of detecting the non-thermal emission of stellar flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the capability of detecting, with Simbol-X, non-thermal emission during stellar flares, and distinguishing it from hot thermal emission. We find that flare non-thermal emission is detectable when at least ~20 cts are detected with the CZT detector in the 20-80 keV band. Therefore Simbol-X will detect the non-thermal emission from some of the X-ray brightest nearby stars, whether the thermal vs. non-thermal relation, derived for solar flares, holds.

C. Argiroffi; G. Micela; A. Maggio

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

29

MERCURY OXIDIZATION IN NON-THERMAL PLASMA BARRIER DISCHARGE SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

In the past decade, the emission of toxic elements from human activities has become a matter of great public concern. Hg, As, Se and Cd typically volatilize during a combustion process and are not easily caught with conventional air pollution control techniques. In addition, there is no pollution prevention technique available now or likely be available in the foreseeable future that can prevent the emission of these trace elements. These trace elements pose additional scientific challenge as they are present at only ppb levels in large gas streams. Mercury, in particular, has attracted significant attention due to its high volatility, toxicity and potential threat to human health. In the present research work, a non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge technique has been used to oxidize Hg{sup 0}(g) to HgO. The basic premise of this approach is that Hg{sup 0} in vapor form cannot be easily removed in an absorption tower whereas HgO as a particulate is amiable to water scrubbing. The work presented in this report consists of three steps: (1) setting-up of an experimental apparatus to generate mercury vapors at a constant rate and modifying the existing non-thermal plasma reactor system, (2) solving the analytical challenge for measuring mercury vapor concentration at ppb level, and (3) conducting experiments on mercury oxidation under plasma conditions to establish proof of concept.

V.K. Mathur

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Oscillating Magnetic Trap and Non-Thermal Emission from Solar Flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......connected with the electron thermal conductivity and ion viscosity...1, ed. Galeev A. A., Sudan R. N. (North-Holland Physics...Oscillating Magnetic Trap and Non-Thermal Emission from Solar Flares...scattering of trapped non-thermal electrons (Aschwanden et al......

Yuri Tsap; Yulia Kopylova; Tatiana Goldvarg; Alexander Stepanov

2013-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

31

MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Design Replacement of silencer Slide serial no 23 ME2132 - DDO Non Thermal Plasma Unit Small scale - 110th Size l Procurement and Manufacture 110th Scale Plasma...

32

Gas Mileage of 1990 Vehicles by Geo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

90 Geo Vehicles 90 Geo Vehicles EPA MPG MODEL City Comb Hwy 1990 Geo Metro 3 cyl, 1.0 L, Automatic 3-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1990 Geo Metro 31 City 33 Combined 36 Highway 1990 Geo Metro 3 cyl, 1.0 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1990 Geo Metro View MPG Estimates Shared By Vehicle Owners 38 City 41 Combined 45 Highway 1990 Geo Metro LSI 3 cyl, 1.0 L, Automatic 3-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1990 Geo Metro LSI 31 City 33 Combined 35 Highway 1990 Geo Metro LSI 3 cyl, 1.0 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1990 Geo Metro LSI 38 City 40 Combined 44 Highway 1990 Geo Metro LSI Convertible 3 cyl, 1.0 L, Automatic 3-spd, Regular Gasoline Compare 1990 Geo Metro LSI Convertible 28 City 30 Combined 33 Highway 1990 Geo Metro LSI Convertible 3 cyl, 1.0 L, Manual 5-spd, Regular Gasoline

33

Note: Local thermal conductivities from boundary driven non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations  

SciTech Connect

We report non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of heat transport in models of molecular fluids. We show that the “local” thermal conductivities obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations agree within numerical accuracy with equilibrium Green-Kubo computations. Our results support the local equilibrium hypothesis for transport properties. We show how to use the local dependence of the thermal gradients to quantify the thermal conductivity of molecular fluids for a wide range of thermodynamic states using a single simulation.

Bresme, F., E-mail: f.bresme@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Chemical Physics Section, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Armstrong, J., E-mail: j.armstrong@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Chemical Physics Section, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

34

EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed 9: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington EA-1189: Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste, Richland, Washington SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to demonstrate the feasibility of commercial treatment of contact-handled low-level mixed waste to meet existing Federal and State regulatory standards for eventual land disposal at the U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations Office. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD September 29, 1998 EA-1189: Finding of No Significant Impact Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste September 29, 1998 EA-1189: Final Environmental Assessment Non-thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-level Mixed Waste

35

Non-thermal plasma enhanced heavy oil upgrading  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A process was proposed for upgrading heavy oil using non-thermal plasma technology in a conventional thermal cracking system under atmospheric pressure. Results from a comparison of the reactivity of a N2, H2 and CH4 plasma showed that the plasma can increase the trap oil yield significantly. The trap oil yield increased by ?9% when the N2 plasma was applied and showed a further increase of ?19% when the H2 or CH4 plasma was applied. A detailed study on the H2 plasma-enhanced upgrading process was carried out and the results showed that the trap oil yields of the plasma-on runs can be 8–33% higher than those of the plasma-off runs, depending on experimental conditions. Compared with the plasma-off runs, trap oil from the plasma-on runs had a higher (H/C)atomic but less heteroatoms (S and N). Over-balanced hydrogen in the products from plasma-on runs revealed the H2 plasma reactivity, which was further demonstrated by an increase in the substitution and condensation indices of trap oil from the plasma-on runs. Although thermal cracking was mainly involved whether the plasma was applied or not, the electrical field for generating the plasma and the generated plasma may assist with hydrocarbon bond cleavage. This was shown by the increased trap oil yield with the N2 plasma and the hydrogen and carbon residue distribution. Compared with the feedstock, more aromatic and ?-hydrogen (HA and H?, respectively) and less ?- and ?-hydrogen (H? and H?, respectively) were present in the residues, which agrees with the bond dissociation energy data. Similarly, the amounts of saturated (Cs) and alkyl (Cp) carbons in the residues were significantly lower than those in the feedstock while the amount of aromatic carbons (Ca) in the residues was higher than the feedstock. The changes in hydrogen and carbon distribution were more significant for the plasma-on runs. This implies that mainly side chain losses and bridged bond breakage are involved in the processes. This was demonstrated further by the molecular weight distribution. In general, the molecular weight of the residues was lower than that of the feedstock, especially for residues from the plasma-on runs. However, compared with the feedstock, the residues contained less saturated, aromatic and resin fractions but more asphaltene and toluene insoluble fractions. This implies that intra-molecular condensation was more significant than inter-molecular condensation, especially in the plasma-on runs. This should be attributed to the higher stabilization ability of the H2 plasma for fragments or radicals and gas (plasma) flow by which the fragments or radicals are separated rapidly.

Haigang Hao; Bao S. Wu; Jianli Yang; Qiang Guo; Yong Yang; Yong W. Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Development of non-premixed porous inserted regenerative thermal oxidizer  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this study, a porous inserted regenerative thermal oxidizer (PRTO) system was developed for a... x emissions and high radiant efficiency. Zirconium dioxide (ZrO2...) ceramic ...

Jun-chun Zhang; Le-ming Cheng; Cheng-hang Zheng…

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Non-Thermal Plasma System Development for CIDI Exhaust Aftertreatment  

SciTech Connect

There is a need for an efficient, durable technology to reduce NOx emissions from oxidative exhaust streams such as those produced by compression-ignition, direct injection (CIDI) diesel or lean-burn gasoline engines. A partnership formed between the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technology, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the USCAR Low Emission Technologies Research and Development Partnership is evaluating the effectiveness of a non-thermal plasma in conjunction with catalytic materials to mediate NOx and particulate emissions from diesel fueled light duty (CIDI) engines. Preliminary studies showed that plasma-catalyst systems could reduce up to 70% of NOx emissions at an equivalent cost of 3.5% of the input fuel in simulated diesel exhaust. These studies also showed that the type and concentration of hydrocarbon play a key role in both the plasma gas phase chemistry and the catalyst surface chemistry. More recently, plasma/catalyst systems have been evaluated for NOx reduction and particulate removal on a CIDI engine. Performance results for select plasma-catalyst systems for both simulated and actual CIDI exhaust will be presented. The effect of NOx and hydrocarbon concentration on plasma-catalyst performance will also be shown. SAE Paper SAE-2000-01-1601 {copyright} 2000 SAE International. This paper is published on this website with permission from SAE International. As a user of this website, you are permitted to view this paper on-line, download this pdf file and print one copy of this paper at no cost for your use only. The downloaded pdf file and printout of this SAE paper may not be copied, distributed or forwarded to others or for the use of others.

Balmer, M. Lou (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)); Tonkyn, Russell (Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories (BPNL)); Maupin, Gary; Yoon, Steven; Kolwaite, Ana (PNNL); Barlow, Stephen (BPNL); Domingo, Norberto; Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge National Laboratory); Hoard, John Wm. (Ford Research Laboratory); Howden, Ken (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Effect of a floating electrode on an atmospheric-pressure non-thermal arc discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Characteristics of the atmospheric non-thermal ac arc air plasmas produced by a plasma generator with a floating electrode are investigated. The measurements show that with the help of the surface dielectric barrier discharges between the main electrodes and the floating electrode the ignition voltage of the non-thermal arc discharges can be reduced significantly and an arc discharge mode can be stabilized at high gas flow rates. The measuredtemperatures of the non-thermal arcs are at the level of 2000–3000 K under different operating conditions.

Zhi-Bin Wang; Guo-Xu Chen; Zhe Wang; Nan Ge; He-Ping Li; Cheng-Yu Bao

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Non-thermal Plasma Processing for Dilute VOCs Decomposition Combined with the Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma process combined with the new catalyst for...2...) named as the carbon balance. For better carbon balance, SED of the electric discharge is more than 90 J/L which is pretty...

Tetsuji Oda; Hikaru Kuramochi; Ryo Ono

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Augmented survival of Neisseria gonorrhoeae within biofilms: exposure to atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Bacteria embedded within biofilms present a challenge to surface decontamination by conventional means. Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma processes have emerged as a promising approach to overcoming this pr...

L. Xu; Y. Tu; Y. Yu; M. Tan; J. Li; H. Chen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Decontamination of Bacillus subtilis Spores in a Sealed Package Using a Non-thermal Plasma System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The safety of packaged food and medical devices is a major concern to consumers and government officials. Recent inventions (PK-1 and PK-2) based on the principles of non-thermal, atmospheric plasma has shown sig...

Kevin M. Keener; J. L. Jensen…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Analysis of the biological effects of a non-thermal plasma on Saccharomyses cerevisiae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cellular and the molecular responses of eukaryotic yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to a non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure are analyzed. A plasma device with a dielectric barrier discharge is ... in ...

Gyungsoon Park; Ku Y. Baik; Jung G. Kim…

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Gaseous phase benzene decomposition by non-thermal plasma coupled with nano titania catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Synergistic effect of atmospheric non-thermal plasma generated by dielectric barrier discharge and nano ... degradation was visible by added photocatalyst in the plasma reactor. When concentration of benzene was ...

T. Zhu M. Sc.; J. Li Ph.D.; Y. Q. Jin…

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas as a novel candidate for preventive therapy of melanoma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to the increased ultraviolet radiation, the incidence of melanoma is increasing worldwide more than that of any other cancer. In this study, the effects of irradiation of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas

Yasuhiro Omata; Machiko Iida; Ichiro Yajima…

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Inactivation of Microorganisms in Model Biofilms by an Atmospheric Pressure Pulsed Non-thermal Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal plasma jet formed by self-running pulsed-periodical ... current spark generator (PPSG) was used for atmospheric pressure inactivation of microorganisms including biofilms. A ... the PPSG is a formatio...

Yuri Akishev; N. Trushkin; M. Grushin…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

The Chemistry of Methane Remediation by a Non?thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The destruction of methane by a non?thermal plasma in atmospheric pressure gas streams of nitrogen with variable ... determined by on?line FTIR spectroscopy and the plasma chemistry is interpreted using kinetic m...

Kirsty J. Pringle; J. Christopher Whitehead…

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Design, Construction and Characterization of AC Atmospheric Pressure Air Non-thermal Plasma Jet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the design and construction of non-thermal plasma jet device which was built in plasma phys. Dept., NRC, AEA, Egypt with a plasma application group. This design will be useful to initiate ...

K. M. Ahmed; T. M. Allam; H. A. El-sayed; H. M. Soliman…

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Ethanol and E85 Reforming Assisted by a Non-thermal Arc Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ethanol and E85 Reforming Assisted by a Non-thermal Arc Discharge ... The input electric power is expressed in terms of the percentage of Qfuel·LHVfuel, and is noted as %LHV. ... for electricity prodn. ...

Guillaume Petitpas; José Gonzalez-Aguilar; Adeline Darmon; Laurent Fulcheri

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

49

Indirect estimation of energy disposition by non-thermal electrons in solar flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The broad-band EUV and microwave fluxes correlate strongly with hard X-ray fluxes in the impulsive phase of a solar flare. This note presents numerical aids for the estimation of the non-thermal electron fluxe...

H. S. Hudson; R. C. Canfield; S. R. Kane

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

An Invariable Point in the Energy Spectra of Non-Thermal Electrons of Solar Flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The power-law energy spectra of non-thermal electrons for each 1.024 second have been drawn together during the flare. For some flares, it is discovered that the energy spectra taken at different times present...

W.Q. Gan

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Composition of a thermal plasma formed from PTFE with copper in non-oxidant atmosphere.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Composition of a thermal plasma formed from PTFE with copper in non-oxidant atmosphere. Part I the minimization of given thermodynamic functions or mass action laws even with plasmas out of thermal equilibrium- . Key Words: circuit breakers, SF6, PTFE, carbon formation, copper, dielectric gas, plasma composition

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

52

Green–Naghdi fluid with non-thermal equilibrium effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...1989a , b ). However, Green- Naghdi (1996) point...modify the theory of Green- Naghdi (1996) to...incorporate the suspension and solvent thermal characteristics...ethylene glycol as the solvent, and CuO or Al2O3 as...coefficient H and the Green-Naghdi extra viscosity...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Non-thermal solar wind heating by supra-thermal ions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The effect of a new energy source due to energies transferred from supra-thermal secondary ions on the temperature profile of the solar wind has been considered. For this purpose ... solution of a tri-fluid model...

H. J. Fahr

1973-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Transient Non-linear Thermal FEM Simulation of Smart Power Switches and Verification by Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal FEM (Finite Element Method) simulations can be used to predict the thermal behavior of power semiconductors in application. Most power semiconductors are made of silicon. Silicon thermal material properties are significantly temperature dependent. In this paper, validity of a common non-linear silicon material model is verified by transient non-linear thermal FEM simulations of Smart Power Switches and measurements. For verification, over-temperature protection behavior of Smart Power Switches is employed. This protection turns off the switch at a pre-defined temperature which is used as a temperature reference in the investigation. Power dissipation generated during a thermal overload event of two Smart Power devices is measured and used as an input stimulus to transient thermal FEM simulations. The duration time of the event together with the temperature reference is confronted with simulation results and thus the validity of the silicon model is proved. In addition, the impact of non-linear thermal properties of silicon on the thermal impedance of power semiconductors is shown.

V. Kosel; R. Sleik; M. Glavanovics

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

55

Entropy Production in Non-Linear, Thermally Driven Hamiltonian Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider a finite chain of non-linear oscillators coupled at its ends to two infinite heat baths which are at different temperatures. Using our earlier results about the existence of a stationary state, we show rigorously that for arbitrary temperature differences and arbitrary couplings, such a system has a unique stationary state. (This extends our earlier results for small temperature differences.) In all these cases, any initial state will converge (at an unknown rate) to the stationary state. We show that this stationary state continually produces entropy. The rate of entropy production is strictly negative when the temperatures are unequal and is proportional to the mean energy flux through the system.

Jean-Pierre Eckmann; Claude-Alain Pillet; Luc Rey-Bellet

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

56

GEO Report on ProgressGEO Report on Progress Presentation to GEOSS in the Americas Symposium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GEO Report on ProgressGEO Report on Progress Presentation to GEOSS in the Americas Symposium. Process & Report Structure1. Process & Report Structure 2. GEO Report on Progress2. GEO Report on ProgressProcess !! " Report on ProgressReport on Progress # " $$ #12;Key ObjectivesKey Objectives · Engage Ministers

57

Non-Boussinesq rolls in 2d thermal convection  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A study of convection in a circular two dimensional cell is presented. The system is heated and cooled at two diametrically opposed points on the edge of the circle, which are parallel or anti-parallel to gravity. The latter’s role in the plane of the cell can be changed by tilting the cell. When the system is in a horizontal position, a non-trivial analytic solution for the temperature distribution of the quiescent fluid can be found. For a slight inclination, the projection of gravity in the plane of the cell is used as a perturbation parameter in the full hydrodynamic description, as the Boussinesq approximation is unjustified. To first order, the equations are solved for the stationary case and four symmetrical rolls become apparent, showing that a purely conductive state is impossible if gravity–however small–is present; an approximate closed analytical expression is obtained, which describes the four convection rolls. Further analysis is done by a direct numerical integration. Comparison with preliminary observations is mentioned.

C. Málaga; F. Mandujano; R. Peralta-Fabi; C. Arzate

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Non-Boussinesq Rolls in 2d Thermal Convection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of convection in a circular two dimensional cell is presented. The system is heated and cooled at two diametrically opposed points on the edge of the circle, which are parallel or anti-parallel to gravity. The latter's role in the plane of the cell can be changed by tilting the cell. When the system is in a horizontal position, a non-trivial analytic solution for the temperature distribution of the quiescent fluid can be found. For a slight inclination, the projection of gravity in the plane of the cell is used as a perturbation parameter in the full hydrodynamic description, as the Boussinesq approximation is inadequate. To first order, the equations are solved for the stationary case and four symmetrical rolls become apparent, showing that a purely conductive state is impossible if gravity -however small- is present; an approximate closed analytical expression is obtained, which describes the four convection rolls. Further analysis is done by a direct numerical integration. Comparison with prelimina...

Málaga, C; Peralta-Fabi, R; Arzate, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Owen Martel GEOS 206, 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Owen Martel GEOS 206, 2009 Paint It, Green: Studio Art and Sustainability Introduction Amidst growing societal concern for sustainability, the arts are particularly fertile ground for the development and dissemination of sustainable thinking. Sustainability itself is an inherently aesthetic concept: in asserting

Aalberts, Daniel P.

60

Multipartite non-locality in a thermalized Ising spin-chain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study multipartite correlations and non-locality in an isotropic Ising ring under transverse magnetic field at both zero and finite temperature. We highlight parity-induced differences between the multipartite Bell-like functions used in order to quantify the degree of non-locality within a ring state and reveal a mechanism for the passive protection of multipartite quantum correlations against thermal spoiling effects that is clearly related to the macroscopic properties of the ring model.

Steve Campbell; Mauro Paternostro

2010-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Other LGH sources include solar thermal energy, geo-thermalThe heat source can be solar thermal energy, biologicalsources include the coolants in coal and nuclear power plants, solar thermal energy,

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Study of non-thermal plasma jet with dielectric barrier configuration in nitrogen and argon  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) is advantageous in generating non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure as it avoids transition to thermal arc and dispenses with costly vacuum system. It has found useful applications in treating heat-sensitive materials such as plastics and living tissue. In this work the discharge formed between the Pyrex glass layer and the ground electrode is extruded through a nozzle to form the non-thermal plasma jet. The DBD characteristics were investigated in terms of charge transferred and mean power dissipated per cycle when operated in nitrogen and argon at various flow rates and applied voltages. These characteristics were then correlated to the dimension of the plasma jet. The mean power dissipated in the DBD was below 7 W giving an efficiency of 17 %. The length of the plasma jet was greatly limited to below 1 cm due to the configuration of the DBD system and nozzle.

O. H. Chin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Induction of cell growth arrest by atmospheric non-thermal plasma in colorectal cancer cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Plasma is generated by ionizing neutral gas molecules, resulting in a mixture of energy particles, including electrons and ions. Recent progress in the understanding of non-thermal atmospheric plasma has led to applications in biomedicine. However, the exact molecular mechanisms involved in plasma-induced cell growth arrest are unclear. In this study, we investigated the feasibility of non-thermal atmospheric plasma treatment for cancer therapy and examined the mechanism by which plasma induces anti-proliferative properties and cell death in human colorectal cancer cells. Non-thermal atmospheric plasma induced cell growth arrest and induced apoptosis. In addition, plasma reduced cell migration and invasion activities. As a result, we found that plasma treatment to the cells increases ?-catenin phosphorylation, suggesting that ?-catenin degradation plays a role at least in part in plasma-induced anti-proliferative activity. Therefore, non-thermal atmospheric plasma constitutes a new biologic tool with the potential for therapeutic applications that modulate cell signaling and function.

Chul-Ho Kim; Jae Hoon Bahn; Seong-Ho Lee; Gye-Yeop Kim; Seung-Ik Jun; Keunho Lee; Seung Joon Baek

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Application of non-thermal atmospheric pressure ac plasmas to the carbon dioxide reforming of methane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Methane conversions of 11.9%, yields of hydrogen as high as 23.3% and energy yields of 1.0 mol H2/kWh have been achieved from CO2 reforming of CH4 in non-thermal, atmospheric pressure plasma reactors with Pt coat...

Stephanie L. Brock; Tomoko Shimojo; Steven L. Suib…

65

Use of non-thermal atmospheric plasmas to reduce the viability of Bacillus subtilis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use of non-thermal atmospheric plasmas to reduce the viability of Bacillus subtilis on spacecraft Laboratory, Kennedy Space Center, FL 32899, USA e-mail: carlos.i.calle@nasa.gov Abstract: Atmospheric pressure glow-discharge (APGD) plasmas have been proposed for sterilizing spacecraft surfaces prior

Schuerger, Andrew C.

66

Universal GeoPower | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeoPower GeoPower Jump to: navigation, search Name Universal GeoPower Place Houston, Texas Zip 77007 Sector Geothermal energy Product A Texas-based geothermal development company. References Universal GeoPower[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Universal GeoPower is a company located in Houston, Texas . References ↑ "Universal GeoPower" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Universal_GeoPower&oldid=352539" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load)

67

Direct Non-oxidative Methane Conversion by Non-thermal Plasma: Modeling Study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The direct non-oxidative conversion of methane to higher hydrocarbons ... dielectric barrier discharges has been investigated theoretically at atmospheric pressure. Preliminary modeling of the results is...2...hy...

Yun Yang

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Non-perturbative Effect on Thermal Relic Abundance of Dark Matter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We point out that thermal relic abundance of the dark matter is strongly altered by a non-perturbative effect called the Sommerfeld enhancement, when constituent particles of the dark matter are non-singlet under the SU(2)_L gauge interaction and much heavier than the weak gauge bosons. Typical candidates for such dark matter particles are the heavy wino- and higgsino-like neutralinos. We investigate the non-perturbative effect on the relic abundance of dark matter for the wino-like neutralino as an example. We show that its thermal abundance is reduced by 50% compared to the perturbative result. The wino-like neutralino mass consistent with the observed dark matter abundance turns out to be 2.7 TeV < m < 3.0 TeV.

Junji Hisano; Shigeki Matsumoto; Minoru Nagai; Osamu Saito; Masato Senami

2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

69

Exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by non-thermal arc discharge for NOx trap regeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by non- thermal arc discharge for NOx trap regeneration to the reforming of Diesel fuel with Diesel engine exhaust gas using a non-thermal plasma torch for NOx trap Diesel fuel reforming with hal-00617141,version1-17May2013 Author manuscript, published in "Energy

Boyer, Edmond

70

Non-Thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-Level Mixed Waste  

SciTech Connect

DOE proposes to transport contact-handled LLMW from the Hanford Site to the Allied Technology Group (ATG) Mixed Waste Facility (MWF) in Richland, Washington, for non-thermal treatment and to return the treated waste to the Hanford Site for eventual land disposal. Over a 3-year period the waste would be staged to the ATG MWF, and treated waste would be returned to the Hanford Site. The ATG MWF would be located on an 18 hectare (ha) (45 acre [at]) ATG Site adjacent to ATG's licensed low-level waste processing facility at 2025 Battelle Boulevard. The ATG MWF is located approximately 0.8 kilometers (km) (0.5 miles [mi]) south of Horn Rapids Road and 1.6 km (1 mi) west of Stevens Drive. The property is located within the Horn Rapids triangle in northern Richland (Figure 2.1). The ATG MWF is to be located on the existing ATG Site, near the DOE Hanford Site, in an industrial area in the City of Richland. The effects of siting, construction, and overall operation of the MWF have been evaluated in a separate State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) EIS (City of Richland 1998). The proposed action includes transporting the LLMW from the Hanford Site to the ATG Facility, non-thermal treatment of the LLMW at the ATG MWF, and transporting the waste from ATG back to the Hanford Site. Impacts fi-om waste treatment operations would be bounded by the ATG SEPA EIS, which included an evaluation of the impacts associated with operating the non-thermal portion of the MWF at maximum design capacity (8,500 metric tons per year) (City of Richland 1998). Up to 50 employees would be required for non-thermal treatment portion of the MWF. This includes 40 employees that would perform waste treatment operations and 10 support staff. Similar numbers were projected for the thermal treatment portion of the MWF (City of Richland 1998).

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Heating of thermal non-equilibrium ions by Alfvén wave via nonresonant interaction  

SciTech Connect

Pickup of thermal non-equilibrium ions by Alfvén wave via nonresonant wave-particle interaction is investigated by means of analytical test-particle theory. Some interesting and new results are found. No matter what the initial velocity distribution is, if the background magnetic field, the Alfvén speed, and the Alfvén magnetic field are fixed, the average parallel velocity never changes when t??. Heating effects in the perpendicular and parallel direction just depend on the initial temperature, and the perpendicular temperature increase is more prominent. It is noted that the heating effect of thermal non-equilibrium ions (Kappa ions) is weaker than that of the Maxwellian. This phenomenon may be relative to the heating of ions in the solar corona as well as in some toroidal confinement fusion devices.

Liu, Hai-Feng; Wang, Shi-Qing [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China) [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); The Engineering and Technical College of Chengdu University of Technology, Leshan 614000 (China); Li, Ke-Hua [The Engineering and Technical College of Chengdu University of Technology, Leshan 614000 (China)] [The Engineering and Technical College of Chengdu University of Technology, Leshan 614000 (China)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

Numerical Study of a Propagating Non-Thermal Microwave Feature in a Solar Flare Loop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We analytically and numerically study the motion of electrons along a magnetic loop, to compare with the observation of the propagating feature of the non-thermal microwave source in the 1999 August 28 solar flare reported by Yokoyama et al. (2002). We model the electron motion with the Fokker-Planck equation and calculate the spatial distribution of the gyrosynchrotron radiation. We find that the microwave propagating feature does not correspond to the motion of electrons with a specific initial pitch angle. This apparent propagating feature is a consequence of the motion of an ensemble of electrons with different initial pitch angles, which have different time and position to produce strong radiation in the loop. We conclude that the non-thermal electrons in the 1999 August 28 flare were isotropically accelerated and then are injected into the loop.

T. Minoshima; T. Yokoyama

2008-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

73

THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET NON-THERMAL LINE BROADENING AND HIGH-ENERGY PARTICLES DURING SOLAR FLARES  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the relationship between the location of EUV non-thermal broadening and high-energy particles during large flares using the EUV Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode, the Nobeyama Radio Polarimeter, the Nobeyama Radioheliograph, and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. We have analyzed five large flare events that contain thermal-rich, intermediate, and thermal-poor flares classified by the definition discussed in the paper. We found that, in the case of thermal-rich flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the top of the flaring loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the footpoint of the flare loop. On the other hand, in the case of intermediate/thermal-poor flares, the non-thermal broadening of Fe XXIV occurred at the footpoint of the flare loop at the beginning of the flares. The source of 17 GHz microwaves is located at the top of the flaring loop. We discussed the difference between thermal-rich and intermediate/thermal-poor flares based on the spatial information of non-thermal broadening, which may provide clues that the presence of turbulence plays an important role in the pitch angle scattering of high-energy electrons.

Kawate, T. [Kwasan and Hida Observatory, Kyoto University, Kurabashira, Kamitakaracho, Takayama, Gifu 506-1314 (Japan); Imada, S. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Determination of Non-thermal Velocity Distributions from SERTS Linewidth Observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 Å and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s–1 in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfvén wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

Aaron J. Coyner; Joseph M. Davila

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

Coyner, Aaron J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: aaron.j.coyner@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

SOLCOST - Version 3. 0. Solar energy design program for non-thermal specialists  

SciTech Connect

The SOLCOST solar energy design program is a public domain computerized design tool intended for use by non-thermal specialists to size solar systems with a methodology based on life cycle cost. An overview of SOLCOST capabilities and options is presented. A detailed guide to the SOLCOST input parameters is included. Sample problems showing typical imput decks and resulting SOLCOST output sheets are given. Details of different parts of the analysis are appended. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Surface modification of several dental substrates by non-thermal, atmospheric plasma brush  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective The purpose of this study was to reveal the effectiveness of non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush in surface wettability and modification of four dental substrates. Methods Specimens of dental substrates including dentin, enamel, and two composites Filtek Z250, Filtek LS Silorane were prepared (?2 mm thick, ?10 mm diameter). The prepared surfaces were treated for 5–45 s with a non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush working at temperatures from 36 to 38 °C. The plasma-treatment effects on these surfaces were studied with contact-angle measurement, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results The non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush was very efficient in improving the surface hydrophilicity of four substrates studied. The results indicated that water contact angle values decreased considerably after only 5 s plasma treatment of all these substrates. After 30 s treatment, the values were further reduced to plasma treatment. SEM surface images indicated that no significant morphology change was induced on these dental substrates after exposure to plasmas. Significance Without affecting the bulk properties, a super-hydrophilic surface could be easily achieved by the plasma brush treatment regardless of original hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity of dental substrates tested.

Mingsheng Chen; Ying Zhang; M. Sky Driver; Anthony N. Caruso; Qingsong Yu; Yong Wang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Measurement of Reactive Hydroxyl Radical Species Inside the Biosolutions During Non-thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet Bombardment onto the Solution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet could generate various kinds of radicals ... The electron temperature and ion density for this non-thermal plasma jet have been measured to be about...13 cm?3 in this e...

Yong Hee Kim; Young June Hong; Ku Youn Baik…

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Dual recycling for GEO 600  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Dual recycling is the combination of signal recycling and power recycling; both optical techniques improve the shot-noise-limited sensitivity of interferometric gravitational-wave detectors. In addition, signal recycling can reduce the loss of light power due to imperfect interference and allows us, in principle, to beat the standard quantum limit. The interferometric gravitational-wave detector GEO 600 is the first of the kilometre-scale detectors to use signal recycling. We have recently equipped the detector with a signal-recycling mirror with a transmittance of 1%. In this paper, we present details of the detector commissioning and the first locks of the dual-recycled interferometer.

H Grote; A Freise; M Malec; G Heinzel; B Willke; H Lück; K A Strain; J Hough; K Danzmann

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

UBIQUITOUS NON-THERMALS IN ASTROPHYSICAL PLASMAS: RESTATING THE DIFFICULTY OF MAINTAINING MAXWELLIANS  

SciTech Connect

This paper outlines the rather narrow conditions on a radiatively decoupled plasma where a Maxwell-Boltzmann (MB) distribution can be assumed with confidence. The complementary non-thermal distribution with non-perturbative kurtosis is argued to have a much broader purview than has previously been accepted. These conditions are expressed in terms of the electron Knudsen number, K{sub e} , the ratio of the electron mean free path to the scale length of electron pressure. Rather generally, f(v < v{sub 2}(K{sub e} )) will be Gaussian, so that MB atomic or wave particle effects controlled by speeds v < v{sub 2} {identical_to} w(15/8K{sub e} ){sup 1/4} will remain defensible, where w is the most probable speed. The sufficient condition for Spitzer-Braginskii plasma fluid closure at the energy equation requires globally K{sub e} (s) {<=} 0.01; this global condition pertains to the maximum value of K{sub e} along the arc length s of the magnetic field (to its extremities) provided that contiguous plasma remains uncoupled from the radiation field. The non-thermal regime K{sub e} > 0.01 is common in all main-sequence stellar atmospheres above approximately 0.05 stellar radii from the surface. The entire solar corona and wind are included in this regime where non-thermal distributions with kurtosis are shown to be ubiquitous, heat flux is not well modeled by Spitzer-Braginskii closure, and fluid modeling is qualitative at best.

Scudder, J. D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 54420 (United States); Karimabadi, H., E-mail: jack-scudder@uiowa.edu [SciberQuest, Del Mar, CA 92014 (United States)

2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Non-Oberbeck-Boussinesq effects in turbulent thermal convection in ethane close to the critical point  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As shown in earlier work [Ahlers et al., J. Fluid Mech. 569, 409 (2006)], non-Oberbeck-Boussinesq (NOB) corrections to the center temperature in turbulent Rayleigh-Bénard convection in water and also in glycerol are governed by the temperature dependences of the kinematic viscosity and the thermal diffusion coefficient. If the working fluid is ethane close to the critical point, the origin of non-Oberbeck-Boussinesq corrections is very different, as will be shown in the present paper. Namely, the main origin of NOB corrections then lies in the strong temperature dependence of the isobaric thermal expansion coefficient ?(T). More precisely, it is the nonlinear T dependence of the density ?(T) in the buoyancy force that causes another type of NOB effect. We demonstrate this through a combination of experimental, numerical, and theoretical work, the last in the framework of the extended Prandtl-Blasius boundary-layer theory developed by Ahlers et al. as cited above. The theory comes to its limits if the temperature dependence of the thermal expension coefficient ?(T) is significant. The measurements reported here cover the ranges 2.1?Pr?3.9 and 5×109?Ra?2×1012 and are for cylindrical samples of aspect ratios 1.0 and 0.5.

Guenter Ahlers; Enrico Calzavarini; Francisco Fontenele Araujo; Denis Funfschilling; Siegfried Grossmann; Detlef Lohse; Kazuyasu Sugiyama

2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

82

Non-Thermal Production of Wino Dark Matter via the Decay of Long-Lived Particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider supersymmetric models in which the neutral Wino is the lightest superparticle (LSP), and study the possibility that non-thermally produced Wino plays the role of dark matter. The thermal relic density of Wino is smaller than the present mass density of dark matter if wino mass is smaller than 2.9 TeV; however, even with smaller Wino mass, Wino can be the dominant component of dark matter if it is non-thermally produced by the decay of an exotic particle. In order to study such a possibility in detail, we perform a precise calculation of the present mass density of Wino produced by the exotic-particle decay, taking account of the following effects: (i) coannihilation among charged and neutral Winos, and (ii) Sommerfeld effect on the pair annihilation cross section of Winos. We consider several well-motivated cases where the exotic particle corresponds to cosmological moduli fields, gravitino, or axino, and discuss the implication of the Wino LSP for these cases.

Takeo Moroi; Minoru Nagai; Masahiro Takimoto

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

83

GEO Secretariat Global Earth Observing System of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Epidemiology 3. Energy Management 4. Climate Variability & Change 5. Water Management 6. Weather Forecasting 7 Data Sets A Single Data Set Will Serve Many Communities #12;© GEO Secretariat Solar Energy #12;© GEO Secretariat Vegetation greenness profiles North America Vegetation Annual Greenness Profiles 100 120 140 160

84

Non-thermal Atmospheric Plasma Treatment for Deactivation of Oral Bacteria and Improvement of Dental Composite Restoration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper reviews our recent research results of using non-thermal ­atmospheric plasmas for oral bacterial deactivation and for composite...Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) and Lactobacillus acidophilus (L. acid...

Qing Song Yu; H. Li; A. C. Ritts; B. Yang…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Generation of non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure in hetero-phase media of air with water aerosol  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The results of experimental investigations on non-thermal plasma generation using of high-voltage discharge in hetero-phase media of airflow at atmospheric pressure with liquid aerosol are presented in...B. subti...

Yu. S. Akishev; G. I. Aponin; M. E. Grushin…

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

RETRACTED ARTICLE: Non-thermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Melanoma Cells via Production of Intracellular Reactive Oxygen Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma may provide a novel approach to treat ... study was to evaluate the potential of DBD plasma to induce apoptosis in melanoma cells. Melano...

Rachel Sensenig; Sameer Kalghatgi; Ekaterina Cerchar…

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Peroxynitrite: A Re-examination of the Chemical Properties of Non-thermal Discharges Burning in Air Over Aqueous Solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The main compounds of non-thermal plasmas generated by a discharge in humid air at atmospheric pressure are re-examined to explain the twin chemical properties of discharges over aqueous waste solutions, i.e. ...

Jean-Louis Brisset; Eugen Hnatiuc

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Recent VOC Control Test Data for a Reactive VOC Converter- Scrubber System for Non-Thermal Control of VOCs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of real estate. Non-thermal VOHAP (Volatile Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant) emission control devices require additional maintenance. They also require the replacement of costly consumables such as activated carbon or they use large amounts of energy...

McGinness, M.

89

Thermal engineering of non-local resistance in lateral spin valves  

SciTech Connect

We study the non-local spin transport in Permalloy/Cu lateral spin valves (LSVs) fabricated on thermally oxidized Si and MgO substrates. While these LSVs show the same magnitude of spin signals, significant substrate dependence of the baseline resistance was observed. The baseline resistance shows much weaker dependence on the inter-electrode distance than that of the spin transport observed in the Cu wires. A simple analysis of voltage-current characteristics in the baseline resistance indicates the observed result can be explained by a combination of the Peltier and Seebeck effects at the injector and detector junctions, suggesting the usage of high thermal conductivity substrate (or under-layer) is effective to reduce the baseline resistance.

Kasai, S., E-mail: KASAI.Shinya@nims.go.jp; Takahashi, Y. K. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Hirayama, S.; Mitani, S.; Hono, K. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-0006 (Japan); Adachi, H.; Ieda, J.; Maekawa, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai 319-1195 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Sanbancho, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

90

D S Geo Innogy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Innogy Innogy Jump to: navigation, search Name D&S Geo Innogy Place Germany Sector Geothermal energy Product JV company set up to develop existing RWE deep geothermal drilling areas. References D&S Geo Innogy[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. D&S Geo Innogy is a company located in Germany . References ↑ "D&S Geo Innogy" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=D_S_Geo_Innogy&oldid=344020" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties About us Disclaimers Energy blogs Linked Data Developer services

91

Final Technical Report -- GEO-VI - USGEO  

SciTech Connect

Representatives of US earth observations departments and agencies, other participating governments, NGOs and civil society participated in the Sixth Plenary Meeting of the Group on Earth Observations (GEO-VI), hosted by the United States in Washington, DC on November 17 and 18, 2009. The meeting was held in the Atrium Ballroom of the Ronald Reagan International Trade Center. Exhibitions of international Earth observation technology and programs were held concurrently in the same venue. A number of GEO committee meetings and side events were held in conjunction with the GEO-VI Plenary, including the GEO-IGOS Symposium on Earth observation science and applications, the GEOSS in the Americas Forum on Coastal Zones, and separate meetings of the GEO Communities of Practice on Carbon, Health, and Air Quality.

Hirsch, Leonard

2009-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

92

Non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush induces HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective Non-thermal atmospheric plasma (NTAP) brush has been regarded as a promising technique to enhance dental interfacial bonding. However, the principal enhancement mechanisms have not been well identified. In this study, the effect of non-thermal plasmas on grafting of HEMA, a typical dental monomer, onto dentin collagen thin films was investigated. Methods Human dentin was sectioned into 10-?m-thick films. After total demineralization in 0.5 M EDTA solution for 30 min, the dentin collagen films were water-rinsed, air-dried, treated with 35 wt% HEMA aqueous solution. The films were then subject to plasma-exposure under a NTAP brush with different time (1–8 min)/input power (5–15 W). For comparison, the dentin collagen films were also treated with the above HEMA solution containing photo-initiators, then subject to light-curing. After plasma-exposure or light-curing, the HEMA-collagen films were rinsed in deionized water, and then examined by FTIR spectroscopy and TEM. Results The FITR results indicated that plasma-exposure could induce significant HEMA grafting onto dentin collagen thin films. In contrast, light-curing led to no detectable interaction of HEMA with dentin collagen. Quantitative IR spectral analysis (i.e., 1720/3075 or 749/3075, HEMA/collagen ratios) further suggested that the grafting efficacy of HEMA onto the plasma-exposed collagen thin films strongly depended on the treatment time and input power of plasmas. TEM results indicated that plasma treatment did not alter collagen's banding structure. Significance The current study provides deeper insight into the mechanism of dental adhesion enhancement induced by non-thermal plasmas treatment. The NTAP brush could be a promising method to create chemical bond between resin monomers and dentin collagen.

Mingsheng Chen; Ying Zhang; Vladimir Dusevich; Yi Liu; Qingsong Yu; Yong Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a Non-Thermal Plasma Device  

SciTech Connect

Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of non-thermal, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a non-thermal, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a non-thermal plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that non-thermal plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the application of this technology for removing elemental mercury from flue gas streams generated by utility boilers. On an absolute basis, the quantity of reagent required to accomplish the oxidation was small. For example, complete oxidation of mercury was accomplished using a 1% volume fraction of oxygen in a nitrogen stream. Overall, the tests with mercury validated the most useful aspect of the CR&E technology: Providing a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by employing a specific plasma reagent to either increase reaction kinetics or promote reactions that would not have occurred under normal circumstances.

Charles Mones

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Antimicrobial effects of non-thermal atmospheric plasma as a novel root canal disinfectant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study aimed to investigate effects of non-thermal atmospheric plasma on an Enterococcus faecalis biofilm within the canals of extracted human teeth. A significant decrease in the number of CFU?s was observed after 2 min cold plasma treatment with an average kill rate of 99.999%. MTT assay showed a significant reduction in the viability of bacteria with a reduction rate of 98.939%. XTT assay showed a reduction of bacterial metabolic activity by 99.7%. Both 2 min cold plasma and 6% NaOCl greatly reduced the viability and metabolic activity of E. faecalis bacteria, but there is no significant difference between them.

Mariam Habib; Timothy L. Hottel; Liang Hong

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Chemical filters by non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas for reactive fields  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal plasmas in electrode configurations are designed in this study and investigated at atmospheric pressure for generation of reactive fields. A combination of insulated wire electrodes and bare metal wire electrodes makes it possible to obtain a filter-like assembly of microplasmas, even in ambient air or in aqueous solutions. Oxidation and reduction fields are obtained by controlling the gas supply of hydrogen, oxygen, and water vapor, and these fields benefit various functional processes such as recycling CO2, decomposing organic molecules, and increasing the work function on metal surfaces.

Osamu Sakai; Tadasuke Morita; Yoshihiko Ueda; Noriaki Sano; Kunihide Tachibana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

RELATION BETWEEN THE CORONAL MASS EJECTION ACCELERATION AND THE NON-THERMAL FLARE CHARACTERISTICS  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the relationship between the main acceleration phase of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the particle acceleration in the associated flares as evidenced in Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager non-thermal X-rays for a set of 37 impulsive flare-CME events. Both the CME peak velocity and peak acceleration yield distinct correlations with various parameters characterizing the flare-accelerated electron spectra. The highest correlation coefficient is obtained for the relation of the CME peak velocity and the total energy in accelerated electrons (c = 0.85), supporting the idea that the acceleration of the CME and the particle acceleration in the associated flare draw their energy from a common source, probably magnetic reconnection in the current sheet behind the erupting structure. In general, the CME peak velocity shows somewhat higher correlations with the non-thermal flare parameters than the CME peak acceleration, except for the spectral index of the accelerated electron spectrum, which yields a higher correlation with the CME peak acceleration (c Almost-Equal-To -0.6), indicating that the hardness of the flare-accelerated electron spectrum is tightly coupled to the impulsive acceleration process of the rising CME structure. We also obtained high correlations between the CME initiation height h{sub 0} and the non-thermal flare parameters, with the highest correlation of h{sub 0} to the spectral index {delta} of flare-accelerated electrons (c Almost-Equal-To 0.8). This means that CMEs erupting at low coronal heights, i.e., in regions of stronger magnetic fields, are accompanied by flares that are more efficient at accelerating electrons to high energies. In the majority of events ({approx}80%), the non-thermal flare emission starts after the CME acceleration, on average delayed by Almost-Equal-To 6 minutes, in line with the standard flare model where the rising flux rope stretches the field lines underneath until magnetic reconnection sets in. We find that the current sheet length at the onset of magnetic reconnection is 21 {+-} 7 Mm. The flare hard X-ray peaks are well synchronized with the peak of the CME acceleration profile, and in 75% of the cases they occur within {+-}5 minutes. Our findings provide strong evidence for the tight coupling between the CME dynamics and the particle acceleration in the associated flare in impulsive events, with the total energy in accelerated electrons being closely correlated with the peak velocity (and thus the kinetic energy) of the CME, whereas the number of electrons accelerated to high energies is decisively related to the CME peak acceleration and the height of the pre-eruptive structure.

Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Bein, B. M.; Temmer, M., E-mail: asv@igam.uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Non-Thermal Electron Acceleration in Low Mach Number Collisionless Shocks. I. Particle Energy Spectra and Acceleration Mechanism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electron acceleration to non-thermal energies in low Mach number (Msolar flares, but the electron acceleration mechanism remains poorly understood. Diffusive shock acceleration, also known as first-order Fermi acceleration, cannot be directly invoked to explain the acceleration of electrons. Rather, an additional mechanism is required to pre-accelerate the electrons from thermal to supra-thermal energies, so they can then participate in the Fermi process. In this work, we use two- and three-dimensional particle-in-cell plasma simulations to study electron acceleration in low Mach number shocks. We focus on the particle energy spectra and the acceleration mechanism in a reference run with M=3. We find that about 15 percent of the electrons can be efficiently accelerated, forming a non-thermal power-law tail in the energy spectrum with a slope of p~2.4. Initially, thermal electrons are energized at the shock front via shock drift a...

Guo, Xinyi; Narayan, Ramesh

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

THERMAL NON-EQUILIBRIUM REVISITED: A HEATING MODEL FOR CORONAL LOOPS  

SciTech Connect

The location and frequency of events that heat the million-degree corona are still a matter of debate. One potential heating scenario is that the energy release is effectively steady and highly localized at the footpoints of coronal structures. Such an energy deposition drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions in the hydrodynamic equations in longer loops. This heating scenario was considered and discarded by Klimchuk et al. on the basis of their one-dimensional simulations as incapable of reproducing observational characteristics of loops. In this paper, we use three-dimensional simulations to generate synthetic emission images, from which we select and analyze six loops. The main differences between our model and that of Klimchuk et al. concern (1) dimensionality, (2) resolution, (3) geometrical properties of the loops, (4) heating function, and (5) radiative function. We find evidence, in this small set of simulated loops, that the evolution of the light curves, the variation of temperature along the loops, the density profile, and the absence of small-scale structures are compatible with the characteristics of observed loops. We conclude that quasi-steady footpoint heating that drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions cannot yet be ruled out as a viable heating scenario for EUV loops.

Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran [Predictive Science, Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Rd., Ste. 170, San Diego, CA 92121-2910 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Mok, Yung, E-mail: lionel@predsci.com, E-mail: linkerj@predsci.com, E-mail: mikicz@predsci.com, E-mail: amy.r.winebarger@nasa.gov, E-mail: ymok@uci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, 4129 Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

99

GeoModel | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeoModel GeoModel Dataset Summary Description Developed by NREL and the U.S. Trade and Development Agency, this geographic toolkit that allows users to relate the renewable energy resource (solar and wind) data to other geographic data, such as land use, protected areas, elevation, etc. The GsT was completely redesigned and re-released in November 2010 to provide a more modern, easier-to-use interface with considerably faster analytical querying capabilities. The revised version of the Geospatial Toolkit for Turkey is available using the following link: http://www.nrel.gov/international/downloads/gst_turkey.exe Source GeoModel Date Released March 31st, 2009 (5 years ago) Date Updated July 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords DNI GeoModel GHI GIS GsT NREL solar SWERA

100

GEO2 Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEO2 Technologies GEO2 Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name GEO2 Technologies Address 12-R Cabot Road Place Woburn, Massachusetts Zip 01801 Product Materials science company working in advanced filtration and complex chemical reactions Website http://www.geo2tech.com/ Coordinates 42.509246°, -71.134124° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.509246,"lon":-71.134124,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Geo-neutrinos and Earth Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the current status of geo-neutrino measurements and their implications for radiogenic heating in the mantle. Earth models predict different levels of radiogenic heating and, therefore, different geo-neutrino fluxes from the mantle. Seismic tomography reveals features in the deep mantle possibly correlated with radiogenic heating and causing spatial variations in the mantle geo-neutrino flux at the Earth surface. An ocean-based observatory offers the greatest sensitivity to the mantle flux and potential for resolving Earth models and mantle features. Refinements to estimates of the geo-neutrino flux from continental crust reduce uncertainty in measurements of the mantle flux, especially measurements from land-based observatories. These refinements enable the resolution of Earth models using the combined measurements from multiple continental observatories.

Dye, S T; Lekic, V; McDonough, W F; Sramek, O

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

GeoInnovation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeoInnovation GeoInnovation Jump to: navigation, search Logo: GeoInnovation Name GeoInnovation Address 2828 N. Country Club, Suite 103 Place Tucson, Arizona Zip 85716 Sector Solar Phone number (520) 615-3883 Website http://www.geoinnovation.com/ Coordinates 32.258457°, -110.926271° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.258457,"lon":-110.926271,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

103

MEASUREMENTS OF ANISOTROPIC ION TEMPERATURES, NON-THERMAL VELOCITIES, AND DOPPLER SHIFTS IN A CORONAL HOLE  

SciTech Connect

We present a new diagnostic allowing one to measure the anisotropy of ion temperatures and non-thermal velocities, as well as Doppler shifts with respect to the ambient magnetic field. This method provides new results, as well as an independent test for previous measurements obtained with other techniques. Our spectral data come from observations of a low-latitude, on-disk coronal hole. A potential field source surface model was used to calculate the angle between the magnetic field lines and the line of sight for each spatial bin of the observation. A fit was performed to determine the line widths and Doppler shifts parallel and perpendicular to the magnetic field. For each line width component we derived ion temperatures T {sub i,} and T {sub i, Parallel-To} and non-thermal velocities v {sub nt,} and v {sub nt, Parallel-To }. T {sub i,} was cooler than off-limb polar coronal hole measurements, suggesting increasing collisional cooling with decreasing height. T {sub i, Parallel-To} is consistent with a uniform temperature of (1.8 {+-} 0.2) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} K for each ion. Since parallel ion heating is expected to be weak, this ion temperature should reflect the proton temperature. A comparison between our results and others implies a large proton temperature gradient around 1.02 R {sub Sun }. The non-thermal velocities are thought to be proportional to the amplitudes of various waves. Our results for v {sub nt,} agree with Alfven wave amplitudes inferred from off-limb polar coronal hole line width measurements. Our v {sub nt, Parallel-To} results are consistent with slow magnetosonic wave amplitudes inferred from Fourier analysis of time-varying intensity fluctuations. Doppler shift measurements yield outflows of Almost-Equal-To 5 km s{sup -1} for ions formed over a broad temperature range. This differs from other studies that found a strong Doppler shift dependence on formation temperature.

Hahn, M.; Savin, D. W. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, MC 5247, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)] [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, MC 5247, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

104

Thermal history sensors for non-destructive temperature measurements in harsh environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The operating temperature is a critical physical parameter in many engineering applications however can be very challenging to measure in certain environments particularly when access is limited or on rotating components. A new quantitative non-destructive temperature measurement technique has been proposed which relies on thermally induced permanent changes in ceramic phosphors. This technique has several distinct advantages over current methods for many different applications. The robust ceramic material stores the temperature information allowing long term thermal exposures in harsh environment to be measured at a convenient time. Additionally rare earth dopants make the ceramic phosphorescent so that the temperature information can be interpreted by automated interrogation of the phosphorescent light. This technique has been demonstrated by application of YAG doped with dysprosium and europium as coatings through the air-plasma spray process. Either material can be used to measure temperature over a wide range namely between 300°C and 900°C. Furthermore results show that the material records the peak exposure temperature and prolonged exposure at lower temperatures would have no effect on the temperature measurement. This indicates that these materials could be used to measure peak operating temperatures in long-term testing.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

EVIDENCE OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM HH 80  

SciTech Connect

Protostellar jets appear at all stages of star formation when the accretion process is still at work. Jets travel at velocities of hundreds of km s{sup –1}, creating strong shocks when interacting with the interstellar medium. Several cases of jets have been detected in X-rays, typically showing soft emission. For the first time, we report evidence of hard X-ray emission possibly related to non-thermal processes not explained by previous models of the post-shock emission predicted in the jet/ambient interaction scenario. HH 80 is located at the south head of the jet associated with the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048. It shows soft and hard X-ray emission in regions that are spatially separated, with the soft X-ray emission region situated behind the region of hard X-ray emission. We propose a scenario for HH 80 where soft X-ray emission is associated with thermal processes from the interaction of the jet with denser ambient matter and hard X-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation at the front shock.

López-Santiago, J. [Instituto de Matemática Interdisciplinar, S. D. Astronomía y Geodesia, Facultad de Ciencias Matemáticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Matemática Interdisciplinar, S. D. Astronomía y Geodesia, Facultad de Ciencias Matemáticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomía (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bonito, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Università di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Miceli, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)] [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monseñor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Río Negro (Argentina)] [Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monseñor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Río Negro (Argentina); De Castro, E. [Dpto. de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Dpto. de Astrofísica y CC. de la Atmósfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

106

SUZAKU OBSERVATIONS OF THE NON-THERMAL SUPERNOVA REMNANT HESS J1731-347  

SciTech Connect

A detailed analysis of the non-thermal X-ray emission from the northwestern and southern parts of the supernova remnant (SNR) HESS J1731-347 with Suzaku is presented. The shell portions covered by the observations emit hard and lineless X-rays. The spectrum can be reproduced by a simple absorbed power-law model with a photon index {Gamma} of 1.8-2.7 and an absorption column density N{sub H} of (1.0-2.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 22} cm{sup -2}. These quantities change significantly from region to region; the northwestern part of the SNR has the hardest and most absorbed spectrum. The western part of the X-ray shell has a smaller curvature than the northwestern and southern shell segments. A comparison of the X-ray morphology to the very high energy gamma-ray and radio images was performed. The efficiency of the electron acceleration and the emission mechanism in each portion of the shell are discussed. Thermal X-ray emission from the SNR was searched for but could not be detected at a significant level.

Bamba, Aya; Yamazaki, Ryo [Department of Physics and Mathematics, Aoyama Gakuin University, 5-10-1 Fuchinobe, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5258 (Japan); Puehlhofer, Gerd; Klochkov, Dmitry [Institut fuer Astronomie und Astrophysik, Universitaet Tuebingen, Sand 1, D-72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Acero, Fabio [Laboratoire Univers et Particules de Montpellier, Universite Montpellier 2, CNRS/IN2P3, CC 72, Place Eugene Bataillon, F-34095 Montpellier (France); Tian Wenwu [National Astronomical Observatories, CAS, Beijing 100012 (China); Li Zhiyuan [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Horns, Dieter [Institut fuer Experimentalphysik, Universitaet Hamburg, Luruper Chaussee 149, D-22761 Hamburg (Germany); Kosack, Karl [CEA Saclay, DSM/IRFU, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Komin, Nukri [Laboratoire d'Annecy-le-Vieux de Physique des Particules, Universite de Savoie, CNRS/IN2P3, F-74941 Annecy-le-Vieux (France)

2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

Thermal history sensors for non-destructive temperature measurements in harsh environments  

SciTech Connect

The operating temperature is a critical physical parameter in many engineering applications, however, can be very challenging to measure in certain environments, particularly when access is limited or on rotating components. A new quantitative non-destructive temperature measurement technique has been proposed which relies on thermally induced permanent changes in ceramic phosphors. This technique has several distinct advantages over current methods for many different applications. The robust ceramic material stores the temperature information allowing long term thermal exposures in harsh environment to be measured at a convenient time. Additionally, rare earth dopants make the ceramic phosphorescent so that the temperature information can be interpreted by automated interrogation of the phosphorescent light. This technique has been demonstrated by application of YAG doped with dysprosium and europium as coatings through the air-plasma spray process. Either material can be used to measure temperature over a wide range, namely between 300°C and 900°C. Furthermore, results show that the material records the peak exposure temperature and prolonged exposure at lower temperatures would have no effect on the temperature measurement. This indicates that these materials could be used to measure peak operating temperatures in long-term testing.

Pilgrim, C. C. [Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK and Sensor Coating Systems, Imperial Incubator, Bessemer Building, Level 1 and 2, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Heyes, A. L. [Energy Technology and Innovation Initiative, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Feist, J. P. [Sensor Coating Systems, Imperial Incubator, Bessemer Building, Level 1 and 2, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

108

Differential sensitivity of lymphocyte subpopulations to non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal atmospheric-pressure plasmas can possibly be used for several applications in particular in medicine. Plasma treatment can be applied to living tissues and cells, e.g., to induce apoptosis and growth arrest in tumour cells or to improve wound healing. However, detailed investigations of plasma–cell interactions are strongly needed. It is not yet clear whether plasmas will be useful in stimulating immune cells to change their behaviour or function. Therefore, this study focused on the influence of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma on cell surface molecules of rat spleen mononuclear cells (MNC) as first important step to gain insight into plasma–immune cells interactions. Rat spleen MNC were treated with plasma by surface dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) at atmospheric pressure in air or argon. Lymphocyte subpopulations and expression of L-selectin, ICAM-1 and LFA-1? expression on T-cells were analysed by flow cytometry 1–48 h after plasma treatment. Plasma changed the ratio of T- and B-cells in favour of B-cells. Of the T-cells the helper T-cells were reduced while cytotoxic T-cells were less affected. L-selectin expressing T-cells were significantly reduced already 1 h after plasma treatment and that of ICAM-1+ and LFA-1?+T-cells only after 4 h. These effects were time dependent and less dramatic when using DBD/argon plasma. In conclusion, different lymphocyte subpopulations show different sensitivity to plasma. Adhesion molecules as L-selectin, ICAM-1 and LFA-1? are down regulated by plasma. Whether these results can be used to modify lymphocyte homing or to activate MNC for different applications remains to be clarified.

Beate Haertel; Frauke Volkmann; Thomas von Woedtke; Ulrike Lindequist

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Non-thermal atmospheric plasmas in dental restoration: Improved resin adhesive penetration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

AbstractObjective To investigate the influence of non-thermal plasma treatment on the penetration of a model dental adhesive into the demineralized dentine. Methods Prepared dentine surfaces were conditioned with Scotchbond Universal etchant for 15 s and sectioned equally perpendicular to the etched surfaces. The separated halves were randomly selected for treatment with an argon plasma brush (input current 6 mA, treatment time 30 s) or gentle argon air blowing (treatment time 30 s, as control). The plasma-treated specimens and control specimens were applied with a model adhesive containing 2,2-bis[4-(2-hydroxy-3-methacryloxypropoxy) phenyl]-propane (BisGMA) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) (mass ratio of 30/70), gently air-dried for 5 s, and light-cured for 20 s. Cross-sectional specimens were characterized using micro-Raman spectral mapping across the dentine, adhesive/dentine interface, and adhesive layer at 1-?m spatial resolution. SEM was also employed to examine the adhesive/dentine interfacial morphology. Results The micro-Raman result disclosed that plasma treatment significantly improved the penetration of the adhesive, evidenced by the apparently higher content of the adhesive at the adhesive/dentine interface as compared to the control. Specifically, the improvement of the adhesive penetration using plasma technique was achieved by dramatically enhancing the penetration of hydrophilic monomer (HEMA), while maintaining the penetration of hydrophobic monomer (BisGMA). Morphological observation at the adhesive/dentine interface using SEM also confirmed the improved adhesive penetration. The results further suggested that plasma treatment could benefit polymerization of the adhesive, especially in the interface region. Conclusion The significant role of the non-thermal plasma brush in improving the adhesive penetration into demineralized dentine has been demonstrated. The results obtained may offer a better prospect of using plasma in dental restoration to optimize adhesion between tooth substrate and restorative materials.

Ying Zhang; Qingsong Yu; Yong Wang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Non Thermal Emission from Clusters of Galaxies: the Importance of a Joint LOFAR/Simbol-X View  

SciTech Connect

Deep radio observations of galaxy clusters have revealed the existence of diffuse radio sources ('halos' and 'relics') related to the presence of relativistic electrons and weak magnetic fields in the intracluster volume. I will outline our current knowledge about the presence and properties of this non-thermal cluster component. Despite the recent progress made in observational and theoretical studies of the non-thermal emission in galaxy clusters, a number of open questions about its origin and its effects on the thermo-dynamical evolution of galaxy clusters need to be answered. I will show the importance of combining galaxy cluster observations by new-generation instruments such as LOFAR and Simbol-X. A deeper knowledge of the non-thermal cluster component, together with statistical studies of radio halos and relics, will allow to test the current cluster formation scenario and to better constrain the physics of large scale structure evolution.

Ferrari, C. [UNSA, CNRS UMR 6202 Cassiopee, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Nice (France)

2009-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

111

The MAC-GEO project 1/84 The MAC-GEO project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of deep geothermal uids extraction process upon phreatic supercial water layers The nal product should impact of deep geothermal uids extraction process upon phreatic supercial water layers The nal productThe MAC-GEO project 1/84 The MAC-GEO project MAthematical modelling for government control

Rosso, Fabio

112

Rarefactive and compressive soliton waves in unmagnetized dusty plasma with non-thermal electron and ion distribution  

SciTech Connect

Sagdeev's pseudo potential method is employed to study dust acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized plasma containing negatively charged dusts with non-thermal electron and ion. The range of parameters for the existence of solitary waves using the analytical expression of the Sagdeev potential has been found. It is observed that, depending on the values of the plasma parameters like ion to electron temperature ratio ?, non-thermal parameters ? and ?, electron to ion density ratio ?, and the value of the Mach number M, both rarefactive and compressive solitary waves may exist.

Eslami, Esmaeil, E-mail: eeslami@iust.ac.ir; Baraz, Rasoul [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran, 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran, 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Advances in the integration of solar thermal energy with conventional and non-conventional power plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Pollution and increasing fuel prices are the main focus for governments today. The main cause of pollution is existing electricity power plants that use huge quantities of fossil fuel. A new strategy should be applied in the coming decades based on the integration of existing power plants with renewable energy sources, such as solar and wind energy. Hybridization of existing power plants with solar energy is one proven option to overcome the problems of pollution and increasing fuel prices. In this paper, a review of the previous studies and papers for integrating solar thermal energy with conventional and non-conventional power plants was carried out. The focus on hybrid solar conventional power plants includes: the review of studies of hybrid solar–steam cycle power plants, integrated solar combined-cycle systems (ISCCS) and hybrid solar–gas turbine power plants, while for hybrid solar non-conventional power plants the focus of study is hybrid solar–geothermal power plants. The most successful option is ISCCS due to their advantages and the plans for implementation at various power plants in the world like in Tunisia, Egypt, Spain, and Iran.

M.S. Jamel; A. Abd Rahman; A.H. Shamsuddin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Non-thermal high-energy emission from colliding winds of massive stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Colliding winds of massive star binary systems are considered as potential sites of non-thermal high-energy photon production. This is motivated merely by the detection of synchrotron radio emission from the expected colliding wind location. Here we investigate the properties of high-energy photon production in colliding winds of long-period WR+OB-systems. We found that in the dominating leptonic radiation process anisotropy and Klein-Nishina effects may yield spectral and variability signatures in the gamma-ray domain at or above the sensitivity of current or upcoming gamma-ray telescopes. Analytical formulae for the steady-state particle spectra are derived assuming diffusive particle acceleration out of a pool of thermal wind particles, and taking into account adiabatic and all relevant radiative losses. For the first time we include their advection/convection in the wind collision zone, and distinguish two regions within this extended region: the acceleration region where spatial diffusion is superior to convective/advective motion, and the convection region defined by the convection time shorter than the diffusion time scale. The calculation of the Inverse Compton radiation uses the full Klein-Nishina cross section, and takes into account the anisotropic nature of the scattering process. This leads to orbital flux variations by up to several orders of magnitude which may, however, be blurred by the geometry of the system. The calculations are applied to the typical WR+OB-systems WR 140 and WR 147 to yield predictions of their expected spectral and temporal characteristica and to evaluate chances to detect high-energy emission with the current and upcoming gamma-ray experiments. (abridged)

A. Reimer; M. Pohl; O. Reimer

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

115

Solvated Electron Technology{sup TM}. Non-Thermal Alternative to Waste Incineration  

SciTech Connect

Solvated Electron Technology (SET{sup TM}) is a patented non-thermal alternative to incineration for treating Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and other mixed waste by destroying organic hazardous components. SET{sup TM} is a treatment process that destroys the hazardous components in mixed waste by chemical reduction. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In application, contaminated materials are placed into a treatment cell and mixed with the solvated electron solution. In the case of PCBs or other halogenated contaminants, chemical reactions strip the halogen ions from the chain or aromatic ring producing sodium chloride and high molecular weight hydrocarbons. At the end of the reaction, ammonia within the treatment cell is removed and recycled. The reaction products (such as sodium salts) produced in the process remain with the matrix. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.999% effective in destroying: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); trichloroethane (TCA) and trichloroethene (TCE); dioxins; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX); pesticides; fungicides; herbicides; chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs); hydro-chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. In September 2007, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Research and Development permit for SET for chemical destruction of 'pure' Pyranol, which is 60% PCBs. These tests were completed in November 2007. SET{sup TM} is recognized by EPA as a non-thermal process equivalent to incineration and three SET{sup TM} systems have been permitted by EPA as commercial mobile PCB destruction units. This paper describes in detail the results of select bench-, pilot-, and commercial-scale treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes for EPA, Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense(DoD), and the applicability of SET{sup TM} to currently problematic waste streams that have very limited treatment alternatives. In summary: SET{sup TM} operates as a non-thermal destruction process under low pressure. The process occurs in a closed system producing no hazardous off-gases and no regulated by-products such as dioxins or furans or their precursors. Advantages of SET{sup TM} include: - Organic contaminants are destroyed, not just removed, diluted or concentrated. - Operates as a closed system - produces no regulated secondary wastes. - Holds an EPA permit for PCB destruction. - Operates at ambient temperatures (70 deg. F). - Portable and sets up quickly in less than 4000 square feet of space. - Scalable to accommodate any size waste stream. - Requires minimal amounts of power, water and infrastructure. - Applicable to heterogeneous waste streams in all phases. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.9999% effective in destroying organic constituents of RCRA and TSCA waste, explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In November 2007, Commodore completed a treatability study on Pyranol to determine the effectiveness of SET{sup TM} treatment on oil containing 600,000 PPM PCBs. Laboratory results proved destruction of PCBs to less than 1 PPM at low temperatures and pressures. SET{sup TM} is a proven, safe and cost-effective alternative to incineration for some of the most difficult waste treatment problems that exist today. (authors)

Foutz, W.L.; Rogers, J.E.; Mather, J.D. [Commodore Advanced Sciences, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Non-destructive Failure Analysis and Modeling of Encapsulated Miniature SMD Ceramic Chip Capacitors under Thermal and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-destructive Failure Analysis and Modeling of Encapsulated Miniature SMD Ceramic Chip Capacitors under Thermal and Mechanical Loading B. Wunderle1 , T. Braun1 , D. May1 , A. Mazloum1 , M. Bouazza1 , H-layer ceramic chip ca- pacitors as integrated passive in e. g. system in package applications needs methods

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

117

Non-thermal emission from standing relativistic shocks: an application to red giant winds interacting with AGN jets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Galactic and extragalactic relativistic jets have rich environments that are full of moving objects, such as stars and dense clumps. These objects can enter into the jets and generate shocks and non-thermal emission. We characterize the emitting properties of the downstream region of a standing shock formed due to the interaction of a relativistic jet with an obstacle. We focus on the case of red giants interacting with an extragalactic jet. We perform relativistic axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of a relativistic jet meeting an obstacle of very large inertia. The results are interpreted in the framework of a red giant whose dense and slow wind interacts with the jet of an active galactic nucleus. Assuming that particles are accelerated in the standing shock generated in the jet as it impacts the red giant wind, we compute the non-thermal particle distribution, the Doppler boosting enhancement, and the non-thermal luminosity in gamma rays. The available non-thermal energy from jet-obstacle interaction...

Bosch-Ramon, V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature and by-products formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature efficiency together with the catalyst activation temperature when a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) is placed the advantageous plasma catalyst coupling effect on the lowering of the catalyst activation temperature

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

119

GeoWells International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeoWells International GeoWells International Jump to: navigation, search Name GeoWells International Place Nairobi, Kenya Sector Geothermal energy, Solar, Wind energy Product Kenya-based geothermal driller. The company also supplies and installs wind and solar units. Coordinates -1.277298°, 36.806261° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-1.277298,"lon":36.806261,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

120

Geo Hydro Supply | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geo Hydro Supply Geo Hydro Supply Jump to: navigation, search Name Geo Hydro Supply Address 997 State Route 93 NW Place Sugarcreek, Ohio Zip 44681 Sector Geothermal energy Phone number 800-820-1005 Website http://www.geohydrosupply.com Coordinates 40.498216°, -81.661197° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.498216,"lon":-81.661197,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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121

GeoLectric Power Company NM LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeoLectric Power Company NM LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name: GeoLectric Power Company NM LLC Place: New Mexico Sector: Geothermal energy Product: Owns geothermal rights to the...

122

The effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet on attachment of osteoblast  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Despite the high success rate of dental implant surgery, the failures are still being reported and investigation have been undergone to improve attachment of osteoblast on the surface of implant material. With increasing interest in non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ), the effects of it on the cellular mechanisms have been previously reported. Hence in this experiment, effects of NTAPPJ on osteoblast for improved attachment and possible application in dental implant surgery were investigated. Mouse osteoblast cells of MC3T3-E1 were first directly treated with NTAPPJ with air for various durations. Also to investigate the effects by culture media, culture media were separately treated with NTAPPJ for the same durations. Cell attachments were then assessed following 4 and 24 h of cell culture using Water Soluble Tetrazolium salt (WST) assay and confirmed by automated cell counter and examining under confocal laser microscope. The results showed that there was significantly improved osteoblast attachment with relatively short duration of NTAPPJ treatment. Also results indicated that NTAPPJ possibly improved osteoblast attachment through interactions with proteins in culture media that in turn interacted with cells. Hence the application of NTAPPJ on osteoblast improves cellular attachment and would be useful tool for dental implant surgery.

Jae-Sung Kwon; Yong Hee Kim; Eun Ha Choi; Kyoung-Nam Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Potential cellular targets and antibacterial efficacy of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma (APNTP) has been gaining increasing interest as a new alternative antibacterial approach. Although this approach has demonstrated promising antibacterial activity, its exact mechanism of action remains unclear. Mechanistic elucidation of the antimicrobial activity will facilitate development and rational optimisation of this approach for potential medical applications. In this study, the antibacterial efficacy of an in-house-built APNTP jet was evaluated alongside an investigation of the interactions between APNTP and major cellular components in order to identify the potential cellular targets involved in plasma-mediated bacterial destruction mechanisms. The investigated plasma jet exhibited excellent, rapid antibacterial activity against a selected panel of clinically significant bacterial species including Bacillus cereus, meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, all of which were completely inactivated within 2 min of plasma exposure. Plasma-mediated damaging effects were observed, to varying degrees, on all of the investigated cellular components including DNA, a model protein enzyme, and lipid membrane integrity and permeability. The antibacterial efficacy of APNTP appears to involve a multiple-target mechanism, which potentially reduces the likelihood of emergence of microbial resistance towards this promising antimicrobial approach. However, cellular membrane damage and resulting permeability perturbation was found to be the most likely rate-determining step in this mechanism.

Mahmoud Y. Alkawareek; Sean P. Gorman; William G. Graham; Brendan F. Gilmore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Application of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma to chlorination of hardly soluble materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The chlorination reaction in which hardly soluble materials are chemically converted into soluble chlorides by atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma (APNTP) and the effect of the plasma-irradiation conditions on the chlorination reaction were investigated. The CeO2 specimens, which have the same crystallographic structure (CaF2 type, cubic) and valence fluctuation behavior as ThO2, were used to simulate hardly soluble nuclear materials. \\{CCl4\\} and He mixed gas were used as the plasma discharge. The emission and electrical properties of APNTP and dissolution behaviors of chloride generated by plasma irradiation were evaluated. The results of the emission spectroscopic analysis and electrical property measurements showed that chlorine and carbon were generated from the decomposition of \\{CCl4\\} caused by the excited atmospheric components and He. Moreover, the production of CeCl3 from CeO2 and a logarithmic progression of the chlorination reaction were indicated with increasing plasma-irradiation time.

Toru Kitagaki; Tatsuya Suzuki; Toshitaka Kaneshiki; Masao Nomura

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Time dependent evolution of RF-generated non-thermal particle distributions in fusion plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We describe fully self-consistent time-dependent simulations of radio frequency (RF) generated ion distributions in the ion cyclotron range of frequencies and RF-generated electron distributions in the lower hybrid range of frequencies using combined Fokker–Planck and full wave electromagnetic field solvers. In each regime, the non-thermal particle distributions have been used in synthetic diagnostic codes to compare with diagnostic measurements from experiment, thus providing validation of the simulation capability. The computational intensive simulations require multiple full wave code runs that iterate with a Fokker–Planck code. We will discuss advanced algorithms that have been implemented to accelerate both the massively parallel full wave simulations as well as the iteration with the distribution code. A vector extrapolation method (Sidi A 2008 Comput. Math. Appl. 56) that permits Jacobian-free acceleration of the traditional fixed point iteration technique is used to reduce the number of iterations needed between the distribution and wave codes to converge to self-consistency. The computational burden of the parallel full wave codes has been reduced by using a more efficient two level parallel decomposition that improves the strong scaling of the codes and reduces the communication overhead.

J C Wright; A Bader; L A Berry; P T Bonoli; R W Harvey; E F Jaeger; J-P Lee; A Schmidt; E D'Azevedo; I Faust; C K Phillips; E Valeo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Comparative Analysis of Non-thermal Emissions and Study of Electron Transport in a Solar Flare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the non-thermal emissions in a solar flare occurring on 2003 May 29 by using RHESSI hard X-ray (HXR) and Nobeyama microwave observations. This flare shows several typical behaviors of the HXR and microwave emissions: time delay of microwave peaks relative to HXR peaks, loop-top microwave and footpoint HXR sources, and a harder electron energy distribution inferred from the microwave spectrum than from the HXR spectrum. In addition, we found that the time profile of the spectral index of the higher-energy ($\\gsim 100$ keV) HXRs is similar to that of the microwaves, and is delayed from that of the lower-energy ($\\lsim 100$ keV) HXRs. We interpret these observations in terms of an electron transport model called {\\TPP}. We numerically solved the spatially-homogeneous {\\FP} equation to determine electron evolution in energy and pitch-angle space. By comparing the behaviors of the HXR and microwave emissions predicted by the model with the observations, we discuss the pitch-angle distribution of the electrons injected into the flare site. We found that the observed spectral variations can qualitatively be explained if the injected electrons have a pitch-angle distribution concentrated perpendicular to the magnetic field lines rather than isotropic distribution.

T. Minoshima; T. Yokoyama; N. Mitani

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

127

GeoPeak Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeoPeak Energy GeoPeak Energy Jump to: navigation, search Logo: GeoPeak Energy Name GeoPeak Energy Address 285 Davidson Avenue Place Somerset, New Jersey Zip 08873 Sector Solar Product Residential and Commercial PV Solar Installations Number of employees 11-50 Company Type For Profit Phone number 732-377-3700 Website http://www.geopeakenergy.com Coordinates 40.5326723°, -74.5284554° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.5326723,"lon":-74.5284554,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

128

Control GIS and geo-information modelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The contribution deals with the contextual design of spatial-temporal data, distinguishes three GIS level for the purposes of the regional development, land management and government and describes the role of the GIS Web services architecture that makes ... Keywords: control GIS, geo-information modelling, spatial decision support, spatial temporal approach, uncertainty

Dana Klimešová

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The role of higher-order modes on the electromagnetic whistler-cyclotron wave fluctuations of thermal and non-thermal plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Two fundamental challenging problems of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas are the understanding of the relaxation of a collisionless plasmas with nearly isotropic velocity distribution functions and the resultant state of nearly equipartition energy density with electromagnetic plasma turbulence. Here, we present the results of a study which shows the role that higher-order-modes play in limiting the electromagnetic whistler-like fluctuations in a thermal and non-thermal plasma. Our main results show that for a thermal plasma the magnetic fluctuations are confined by regions that are bounded by the least-damped higher order modes. We further show that the zone where the whistler-cyclotron normal modes merges the electromagnetic fluctuations shifts to longer wavelengths as the ?{sub e} increases. This merging zone has been interpreted as the beginning of the region where the whistler-cyclotron waves losses their identity and become heavily damped while merging with the fluctuations. Our results further indicate that in the case of nonthermal plasmas, the higher-order modes do not confine the fluctuations due to the effective higher-temperature effects and the excess of suprathermal plasma particles. The analysis presented here considers the second-order theory of fluctuations and the dispersion relation of weakly transverse fluctuations, with wave vectors parallel to the uniform background magnetic field, in a finite temperature isotropic bi-Maxwellian and Tsallis-kappa-like magnetized electron–proton plasma. Our results indicate that the spontaneously emitted electromagnetic fluctuations are in fact enhanced over these quasi modes suggesting that such modes play an important role in the emission and absorption of electromagnetic fluctuations in thermal or quasi-thermal plasmas.

Viñas, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Moya, Pablo S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States) [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, District of Columbia 20064 (United States); Navarro, Roberto [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile)] [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Araneda, Jaime A. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile)] [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Concepción Facultad de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Casilla 160-C, Concepción (Chile)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Thermal and non-thermal radiation of rotating polarizable particle moving in an equilibrium background of electromagnetic radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A theory of thermal and nonthermal radiation in a vacuum background of arbitrary temperature generated by relativistic polarizable particle with spin is proposed. When the particle rotates, radiation is produced by vacuum fluctuations even in the case of zero temperature of the system. In the ultrarelativistic case, the spectral-angular intensity of radiation is concentrated along the velocity of the particle. At finite temperatures of particle and vacuum, the particle temperature (in its rest frame) rather quickly acquires an equilibrium magnitude depending on the velocities of rotation and uniform motion and the background temperature. This equilibrium temperature determines the intensity of radiation. The dynamical slowing down takes a very long time until the kinetic energy of uniform motion and rotation is converted into radiation.

A. A. Kyasov; G. V Dedkov

2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

131

Laser schlieren deflectometry for temperature analysis of filamentary non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The heat convection generated by micro filaments of a self-organized non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet in Ar is characterized by employing laser schlieren deflectometry (LSD). It is demonstrated as a proof of principle that the spatial and temporal changes of the refractive indexn in the optical beam path related to the neutral gas temperature of the plasma jet can be monitored and evaluated simultaneously. The refraction of a laser beam in a high gradient field of n(r) with cylindrical symmetry is given for a general real refraction index profile. However the usually applied Abel approach represents an ill-posed problem and in particular for this plasma configuration. A simple analytical model is proposed in order to minimize the statistical error. Based on that the temperature profile specifically the absolute temperature in the filament core the FWHM and the frequencies of the collective filament dynamics are obtained for non-stationary conditions. For a gas temperature of 700 K inside the filament the presented model predicts maximum deflection angles of the laser beam of 0.3 mrad which is in accordance to the experimental results obtained with LSD. Furthermore the experimentally obtained FWHM of the temperature profile produced by the filament at the end of capillary is (1.5 ± 0.2) mm which is about 10 times wider than the visual radius of the filament. The obtained maximum temperature in the effluent is (450 ± 30) K and is in consistence with results of other techniques. The study demonstrates that LSD represents a useful low-cost method for monitoring the spatiotemporal behaviour of microdischarges and allows to uncover their dynamic characteristics e.g. the temperature profile even for challenging diagnostic conditions such as moving thin discharge filaments. The method is not restricted to the miniaturized and self-organizedplasma studied here. Instead it can be readily applied to other configurations that produce measurable gradients of refractive index by local gas heating and opens new diagnostics prospects particularly for microplasmas.

J. Schäfer; R. Foest; S. Reuter; T. Kewitz; J. Šperka; K.-D. Weltmann

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

A numerical model of non-equilibrium thermal plasmas. I. Transport properties  

SciTech Connect

A self-consistent and complete numerical model for investigating the fundamental processes in a non-equilibrium thermal plasma system consists of the governing equations and the corresponding physical properties of the plasmas. In this paper, a new kinetic theory of the transport properties of two-temperature (2-T) plasmas, based on the solution of the Boltzmann equation using a modified Chapman-Enskog method, is presented. This work is motivated by the large discrepancies between the theories for the calculation of the transport properties of 2-T plasmas proposed by different authors in previous publications. In the present paper, the coupling between electrons and heavy species is taken into account, but reasonable simplifications are adopted, based on the physical fact that m{sub e}/m{sub h} Much-Less-Than 1, where m{sub e} and m{sub h} are, respectively, the masses of electrons and heavy species. A new set of formulas for the transport coefficients of 2-T plasmas is obtained. The new theory has important physical and practical advantages over previous approaches. In particular, the diffusion coefficients are complete and satisfy the mass conversation law due to the consideration of the coupling between electrons and heavy species. Moreover, this essential requirement is satisfied without increasing the complexity of the transport coefficient formulas. Expressions for the 2-T combined diffusion coefficients are obtained. The expressions for the transport coefficients can be reduced to the corresponding well-established expressions for plasmas in local thermodynamic equilibrium for the case in which the electron and heavy-species temperatures are equal.

Zhang XiaoNing; Xia WeiDong [Department of Thermal Science and Energy Engineering, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui Province 230026 (China); Li HePing [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Murphy, Anthony B. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, PO Box 218, Lindfield NSW 2070 (Australia)

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

133

Bactericidal effect of various non-thermal plasma agents and the influence of experimental conditions in microbial inactivation: A review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Microbial inactivation using non-thermal gas discharge at atmospheric pressure has become a subject of significant research effort in the recent years. In this paper, we reviewed the different viewpoints proposed by various researchers, and discussed the reasons for arriving at these conclusions. We summarized some general rules, and offered a proposal to study the reasons behind their conclusions by building mathematical model for prediction of principle factors. The future prospects for the application of plasma are outlined.

Jian Guo; Kang Huang; Jianping Wang

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Thermal non-equilibrium in dispersed flow film boiling in a vertical tube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The departure from thermal equilibrium between a dispersed liquid phase and its vapor at high quality during film boiling is investigated, The departure from equilibruim is manifested by the high resistance to heat transfer ...

Forslund, Robert Paul

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Geo Energy Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geo Energy Technology Geo Energy Technology Place Gangwon-Do, Korea (Republic) Zip 210-792 Sector Solar Product Manufacturs biodiesel plants and designs and constructs solar power systems. Coordinates 37.81773°, 128.234558° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.81773,"lon":128.234558,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

136

Interactions of Non-Thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma with Solid and Liquid Food Systems: A Review  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma processes combine several advantages such as non- ... science and technology dealing with the application of plasma processes on solid and liquid foodstuff. Starting wi...

Björn Surowsky; Oliver Schlüter; Dietrich Knorr

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

OM300-GeoThermal MWD Navigation Instrument  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Develop a 300°C capable directional drilling navigation tool using Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers and flux-gate magnetometers.

138

ESS 2012 Peer Review - CAES Geo Performance for Natural Gas and Salt Reservoirs and TMH Response of GSFs - Payton Gardner, SNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CAES Geo Performance CAES Geo Performance for Natural Gas and Salt Reservoirs, Thermal-Mechanical- Hydraulic Response of Geological Storage Formations for CAES 27 September 2012 SJ Bauer, M Martinez, W. Payton Gardner, J Holland 2 CAES Geo Performance for Natural Gas and Salt Reservoirs / Thermal-Mechanical-Hydraulic (T-M-H) Response of Geological Storage Formations for CAES  Problem: Siting of CAES facilities may be limited by specific geologic conditions  Opportunity: Fundamental understanding of T-M-H will enable/extend CAES siting potential throughout the US 3 Images taken from: http://www.rwe.com/ 1. CAES in Mined Salt Caverns  Model large scale salt cavern response to air pressure cycling  Experimentally evaluate thermal cycling effect on domal salt

139

Non-destructive evaluation of degradation in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings by infrared reflectance spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At room temperature and atmospheric conditions infrared reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed for the detection of the phase transformation and residual stress within thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The TBC's samples initially consisted of the porous ceramic topcoat deposited by electron beam plasma vapor deposition a bond coat and a superalloy substrate. Reflectance spectroscopy scans were performed from 7497 cm?1 to 68 cm?1 to analysis the fingerprint region as well as the chemical bonding region. These regions should indicate if a detectable change within the TBC response is a result of thermal degradation of the microstructure and the changes in yttrium dispersion throughout the yttrium stabilized zirconium. The thermal degradation was induced by thermal cycling the samples to 1100° C and then cooling them in an atmospheric environment. X-ray diffraction was also used to detect the phase composition within the TBC samples and see if either would clearly identify failure prior to actual spallation. The eventual measurability and quantify-ability of the phase changes within the TBC's may be used as an effective non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that would allow personnel in the field to know when servicing of the turbine blade was necessary.

Adam T. Cooney

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Non-destructive evaluation of degradation in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings by infrared reflectance spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

At room temperature and atmospheric conditions infrared reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed for the detection of the phase transformation and residual stress within thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The TBC's samples initially consisted of the porous ceramic topcoat deposited by electron beam plasma vapor deposition, a bond coat and a superalloy substrate. Reflectance spectroscopy scans were performed from 7497 cm{sup -1} to 68 cm{sup -1} to analysis the fingerprint region as well as the chemical bonding region. These regions should indicate if a detectable change within the TBC response is a result of thermal degradation of the microstructure and the changes in yttrium dispersion throughout the yttrium stabilized zirconium. The thermal degradation was induced by thermal cycling the samples to 1100 Degree-Sign C and then cooling them in an atmospheric environment. X-ray diffraction was also used to detect the phase composition within the TBC samples and see if either would clearly identify failure prior to actual spallation. The eventual measurability and quantify-ability of the phase changes within the TBC's may be used as an effective non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that would allow personnel in the field to know when servicing of the turbine blade was necessary.

Flattum, Richard Y.; Cooney, Adam T. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, NonDestructive Evaluation Branch, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States)

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Thermo-chemical dynamics and chemical quasi-equilibrium of plasmas in thermal non-equilibrium  

SciTech Connect

We examine both processes of ionization by electron and heavy-particle impact in spatially uniform plasmas at rest in the absence of external forces. A singular perturbation analysis is used to study the following physical scenario, in which thermal relaxation becomes much slower than chemical reactions. First, electron-impact ionization is investigated. The dynamics of the system rapidly becomes close to a slow dynamics manifold that allows for defining a unique chemical quasi-equilibrium for two-temperature plasmas and proving that the second law of thermodynamics is satisfied. Then, all ionization reactions are taken into account simultaneously, leading to a surprising conclusion: the inner layer for short time scale (or time boundary layer) directly leads to thermal equilibrium. Global thermo-chemical equilibrium is reached within a short time scale, involving only chemical reactions, even if thermal relaxation through elastic collisions is assumed to be slow.

Massot, Marc [Laboratoire EM2C, UPR 288 CNRS - Ecole Centrale Paris (France); Graille, Benjamin [Laboratoire de Mathematiques d'Orsay, UMR 8628 CNRS - Universite Paris-Sud (France); Magin, Thierry E. [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics (Belgium)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

142

Thermal imaging measurement of lateral diffusivity and non-invasive material defect detection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system and method for determining lateral thermal diffusivity of a material sample using a heat pulse; a sample oriented within an orthogonal coordinate system; an infrared camera; and a computer that has a digital frame grabber, and data acquisition and processing software. The mathematical model used within the data processing software is capable of determining the lateral thermal diffusivity of a sample of finite boundaries. The system and method may also be used as a nondestructive method for detecting and locating cracks within the material sample.

Sun, Jiangang (Westmont, IL); Deemer, Chris (Downers Grove, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Novel AC and DC Non-Thermal Plasma Sources for Cold Surface Treatment of Polymer Films and Fabrics at Atmospheric Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Novel types of non-thermal plasma sources at atmospheric pressure based on multi-pin DC (direct ... ofdischarges mentioned and output energy characteristics of new plasma sources as well as data on after-...

Yuri Akishev; Michail Grushin; Anatoly Napartovich…

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Two-Temperature Two-Dimensional Non Chemical Equilibrium Modeling of Ar–CO2–H2 Induction Thermal Plasmas at Atmospheric Pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Here the authors developed a two-dimensional two-temperature chemical non-equilibrium (2T-NCE) model of Ar–...2–H2 inductively coupled thermal plasmas (ICTP) around atmospheric pressure (760 torr). Assuming 22 di...

Sharif Abdullah Al-Mamun; Yasunori Tanaka…

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Effect of Plasma Deposition Using Low-Power/Non-thermal Atmospheric Pressure Plasma on Promoting Adhesion of Composite Resin to Enamel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...This study investigated the effect of monomer deposition through a low-power, non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NT-APP) on adhesion of resin ... stereomicroscope and a scanning electron microscope. The

Geum-Jun Han; Jae-Hoon Kim; Sung-No Chung…

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A comparison of thermal decomposition energy and nitrogen content of nitrocellulose in non-fat process of linters by DSC and EA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Investigations of nitrogen content and thermal decomposition activation energy (E a) of two different kinds of nitrocellulose (NC) products, NMNC and MNC from the non-fat and original processes of...

C. -P. Lin; C. -M. Shu

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Hydrogen Bonds in Crystals. X. The Isotope Effect and Thermal Expansion of Non-Co-Operative Hydrogen Bonds in Furoic Acid  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

24 April 1956 research-article Hydrogen Bonds in Crystals. X. The Isotope Effect...Thermal Expansion of Non-Co-Operative Hydrogen Bonds in Furoic Acid J. McC. Pollock...Ubbelohde Ida Woodward Thermal effects in the hydrogen bonds in crystalline furoic acid have...

1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

GeoSyndicate Power Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeoSyndicate Power Pvt Ltd Place: Mumbai, Maharashtra, India Zip: 400076 Sector: Geothermal energy Product: Plans to explore and set up geothermal energy power projects in India....

149

Estimation of point of zero charge for activated carbon treated with atmospheric pressure non-thermal oxygen plasmas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Commercial activated carbon was treated with a non-thermal oxygen plasma under atmospheric pressure using three types of reactors: a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) parallel-plate reactor; an atmospheric pressure glow discharge plasma jet reactor and a DBD coaxial type reactor. The samples treated with the plasma were characterized by the pH value at the point of zero charge. An estimation of the adsorption properties of samples for copper ions in aqueous solution was also carried out in order to explain the effect of pH value on the adsorption results.

Satoshi Kodama; Hidetoshi Sekiguchi

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Non-destructive assay of mechanical components using gamma-rays and thermal neutrons  

SciTech Connect

This work presents the results obtained in the inspection of several mechanical components through neutron and gamma-ray transmission radiography. The 4.46 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} thermal neutron flux available at the main port of the Argonauta research reactor in Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear has been used as source for the neutron radiographic imaging. The 412 keV {gamma}-ray emitted by {sup 198}Au, also produced in that reactor, has been used as interrogation agent for the gamma radiography. Imaging Plates - IP specifically designed to operate with thermal neutrons or with X-rays have been employed as detectors and storage devices for each of these radiations.

Souza, Erica Silvani; Avelino, Mila R. [PPG-EM/UERJ, R. Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, Maracana - Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Souza, Maria Ines S. [IEN/CNEN, Rua Helio de Almeida, 75, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

151

Atmospheric Pollutant Removal by Non?Thermal Plasmas: Basic Data Needs for Understanding and Optimization of the Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since fifteen years an increasing interest has been devoted to removal of atmospheric pollutant by non?thermal plasmas achieved using e?beams or pulsed discharges for the nitrous oxides the so?called de?NOx process or for Volatils Organic Compounds the so?called de?VOC process. However the physical and chemical mechanisms involved are not easy to understand: molecules or gas mixtures are quite complex and the transient plasma created by the type of discharge often used dielectric barrier or corona ones is non homogeneous in space. In this paper is discussed some data needs for understanding of the NO?removal process and the destruction of some selected VOC molecules TCE and TCA by pulsed discharge plasmas. Some experimental studies performed to get insight into the discharge plasma kinetic involved in the pollutant removal are presented in particular about the hydroxyl radical OH which play an important role in this kinetic.

S. Pasquiers; M. Cormier; O. Motret

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Non-climatic thermal adaptation: implications for species' responses to climate warming  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Grahamstown, South Africa 3 The Swire Institute of...non-climatic heat sources (solar and geothermal) seems likely...Wald 2001 The European solar radiation atlas: a valuable digital tool. Solar Energy 71, 81-83. ( doi:10...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Vibrational Energy-Spectra of Protein Molecules and Non-thermally Biological Effect of Infrared Light  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The quantum energy-spectra including high excited states of the ... from metabolically active E. Coli. From this energy spectra we know that the infrared light with 1–3 ? m and 5– ... accordance with the non-line...

Xiao-feng Pang

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Eradication of marine biofilms by atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma: A potential approach to control biofouling?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Although the antimicrobial activity of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasmas, including its capacity to eradicate microbial biofilms, has been gaining an ever increasing interest for different medical applications, its potential utilisation in the control of biofouling and biodeterioration has, to date, received no attention. In this study, the ability of atmospheric pressure plasma to eradicate biofilms of four biofouling bacterial species, frequently encountered in marine environments, was investigated. Biofilms were grown on both polystyrene and stainless steel surfaces before being exposed to the plasma source. Viability and biomass of biofilms were evaluated using colony count method and differential Live/Dead fluorescence staining followed by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Rapid and complete eradication of all biofilms under study was achieved after plasma exposures ranging from 60 to 120 s. Confocal microscopy examination showed that plasma treatment has mediated not only cell killing but also varying degrees of physical removal of biofilms. Further investigation and tailored development of atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma sources for this particular application could provide an additional powerful and effective weapon in the current anti-biofouling armamentarium.

Mahmoud Y. Alkawareek; Sean P. Gorman; William G. Graham; Brendan F. Gilmore

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Heating and Non-thermal Particle Acceleration in Relativistic, Transverse Magnetosonic Shock Waves in Proton-Electron-Positron Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the results of 1D particle-in-cell simulations of ultrarelativistic shock waves in proton-electron-positron plasmas. We consider magnetized shock waves, in which the upstream medium carries a large scale magnetic field, directed transverse to the flow. Relativistic cyclotron instability of each species as the incoming particles encounter the increasing magnetic field within the shock front provides the basic plasma heating mechanism. The most significant new results come from simulations with mass ratio $m_p/m_\\pm = 100$. We show that if the protons provide a sufficiently large fraction of the upstream flow energy density (including particle kinetic energy and Poynting flux), a substantial fraction of the shock heating goes into the formation of suprathermal power-law spectra of pairs. Cyclotron absorption by the pairs of the high harmonic ion cyclotron waves, emitted by the protons, provides the non-thermal acceleration mechanism. As the proton fraction increases, the non-thermal efficiency increases and the pairs' power-law spectra harden. We suggest that the varying power law spectra observed in synchrotron sources powered by magnetized winds and jets might reflect the correlation of the proton to pair content enforced by the underlying electrodynamics of these sources' outflows, and that the observed correlation between the X-ray spectra of rotation powered pulsars with the X-ray spectra of their nebulae might reflect the same correlation.

Elena Amato; Jonathan Arons

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

OLADE-Geo-Information System Referenced Renewable Energy | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OLADE-Geo-Information System Referenced Renewable Energy OLADE-Geo-Information System Referenced Renewable Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: OLADE-Geo-Information System Referenced Renewable Energy Agency/Company /Organization: Latin American Energy Organization (OLADE) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Resource Type: Case studies/examples, Maps, Training materials, Video User Interface: Website Website: www.hidroinformatica.org/siger/home/es/index.html Cost: Free Language: Spanish; Castilian OLADE-Geo-Information System Referenced Renewable Energy Screenshot References: OLADE-Geo-Information System Referenced Renewable Energy[1] "Renewable energy sources have an important contribution to meet the growing energy demand in a sustainable manner. These energy sources have a

157

D S Geo Innogy Fraport JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Innogy Fraport JV Innogy Fraport JV Jump to: navigation, search Name D&S Geo Innogy & Fraport JV Place Germany Sector Geothermal energy Product Germany-based JV that will supply part of the airport with geothermal energy for its heat requirements. References D&S Geo Innogy & Fraport JV[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. D&S Geo Innogy & Fraport JV is a company located in Germany . References ↑ "D&S Geo Innogy & Fraport JV" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=D_S_Geo_Innogy_Fraport_JV&oldid=344021" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

158

Surface modification of biphasic calcium phosphate scaffolds by non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatment for improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Surface modifications induced by non-thermal plasma have been used extensively in biomedical applications. The attachment and proliferation of osteoblast cells are important in bone tissue engineering using scaffolds. Hence the effect of non-thermal plasma on hydroxyapatite/?-tri-calcium phosphate (HA/?-TCP) scaffolds in terms of improving osteoblast attachment and proliferation was investigated. Experimental groups were treated with non-thermal plasma for 10 min and 20 min and a control group was not treated with non-thermal plasma. For surface chemistry analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis was carried out. The hydrophilicity was determined from contact angle measurement on the surface. Atomic force microscopy analysis (AFM) was used to test the change in surface roughness and cell attachment and proliferation were evaluated using MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells. XPS spectra revealed a decreased amount of carbon on the surface of the plasma-treated sample. The contact angle was also decreased following plasma treatment, indicating improved hydrophilicity of plasma-treated surfaces compared to the untreated disc. A significant increase in MC3T3E-1 cell attachment and proliferation was noted on plasma-treated samples as compared to untreated specimens. The results suggest that non-thermal atmospheric pressure nitrogen and air plasma treatments provide beneficial surface characteristics on HA/?-TCP scaffolds.

Yu-Ri Choi; Jae-Sung Kwon; Doo-Hoon Song; Eun Ha Choi; Yong-Keun Lee; Kyoung-Nam Kim; Kwang-Mahn Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Geo mbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mbH mbH Jump to: navigation, search Name Geo mbH Place Enge-Sande, Germany Zip 25917 Sector Wind energy Product Wind farm developer and on-grid generator Coordinates 54.727247°, 8.979287° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":54.727247,"lon":8.979287,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

160

Organic pollutants abatement and biodecontamination of brewery effluents by a non-thermal quenched plasma at atmospheric pressure  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A preliminary study was carried out to investigate possible decontamination of the waste waters from a Cameroonian brewery by using a non-thermal atmospheric plasma. Samples of waste waters collected during periods of intense activity of production were first analysed for organoleptic, physical–chemical and organic parameters, and then exposed to a humid air electric discharge at ambient temperature and pressure. The resultant pollution abatement and germicidal effects are both ascribed to strong oxidising effects of OH and NO radicals formed in the plasma. The BOD removal efficiency of the process with brewery industrial wastewaters under BOD concentration of 385 and 1018 mg l?1 were 74% and 98% respectively. The alkaline wastewaters are rapidly neutralised due to the pH lowering effects of the plasma treatment.

A. Doubla; S. Laminsi; S. Nzali; E. Njoyim; J. Kamsu-Kom; J.-L. Brisset

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

ADC non-linear errors correction in thermal diagnostics for the LISA mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low-noise temperature measurements at frequencies in the milli-Hertz range are needed in the LISA and LISA PathFinder (LPF). The required temperature stability for LISA is around 10 uK/sqrt(Hz) at frequencies down to 0.1 mHz. In this paper we focus on the identification and reduction of a source of excess noise detected when measuring time-varying temperature signals. This is shown to be due to non-idealities in the ADC transfer curve, and degrades the measurement by about one order of magnitude in the measurement bandwidth when the measured temperature exhibits drifts of uK/s. In a suitable measuring system for the LISA mission, this noise needs to be reduced. Two different methods based on the same technique have been implemented, both consisting in the addition of dither signals out of band to mitigate the ADC non-ideality errors. Excess noise of this nature has been satisfactorily reduced by using these methods when measuring temperature ramps up to 10 uK/s .

J. Sanjuan; A. Lobo; J. Ramos-Castro

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

162

OpenEI:OldGeoGateway | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project page Project page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » OpenEI:OldGeoGateway Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Geothermalpower.jpg GeoInfo.png Geothermal Information Geothermal Energy Overview Types of Geothermal Resources Energy Conversion Technologies Cooling Technologies Exploration Techniques Reference Materials GeoModels.png Geothermal Models & Tools GETEM SAM Geothermal Prospector Exploration Cost and Time Metric Georesource.png Resource Assessments USGS Maps (2008) Geothermal Resource Potential Map Geothermal Areas Geothermal Regions Installed.png Installed & Planned Capacity Geothermal Generation Installed Capacity Planned Capacity Geofinancing.png Geothermal Financing Developers' Financing Handbook RE Project Finance CREST

163

Characteristics of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal N2 and N2/O2 gas mixture plasma jet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma jet driven by high frequency alternating current and operating on N2 and N2/O2 gas mixture is investigated. The plasma jet can reach 55?mm in length at a gas flow rate of 2500?l/h. The gas temperature at a distance of 4?mm from the nozzle is close to room temperature. Optical emission spectroscopy is employed to investigate the important plasma parameters such as the excited species rotational temperature vibrational temperature and excitation temperature under different discharge conditions. The results show that the plasma source operates under non-equilibrium conditions. The absolute irradiance intensity of the vibrational band N2(C-B) in the active region is measured. Taking into account the irradiance intensity of N2(C-B 0-0) and N2(B-X 0-0) as well as measured current the electron density which is determined by considering direct and step-wise electron impact excitation of nitrogen emission reaches a maximum value of 5.6?×?1020/m3.

Dezhi Xiao; Cheng Cheng; Jie Shen; Yan Lan; Hongbing Xie; Xingsheng Shu; Jiangang Li; Paul K. Chu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

FirstGeoTherm GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

FirstGeoTherm GmbH FirstGeoTherm GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name FirstGeoTherm GmbH Place Waldsee, Germany Zip 67165 Sector Geothermal energy Product FirstGeoTherm plans and engineers geothermal plants in Germany. Coordinates 49.39388°, 8.441115° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":49.39388,"lon":8.441115,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

165

Property:ModernGeoFeatures | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ModernGeoFeatures ModernGeoFeatures Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ModernGeoFeatures Property Type Page Description Describes modern surface manifestations present in vicinity of the resource area (e.g. hot springs, fumaroles, mudpots, geysers). See also Modern_Geothermal_Features This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 12 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Raft River Geothermal Area Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area S cont. Soda Lake Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Stillwater Geothermal Area Pages using the property "ModernGeoFeatures"

166

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- GeoEnergy technology  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GeoEnergy technology Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New Hot Docs...

167

Property:RelictGeoFeatures | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RelictGeoFeatures RelictGeoFeatures Jump to: navigation, search Property Name RelictGeoFeatures Property Type String Description Describes evidence of ancient surface manifestations in the vicinity of the resource area (e.g. hydrothermally altered rock, hydrothermally deposited rock) This is a property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 8 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area Soda Lake Geothermal Area S cont. Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "RelictGeoFeatures" Showing 9 pages using this property. A Amedee Geothermal Area + Hydrothermal Deposition +

168

Property:AvgGeoFluidTemp | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AvgGeoFluidTemp AvgGeoFluidTemp Jump to: navigation, search Property Name AvgGeoFluidTemp Property Type Temperature Description Average temperature of geofluid in a geothermal area. Subproperties This property has the following 15 subproperties: B Beowawe Hot Springs Geothermal Area Brady Hot Springs Geothermal Area C Chena Geothermal Area D Desert Peak Geothermal Area E East Mesa Geothermal Area G Geysers Geothermal Area H Heber Geothermal Area L Lightning Dock Geothermal Area R Roosevelt Hot Springs Geothermal Area S Salton Sea Geothermal Area San Emidio Desert Geothermal Area S cont. Soda Lake Geothermal Area Steamboat Springs Geothermal Area Stillwater Geothermal Area W Wabuska Hot Springs Geothermal Area Pages using the property "AvgGeoFluidTemp" Showing 10 pages using this property.

169

The Climatology of Parameterized Physical Processes in the GEOS-1 GCM and Their Impact on the GEOS-1 Data Assimilation System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) General Circulation Model (GCM) is part of the GEOS Data Assimilation System (DAS), which is being developed at the Goddard Data Assimilation Office for the production of climate datasets. This study ...

Andrea Molod; H. M. Helfand; Lawrence L. Takacs

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

ccsd-00001265(version1):10Mar2004 Applied Physics A (2004) accepted Silicon clusters produced by femtosecond laser ablation: Non-thermal emission and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by femtosecond laser ablation: Non-thermal emission and gas-phase condensation Alexander V. Bulgakov Institute mechanisms of cluster formation (Coulomb explosion, gas-phase condensation, phase explosion) are discussed sampled parallel to the plume axis by a 500 V repeller pulse at a time delay td in respect to the laser

Boyer, Edmond

171

A Clarification on the invariable point in the power-law energy spectra of non-thermal electrons of solar flares  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The invariable point of non-thermal electrons was proposed two years ago, based on analyzing the two intense gamma-ray line flares observed with the X2 detector on GRS/SMM. Due to too strong hard X-ray flux in...

W.Q. Gan; J. Chang; T. Ma

172

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma: Screening for gentle process conditions and antibacterial efficiency on perishable fresh produce  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Fresh fruits and vegetables, destined to be eaten raw or minimally processed only, harbor the risk of conveying pathogenic microorganisms. Factors such as weather conditions, which favor survival or growth of microorganisms, and improper handling during cultivation or in the postharvest chain, can contribute to outbreaks of food-borne illness. Application of chemical sanitizers or physical treatments often shows a limited efficiency or does not meet consumer acceptance. Availability of gentle and effective techniques for disinfection of fresh produce, therefore, is highly desirable. Non-thermal gas plasma (NTP) treatment is a promising novel technique to reduce the microbial load on fresh fruits and vegetables. However, knowledge on practical applicability of NTP for fresh fruits and vegetables is very limited. In this study, chlorophyll fluorescence imaging (CFI) was used to elucidate suitable process parameters for application of an atmospheric pressure plasma-jet (kINPen 09, INP Greifswald, Germany) on corn salad, a perishable leafy green. Keeping a distance of 17 mm to the plasma-jet, corn salad leaves could be treated for up to 60 s at a fixed power (8 W) and 5 L min? 1 of argon mixed with 0.1% oxygen. Surface temperature on leaves did never exceed 35.2 °C. Antibacterial tests were performed on corn salad, cucumber, apple, and tomato and achieved an inactivation of artificially inoculated Escherichia coli DSM 1116 of 4.1 ± 1.2, 4.7 ± 0.4, 4.7 ± 0, and 3.3 ± 0.9 log units, respectively, after 60 s treatment time. Additional tests with a dielectric barrier discharge plasma and indirect plasma treatment within a remote exposure reactor, fed by a microwave induced plasma torch, did not result in equivalent levels of quality retention as observed using the plasma-jet. Industrial relevance Development of gentle non-thermal disinfection methods aims to provide the industry with new tools to actively improve the microbial status of fresh produce beyond the preventive benefits of good hygiene practices and the limited efficacy of post-harvest washing. The presented study shows how cold plasma can be applied to heat-sensitive lettuce leaves without detrimental effects to product quality. The additional microbiological tests offer insights into the antibacterial capacity of cold plasma on different produce surfaces. The results contribute to prompt the development of appropriate large-scale plasma sources to establish a new plasma-based sanitation technique for fresh fruits and vegetables, which should also be implementable into running process lines.

Matthias Baier; Mandy Görgen; Jörg Ehlbeck; Dietrich Knorr; Werner B. Herppich; Oliver Schlüter

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

The effects of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet on cellular activity at SLA-treated titanium surfaces  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Titanium (Ti) is a primary material used for dental implants, and the sandblasted, large-grit, and acid-etched (SLA) surface treatment is commonly used on titanium to promote early osseointegration. Despite their benefits, SLA-treated Ti surfaces are disadvantaged by their hydrophobic property, and much research has been performed to address this problem. In current study, we hypothesized the effects of a nitrogen-based non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma jet (NTAPPJ) treatment on SLA-treated Ti would increase hydrophilicity and cellular activity. Samples with and without the NTAPPJ treatment were analyzed using a field emission scanning electron microscope, optical surface roughness system, X-ray photoelectron spectroscope, and water contact angle measuring system. MC3T3-E1 cells (murine osteoblastic cell line) attachments and proliferations were examined by the MTT and BrdU colorimetry assay. Cell immunofluorescent microscopic images were observed by a confocal laser scanning microscope for a morphological analysis. This study found that the nitrogen-based NTAPPJ treatment on SLA-treated Ti significantly increased the hydrophilicity and MC3T3-E1 cell attachments and proliferations. Hence, it was concluded that an additional procedure of nitrogen-based NTAPPJ treatment just prior to implantation of SLA-treated Ti into oral defect sites could improve the success of dental implant surgery.

Eun-Jung Lee; Jae-Sung Kwon; Soo-Hyuk Uhm; Doo-Hoon Song; Yong Hee Kim; Eun Ha Choi; Kyoung-Nam Kim

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Influence of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma on cellular structures and processes in human keratinocytes (HaCaT)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Background The use of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma in dermatology to improve the healing of chronic wounds is a promising application. The antimicrobial properties of physical plasma offer on the one hand the killing of bacteria, which are often a problem in chronic wounds. On the other hand, plasma can activate cells which are involved in the wound closure. Objective To guarantee a safe application it is essential to understand basic interactions between physical plasma and human skin cells. Methods In our study, human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) were directly plasma treated with a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma source and effects on viability, DNA, cell cycle, intracellular concentration of reactive oxygen species and induction of apoptosis were observed. Results A treatment time-dependent loss of recovered adherent HaCaT cells after 24 h and a linear increase of DNA damage were observed, which was no longer evident 24 h after plasma stimulation, except for long treatment times. An accumulation of HaCaT cells in G2/M phase and a decrease in the G1 phase was caused by DBD plasma. The increasing formation of intracellular ROS is also attributed to plasma treatment. In contrast to other studies we did not find clear evidences for apoptosis in adherent HaCaT cells. A culture medium exchange subsequently after plasma treatment weakened the observed effects. Conclusion DBD plasma treatment resulted in oxidative stress in human keratinocytes which is related to deficient cell performance.

Susanne Blackert; Beate Haertel; Kristian Wende; Thomas von Woedtke; Ulrike Lindequist

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Acetaldehyde removal using an atmospheric non-thermal plasma combined with a packed bed: Role of the adsorption process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This work is an attempt in order to help towards understanding the influence of the adsorption process on the removal of a VOC (acetaldehyde, CH3CHO) using cyclic non thermal plasma (NTP) combined with a packed-bed of a catalyst support, ?-Al2O3. In the first part, the results obtained by placing the saturated alumina pellets inside the plasma discharge zone are discussed, in terms of acetaldehyde removal, CO and CO2 production. In the second part, adsorption of CH3CHO, CO, CO2 and O3 was carried out, from single and multicomponent mixtures of the different compounds. The results showed that (i) the adsorption capacities followed the order CH 3 CHO ? ? ? CO 2 ? > ? CO ; (ii) O3 was decomposed on the alumina surface; (iii) CO oxidation occurred on the surface when O3 was present. In the third part, diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS) was used to follow the alumina surface during acetaldehyde adsorption. DRIFTS measurements demonstrated that besides the bands of molecularly adsorbed acetaldehyde, several absorptions appeared on the spectra showing the intermediate surface transformation of acetaldehyde already at 300 K. Finally, the relationship between the adsorption results and the NTP combined with a packed-bed process is discussed.

C. Klett; X. Duten; S. Tieng; S. Touchard; P. Jestin; K. Hassouni; A. Vega-González

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Non-thermal Cosmic Backgrounds from Blazars: the contribution to the CMB, X-ray and gamma-ray Backgrounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new assessment of the contribution of Blazars to the extragalactic background radiation across the e.m. spectrum. Our calculations rely on deep Blazar radio counts that we derived combining several multifrequency surveys. The integrated Blazar emission yields a broad-band non-thermal background that in some parts of the e.m. spectrum dominates the extragalactic brightness. Blazars are the main point-like contributors to the CMB. Their integrated emission causes an apparent T increase of 5-50 muK in the 50-250 GHz range. The CMB fluctuation spectrum is sensibly contaminated at l>300, for a Poissonian source distribution, or at lower l values if spatial clustering is present. We estimate that well over 100,000 Blazars will produce a significant signal in the PLANCK CMB anisotropy maps. Because of the microwave-Xray flux correlation, these sources are expected to have flux > a few 10^{-15} erg/s in the soft X-ray band. Thus, a large fraction of the foreground sources in CMB anisotropy maps could be ...

Giommi, P; Cavazzuti, E; Perri, M; Pittori, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Impacts of light shading and nutrient enrichment geo-engineering approaches on the productivity of a stratified, oligotrophic ocean ecosystem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...geo-engineering approaches on the productivity...Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido...geo-engineering approaches on ocean ecosystem...solar radiation management|South Atlantic...geo-engineering approaches, solar radiation management (SRM), could...

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen plasma jet for biomedical applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we have applied optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to investigate the characteristics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The discharge characteristics in the active and afterglow region of the plasma jet that are critical for biomedical applications have been investigated. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma discharge were analyzed and the average plasma power was measured to be around 18?W. The effect of addition of small fractions of oxygen at 0.1%–0.5% on the plasma jet characteristics was studied. The addition of oxygen resulted in a decrease in plasma plume length due to the electronegativity property of oxygen. Atomic and molecular lines of selected reactive plasma species that are considered to be useful to induce biochemical reactions such as OH transitions A 2 ? + ( ? = 0 1 ) ? X 2 ? ( ? ? = 0 ) at 308?nm and A 2 ? + ( ? = 0 1 ) ? X 2 ? ( ? ? = 1 ) at 287?nm O I transitions 3p5P?3s5S0 at 777.41?nm and 3p3P?3s3S0 at 844.6?nm N2(C-B) second positive system with electronic transition C 3 ? u ? ? B 3 ? g ? in the range of 300–450?nm and N2 +(B-X) first negative system with electronic transition B 2 ? u + ? X 2 ? g + ( ? ? = 0 ) at 391.4?nm have been studied. The atomic emission lines of helium were identified including the He I transitions 3p3P0?2s3S at 388.8?nm 3p1P0? 2s1S at 501.6?nm 3d3D?2p3P0 at 587.6?nm 3d1D?2p1P0 at 667.8?nm 3s3S1?2p3P0 at 706.5?nm 3s1S0?2p1P0 at 728.1?nm and H? transition 2p-3d at 656.3?nm. Using a spectral fitting method the OH radicals at 306–312?nm the rotational and vibrational temperatures equivalent to gas temperatures of the discharge was measured and the effective non-equilibrium nature of the plasma jet was demonstrated. Our results show that in the entire active plasma region the gas temperature remains at 310?±?25?K and 340?±?25?K and it increases to 320?±?25?K and 360?±?25?K in the afterglow region of the plasma jet for pure helium and helium/oxygen (0.1%) mixture respectively. Additionally the vibrational temperatures range from 2200?±?100?K and 2500?±?100?K for pure helium and helium/oxygen (0.1%) mixture respectively. The plasma jet was tested on heat sensitive polymer films used in biomedical applications such as polyethylene terephthalate and poly-L-lactide samples continuously for several minutes without causing any physical or thermal damage to the films. The plasma jet produces significant reactive species of interest while the gas temperatures remain very low demonstrating its potential for a range of biomedical applications.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Non-thermal Cosmic Backgrounds from Blazars: the contribution to the CMB, X-ray and gamma-ray Backgrounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new assessment of the contribution of Blazars to the extragalactic background radiation across the e.m. spectrum. Our calculations rely on deep Blazar radio counts that we derived combining several multifrequency surveys. The integrated Blazar emission yields a broad-band non-thermal background that in some parts of the e.m. spectrum dominates the extragalactic brightness. Blazars are the main point-like contributors to the CMB. Their integrated emission causes an apparent T increase of 5-50 muK in the 50-250 GHz range. The CMB fluctuation spectrum is sensibly contaminated at l>300, for a Poissonian source distribution, or at lower l values if spatial clustering is present. We estimate that well over 100,000 Blazars will produce a significant signal in the PLANCK CMB anisotropy maps. Because of the microwave-Xray flux correlation, these sources are expected to have flux > a few 10^{-15} erg/s in the soft X-ray band. Thus, a large fraction of the foreground sources in CMB anisotropy maps could be identified and removed using a multi frequency approach, provided that a sufficiently deep all sky X-ray survey will be available. We further show that Blazars are a major constituent of all high-E extragalactic backgrounds. Their contribution is 11-12% at X-ray frequencies and possibly 100% in the 0.5-50 MeV band. At E>100 MeV, the Blazar collective emission, obtained extrapolating their integrated micro-wave flux to the gamma-ray band using the SED of EGRET detected sources, over-predicts the extragalactic background by a large factor, implying that Blazars not only dominate the gamma-ray sky but also that their average duty cycle at these frequencies must be rather low. We also find that Blazars of the HBL type may produce a significant amount of flux at TeV energies.

P. Giommi; S. Colafrancesco; E. Cavazzuti; M. Perri; C. Pittori

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

The GEO-SEQ Project: First-Year Status Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GEO-SEQ PROJECT: FIRST-YEAR STATUS REPORT GEO-SEQ PROJECT: FIRST-YEAR STATUS REPORT Sally M. Benson and Larry Myer Earth Sciences Division Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, California 94720 smbenson@lbl.gov ABSTRACT The GEO-SEQ Project is a public-private applied R&D partnership, formed with the goal of developing the technology and information needed to enable safe and cost-effective geologic sequestration by the year 2015. The effort, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) National Energy Technology Laboratory, involves Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Stanford University, the U.S. Geological Survey, the Texas Bureau of Economic Geology, the Alberta Research Council, and five private-sector partners

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

GeoGreen Fuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GeoGreen Fuels LLC GeoGreen Fuels LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name GeoGreen Fuels LLC Place Houston, Texas Product Houston-based developer of biodiesel plants in Texas. Coordinates 29.76045°, -95.369784° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.76045,"lon":-95.369784,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

182

A Resource assessment protocol for GEO-ELEC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

protocol for GEO-ELEC Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: A Resource assessment protocol for GEO-ELEC Authors Jan-Diederik van Wees, Thijs...

183

Effect of a non-thermal, atmospheric-pressure, plasma brush on conversion of model self-etch adhesive formulations compared to conventional photo-polymerization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Objective To determine the effectiveness and efficiency of non-thermal, atmospheric plasmas for inducing polymerization of model dental self-etch adhesives. Methods The monomer mixtures used were bis-[2-(methacryloyloxy)ethyl] phosphate (2MP) and 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA), with mass ratios of 70/30, 50/50 and 30/70. Water was added to the above formulations: 10–30 wt%. These monomer/water mixtures were treated steadily for 40 s under a non-thermal atmospheric plasma brush working at temperatures from 32 to 35 °C. For comparison, photo-initiators were added to the above formulations for photo-polymerization studies, which were light-cured for 40 s. The degree of conversion (DC) of both the plasma- and light-cured samples was measured using FTIR spectroscopy with an attenuated total reflectance attachment. Results The non-thermal plasma brush was effective in inducing polymerization of the model self-etch adhesives. The presence of water did not negatively affect the DC of plasma-cured samples. Indeed, DC values slightly increased, with increasing water content in adhesives: from 58.3% to 68.7% when the water content increased from 10% to 30% in the adhesives with a 50/50 (2MP/HEMA) mass ratio. Conversion values of the plasma-cured groups were higher than those of light-cured samples with the same mass ratio and water content. Spectral differences between the plasma- and light-cured groups indicate subtle structural distinctions in the resultant polymer networks. Significance This research if the first to demonstrate that the non-thermal plasma brush induces polymerization of model adhesives under clinical settings by direct/indirect energy transfer. This device shows promise for polymerization of dental composite restorations having enhanced properties and performance.

Mingsheng Chen; Ying Zhang; Xiaomei Yao; Hao Li; Qingsong Yu; Yong Wang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Non-Profit Rebate Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rebate Program Rebate Program Jump to: navigation, search States, local governments and utilities offer rebates to promote the installation of renewable energy systems and energy efficiency measures. The majority of rebate programs that support renewable energy are administered by states, municipal utilities and electric cooperatives; these programs commonly provide funding for solar water heating and/or photovoltaic (PV) systems. Most rebate programs that support energy efficiency are administered by utilities. Rebate amounts vary widely based on technology and program administrator. [1] Non-Profit Rebate Program Incentives CSV (rows 1 - 8) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Green Energy Ohio - GEO Solar Thermal Rebate Program (Ohio) Non-Profit Rebate Program Ohio Residential Solar Water Heat Yes

185

Morphology effects on non-isotropic thermal conduction of aligned single- and multi-walled carbon nanotubes in polymer nanocomposites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon nanotube (CNT)?CNT contact and CNT distribution effects on anisotropic thermal transport in aligned CNT?polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) are studied using an off-lattice Monte Carlo numerical simulation. Inter-CNT ...

Duong, Hai M.

186

Mission analysis for hybrid thermionic nuclear reactor LEO-to-GEO transfer applications  

SciTech Connect

This paper details the results of mission analyses concerning a hybrid STAR-C based system, which is based on a safe solid fuel form for high-temperature reactor core operation and a rugged planar thermionic energy converter for long-life steady-state electric power production. Hybrid power/propulsion system concepts are shown to offer superior performance capabilities for Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) to Geosynchronous-Earth-Orbit (GEO) orbital transfer applications over chemical propulsion systems. A key feature of the hybrid power/propulsion system is that the propulsion system uses the on-board payload power system. Mission results for hybrid concepts using Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP), Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), and combination of NTP and NEP are discussed.

Widman, F.W. Jr.; North, D.M. (Rockwell International/Rocketdyne Division, 6633 Canoga Avenue, Canoga Park, California 91303 (United States)); Choong, P.T.; Teofilo, V.L. (Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc., 1111 Lockheed Way, Synnyvale, California 94088 (United States))

1993-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

187

NON  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NON-ENERGY BENEFITS OF ADVANCED WINDOWS NON-ENERGY BENEFITS OF ADVANCED WINDOWS Objectives: The project aims to discover and quantify the correlations between advanced windows and human comfort. This project builds on comfort research and applies it to fenestration products. When properly selected and operated, high-performance windows reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions. Individual designers and consumers, who are not easily persuaded that operational energy savings justify a capital cost premium, would probably respond well if improved comfort were recognized and quantified. High-performance glazing systems also provide improved protection for interior furnishings against fading damage caused by ultraviolet and short-wave visible light. This project builds on ongoing LBNL research on glazing properties to provide technical information to window specifiers regarding fading protection and advanced windows.

188

GEO NET Umweltconsulting GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GEO NET Umweltconsulting GmbH GEO NET Umweltconsulting GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name GEO-NET Umweltconsulting GmbH Place Hannover, Germany Zip 30161 Sector Wind energy Product Undertakes environmental planning and consulting in wind and other sectors. Part of the GEO-NET interdisciplinary technology-oriented research, consulting and service agency. Coordinates 52.372278°, 9.738157° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":52.372278,"lon":9.738157,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

189

Lindsay Millert GEOS 206--Renewable Energy and the Sustainable Campuses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the proposed details of a sustainable plan. The building, constructed in 1924, was intended to be usedMillert 1 Lindsay Millert GEOS 206--Renewable Energy and the Sustainable Campuses Final Paper--Green Renovation/Design May 13, 2008 Greening Garfield: the Issues and the Solutions Aldo Leopold writes in his

Aalberts, Daniel P.

190

Exploring a Marine Sanctuary Lab 2 GEO 465/565  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the nation's system of marine protected areas, to conserve, protect, and enhance their biodiversity1 Exploring a Marine Sanctuary Lab 2 GEO 465/565 Based on the Mapping an Ocean Sanctuary series of the Center for Image Processing in Education (www.evisual.org) Overview Channel Islands National Marine

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

191

Environmental model access and interoperability: The GEO Model Web initiative  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Group on Earth Observation (GEO) Model Web initiative utilizes a Model as a Service approach to increase model access and sharing. It relies on gradual, organic growth leading towards dynamic webs of interacting models, analogous to the World Wide ... Keywords: Composition as a Service (CaaS), Environmental Modelling, GEOSS, Interoperability, Model Web, Model as a Service (MaaS)

Stefano Nativi; Paolo Mazzetti; Gary N. Geller

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

NCBI GEO: archive for functional genomics data sets--update  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Genetics Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA Received and gene expres- sion profile charts. The GEO database continues to grow and is being actively developed towards facilitating data mining and discovery; this article provides an update of the current status

Levin, Judith G.

193

Large Diffractive Optics for GEo-Based Earth Surveillance  

SciTech Connect

The natural vantage point for performing Earth-centric operations from space is geosynchronous orbit (GEO); a platform there moves at the same rate as the Earth's surface, so appears to continually ''hover'' over a fixed site on the Earth. Unlike spacecraft in other orbits, which rapidly fly-over targets, a GEO-based platform remains in-position all the time. In order to insure continual access to sites using low earth orbit (LEO) platforms, one needs a large enough constellation ({approx} 50) of spacecraft so that one is always overhead; in contrast, a single GEO platform provides continuous coverage over sites throughout Euro-Asia. This permanent coverage comes, unfortunately, with a stiff price-tag; geosynchronous orbit is 36,000 km high, so space platforms there must operate at ranges roughly 100 times greater than ones located in LEO. For optical-based applications, this extreme range is difficult to deal with; for surveillance the price is a 100-fold loss of resolution, for laser weapons it is a 10,000-fold loss in flux-on-target. These huge performance penalties are almost always unacceptable, preventing us from successfully using GEO-based platforms. In practice, we are forced to either settle for brief, infrequent access to targets, or, if we demand continuous coverage, to invest in large, many-satellite, constellations. There is, fortunately, a way to use GEO-based optical platforms without incurring the huge, range-dependent, performance penalties; one must simply use bigger optics. As long as the aperture of a platform's optics increases as much as its operating range, then its performance (resolution and/or flux) does not suffer; the price for operating from GEO is simply 100-fold larger optics. This is, of course, a very stiff price; while meter-class optics may suffice for many low-earth-orbit applications, 100 meter apertures are needed in order to achieve similar performance from GEO. Since even the largest Earth-based telescope is only 10 meters in diameter, building ten-fold larger ones for GEO applications (let alone delivering and operating them there) presents major difficulties. However, since the challenges of fielding large platforms in GEO are matched by the benefits of continuous coverage, we propose a program to develop such optical platforms. In this section, we will examine a particular form of large aperture optic, using a flat diffractive lens instead of the more conventional curved reflectors considered elsewhere in this report. We will discuss both the development of this type of large aperture optics, as well as the steps necessary to use it for GEO-based Earth surveillance. In a later section of this report we will discuss another use for large diffractive optics, their application for global-reach laser weapons.

Hyde, R A

2003-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

194

Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2013 Improving the Efficiency of a Non-Pressurized Thermal Storage Tank  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Pressurized Thermal Storage Tank Overview Hydroflex had provided the team with a tank and the heat exchanger coil that was to be used to heat the tank. While attempting to improve the tank's efficiency, the team was required to keep certain parameters of the tank the same, such as it insulation and the type of coil that was used

Demirel, Melik C.

195

Minor ion heating in spectra of linearly and circularly polarized Alfvén waves: Thermal and non-thermal motions associated with perpendicular heating  

SciTech Connect

Minor ion (such as He{sup 2+}) heating via nonresonant interaction with spectra of linearly and circularly polarized Alfvén waves (LPAWs and CPAWs hereafter) is studied. The obtained analytic solutions are in good agreement with the simulation results, indicating that newborn ions are heated by low-frequency Alfvén waves with finite amplitude in low-beta plasmas such as the solar corona. The analytic solutions also reproduce the preferential heating of heavy ions in the solar wind. In the presence of parallel propagating Alfvén waves, turbulence-induced particle motion is clearly observed in the wave (magnetic field) polarized directions. After the waves diminish, the newborn ions are heated, which is caused by the phase difference (randomization) between ions due to their different parallel thermal motions. The heating is dominant in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The perpendicular heating, ?=(T{sub i?}{sup R}?T{sub i0?}{sup R})/T{sub i0?}{sup R} (where T{sub i0?}{sup R} and T{sub i?}{sup R} are the perpendicular temperature of species i before and after genuine heating, respectively), in the spectrum of CPAWs is a factor of two stronger than that of LPAWs. Moreover, we also study the effect of field-aligned differential flow speed of species i relative to H{sup +}, ?v{sub ip}=(v{sub i}?v{sub p})·B/|B| (where v{sub i} and v{sub p} denote vector velocities of the H{sup +} and species i, respectively), on the perpendicular heating. It reveals that large drift speed, v{sub d}=?v{sub ip}, has an effect on reducing the efficiency of perpendicular heating, which is consistent with observations.

Dong, Chuanfei, E-mail: dcfy@umich.edu [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States) [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Electron density measurements of atmospheric-pressure non-thermal N2 plasma jet by Stark broadening and irradiance intensity methods  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An atmospheric-pressure non-thermal plasma jet excited by high frequency alternating current using nitrogen is developed and the electron density in the active region of this plasma jet is investigated by two different methods using optical emission spectroscopy Stark broadening and irradiance intensity method. The irradiance intensity method shows that the average electron density is about 1020/m3 which is slightly smaller than that by the Stark broadening method. However the trend of the change in the electron density with input power obtained by these two methods is consistent.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Geological Sequestration of CO2: The GEO-SEQ Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeoloGical SequeStration of co GeoloGical SequeStration of co 2 : the Geo-Seq Project Background Growing concern over the potential adverse effects of carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) buildup in the atmosphere leading to global climate change may require reductions in carbon emissions from industrial, transportation, and other sources. One promising option is the capture of CO 2 from large point sources and subsequent sequestration in geologic formations. For this approach to achieve wide acceptance, t assurances that safe, permanent, and verifiable CO 2 geologic storage is attained during sequestration operations must be made. Project results are made available to potential CO 2 storage operators and other interested stakeholders. The primary performing organizations of the GEO-SEQ project team are Lawrence

198

Microsoft Word - Building Energy Codes Survey Report GEO _2_.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building & Energy Codes Building & Energy Codes Survey Results Prepared by the Governor's Energy Offi ce July 2009 The Governor's Energy Offi ce 1580 Logan Street, Suite 100 Denver, CO 80203 www.colorado.gov/energy (303) 866-2100 Executive Summary Colorado Governor Bill Ritter, Jr., issued an Executive Order on April 16, 2007, re-creating the Governor's Office of Energy Management and Conservation as the Governor's Energy Office (GEO). The GEO's mission is to lead Colorado to a New Energy Economy by advancing energy efficiency and renewable, clean energy resources. The New Energy Economy embraces energy conservation as an important component in our energy future, yet requires a broader mission to meet the goals of expanding renewable and clean energy resources and opportunities for the state's economy, environment and energy

199

Tunneling states in vitreous GeO2s  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ultrasonic measurements of the attenuation and the velocity variation have been carried out in amorphous GeO2 at low temperature (0.3–10 K) and high frequencies (80–210 MHz). From numerical fits to the tunneling model, the typical parameters of the tunneling states (TS) were determined and compared to those found for vitreous SiO2 . The study reveals that in a-GeO2 , which is considered as a close structural analog to a-SiO2 , although the density of states is found to be very similar in both materials, the coupling between the TS and the phonons is significantly smaller. In the model of coupled tetrahedra as the origin of the TS, this difference can be understood in view of the fact that numerical calculations about the vibrational characteristics of network amorphous solids indicate that the tetrahedra are more decoupled in vitreous GeO2 than in vitreous silica.

Christiane Laermans; Veerle Keppens; Robert Weeks

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Electric Storage Partners / GeoBATTERY | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Storage Partners / GeoBATTERY Storage Partners / GeoBATTERY Jump to: navigation, search Name Electric Storage Partners / GeoBATTERY Address P.O. Box 3321 Place Austin, Texas Zip 78764 Sector Efficiency Product Manufacturer and developer of utility-scale bulk grid storage systems for the electric utilities Website http://www.geobattery.com/ Coordinates 30.2667°, -97.7428° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.2667,"lon":-97.7428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

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201

Non-Thermal X-ray Emission from the Northwestern Rim of the Galactic Supernova Remnant G266.2-1.2 (RX J0852.0-4622)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a detailed spatially-resolved spectroscopic analysis of two X-ray observations (with a total integration time of 73280 seconds) made of the luminous northwestern rim complex of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G266.2-1.2 (RX J0852.0-4622) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. G266.2-1.2 is a member of a class of Galactic SNRs which feature X-ray spectra dominated by non-thermal emission: in the cases of these SNRs, the emission is believed to have a synchrotron origin and studies of the X-ray spectra of these SNRs can lend insights into how SNRs accelerate cosmic-ray particles. The Chandra observations have clearly revealed fine structure in this rim complex and the spectra of these features are dominated by non-thermal emission. We have measured the length scales of the upstream structures at eight positions along the rim and derive lengths of 0.02-0.08 pc (assuming a distance of 750 pc to G266.2-1.2). We have also extracted spectra from seven regions in the rim complex and fit these spectra wit...

Pannuti, Thomas G; Filipovic, Miroslav D; De Horta, Ain; Stupar, Milorad; Agrawal, Rashika

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Impulsive energy release and non-thermal emission in a confined M4.0 flare triggered by rapidly evolving magnetic structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present observations of a confined M4.0 flare from NOAA 11302 on 2011 September 26. Observations at high temporal, spatial, and spectral resolution from Solar Dynamics Observatory, Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager, and Nobeyama Radioheliograph enabled us to explore the possible triggering and energy release processes of this flare despite its very impulsive behavior and compact morphology. The flare light curves exhibit an abrupt rise of non-thermal emission with co-temporal hard X-ray (HXR) and microwave (MW) bursts that peaked instantly without any precursor emission. This stage was associated with HXR emission up to 200 keV that followed a power law with photon spectral index ($\\delta$) $\\sim$3. Another non-thermal peak, observed 32 s later, was more pronounced in the MW flux than the HXR profiles. Dual peaked structure in the MW and HXR light curves suggest a two-step magnetic reconnection process. Extreme ultraviolet (EUV) images exhibit a sequential evolution of the inner and oute...

Kushwaha, Upendra; cho, Kyung-suk; Veronig, Astrid; Tiwari, Sanjiv Kumar; Mathew, S K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

TNX GeoSiphon Cell (TGSC-1) Phase I Deployment/Demonstration Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the results of the installation of the TNX GeoSiphon Cell and the Phase I testing of the cell.

Phifer, M.A. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States); Sappington, F.C.; Denham, M.E.

1998-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

204

E-Print Network 3.0 - aos sistemas geo Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary: ustica submarina para exploracao e observacao do oceano (tomografia, geo-acustica, etc) sao as dimens... veiculos e necessario em tarefas de...

205

Multiwavelength Thermal Emission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

California at Santa Cruz, University of

206

Geo energy research and development: technology transfer update  

SciTech Connect

Sandia Geo Energy Programs in geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel technologies have been effective in transferring research concepts to applications in private industry. This report updates the previous summary (SAND82-0211, March 1982) to include recent technology transfers and to reflect recent changes in philosophy on technology transfer. Over 40 items transferred to industry have been identified in the areas of Hardware, Risk Removal and Understanding. Successful transfer is due largely to personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staffs of private industry.

Traeger, R.K.; Dugan, V.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Concerning the Cause of the General Trade-Winds: By Geo. Hadley, Esq; F. R. S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1735-1736 research-article Concerning the Cause of the General Trade-Winds: By Geo. Hadley, Esq; F. R. S. Geo. Hadley The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Philosophical Transactions (1683-1775). www.jstor.org

1735-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Microsoft PowerPoint - GeoSiphonTechBriefp1.ppt  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GeoSiphon GeoSiphon at a glance  U.S. patent 6,254,785  in situ  accelerated clean-up  lower operating & maintenance costs  proven technology Scientists at the Savannah River National Laboratory have developed innovative processes for groundwater remediation. Called the GeoSiphon, this process offers significant advantages over pump and treat systems, funnel and gate systems and continuous permeable wall treatment systems. The GeoSiphon Cell is a passive, in situ, groundwater treatment system which uses a siphon between two points of natural head difference to induce greater than natural flow through a permeable treatment media. GeoSiphon cells advance the current state of the art for reactive barriers (i.e. funnel and gate) by using

209

Evaluation and Application of the Constant Flow Technique in Testing Low-Permeability Geo-Materials  

SciTech Connect

Safety assessment of facilities involved in geological disposal of hazardous waste, including radioactive nuclear waste, is generally performed through mass transport simulations combined with uncertainty and sensitivity analyses. Transport of contaminants, such as radionuclides, through an engineered and/or natural barrier system is mainly controlled by advection, dispersion, sorption, and chain decay. Ideally, waste disposal facilities should be constructed in the geological environments where groundwater is not existent, or groundwater is static, or its flow is extremely slow. Potential fluid flow, however, may be induced by thermal convection and/or gas generation, and thus accurate evaluation of hydraulic properties, specifically the permeability and specific storage, along with diffusive transport properties of engineered and natural barrier materials, is of fundamental importance for safety assessment. The engineered and natural barrier materials for isolating hazardous wastes are hydraulically tight, and special techniques are generally required to obtain both rapid and accurate determination of their hydraulic properties. In this paper, the constant flow technique is introduced and evaluated. The capability of this technique in testing low-permeability geo-materials are illustrated through practical applications to a bentonite-sand mixture and rock samples having low permeabilities. (authors)

Nakajima, H.; Takeda, M.; Zhang, M. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Research Center for Deep Geological Environments, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Solar thermal propulsion status and future  

SciTech Connect

The status of solar absorber/thruster research is reviewed, and potential future applications and advanced solar thermal propulsion concepts are discussed. Emphasis is placed on two concepts, the windowless heat exchanger cavity and the porous material absorption concepts. Mission studies demonstrate greater than 50 percent increase in payload compared to chemical propulsion for a LEO-to-GEO mission. Alternative missions that have been considered for this concept include the Thousand Astronomical Unit mission, LEO-to-lunar orbit, and other SEI missions. It is pointed out that solar thermal propulsion is inherently simple and capable of moderate-to-high engine performance at moderate-to-low thrust levels. 15 refs.

Shoji, J.M.; Frye, P.E.; Mcclanahan, J.A. (Rockwell International Corp., Rocketdyne Div., Canoga Park, CA (United States))

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

OpenEI:GeoTeam | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

with form History with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » OpenEI:GeoTeam Jump to: navigation, search How to Create a new Exploration Technique Be sure the technique you want to add does not already exist - in any form of the name Go to Click on "Add a new Exploration Technique" Enter the name of the new technique - be careful to check the spelling, since this creates the page name, which can be problematic to change in the future - and click enter. You will be brought to the exploration techniques template. For the "Exploration Group" - enter one of the 8 exploration groups listed here For the "Exploration Subgroup" - enter then next level below the exploration group. If the technique itself is the next level, enter the technique as the subgroup

212

Property:GeoNames URL | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

URL URL Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type URL. Pages using the property "GeoNames URL" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A Abbotsford, Australia + http://sws.geonames.org/2178377/ + Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire + http://sws.geonames.org/2293538/ + Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates + http://sws.geonames.org/292968/ + Accra, Ghana + http://sws.geonames.org/2306104/ + Alberta + http://sws.geonames.org/5883102/ + Alger, Algeria + http://sws.geonames.org/2507480/ + Almo, Idaho + http://sws.geonames.org/5583921/ + Anaconda, Montana + http://sws.geonames.org/5637146/ + Animas, New Mexico + http://sws.geonames.org/5455243/ + Ankara, Turkey + http://sws.geonames.org/323786/ + Argonne, Illinois + http://sws.geonames.org/4883533/ +

213

Geo X GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

X GmbH X GmbH Jump to: navigation, search Name Geo X GmbH Place Landau, Germany Zip 76829 Sector Geothermal energy Product Germany-based geothermal project developer. Coordinates 48.672821°, 12.69422° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.672821,"lon":12.69422,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

214

Giangiacorno, SPE, Fluor Daniel (NPOSR), Inc.; D. Michael Dennis, Geo  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 1 Field Testing of the Biocompetitive Exclusion Process for Control of Iron and Hydrogen Sulfides Leo A. Giangiacorno, SPE, Fluor Daniel (NPOSR), Inc.; D. Michael Dennis, Geo - Microbial Technologies, Inc. This paper was prepared for presentation at the 1997 SPE Rocky Mountain Regional Meeting held in Casper, Wyoming, 18 - 21 May 1997. This paper was selected for presentation by an SPE Program Committee following review of information contained in an abstract submitted by the author(s) Contents of the paper, as presented, have not been reviewed by the Society of Petroleum Engineers and are subject to co rrection by the author(s). The material, as presented, does not necessarily reflect any position of the Society of Petroleum Engineers, its officers, or members. Papers

215

On the performance and mechanisms of toluene removal by FeOx/SBA-15-assisted non-thermal plasma at atmospheric pressure and room temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract FeOx/SBA-15 catalysts were prepared via impregnation and utilized for toluene removal in dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) plasma at atmospheric pressure and room temperature. Toluene removal was investigated in the environment of various mixed N2/O2 plasmas, showing that toluene removal efficiency and \\{COx\\} selectivity were greatly increased by FeOx/SBA-15 and that the organic intermediates were greatly reduced by catalysts. In pure N2 plasma, the bulk oxygen in the catalyst was involved in the toluene oxidation, and the 3%FeOx/SBA-15 catalyst showed the optimal toluene oxidation activity. The catalysts were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), N2 adsorption–desorption, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), H2 temperature-programmed reduction (H2-TPR) and O2 temperature-programmed desorption (O2-TPD), showing that toluene oxidation was closely related to the highly dispersed nature of iron on the SBA-15 surface, the reduction temperature of Fe2+ and the oxygen adsorption ability of the catalyst. The pathways of toluene decomposition in the combination of FeOx/SBA-15 with a non-thermal plasma (NTP) system were proposed based on the identified intermediates.

Meijuan Lu; Rong Huang; Junliang Wu; Mingli Fu; Limin Chen; Daiqi Ye

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

AE AURIGAE: FIRST DETECTION OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM A BOW SHOCK PRODUCED BY A RUNAWAY STAR  

SciTech Connect

Runaway stars produce shocks when passing through interstellar medium at supersonic velocities. Bow shocks have been detected in the mid-infrared for several high-mass runaway stars and in radio waves for one star. Theoretical models predict the production of high-energy photons by non-thermal radiative processes in a number sufficiently large to be detected in X-rays. To date, no stellar bow shock has been detected at such energies. We present the first detection of X-ray emission from a bow shock produced by a runaway star. The star is AE Aur, which was likely expelled from its birthplace due to the encounter of two massive binary systems and now is passing through the dense nebula IC 405. The X-ray emission from the bow shock is detected at 30'' northeast of the star, coinciding with an enhancement in the density of the nebula. From the analysis of the observed X-ray spectrum of the source and our theoretical emission model, we confirm that the X-ray emission is produced mainly by inverse Compton upscattering of infrared photons from dust in the shock front.

Lopez-Santiago, J.; Pereira, V.; De Castro, E. [Dpto. de Astrofisica y CC. de la Atmosfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Miceli, M.; Bonito, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Del Valle, M. V.; Romero, G. E. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Centro Universitario Regional Zona Atlantica (CURZA), Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monsenor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Rio Negro (Argentina); Damiani, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

217

Vaporization of bulk metals into single-digit nanoparticles by non-thermal plasma filaments in atmospheric pressure dielectric barrier discharges  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A compact, inexpensive and simple dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) design is presented with related electro-thermal properties for the production of metal nanoparticles. Nanoparticle formation and growth mechanisms are depicted from size distributions and chemical analyses of particles collected just after the 70 kHz DBD in nitrogen. At first, it is confirmed that the initial local vapor flux is produced from the spots of interaction between plasma filaments and different metal electrodes (Au, Ag, and Cu). Amorphous and crystalline pure metal primary nanoparticles with diameters below 5 nm are then produced by physical nucleation in expanding vapors jets. Finally, some small agglomerates with diameters still below 5 nm are also formed by ballistic agglomeration of a fraction of these primary particles. This happens at the end of the vapor jet expansion, as well as after the production during the transit between subsequent filaments in the DBD. The first local agglomeration step can be limited at reduced energy per filament by lowering the initial vapor flux in smaller gaps, while the second growth step depends on the transit time in the DBD. Hence, such “low” energy plasma filaments (up to a few tens of µJ) lower the initial vapor flux to control the agglomeration. DBD were thus successfully tested for the production of tailored nanoparticles with tunable size, controlled morphology of spherical agglomerates and the same composition as the metal electrode. The production per unit energy (mol J?1) is related to both plasma and material properties. Besides, neglecting vapor and nanoparticles losses, the mass production rate (g s?1) depends on the input power related to the product of the energy controlling the production per filament times the number of filaments per second, for any given material. This non-thermal plasma process presents great potentialities for nano-technologies since it is performed at atmospheric pressure and can be used to reach size-dependent properties of nano-materials, without any gaseous precursor or solvent.

J.-P. Borra; N. Jidenko; J. Hou; A. Weber

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

GeoF: Geodesic Forests for Learning Coupled Predictors P. Kontschieder  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GeoF: Geodesic Forests for Learning Coupled Predictors P. Kontschieder P. Kohli J. Shotton A are captured via new long-range, soft connectivity features, computed via generalized geodesic distance trans

Kohli, Pushmeet

219

The Evolution of International Geo-Political Risk 1956–2001  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we study the characteristics and evolution of international geo-political risk between 1956, the end of the Korean ... To this end we propose a database of political events with global impact that s...

Ephraim Clark; Radu Tunaru

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

"Foundation Challenges in Urban Environment" Presented by ASCE Metropolitan Section / Geo-Institute Chapter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Foundation Challenges in Urban Environment" Presented by ASCE Metropolitan Section / Geo EXCAVATION STABILITY: A CRITICAL FOUNDATION CONSIDERATION IN URBAN ENVIRONMENTS Daniel A. Vellone, PG, M: Urban construction environments in rock present unique foundation challenges. Owners, design

Merguerian, Charles

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

GeoEnergy is Beautiful 2014 – Apply by April 5th!  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

GeoEnergy Is Beautiful 2014 is a student competition promoting awareness of geothermal energy as a key player in the nation's renewable energy mix. Student teams from leading colleges and...

222

LoCuSS: A COMPARISON OF CLUSTER MASS MEASUREMENTS FROM XMM-NEWTON AND SUBARU-TESTING DEVIATION FROM HYDROSTATIC EQUILIBRIUM AND NON-THERMAL PRESSURE SUPPORT  

SciTech Connect

We compare X-ray hydrostatic and weak-lensing mass estimates for a sample of 12 clusters that have been observed with both XMM-Newton and Subaru. At an over-density of DELTA = 500, we obtain 1 - M {sup X}/M {sup WL} = 0.01 +- 0.07 for the whole sample. We also divided the sample into undisturbed and disturbed sub-samples based on quantitative X-ray morphologies using asymmetry and fluctuation parameters, obtaining 1 - M {sup X}/M {sup WL} = 0.09 +- 0.06 and -0.06 +- 0.12 for the undisturbed and disturbed clusters, respectively. In addition to non-thermal pressure support, there may be a competing effect associated with adiabatic compression and/or shock heating which leads to overestimate of X-ray hydrostatic masses for disturbed clusters, for example, in the famous merging cluster A1914. Despite the modest statistical significance of the mass discrepancy, on average, in the undisturbed clusters, we detect a clear trend of improving agreement between M {sup X} and M {sup WL} as a function of increasing over-density, M{sup X}/M{sup WL}=(0.908+-0.004)+(0.187+-0.010){center_dot} log{sub 10}(DELTA/500). We also examine the gas mass fractions, f{sub gas} = M {sup gas}/M {sup WL}, finding that they are an increasing function of cluster radius, with no dependence on dynamical state, in agreement with predictions from numerical simulations. Overall, our results demonstrate that XMM-Newton and Subaru are a powerful combination for calibrating systematic uncertainties in cluster mass measurements.

Zhang, Yu-Ying [Argelander-Institut fuer Astronomie, Universitaet Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Okabe, Nobuhiro [Academia Sinica Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, P.O. Box 23-141, 10617 Taipei, Taiwan (China); Finoguenov, Alexis [Max-Planck-Institut fuer extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse, 85748 Garching (Germany); Smith, Graham P.; Sanderson, Alastair J. R. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Birmingham, Edgbaston, Birmingham, B152TT (United Kingdom); Piffaretti, Rocco [CEA, CEA-Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Valdarnini, Riccardo [SISSA/ISAS, via Beirut 4, 34014 Trieste (Italy); Babul, Arif [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC (Canada); Evrard, August E. [Department of Physics and Michigan Center for Theoretical Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Mazzotta, Pasquale [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Roma 'Tor Vergata', Via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, I-00133 Rome (Italy); Marrone, Daniel P., E-mail: yyzhang@astro.uni-bonn.d [Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

2010-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

223

The climatology of parameterized physical processes in the GEOS-1 GCM and their impact on the GEOS-1 data assimilation system  

SciTech Connect

The Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) General Circulation Model (GCM) is part of the GEOS Data Assimilation System (DAS), which is being developed at the Goddard Data Assimilation Office for the production of climate datasets. This study examines Version 1 of the GEOS GCM by evaluating the quality of the fields that relate most closely to the GCM physical parameterizations and examines the impact of the GCM climate errors on the climate of the DAS assimilated fields. The climate characteristics are evaluated using independent satellite and ground-based data for comparison. The GEOS-1 GCM shows reasonably good agreement with available observations in terms of general global distribution and seasonal cycles. The major biases or systematic errors are a tendency toward a dry tropical atmosphere and an inadequate cloud radiative impact in the extratropics. Other systematic errors are a generally wet subtropical atmosphere, slightly excess precipitation over the continents, and excess cloud radiative effects over the Tropics. There is also an underestimation of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes over the area of maximum flux. The DAS climate characteristics, in general, show better agreement with available observations than the GCM. Four distinct ways that the GCM impacts the DAS have been identified, ranging from a DAS climate with little or no impact form the GCM bias to a DAS climate with a greater bias than the GCM due to a spurious feedback between the GCM and the input data. 59 refs., 26 figs.

Molod, A.; Helfand, H.M.; Takacs, L.L. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Kinetic study of GeO disproportionation into a GeO{sub 2}/Ge system using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

GeO disproportionation into GeO{sub 2} and Ge is studied through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Direct evidence for the reaction 2GeO {yields} GeO{sub 2} + Ge after annealing in ultra-high vacuum is presented. Activation energy for GeO disproportionation is found to be about 0.7 {+-} 0.2 eV through kinetic and thermodynamic calculations. A kinetic model of GeO disproportionation is established by considering oxygen transfer in the GeO network. The relationship between GeO disproportionation and GeO desorption induced by GeO{sub 2}/Ge interfacial reaction is discussed, and the apparent contradiction between GeO desorption via interfacial redox reaction and GeO disproportionation into Ge and GeO{sub 2} is explained by considering the oxygen vacancy.

Wang Shengkai [Micorowave Devices and Integrated Circuits Department, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 3 Bei-Tu-Cheng West Road, Beijing 100029 (China); Department of Materials Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Liu Honggang [Microwave Devices and Integrated Circuits Department, Institute of Microelectronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 3 Bei-Tu-Cheng West Road, Beijing 100029 (China); Toriumi, Akira [Department of Materials Engineering, University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2012-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

225

Report of the First GEO Forest Monitoring Symposium 4-7 November 2008, Foz do Iguau, Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report of the First GEO Forest Monitoring Symposium 4-7 November 2008, Foz do Iguaçu, Brazil Edited

226

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Solar thermal energy collection is an exciting technology for the replacement of non-renewable energy production.

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Dynamometer testing of the U.S. Electricar Geo Prizm conversion electric vehicle  

SciTech Connect

A Geo Prizm electric vehicle conversion by U.S. Electricar was tested in the INEL HEV Laboratory over several standard driving regimes. The vehicle, owned by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP), was loaned to the INEL for performance testing under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB). The Prizm conversion is the fourth vehicle in the planned test series. A summary of the test results is presented as Table ES-1. For the LA-92 and the Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles, the driving cycle ranges were 71 and 95 km, respectively. The net DC energy consumption during these cycles was measured at 199 and 154 W-h/km, respectively. During the constant-current-discharge test, the vehicle was driven 150 km at an average steady speed of 43 km/h. Energy consumption at various steady-state speeds, averaged over two tests, was approximately 108 W-h/km at 40 km/hr and 175 W-h/km at 96 km/h at 80T state-of-charge (SOC). Gradeability-at-speed tests indicated that the vehicle can be driven at 80 km/h up a simulated 5% grade for periods up to 15 minutes beginning at an initial 100% SOC, and 3 minutes beginning at 80% battery depth-of-discharge (DOD). Maximum-effort vehicle acceleration times were determined at five different battery DODs and speeds from 24 to 104 km/h. The acceleration is approximately linear up to 48 km/h, with no DOD effect; at higher speeds the curve becomes non-linear, and the effect of DOD becomes increasingly evident. Gradeability at each of these speeds was also determined, showing a decrease from the initial 26% at 24 km/h to 4% at 104 km/h.

Richardson, R.A.; Yarger, E.J.; Cole, G.H.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

"Geo-social media analytics: exploring and exploiting geo-social experience from crowd-sourced lifelogs" by R. Lee, S. Wakamiya, and K. Sumiya with Ching-man Au Yeung as coordinator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Geo-social media represents geo-tagged crowd-sourced media emerged from the wide-spread dissemination of smartphones and the availability of social media during daily social activities. Nowadays, with such novel media as a fertile ground to observe a ...

Ryong Lee; Shoko Wakamiya; Kazutoshi Sumiya

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

GeoExchange for Public Housing Authority Low,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

;Geothermal Heat Pump Efficiency One unit of energy from the grid Plus: 3-5 units of energy from the earth home is used to meet thermal loads 14 #12;Typical Residential Site Energy Usage Geothermal Heat Pump kWhperM2 Geothermal Gas Furnace w A/C 50% Site Energy Savings 16 #12;Large Scale Application Energy

230

An Account and Abstract of the Meteorological Diaries Communicated to the Royal Society, for the Years 1729 and 1730. By Geo. Hadley, Esq; F. R. S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the Meteorological Diaries Communicated to the Royal Society, for the Years 1729 and 1730. By Geo. Hadley, Esq; F. R. S. Geo. Hadley The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Philosophical...

1737-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Long-term surveillance and maintenance Geo-spatial Environmental Mapping System  

SciTech Connect

For sites currently under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) and for sites transitioning to LM, technical, operational, and environmental monitoring information continues to be of great interest to stakeholders. The Web-based Geo-spatial Environmental Mapping System (GEMS) developed by LM provides stakeholders, DOE, regulators, project staff, and the public with a user-friendly mechanism for retrieving geo-spatial and environmental monitoring information about the sites. This paper discusses GEMS and its use by LM stakeholders. (authors)

Appetta, J. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); MacMillan, S.; Miller, K.; LaBonte, E. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Junction, CO (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Experimental and theoretical study of exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by a non-thermal arc discharge for syngas production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-thermal arc discharge for syngas production A. Lebouvier1,2 , F. Fresnet2 , F. Fabry1 , V. Boch2 , V. Rohani1% and a conversion rate of 95% have been reached which correspond to a syngas dry molar fraction of 25%. For the most to POx reaction. To higher the temperature, more oxygen is needed but local combustion can happen

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

233

11/7/2004 Prashant and Penumadu. Geo-Quebec 2004 1 INFLUENCE OF SPECIMEN SHAPE ANDINFLUENCE OF SPECIMEN SHAPE AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11/7/2004 Prashant and Penumadu. Geo-Quebec 2004 1 INFLUENCE OF SPECIMEN SHAPE ANDINFLUENCE. Geo-Quebec 2004 2 Presentation outlinePresentation outline The need of laboratory testing behaviour Conclusions #12;11/7/2004 Prashant and Penumadu. Geo-Quebec 2004 3 Triaxial test on solid

Prashant, Amit

234

Understanding of interface structures and reaction mechanisms induced by Ge or GeO diffusion in Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ge structure  

SciTech Connect

The reaction mechanisms at Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/Ge interfaces with thermal oxidation through the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer have been investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that an Al{sub 6}Ge{sub 2}O{sub 13} layer is formed near the interface, and a GeO{sub 2} layer is formed on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} surface, suggesting Ge or GeO diffusion from the Ge surface. It is also clarified that the Al{sub 6}Ge{sub 2}O{sub 13} layer is formed by the different mechanism with a small activation energy of 0.2 eV, compared with the GeO{sub 2} formation limited by oxygen diffusion. Formation of Al-O-Ge bonds due to the AlGeO formation could lead appropriate interface structures with high interface qualities.

Shibayama, Shigehisa [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan) [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan); JSPS, 5-3-1 Kojimachi, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0083 (Japan); Kato, Kimihiko; Sakashita, Mitsuo; Takeuchi, Wakana; Taoka, Noriyuki; Nakatsuka, Osamu; Zaima, Shigeaki [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)] [Department of Crystalline Materials Science, Graduate School of Engineering, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

235

ECr Technologies Inc formerly GeoSolar Energy Corporation | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ECr Technologies Inc formerly GeoSolar Energy Corporation ECr Technologies Inc formerly GeoSolar Energy Corporation Jump to: navigation, search Name ECr Technologies Inc (formerly GeoSolar Energy Corporation) Place Lakeland, Florida Zip 33811 Sector Geothermal energy Product Manufactures and markets the GeoExchange geothermal heat pump systems. Coordinates 35.264796°, -89.724114° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.264796,"lon":-89.724114,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

236

Random even graphs and the Ising model Geo#rey Grimmett # , Svante Janson +  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Random even graphs and the Ising model Geo#rey Grimmett # , Svante Janson + September 19, 2007 Abstract We explore the relationship between the Ising model with inverse temperature #, the q = 2 random. For a planar graph G, the boundary edges of the + clusters of the Ising model on the planar dual of G forms

Janson, Svante

237

Entanglement in the quantum Ising model Geo#rey R. Grimmett # , Tobias J. Osborne + ,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Entanglement in the quantum Ising model Geo#rey R. Grimmett # , Tobias J. Osborne + , Petra F for the ground state of the one­dimensional quantum Ising model with transverse field. When the field is su of disordered interactions. 1 The quantum Ising model The quantum Ising model in a transverse magnetic field

Grimmett, Geoffrey

238

ORIGINAL ARTICLE GeoChip 3.0 as a high-throughput tool for analyzing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

significantly changed with the plant species diversity. As expected, GeoChip 3.0 is a high-throughput powerful Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA and 8 Virtual Institute Keywords: microarray; functional genes; microbial community; plant diversity Introduction Microorganisms

Hazen, Terry

239

ORIGINAL ARTICLE GeoChip 3.0 as a high-throughput tool for analyzing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

significantly changed with the plant species diversity. As expected, GeoChip 3.0 is a high-throughput powerful Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA and 8 Virtual Institute in microbial ecology Keywords: microarray; functional genes; microbial community; plant diversity Introduction

Weiblen, George D

240

"Foundation Challenges in Urban Environments" Presented by ASCE Metropolitan Section / Geo-Institute Chapter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"Foundation Challenges in Urban Environments" Presented by ASCE Metropolitan Section / Geo-Institute Chapter May 16, 2013, New York City FOUNDATION CHALLENGES IN THE NEW YORK CITY METROPOLITAN AREA CAUSED by foundation engineers and constructors in the New York City metropolitan area are the result of a complex

Horvath, John S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

GTube: geo-predictive video streaming over HTTP in mobile environments  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Mobile video streaming sometimes suffers from playback interruptions which are typically due to considerable network bandwidth variations that a user may experience when s/he travels along a route. Segmented adaptive HTTP streaming that switches between ... Keywords: DASH, geo-prediction, location services, mobile video

Jia Hao; Roger Zimmermann; Haiyang Ma

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

2006 GeoX Conference, pages 1 to 6 Characterisation of hydraulic fractures in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2006 GeoX Conference, pages 1 to 6 Characterisation of hydraulic fractures in limestones using X, France Jacques.Desrues@hmg.inpg.fr ABSTRACT: Hydraulic tension fractures were produced in porous, hydraulic fracture, permeability tensor MOTS-CLÃ?S: microtomographie, fracturation hydraulique, tenseur de

243

TNX GeoSiphon Cell (TGSC-1) Phase II Single Cell Deployment/Demonstration Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This Phase II final report documents the Phase II testing conducted from June 18, 1998 through November 13, 1998, and it focuses on the application of the siphon technology as a sub-component of the overall GeoSiphon Cell technology. [Q-TPL-T-00004

Phifer, M.A.

1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

244

Visualizing Multivariate Network Using GeoSOM and Spherical Disk Layout School of Information Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Connections in the network describe relationships/activities between the data points. Many real world data countries are repre- sented as nodes, each country has properties like gross domestic product (GDP), GDP Previously, we treat each graph node as a point in high-dimensional space and use GeoSOM to project the nodes

Hong,Seokhee

245

Semantic MediaWiki GeoChart | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dandrocec on 6 March, 2014 - 00:52 Points: 0 Hi Nick, I have a question. Google GeoChart API is JavaScript. How can I use it in Semantic MediaWiki? In OpenEI code I see something...

246

Carbon-aware Load Balancing for Geo-distributed Cloud Services  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon-aware Load Balancing for Geo-distributed Cloud Services Zhi Zhou1 Fangming Liu1 Yong Xu1 Chinese University of Hong Kong. Abstract--Recently, datacenter carbon emission has become an emerging of the electricity carbon footprint can be fully exploited to further green the cloud running on top

Lui, John C.S.

247

GIS&T Professional Ethics Project GEO 599 Initial Student Survey  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 GIS&T Professional Ethics Project GEO 599 Initial Student Survey A. Personal Information 1. Name familiar with the Code of Ethics by the GIS Certification Institute. 2. I am familiar with the Rules of Conduct by the GIS Certification Institute. 3. To what extent should ethics education be a required

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

248

Fuel Cell Generation in Geo-Distributed Cloud Services: A Quantitative Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel Cell Generation in Geo-Distributed Cloud Services: A Quantitative Study Zhi Zhou1 Fangming Liu of fuel cell energy in cloud computing, yet it is unclear what and how much benefit it may bring. This paper, for the first time, attempts to quantitatively examine the benefits brought by fuel cell

Li, Baochun

249

Forcings and feedbacks in the GeoMIP ensemble for a reduction in solar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forcings and feedbacks in the GeoMIP ensemble for a reduction in solar irradiance and increase Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Environment Canada, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, 5 School of Earth and Ocean Sciences, University of Victoria, Victoria, British Columbia, Canada, 6 State Key

Robock, Alan

250

GeoTran-HC: Geometric transformation of highly coupled variable topology multi-body problems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Manipulating geometry to prepare a CAD design model for mesh generation is an important step in the finite element analysis (FEA) process. However, complex problems such as electronic chip packages often consist of hundreds or even thousands of sub-features ... Keywords: Cell decomposition, Chip package, FEA modeling, GeoTran-HC, Geometrical transformation, Knowledge-based design and analysis

Sai Zeng; Angran Xiao; Russell S. Peak

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Investigation and Analysis of Winter Classroom Thermal Environment in Chongqing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the thermal sense value of the occupants, the winter classroom thermal environment was evaluated. Measures for improving the classroom indoor thermal environmental quality were also given. The lower limit air temperature of the non-air conditioned classrooms...

Liu, J.; Li, B.; Yao, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Structure of GeO2 glass at pressures up to 8.6 GPa  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The structure of GeO2 glass at pressures extending from ambient to 8.6(5) GPa was measured at ?25?°C by using in situ neutron diffraction. The results show a gradual change in the intermediate range order with increasing density as manifested by an increase in position and reduction in height of the first sharp diffraction peak in the total structure factor. By contrast, the local ordering, as characterized by the Ge-O bond length and coordination number, remains constant for the pressure range from ambient to ?5?GPa. As the pressure is increased further to 8.6(5) GPa, however, a steady increase from 4.0(1) to 4.9(1) is observed in the Ge-O coordination number as the corresponding distance increases from 1.73(2) to 1.77(2)?Å. The results are therefore consistent with the operation of two densification mechanisms, the low-pressure one associated with squeezing the open network of corner-linked tetrahedral motifs and the high-pressure one associated with a transformation of those motifs. There is no evidence in support of an abrupt transformation of the network structure over the investigated pressure range. The structure of permanently densified GeO2 glass was also investigated by high-energy x-ray diffraction. The results show that there is a threshold pressure at ?5?GPa below which the structure of a recovered glass is similar to that of the high-pressure material. Above the threshold pressure there is, however, a reorganization of both the local and intermediate range ordering once the pressure is released and the Ge-O coordination number returns to 4.

James W. E. Drewitt; Philip S. Salmon; Adrian C. Barnes; Stefan Klotz; Henry E. Fischer; Wilson A. Crichton

2010-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

253

An automated vision-based method for rapid 3D energy performance modeling of existing buildings using thermal and digital imagery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Modeling the energy performance of existing buildings enables quick identification and reporting of potential areas for building retrofit. However, current modeling practices of using energy simulation tools do not model the energy performance of buildings at their element level. As a result, potential retrofit candidates caused by construction defects and degradations are not represented. Furthermore, due to manual modeling and calibration processes, their application is often time-consuming. Current application of 2D thermography for building diagnostics is also facing several challenges due to a large number of unordered and non-geo-tagged images. To address these limitations, this paper presents a new computer vision-based method for automated 3D energy performance modeling of existing buildings using thermal and digital imagery captured by a single thermal camera. First, using a new image-based 3D reconstruction pipeline which consists of Graphic Processing Unit (GPU)-based Structure-from-Motion (SfM) and Multi-View Stereo (MVS) algorithms, the geometrical conditions of an existing building is reconstructed in 3D. Next, a 3D thermal point cloud model of the building is generated by using a new 3D thermal modeling algorithm. This algorithm involves a one-time thermal camera calibration, deriving the relative transformation by forming the Epipolar geometry between thermal and digital images, and the MVS algorithm for dense reconstruction. By automatically superimposing the 3D building and thermal point cloud models, 3D spatio-thermal models are formed, which enable the users to visualize, query, and analyze temperatures at the level of 3D points. The underlying algorithms for generating and visualizing the 3D spatio-thermal models and the 3D-registered digital and thermal images are presented in detail. The proposed method is validated for several interior and exterior locations of a typical residential building and an instructional facility. The experimental results show that inexpensive digital and thermal imagery can be converted into ubiquitous reporters of the actual energy performance of existing buildings. The proposed method expedites the modeling process and has the potential to be used as a rapid and robust building diagnostic tool.

Youngjib Ham; Mani Golparvar-Fard

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

All-sky search for gravitational-wave bursts in the first joint LIGO-GEO-Virgo run  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from an all-sky search for unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts in the data collected by the LIGO, GEO 600 and Virgo detectors between November 2006 and October 2007. The search is performed by three ...

Weiss, Rainer

255

Towards a Better Understanding of the GRB Phenomenon: a New Model for GRB Prompt Emission and its effects on the New Non-Thermal L$_\\mathrm{i}^\\mathrm{NT}$-E$_\\mathrm{peak,i}^\\mathrm{rest,NT}$ relation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We reanalyze the prompt emission of two of the brightest Fermi GRBs (080916C and 090926A) with a new model composed of 3 components: (i) a thermal-like component--approximated with a black body (BB)--interpreted as the jet photosphere emission of a magnetized relativistic outflow, (ii) a non-thermal component--approximated with a Band function--interpreted as synchrotron radiation in an optically thin region above the photosphere either from internal shocks or magnetic field dissipation, and (iii) an extra power law (PL) extending from low to high energies likely of inverse Compton origin, even though it remains challenging. Through fine-time spectroscopy down to the 100 ms time scale, we follow the smooth evolution of the various components. From this analysis the Band function is globally the most intense component, although the additional PL can overpower the others in sharp time structures. The Band function and the BB component are the most intense at early times and globally fade across the burst durati...

Guiriec, S; Daigne, F; Zhang, B; Hascoet, R; Nemmen, R; Thompson, D; Bhat, N; Gehrels, N; Gonzalez, M; Kaneko, Y; McEnery, J; Mochkovitch, R; Racusin, J; Ryde, F; Sacahui, J; Unsal, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Flows and Non-thermal Velocities in Solar Active Regions Observed with the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on Hinode: A Tracer of Active Region Sources of Heliospheric Magnetic Fields?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From Doppler velocity maps of active regions constructed from spectra obtained by the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on the Hinode spacecraft we observe large areas of outflow (20-50 km/s) that can persist for at least a day. These outflows occur in areas of active regions that are faint in coronal spectral lines formed at typical quiet Sun and active region temperatures. The outflows are positively correlated with non-thermal velocities in coronal plasmas. The bulk mass motions and non-thermal velocities are derived from spectral line centroids and line widths, mostly from a strong line of Fe XII at 195.12 Angstroms. The electron temperature of the outflow regions estimated from an Fe XIII to Fe XII line intensity ratio is about 1.2-1.4 MK. The electron density of the outflow regions derived from a density sensitive intensity ratio of Fe XII lines is rather low for an active region. Most regions average around 7E10+8 cm(-3), but there are variations on pixel spatial scales of about a factor of 4. We discuss results in detail for two active regions observed by EIS. Images of active regions in line intensity, line width, and line centroid are obtained by rastering the regions. We also discuss data from the active regions obtained from other orbiting spacecraft that support the conclusions obtained from analysis of the EIS spectra. The locations of the flows in the active regions with respect to the longitudinal photospheric magnetic fields suggest that these regions might be tracers of long loops and/or open magnetic fields that extend into the heliosphere, and thus the flows could possibly contribute significantly to the solar wind.

G. A. Doschek; H. P. Warren; J. T. Mariska; K. Muglach; J. L. Culhane; H. Hara; T Watanabe

2008-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

257

A Plastic for Thermal Insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... ft. per in. thickness per 1° F. difference of temperature, so that its insulation properties compare very favourably with slab-cork (0-25 B.TH.U.), glass ... tenth that of slab-cork. This makes it of considerable interest in connexion with thermal insulation during transport. Isoflex is non-porous and non-absorbent, with the result that its ...

1941-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

258

THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.  

SciTech Connect

Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

2004-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

259

Thermal treatment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal treatment can be regarded as either a pre-treatment of waste prior to final disposal, or as a means of valorising waste by recovering energy. It includes both the burning of mixed MSW in municipal inciner...

Dr. P. White; Dr. M. Franke; P. Hindle

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Thermal Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass, to release hydrogen, which is part of their molecular structure. In other processes, heat, in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Underground Coal Thermal Treatment  

SciTech Connect

The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coalâ??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: â?¢ Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). â?¢ Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). â?¢ Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). â?¢ Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma induces apoptosis in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma: Involvement of DNA-damage-triggering sub-G1 arrest via the ATM/p53 pathway  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Recent advances in physics have made possible the use of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma (NTP) in cancer research. Although increasing evidence suggests that NTP induces death of various cancer cell types, thus offering a promising alternative treatment, the mechanism of its therapeutic effect is little understood. In this study, we report for the first time that NTP led to apoptotic cell death in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Interestingly, NTP induced a sub-G1 arrest in p53 wild-type OSCCs, but not in p53-mutated OSCCs. In addition, NTP increased the expression levels of ATM, p53 (Ser 15, 20 and 46), p21, and cyclin D1. A comet assay, Western blotting and immunocytochemistry of ?H2AX suggested that NTP-induced apoptosis and sub-G1 arrest were associated with DNA damage and the ATM/p53 signaling pathway in SCC25 cells. Moreover, ATM knockdown using siRNA attenuated the effect of NTP on cell death, sub-G1 arrest and related signals. Taken together, these results indicate that NTP induced apoptotic cell death in p53 wild-type \\{OSCCs\\} through a novel mechanism involving DNA damage and triggering of sub-G1 arrest via the ATM/p53 pathway. These findings show the therapeutic potential of NTP in OSCC.

Jae Won Chang; Sung Un Kang; Yoo Seob Shin; Kang Il Kim; Seong Jin Seo; Sang Sik Yang; Jong-Soo Lee; Eunpyo Moon; Seung Jae Baek; Keunho Lee; Chul-Ho Kim

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

An Account and Abstract of the Meteorological Observations Communicated to the Royal Society, for the Years 1731, 1732, 1733, 1734 and 1735. By Geo. Hadley, Esq; F. R. S.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Observations Communicated to the Royal Society, for the Years 1731, 1732, 1733, 1734 and 1735. By Geo. Hadley, Esq; F. R. S. Geo. Hadley The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Philosophical...

1742-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

The Treatment of Mixed Waste with GeoMelt In-Container Vitrification  

SciTech Connect

AMEC's GeoMelt{sup R} In-Container Vitrification (ICV){sup TM} has been used to treat diverse types of mixed low-level radioactive waste. ICV is effective in the treatment of mixed wastes containing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and other semi-volatile organic compounds, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and heavy metals. The GeoMelt vitrification process destroys organic compounds and immobilizes metals and radionuclides in an extremely durable glass waste form. The process is flexible allowing for treatment of aqueous, oily, and solid mixed waste, including contaminated soil. In 2004, ICV was used to treat mixed radioactive waste sludge containing PCBs generated from a commercial cleanup project regulated by the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA), and to treat contaminated soil from Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site. The Rocky Flats soil contained cadmium, PCBs, and depleted uranium. In 2005, AMEC completed a treatability demonstration of the ICV technology on Mock High Explosive from Sandia National Laboratories. This paper summarizes results from these mixed waste treatment projects. (authors)

Finucane, K.G.; Campbell, B.E. [AMEC Earth and Environmental, Inc., 1135 Jadwin Avenue, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Geo-neutrino Observation S.T. Dye^'^ M. Alderman^, M. Batygov^ J.G. Learned^ S. Matsuno^  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-neutrino observation and describes the scientific capabilities of the deep ocean observatory, with emphasis on geology are in the decay series of uranium-238 and thorium-232. Terrestrial antineutrino observation relies on detecting comprehensive reviews of geo-neutrinos exist in the literature''^. Uranium-238 and thorium-232, the parent

Mcdonough, William F.

267

Non-Aqueous Battery Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...0 V. Practical non-aqueous batteries have energies extending from 100...electric watches to 20 kWh secondary batteries being developed for vehicle traction...10 years, to a military lithium thermal battery delivering all of its energy in...

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Thermally switchable dielectrics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Precursor polymers to conjugated polymers, such as poly(phenylene vinylene), poly(poly(thiophene vinylene), poly(aniline vinylene), and poly(pyrrole vinylene), can be used as thermally switchable capacitor dielectrics that fail at a specific temperature due to the non-conjugated precursor polymer irreversibly switching from an insulator to the conjugated polymer, which serves as a bleed resistor. The precursor polymer is a good dielectric until it reaches a specific temperature determined by the stability of the leaving groups. Conjugation of the polymer backbone at high temperature effectively disables the capacitor, providing a `built-in` safety mechanism for electronic devices.

Dirk, Shawn M.; Johnson, Ross S.

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

Raman spectroscopic study of the pressure-induced coordination change in GeO2 glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Raman spectra of GeO2 glass are recorded in situ as a function of pressure to 56 GPa at room temperature. Under initial compression to 6 GPa the main 419-cm-1 Raman band shifts to higher frequency and broadens with a gradual loss of intensity. These spectral changes are consistent with an increase in distortion of GeO4 tetrahedra and a decrease in the intertetrahedral bond angle with pressure. Between 6 and 13 GPa (the pressure range of the reported fourfold- to sixfold-coordination change of Ge in germania glass) the main Raman band broadens, and the scattering intensity is dramatically reduced with little shift in peak frequency. This pressure interval is also marked with the appearance and growth of a broad low-frequency band near 240 cm-1. The inferred pressure-induced coordination change occurs without the formation of nonbridging oxygens. Above 13 GPa no further major structural changes are indicated by the Raman data taken with pressures up to 56 GPa. On decompression the back transformation of octahedral Ge to tetrahedral coordination is complete but exhibits a large hysteresis. The Raman data indicate that the high-coordinate germanium species are retained down to pressures of at least 2.3 GPa. In samples decompressed from high pressures, the intensity of the 520-cm-1 ‘‘defect’’ band is considerably enhanced relative to that in normal germania glass, consistent with an increase in three-membered-ring population. It is proposed that a large component of this increase in three-membered rings is a result of the reversion of OIII species to tetrahedra-bridging OII species under decompression.

Dan J. Durben and George H. Wolf

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

Practical Solar Thermal Chilled Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the potential to impact America's use of non-renewable energy beyond its own design capacity by applying it to the optimization of an existing building's system. Solar-thermal chilling systems are not new. However, few of them can be described as a practical...

Leavell, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Los Alamos probes mysteries of uranium dioxide's thermal conductivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of nuclear materials into the hands of terrorists and other non-state actors. The depleted uranium dioxide crystals used for the thermal conductivity measurements were...

272

Thermally induced photon splitting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate thermal corrections to the non-linear QED effective action for low-energy photon interactions in a background electromagnetic field. The high-temperature expansion shows that at $T \\gg m$ the vacuum contribution is exactly cancelled to all orders in the external field except for a non-trivial two-point function contribution. The high-temperature expansion derived reveals a remarkable cancellation of infrared sensitive contributions. As a result photon-splitting in the presence of a magnetic field is suppressed in the presence of an electron-positron QED-plasma at very high temperatures. In a cold and dense plasma a similar suppression takes place. At the same time Compton scattering dominates for weak fields and the suppression is rarely important in physical situations.

Per Elmfors; Bo-Sture Skagerstam

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

273

The component interaction network approach for modeling of complex thermal systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A practical approach for the thermal modeling of complex thermal systems, called the component interaction network (CIN) is presented. Its stages are explained: description of the thermal system as a set of non-overlapping components and their interactions ... Keywords: Component interaction network, Electric furnace, Experimental validation, Heat transfer, Rapid thermal processing, Thermal modeling

K. El Khoury; G. Mouawad; G. El Hitti; M. Nemer

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Phase-change radiative thermal diode  

SciTech Connect

A thermal diode transports heat mainly in one preferential direction rather than in the opposite direction. This behavior is generally due to the non-linear dependence of certain physical properties with respect to the temperature. Here we introduce a radiative thermal diode which rectifies heat transport thanks to the phase transitions of materials. Rectification coefficients greater than 70% and up to 90% are shown, even for small temperature differences. This result could have important applications in the development of future contactless thermal circuits or in the conception of radiative coatings for thermal management.

Ben-Abdallah, Philippe, E-mail: pba@institutoptique.fr [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, UMR 8501, Institut d'Optique, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud 11, 2, Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, UMR 8501, Institut d'Optique, CNRS, Université Paris-Sud 11, 2, Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Biehs, Svend-Age, E-mail: s.age.biehs@uni-oldenburg.de [Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany)] [Institut für Physik, Carl von Ossietzky Universität, D-26111 Oldenburg (Germany)

2013-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

275

Modeling of Air Pollution over the Ganges Basin and North-West Bay of Bengal in the Early Post-monsoon Season Using the NASA GEOS-5 Model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The NASA GEOS-5 model was used to extend the MERRA reanalysis with five atmospheric aerosol components (sulfates, organic carbon, black carbon, desert dust, and sea-salt). The obtained eight-year (2002–2009) MERR...

Pavel Kishcha; Arlindo M. da Silva…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Yngve Kristoffersen, University of Bergen, Allegaten 41, Bergen, 5007 Norway, yngve.kristoffersen@geo.uib.no Coen Hofstede, AWI, Bremerhaven, Germany  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.kristoffersen@geo.uib.no Coen Hofstede, AWI, Bremerhaven, Germany Olaf Eisen, AWI, Bremerhaven, Germany Lomonosov Canada Basin Coen Hofstede, AWI, Bremerhaven, Germany Olaf Eisen, AWI, Bremerhaven, Germany Richard Blenkner, Dept

Kristoffersen, Yngve

277

SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.  

SciTech Connect

This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report “SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report”, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

Edwards, Lloyd A. [Leading Solutions, LLC.; Paresol, Bernard [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

EPR investigation of defects in Bi12GeO20:Cr single crystal irradiated by high energy uranium ions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The results of investigations of EPR spectra of chromium doped $Bi_{12} GeO_{20} (BGO)$ single crystals are presented. The crystals were studied before and after irradiation by the $^{235}U$ ions with energy 9.47 MeV/u and fluency $5 \\cdot 10^{2} cm^{-2}$. The effect of heating irradiated samples in air on the EPR spectra is also studied.

Stefaniuk, I; Rogalska, I; Wróbel, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Innovative reuse of drinking water sludge in geo-environmental applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In recent years, the replacement of natural raw materials with new alternative materials, which acquire an economic, energetic and environmental value, has gained increasing importance. The considerable consumption of water has favoured the increase in the number of drinking water treatment plants and, consequently, the production of drinking water sludge. This paper proposes a protocol of analyses capable of evaluating chemical characteristics of drinking water sludge from surface water treatment plants. Thereby we are able to assess their possible beneficial use for geo-environmental applications, such as the construction of barrier layers for landfill and for the formation of “bio-soils”, when mixed with the stabilized organic fraction of municipal solid waste. This paper reports the results of a study aimed at evaluating the quality and environmental aspects of reconstructed soils (“bio-soil”), which are used in much greater quantities than the usual standard, for “massive” applications in environmental actions such as the final cover of landfills. The granulometric, chemical and physical analyses of the sludge and the leaching test on the stabilized organic fraction showed the suitability of the proposed materials for reuse. The study proved that the reuse of drinking water sludge for the construction of barrier layers and the formation of “bio-soils” reduces the consumption of natural materials, the demand for landfill volumes, and offers numerous technological advantages.

D. Caniani; S. Masi; I.M. Mancini; E. Trulli

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Thermal unobtainiums? The perfect thermal conductor and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contribute to thermal resistance · Isotopically pure diamond has highest thermal conductivity of any material materials: disordered layered crystals Conclude with some thoughts on promising, high-risk, research even in a computer model. #12;Thermal resistance is created by Umklapp scattering (U

Braun, Paul

282

Thermal Control & System Integration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

283

The Hydrological Impact of Geoengineering in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)  

SciTech Connect

Abstract: The hydrologic impact of enhancing Earth’s albedo due to solar radiation management (SRM) is investigated using simulations from 12 models contributing to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). An artificial experiment is investigated, where global mean temperature is preserved at pre-industrial conditions, while atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are quadrupled. The associated reduction of downwelling surface solar radiation in a high CO2 environment leads to a reduction of global evaporation of 10% and 4% and precipitation of 6.1% and 6.3% over land and ocean, respectively. An initial reduction of latent heat flux at the surface is largely driven by reduced evapotranspiration over land with instantly increasing CO2 concentrations in both experiments. A warming surface associated with the transient adjustment in the 4xCO2 experiment further generates an increase of global precipitation, with considerable regional changes, such as a significant precipitation reduction of 7% for the North American summer monsoon. Reduced global precipitation persists in the geoengineered experiment where temperatures are stabilized, with considerable regional rainfall deficits. Precipitation reductions that are consistent in sign across models are identified in the geoengineered experiment over monsoonal land regions of East Asia (6%), North America (7%), South America (6%) and South Africa (5%). In contrast to the 4xCO2 experiment, where the frequency of months with heavy precipitation intensity is increased by over 50%, it is reduced by up to 20% in the geoengineering scenario . The reduction in heavy precipitation is more pronounced over land than over the ocean, and accompanies a stronger reduction in evaporation over land. For northern mid-latitudes, maximum precipitation reduction over land ranges from 1 to 16% for individual models. For 45-65°N, the frequency of median to high intensity precipitation in summer is strongly reduced. These changes in precipitation in both total amount and frequency of extremes, point to a considerable weakening of the hydrological cycle in a geoengineered world.

Tilmes, S.; Fasullo, John; Lamarque, J.-F.; Marsh, D.; Mills, Mike; Alterskjaer, Kari; Muri, Helene O.; Kristjansson, Jon E.; Boucher, Olivier; Schulz, M.; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Jones, A.; Haywood, J.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Moore, John; Bou Karam, Diana; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rasch, Philip J.; Singh, Balwinder; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Robock, Alan; Yang, Shuting; Watanabe, Shingo

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

284

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a better thermal conductance and when ceramic particles areor ceramic fillers that enhances thermal conductivity. Solid

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Solar Thermal Incentive Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Incentive Program Thermal Incentive Program Solar Thermal Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Residential: $4,000 per site/meter Non-residential: $25,000 per site/meter Incentive also capped at 80% of calculated existing thermal load Program Info Funding Source RPS surcharge Start Date 12/10/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2015 State New York Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount $1.50 per kWh displaced annually, for displacement of up to 80% of calculated existing thermal load Provider New York State Energy Research and Development Authority The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)

286

A boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier  

SciTech Connect

The precise guidance of heat from one specific location to another is paramount in many industrial and commercial applications, including thermal management and thermoelectric generation. One of the cardinal requirements is a preferential conduction of thermal energy, also known as thermal rectification, in the materials. This study introduces a novel nanomaterial for rectifying heat—the boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier. Classical non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed on this nanomaterial, and interestingly, the strength of the rectification phenomenon is dissimilar at different operating temperatures. This is due to the contingence of the thermal flux on the conductance at the localized region around the scatterer, which varies with temperature. The rectification performance of the peapod rectifier is inherently dependent on its asymmetry. Last but not least, the favourable rectifying direction in the nanomaterial is established.

Loh, G. C., E-mail: jgloh@mtu.edu [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Baillargeat, D. [CNRS-International-NTU-Thales Research Alliance (CINTRA), 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

287

Numerical Modeling of the Transient Thermal Interference of Vertical U-Tube Haet Exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

installation separation range. Non-homogenous media were modeled by varying backfill thermal conductivity. Maximum heat transfer was achieved with a fictitious backfill thermal conductivity of 1,000 W/m-K, while measured bentonite backfill conductivities were...

Muraya, Norman K.

288

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-E’s HEATS program, short for “High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage,” seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Holographic thermalization patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the behaviour of various correlators in N=4 super Yang Mills theory, taking finite coupling corrections into account. In the thermal limit we investigate the flow of the quasinormal modes as a function of the 't Hooft coupling. Then by using a specific model of holographic thermalization we investigate the deviation of the spectral densities from their thermal limit in an out-of-equilibrium situation. The main focus lies on the thermalization pattern with which the various plasma constituents of different energies approach their final thermal distribution as the coupling constant decreases from the infinite coupling limit. All results point towards the weakening of the usual top down thermalization pattern.

Stefan Stricker

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

290

Holographic thermalization patterns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the behaviour of various correlators in N=4 super Yang Mills theory, taking finite coupling corrections into account. In the thermal limit we investigate the flow of the quasinormal modes as a function of the 't Hooft coupling. Then by using a specific model of holographic thermalization we investigate the deviation of the spectral densities from their thermal limit in an out-of-equilibrium situation. The main focus lies on the thermalization pattern with which the various plasma constituents of different energies approach their final thermal distribution as the coupling constant decreases from the infinite coupling limit. All results point towards the weakening of the usual top down thermalization pattern.

Stricker, Stefan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Insulation products promote thermal efficiency  

SciTech Connect

The judicious use of thermal insulation products in non-residential buildings can provide a number of advantages including increased energy efficiency, lower first costs (by avoiding overside HVAC systems), improved fire safety and better acoustics. Thermal insulation products are those products which retard the flow of heat energy. Materials include glass, plastics, and organic materials such as wood fibers, vermiculite and perlite. Forms range from the familiar batts and blankets of glass fibers to foamed plastic, rigid boards, losse fill and systems combining two or more products, such as polystyrene boards covered with insulating plaster. The R values of selected insulation materials with a cost/sq. ft. of each material at R 10 are given. Costs cover both the material and installation and may vary depending on local conditions.

Chalmers, R.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Thermal contact resistance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work deals with phenomena of thermal resistance for metallic surfaces in contact. The main concern of the work is to develop reliable and practical methods for prediction of the thermal contact resistance for various ...

Mikic, B. B.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Solar Thermal Processes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of solar energy for desalination purposes was one of ... The process is based on the use of solar thermal energy to evaporate water, thus separating pure ... brine. In this chapter an overview of solar thermal

M.T. Chaibi; Ali M. El-Nashar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Thermal Neutron Scattering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... of its title. It is not for the nuclear physicist, nor even for the neutron physicist, but for the student of solids and liquids. "Thermal ... physicist, but for the student of solids and liquids. "Thermal neutron ...

G. E. BACON

1968-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

295

Thermal neutron detection system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

Moreno, G.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Phase change thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storge composition is disclosed. The composition comprises a non-chloride hydrate having a phase change transition temperature in the range of 70.degree.-95.degree. F. and a latent heat of transformation of at least about 35 calories/gram.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

STANDARD DATA FILES FOR COMPUTER THERMAL SIMULATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STANDARD DATA FILES FOR COMPUTER THERMAL SIMULATION OF SOLAR LOW ENERGY NON-RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS has been collated into descriptions of standard buildings to provide starting points for designers); Weather File Analyses (6) Standard Model Building Descriptions 6 Testing of Model Buildings 7 Summary 7

Amor, Robert

299

Support Effect in the Thermal Decomposition of Some Catalyst Precursors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal decompositions of ammonium metavanadate, molybdic acid and ammonium phosphomolybdate supported on carborundum or silica were subjected to non-isothermal kinetic study. The compensation effect is di...

T. Vlase; G. Jurca; N. Doca

300

Photo-Thermal Effects in Fiber Bragg Gratings  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The photo-thermal effect describes the absorption of light and a change in grating characteristics via dn/dT, which can mask fast non-linear optical effects. The effect is...

Littler, Ian C; Grujic, Thomas; Eggleton, Benjamin J

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

temperature energy resources such as solar thermal,low temperature energy resources such as solar ponds (70 orenewable energy resources such as non-concentrated solar

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Thermal Insulation in Solar Thermal Devices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal Insulation is a device or a practice which is used in a system for minimising heat losses caused due to transfer of heat from hotter to colder regions. It is one of the cheapest methods of energy conse...

B. C. Raychaudhuri

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Methods and results of a search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts using the GEO 600, LIGO, and Virgo detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we report on a search for short-duration gravitational wave bursts in the frequency range 64 Hz–1792 Hz associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), using data from GEO 600 and one of the LIGO or Virgo detectors. ...

Aggarwal, Nancy

304

Web tool for energy policy decision-making through geo-localized LCA models: A focus on offshore wind farms in Northern Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Web tool for energy policy decision-making through geo-localized LCA models: A focus on offshore-dependent life cycle assessment (LCA) taking into ac- count geographical issues is of high interest for different configurations has been developed. Based on a modular LCA model and on collaborative works made

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

305

Riad, EPS Structures Innovations on Central Artery/Tunnel (CA/T) Project 2005 BSCES-GEO-INSTITUTE RECENT ADVANCES IN GEOTECHNICAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Riad, EPS Structures Innovations on Central Artery/Tunnel (CA/T) Project 2005 BSCES-GEO-INSTITUTE RECENT ADVANCES IN GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING Seminar 1 EPS STRUCTURES INNOVATIONS ON CENTRAL ARTERY/TUNNEL (CA/T) PROJECT Hany L. Riad, Ph.D., P.E. (1) Abstract The use of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) in block

Horvath, John S.

306

Partially Crystalline Zn2GeO4 Nanorod/Graphene Composites as Anode Materials for High Performance Lithium Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-step hydrothermal processing. Crystalline and amorphous regions were found to coexist in a single Zn2GeO4 nanorod change during the charge and discharge processes. These advantageous attributes make ZGCs the potential expansion and eliminate the stress during the charge and discharge processes. Clearly, it remains

Lin, Zhiqun

307

ExpTreeDB: Web-based query and visualization of manually annotated gene expression profiling experiments of human and mouse from GEO  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......PAPERS DATABASES AND ONTOLOGIES ExpTreeDB: Web-based query and visualization of manually...biotech.bmi.ac.cn/ExpTreeDB . Web site is implemented in Perl, PHP, R...allows keywords and signature search. Other Web servers for analysis and annotation of GEO......

Ming Ni; Fuqiang Ye; Juanjuan Zhu; Zongwei Li; Shuai Yang; Bite Yang; Lu Han; Yongge Wu; Ying Chen; Fei Li; Shengqi Wang; Xiaochen Bo

2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

IM-GEO: Impact of R and D on cost of geothermal power: Documentation of Model Version 2. 09  

SciTech Connect

IM-GEO is an analysis used to estimate the impact of technology improvements on the relative cost of hydrothermal power. The analysis is available in a tutorial program for use on personal computers. It is designed for use by R and D program managers to evaluate R and D options. Only the potential impact of technologies is considered with all economic factors being held constant. This analysis has one unique feature. The economic impact of reducing risk by improving reservoir characterization is included using a strategy currently employed by financial institutions. This report describes the basis of the calculations, documents the code, and describes the operational procedures. Application of the code to study potential cost reductions due to R and D success will be done by R and D managers to evaluate and direct their own programs.

Petty, S.; Entingh, D.; Livesay, B.J.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Thermal comfort during surgery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

THERMAL COMFORT DURING SURGERY A Thesis by DAVID HAROLD MANNING Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Industrial... Engineering THERMAL COMFORT DURING SURGERY A Thesis by DAVID HAROLD MANNING Approved as to style and content by: airman of C it ee Head of Department Member Me er December 1978 ABSTRACT Thermal Comfort During Surgery (December 1978) David Harold...

Manning, David Harold

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

A miniature shock-activated thermal battery for munitions applications  

SciTech Connect

The feasibility of a small, fast-rise thermal battery for non-spinning munitions applications was examined by studying the response of conventional thermal cells to impact (mechanical) energy to simulate a setback environment. This is an extension of earlier work that demonstrated that shock activation could be used to produce power from a conventional thermal-battery cell. The results of tests with both single and multiple cells are presented, along with data for a 5-cell miniature (5-mm diameter) thermal battery. The issues needing to be resolved before such a device can become a commercial reality are also discussed.

Guidotti, R.A.; Kirby, D.L.; Reinhardt, F.W.

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES  

SciTech Connect

Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

312

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

313

Quantum thermal machines with single nonequilibrium environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a scheme for a quantum thermal machine made by atoms interacting with a single non-equilibrium electromagnetic field. The field is produced by a simple configuration of macroscopic objects held at thermal equilibrium at different temperatures. We show that these machines can deliver all thermodynamic tasks (cooling, heating and population inversion), and this by establishing quantum coherence with the body on which they act. Remarkably, this system allows to reach efficiencies at maximum power very close to the Carnot limit, much more than in existing models. Our findings offer a new paradigm for efficient quantum energy flux management, and can be relevant for both experimental and technological purposes.

Bruno Leggio; Bruno Bellomo; Mauro Antezza

2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

314

NANO REVIEW Open Access Thermal conductivity and thermal boundary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NANO REVIEW Open Access Thermal conductivity and thermal boundary resistance of nanostructures and the thermal transport prop- erties is a key point to design materials with preferred thermal properties with the heat dissipation on them. The influence of the interfacial roughness on the thermal conductivity

Boyer, Edmond

315

Thermal Insulation of Houses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... THE Thermal Insulation (Dwellings) Bill which Mr. G. Nabarro introduced into the House of Commons on ... , sponsored by members of both major political parties, extends the principle of the Thermal Insulation (Industrial Buildings) Act of July 1957 to all new dwelling houses built in the ...

1958-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

316

Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group The Mechanical Engineering (ME) & Thermal Group at LASP has, and ground- based mechanical systems. Instrument Design Building on decades of design experience that has evolved with the complexity of instrument design demands, LASP mechanical engineers develop advanced

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

317

Thermal Recovery Methods  

SciTech Connect

Thermal Recovery Methods describes the basic concepts of thermal recovery and explains the injection patterns used to exploit reservoir conditions. Basic reservoir engineering is reviewed with an emphasis on changes in flow characteristics caused by temperature. The authors discuss an energy balance for steam and combustion drive, and they explain in situ reactions. Heat loss, combustion drive, and steam displacement also are examined in detail, as well as cyclic steam injection, downhole ignition, well heating, and low-temperature oxidation. Contents: Thermal processes; Formation and reservoir evaluations; Well patterns and spacing; Flow and process equations; Laboratory simulation of thermal recovery; Heat loss and transmission; Displacement and production; Equipment; Basic data for field selection; Laboratory evaluation of combustion characteristics; Thermal properties of reservoirs and fluids.

White, P.D.; Moss, J.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Tunable thermal link  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a device whereby the thermal conductance of a multiwalled nanostructure such as a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) can be controllably and reversibly tuned by sliding one or more outer shells with respect to the inner core. As one example, the thermal conductance of an MWCNT dropped to 15% of the original value after extending the length of the MWCNT by 190 nm. The thermal conductivity returned when the tube was contracted. The device may comprise numbers of multiwalled nanotubes or other graphitic layers connected to a heat source and a heat drain and various means for tuning the overall thermal conductance for applications in structure heat management, heat flow in nanoscale or microscale devices and thermal logic devices.

Chang, Chih-Wei; Majumdar, Arunava; Zettl, Alexander K.

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

319

Solar thermal aircraft  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

320

Mayne, P.W., Coop, M.R., Springman, S., Huang, A-B., and Zornberg, J. (2009). State-of-the-Art Paper (SOA-1): GeoMaterial Behavior and Testing. Proc. 17th Intl. Conf. Soil Mechanics & Geotechnical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mayne, P.W., Coop, M.R., Springman, S., Huang, A-B., and Zornberg, J. (2009). State-of-the-Art Paper (SOA-1): GeoMaterial Behavior and Testing. Proc. 17th Intl. Conf. Soil Mechanics & Geotechnical

Mayne, Paul W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production Award Number: DE-EE00025828 Report Date: March 15, 2013 PI: Stephen Obrey * Technical approach is focused on...

322

Bernstein instability driven by thermal ring distribution  

SciTech Connect

The classic Bernstein waves may be intimately related to banded emissions detected in laboratory plasmas, terrestrial, and other planetary magnetospheres. However, the customary discussion of the Bernstein wave is based upon isotropic thermal velocity distribution function. In order to understand how such waves can be excited, one needs an emission mechanism, i.e., an instability. In non-relativistic collision-less plasmas, the only known Bernstein wave instability is that associated with a cold perpendicular velocity ring distribution function. However, cold ring distribution is highly idealized. The present Brief Communication generalizes the cold ring distribution model to include thermal spread, so that the Bernstein-ring instability is described by a more realistic electron distribution function, with which the stabilization by thermal spread associated with the ring distribution is demonstrated. The present findings imply that the excitation of Bernstein waves requires a sufficiently high perpendicular velocity gradient associated with the electron distribution function.

Yoon, Peter H., E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hadi, Fazal; Qamar, Anisa [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Theory of delayed thermal fluorescence  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A theory of nonradiative thermal activation involved in delayed thermal fluorescence has been developed from the viewpoint of the breakdown of the Born-Oppenheimer adiabatic approximation.

S. H. Lin

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Thermal insulations using vacuum panels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Thermal insulation vacuum panels are formed of an inner core of compressed low thermal conductivity powders enclosed by a ceramic/glass envelope evaluated to a low pressure.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Burke, Melissa S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

325

Thermally driven circulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Several problems connected by the theme of thermal forcing are addressed herein. The main topic is the stratification and flow field resulting from imposing a specified heat flux on a fluid that is otherwise confined to a ...

Nelken, Haim

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Manipulation of Thermal Phonons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to manipulate the behavior of phonons is crucial for both energy applications and the cooling of integrated circuits. A novel class of artificially periodic structured materials — phononic crystals — might make manipulation of thermal phonons possible. In many...

Hsu, Chung-Hao

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

327

Solar Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various types of thermal energy storage systems are introduced and their importance and desired characteristics are outlined. Sensible heat storage, which is one of the most commonly used storage systems in pract...

E. Paykoç; S. Kakaç

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Contact thermal lithography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contact thermal lithography is a method for fabricating microscale patterns using heat transfer. In contrast to photolithography, where the minimum achievable feature size is proportional to the wavelength of light used ...

Schmidt, Aaron Jerome, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Neutron stars - thermal emitters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Confronting theoretical models with observations of thermal radiation emitted by neutron stars is one of the most important ways to understand the properties of both, superdense matter in the interiors of the neutron stars and dense magnetized plasmas in their outer layers. Here we review the theory of thermal emission from the surface layers of strongly magnetized neutron stars, and the main properties of the observational data. In particular, we focus on the nearby sources for which a clear thermal component has been detected, without being contaminated by other emission processes (magnetosphere, accretion, nebulae). We also discuss the applications of the modern theoretical models of the formation of spectra of strongly magnetized neutron stars to the observed thermally emitting objects.

Potekhin, A Y; Pons, J A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

GeoChip-based analysis of functional microbial communities during the reoxidation of a bioreduced uranium-contaminated aquifer  

SciTech Connect

A pilot-scale system was established for in situ biostimulation of U(VI) reduction by ethanol addition at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Field Research Center (Oak Ridge, TN). After achieving U(VI) reduction, stability of the bioreduced U(IV) was evaluated under conditions of (i) resting (no ethanol injection), (ii) reoxidation by introducing dissolved oxygen (DO), and (iii) reinjection of ethanol. GeoChip, a functional gene array with probes for N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation genes, was used for monitoring groundwater microbial communities. High diversity of all major functional groups was observed during all experimental phases. The microbial community was extremely responsive to ethanol, showing a substantial change in community structure with increased gene number and diversity after ethanol injections resumed. While gene numbers showed considerable variations, the relative abundance (i.e. percentage of each gene category) of most gene groups changed little. During the reoxidation period, U(VI) increased, suggesting reoxidation of reduced U(IV). However, when introduction of DO was stopped, U(VI) reduction resumed and returned to pre-reoxidation levels. These findings suggest that the community in this system can be stimulated and that the ability to reduce U(VI) can be maintained by the addition of electron donors. This biostimulation approach may potentially offer an effective means for the bioremediation of U(VI)-contaminated sites.

Van Nostrand, Joy [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Wu, Weimin [ORNL; Wu, Liyou [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Deng, Ye [University of Oklahoma; Carley, Jack M [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Luo, Jian [ORNL; Criddle, Craig [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Marsh, Terence [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tiedje, James [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Hazen, T. C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Solar thermal upper stage technology demonstrator liquid hydrogen storage and feed system test program  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Solar Thermal Upper Stage Technology Demonstrator (STUSTD) Liquid Hydrogen Storage and Feed System (LHSFS) Test Program is described. The test program consists of two principal phases. First an engineering characterization phase includes tests performed to demonstrate and understand the expected tank performance. This includes fill and drain; baseline heat leak; active Thermodynamic Vent System (TVS); and flow tests. After the LHSFS performance is understood and performance characteristics are determined a 30 day mission simulation test will be conducted. This test will simulate a 30 day transfer mission from low earth orbit (LEO) to geosynchronous equatorial orbit (GEO). Mission performance predictions based on the results of the engineering characterization tests will be used to correlate the results of the 30 day mission simulation.

E. C. Cady

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Texas Thermal Comfort Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thermal comfort thermal comfort Too often, the systems in our houses are both physically and intellectually inaccessible. In the SNAP House, HVAC components are integrated into the overall structure, and act as an experiential threshold between public and private spaces. They are located in a central, structural chase that supports the clerestory and gives the systems a functional presence within the interior. Each individual component is contained within a single chase

333

Photovoltaic-thermal collectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photovoltaic-thermal solar cell including a semiconductor body having antireflective top and bottom surfaces and coated on each said surface with a patterned electrode covering less than 10% of the surface area. A thermal-absorbing surface is spaced apart from the bottom surface of the semiconductor and a heat-exchange fluid is passed between the bottom surface and the heat-absorbing surface.

Cox, III, Charles H. (Carlisle, MA)

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

334

Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks Beatriz L´opez-Wallea,1 and analytical calculations. Key words: Micro-actuators, Thermal modelling, Electrical analogy, Thermal network 1 and MicroMechatronic Systems Department (AS2M), 24 rue Alain Savary, 25000 Besan¸con, France Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

335

Development of a Non Air-assisted Thermal Regenerator | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Development of an Active Regeneration Diesel Particulate Filter System Blowers for Air Assisted Diesel Particulate Filter Regeneration SCR Technologies for NOx Reduction...

336

Green–Naghdi fluid with non-thermal equilibrium effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...appendices to Bleustein- Green (1967) and Green- Rivlin (1964), they...expression for the kinetic energy of a system of particles...on the fluid theory of Green- Naghdi (1996), their...procedure leads to a kinetic energy that can be equated to...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Thermal contact resistance with non-uniform interface pressures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work considers the effect of roughness and waviness on interfacial pressure distributions and interfacial contact resistance. It is shown that for moderate roughness the contour area could be substantially different ...

McMillan, Robert

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

339

Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

"This fact sheet describes a scattering solar thermal concentrators project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by the Pennsylvania State University, is working to demonstrate a new, scattering-based approach to concentrating sunlight that aims to improve the overall performance and reliability of the collector field. The research team aims to show that scattering solar thermal collectors are capable of achieving optical performance equal to state-of-the-art parabolic trough systems, but with the added benefits of immunity to wind-load tracking error, more efficient land use, and utilization of stationary receivers."

340

Thermal ignition combustion system  

SciTech Connect

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m.degree. C. and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg.degree. C. with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

Kamo, Roy (Columbus, IN); Kakwani, Ramesh M. (Columbus, IN); Valdmanis, Edgars (Columbus, IN); Woods, Melvins E. (Columbus, IN)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Thermal ignition combustion system  

SciTech Connect

A thermal ignition combustion system adapted for use with an internal combustion engine is described comprising: (a) means for providing ignition chamber walls defining an ignition chamber, the chamber walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m/sup 0/C. and a specific heat greater than 480J/kg/sup 0/C., the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber; (b) means for maintaining the temperature of the chamber walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel; and (c) means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

342

Thermal test options  

SciTech Connect

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Z .Cold Regions Science and Technology 28 1998 189202 Antifreeze thermal ice core drilling: an effective approach to the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and intermediate ice coring was done with large thermal or electromechanical drilling systems using hy- Zdrophobic and Rufli, 1994; .Blake et al., 1998 . For non liquid filled boreholes, a thermal drill can go deeper due to its large clearance. The depth range of 800­1000 m was achieved with thermal drills in cold ice

Howat, Ian M.

344

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS,”Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal PowerThermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWERfor Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermalfor Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Background Solar thermal energy collection is anCHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWERfor Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Thermal barrier coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Thermal management of nanoelectronics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-state thermoelectric on- spot cooling, requiring efficient thermoelectric materials that can be integrated with the IC are further complicated by the fact that the material's ability to conduct heat deteriorates when at the packaging level but also at the nanoscale materials and device levels. THERMAL CHALLENGES AT NANOSCALE One

349

Thermal Reactor Safety  

SciTech Connect

Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

The Bulk Channel in Thermal Gauge Theories  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the thermal correlator of the trace of the energy-momentum tensor in the SU(3) Yang-Mills theory. Our goal is to constrain the spectral function in that channel, whose low-frequency part determines the bulk viscosity. We focus on the thermal modification of the spectral function, $\\rho(\\omega,T)-\\rho(\\omega,0)$. Using the operator-product expansion we give the high-frequency behavior of this difference in terms of thermodynamic potentials. We take into account the presence of an exact delta function located at the origin, which had been missed in previous analyses. We then combine the bulk sum rule and a Monte-Carlo evaluation of the Euclidean correlator to determine the intervals of frequency where the spectral density is enhanced or depleted by thermal effects. We find evidence that the thermal spectral density is non-zero for frequencies below the scalar glueball mass $m$ and is significantly depleted for $m\\lesssim\\omega\\lesssim 3m$.

Harvey B. Meyer

2010-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

351

High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Q1 High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production - FY13 Q1 This document summarizes the progress of this Los Alamos National Laboratory...

352

Impact of Ageing on Thermal Efficiency of Solar Thermal Collectors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Today it is common practice to calculate the performance of solar thermal systems or solar collectors based on the results of a thermal performance test carried out with a new solar collector. However, for an int...

Elke Streicher; Stephan Fischer…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Preliminary requirements for thermal storage subsystems in solar thermal applications  

SciTech Connect

Methodologies for the analysis of value and comparing thermal storage concepts are presented. Value is a measure of worth and is determined by the cost of conventional fuel systems. Value data for thermal storage in large solar thermal electric power applications are presented. Thermal storage concepts must be compared when all are performing the same mission. A method for doing that analysis, called the ranking index, is derived. Necessary data to use the methodology are included.

Copeland, R.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Competition Between Thermal and Non-Thermal Processes During Femtosecond Switching of Phase Change Materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We use ultrafast optics and electron diffraction to measure irreversible amorphization of crystalline Ge2Sb2Te5 phase change films. We find that light directly modifies the local...

Wall, Simon; Waldecker, Lutz; Miller, Timothy A; Ernstorfer, Ralph; Pruneri, Valerio; Rude, Miquel; Simpson, Robert

355

Thermal Storage of Solar Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal storage is needed to improve the efficiency and usefulness of solar thermal systems. The paper indicates the main storage ... which would greatly increase the practical use of solar energy — is more diffi...

H. Tabor

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak Ridgefor Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of the DOE-

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Electric Motor Thermal Management | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Merit Review and Peer Evaluation ape030bennion2011o.pdf More Documents & Publications Motor Thermal Control Electric Motor Thermal Management Electric Motor Thermal Management...

358

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

More Documents & Publications Motor Thermal Control Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management...

359

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solarsolar captors, thermal effluents, low cost energy duringSeale Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withconcept of thermal energy storage in aquifers was suggestedAnnual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors' Information

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings A Dissertation Presented to The Faculty of the School conductivity of the coatings. The minimum thermal conductivity occurs at a low rotation rate and is 0.8 W intrinsic thermal conductivity, good phase stability and greater resistance to sintering and CMAS attack

Wadley, Haydn

364

LSPE Interim Stowage Thermal Constraints  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-arm and thermal battery timers require operating temperatures at or above +40°F for reliable starting when·, ' LSPE Interim Stowage Thermal Constraints· Nl,;. ATM1080 PAGE 1 OF 13 DATE 15 December l97l constraints required for thermal integrity are defined. Prepared by:.:Z4·:..=..-~31!::..--.::..·~-:·::....-c

Rathbun, Julie A.

365

Reactor Thermal-Hydraulics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal-Hydraulics Thermal-Hydraulics Dr. Tanju Sofu, Argonne National Laboratory In a power reactor, the energy produced in fission reaction manifests itself as heat to be removed by a coolant and utilized in a thermodynamic energy conversion cycle to produce electricity. A simplified schematic of a typical nuclear power plant is shown in the diagram below. Primary coolant loop Steam Reactor Heat exchanger Primary pump Secondary pump Condenser Turbine Water Although this process is essentially the same as in any other steam plant configuration, the power density in a nuclear reactor core is typically four orders of magnitude higher than a fossil fueled plant and therefore it poses significant heat transfer challenges. Maximum power that can be obtained from a nuclear reactor is often limited by the

366

Thermalization through parton transport  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A radiative transport model is used to study kinetic equilibration during the early stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision. The parton system is found to be able to overcome expansion and move toward thermalization via parton collisions. Scaling behaviors show up in both the pressure anisotropy and the energy density evolutions. In particular, the pressure anisotropy evolution shows an approximate alpha_s scaling when radiative processes are included. It approaches an asymptotic time evolution on a time scale of 1 to 2 fm/c. The energy density evolution shows an asymptotic time evolution that decreases slower than the ideal hydro evolution. These observations indicate that partial thermalization can be achieved and viscosity is important for the evolution during the early longitudinal expansion stage of a relativistic heavy ion collision.

Bin Zhang

2009-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

367

Thermal energy storage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various types of thermal stares for solar systems are surveyed which include: long-term water stores for solar systems; ground storage using soil as an interseasonal energy store; ground-water aquifers; pebble or rock bed storage; phase change storage; solar ponds; high temperature storage; and cold stores for solar air conditioning system. The use of mathematical models for analysis of the storage systems is considered

W.E.J. Neal

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Cylindrical thermal contact conductance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Mahr-Federal, Inc. respectively facilitated and provided the necessary surface metrology data of the test pieces. Mr. Claude Davis of Corning, Inc. obtained the thermophysical properties of the Ultra Low Expansion Titanium Silicate glass used... as thermal expansion standard. The engineers at National Instruments provided some much-needed advice and software for programming the data acquisition system. The TAMU Physics Machine Shop provided design advice and a couple of last...

Ayers, George Harold

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

369

Thermally actuated thermionic switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

370

Mobile Window Thermal Test  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility Mobile Window Thermal Test (MoWiTT) Facility winter.jpg (469135 bytes) The window has come a long way since the days when it was a single pane of glass in a wood frame. Low-emissivity windows were designed to help buildings retain some of the energy that would have leaked out of less efficient windows. Designing efficient window-and-frame systems is one strategy for reducing the energy use of buildings. But the net energy flowing through a window is a combination of temperature- driven thermal flows and transmission of incident solar energy, both of which vary with time. U-factor and solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), the window properties that control these flows, depend partly on ambient conditions. Window energy flows can affect how much energy a building uses, depending on when the window flows are available to help meet other energy demands within the building, and when they are adverse, adding to building energy use. This leads to a second strategy for reducing building energy use: using the beneficial solar gain available through a window, either for winter heating or for daylighting, while minimizing adverse flows.

371

Comparison of the neutron, Raman, and infrared vibrational spectra of vitreous SiO2, GeO2, and BeF2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The inelastic neutron, Raman, and infrared vibrational spectra of vitreous SiO2, GeO2, and BeF2 are reported in detail and compared with one another. The neutron spectrum is shown to be a good measure of the vibrational density of states for glassy SiO2 and GeO2, but a poorer measure for BeF2. The density of states is shown to be split into transverse-optical—longitudinal-optical bands whose nature is revealed in the infrared and Raman spectra. Empirical selection rules are noted, including the observation that the HV Raman spectrum "mimics" the density of states, while the HH spectrum is dominated by matrix-element effects. The spectra are discussed in terms of an augmented central-force model which allows prediction of selection rules and relative densities of states. The latter allows an empirical estimate of the frequency dependence of the neutron scattering coupling coefficients, showing relatively weak scattering by acoustic modes, especially in the case of BeF2 glass.

F. L. Galeener; A. J. Leadbetter; M. W. Stringfellow

1983-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Thermal fluctuations of free standing graphene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use non-perturbative renormalization group techniques to calculate the momentum dependence of thermal fluctuations of graphene, based on a self-consistent calculation of the momentum dependent elastic constants of a tethered membrane. We find a sharp crossover from the perturbative to the anomalous regime, in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo results for graphene, and give an accurate value for the crossover scale. Our work strongly supports the notion that graphene is well described as a tethered membrane. Ripples emerge naturally from our analysis.

F. L. Braghin; N. Hasselmann

2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

373

Cyanophycin Mediates the Accumulation and Storage of Fixed Carbon in Non-Heterocystous Filamentous Cyanobacteria from Coniform Mats  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thin, filamentous, non-heterocystous, benthic cyanobacteria (Subsection III) from some marine, lacustrine and thermal environments aggregate into macroscopic cones and conical stromatolites. We investigate the uptake and ...

Liang, Biqing

374

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Thermal Comfort Model  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Comfort Model Comfort Model Photo of human testing to determine thermal comfort perception data. Photo of human testing to determine thermal comfort perception data. Working with researchers at the University of California, Berkeley, our team at NREL developed an empirical model of people's temperature sensation (hot/cold) as well as perceptions (comfortable/uncomfortable) in a transient non-homogeneous environment. The model predicts sensation and comfort locally (at specific points on the body) as well as globally (overall). The university performed more than 100 tests on human test subjects in a controlled environmental chamber under a range of steady state and transient thermal conditions. Participants subjectively recorded their thermal comfort on a simple form. Core and local skin temperature data was

375

Bionics in textiles: flexible and translucent thermal insulations for solar thermal applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...translucent thermal insulations for solar thermal applications Thomas Stegmaier...Denkendorf73770 Denkendorf, Germany Solar thermal collectors used at present consist...transparent thermal insulation|solar thermal collector| 1. Introduction...

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK CALIFORNIA PUBLIC UTILITIES California Solar Initiative Thermal Program Handbook i 1. Introduction to CSI-Thermal Program ..........................................................................3 2.1 Participants in the CSI-Thermal Program

377

Thermomechanical measurements on thermal microactuators.  

SciTech Connect

Due to the coupling of thermal and mechanical behaviors at small scales, a Campaign 6 project was created to investigate thermomechanical phenomena in microsystems. This report documents experimental measurements conducted under the auspices of this project. Since thermal and mechanical measurements for thermal microactuators were not available for a single microactuator design, a comprehensive suite of thermal and mechanical experimental data was taken and compiled for model validation purposes. Three thermal microactuator designs were selected and fabricated using the SUMMiT V{sup TM} process at Sandia National Laboratories. Thermal and mechanical measurements for the bent-beam polycrystalline silicon thermal microactuators are reported, including displacement, overall actuator electrical resistance, force, temperature profiles along microactuator legs in standard laboratory air pressures and reduced pressures down to 50 mTorr, resonant frequency, out-of-plane displacement, and dynamic displacement response to applied voltages.

Baker, Michael Sean; Epp, David S.; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Gorby, Allen D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Radiation-Driven Flame Spread Over Thermally-Thick Fuels in Quiescent Microgravity Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Radiation-Driven Flame Spread Over Thermally-Thick Fuels in Quiescent Microgravity Environments-non-premixed, flame-spread Submitted to Twenty-Ninth International Symposium on Combustion, Sapporo, Japan, July 21 ­ July 26, 2002. #12;Radiation-Driven Flame Spread Over Thermally-Thick Fuels in Quiescent Microgravity

379

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Systems (VTMS) Analysis...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Characterization and Development of Advanced Heat Transfer Technologies...

380

Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond/Silicon...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline DiamondSilicon Carbide Nanocomposites for Drill Bits Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline DiamondSilicon Carbide...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Report on workshop on thermal property measurements  

SciTech Connect

Results of thermogravimetric analysis of basalt is discussed. Heat capacity, thermal conductivity and thermal expansion are specifically addressed. (CBS)

Robertson, E.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Experimental Study of Thermal Performance and the Contribution of Plant-Covered Walls to the Thermal Behavior of Building  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper presented on experimental investigation of the influence of plant-covered wall on the thermal behavior of buildings in the semi-arid regions during the summer period. Thermal performance of a green walls system on facade walls has been experimentally investigated in a test room. The test cell dimensions are 1x1.2x0.8 m. In this study the thermal analysis concerns two test cells that incorporate non-covered and covered with two types of plants (Jasmine and Aristolochia). A Light source is used to simulate solar radiation. The results showed that plant cover improved indoor thermal comfort in both summer, and reduced heat gains and losses through the wall structure. It is verified that a microclimate between the wall of the test cell and the green wall is created, and it is characterized by slightly lower temperatures and higher relative humidity.

Saifi Nadia; Settou Noureddine; Necib Hichem; Damene Djamila

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A 10% increase in shaft work is directly attributable to modified thermal heat capacity Engineering HTF Specific heat yields modified power output. 27 127 227 327 427 527...

384

THERMAL ANALYSIS OF 3013/9975 CONFIGURATION  

SciTech Connect

The 3013 containers are designed in accordance with the DOE-STD-3013-2004 and are qualified to store plutonium (Pu) bearing materials for 50 years. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) certified Model 9975 shipping package is used to transport the 3013 containers to the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and to store the containers until the plutonium can be properly dispositioned. Detailed thermal analyses to support the storage in the KAMS facility are given in References 2, 3, and 4. The analyses in this paper serve to provide non-accident condition, non-bounding, specific 3013 container temperatures for use in the surveillance activities. This paper presents a methodology where critical component temperatures are estimated using numerical methods over a range of package and storage parameters. The analyses include factors such as ambient storage temperature and the content weight, density, heat generation rate, and fill height, that may impact the thermal response of the packages. Statistical methods are used to develop algebraic equations for ease of computations to cover the factor space. All computations were performed in BTU-FT-Hr-{sup o}F units.

Gupta, N.

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

385

Thermal plasmonic interconnects in graphene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As one emerging plasmonic material, graphene can support surface plasmons at infrared and terahertz frequencies with unprecedented properties due to the strong interactions between graphene and low-frequency photons. Since graphene surface plasmons exist in the infrared and terahertz regime, they can be thermally pumped (excited) by the infrared evanescent waves emitted from an object. Here we show that thermal graphene plasmons can be efficiently excited and have monochromatic and tunable spectra, thus paving a way to harness thermal energy for graphene plasmonic devices. We further demonstrate that “thermal information communication” via graphene surface plasmons can be potentially realized by effectively harnessing thermal energy from various heat sources, e.g., the waste heat dissipated from nanoelectronic devices. These findings open up an avenue of thermal plasmonics based on graphene for different applications ranging from infrared emission control, to information processing and communication, to energy harvesting.

Baoan Liu; Yongmin Liu; Sheng Shen

2014-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

386

Non-stoichiometric mixed-phase titania photocatalyst  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mixed anatase-rutile phase, non-stoichiometric titania photocatalyst material is a highly reactive and is a UV and visible light responsive photocastalyst in the as-deposited condition (i.e. without the need for a subsequent thermal treatment). The mixed phase, non-stoichiometric titania thin film material is non-stoichiometric in terms of its oxygen content such that the thin film material shows a marked red-shift in photoresponse.

Chen, Le (Lakewood, CO); Gray, Kimberly A. (Evanston, IL); Graham, Michael E. (Evanston, IL)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

387

Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Disilane  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal Decomposition Mechanism of Disilane ... Thermal decomposition of disilane was investigated using time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometry coupled with vacuum ultraviolet single-photon ionization (VUV-SPI) at a temperature range of 675?740 K and total pressure of 20?40 Torr. ... Concentrations of disilane and trisilane during thermal decomposition of disilane were quantitatively measured using the VUV-SPI method. ...

Kazumasa Yoshida; Keiji Matsumoto; Tatsuo Oguchi; Kenichi Tonokura; Mitsuo Koshi

2006-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

388

Thermal desorption for passive dosimeter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~ ~ ~ \\ ~ ~ ~ ~ Flare Tubes for Thermal Desorber . . . . . ~. . . . . . ~ ~ . 27 4. 5 ~ Thermal Desorber Manufactured by Century System Sample Flow from Thermal Desorber to Gas Chromatograph 29 6. Direct Injection Port for Therma1 Desorber . . . . . $2... the gas badges and. providing additional guidance in conducting the study. DEDICATZOil This thesis is cedicated to my parents and my wife, Unice, for their support during the last t', o years AHSTHACT ACKI;ODL DG~~. 'ITS D' DICATICI'. LIST OF TABL...

Liu, Wen-Chen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Actively driven thermal radiation shield  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Enhanced Thermal Conductivity Oxide Fuels  

SciTech Connect

the purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of increasing the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels by adding small fractions of a high conductivity solid phase.

Alvin Solomon; Shripad Revankar; J. Kevin McCoy

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Thermal gauge boson masses of the electroweak theory in the broken phase  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermal effects in the broken phase of the electroweak theory are studied in the strongly interacting Higgs boson limit. In that limit and at the tree level the bosonic sector of the theory is a gauged non-linear sigma model. The associated one-loop thermal effective action for soft fields is then computed by using the background field method together with the Stueckelberg formalism. This effective action describes thermal corrections to the masses of the gauge bosons W, Z and the photon. It is the proper generalization of the hard thermal effective action of a Yang-Mills theory when there is a Higgs mechanism for a heavy Higgs particle.

Cristina Manuel

1998-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

392

Thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

393

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Phase Change Materials for ThermalOF THE THESIS Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energyto utilize phase change materials (PCM’s) to enhance thermal

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in ConcentratedChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Strings at Finite Temperature: Wilson Lines, Free Energies, and the Thermal Landscape  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According to the standard prescriptions, zero-temperature string theories can be extended to finite temperature by compactifying their time directions on a so-called "thermal circle" and implementing certain orbifold twists. However, the existence of a topologically non-trivial thermal circle leaves open the possibility that a gauge flux can pierce this circle --- i.e., that a non-trivial Wilson line (or equivalently a non-zero chemical potential) might be involved in the finite-temperature extension. In this paper, we concentrate on the zero-temperature heterotic and Type I strings in ten dimensions, and survey the possible Wilson lines which might be introduced in their finite-temperature extensions. We find a rich structure of possible thermal string theories, some of which even have non-traditional Hagedorn temperatures, and we demonstrate that these new thermal string theories can be interpreted as extrema of a continuous thermal free-energy "landscape". Our analysis also uncovers a unique finite-temperature extension of the heterotic SO(32) and $E_8\\times E_8$ strings which involves a non-trivial Wilson line, but which --- like the traditional finite-temperature extension without Wilson lines --- is metastable in this thermal landscape.

Keith R. Dienes; Michael Lennek; Menika Sharma

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

396

Holographic thermal field theory on curved spacetimes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The AdS/CFT correspondence relates certain strongly coupled CFTs with large effective central charge $c_\\text{eff}$ to semi-classical gravitational theories with AdS asymptotics. We describe recent progress in understanding gravity duals for CFTs on non-trivial spacetimes at finite temperature, both in and out of equilibrium. Such gravity methods provide powerful new tools to access the physics of these strongly coupled theories, which often differs qualitatively from that found at weak coupling. Our discussion begins with basic aspects of AdS/CFT and progresses through thermal CFTs on the Einstein Static Universe and on periodically identified Minkowski spacetime. In the latter context we focus on states describing so-called plasma balls, which become stable at large $c_\\text{eff}$. We then proceed to out-of-equilibrium situations associated with dynamical bulk black holes. In particular, the non-compact nature of these bulk black holes allows stationary solutions with non-Killing horizons that describe time-independent flows of CFT plasma. As final a topic we consider CFTs on black hole spacetimes. This discussion provides insight into how the CFT transports heat between general heat sources and sinks of finite size. In certain phases the coupling to small sources can be strongly suppressed, resulting in negligible heat transport despite the presence of a deconfined plasma with sizeable thermal conductivity. We also present a new result, explaining how this so-called droplet behaviour is related to confinement via a change of conformal frame.

Donald Marolf; Mukund Rangamani; Toby Wiseman

2014-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

397

Peg supported thermal insulation panel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprises high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 2 figs.

Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

Peg supported thermal insulation panel  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprising high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

Nowobilski, Jeffert J. (Orchard Park, NY); Owens, William J. (Kenmore, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Thermalization of isolated quantum systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the evolution towards thermal equilibrium of an isolated quantum system is at the foundation of statistical mechanics and a subject of interest in such diverse areas as cold atom physics or the quantum mechanics of black holes. Since a pure state can never evolve into a thermal density matrix, the Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis (ETH) has been put forward by Deutsch and Srednicki as a way to explain this apparent thermalization, similarly to what the ergodic theorem does in classical mechanics. In this paper this hypothesis is tested numerically. First, it is observed that thermalization happens in a subspace of states (the Krylov subspace) with dimension much smaller than that of the total Hilbert space. We check numerically the validity of ETH in such a subspace, for a system of hard core bosons on a two-dimensional lattice. We then discuss how well the eigenstates of the Hamiltonian projected on the Krylov subspace represent the true eigenstates. This discussion is aided by bringing the projected Hamiltonian to the tridiagonal form and interpreting it as an Anderson localization problem for a finite one-dimensional chain. We also consider thermalization of a subsystem and argue that generation of a large entanglement entropy can lead to a thermal density matrix for the subsystem well before the whole system thermalizes. Finally, we comment on possible implications of ETH in quantum gravity.

Sergei Khlebnikov; Martin Kruczenski

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

400

Thermal Conductivity and Noise Attenuation in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.3.4 Corrosion-resistant and high-temperature filters 9 1.3.5 Acoustic Applications 9 2. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY 2.1 THERMAL RESISTANCE 2.1.1 Thermal Conductors in Series 12 2.1.2 Thermal conductors in parallel 13 2 difference RTH Thermal resistance of conductor sb Stefan's constant T4 Temperature difference K* Total

Cambridge, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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401

Nanoscale Thermal Transport andMicrorefrigeratorsonaChip  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are promising candidates as thermal vias and thermal interface materials due to their inherently high thermal; superlattices; thermal boundary resistance; thermionics; thermotunneling; thermoelectrics I. INTRODUCTIONINVITED P A P E R Nanoscale Thermal Transport andMicrorefrigeratorsonaChip Devices for cooling high

402

Experimental Analysis of the Effect of Vibrational Non-Equilibrium on the Decay of Grid-Generated Turbulence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the fundamental scientific question: ?Does thermal non-equilibrium alter the decay rate of turbulence?? The results of this study show that the answer is ?Yes.? The results demonstrate a clear coupling between thermal non-equilibrium and turbulence transport... ................................................................... 86 2.70 Macor-aluminum test section (exploded view) ....................................... 87 2.71 Upwind flange .......................................................................................... 88 2.72 Macor slab...

Fuller, T. J.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

403

MINIMIZING THE BONDLINE THERMAL RESISTANCE IN THERMAL INTERFACE MATERIALS WITHOUT AFFECTING RELIABILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MINIMIZING THE BONDLINE THERMAL RESISTANCE IN THERMAL INTERFACE MATERIALS WITHOUT AFFECTING microstructure, and bondline thermal resistance with the tradeoffs between material systems, manufacturability of devices to heat sinks using existing commercial thermal interface materials (TIMs). The present study

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

404

Thermal to electricity conversion using thermal magnetic properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for the generation of Electricity from Thermal Energy using the thermal magnetic properties of a Ferromagnetic, Electrically Conductive Material (FECM) in one or more Magnetic Fields. A FECM is exposed to one or more Magnetic Fields. Thermal Energy is applied to a portion of the FECM heating the FECM above its Curie Point. The FECM, now partially paramagnetic, moves under the force of the one or more Magnetic Fields. The movement of the FECM induces an electrical current through the FECM, generating Electricity.

West, Phillip B [Idaho Falls, ID; Svoboda, John [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

405

Generating random thermal momenta  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generation of random thermal particle momenta is a basic task in many problems, such as microscopic studies of equilibrium and transport properties of systems, or the conversion of a fluid to particles. In heavy-ion physics, the (in)efficiency of the algorithm matters particularly in hybrid hydrodynamics + hadronic transport calculations. With popular software packages, such as UrQMD 3.3p1 or THERMINATOR, it can still take ten hours to generate particles for a single Pb+Pb "event" at the LHC from fluid dynamics output. Below I describe reasonably efficient simple algorithms using the MPC package, which should help speed momentum generation up by at least one order of magnitude. It is likely that this wheel has been reinvented many times instead of reuse, so there may very well exist older and/or better algorithms that I am not aware of (MPC has been around only since 2000). The main goal here is to encourage practitioners to use available efficient routines, and offer a few practical solutions.

Denes Molnar

2012-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

406

Microelectromechanical (MEM) thermal actuator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Microelectromechanical (MEM) buckling beam thermal actuators are disclosed wherein the buckling direction of a beam is constrained to a desired direction of actuation, which can be in-plane or out-of-plane with respect to a support substrate. The actuators comprise as-fabricated, linear beams of uniform cross section supported above the substrate by supports which rigidly attach a beam to the substrate. The beams can be heated by methods including the passage of an electrical current through them. The buckling direction of an initially straight beam upon heating and expansion is controlled by incorporating one or more directional constraints attached to the substrate and proximal to the mid-point of the beam. In the event that the beam initially buckles in an undesired direction, deformation of the beam induced by contact with a directional constraint generates an opposing force to re-direct the buckling beam into the desired direction. The displacement and force generated by the movement of the buckling beam can be harnessed to perform useful work, such as closing contacts in an electrical switch.

Garcia, Ernest J. (Albuquerque, NM); Fulcher, Clay W. G. (Sandia Park, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

407

Commercial Solar Thermal Incentive Program (Connecticut) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Thermal Incentive Program (Connecticut) Solar Thermal Incentive Program (Connecticut) Commercial Solar Thermal Incentive Program (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Institutional Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Schools Tribal Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $150,000 Program Info Funding Source Public Benefits Fund Start Date 03/15/2013 State Connecticut Program Type State Grant Program Provider Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority '''''Note: This program is not currently accepting applications. Check the program web site for information regarding future financing programs. ''''' The Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority is offering grants and loans to non-residential entities for solar hot water installations. Only

408

Far-IR and radio thermal continua in solar flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

With the invention of new far-infrared (FIR) and radio mm and sub-mm instruments (DESIR on SMESE satellite, ESO-ALMA), there is a growing interest in observations and analysis of solar flares in this so far unexplored wavelength region. Two principal radiation mechanisms play a role: the synchrotron emission due to accelerated particle beams moving in the magnetic field and the thermal emission due to the energy deposit in the lower atmospheric layers. In this contribution we explore the time-dependent effects of beams on thermal FIR and radio continua. We show how and where these continua are formed in the presence of time dependent beam heating and non-thermal excitation/ionisation of the chromospheric hydrogen plasma.

Kašparová, J; Karlický, M; Moravec, Z; Varady, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Thermal and Power Challenges in High Performance Computing Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper provides an overview of the thermal and power challenges in emerging high performance computing platforms. The advent of new sophisticated applications in highly diverse areas such as health, education, finance, entertainment, etc. is driving the platform and device requirements for future systems. The key ingredients of future platforms are vertically integrated (3D) die-stacked devices which provide the required performance characteristics with the associated form factor advantages. Two of the major challenges to the design of through silicon via (TSV) based 3D stacked technologies are (i) effective thermal management and (ii) efficient power delivery mechanisms. Some of the key challenges that are articulated in this paper include hot-spot superposition and intensification in a 3D stack, design/optimization of thermal through silicon vias (TTSVs), non-uniform power loading of multi-die stacks, efficient on-chip power delivery, minimization of electrical hotspots etc.

Venkat Natarajan; Anand Deshpande; Sudarshan Solanki; Arun Chandrasekhar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Nonlocal probes of thermalization in holographic quenches with spectral methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the application of pseudo-spectral methods to problems of holographic thermal quenches of relevant couplings in strongly coupled gauge theories. We focus on quenches of a fermionic mass term in a strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma, and the subsequent equilibration of the system. From the dual gravitational perspective, we study gravitational collapse of a massive scalar field in asymptotically anti-de-Sitter geometry with a prescribed boundary condition for its non-normalizable mode. Access to the full background geometry of the gravitational collapse allows for the study of nonlocal probes of the thermalization process. We discuss the evolution of the apparent and the event horizons, the two-point correlation functions of operators of large conformal dimensions, and the evolution of the entanglement entropy of the system. We compare the thermalization process from the viewpoint of local (the one-point) correlation functions and these nonlocal probes, finding that the thermaliza...

Buchel, Alex; van Niekerk, Anton

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Integrated EM & Thermal Simulations with Upgraded VORPAL Software  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear physics accelerators are powered by microwaves which must travel in waveguides between room-temperature sources and the cryogenic accelerator structures. The ohmic heat load from the microwaves is affected by the temperature-dependent surface resistance and in turn affects the cryogenic thermal conduction problem. Integrated EM & thermal analysis of this difficult non-linear problem is now possible with the VORPAL finite-difference time-domain simulation tool. We highlight thermal benchmarking work with a complex HOM feed-through geometry, done in collaboration with researchers at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory, and discuss upcoming design studies with this emerging tool. This work is part of an effort to generalize the VORPAL framework to include generalized PDE capabilities, for wider multi-physics capabilities in the accelerator, vacuum electronics, plasma processing and fusion R&D fields, and we will also discuss user interface and algorithmic upgrades which facilitate this emerging multiphysics capability.

D.N. Smithe, D. Karipides, P. Stoltz, G. Cheng, H. Wang

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak RidgeAquifers for Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Advanced nanofabrication of thermal emission devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanofabricated thermal emission devices can be used to modify and modulate blackbody thermal radiation. There are many areas in which altering thermal radiation is extremely useful, especially in static power conversion, ...

Hurley, Fergus (Fergus Gerard)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Ceramic thermal barrier coating for rapid thermal cycling applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal barrier coating for metal articles subjected to rapid thermal cycling includes a metallic bond coat deposited on the metal article, at least one MCrAlY/ceramic layer deposited on the bond coat, and a ceramic top layer deposited on the MCrAlY/ceramic layer. The M in the MCrAlY material is Fe, Ni, Co, or a mixture of Ni and Co. The ceramic in the MCrAlY/ceramic layer is mullite or Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. The ceramic top layer includes a ceramic with a coefficient of thermal expansion less than about 5.4.times.10.sup.-6 .degree.C.sup.-1 and a thermal conductivity between about 1 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1 and about 1.7 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1.

Scharman, Alan J. (Hebron, CT); Yonushonis, Thomas M. (Columbus, IN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Thermoelectrics Combined with Solar Concentration for Electrical and Thermal Cogeneration  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

significant challenge for solar thermal energy generation issolar thermal, cogeneration of electrical and thermal energy,for efficient energy production. Solar thermal plants, such

Jackson, Philip Robert

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changing World Technologies' Changing World Technologies' Thermal Conversion Process Commercial Demonstration Plant DOE/EA 1506 Weld County, Colorado December 2004 U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GOLDEN FIELD OFFICE 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology Commercial Demonstration - Weld County, CO TABLE OF CONTENTS Environmental Assessment Thermal Conversion Process (TCP) Technology Commercial Demonstration Project Weld County, Colorado SUMMARY............................................................................................................................. S-1 1.0 INTRODUCTION.........................................................................................................1-1 1.1. National Environmental Policy Act and Related Procedures...........................1-1

417

Energy, Exergy and Uncertainty Analyses of the Thermal Response Test for a Ground Heat Exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from the hydraulic section #12;3 1. Introduction Geothermal energy (geo-exchange) systems have been engineering applications and is now recognized as a cost effective standard for energy conservation. In geo such systems in this environment. This is a starting point for a future development in the geothermal energy

Al-Shayea, Naser Abdul-Rahman

418

Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment:...

419

NREL: Energy Systems Integration Facility - Thermal Distribution...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

thermal distribution bus consists of a thermal water loop connected to a research boiler and chiller that provide precise and efficient control of the water temperature...

420

Integrated External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis for Heavy Vehicles Integrated External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis for Heavy Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene Fibers and Sheets Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene Fibers and Sheets Massachusetts Institute of...

422

Electric Motor Thermal Management | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Peer Evaluation Meeting ape030bennion2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Electric Motor Thermal Management Electric Motor Thermal Management Vehicle Technologies...

423

Thermal Regenerator Testing | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Regenerator Testing Thermal Regenerator Testing Poster presentation at the 2007 Diesel Engine-Efficiency & Emissions Research Conference (DEER 2007). 13-16 August, 2007,...

424

NREL: Energy Storage - Energy Storage Thermal Management  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Storage Thermal Management Infrared image of rectangular battery cell. Infrared thermal image of a lithium-ion battery cell with poor terminal design. Graph of relative...

425

Solar Thermal Process Heat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSolarThermalProcessHeat&oldid267198" Category: Articles with outstanding TODO tasks...

426

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draft Programmaticof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Laser Texturing for Solar Thermal Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High solar absorptance and low thermal emittance is desired for absorber surface in solar thermal systems. Molybdenum surface was textured by pulsed fiber laser and...

Shah, Ankit; Gupta, Mool

428

Solar Keymark Testing of Solar Thermal Products  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Solar Keymark is the official CEN certification scheme for thermal solar collectors and factory made thermal solar systems. The Solar Keymark requires that the products fulfil the...

Harald Drück; Stephan Fischer…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Thermal-Mechanical Technologies | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal-Mechanical Technologies Thermal-Mechanical Technologies Heat management plays a critical role in almost all energy-related applications. Research topics in this area...

430

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

431

Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

36% deduction of PV, solar thermal and energy efficiencyno biomass, solar -, geo- solid municipal thermal energy, no

Haas, Reinhard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Thermal Shock Resistance (TSR) and Thermal Fatigue Resistance (TFR) of Refractory Materials. Evaluation Method Based on the Dynamic Elastic Modulus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The importance of the thermal shock resistance (TSR) of refractory material is discussed. Understanding the evolution of thermal ... undergo repeated thermal cycling. The thermal fatigue resistance (TFR) behavior...

Nicolás M. Rendtorff; Esteban F. Aglietti

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Duality of the Interfacial Thermal Conductance in Graphene-based Nanocomposites  

SciTech Connect

The thermal conductance of graphene-matrix interfaces plays a key role in controlling the thermal transport properties of graphene-based nanocomposites. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we found that the interfacial thermal conductance depends strongly on the mode of heat transfer at the graphene-matrix interfaces: if heat enters graphene from one side of its basal plane and immediately leaves the graphene through the other side, the corresponding interfacial thermal conductance, G(across), is large; if heat enters graphene from both sides of its basal plane and leaves the graphene at a position far away on its basal plane, the corresponding interfacial thermal conductance, G(non-across), is small. For a single-layer graphene immersed in liquid octane, G(across) is ~150 MW/m2K while Gnon-across is ~5 MW/m2K. G(across) decreases with increasing multi-layer graphene thickness (i.e., number of layers in graphene) and approaches an asymptotic value of 100 MW/m2K for 7-layer graphenes. G(non-across) increases only marginally as the graphene sheet thickness increases. Such a duality of the interface thermal conductance for different probing methods and its dependence on graphene sheet thickness can be traced ultimately to the unique physical and chemical structure of graphene materials. The ramifications of these results in areas such as experimental measurement of thermal conductivity of graphene and the design of graphene-based thermal nanocomposites are discussed.

Liu, Ying [Clemson University] [Clemson University; Huang, Jingsong [ORNL] [ORNL; Yang, Bao [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL] [ORNL; Qiao, Rui [Clemson University] [Clemson University

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Fusion-product transport in axisymmetric tokamaks: losses and thermalization  

SciTech Connect

High-energy fusion-product losses from an axisymmetric tokamak plasma are studied. Prompt-escape loss fluxes (i.e. prior to slowing down) are calculated including the non-separable dependence of flux as a function of poloidal angle and local angle-of-incidence at the first wall. Fusion-product (fp) thermalization and heating are calculated assuming classical slowing down. The present analytical model describes fast ion orbits and their distribution function in realistic, high-..beta.., non-circular tokamak equilibria. First-orbit losses, trapping effects, and slowing-down drifts are also treated.

Hively, L.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Domestic Heating and Thermal Insulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... DIGEST 133 of the Building Research Station, entitled "Domestic Heating and Thermal Insulation" (Pp. 7. London : H.M. Stationery Office, 1960. 4insulation, the standard of heating, the ventilation-rate and the length of the heating season ...

1960-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

436

Thermal Insulation for Energy Conservation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of thermal insulations to reduce heat flow across the building ... decades. Materials available for use as building insulation include naturally occurring fibers and particles, man ... plastics, evacuated...

Dr. David W. Yarbrough Ph.D.; PE

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Thermal expansion of SOFC materials  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A short overview is given for the thermal expansion of solid oxide fuel cell materials. The thermomechanical compatibility of state-of-the-art materials is compared with alternative, new materials. With these ...

F. Tietz

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Thermal Solar Power Plants Experience  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In parallel with rising interest in solar power generation, several solar thermal facilities of different configuration and size were ... were designed as modest-size experimental or prototype solar power plants ...

W. Grasse; H. P. Hertlein; C.-J. Winter; G. W. Braun

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Solar thermal electric power information user study  

SciTech Connect

The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on solar thermal electric power are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. The report is 1 of 10 discussing study results. The overall study provides baseline data about information needs in the solar community. An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from five solar thermal electric power groups of respondents are analyzed: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Representatives of Utilities, Electric Power Engineers, and Educators. The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Nonlocal probes of thermalization in holographic quenches with spectral methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the application of pseudo-spectral methods to problems of holographic thermal quenches of relevant couplings in strongly coupled gauge theories. We focus on quenches of a fermionic mass term in a strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma, and the subsequent equilibration of the system. From the dual gravitational perspective, we study gravitational collapse of a massive scalar field in asymptotically anti-de-Sitter geometry with a prescribed boundary condition for its non-normalizable mode. Access to the full background geometry of the gravitational collapse allows for the study of nonlocal probes of the thermalization process. We discuss the evolution of the apparent and the event horizons, the two-point correlation functions of operators of large conformal dimensions, and the evolution of the entanglement entropy of the system. We compare the thermalization process from the viewpoint of local (the one-point) correlation functions and these nonlocal probes, finding that the thermalization time as measured by the probes is length dependent, and can exceed that of the one-point function. We further discuss how the different energy scales of the problem contribute to its thermalization.

Alex Buchel; Robert C. Myers; Anton van Niekerk

2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Thermal Batteries for Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: UT Austin will demonstrate a high-energy density and low-cost thermal storage system that will provide efficient cabin heating and cooling for EVs. Compared to existing HVAC systems powered by electric batteries in EVs, the innovative hot-and-cold thermal batteries-based technology is expected to decrease the manufacturing cost and increase the driving range of next-generation EVs. These thermal batteries can be charged with off-peak electric power together with the electric batteries. Based on innovations in composite materials offering twice the energy density of ice and 10 times the thermal conductivity of water, these thermal batteries are expected to achieve a comparable energy density at 25% of the cost of electric batteries. Moreover, because UT Austin’s thermal energy storage systems are modular, they may be incorporated into the heating and cooling systems in buildings, providing further energy efficiencies and positively impacting the emissions of current building heating/cooling systems.

None

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

442

Thermal storage module for solar dynamic receivers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage system comprising a germanium phase change material and a graphite container.

Beatty, Ronald L. (Farragut, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

NUMERICAL DESIGN TOOLS FOR THERMAL REPLICATION OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by heating Ceramic block Glass workpiece before heating Figure 1: Thermal Replication (after Smith et al. [14NUMERICAL DESIGN TOOLS FOR THERMAL REPLICATION OF OPTICAL­QUALITY SURFACES Y.M. Stokes 1 Department. #12; Thermal replication of optical surfaces 1 1 Introduction Thermal replication is an industrial

Stokes, Yvonne

444

Battery Thermal Management System Design Modeling (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

Presents the objectives and motivations for a battery thermal management vehicle system design study.

Kim, G-H.; Pesaran, A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Device for thermal transfer and power generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is provided. The system includes a device that includes top and bottom thermally conductive substrates positioned opposite to one another, wherein a top surface of the bottom thermally conductive substrate is substantially atomically flat and a thermal blocking layer disposed between the top and bottom thermally conductive substrates. The device also includes top and bottom electrodes separated from one another between the top and bottom thermally conductive substrates to define a tunneling path, wherein the top electrode is disposed on the thermal blocking layer and the bottom electrode is disposed on the bottom thermally conductive substrate.

Weaver, Stanton Earl (Northville, NY); Arik, Mehmet (Niskayuna, NY)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

446

A new mineralogical approach to predict coefficient of thermal expansion of aggregate and concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the construction allows for accurate prediction of the potential thermal change on crack development and crack width and enhances the overall design process. Siliceous gravel use results in larger crack width than does the limestone and at low temperature... increment between the contacts to the flask volume, the amount of aggregate in the flask, and the thermal characteristics of the aggregate. For measurements made below the freezing point of water, a non-reactive liquid, such as toluene, which does...

Neekhra, Siddharth

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

447

High Performance Thermal Interface Technology Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An overview on recent developments in thermal interfaces is given with a focus on a novel thermal interface technology that allows the formation of 2-3 times thinner bondlines with strongly improved thermal properties at lower assembly pressures. This is achieved using nested hierarchical surface channels to control the particle stacking with highly particle-filled materials. Reliability testing with thermal cycling has also demonstrated a decrease in thermal resistance after extended times with longer overall lifetime compared to a flat interface.

R. Linderman; T. Brunschwiler; B. Smith; B. Michel

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

448

High Performance Thermal Interface Technology Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An overview on recent developments in thermal interfaces is given with a focus on a novel thermal interface technology that allows the formation of 2-3 times thinner bondlines with strongly improved thermal properties at lower assembly pressures. This is achieved using nested hierarchical surface channels to control the particle stacking with highly particle-filled materials. Reliability testing with thermal cycling has also demonstrated a decrease in thermal resistance after extended times with longer overall lifetime compared to a flat interface.

Linderman, R; Smith, B; Michel, B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

On applicability of the “thermalized potential” solver in simulations of the plasma flow in Hall thrusters  

SciTech Connect

In Hall thrusters, the potential distribution plays an important role in discharge processes and ion acceleration. This paper presents a 2D potential solver in the Hall thruster instead of the “thermalized potential”, and compares equipotential contours solved by these two methods for different magnetic field conditions. The comparison results reveal that the expected “thermalized potential” works very well when the magnetic field is nearly uniform and electron temperature is constant along the magnetic field lines. However for the case with a highly non-uniform magnetic field or variable electron temperature along the magnetic field lines, the “thermalized potential” is not accurate. In some case with magnetic separatrix inside the thruster channel, the “thermalized potential” model cannot be applied at all. In those cases, a full 2D potential solver must be applied. Overall, this paper shows the limit of applicability of the “thermalized potential” model.

Geng, Jinyue [School of Astronautics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China) [School of Astronautics, Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Beijing 100191 (China); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia 20052 (United States); Brieda, Lubos [Particle in Cell Consulting LLC, Falls Church, Virginia 22046 (United States)] [Particle in Cell Consulting LLC, Falls Church, Virginia 22046 (United States); Rose, Laura; Keidar, Michael [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia 20052 (United States)] [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The George Washington University, Washington, District of Columbia 20052 (United States)

2013-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

450

Ultralow thermal conductivity and the thermal d t f i t fconductance of interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are critical at the nanoscale · Low thermal conductivity in nanostructured materials ­ improved thermoelectric to the thermal conductivity of materials. · Ultralow thermal conductivity: beating the amorphous limitUltralow thermal conductivity and the thermal d t f i t fconductance of interfaces David G. Cahill

Braun, Paul

451

Particle-in-cell simulations on spontaneous thermal magnetic field fluctuations  

SciTech Connect

In this paper an electromagnetic particle code is used to investigate the spontaneous thermal emission. Specifically we perform particle-in-cell simulations employing a non-relativistic isotropic Maxwellian particle distribution to show that thermal fluctuations are related to the origin of spontaneous magnetic field fluctuation. These thermal fluctuations can become seed for further amplification mechanisms and thus be considered at the origin of the cosmological magnetic field, at microgauss levels. Our numerical results are in accordance with theoretical results presented in the literature.

Simões, F. J. R. Jr.; Pavan, J. [Instituto de Física e Matemática, UFPel, Pelotas, RS (Brazil)] [Instituto de Física e Matemática, UFPel, Pelotas, RS (Brazil); Gaelzer, R.; Ziebell, L. F. [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)] [Instituto de Física, UFRGS, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Yoon, P. H. [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)] [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Thermal behavior of bovine serum albumin after exposure to barrier discharge helium plasma jet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-thermal plasma jets at atmospheric pressure are useful tools nowadays in plasma medicine. Various applications are tested such as cauterization coagulation wound healing natural and artificial surfaces decontamination and sterilization. In order to know more about the effects of gas plasma on biological supramolecules we exposed proteinpowders to a barrier discharge helium plasma jet. Then spectroscopic investigations were carried out in order to obtain information on protein secondary tertiary and quaternary structures. We obtained a reduction of the protein alpha-helix content after the plasma exposure and a different behavior for both thermal denaturation/renaturation kinetics and thermal aggregation process.

R. Jijie; V. Pohoata; I. Topala

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Cornell University Thermal Comfort Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort Thermal comfort in the CUSD home is a top priority for our team. Accordingly, we designed a redundant HVAC system that would carefully manage the comfort of our decathletes and guests throughout the competition and the life of the house. The CUSD home's HVAC system was optimized for Washington, DC, with the cold Ithaca climate in mind. Our design tools included a schematic energy-modeling interface called TREAT, which was built off of the SuNREL platform. TREAT was used to passively condition the space. Our schematic energy modeling helped us properly size window areas, overhangs, and building mass distribution. We used a computation fluid dynamics (CFD) package called AirPak, to refine our design. The home was modeled in both

454

solar thermal | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal thermal Dataset Summary Description This dataset presents summary information related to world solar energy. It is part of a supporting dataset for the book World On the Edge: How to Prevent Environmental and Economic Collapse by Lester R. Source Earth Policy Institute Date Released January 12th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EU solar solar PV solar thermal world Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Excel spreadsheet, summary solar energy data on multiple tabs (xls, 145.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period License License Open Data Commons Attribution License Comment "Reuse of our data is permitted. We merely ask that wherever it is listed, it be appropriately cited"

455

Microfluidic exergy loss in a non-polarized thermomagnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microfluidic exergy loss in a non-polarized thermomagnetic field G.F. Naterer *, O.B. Adeyinka 28 June 2005 Abstract In this article, exergy losses of fluid motion in a microchannel are investigated. Thermal, friction and electromagnetic irreversibilities contribute to the total rate of exergy

Naterer, Greg F.

456

On the non-linear evolution of sand dunes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan International Centre for Theoretical...University of Khartoum, Khartoum, Sudan. Adopting a multiple scale...A. , 1977. Non-linear thermal convection in an elasticoviscous...University ofKhartoum, Khartoum, Sudan M. H. A. Hassan International......

I. A. Eltayeb; M. H. A. Hassan

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Transition Region Emission and Energy Input to Thermal Plasma During the Impulsive Phase of Solar Flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy released in a solar flare is partitioned between thermal and non-thermal particle energy and lost to thermal conduction and radiation over a broad range of wavelengths. It is difficult to determine the conductive losses and the energy radiated at transition region temperatures during the impulsive phases of flares. We use UVCS measurements of O VI photons produced by 5 flares and subsequently scattered by O VI ions in the corona to determine the 5.0 thermal energy and the conductive losses deduced from RHESSI and GOES X-ray data using areas from RHESSI images to estimate the loop volumes, cross-sectional areas and scale lengths. The transition region luminosities during the impulsive phase exceed the X-ray luminosities for the first few minutes, but they are smaller than the rates of increase of thermal energy unless the filling factor of the X-ray emitting gas is ~ 0.01. The estimated conductive losses from the hot gas are too large to be balanced by radiative losses or heating of evaporated plasma, and we conclude that the area of the flare magnetic flux tubes is much smaller than the effective area measured by RHESSI during this phase of the flares. For the 2002 July 23 flare, the energy deposited by non-thermal particles exceeds the X-ray and UV energy losses and the rate of increase of the thermal energy.

J. C. Raymond; G. Holman; A. Ciaravella; A. Panasyuk; Y. -K. Ko; J. Kohl

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

458

Westinghouse thermal barrier coatings development  

SciTech Connect

Westinghouse, in conjunction with the Department of Energy and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, has embarked upon a program for the development of advanced thermal barrier coatings for industrial gas turbines. Development of thermal barrier coatings (TBC`s) for industrial gas turbines has relied heavily on the transfer of technology from the aerospace industry. Significant differences in the time/temperature/stress duty cycles exist between these two coating applications. Coating systems which perform well in aerospace applications may not been optimized to meet power generation performance requirements. This program will focus on development of TBC`s to meet the specific needs of power generation applications.

Goedjen, J.G.; Wagner, G.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

Thermal treatment for VOC control  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic and thermal oxidation are well-established technologies for controlling volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Oxidation destroys pollutants, rather than capturing them. Oxidation units can destroy nearly 100% of VOC and toxic emissions targeted by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990--some systems attain destruction efficiencies over 99.99%. To assist in the design of these systems, an engineer will often look a/t the heat of combustion of the gas stream, along with the type of pollutant, to best determine the correct type of oxidation device to use. The paper discusses catalytic and thermal oxidation, energy recovery, and equipment for these processes.

Cloud, R.A. [Huntington Environmental Systems, Schaumburg, IL (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Effective Thermal Conductivity of Graded Nanocomposites with Interfacial Thermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.M. Yin", G. H. Paulino", W.G. Buttlar", and L.Z. Sun'' '^Department of Civil and Environmental the effective thermal conductivity distribution in functionally graded materials (FGMs) considering the Kapitza is developed to derive the averaged heat flux field of the particle phase. Then the temperature gradient can

Paulino, Glaucio H.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Nanoscale thermal transport and the thermal conductance of interfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-8 2008 #12;Er-fiber laser system, UIUC Nov. 2007 #12;Solid-liquid interfaces: Two approaches · Transient-wide: ­ thermal interface materials ­ so-called "nanofluids" (suspensions in liquids) ­ polymer composites absorption depends on temperature of the nanotube · Assume heat capacity is comparable to graphite · Cooling

Braun, Paul

462

Thermal power plant efficiency enhancement with Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In addition to greenhouse gas emissions, coastal thermal power plants would gain further opposition due to their heat rejection distressing the local ecosystem. Therefore, these plants need to enhance their thermal efficiency while reducing their environmental offense. In this study, a hybrid plant based on the principle of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion was coupled to a 740 MW coal-fired power plant project located at latitude 28°S where the surface to deepwater temperature difference would not suffice for regular OTEC plants. This paper presents the thermodynamical model to assess the overall efficiency gained by adopting an ammonia Rankine cycle plus a desalinating unit, heated by the power plant condenser discharge and refrigerated by cold deep seawater. The simulation allowed us to optimize a system that would finally enhance the plant power output by 25–37 MW, depending on the season, without added emissions while reducing dramatically the water temperature at discharge and also desalinating up to 5.8 million tons per year. The supplemental equipment was sized and the specific emissions reduction was estimated. We believe that this approach would improve the acceptability of thermal and nuclear power plant projects regardless of the plant location.

Rodrigo Soto; Julio Vergara

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

University of Colorado Thermal Comfort Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A A Warmboard sub-floor with tubing and wood Image Courtsey of Warmboard Image Thermal Comfort "That Condition of mind, which expresses satisfaction with the thermal environment" (ASHRAE Standard 55) Design Criteria Design Criteria Design Criteria Design Criteria 1. Thermally comfortable conditions achieved by integrating technologically and economically innovative, low-energy strategies: a. Temperatures between 72 o F and 76 o F b. Humidity between 40.0% and 55.0% 2. Minimal distractions to the occupant 3. Easy control of thermal comfort system 4. Uniform thermal conditions exist throughout the house Bio Bio Bio Bio- - - -S S S S ( ( ( (h h h h) ) ) ) ip ip ip ip Thermal Comfort Features Thermal Comfort Features Thermal Comfort Features Thermal Comfort Features

464

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A ThesisStorage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants by Corey

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Recovery of Galilean Invariance in Thermal Lattice Boltzmann Models for Arbitrary Prandtl Number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we demonstrate a set of fundamental conditions required for the formulation of a thermohydrodynamic lattice Boltzmann model at an arbitrary Prandtl number. A specific collision operator form is then proposed that is in compliance with these conditions. It admits two independent relaxation times, one for viscosity and another for thermal conductivity. But more importantly, the resulting thermohydrodynamic equations based on such a collision operator form is theoretically shown to remove the well known non-Galilean invariant artifact at non-unity Prandtl numbers in previous thermal lattice Boltzmann models with multiple relaxation times.

Chen, Hudong; Zhang, Raoyang

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Thermally Enhanced Pipe for Geothermal Applications Stphane Gonthier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in St-Lazare, QC, Canada · Leaders in Pipe and Tubing in Niche Markets · Over 30 years of experience in the Market : 2009 in Canada (CGC Conference, Toronto, ON) 2010 in USA (IGSHPA Technical Conference and Expo Field (2010), Designer: Ecosystem, QC · 3 Geo-Solar Hybrid Systems in NH and MA, 250 X ¾" slinkies (2011

467

APPLIED THERMAL ENGINEERING Manuscript Draft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the heat pump from the grid during the two hours of electrical peak power · Design of a new heat exchangerAPPLIED THERMAL ENGINEERING Manuscript Draft TITLE: Experimental assessment of a PCM to air heat This paper presents a heat exchanger prototype containing PCM material designed to provide a 1kW heating

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

468

Solar energy thermalization and storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive solar thermalization and thermal energy storage assembly which is visually transparent. The assembly consists of two substantial parallel, transparent wall members mounted in a rectangular support frame to form a liquid-tight chamber. A semitransparent thermalization plate is located in the chamber, substantially paralled to and about equidistant from the transparent wall members to thermalize solar radiation which is stored in a transparent thermal energy storage liquid which fills the chamber. A number of the devices, as modules, can be stacked together to construct a visually transparent, thermal storage wall for passive solar-heated buildings.

McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Method and apparatus for thermal processing of semiconductor substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus and method for thermal processing of semiconductor wafers. The apparatus and method provide the temperature stability and uniformity of a conventional batch furnace as well as the processing speed and reduced time-at-temperature of a lamp-heated rapid thermal processor (RTP). Individual wafers are rapidly inserted into and withdrawn from a furnace cavity held at a nearly constant and isothermal temperature. The speeds of insertion and withdrawal are sufficiently large to limit thermal stresses and thereby reduce or prevent plastic deformation of the wafer as it enters and leaves the furnace. By processing the semiconductor wafer in a substantially isothermal cavity, the wafer temperature and spatial uniformity of the wafer temperature can be ensured by measuring and controlling only temperatures of the cavity walls. Further, peak power requirements are very small compared to lamp-heated RTPs because the cavity temperature is not cycled and the thermal mass of the cavity is relatively large. Increased speeds of insertion and/or removal may also be used with non-isothermal furnaces.

Griffiths, Stewart K. (Danville, CA); Nilson, Robert H. (Cardiss, CA); Mattson, Brad S. (Los Gatos, CA); Savas, Stephen E. (Alameda, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Method and apparatus for thermal processing of semiconductor substrates  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved apparatus and method for thermal processing of semiconductor wafers. The apparatus and method provide the temperature stability and uniformity of a conventional batch furnace as well as the processing speed and reduced time-at-temperature of a lamp-heated rapid thermal processor (RTP). Individual wafers are rapidly inserted into and withdrawn from a furnace cavity held at a nearly constant and isothermal temperature. The speeds of insertion and withdrawal are sufficiently large to limit thermal stresses and thereby reduce or prevent plastic deformation of the wafer as it enters and leaves the furnace. By processing the semiconductor wafer in a substantially isothermal cavity, the wafer temperature and spatial uniformity of the wafer temperature can be ensured by measuring and controlling only temperatures of the cavity walls. Further, peak power requirements are very small compared to lamp-heated RTPs because the cavity temperature is not cycled and the thermal mass of the cavity is relatively large. Increased speeds of insertion and/or removal may also be used with non-isothermal furnaces.

Griffiths, Stewart K. (Danville, CA); Nilson, Robert H. (Cardiss, CA); Mattson, Brad S. (Los Gatos, CA); Savas, Stephen E. (Alameda, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Thermal Characterization of Graphitic Carbon Foams for Use in Thermal Storage Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Highly conductive graphitic foams are currently being studied for use as thermal conductivity enhancers (TCEs) in thermal energy storage (TES) systems. TES systems store… (more)

Drummond, Kevin P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Experimental studies are presented that aim to utilize phase change materials (PCM's) to enhance thermal energy storage systems for concentrated solar thermal power (CSP) systems.… (more)

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Optical and Thermal Characterization of High Reflective Surface with Applications in Thermal-Solar Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Selective solar absorbing coating consists of a high thermal reflectance layer and high solar absorbance layer deposited over a substrate. In this work optical and thermal properties...

Macias, Juan Daniel; Ramirez Rincon, Jorge Andres; Lizama Tzec, Francisco Ivan; Ares Muzio, Oscar Eduardo; Oskam, Gerko; De Coss Gomez, Romeo; Alvarado Gil, Juan José

474

Optical and Thermal Characterization of High Reflection Surfaces with Applcations in Thermal-Solar Technology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Selective solar absorbing coating consists of a high thermal reflectance layer and a high solar absorbance layer deposited over a substrate. In this work optical and thermal properties...

Macias, Juan Daniel; Ramirez Rincon, Jorge Andres; Lizama Tzec, Francisco Ivan; Ares Muzio, Oscar Eduardo; Oskam, Gerko; De Coss Gomez, Romeo; Alvarado Gil, Juan José

475

Approximation of inhomogeneous thermal lines via series connection of homogeneous thermal lines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A method is given for approximating an arbitrary inhomogeneous thermal line (ITL) as a series connection of homogeneous thermal lines (HTL). The method is compared with...

L. S. Eleinikova

1974-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Polymer Nanofibers with Outstanding Thermal Conductivity and Thermal Stability: Fundamental Linkage between Molecular Characteristics and Macroscopic Thermal Properties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polymer nanofibers with high thermal conductivities and outstanding thermal stabilities are highly desirable in heat transfer-critical applications such as thermal management, heat exchangers and energy storage. In this work, we unlock the fundamental relations between the thermal conductivity and thermal stability of polymer nanofibers and their molecular characteristics by studying the temperature-induced phase transitions and thermal transport of a series of polymer nanofibers. Ten different polymer nanofibers with systematically chosen molecular structures are studied using large scale molecular dynamics simulations. We found that high thermal conductivity and good thermal stability can be achieved in polymers with rigid backbones, exemplified by {\\pi}-conjugated polymers, due to suppressed segmental rotations and large phonon group velocities. The low probability of segmental rotation does not only prevent temperature-induced phase transition but also enables long phonon mean free paths due to reduced di...

Zhang, Teng; Luo, Tengfei

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program  

SciTech Connect

This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

Prater, L.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Thermalization, Error Correction, and Memory Lifetime for Ising Anyon Systems  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We consider two-dimensional lattice models that support Ising anyonic excitations and are coupled to a thermal bath. We propose a phenomenological model for the resulting short-time dynamics that includes pair creation, hopping, braiding, and fusion of anyons. By explicitly constructing topological quantum error-correcting codes for this class of system, we use our thermalization model to estimate the lifetime of the quantum information stored in the encoded spaces. To decode and correct errors in these codes, we adapt several existing topological decoders to the non-Abelian setting. We perform large-scale numerical simulations of these two-dimensional Ising anyon systems and find that the thresholds of these models range from 13% to 25%. To our knowledge, these are the first numerical threshold estimates for quantum codes without explicit additive structure.

Courtney G. Brell; Simon Burton; Guillaume Dauphinais; Steven T. Flammia; David Poulin

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

479

Study of the Thermal Pulsation of AGB Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A systematic investigation on the third dredge up in a 3M$_{\\odot}$, solar metallicity AGB star will be presented. The model evolves from the main sequence up to the Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB). Intermediate mass stars are important because they contribute significantly via the slow neutron capture nucleosynthesis. The aim of this work is to gain insight on the behaviour of the AGB star during thermal pulsation. This investigation is based on an extended numerical simulation of the evolutionary phases and full, consistent AGB model calculations. In particular, the convective structure during pulsation will be studied, giving particular emphasis to the analysis of the stability of the Schwarzschild boundary that will eventually determine the occurrence of Third Dredge Up (hereafter referred to as TDUP). We provide a brief description of our updated evolutionary code and focus primarily on the obtaining the TDUP after 14 thermal pulses. We elaborate on the non-standard treatment of convection known as "oversh...

Halabi, Ghina M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Thermal analysis of cast-resin dry-type transformers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-flammable characteristic of dry-type cast-resin transformers make them suitable for residential and hospital usages. However, because of resin’s property, thermal behavior of these transformers is undesirable, so it is important to analyze their thermal behavior. In this paper temperature distribution of cast-resin transformers is modeled by two different approaches. A FEM-based model which uses experimental-analytical formula for air–cooling vertical ducts and a 3D finite volume based CFD model which is established in the ANSYS CFX software. In order to evaluate and compare the models, the simulation results were compared with the experimental data measured from an 800 kVA transformer. Finally, the influences of some construction parameters and environmental conditions on temperature distribution of cast-resin transformers were discussed.

M. Eslamian; B. Vahidi; A. Eslamian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

On the thermalization of the $?$-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study theoretically the original $\\alpha$-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) system with $N=16,32$ and $64$ masses connected by a nonlinear quadratic spring. Our approach is based on resonant wave-wave interaction theory. We show that the route to thermalization consists of three stages. The first one is associated with non-resonant three-wave interactions. At this short time scale, the dynamics is reversible; this stage coincides with the observation of recurrent phenomena in numerical simulations of the $\\alpha$-FPU. On a larger time scale, exact four-wave resonant interactions start to take place; however, we find that all quartets are isolated, preventing a full mixing of energy in the spectrum and thermalization. The last stage corresponds to six-wave resonant interactions. Those are responsible for the energy equipartition recently observed in numerical simulations. A key role in our finding is played by the {\\it Umklapp} (flip over) resonant interactions, typical of discrete systems.

Miguel Onorato; Lara Vozella; Davide Proment; Yuri V. Lvov

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

482

Radiography used to image thermal explosions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiography used to image thermal explosions Radiography used to image thermal explosions Radiography used to image thermal explosions Researchers have gained an understanding of the mechanism of thermal explosions and have created a model capturing the stages of the explosion. October 9, 2012 Tabletop X-ray radiography of a thermal explosion. Tabletop X-ray radiography of a thermal explosion. Researchers have gained an understanding of the mechanism of thermal explosions and have created a model capturing the stages of the explosion. Proton radiography (pRad) at LANSCE imaged thermal explosions at high speeds to provide a real-time look at how an explosion unfolds and releases its energy. Specifically, it is important to know the range of temperature over which ignition may occur and the subsequent power of the explosion.

483

A COMPUTATIONAL STUDY ON THERMAL CONDUCITIVITY OF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aspect ratio, weight fraction, and thermal resistance at the interface between the SWNTsA COMPUTATIONAL STUDY ON THERMAL CONDUCITIVITY OF CARBON NANOTUBE DISPERSED BIOLOGICAL NANOFLUIDS: Massachusetts Institute of Technology 2: School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering, Oklahoma

Maruyama, Shigeo

484

Reduced Thermal Conductivity of Compacted Silicon Nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal-Barrier-Coating Applications,” Journa of American Ceramicthermal conductivity materials are typically found among ceramicsThermal Conductivity of Porous Materials: Application to Thick Barrier Coatings,” Journal of the European Ceramic

Yuen, Taylor S.

485

Thermal pumping of light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The work presented here is a study of thermally enhanced injection in light-emitting diodes (LEDs). This effect, which we refer to as "thermal pumping", results from Peltier energy exchange from the lattice to charge ...

Gray, Dodd (Dodd J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Thermal neutron flux contours from criticality event  

SciTech Connect

The generation of thermal neutron flux contours from a criticality event is demonstrated for an idealized building with a criticality event in one of the rooms. The MCNP Monte Carlo computer code is used to calculate the thermal neutron flux.

Carter, L.L., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Status of Solar Thermal Conversion in China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

China has an abundant solar energy resource. Solar thermal conversion systems have been studied for more than 25 years and solar thermal industry has been developing since 1990’s....2 solar collectors were sold a...

Yin Zhiqiang

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Thermal instability in planar solar coronal structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Prominentes and filaments are thought to arise as a consequence of a magnetized plasma undergoing thermal instability. Therefore the thermal stability of a magnetized plasma is investigated under coronal condi...

R. A. M. Van der Linden; M. Goossens

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Successfully Marketing Thermal Storage in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper first reviews the key hurdles to thermal energy storage. Next, case studies of three electric utility thermal storage marketing programs are reviewed. The results of these case studies. as well as advice and experiences from other...

McDonald, C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

NON-PROPRIETARY RESEARCH  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NON-PROPRIETARY RESEARCH NON-PROPRIETARY RESEARCH Facility use costs are not paid (sample) PROPRIETARY RESEARCH Full cost recovery for facility use is paid (sample) OPEN DATA RESEARCH Full cost recovery for facility use is paid (sample) * Users ARE NOT charged for "machine time" or potential agreed upon collaborative effort of Brookhaven researchers; users may be charged for ancillary materials, supplies, and services obtained from the User Facility. * Users ARE charged for "machine time" and limited support services (non-collaborative) from Brookhaven personnel on a full- cost recovery basis. * Users ARE charged for "machine time" and limited support services (non-collaborative) from Brookhaven personnel on a full- cost recovery basis.

491

Environmental limits on the non-resonant cosmic-ray current-driven instability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the so-called non-resonant cosmic-ray streaming instability, first discussed by Bell (2004). The extent to which thermal damping and ion-neutral collisions reduce the growth of this instability is calculated. Limits on the growth of the non-resonant mode in SN1006 and RX J1713.7-3946 are presented.

B. Reville; J. G. Kirk; P. Duffy; S. O'Sullivan

2008-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

492

Development of an Airless Thermal Enhancer | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of a Thermal Enhancer for Combined Partial Range Burning and Hydrocarbon Dosing Thermal Enhancer - Airless Exhaust Thermal Management Device SCR Technologies for NOx Reduction...

493

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ADVANCED THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE CONCEPT DEFINITION STUDY FORSchilling. F. E. , Thermal Energy Storage Using PrestressedNo ~cumulate thermal energy storage. Estimate ESTrof2(

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

density, making direct thermal energy storage methods, e.g.reduced. Conventional thermal energy harvesting and storageharvesting, storage, and utilization of thermal energy has

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of thermal expansion between polymers and ceramics. However,of thermal expansion for selected ceramics, metals, andof thermal expansion for selected ceramics, metals, and

Warren, Clinton Gregory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Review of Thermally Activated Technologies, July 2004 | Department...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and waste-heat-fired applications of thermally-driven cooling systems, thermally-driven heat pumps, and thermally-driven bottoming cycles, primarily for use in commercial...

498

Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric Machines Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Thermal Performance and...

499

Thermal Imaging Technique for Measuring Mixing of Fluids - Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Solar Thermal Solar Thermal Energy Analysis Energy Analysis Building Energy Efficiency Building Energy Efficiency Find More Like This Return to Search Thermal Imaging Technique for...

500

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft ProgrammaticPlan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE Assistantl OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z