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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal 21st August - 2nd September 2011 on the principles of solar energy conversion. Theoretical knowledge will be complemented with practical workshops of solar energy conversion. Theoretical knowledge will be comple- mented with practical workshops

2

Green Energy Ohio- GEO Solar Thermal Rebate Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

With funding from The Sierra Club, Green Energy Ohio (GEO) is offering rebates on residential properties in Ohio for solar water heating systems purchased after April 1, 2009. The rebates are...

3

Non-thermal Plasma Chemistry Non-thermal Thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-thermal Plasma Chemical Flow Reactor #12;Werner von Siemens ,, ... construction of an apparatus generation (1857) pollution control volatile organic components, NOx reforming, ... radiation sources excimer;Leuchtstoffröhre Plasma-Bildschirm Energiesparlampe #12;electrical engineering light sources textile industry

Greifswald, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-Universität

4

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of non-thermal energy to hot flare plasma.

Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

5

Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System Under Transient and Steady State Conditions Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System Under...

6

Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment of diesel exhaust particulates and NOx Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment of diesel exhaust...

7

Geo-neutrinos: recent developments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiogenic heating is a key component of the energy balance and thermal evolution of the Earth. It contributes to mantle convection, plate tectonics, volcanoes, and mountain building. Geo-neutrino observations estimate the present radiogenic power of our planet. This estimate depends on the quantity and distribution of heat-producing elements in various Earth reservoirs. Of particular geological importance is radiogenic heating in the mantle. This quantity informs the origin and thermal evolution of our planet. Here we present: currently reported geo-neutrino observations; estimates of the mantle geo-neutrino signal, mantle radiogenic heating, and mantle cooling; a comparison of chemical Earth model predictions of the mantle geo-neutrino signal and mantle radiogenic heating; a brief discussion of radiogenic heating in the core, including calculations of geo-neutrino signals per pW/kg; and finally a discussion of observational strategy.

Dye, Steve

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geo-thermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat ingeothermal energy, ocean thermal energy, wasted heat inthermal energy, geo/ocean-thermal energy, wasted heat in

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Fuel injector utilizing non-thermal plasma activation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-thermal plasma assisted combustion fuel injector that uses an inner and outer electrode to create an electric field from a high voltage power supply. A dielectric material is operatively disposed between the two electrodes to prevent arcing and to promote the formation of a non-thermal plasma. A fuel injector, which converts a liquid fuel into a dispersed mist, vapor, or aerosolized fuel, injects into the non-thermal plasma generating energetic electrons and other highly reactive chemical species.

Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Rosocha, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Ceramics in non-thermal plasma discharge for hydrogen generation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Recent interest in hydrogen as an energy source has resulted in development of new technologies such as non-thermal plasma processing of natural gas. We report (more)

Vintila, Ramona Roxana

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Dynamics & Propulsion Innovation Center Performance Evaluation of the Delphi Non-Thermal Plasma System Under Transient and Steady State Conditions 8 th Diesel Engine Emission...

12

Thermal recovery from a fractured medium in local thermal non-equilibrium Rachel Geleta,b,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effective stress is tensile near the injection well, illustrating the thermal contraction of the rock, whileThermal recovery from a fractured medium in local thermal non-equilibrium Rachel Geleta, Australia Abstract Thermal recovery from a hot dry rock reservoir viewed as a deformable fractured medium

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

13

Geo-neutrinos and the Radioactive Power of the Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chemical and physical Earth models agree little as to the radioactive power of the planet. Each predicts a range of radioactive powers, overlapping slightly with the other at about 24 TW, and together spanning 14-46 TW. Approximately 20 % of this radioactive power (3-8 TW) escapes to space in the form of geo-neutrinos. The remaining 11-38 TW heats the planet with significant geo-dynamical consequences, appearing as the radiogenic component of the 43-49 TW surface heat flow. The non-radiogenic component of the surface heat flow (5-38 TW) is presumably primordial, a legacy of the formation and early evolution of the planet. A constraining measurement of radiogenic heating provides insights to the thermal history of the Earth and potentially discriminates chemical and physical Earth models. Radiogenic heating in the planet primarily springs from unstable nuclides of uranium, thorium, and potassium. The paths to their stable daughter nuclides include nuclear beta decays, producing geo-neutrinos. Large sub-surface detectors efficiently record the energy but not the direction of the infrequent interactions of the highest energy geo-neutrinos, originating only from uranium and thorium. The measured energy spectrum of the interactions estimates the relative amounts of these heat-producing elements, while the intensity estimates planetary radiogenic power. Recent geo-neutrino observations in Japan and Italy find consistent values of radiogenic heating. The combined result mildly excludes the lowest model values of radiogenic heating and, assuming whole mantle convection, identifies primordial heat loss. Future observations have the potential to measure radiogenic heating with better precision, further constraining geological models and the thermal evolution of the Earth.

Steve Dye

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

14

Kinetic Modeling of Non-thermal Escape: Planets and Exoplanets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kinetic Modeling of Non-thermal Escape: Planets and Exoplanets Valery I. Shematovich Institute of Astronomy, Russian Academy of Sciences Modeling Atmospheric Escape Workshop - Spring 2012 University are populated by the atoms and molecules with both thermal and suprathermal kinetic energies (Johnson et al

Johnson, Robert E.

15

Pressure Balance between Thermal and Non-Thermal Plasmas in the 3C129 Cluster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With new Chandra observations of the cluster containing the two radio galaxies 3C129 and 3C129.1, we have made a fit to the X-ray surface brightness to obtain thermal pressures. VLA data at 1.4 GHz have been obtained to complement previous maps at 0.33 GHz and at 5 and 8 GHz. From these radio data, we are able to derive the minimum non-thermal pressure of various emitting volumes along the tail of 3C129 and in the lobes of 3C129.1. Under the assumption that the non-thermal plasma excludes significant thermal plasma, we may expect pressure balance for most features since ram pressure should be important only close to the cores of the galaxies. Since we find that the minimum non-thermal pressures are generally only a factor of a few below estimates of the ambient thermal pressure, we conclude that it is unlikely that relativistic protons contribute significantly to the total pressure. Reasonable contributions from low energy electrons and filling factors in the range 0.1 to 1 suffice to achieve pressure balance. Although we do not find strong signatures for the exclusion of hot gas from the radio structures, we find soft features near the cores of both galaxies suggestive of cool gas stripping and hard features associated with radio jets and possibly a leading bow shock.

D. E. Harris; H. Krawczynski

2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

16

Simbol-X capability of detecting the non-thermal emission of stellar flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the capability of detecting, with Simbol-X, non-thermal emission during stellar flares, and distinguishing it from hot thermal emission. We find that flare non-thermal emission is detectable when at least ~20 cts are detected with the CZT detector in the 20-80 keV band. Therefore Simbol-X will detect the non-thermal emission from some of the X-ray brightest nearby stars, whether the thermal vs. non-thermal relation, derived for solar flares, holds.

C. Argiroffi; G. Micela; A. Maggio

2008-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

17

MERCURY OXIDIZATION IN NON-THERMAL PLASMA BARRIER DISCHARGE SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past decade, the emission of toxic elements from human activities has become a matter of great public concern. Hg, As, Se and Cd typically volatilize during a combustion process and are not easily caught with conventional air pollution control techniques. In addition, there is no pollution prevention technique available now or likely be available in the foreseeable future that can prevent the emission of these trace elements. These trace elements pose additional scientific challenge as they are present at only ppb levels in large gas streams. Mercury, in particular, has attracted significant attention due to its high volatility, toxicity and potential threat to human health. In the present research work, a non-thermal plasma dielectric barrier discharge technique has been used to oxidize Hg{sup 0}(g) to HgO. The basic premise of this approach is that Hg{sup 0} in vapor form cannot be easily removed in an absorption tower whereas HgO as a particulate is amiable to water scrubbing. The work presented in this report consists of three steps: (1) setting-up of an experimental apparatus to generate mercury vapors at a constant rate and modifying the existing non-thermal plasma reactor system, (2) solving the analytical challenge for measuring mercury vapor concentration at ppb level, and (3) conducting experiments on mercury oxidation under plasma conditions to establish proof of concept.

V.K. Mathur

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Syngas Production from Propane Using Atmospheric Non-thermal Plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Propane steam reforming using a sliding discharge reactor was investigated under atmospheric pressure and low temperature (420 K). Non-thermal plasma steam reforming proceeded efficiently and hydrogen was formed as a main product (H2 concentration up to 50%). By-products (C2-hydrocarbons, methane, carbon dioxide) were measured with concentrations lower than 6%. The mean electrical power injected in the discharge is less than 2 kW. The process efficiency is described in terms of propane conversion rate, steam reforming and cracking selectivity, as well as by-products production. Chemical processes modelling based on classical thermodynamic equilibrium reactor is also proposed. Calculated data fit quiet well experimental results and indicate that the improvement of C3H8 conversion and then H2 production can be achieved by increasing the gas fraction through the discharge. By improving the reactor design, the non-thermal plasma has a potential for being an effective way for supplying hydrogen or synthesis gas.

Ouni, Fakhreddine; Cormier, Jean Marie; 10.1007/s11090-009-9166-2

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Estimations of local thermal impact on living organisms irradiated by non-thermal microwaves  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pennes' differential equation for bioheat transfer and the heat transfer equation are solved for the temperature distribution in a living tissue with spherical inclusions, irradiated by microwave power. It is shown that relative temperature excess in a small inclusion in the tissue in some cases is inversely proportional to its radius and does not depend on the applied power. In pulsing RF fields the effect is amplified proportionally to the ratio of the pulse period to the pulse duration. The local temperature rise significantly outpaces the averaged one and therefore the Watt to Weight SAR limits may be insufficient to estimate the safety of RF radiation and the conventional division of the biological effects of electromagnetic fields on the thermal and non-thermal needs to be revised.

Shatalov, Vladimir

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Non-thermal radiation from a runaway massive star  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a study of the radio emission from a massive runaway star. The star forms a bow shock that is clearly observed in the infrared. We have performed VLA observations under the assumption that the reverse shock in the stellar wind might accelerate charged particles up to relativistic energies. Non-thermal radio emission of synchrotron origin has been detected, confirming the hypothesis. We have then modeled the system and we predict a spectral energy distribution that extends up to gamma-rays. Under some simplifying assumptions, we find that the intensity at high energies is too low to be detected by current instruments, but the future Cherenkov Telescope Array might detect the source.

Romero, Gustavo E; Peri, Cintia S; Marti, Josep; Araudo, Anabella T

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

E-Print Network 3.0 - atmospheric non-thermal plasma Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: phenomena in the plasma reactor. KEYWORDS : fuel reforming, non-thermal plasma, modelling, experimental... are carried out by gas chromatography (HP 5890 serie II). The...

22

On the equipartition of thermal and non-thermal energy in clusters of galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Clusters of galaxies are revealing themselves as powerful sources of non thermal radiation in a wide range of wavelengths. In order to account for these multifrequency observations equipartition of cosmic rays (CRs) with the thermal gas in clusters of galaxies is often invoked. This condition might suggest a dynamical role played by cosmic rays in the virialization of these large scale structures and is now testable through gamma ray observations. We show here, in the specific case of the Coma and Virgo clusters, for which upper limits on the gamma ray emission exist, that equipartition implies gamma ray fluxes that are close or even in excess of the EGRET limit, depending on the adopted model of CR injection. We use this bound to limit the validity of the equipartition condition. We also show that, contrary to what claimed in previous calculations, the equipartition assumption implies gamma ray fluxes in the TeV range which can be detectable even by currently operating gamma ray observatories if the injection cosmic ray spectrum is flatter than $E^{-2.4}$.

Pasquale Blasi

1999-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

23

Non-Thermal Continuum toward SGRB2(N-LMH)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis of continuum antenna temperatures observed in the Green Bank Telescope (GBT) spectrometer bandpasses is presented for observations toward SgrB2(N-LMH). Since 2004, we have identified four new prebiotic molecules toward this source by means of rotational transitions between low energy levels; concurrently, we have observed significant continuum in the GBT spectrometer bandpasses centered at 85 different frequencies in the range of 1 to 48 GHz. The continuum heavily influences the molecular spectral features since we have observed far more absorption lines than emission lines for each of these new molecular species. Hence, it is important to understand the nature, distribution, and intensity of the underlying continuum in the GBT bandpasses for the purposes of radiative transfer, i.e. the means by which reliable molecular abundances are estimated. We find that the GBT spectrometer bandpass continuum is consistent with optically-thin, non thermal (synchrotron) emission with a flux density spectral index of -0.7 and a Gaussian source size of ~143" at 1 GHz that decreases with increasing frequency as nu^(-0.52). Some support for this model is provided by high frequency Very Large Array (VLA) observations of SgrB2.

J. M. Hollis; P. R. Jewell; Anthony J. Remijan; F. J. Lovas

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

GeoEnergy technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the GeoEnergy Technology Program is to improve the understanding and efficiency of energy extraction and conversion from geologic resources, hence maintaining domestic production capability of fossil energy resources and expanding the usage of geothermal energy. The GeoEnergy Technology Program conducts projects for the Department of Energy in four resource areas--coal, oil and gas, synthetic fuels and geothermal energy. These projects, which are conducted collaboratively with private industry and DOE`s Energy Technology Centers, draw heavily on expertise derived from the nuclear weapons engineering capabilities of Sandia. The primary technologies utilized in the program are instrumentation development and application, geotechnical engineering, drilling and well completions, and chemical and physical process research. Studies in all four resource areas are described.

NONE

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Note: Local thermal conductivities from boundary driven non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of heat transport in models of molecular fluids. We show that the local thermal conductivities obtained from non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations agree within numerical accuracy with equilibrium Green-Kubo computations. Our results support the local equilibrium hypothesis for transport properties. We show how to use the local dependence of the thermal gradients to quantify the thermal conductivity of molecular fluids for a wide range of thermodynamic states using a single simulation.

Bresme, F., E-mail: f.bresme@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Chemical Physics Section, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Armstrong, J., E-mail: j.armstrong@imperial.ac.uk [Department of Chemistry, Chemical Physics Section, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2014-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

26

THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY OF NON-REPOSITORY LITHOSTRATIGRAPHIC LAYERS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This model report addresses activities described in ''Technical Work Plan for: Near-Field Environment and Transport Thermal Properties and Analysis Reports Integration'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171708]). The model develops values for thermal conductivity, and its uncertainty, for the nonrepository layers of Yucca Mountain; in addition, the model provides estimates for matrix porosity and dry bulk density for the nonrepository layers. The studied lithostratigraphic units, as identified in the ''Geologic Framework Model'' (GFM 2000) (BSC 2004 [DIRS 170029]), are the Timber Mountain Group, the Tiva Canyon Tuff, the Yucca Mountain Tuff, the Pah Canyon Tuff, the Topopah Spring Tuff (excluding the repository layers), the Calico Hills Formation, the Prow Pass Tuff, the Bullfrog Tuff, and the Tram Tuff. The deepest model units of the GFM (Tund and Paleozoic) are excluded from this study because no data suitable for model input are available. The parameter estimates developed in this report are used as input to various models and calculations that simulate heat transport through the rock mass. Specifically, analysis model reports that use product output from this report are: (1) Drift-scale coupled processes (DST and TH seepage) models; (2) Drift degradation analysis; (3) Multiscale thermohydrologic model; and (4) Ventilation model and analysis report. In keeping with the methodology of the thermal conductivity model for the repository layers in ''Thermal Conductivity of the Potential Repository Horizon'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 169854]), the Hsu et al. (1995 [DIRS 158073]) three-dimensional (3-D) cubic model (referred to herein as ''the Hsu model'') was used to represent the matrix thermal conductivity as a function of the four parameters (matrix porosity, thermal conductivity of the saturating fluid, thermal conductivity of the solid, and geometric connectivity of the solid). The Hsu model requires input data from each test specimen to meet three specific conditions: (1) Known value for matrix porosity; (2) Known values for wet and dry thermal conductivity; and (3) The location of the measured specimen in relation to the model stratigraphic unit. The only matrix thermal conductivity values developed are limited to fully saturated and dry conditions. The model does not include the effects of convection and thermal radiation in voids. The model does not include temperature dependence of thermal conductivity, porosity, or bulk density.

R. JONES

2004-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

27

Non-thermal plasma-assisted NOx reduction over Na-Y zeolites...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

investigated in the non-thermal plasma assisted NOx reduction reaction using a simulated diesel engine exhaust gas mixture. The acid sites were formed by NH4+ ion exchange and...

28

Geometry and temperature dependent thermal conductivity of diamond nanowires: A non-equilibrium molecular dynamics study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plasma etching of polycrystalline diamond films [7], microwave plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition. For theoretical calculations of proper- ties of nanosized diamond materials, polycrystalline diamond thin filmsGeometry and temperature dependent thermal conductivity of diamond nanowires: A non

Melnik, Roderick

29

MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 MPS213 - A Non-Thermal Plasma Application for the Royal Navy - Part 3 2002 DEER Conference Presentation: Marine Propulsion Systems - Integrated Project Team 2002deerhughes3.pdf...

30

Non Thermal Features in the Cosmic Neutrino Background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I review some of the basic information on the Cosmic Neutrino Background momentum distribution. In particular, I discuss how present data from several cosmological observables such as Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure power spectrum constrain possible deviations from a standard Fermi-Dirac thermal distribution.

G. Mangano

2006-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

31

GeoPowering the West  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summary brochure of GeoPowering the West (GPW) activities, and areas of technology transfer and market transformation. It also provides current contact information for key DOE and national laboratory staff representing the GPW program.

Not Available

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Thermal non-equilibrium transport in colloids Alois Wrger  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to an Onsager cross coefficient that describes the coupling between heat and particle flows. In the last decade. Boundary layer approximation 6 B. Double-layer forces 7 C. Transport velocity 8 D. Non-uniform electrolyte condition 15 I. Size dependence 16 III. Dispersion and depletion forces 18 A. Colloid-polymer mixtures 18 B

Boyer, Edmond

33

Entropy Production in Non-Linear, Thermally Driven Hamiltonian Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider a finite chain of non-linear oscillators coupled at its ends to two infinite heat baths which are at different temperatures. Using our earlier results about the existence of a stationary state, we show rigorously that for arbitrary temperature differences and arbitrary couplings, such a system has a unique stationary state. (This extends our earlier results for small temperature differences.) In all these cases, any initial state will converge (at an unknown rate) to the stationary state. We show that this stationary state continually produces entropy. The rate of entropy production is strictly negative when the temperatures are unequal and is proportional to the mean energy flux through the system.

Jean-Pierre Eckmann; Claude-Alain Pillet; Luc Rey-Bellet

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Development of High Fidelity, Fuel-Like Thermal Simulators for Non-Nuclear Testing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-nuclear testing can be a valuable tool in the development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. In a non-nuclear test bed, electric heaters are used to simulate the heat from nuclear fuel. Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity thermal simulators that not only match the static power profile that would be observed in an operating, fueled nuclear reactor, but also match the dynamic fuel pin performance during feasible transients. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being developed are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. Static and dynamic fuel pin performances for a proposed reactor design have been determined using SINDA/FLUINT thermal analysis software, and initial comparison has been made between the expected nuclear performance and the performance of conceptual thermal simulator designs. Through a series of iterative analysis, a conceptual high fidelity design will be developed, followed by engineering design, fabrication, and testing to validate the overall design process. Although the resulting thermal simulator will be designed for a specific reactor concept, establishing this rigorous design process will assist in streamlining the thermal simulator development for other reactor concepts. This paper presents the current status of high fidelity thermal simulator design relative to a SNAP derivative reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear Systems Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 25812 (United States); Dixon, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Decision Applications Division, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States); Kapernick, Richard [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Decision Applications Division, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

35

Dust-acoustic solitary waves in dusty plasmas with non-thermal ions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Most studies on dusty plasmas have assumed that electrons and ions follow Maxwellian distributions. However, in the presence of energetic ions, the distribution of ions tends to be non-Maxwellian. It is shown here that the existence of non-thermal ions would increase the phase velocity of a dust-acoustic wave. It is also found that the change in the phase velocity profoundly affects the characteristics of a dust-acoustic solitary wave.

Asgari, H.; Muniandy, S. V.; Wong, C. S. [Plasma Technology Research Center, Department of Physics, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Removal of Pollutants by Atmospheric Non Thermal Plasmas Ahmed Khacef 1*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Removal of Pollutants by Atmospheric Non Thermal Plasmas Ahmed Khacef 1* , Jean Marie Cormier1]. The electron beam technique which is very efficient for removal of pollutants such NOx and VOCs has been first operating conditions (atmospheric pressure and room temperature), and relatively low maintenance

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

37

Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Syngas Production from Propane using Atmospheric Non-Thermal Plasma F. Ouni, A. Khacef* and J. M Propane steam reforming using a sliding discharge reactor was investigated under atmospheric pressure in the discharge is less than 2 kW. The process efficiency is described in terms of propane conversion rate, steam

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

38

GEO Report on ProgressGEO Report on Progress Presentation to GEOSS in the Americas Symposium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEO Report on ProgressGEO Report on Progress Presentation to GEOSS in the Americas Symposium. Process & Report Structure1. Process & Report Structure 2. GEO Report on Progress2. GEO Report on ProgressProcess !! " Report on ProgressReport on Progress # " $$ #12;Key ObjectivesKey Objectives · Engage Ministers

39

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Other LGH sources include solar thermal energy, geo-thermalThe heat source can be solar thermal energy, biologicalsources include the coolants in coal and nuclear power plants, solar thermal energy,

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

GEO 101N General geology Kathleen M. Harper (Pre or co) with any geo course below 130 GEO 101N General geology TBA Pre or co with any geo course below 131  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

W. or GEO 101N General geology Kathleen M. Harper (Pre or co) with any geo course below 130 GEO 101N General geology TBA Pre or co with any geo course below 131 GEO 102N General geology Laboratory TA TBA none GEO 207 Geological Hazards and Disasters Pre - min C in any 100-level geosciences course

Vonessen, Nikolaus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Owen Martel GEOS 206, 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Owen Martel GEOS 206, 2009 Paint It, Green: Studio Art and Sustainability Introduction Amidst growing societal concern for sustainability, the arts are particularly fertile ground for the development and dissemination of sustainable thinking. Sustainability itself is an inherently aesthetic concept: in asserting

Aalberts, Daniel P.

42

Exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by non-thermal arc discharge for NOx trap regeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by non- thermal arc discharge for NOx trap regeneration to the reforming of Diesel fuel with Diesel engine exhaust gas using a non-thermal plasma torch for NOx trap Diesel fuel reforming with hal-00617141,version1-17May2013 Author manuscript, published in "Energy

Boyer, Edmond

43

Theoretical study of Diesel fuel reforming by a non-thermal arc discharge A. Lebouvier1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theoretical study of Diesel fuel reforming by a non-thermal arc discharge A. Lebouvier1,2 , G anti-pollution norm namely for Diesel powered vehicles. NOx (NO, NO2,...) are very irritant pollutants- nologies purge is the use of non-thermal plasma. Plasma reforming of diesel fuel and exhaust gas mix- ture

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

44

Non-Thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-Level Mixed Waste  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE proposes to transport contact-handled LLMW from the Hanford Site to the Allied Technology Group (ATG) Mixed Waste Facility (MWF) in Richland, Washington, for non-thermal treatment and to return the treated waste to the Hanford Site for eventual land disposal. Over a 3-year period the waste would be staged to the ATG MWF, and treated waste would be returned to the Hanford Site. The ATG MWF would be located on an 18 hectare (ha) (45 acre [at]) ATG Site adjacent to ATG's licensed low-level waste processing facility at 2025 Battelle Boulevard. The ATG MWF is located approximately 0.8 kilometers (km) (0.5 miles [mi]) south of Horn Rapids Road and 1.6 km (1 mi) west of Stevens Drive. The property is located within the Horn Rapids triangle in northern Richland (Figure 2.1). The ATG MWF is to be located on the existing ATG Site, near the DOE Hanford Site, in an industrial area in the City of Richland. The effects of siting, construction, and overall operation of the MWF have been evaluated in a separate State Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) EIS (City of Richland 1998). The proposed action includes transporting the LLMW from the Hanford Site to the ATG Facility, non-thermal treatment of the LLMW at the ATG MWF, and transporting the waste from ATG back to the Hanford Site. Impacts fi-om waste treatment operations would be bounded by the ATG SEPA EIS, which included an evaluation of the impacts associated with operating the non-thermal portion of the MWF at maximum design capacity (8,500 metric tons per year) (City of Richland 1998). Up to 50 employees would be required for non-thermal treatment portion of the MWF. This includes 40 employees that would perform waste treatment operations and 10 support staff. Similar numbers were projected for the thermal treatment portion of the MWF (City of Richland 1998).

NONE

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Heating of thermal non-equilibrium ions by Alfvn wave via nonresonant interaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pickup of thermal non-equilibrium ions by Alfvn wave via nonresonant wave-particle interaction is investigated by means of analytical test-particle theory. Some interesting and new results are found. No matter what the initial velocity distribution is, if the background magnetic field, the Alfvn speed, and the Alfvn magnetic field are fixed, the average parallel velocity never changes when t??. Heating effects in the perpendicular and parallel direction just depend on the initial temperature, and the perpendicular temperature increase is more prominent. It is noted that the heating effect of thermal non-equilibrium ions (Kappa ions) is weaker than that of the Maxwellian. This phenomenon may be relative to the heating of ions in the solar corona as well as in some toroidal confinement fusion devices.

Liu, Hai-Feng; Wang, Shi-Qing [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China) [Southwestern Institute of Physics, Chengdu 610041 (China); The Engineering and Technical College of Chengdu University of Technology, Leshan 614000 (China); Li, Ke-Hua [The Engineering and Technical College of Chengdu University of Technology, Leshan 614000 (China)] [The Engineering and Technical College of Chengdu University of Technology, Leshan 614000 (China)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

46

Numerical Study of a Propagating Non-Thermal Microwave Feature in a Solar Flare Loop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analytically and numerically study the motion of electrons along a magnetic loop, to compare with the observation of the propagating feature of the non-thermal microwave source in the 1999 August 28 solar flare reported by Yokoyama et al. (2002). We model the electron motion with the Fokker-Planck equation and calculate the spatial distribution of the gyrosynchrotron radiation. We find that the microwave propagating feature does not correspond to the motion of electrons with a specific initial pitch angle. This apparent propagating feature is a consequence of the motion of an ensemble of electrons with different initial pitch angles, which have different time and position to produce strong radiation in the loop. We conclude that the non-thermal electrons in the 1999 August 28 flare were isotropically accelerated and then are injected into the loop.

T. Minoshima; T. Yokoyama

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

47

SOLCOST - Version 3. 0. Solar energy design program for non-thermal specialists  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The SOLCOST solar energy design program is a public domain computerized design tool intended for use by non-thermal specialists to size solar systems with a methodology based on life cycle cost. An overview of SOLCOST capabilities and options is presented. A detailed guide to the SOLCOST input parameters is included. Sample problems showing typical imput decks and resulting SOLCOST output sheets are given. Details of different parts of the analysis are appended. (MHR)

Not Available

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

DETERMINATION OF NON-THERMAL VELOCITY DISTRIBUTIONS FROM SERTS LINEWIDTH OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Non-thermal velocities obtained from the measurement of coronal Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) linewidths have been consistently observed in solar EUV spectral observations and have been theorized to result from many plausible scenarios including wave motions, turbulence, or magnetic reconnection. Constraining these velocities can provide a physical limit for the available energy resulting from unresolved motions in the corona. We statistically determine a series of non-thermal velocity distributions from linewidth measurements of 390 emission lines from a wide array of elements and ionization states observed during the Solar Extreme Ultraviolet Research Telescope and Spectrograph 1991-1997 flights covering the spectral range 174-418 A and a temperature range from 80,000 K to 12.6 MK. This sample includes 248 lines from active regions, 101 lines from quiet-Sun regions, and 41 lines were observed from plasma off the solar limb. We find a strongly peaked distribution corresponding to a non-thermal velocity of 19-22 km s{sup -1} in all three of the quiet-Sun, active region, and off-limb distributions. For the possibility of Alfven wave resonance heating, we find that velocities in the core of these distributions do not provide sufficient energy, given typical densities and magnetic field strengths for the coronal plasma, to overcome the estimated coronal energy losses required to maintain the corona at the typical temperatures working as the sole mechanism. We find that at perfect efficiency 50%-60% of the needed energy flux can be produced from the non-thermal velocities measured.

Coyner, Aaron J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Avenue, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, Joseph M., E-mail: aaron.j.coyner@nasa.gov [Code 671, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Preradiation studies for non-thermal Z-pinch wire load experiments on Saturn  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The implosion dynamics of compact wire arrays on Saturn are explored as a function of wire mass m, wire length {ell}, wire radii R, and radial power-flow feed geometry using the ZORK code. Electron losses and the likelihood of arcing in the radial feed adjacent the wire load are analyzed using the TWOQUICK and CYLTRAN codes. The physical characteristics of the implosion and subsequent thermal radiation production are estimated using the LASNEX code in one dimension. These analyses show that compact tungsten wire arrays with parameters suggested by D. Mosher and with a 21-nH vacuum feed geometry satisfy the empirical scaling criterion I/(M/{ell}) {approximately} 2 MA/(mg/cm) of Mosher for optimizing non-thermal radiation from z pinches, generate low electron losses in the radial feeds, and generate electric fields at the insulator stack below the Charlie Martin flashover limit thereby permitting full power to be delivered to the load. Under such conditions, peak currents of {approximately}5 MA can be delivered to wire loads {approximately}20 ns before the driving voltage reverses at the insulator stack, potentially allowing the m = 0 instability to develop with the subsequent emission of non-thermal radiation as predicted by the Mosher model.

Sanford, T.W.L.; Humphreys, D.R.; Poukey, J.W.; Marder, B.M.; Halbleib, J.A.; Crow, J.T.; Spielman, R.B. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mock, R.C. [Ktech Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Recent VOC Control Test Data for a Reactive VOC Converter- Scrubber System for Non-Thermal Control of VOCs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of real estate. Non-thermal VOHAP (Volatile Organic Hazardous Air Pollutant) emission control devices require additional maintenance. They also require the replacement of costly consumables such as activated carbon or they use large amounts of energy...

McGinness, M.

51

Thermal engineering of non-local resistance in lateral spin valves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We study the non-local spin transport in Permalloy/Cu lateral spin valves (LSVs) fabricated on thermally oxidized Si and MgO substrates. While these LSVs show the same magnitude of spin signals, significant substrate dependence of the baseline resistance was observed. The baseline resistance shows much weaker dependence on the inter-electrode distance than that of the spin transport observed in the Cu wires. A simple analysis of voltage-current characteristics in the baseline resistance indicates the observed result can be explained by a combination of the Peltier and Seebeck effects at the injector and detector junctions, suggesting the usage of high thermal conductivity substrate (or under-layer) is effective to reduce the baseline resistance.

Kasai, S., E-mail: KASAI.Shinya@nims.go.jp; Takahashi, Y. K. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Hirayama, S.; Mitani, S.; Hono, K. [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan); Graduate School of Pure and Applied Sciences, University of Tsukuba, Tsukuba 305-0006 (Japan); Adachi, H.; Ieda, J.; Maekawa, S. [Advanced Science Research Center, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai 319-1195 (Japan); CREST, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Sanbancho, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

52

RELATION BETWEEN THE CORONAL MASS EJECTION ACCELERATION AND THE NON-THERMAL FLARE CHARACTERISTICS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigate the relationship between the main acceleration phase of coronal mass ejections (CMEs) and the particle acceleration in the associated flares as evidenced in Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager non-thermal X-rays for a set of 37 impulsive flare-CME events. Both the CME peak velocity and peak acceleration yield distinct correlations with various parameters characterizing the flare-accelerated electron spectra. The highest correlation coefficient is obtained for the relation of the CME peak velocity and the total energy in accelerated electrons (c = 0.85), supporting the idea that the acceleration of the CME and the particle acceleration in the associated flare draw their energy from a common source, probably magnetic reconnection in the current sheet behind the erupting structure. In general, the CME peak velocity shows somewhat higher correlations with the non-thermal flare parameters than the CME peak acceleration, except for the spectral index of the accelerated electron spectrum, which yields a higher correlation with the CME peak acceleration (c Almost-Equal-To -0.6), indicating that the hardness of the flare-accelerated electron spectrum is tightly coupled to the impulsive acceleration process of the rising CME structure. We also obtained high correlations between the CME initiation height h{sub 0} and the non-thermal flare parameters, with the highest correlation of h{sub 0} to the spectral index {delta} of flare-accelerated electrons (c Almost-Equal-To 0.8). This means that CMEs erupting at low coronal heights, i.e., in regions of stronger magnetic fields, are accompanied by flares that are more efficient at accelerating electrons to high energies. In the majority of events ({approx}80%), the non-thermal flare emission starts after the CME acceleration, on average delayed by Almost-Equal-To 6 minutes, in line with the standard flare model where the rising flux rope stretches the field lines underneath until magnetic reconnection sets in. We find that the current sheet length at the onset of magnetic reconnection is 21 {+-} 7 Mm. The flare hard X-ray peaks are well synchronized with the peak of the CME acceleration profile, and in 75% of the cases they occur within {+-}5 minutes. Our findings provide strong evidence for the tight coupling between the CME dynamics and the particle acceleration in the associated flare in impulsive events, with the total energy in accelerated electrons being closely correlated with the peak velocity (and thus the kinetic energy) of the CME, whereas the number of electrons accelerated to high energies is decisively related to the CME peak acceleration and the height of the pre-eruptive structure.

Berkebile-Stoiser, S.; Veronig, A. M.; Bein, B. M.; Temmer, M., E-mail: asv@igam.uni-graz.at [Institute of Physics, University of Graz, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Removal of Elemental Mercury from a Gas Stream Facilitated by a Non-Thermal Plasma Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Mercury generated from anthropogenic sources presents a difficult environmental problem. In comparison to other toxic metals, mercury has a low vaporization temperature. Mercury and mercury compounds are highly toxic, and organic forms such as methyl mercury can be bio-accumulated. Exposure pathways include inhalation and transport to surface waters. Mercury poisoning can result in both acute and chronic effects. Most commonly, chronic exposure to mercury vapor affects the central nervous system and brain, resulting in neurological damage. The CRE technology employs a series of non-thermal, plasma-jet devices to provide a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by targeting relevant chemical reactions. The technology couples the known chemistry of converting elemental mercury to ionic compounds by mercury-chlorine-oxygen reactions with the generation of highly reactive species in a non-thermal, atmospheric, plasma device. The generation of highly reactive metastable species in a non-thermal plasma device is well known. The introduction of plasma using a jet-injection device provides a means to contact highly reactive species with elemental mercury in a manner to overcome the kinetic and mass-transfer limitations encountered by previous researchers. To demonstrate this technology, WRI has constructed a plasma test facility that includes plasma reactors capable of using up to four plasma jets, flow control instrumentation, an integrated control panel to operate the facility, a mercury generation system that employs a temperature controlled oven and permeation tube, combustible and mercury gas analyzers, and a ductless fume hood designed to capture fugitive mercury emissions. Continental Research and Engineering (CR&E) and Western Research Institute (WRI) successfully demonstrated that non-thermal plasma containing oxygen and chlorine-oxygen reagents could completely convert elemental mercury to an ionic form. These results demonstrate potential the application of this technology for removing elemental mercury from flue gas streams generated by utility boilers. On an absolute basis, the quantity of reagent required to accomplish the oxidation was small. For example, complete oxidation of mercury was accomplished using a 1% volume fraction of oxygen in a nitrogen stream. Overall, the tests with mercury validated the most useful aspect of the CR&E technology: Providing a method for elemental mercury removal from a gas phase by employing a specific plasma reagent to either increase reaction kinetics or promote reactions that would not have occurred under normal circumstances.

Charles Mones

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Field-enhanced electrodes for additive-injection non-thermal plasma (NTP) processor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention comprises a field enhanced electrode package for use in a non-thermal plasma processor. The field enhanced electrode package includes a high voltage electrode and a field-enhancing electrode with a dielectric material layer disposed in-between the high voltage electrode and the field-enhancing electrode. The field-enhancing electrode features at least one raised section that includes at least one injection hole that allows plasma discharge streamers to occur primarily within an injected additive gas.

Rosocha, Louis A. (Los Alamos, NM); Ferreri, Vincent (Westminster, CO); Kim, Yongho (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

55

Non-local thermodynamic equilibrium effects on isentropic coefficient in argon and helium thermal plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the present work, two cases of thermal plasma have been considered; the ground state plasma in which all the atoms and ions are assumed to be in the ground state and the excited state plasma in which atoms and ions are distributed over various possible excited states. The variation of Z?, frozen isentropic coefficient and the isentropic coefficient with degree of ionization and non-equilibrium parameter ?(= T{sub e}/T{sub h}) has been investigated for the ground and excited state helium and argon plasmas at pressures 1?atm, 10?atm, and 100?atm in the temperature range from 6000?K to 60?000?K. For a given value of non-equilibrium parameter, the relationship of Z? with degree of ionization does not show any dependence on electronically excited states in helium plasma whereas in case of argon plasma this dependence is not appreciable till degree of ionization approaches 2. The minima of frozen isentropic coefficient shifts toward lower temperature with increase of non-equilibrium parameter for both the helium and argon plasmas. The lowering of non-equilibrium parameter decreases the frozen isentropic coefficient more emphatically in helium plasma at high pressures in comparison to argon plasma. The increase of pressure slightly reduces the ionization range over which isentropic coefficient almost remains constant and it does not affect appreciably the dependence of isentropic coefficient on non-equilibrium parameter.

Sharma, Rohit [Satyam Institute of Engineering and Technology, Amritsar 143107 (India)] [Satyam Institute of Engineering and Technology, Amritsar 143107 (India); Singh, Kuldip [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India)] [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

56

Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (?7?min) and with similar thermal expansion (?12??strain/?C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 ?m thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) ?m, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) ?l. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 3.6) 10{sup ?3} cm{sup 2}/s, for thermal conductivity (228 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 0.06) W s{sup 0.5}/cm{sup 2} K and volume heat capacity (5.2 0.7) J/cm{sup 3} K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 ?m using 57 ?l of distilled water)

Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Bento, A. C., E-mail: acbento@uem.br [Departamento de Fsica, Grupo de Espectroscopia Fotoacstica e Fototrmica, Universidade Estadual de Maring UEM, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maring, Paran (Brazil); Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S. [Departamento de Fsica e Qumica, Universidade Estadual Paulista Jlio de Mesquita Filho UNESP, Av. Brasil 56, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil)

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

57

Geo-Engineering through Internet Informatics (GEMINI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The program, for development and methodologies, was a 3-year interdisciplinary effort to develop an interactive, integrated Internet Website named GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through Internet Informatics) that would build real-time geo-engineering reservoir models for the Internet using the latest technology in Web applications.

Doveton, John H.; Watney, W. Lynn

2003-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

58

THERMAL NON-EQUILIBRIUM REVISITED: A HEATING MODEL FOR CORONAL LOOPS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The location and frequency of events that heat the million-degree corona are still a matter of debate. One potential heating scenario is that the energy release is effectively steady and highly localized at the footpoints of coronal structures. Such an energy deposition drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions in the hydrodynamic equations in longer loops. This heating scenario was considered and discarded by Klimchuk et al. on the basis of their one-dimensional simulations as incapable of reproducing observational characteristics of loops. In this paper, we use three-dimensional simulations to generate synthetic emission images, from which we select and analyze six loops. The main differences between our model and that of Klimchuk et al. concern (1) dimensionality, (2) resolution, (3) geometrical properties of the loops, (4) heating function, and (5) radiative function. We find evidence, in this small set of simulated loops, that the evolution of the light curves, the variation of temperature along the loops, the density profile, and the absence of small-scale structures are compatible with the characteristics of observed loops. We conclude that quasi-steady footpoint heating that drives thermal non-equilibrium solutions cannot yet be ruled out as a viable heating scenario for EUV loops.

Lionello, Roberto; Linker, Jon A.; Mikic, Zoran [Predictive Science, Inc., 9990 Mesa Rim Rd., Ste. 170, San Diego, CA 92121-2910 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, ZP 13, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Mok, Yung, E-mail: lionel@predsci.com, E-mail: linkerj@predsci.com, E-mail: mikicz@predsci.com, E-mail: amy.r.winebarger@nasa.gov, E-mail: ymok@uci.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, 4129 Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

59

Non-thermal Electrons at the Earth's Bow Shock: A `Gradual' Event  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth's bow shock is known to produce non-thermal electrons which are generally observed as a `spike' in their flux profile. Here, in this paper, we present an analysis of electron and whistler wave properties for a quasi-perpendicular shock crossing that is supercritical, but subcritical to the so-called whistler critical Mach number, M$^w_{\\rm crit}$, above which whistler waves cannot propagate upstream. We have found that the amplitudes of whistler waves increased exponentially as a function of time prior to the shock encounter, while the suprathermal ($>$ 2 keV) electron flux similarly increased with time, although with differing $e$-folding time scales. Comparison of the electron energy spectrum measured within the ramp with predictions from diffusive shock acceleration theory was poor, but the variation of pitch angle distribution showed scattering of non-thermal electrons in the upstream region. While not finding a specific mechanism to account for the electron diffusion, we suggest that the whistlers seen probably account for the differences observed between this `gradual' event and the `spike' events seen at shocks with no upstream whistlers.

M. Oka; T. Terasawa; M. Fujimoto; H. Matsui; Y. Kasaba; Y. Saito; H. Kojima; H. Matsumoto; T. Mukai

2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

60

Non-thermal Electrons at the Earth's Bow Shock: A `Gradual' Event  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Earth's bow shock is known to produce non-thermal electrons which are generally observed as a `spike' in their flux profile. Here, in this paper, we present an analysis of electron and whistler wave properties for a quasi-perpendicular shock crossing that is supercritical, but subcritical to the so-called whistler critical Mach number, M$^w_{\\rm crit}$, above which whistler waves cannot propagate upstream. We have found that the amplitudes of whistler waves increased exponentially as a function of time prior to the shock encounter, while the suprathermal ($>$ 2 keV) electron flux similarly increased with time, although with differing $e$-folding time scales. Comparison of the electron energy spectrum measured within the ramp with predictions from diffusive shock acceleration theory was poor, but the variation of pitch angle distribution showed scattering of non-thermal electrons in the upstream region. While not finding a specific mechanism to account for the electron diffusion, we suggest that the whistlers ...

Oka, M; Fujimoto, M; Matsui, H; Kasaba, Y; Sait, Y; Kojima, H; Matsumoto, H; Mukai, T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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61

On thermalization and isotropization of a boost-invariant non Abelian plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using a holographic method, we further investigate the relaxation towards the hydrodynamic regime of a boost-invariant non Abelian plasma taken out-of-equilibrium. In the dual description, the system is driven out-of-equilibrium by a deformation of the boundary metric, as proposed by Chesler and Yaffe. The effects of several deformation profiles on the bulk geometry are investigated by the analysis of the corresponding solutions of the Einstein equations. In particular, the times of restoration of the hydrodynamic regime and of the pressure isotropy are determined: setting the effective temperature of the system at the beginning of thermalization to $T_{eff}(\\tau^*)=500$ MeV, pressure isotropization is reached after a lapse of time of ${\\cal O}$(1 fm/c).

Bellantuono, L; De Fazio, F; Giannuzzi, F

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

EVIDENCE OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM HH 80  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Protostellar jets appear at all stages of star formation when the accretion process is still at work. Jets travel at velocities of hundreds of km s{sup 1}, creating strong shocks when interacting with the interstellar medium. Several cases of jets have been detected in X-rays, typically showing soft emission. For the first time, we report evidence of hard X-ray emission possibly related to non-thermal processes not explained by previous models of the post-shock emission predicted in the jet/ambient interaction scenario. HH 80 is located at the south head of the jet associated with the massive protostar IRAS 18162-2048. It shows soft and hard X-ray emission in regions that are spatially separated, with the soft X-ray emission region situated behind the region of hard X-ray emission. We propose a scenario for HH 80 where soft X-ray emission is associated with thermal processes from the interaction of the jet with denser ambient matter and hard X-ray emission is produced by synchrotron radiation at the front shock.

Lpez-Santiago, J. [Instituto de Matemtica Interdisciplinar, S. D. Astronoma y Geodesia, Facultad de Ciencias Matemticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Matemtica Interdisciplinar, S. D. Astronoma y Geodesia, Facultad de Ciencias Matemticas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Peri, C. S.; Benaglia, P. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronoma (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina)] [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronoma (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bonito, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Universit di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)] [Dipartimento di Fisica e Chimica, Universit di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Miceli, M. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)] [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monseor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Ro Negro (Argentina)] [Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monseor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Ro Negro (Argentina); De Castro, E. [Dpto. de Astrofsica y CC. de la Atmsfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)] [Dpto. de Astrofsica y CC. de la Atmsfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

2013-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

63

Thermal history sensors for non-destructive temperature measurements in harsh environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operating temperature is a critical physical parameter in many engineering applications, however, can be very challenging to measure in certain environments, particularly when access is limited or on rotating components. A new quantitative non-destructive temperature measurement technique has been proposed which relies on thermally induced permanent changes in ceramic phosphors. This technique has several distinct advantages over current methods for many different applications. The robust ceramic material stores the temperature information allowing long term thermal exposures in harsh environment to be measured at a convenient time. Additionally, rare earth dopants make the ceramic phosphorescent so that the temperature information can be interpreted by automated interrogation of the phosphorescent light. This technique has been demonstrated by application of YAG doped with dysprosium and europium as coatings through the air-plasma spray process. Either material can be used to measure temperature over a wide range, namely between 300C and 900C. Furthermore, results show that the material records the peak exposure temperature and prolonged exposure at lower temperatures would have no effect on the temperature measurement. This indicates that these materials could be used to measure peak operating temperatures in long-term testing.

Pilgrim, C. C. [Mechanical Engineering, Imperial College London, London, SW7 2AZ, UK and Sensor Coating Systems, Imperial Incubator, Bessemer Building, Level 1 and 2, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Heyes, A. L. [Energy Technology and Innovation Initiative, University of Leeds, Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Feist, J. P. [Sensor Coating Systems, Imperial Incubator, Bessemer Building, Level 1 and 2, Imperial College London, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom)

2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

64

Large amplitude dust-acoustic double layers in non-thermal plasmas with positive and negative dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The existence of large amplitude double layers in a plasma composed of cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, non-thermal ions and Boltzmann electrons is investigated using the Sagdeev pseudopotential technique. Both positive potential and negative potential double layers are found to be supported by the model. The variation of the maximum amplitudes of the double layers and corresponding Mach numbers are examined as a function of various plasma parameters. In particular, we investigate to what extent ion non-thermal effects are required for positive potential double layers to occur.

Maharaj, S. K. [South African National Space Agency Space Science, P O Box 32, Hermanus 7200 (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Modderdam Road, Bellville 7530 (South Africa); Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai 410218 (India); Pillay, S. R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

65

Rarefactive and compressive soliton waves in unmagnetized dusty plasma with non-thermal electron and ion distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sagdeev's pseudo potential method is employed to study dust acoustic solitary waves in an unmagnetized plasma containing negatively charged dusts with non-thermal electron and ion. The range of parameters for the existence of solitary waves using the analytical expression of the Sagdeev potential has been found. It is observed that, depending on the values of the plasma parameters like ion to electron temperature ratio ?, non-thermal parameters ? and ?, electron to ion density ratio ?, and the value of the Mach number M, both rarefactive and compressive solitary waves may exist.

Eslami, Esmaeil, E-mail: eeslami@iust.ac.ir; Baraz, Rasoul [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran, 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Physics, Iran University of Science and Technology, Narmak, Tehran, 16846-13114 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

Non-thermal high-energy emission from colliding winds of massive stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Colliding winds of massive star binary systems are considered as potential sites of non-thermal high-energy photon production. This is motivated merely by the detection of synchrotron radio emission from the expected colliding wind location. Here we investigate the properties of high-energy photon production in colliding winds of long-period WR+OB-systems. We found that in the dominating leptonic radiation process anisotropy and Klein-Nishina effects may yield spectral and variability signatures in the gamma-ray domain at or above the sensitivity of current or upcoming gamma-ray telescopes. Analytical formulae for the steady-state particle spectra are derived assuming diffusive particle acceleration out of a pool of thermal wind particles, and taking into account adiabatic and all relevant radiative losses. For the first time we include their advection/convection in the wind collision zone, and distinguish two regions within this extended region: the acceleration region where spatial diffusion is superior to convective/advective motion, and the convection region defined by the convection time shorter than the diffusion time scale. The calculation of the Inverse Compton radiation uses the full Klein-Nishina cross section, and takes into account the anisotropic nature of the scattering process. This leads to orbital flux variations by up to several orders of magnitude which may, however, be blurred by the geometry of the system. The calculations are applied to the typical WR+OB-systems WR 140 and WR 147 to yield predictions of their expected spectral and temporal characteristica and to evaluate chances to detect high-energy emission with the current and upcoming gamma-ray experiments. (abridged)

A. Reimer; M. Pohl; O. Reimer

2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

67

Solvated Electron Technology{sup TM}. Non-Thermal Alternative to Waste Incineration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Solvated Electron Technology (SET{sup TM}) is a patented non-thermal alternative to incineration for treating Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) and other mixed waste by destroying organic hazardous components. SET{sup TM} is a treatment process that destroys the hazardous components in mixed waste by chemical reduction. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In application, contaminated materials are placed into a treatment cell and mixed with the solvated electron solution. In the case of PCBs or other halogenated contaminants, chemical reactions strip the halogen ions from the chain or aromatic ring producing sodium chloride and high molecular weight hydrocarbons. At the end of the reaction, ammonia within the treatment cell is removed and recycled. The reaction products (such as sodium salts) produced in the process remain with the matrix. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.999% effective in destroying: polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs); trichloroethane (TCA) and trichloroethene (TCE); dioxins; polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs); benzene, toluene, xylene (BTX); pesticides; fungicides; herbicides; chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs); hydro-chlorofluorocarbons (HCFCs), explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. In September 2007, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued a Research and Development permit for SET for chemical destruction of 'pure' Pyranol, which is 60% PCBs. These tests were completed in November 2007. SET{sup TM} is recognized by EPA as a non-thermal process equivalent to incineration and three SET{sup TM} systems have been permitted by EPA as commercial mobile PCB destruction units. This paper describes in detail the results of select bench-, pilot-, and commercial-scale treatment of hazardous and mixed wastes for EPA, Department of Energy (DOE), and the Department of Defense(DoD), and the applicability of SET{sup TM} to currently problematic waste streams that have very limited treatment alternatives. In summary: SET{sup TM} operates as a non-thermal destruction process under low pressure. The process occurs in a closed system producing no hazardous off-gases and no regulated by-products such as dioxins or furans or their precursors. Advantages of SET{sup TM} include: - Organic contaminants are destroyed, not just removed, diluted or concentrated. - Operates as a closed system - produces no regulated secondary wastes. - Holds an EPA permit for PCB destruction. - Operates at ambient temperatures (70 deg. F). - Portable and sets up quickly in less than 4000 square feet of space. - Scalable to accommodate any size waste stream. - Requires minimal amounts of power, water and infrastructure. - Applicable to heterogeneous waste streams in all phases. The SET{sup TM} process is 99.9999% effective in destroying organic constituents of RCRA and TSCA waste, explosives and chemical-warfare agents; and has successfully destroyed many of the wastes listed in 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 261. The residual material meets land disposal restriction (LDR) and TSCA requirements for disposal. In November 2007, Commodore completed a treatability study on Pyranol to determine the effectiveness of SET{sup TM} treatment on oil containing 600,000 PPM PCBs. Laboratory results proved destruction of PCBs to less than 1 PPM at low temperatures and pressures. SET{sup TM} is a proven, safe and cost-effective alternative to incineration for some of the most difficult waste treatment problems that exist today. (authors)

Foutz, W.L.; Rogers, J.E.; Mather, J.D. [Commodore Advanced Sciences, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

RAPID/Roadmap/Geo/Flowcharts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant of Access Permit5-ID-a Drilling7-HI-ceGeo/Flowcharts <

69

RAPID/Roadmap/Geo/Getting Started | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant of Access Permit5-ID-a Drilling7-HI-ceGeo/Flowcharts <

70

RAPID/Roadmap/Geo/Sections | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant of Access Permit5-ID-a Drilling7-HI-ceGeo/Flowcharts <source

71

A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR reservoir  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A thermo-hydro-mechanical coupled model in local thermal non-equilibrium for fractured HDR of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia. Abstract The constitutive thermo-hydro-mechanical equations is next applied to simulate circulation tests at the Fenton Hill HDR reservoir. The finer thermo-hydro

Boyer, Edmond

72

Non-destructive Failure Analysis and Modeling of Encapsulated Miniature SMD Ceramic Chip Capacitors under Thermal and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Non-destructive Failure Analysis and Modeling of Encapsulated Miniature SMD Ceramic Chip Capacitors under Thermal and Mechanical Loading B. Wunderle1 , T. Braun1 , D. May1 , A. Mazloum1 , M. Bouazza1 , H-layer ceramic chip ca- pacitors as integrated passive in e. g. system in package applications needs methods

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

73

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature and by-products formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesel Oxidation Catalyst Combined to Non-Thermal Plasma: Effect on Activation Catalyst Temperature efficiency together with the catalyst activation temperature when a Diesel Oxidation Catalyst (DOC) is placed downstream to a multi-plans Dielectric Barrier Discharge (DBD) reactor. In order to simulate Diesel engine

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

74

Non-thermal emission from standing relativistic shocks: an application to red giant winds interacting with AGN jets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Galactic and extragalactic relativistic jets have rich environments that are full of moving objects, such as stars and dense clumps. These objects can enter into the jets and generate shocks and non-thermal emission. We characterize the emitting properties of the downstream region of a standing shock formed due to the interaction of a relativistic jet with an obstacle. We focus on the case of red giants interacting with an extragalactic jet. We perform relativistic axisymmetric hydrodynamical simulations of a relativistic jet meeting an obstacle of very large inertia. The results are interpreted in the framework of a red giant whose dense and slow wind interacts with the jet of an active galactic nucleus. Assuming that particles are accelerated in the standing shock generated in the jet as it impacts the red giant wind, we compute the non-thermal particle distribution, the Doppler boosting enhancement, and the non-thermal luminosity in gamma rays. The available non-thermal energy from jet-obstacle interaction...

Bosch-Ramon, V

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The MAC-GEO project 1/84 The MAC-GEO project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of deep geothermal uids extraction process upon phreatic supercial water layers The nal product should impact of deep geothermal uids extraction process upon phreatic supercial water layers The nal productThe MAC-GEO project 1/84 The MAC-GEO project MAthematical modelling for government control

Rosso, Fabio

76

Comparative Analysis of Non-thermal Emissions and Study of Electron Transport in a Solar Flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the non-thermal emissions in a solar flare occurring on 2003 May 29 by using RHESSI hard X-ray (HXR) and Nobeyama microwave observations. This flare shows several typical behaviors of the HXR and microwave emissions: time delay of microwave peaks relative to HXR peaks, loop-top microwave and footpoint HXR sources, and a harder electron energy distribution inferred from the microwave spectrum than from the HXR spectrum. In addition, we found that the time profile of the spectral index of the higher-energy ($\\gsim 100$ keV) HXRs is similar to that of the microwaves, and is delayed from that of the lower-energy ($\\lsim 100$ keV) HXRs. We interpret these observations in terms of an electron transport model called {\\TPP}. We numerically solved the spatially-homogeneous {\\FP} equation to determine electron evolution in energy and pitch-angle space. By comparing the behaviors of the HXR and microwave emissions predicted by the model with the observations, we discuss the pitch-angle distribution of the electrons injected into the flare site. We found that the observed spectral variations can qualitatively be explained if the injected electrons have a pitch-angle distribution concentrated perpendicular to the magnetic field lines rather than isotropic distribution.

T. Minoshima; T. Yokoyama; N. Mitani

2007-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

77

RXTE and ASCA Constraints on Non-thermal Emission from the A2256 Galaxy Cluster  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An 8.3 hour observation of the Abell 2256 galaxy cluster using the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer proportional counter array produced a high quality spectrum in the 2 - 30 keV range. Joint fitting with the 0.7 - 11 keV spectrum obtained with the Advanced Satellite for Astrophysics and Cosmology gas imaging spectrometer gives an upperlimit of 2.3x10^-7 photons/cm^2/sec/keV for non-thermal emission at 30 keV. This yields a lower limit to the mean magnetic field of 0.36 micro Gauss (uG) and an upperlimit of 1.8x10^-13 ergs/cm^3 for the cosmic-ray electron energy density. The resulting lower limit to the central magnetic field is ~1 - 3 uG While a magnetic field of ~0.1 - 0.2 uG can be created by galaxy wakes, a magnetic field of several uG is usually associated with a cooling flow or, as in the case of the Coma cluster, a subcluster merger. However, for A2256, the evidence for a merger is weak and the main cluster shows no evidence of a cooling flow. Thus, there is presently no satisfactory hypothesis for the origin of an average cluster magnetic field as high as >0.36 uG in the A2256 cluster.

M. Henriksen

1999-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

78

The role of higher-order modes on the electromagnetic whistler-cyclotron wave fluctuations of thermal and non-thermal plasmas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two fundamental challenging problems of laboratory and astrophysical plasmas are the understanding of the relaxation of a collisionless plasmas with nearly isotropic velocity distribution functions and the resultant state of nearly equipartition energy density with electromagnetic plasma turbulence. Here, we present the results of a study which shows the role that higher-order-modes play in limiting the electromagnetic whistler-like fluctuations in a thermal and non-thermal plasma. Our main results show that for a thermal plasma the magnetic fluctuations are confined by regions that are bounded by the least-damped higher order modes. We further show that the zone where the whistler-cyclotron normal modes merges the electromagnetic fluctuations shifts to longer wavelengths as the ?{sub e} increases. This merging zone has been interpreted as the beginning of the region where the whistler-cyclotron waves losses their identity and become heavily damped while merging with the fluctuations. Our results further indicate that in the case of nonthermal plasmas, the higher-order modes do not confine the fluctuations due to the effective higher-temperature effects and the excess of suprathermal plasma particles. The analysis presented here considers the second-order theory of fluctuations and the dispersion relation of weakly transverse fluctuations, with wave vectors parallel to the uniform background magnetic field, in a finite temperature isotropic bi-Maxwellian and Tsallis-kappa-like magnetized electronproton plasma. Our results indicate that the spontaneously emitted electromagnetic fluctuations are in fact enhanced over these quasi modes suggesting that such modes play an important role in the emission and absorption of electromagnetic fluctuations in thermal or quasi-thermal plasmas.

Vias, Adolfo F. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Moya, Pablo S. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States) [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Heliophysics Science Division, Geospace Physics Laboratory, Mail Code 673, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States); Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, District of Columbia 20064 (United States); Navarro, Roberto [Departamento de Fsica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile)] [Departamento de Fsica, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago (Chile); Araneda, Jaime A. [Departamento de Fsica, Universidad de Concepcin Facultad de Ciencias Fsicas y Matemticas, Casilla 160-C, Concepcin (Chile)] [Departamento de Fsica, Universidad de Concepcin Facultad de Ciencias Fsicas y Matemticas, Casilla 160-C, Concepcin (Chile)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

79

Thermal and non-thermal radiation of rotating polarizable particle moving in an equilibrium background of electromagnetic radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A theory of thermal and nonthermal radiation in a vacuum background of arbitrary temperature generated by relativistic polarizable particle with spin is proposed. When the particle rotates, radiation is produced by vacuum fluctuations even in the case of zero temperature of the system. In the ultrarelativistic case, the spectral-angular intensity of radiation is concentrated along the velocity of the particle. At finite temperatures of particle and vacuum, the particle temperature (in its rest frame) rather quickly acquires an equilibrium magnitude depending on the velocities of rotation and uniform motion and the background temperature. This equilibrium temperature determines the intensity of radiation. The dynamical slowing down takes a very long time until the kinetic energy of uniform motion and rotation is converted into radiation.

A. A. Kyasov; G. V Dedkov

2014-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

80

Situation fencing: making geo-fencing personal and dynamic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geo-fencing has recently been applied to multiple applications including media recommendation, advertisements, wildlife monitoring, and recreational activities. However current geo-fencing systems work with static geographical ...

Pongpaichet, Siripen

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

NON-CONTACT ACOUSTO-THERMAL SIGNATURES OF PLASTIC DEFORMATION IN TI-6AL-4V  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plastic deformation introduces changes in a material which include increases in: dislocations, strains, residual stress, and yield stress. However, these changes have a very small impact on the material properties such as elastic modulus, conductivity and ultrasonic wave speed. This is due to the fact that interatomic forces govern these properties, and they are not affected by plastic deformation to any large degree. This is evident from the fact that the changes in electrical resistance and ultrasonic velocity in plastically deformed and virgin samples are very small and can only be determined by highly controlled experiments. Except for X-ray diffraction, there are no direct nondestructive methods for measuring strain and the residual stress. This paper presents an application of the non-contact acousto-thermal signature (NCATS) NDE methodology to detect plastic deformation in flat dog bone Ti-6Al-4V samples. Results of the NCATS measurements on samples subjected to incremental amounts of plastic deformation are presented. The maximum temperature attained by the sample due to acoustic excitation is found to be sensitive to the amount of plastic strain. It is observed that the temperature induced by acoustic excitation increases to a peak followed by a decrease to failure. The maximum temperature peak occurs at plastic strains of 12-14%. It is observed that there is a correlation between the peak in maximum temperature rise and the strain at the experimentally determined ultimate tensile strength. A microstructural based explanation for this will be presented. The results are discussed in reference to utilizing this technique for detection and evaluation of plastic deformation.

Welter, J. T.; Jata, K. V.; Blodgett, M. P. [Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, Nondestructive Evaluation Branch Wright-Patterson AFB, OH 45433 (United States); Malott, G. [SOCHE, 3155 Research Blvd, Dayton, OH 45420 (United States); Schehl, N.; Sathish, S. [Structural Integrity Division, University of Dayton Research Institute, Dayton, OH 45469 (United States)

2010-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

82

Non-thermal emission from Galaxy Clusters and future observations with the FERMI gamma-ray telescope and LOFAR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FERMI (formely GLAST) and LOFAR will shortly provide crucial information on the non-thermal components (relativistic particles and magnetic field) in galaxy clusters. After discussing observational facts that already put constraints on the properties and origin of non-thermal components, I will report on the emission spectrum from galaxy clusters as expected in the context of general calculations in which relativistic particles (protons and secondary electrons due to proton-proton collisions) interact with MHD turbulence generated in the cluster volume during cluster-cluster mergers. In this scenario (known as re-acceleration scenario) diffuse cluster-scale radio emission is produced in massive clusters during merging events, while gamma ray emission, at some level, is expected to be common in clusters. Expectations of interest for LOFAR and FERMI are also briefly discussed.

G. Brunetti

2008-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

83

GeoEngineering Assessment & Research The climate cooling potential of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GeoEngineering Assessment & Research The climate cooling potential of different geoengineering options Tim Lenton & Naomi Vaughan GeoEngineering Assessment & Research (GEAR) initiative School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK www.gear.uea.ac.uk #12;GeoEngineering Assessment

Polz, Martin

84

Thermal non-equilibrium in dispersed flow film boiling in a vertical tube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The departure from thermal equilibrium between a dispersed liquid phase and its vapor at high quality during film boiling is investigated, The departure from equilibruim is manifested by the high resistance to heat transfer ...

Forslund, Robert Paul

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Morphology and non-isothermal crystallization kinetics of CuInS{sub 2} nanocrystals synthesized by solvo-thermal method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nanocrystals of copper indium disulphide (CuInS{sub 2}) were synthesized by a solvo-thermal method. The structure, morphology and non-isothermal crystallization kinetic behavior of samples were investigated using X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, field emission transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis techniques. Non-isothermal measurements at different heating rates were carried out and the crystallization kinetics of samples were analyzed using the most reliable non-isothermal kinetic methods. The kinetic parameters such as glass transition temperature, thermal stability, activation energy, Avrami exponent etc. were evaluated. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CuInS{sub 2} nanocrystals have scientific and technological importance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Samples have been prepared by solvo-thermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesized samples exhibit excellent morphology and thermal properties. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Investigated properties may be utilized in design and fabrication of solar cell devices.

Majeed Khan, M.A., E-mail: majeed_phys@yahoo.co.in [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Kumar, Sushil [Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa 125055 (India); Alsalhi, M.S. [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics and Astronomy, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Ahamed, Maqusood [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Alhoshan, Mansour [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Chemical Engineering Department, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Alrokayan, Salman A. [King Abdullah Institute for Nanotechnology, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia); Ahamad, Tansir [Department of Chemistry, King Saud University, Riyadh 11451 (Saudi Arabia)

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Non-destructive evaluation of degradation in EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings by infrared reflectance spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At room temperature and atmospheric conditions infrared reflectance spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction were employed for the detection of the phase transformation and residual stress within thermal barrier coatings (TBC). The TBC's samples initially consisted of the porous ceramic topcoat deposited by electron beam plasma vapor deposition, a bond coat and a superalloy substrate. Reflectance spectroscopy scans were performed from 7497 cm{sup -1} to 68 cm{sup -1} to analysis the fingerprint region as well as the chemical bonding region. These regions should indicate if a detectable change within the TBC response is a result of thermal degradation of the microstructure and the changes in yttrium dispersion throughout the yttrium stabilized zirconium. The thermal degradation was induced by thermal cycling the samples to 1100 Degree-Sign C and then cooling them in an atmospheric environment. X-ray diffraction was also used to detect the phase composition within the TBC samples and see if either would clearly identify failure prior to actual spallation. The eventual measurability and quantify-ability of the phase changes within the TBC's may be used as an effective non-destructive evaluation (NDE) technique that would allow personnel in the field to know when servicing of the turbine blade was necessary.

Flattum, Richard Y.; Cooney, Adam T. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Materials and Manufacturing Directorate, NonDestructive Evaluation Branch, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH (United States)

2013-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

87

Thermo-chemical dynamics and chemical quasi-equilibrium of plasmas in thermal non-equilibrium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine both processes of ionization by electron and heavy-particle impact in spatially uniform plasmas at rest in the absence of external forces. A singular perturbation analysis is used to study the following physical scenario, in which thermal relaxation becomes much slower than chemical reactions. First, electron-impact ionization is investigated. The dynamics of the system rapidly becomes close to a slow dynamics manifold that allows for defining a unique chemical quasi-equilibrium for two-temperature plasmas and proving that the second law of thermodynamics is satisfied. Then, all ionization reactions are taken into account simultaneously, leading to a surprising conclusion: the inner layer for short time scale (or time boundary layer) directly leads to thermal equilibrium. Global thermo-chemical equilibrium is reached within a short time scale, involving only chemical reactions, even if thermal relaxation through elastic collisions is assumed to be slow.

Massot, Marc [Laboratoire EM2C, UPR 288 CNRS - Ecole Centrale Paris (France); Graille, Benjamin [Laboratoire de Mathematiques d'Orsay, UMR 8628 CNRS - Universite Paris-Sud (France); Magin, Thierry E. [Aeronautics and Aerospace Department, von Karman Institute for Fluid Dynamics (Belgium)

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

88

Thermal imaging measurement of lateral diffusivity and non-invasive material defect detection  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for determining lateral thermal diffusivity of a material sample using a heat pulse; a sample oriented within an orthogonal coordinate system; an infrared camera; and a computer that has a digital frame grabber, and data acquisition and processing software. The mathematical model used within the data processing software is capable of determining the lateral thermal diffusivity of a sample of finite boundaries. The system and method may also be used as a nondestructive method for detecting and locating cracks within the material sample.

Sun, Jiangang (Westmont, IL); Deemer, Chris (Downers Grove, IL)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

OM300-GeoThermal MWD Navigation Instrument  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Develop a 300C capable directional drilling navigation tool using Micro Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) accelerometers and flux-gate magnetometers.

90

Geo-neutrinos and Earth's interior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The deepest hole that has ever been dug is about 12 km deep. Geochemists analyze samples from the Earth's crust and from the top of the mantle. Seismology can reconstruct the density profile throughout all Earth, but not its composition. In this respect, our planet is mainly unexplored. Geo-neutrinos, the antineutrinos from the progenies of U, Th and K40 decays in the Earth, bring to the surface information from the whole planet, concerning its content of natural radioactive elements. Their detection can shed light on the sources of the terrestrial heat flow, on the present composition, and on the origins of the Earth. Geo-neutrinos represent a new probe of our planet, which can be exploited as a consequence of two fundamental advances that occurred in the last few years: the development of extremely low background neutrino detectors and the progress on understanding neutrino propagation. We review the status and the prospects of the field.

Gianni Fiorentini; Marcello Lissia; Fabio Mantovani

2007-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

91

CLASSIFICATION OF NON-HEAT GENERATING OUTDOOR OBJECTS IN THERMAL SCENES FOR AUTONOMOUS ROBOTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

describes a physics-based adaptive Bayesian pattern classification model that uses a passive thermal as a result of the diurnal cycle of solar energy. The model that we present will allow bots to "see beyond by the classes of objects and design our Adaptive Bayesian Classification Model. We demonstrate that our novel

Shaw, Leah B.

92

NON-THERMAL RESPONSE OF THE CORONA TO THE MAGNETIC FLUX DISPERSAL IN THE PHOTOSPHERE OF A DECAYING ACTIVE REGION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We analyzed Solar Dynamics Observatory line-of-sight magnetograms for a decaying NOAA active region (AR) 11451 along with co-temporal Extreme-Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) data from the Hinode spacecraft. The photosphere was studied via time variations of the turbulent magnetic diffusivity coefficient, {eta}(t), and the magnetic power spectrum index, {alpha}, through analysis of magnetogram data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI). These measure the intensity of the random motions of magnetic elements and the state of turbulence of the magnetic field, respectively. The time changes of the non-thermal energy release in the corona was explored via histogram analysis of the non-thermal velocity, v {sub nt}, in order to highlight the largest values at each time, which may indicate an increase in energy release in the corona. We used the 10% upper range of the histogram of v {sub nt} (which we called V {sup upp} {sub nt}) of the coronal spectral line of Fe XII 195 A. A 2 day time interval was analyzed from HMI data, along with the EIS data for the same field of view. Our main findings are the following. (1) The magnetic turbulent diffusion coefficient, {eta}(t), precedes the upper range of the v {sub nt} with the time lag of approximately 2 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.76. (2) The power-law index, {alpha}, of the magnetic power spectrum precedes V {sup upp} {sub nt} with a time lag of approximately 3 hr and the cross-correlation coefficient of 0.5. The data show that the magnetic flux dispersal in the photosphere is relevant to non-thermal energy release dynamics in the above corona. The results are consistent with the nanoflare mechanism of the coronal heating, due to the time lags being consistent with the process of heating and cooling the loops heated by nanoflares.

Harra, L. K. [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Abramenko, V. I. [Big Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 N. Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314 (United States)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

93

Existence domains of large amplitude dust-acoustic solitons in non-thermal plasmas with positive and negative dust  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the traditional Sagdeev pseudopotential approach, the existence of large amplitude solitons is investigated for a plasma composed of cold negative dust, adiabatic positive dust, non-thermal ions and Boltzmann electrons. The lower and upper soliton Mach number limitations are determined as a function of various parameters and physical reasons are provided as to why these Mach number limits occur. Some regions in parameter space have been identified where only negative or positive solitons occur, whereas, other regions support the coexistence of both positive and negative potential solitons.

Maharaj, S. K. [South African National Space Agency Space Science, P O Box 32, Hermanus 7200 (South Africa); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Modderdam Road, Bellville 7530 (South Africa); Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, New Panvel, Navi Mumbai 410218 (India); Pillay, S. R. [University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X54001, Durban 4000 (South Africa)

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

94

Non-destructive assay of mechanical components using gamma-rays and thermal neutrons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This work presents the results obtained in the inspection of several mechanical components through neutron and gamma-ray transmission radiography. The 4.46 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} thermal neutron flux available at the main port of the Argonauta research reactor in Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear has been used as source for the neutron radiographic imaging. The 412 keV {gamma}-ray emitted by {sup 198}Au, also produced in that reactor, has been used as interrogation agent for the gamma radiography. Imaging Plates - IP specifically designed to operate with thermal neutrons or with X-rays have been employed as detectors and storage devices for each of these radiations.

Souza, Erica Silvani; Avelino, Mila R. [PPG-EM/UERJ, R. Sao Francisco Xavier, 524, Maracana - Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil); Almeida, Gevaldo L. de; Souza, Maria Ines S. [IEN/CNEN, Rua Helio de Almeida, 75, Ilha do Fundao, Rio de Janeiro - RJ (Brazil)

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

95

Design and thermal modeling of a non-invasive probe for measuring perfusion by thermodiffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research 1) explores the feasibility of developing a non-invasive probe to precisely quantify microcirculatory blood flow (tissue perfusion), in real time and in absolute units, and 2) presents designs and models of ...

Charles, Steven Knight

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Multiphysics Thermal-Fluid Design Analysis of a Non-Nuclear Tester for Hot-Hydrogen Materials and Component Development  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this effort is to perform design analyses for a non-nuclear hot-hydrogen materials tester, as a first step towards developing efficient and accurate multiphysics, thermo-fluid computational methodology to predict environments for hypothetical solid-core, nuclear thermal engine thrust chamber design and analysis. The computational methodology is based on a multidimensional, finite-volume, turbulent, chemically reacting, thermally radiating, unstructured-grid, and pressure-based formulation. The multiphysics invoked in this study include hydrogen dissociation kinetics and thermodynamics, turbulent flow, convective, and thermal radiative heat transfers. The goals of the design analyses are to maintain maximum hot-hydrogen jet impingement energy and to minimize chamber wall heating. The results of analyses on three test fixture configurations and the rationale for final selection are presented. The interrogation of physics revealed that reactions of hydrogen dissociation and recombination are highly correlated with local temperature and are necessary for accurate prediction of the hot-hydrogen jet temperature.

Wang, T.-S.; Foote, John; Litchford, Ron [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama, 35812 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

97

Non-Thermal Treatment of Hanford Site Low-Level Mixed Waste  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNationalNewportBig Eddy ArcheologicalSolar Thermal Solar89

98

Non-thermal Plasma-Assisted Catalytic NOx Reduction over Ba-Y,FAU: The  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNationalNewportBig Eddy ArcheologicalSolar Thermal Page 1Effect

99

Non-thermal plasma-assisted NOx reduction over Na-Y zeolites: The  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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100

Geo energy research and development: technology transfer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia Geo Energy Programs related to geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel resources have provided a useful mechanism for transferring laboratory technologies to private industry. Significant transfer of hardware, computer programs, diagnostics and instrumentation, advanced materials, and in situ process understanding has occurred through US/DOE supported programs in the past five years. The text briefly reviews the technology transfer procedures and summarizes 32 items that have been transferred and another 20 technologies that are now being considered for possible transfer to industry. A major factor in successful transfer has been personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staff from private industry during all aspects of the technology development.

Traeger, R.K.

1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Geo Energy Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeauga County, Ohio: EnergySector: SolarGenoa is a villageGentryGeo

102

Geo processors USA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeauga County, Ohio: EnergySector: SolarGenoa is aGeo X GmbH

103

GeoGenix | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeauga County, Ohio: EnergySector: SolarGenoa is aGeo X GmbHGeoGenix

104

Geo mbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpen EnergyBoard" form. To createResearchEnergy Inc JumpGeo mbH

105

GeoInnovation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpen EnergyBoard" form. To createResearchEnergy Inc JumpGeo

106

GEO2 Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (TheEtelligence (SmartHomeFremont,usingGEO2 Technologies Jump to:

107

GeoPeak Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision has beenFfe2fb55-352f-473b-a2dd-50ae8b27f0a6TheoreticalFuelCellGemini SolarAssets LLCGenifuel JumpGeoPeak

108

Thermal Performance of Poly Alpha Olefin Nanofluid with Spherical and Non-spherical Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Nanoparticles can be metallic or non-metallic and also can have different shapes. In this study, Poly-Alpha-Olefin (PAO) has been used as a base fluid with Alumina (Al2O3) nanoparticles. Poly-Alpha-Olefin is commonly used for engine lubrication in military...

Park, Chan Hyun

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

109

Integrated Network of Scientific Information and GeoHydrologic Tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INSIGHT: Integrated Network of Scientific Information and GeoHydrologic Tools Laura Paeglis, IWM and GeoHydrologic Tools #12;What is INSIGHT? · Interactive, web-based maps. · Evaluations of basins and their status as fully or overappropriated. · Educational tool for water managers and the public. · One

Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

110

Enhancement of the helium resonance lines in the solar atmosphere by suprathermal electron excitation I: non-thermal transport of helium ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Models of the solar transition region made from lines other than those of helium cannot account for the strength of the helium lines. However, the collisional excitation rates of the helium resonance lines are unusually sensitive to the energy of the exciting electrons. Non-thermal motions in the transition region could drive slowly-ionizing helium ions rapidly through the steep temperature gradient, exposing them to excitation by electrons characteristic of higher temperatures than those describing their ionization state. We present the results of calculations which use a more physical representation of the lifetimes of the ground states of He I and He II than was adopted in earlier work on this process. New emission measure distributions are used to calculate the temperature variation with height. The results show that non-thermal motions can lead to enhancements of the He I and He II resonance line intensities by factors that are comparable with those required. Excitation by non-Maxwellian electron distributions would reduce the effects of non-thermal transport. The effects of non-thermal motions are more consistent with the observed spatial distribution of helium emission than are those of excitation by non-Maxwellian electron distributions alone. In particular, they account better for the observed line intensity ratio I(537.0 A)/I(584.3 A), and its variation with location.

G. R. Smith; C. Jordan

2002-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

111

Thermal structure of hot non-flaring corona from Hinode/EIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In previous studies a very hot plasma component has been diagnosed in solar active regions through the images in three different narrow-band channels of SDO/AIA. This diagnostic from EUV imaging data has also been supported by the matching morphology of the emission in the hot Ca XVII line, as observed with Hinode/EIS. This evidence is debated because of unknown distribution of the emission measure along the line of sight. Here we investigate in detail the thermal distribution of one of such regions using EUV spectroscopic data. In an active region observed with SDO/AIA, Hinode/EIS and XRT, we select a subregion with a very hot plasma component and another cooler one for comparison. The average spectrum is extracted for both, and 14 intense lines are selected for analysis, that probe the 5.5 = 6.3, the distribution of the hot region shows a well-defined peak at log T = 6.6 and gradually decreasing trends on both sides, thus supporting the very hot nature of the hot component diagnosed with imagers. The other ...

Petralia, A; Testa, P; Del Zanna, G

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectroscopy diagnostic system for the study of non-thermal electrons at Aditya tokamak  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Silicon drift detector based X-ray spectrometer diagnostic was developed to study the non-thermal electron for Aditya tokamak plasma. The diagnostic was mounted on a radial mid plane port at the Aditya. The objective of diagnostic includes the estimation of the non-thermal electron temperature for the ohmically heated plasma. Bi-Maxwellian plasma model was adopted for the temperature estimation. Along with that the study of high Z impurity line radiation from the ECR pre-ionization experiments was also aimed. The performance and first experimental results from the new X-ray spectrometer system are presented.

Purohit, S., E-mail: pshishir@ipr.res.in; Joisa, Y. S.; Raval, J. V.; Ghosh, J.; Tanna, R.; Shukla, B. K.; Bhatt, S. B. [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428 (India)

2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Geo-neutrinos and Silicate Earth Enrichment of U and Th  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The terrestrial distribution of U, Th, and K abundances governs the thermal evolution, traces the differentiation, and reflects the bulk composition of the earth. Comparing the bulk earth composition to chondritic meteorites estimates the net amounts of these radiogenic heat-producing elements available for partitioning to the crust, mantle, and core. Core formation enriches the abundances of refractory lithophile elements, including U and Th, in the silicate earth by ~1.5. Global removal of volatile elements potentially increases this enrichment to ~2.8. The K content of the silicate earth follows from the ratio of K to U. Variable enrichment produces a range of possible heat-producing element abundances in the silicate earth. A model assesses the essentially fixed amounts of U, Th, and K in the approximately closed crust reservoir. Subtracting these sequestered crustal amounts from the variable amounts in the silicate earth results in a range of possible mantle allocations, leaving global dynamics and thermal evolution poorly constrained. Terrestrial antineutrinos from {\\beta}-emitting daughter nuclei in the U and Th decay series traverse the earth with negligible attenuation. The rate at which large subsurface instruments observe these geo-neutrinos depends on the distribution of U and Th relative to the detector. Geo-neutrino observations with sensitivity to U and Th in the mantle are able to estimate silicate earth enrichment, leading to a more complete understanding of the origin, accretion, differentiation, and thermal history of the planet.

Steve Dye

2010-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

114

Non-thermal Cosmic Backgrounds from Blazars: the contribution to the CMB, X-ray and gamma-ray Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new assessment of the contribution of Blazars to the extragalactic background radiation across the e.m. spectrum. Our calculations rely on deep Blazar radio counts that we derived combining several multifrequency surveys. The integrated Blazar emission yields a broad-band non-thermal background that in some parts of the e.m. spectrum dominates the extragalactic brightness. Blazars are the main point-like contributors to the CMB. Their integrated emission causes an apparent T increase of 5-50 muK in the 50-250 GHz range. The CMB fluctuation spectrum is sensibly contaminated at l>300, for a Poissonian source distribution, or at lower l values if spatial clustering is present. We estimate that well over 100,000 Blazars will produce a significant signal in the PLANCK CMB anisotropy maps. Because of the microwave-Xray flux correlation, these sources are expected to have flux > a few 10^{-15} erg/s in the soft X-ray band. Thus, a large fraction of the foreground sources in CMB anisotropy maps could be ...

Giommi, P; Cavazzuti, E; Perri, M; Pittori, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Electrostatic solitary structures in presence of non-thermal electrons and a warm electron beam on the auroral field lines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Electrostatic solitary waves (ESWs) have been observed by satellites in the auroral region of the Earth's magnetosphere. These ESWs are found to be having both positive and negative electrostatic potentials. Using the Sagdeeev psuedo-potential technique, arbitrary amplitude electron-acoustic solitary waves/double layers are studied in an unmagnetized plasma consisting of non-thermally distributed hot electrons, fluid cold electrons, a warm electron beam, and ions. The inertia of the warm electrons, and not the beam speed, is essential for the existence of positive potential solitary structures. Existence domains for positive as well as negative potential electrostatic solitons/double layers are obtained. For the typical auroral region parameters, the electric field amplitude of the negative potential solitons is found to be in the range {approx}(3-30) mV/m and {approx}(5-80) mV/m for the positive potential solitons. For the negative potential solitons/double layers, the amplitudes are higher when their widths are smaller. On the other hand, the amplitude of the positive potential structures increase with their widths.

Singh, S. V. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India); School of Physics, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa); Lakhina, G. S. [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India); Bharuthram, R. [University of the Western Cape, Bellville (South Africa); Pillay, S. R. [School of Physics, University of Kwazulu-Natal, Durban (South Africa)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

Non-thermal Cosmic Backgrounds from Blazars: the contribution to the CMB, X-ray and gamma-ray Backgrounds  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a new assessment of the contribution of Blazars to the extragalactic background radiation across the e.m. spectrum. Our calculations rely on deep Blazar radio counts that we derived combining several multifrequency surveys. The integrated Blazar emission yields a broad-band non-thermal background that in some parts of the e.m. spectrum dominates the extragalactic brightness. Blazars are the main point-like contributors to the CMB. Their integrated emission causes an apparent T increase of 5-50 muK in the 50-250 GHz range. The CMB fluctuation spectrum is sensibly contaminated at l>300, for a Poissonian source distribution, or at lower l values if spatial clustering is present. We estimate that well over 100,000 Blazars will produce a significant signal in the PLANCK CMB anisotropy maps. Because of the microwave-Xray flux correlation, these sources are expected to have flux > a few 10^{-15} erg/s in the soft X-ray band. Thus, a large fraction of the foreground sources in CMB anisotropy maps could be identified and removed using a multi frequency approach, provided that a sufficiently deep all sky X-ray survey will be available. We further show that Blazars are a major constituent of all high-E extragalactic backgrounds. Their contribution is 11-12% at X-ray frequencies and possibly 100% in the 0.5-50 MeV band. At E>100 MeV, the Blazar collective emission, obtained extrapolating their integrated micro-wave flux to the gamma-ray band using the SED of EGRET detected sources, over-predicts the extragalactic background by a large factor, implying that Blazars not only dominate the gamma-ray sky but also that their average duty cycle at these frequencies must be rather low. We also find that Blazars of the HBL type may produce a significant amount of flux at TeV energies.

P. Giommi; S. Colafrancesco; E. Cavazzuti; M. Perri; C. Pittori

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

A Study on Zoning Regulations' Impact on Thermal Comfort Conditions in Non-conditioned Apartment Buildings in Dhaka City  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zoning schemes seemed essential for this study. To analyze the four zoning regulation schemes' impact on thermal comfort in apartment buildings, four sets of built environment were created in EnergyPlus (Energy Simulation software) as well as in Fluent...

Islam, Saiful

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

118

User:Woodjr/Sandbox/GeoMap | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save Energy NowNew Hampshire Address ChaseGeoNamesSfomailGeoMap

119

Building a Scalable GeoSpatial DBMS: Technology, Implementation, and Evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building a Scalable Geo­Spatial DBMS: Technology, Implementation, and Evaluation Jignesh Patel, Jie describe new techniques for building a parallel geo­ spatial DBMS, discuss our implementation

Tufte, Kristin

120

Optical emission spectroscopic diagnostics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium-oxygen plasma jet for biomedical applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, we have applied optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics to investigate the characteristics of a non-thermal atmospheric pressure helium plasma jet. The discharge characteristics in the active and afterglow region of the plasma jet, that are critical for biomedical applications, have been investigated. The voltage-current characteristics of the plasma discharge were analyzed and the average plasma power was measured to be around 18 W. The effect of addition of small fractions of oxygen at 0.1%-0.5% on the plasma jet characteristics was studied. The addition of oxygen resulted in a decrease in plasma plume length due to the electronegativity property of oxygen. Atomic and molecular lines of selected reactive plasma species that are considered to be useful to induce biochemical reactions such as OH transitions A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({nu}=0,1){yields}X{sup 2}{Pi}({Delta}{nu}=0) at 308 nm and A{sup 2}{Sigma}{sup +}({nu}=0,1){yields}X{sup 2}{Pi}({Delta}{nu}=1) at 287 nm, O I transitions 3p{sup 5}P{yields}3s{sup 5}S{sup 0} at 777.41 nm, and 3p{sup 3}P{yields}3s{sup 3}S{sup 0} at 844.6 nm, N{sub 2}(C-B) second positive system with electronic transition C{sup 3}{Pi}{sub u}{sup {yields}}B{sup 3}{Pi}{sub g}'' in the range of 300-450 nm and N{sub 2}{sup +}(B-X) first negative system with electronic transition B{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub u}{sup +}{yields}X{sup 2}{Sigma}{sub g}{sup +}({Delta}{nu}=0) at 391.4 nm have been studied. The atomic emission lines of helium were identified, including the He I transitions 3p{sup 3}P{sup 0}{yields}2s{sup 3}S at 388.8 nm, 3p{sup 1}P{sup 0}{yields} 2s{sup 1}S at 501.6 nm, 3d{sup 3}D{yields}2p{sup 3}P{sup 0} at 587.6 nm, 3d{sup 1}D{yields}2p{sup 1}P{sup 0} at 667.8 nm, 3s{sup 3}S{sup 1}{yields}2p{sup 3}P{sup 0} at 706.5 nm, 3s{sup 1}S{sup 0}{yields}2p{sup 1}P{sup 0} at 728.1 nm, and H{sub {alpha}} transition 2p-3d at 656.3 nm. Using a spectral fitting method, the OH radicals at 306-312 nm, the rotational and vibrational temperatures equivalent to gas temperatures of the discharge was measured and the effective non-equilibrium nature of the plasma jet was demonstrated. Our results show that, in the entire active plasma region, the gas temperature remains at 310 {+-} 25 K and 340 {+-} 25 K and it increases to 320 {+-} 25 K and 360 {+-} 25 K in the afterglow region of the plasma jet for pure helium and helium/oxygen (0.1%) mixture, respectively. Additionally, the vibrational temperatures range from 2200 {+-} 100 K and 2500 {+-} 100 K for pure helium and helium/oxygen (0.1%) mixture, respectively. The plasma jet was tested on heat sensitive polymer films used in biomedical applications such as polyethylene terephthalate and poly-L-lactide samples continuously for several minutes without causing any physical or thermal damage to the films. The plasma jet produces significant reactive species of interest while the gas temperatures remain very low demonstrating its potential for a range of biomedical applications.

Thiyagarajan, Magesh; Sarani, Abdollah; Nicula, Cosmina [Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory (PERL), College of Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University-Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 (United States)] [Plasma Engineering Research Laboratory (PERL), College of Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University-Corpus Christi, Texas 78412 (United States)

2013-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

An overview of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An overview of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) Ben Kravitz,1 Alan Robock] The Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) was designed to determine robust climate system model responses to solar geoengineering. GeoMIP currently consists of four standardized simulations involving

Robock, Alan

122

Mission analysis for hybrid thermionic nuclear reactor LEO-to-GEO transfer applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper details the results of mission analyses concerning a hybrid STAR-C based system, which is based on a safe solid fuel form for high-temperature reactor core operation and a rugged planar thermionic energy converter for long-life steady-state electric power production. Hybrid power/propulsion system concepts are shown to offer superior performance capabilities for Low-Earth-Orbit (LEO) to Geosynchronous-Earth-Orbit (GEO) orbital transfer applications over chemical propulsion systems. A key feature of the hybrid power/propulsion system is that the propulsion system uses the on-board payload power system. Mission results for hybrid concepts using Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP), Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), and combination of NTP and NEP are discussed.

Widman, F.W. Jr.; North, D.M. (Rockwell International/Rocketdyne Division, 6633 Canoga Avenue, Canoga Park, California 91303 (United States)); Choong, P.T.; Teofilo, V.L. (Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc., 1111 Lockheed Way, Synnyvale, California 94088 (United States))

1993-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

123

Lindsay Millert GEOS 206--Renewable Energy and the Sustainable Campuses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Millert 1 Lindsay Millert GEOS 206--Renewable Energy and the Sustainable Campuses Final Paper and the natural world. Sustainability is the intersection of these realms, the ultimate goal. The Renewable Energy of the earth's health, has thankfully adopted a campus sustainability initiative that reads as follows

Aalberts, Daniel P.

124

NCBI GEO: archive for functional genomics data sets--update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Genetics Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892, USA Received and gene expres- sion profile charts. The GEO database continues to grow and is being actively developed towards facilitating data mining and discovery; this article provides an update of the current status

Levin, Judith G.

125

Second Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition GeoAmericas 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

geomembranes and geosynthetic clay liners of various phenolic compounds (phenol, o-cresol, p-cresol, 2Second Pan American Geosynthetics Conference & Exhibition GeoAmericas 2012 Lima, Perú - May 2012 Quantification of the impact of the transfer of phenolic coumpounds through landfill bottom liners J. Sousa

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

126

Department of Mechanical Engineering Spring 2013 Improving the Efficiency of a Non-Pressurized Thermal Storage Tank  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-Pressurized Thermal Storage Tank Overview Hydroflex had provided the team with a tank and the heat exchanger coil that was to be used to heat the tank. While attempting to improve the tank's efficiency, the team was required to keep certain parameters of the tank the same, such as it insulation and the type of coil that was used

Demirel, Melik C.

127

Non-smooth Chemical Freeze-out and Apparent Width of Wide Resonances and Quark Gluon Bags in a Thermal Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we develop the hadron resonance gas model with the Gaussian width of hadron resonances. This model allows us to treat the usual hadrons and the quark gluon bags on the same footing and to study the stability of the results obtained within different formulations of the hadron resonance gas model. In this work we perform a successful fit of 111 independent hadronic multiplicity ratios measured for $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} $= 2.7- 200 GeV. We demonstrate that in a narrow range of collision energy $\\sqrt{s_{NN}} =$ 4.3-4.9 GeV there exist peculiar irregularities in various thermodynamic quantities found at chemical freeze-out. The most remarkable irregularity is an unprecedented jump of the number of effective degrees of freedom observed in this narrow energy range which is seen in all realistic versions of the hadron resonance gas model. Therefore, the developed concept is called the non-smooth chemical freeze-out. We are arguing that these irregularities evidence for the possible formation of quark gluon bags. In order to develop other possible signals of their formation here we study the apparent width of wide hadronic resonances and quark gluon bags in a thermal environment. Two new effects generated for the wide resonances and quark gluon bags by a thermal medium are discussed here: the near threshold thermal resonance enhancement and the near threshold thermal resonance sharpening. On the basis of the new effects we argue that the most optimistic chance to find experimentally the quark gluon bags may be related to their sharpening and enhancement in a thermal medium. In this case the wide quark gluon bags may appear directly or in decays as narrow resonances that are absent in the tables of elementary particles and that have the apparent width about 50-120 MeV and the mass about or above 2.5 GeV.

K. A. Bugaev; A. I. Ivanytskyi; D. R. Oliinychenko; E. G. Nikonov; V. V. Sagun; G. M. Zinovjev

2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

128

Minor ion heating in spectra of linearly and circularly polarized Alfvn waves: Thermal and non-thermal motions associated with perpendicular heating  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Minor ion (such as He{sup 2+}) heating via nonresonant interaction with spectra of linearly and circularly polarized Alfvn waves (LPAWs and CPAWs hereafter) is studied. The obtained analytic solutions are in good agreement with the simulation results, indicating that newborn ions are heated by low-frequency Alfvn waves with finite amplitude in low-beta plasmas such as the solar corona. The analytic solutions also reproduce the preferential heating of heavy ions in the solar wind. In the presence of parallel propagating Alfvn waves, turbulence-induced particle motion is clearly observed in the wave (magnetic field) polarized directions. After the waves diminish, the newborn ions are heated, which is caused by the phase difference (randomization) between ions due to their different parallel thermal motions. The heating is dominant in the direction perpendicular to the ambient magnetic field. The perpendicular heating, ?=(T{sub i?}{sup R}?T{sub i0?}{sup R})/T{sub i0?}{sup R} (where T{sub i0?}{sup R} and T{sub i?}{sup R} are the perpendicular temperature of species i before and after genuine heating, respectively), in the spectrum of CPAWs is a factor of two stronger than that of LPAWs. Moreover, we also study the effect of field-aligned differential flow speed of species i relative to H{sup +}, ?v{sub ip}=(v{sub i}?v{sub p})B/|B| (where v{sub i} and v{sub p} denote vector velocities of the H{sup +} and species i, respectively), on the perpendicular heating. It reveals that large drift speed, v{sub d}=?v{sub ip}, has an effect on reducing the efficiency of perpendicular heating, which is consistent with observations.

Dong, Chuanfei, E-mail: dcfy@umich.edu [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States) [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Human leading the Thermal Comfort Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007 Zhang H., 2003, Human Thermal Sensation and Comfort in Transient and Non Uniform Thermal Environments; Phd Thesis Zhang H., Arens E., Huizinga C., Han T., 2010, Thermal sensations and comfort models for non-uniform and transient environments...

Zeiler, W.; Boxem, G.; Van Houten, R.; Vissers, D.; Maaijen, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Method and system for the combination of non-thermal plasma and metal/metal oxide doped .gamma.-alumina catalysts for diesel engine exhaust aftertreatment system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present disclosure pertains to a system and method for treatment of oxygen rich exhaust and more specifically to a method and system that combines non-thermal plasma with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina catalyst. Current catalyst systems for the treatment of oxygen rich exhaust are capable of achieving only approximately 7 to 12% NO.sub.x reduction as a passive system and only 25 40% reduction when a supplemental hydrocarbon reductant is injected into the exhaust stream. It has been found that treatment of an oxygen rich exhaust initially with a non-thermal plasma and followed by subsequent treatment with a metal doped .gamma.-alumina prepared by the sol gel method is capable of increasing the NO.sub.x reduction to a level of approximately 90% in the absence of SO.sub.2 and 80% in the presence of 20 ppm of SO.sub.2. Especially useful metals have been found to be indium, gallium, and tin.

Aardahl, Christopher L. (Richland, WA); Balmer-Miller, Mari Lou (West Richland, WA); Chanda, Ashok (Peoria, IL); Habeger, Craig F. (West Richland, WA); Koshkarian, Kent A. (Peoria, IL); Park, Paul W. (Peoria, IL)

2006-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

131

Non-Thermal X-ray Emission from the Northwestern Rim of the Galactic Supernova Remnant G266.2-1.2 (RX J0852.0-4622)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a detailed spatially-resolved spectroscopic analysis of two X-ray observations (with a total integration time of 73280 seconds) made of the luminous northwestern rim complex of the Galactic supernova remnant (SNR) G266.2-1.2 (RX J0852.0-4622) with the Chandra X-ray Observatory. G266.2-1.2 is a member of a class of Galactic SNRs which feature X-ray spectra dominated by non-thermal emission: in the cases of these SNRs, the emission is believed to have a synchrotron origin and studies of the X-ray spectra of these SNRs can lend insights into how SNRs accelerate cosmic-ray particles. The Chandra observations have clearly revealed fine structure in this rim complex and the spectra of these features are dominated by non-thermal emission. We have measured the length scales of the upstream structures at eight positions along the rim and derive lengths of 0.02-0.08 pc (assuming a distance of 750 pc to G266.2-1.2). We have also extracted spectra from seven regions in the rim complex and fit these spectra wit...

Pannuti, Thomas G; Filipovic, Miroslav D; De Horta, Ain; Stupar, Milorad; Agrawal, Rashika

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Geo-neutrinos: a new probe of Earth's interior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In preparation to the experimental results which will be available in the future, we study geo-neutrino production for different models of mantle convection and composition. By using global mass balance for the Bulk Silicate Earth, the predicted flux contribution from distant sources in the crust and in the mantle is fixed within a total uncertainty of +-15%. We also discuss regional effects, provided by subducting slabs or plumes near the detector. In four years a five-kton detector operating at a site relatively far from nuclear power plants can achieve measurements of the geo-neutrino signal accurate to within +-5%. It will provide a crucial test of the Bulk Silicate Earth and a direct estimate of the radiogenic contribution to terrestrial heat.

Gianni Fiorentini; Marcello Lissia; Fabio Mantovani; Riccardo Vannucci

2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

133

GeoSyndicate Power Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeauga County, Ohio: EnergySector: SolarGenoa is aGeo

134

Multiwavelength Thermal Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Multiwavelength Astronomy NASA #12;Thermal Emission #12;Thermal Emission Non-thermal p-p collisions Optical IR Radio/ Microwave sources of emission massive stars, WHIM, Ly many dust, cool objects-ray ~GeV Gamma-ray ~TeV sources of emission AGN, clusters, SNR, binaries, stars AGN (obscured), shocks

California at Santa Cruz, University of

135

Department of Energy Geo-Environmental Engineering Spring 2012 Diesel Engine Cost and Quality Improvement  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PENNSTATE Department of Energy Geo-Environmental Engineering Spring 2012 Diesel Engine Cost and Quality Improvement Overview Tasked with improving cost and quality throughout the Volvo diesel engine

Demirel, Melik C.

136

E-Print Network 3.0 - aos sistemas geo Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: ustica submarina para exploracao e observacao do oceano (tomografia, geo-acustica, etc) sao as dimens... veiculos e necessario em tarefas de...

137

D S Geo Innogy Fraport JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003)CrowleyEnergy InformationCuyamungue,Czero, Inc JumpGeo

138

Geo energy research and development: technology transfer update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia Geo Energy Programs in geothermal, coal, oil and gas, and synfuel technologies have been effective in transferring research concepts to applications in private industry. This report updates the previous summary (SAND82-0211, March 1982) to include recent technology transfers and to reflect recent changes in philosophy on technology transfer. Over 40 items transferred to industry have been identified in the areas of Hardware, Risk Removal and Understanding. Successful transfer is due largely to personal interactions between Sandia engineers and the technical staffs of private industry.

Traeger, R.K.; Dugan, V.L.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

GeoSprings Hybrid Water Heater - Energy Innovation Portal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky Learning Fun withGenepoolCrystals.Genomefor GenomicsGeoSprings

140

Geo X GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeauga County, Ohio: EnergySector: SolarGenoa is aGeo X GmbH Jump

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

GeoGreen Fuels LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeauga County, Ohio: EnergySector: SolarGenoa is aGeo X

142

GeoLectric Power Company NM LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeauga County, Ohio: EnergySector: SolarGenoa is aGeo XGeoLectric

143

GEO NET Umweltconsulting GmbH | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpen EnergyBoard" form. To create aGA SNC Solar JumpGCWindGEO NET

144

American Society of Civil Engineers Geo-Institute Geo-Trans 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the term is any relatively compressible material that is intentionally placed between a rigid and/or non impact they way in which earth-retaining structures are designed, constructed, maintained, rehabilitated on the need to prevent failure (the limit state) in the broadest sense of the word (i.e. loss of function

Horvath, John S.

145

FTIR Emission Spectra, Molecular Constants, and Potential Curve of Ground State GeO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FTIR Emission Spectra, Molecular Constants, and Potential Curve of Ground State GeO Edward G. Lee-resolution FTIR emission spectroscopy measurements for the five common isoto- pomers of GeO are combined­9), photoelectron spectroscopy (10), electronic absorption (11­13), and emission (14) spectroscopy, and in matrix

Le Roy, Robert J.

146

Climate model response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)1! Ben Kravitz,1*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

! 1 Climate model response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)1! 2! Ben, MSIN K9-24, Richland, WA32! 99352, ben.kravitz@pnnl.gov.33! #12;! 2 Abstract34! Solar geoengineering of the Geoengineering Model37! Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP), in which 12 climate models have simulated the climate38

Robock, Alan

147

GeoDec: A Framework to Effectively Visualize and Query Geospatial Data for Decision-Making  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GeoDec: A Framework to Effectively Visualize and Query Geospatial Data for Decision-Making Cyrus-to-end system that enables geospatial decision-making by virtualizing the real-world geolocations. With GeoDec, first the geolocation of interest is rapidly and realistically simulated and all relevant geospatial

Shahabi, Cyrus

148

Analytical, Visual, and Interactive Concepts for Geo-Visual Analytics Heidrun Schumanna,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Supporting the visual analysis of structured multivariate geo-spatial data is a challenging task involving [15], Chapter 4). In this work, we consider visual analytics support for the analysis of multivariate and analysis of geo-spatial data. In particular, we address the visualization of hierarchical structures

Tominski, Christian

149

Curriculum for Joint Doctoral Programme Geo-Engineering and Water Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Curriculum for Joint Doctoral Programme Geo-Engineering and Water Management Curriculum for Joint Doctoral Programme Geo-Engineering and Water Management June 2009 Introduction This Curriculum for Joint-Engineering and Water Management. The participating Universities and Faculties in this Joint Doctoral Programme (JDP

150

Research on Ocean Resources, Marine Geo-Engineering and Climate Change -New Regulations: Implications for Ocean  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Research on Ocean Resources, Marine Geo-Engineering and Climate Change - New Regulations: Implications for Ocean Engineers Dr. Philomène Verlaan Visiting Colleague, Department of Oceanography & Senior Framework for Scientific Research Involving Ocean Fertilization", a definition of marine geo-engineering

Frandsen, Jannette B.

151

Bellini: Ferrying Application Traffic Flows through Geo-distributed Datacenters in the Cloud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bellini: Ferrying Application Traffic Flows through Geo-distributed Datacenters in the Cloud Zimu. To take full advantage of superior connectivities between geo-distributed datacenters, application traffic, implementing and deploying such inter- datacenter protocols for various applications, such as messaging

Li, Baochun

152

Enhancing Mobile Object Classification Using Geo-referenced Maps and Evidential Grids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Enhancing Mobile Object Classification Using Geo-referenced Maps and Evidential Grids Marek Kurdej, geo-referenced maps, mobile perception, prior knowledge, evidential occupancy grid, au- tonomous, Julien Moras, Veronique Cherfaoui, Philippe Bonnifait Abstract-- Evidential grids have recently shown

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

153

GeoTriples: a Tool for Publishing Geospatial Data as RDF Graphs Using R2RML Mappings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GeoTriples: a Tool for Publishing Geospatial Data as RDF Graphs Using R2RML Mappings Kostis the tool GeoTriples that allows the transformation of Earth Observation data and geospatial data into RDF of geospatial data. GeoTriples is a semi- automated tool that transforms geospatial information into RDF follow

Koubarakis, Manolis

154

AE AURIGAE: FIRST DETECTION OF NON-THERMAL X-RAY EMISSION FROM A BOW SHOCK PRODUCED BY A RUNAWAY STAR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Runaway stars produce shocks when passing through interstellar medium at supersonic velocities. Bow shocks have been detected in the mid-infrared for several high-mass runaway stars and in radio waves for one star. Theoretical models predict the production of high-energy photons by non-thermal radiative processes in a number sufficiently large to be detected in X-rays. To date, no stellar bow shock has been detected at such energies. We present the first detection of X-ray emission from a bow shock produced by a runaway star. The star is AE Aur, which was likely expelled from its birthplace due to the encounter of two massive binary systems and now is passing through the dense nebula IC 405. The X-ray emission from the bow shock is detected at 30'' northeast of the star, coinciding with an enhancement in the density of the nebula. From the analysis of the observed X-ray spectrum of the source and our theoretical emission model, we confirm that the X-ray emission is produced mainly by inverse Compton upscattering of infrared photons from dust in the shock front.

Lopez-Santiago, J.; Pereira, V.; De Castro, E. [Dpto. de Astrofisica y CC. de la Atmosfera, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Miceli, M.; Bonito, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy); Del Valle, M. V.; Romero, G. E. [Instituto Argentino de Radioastronomia (IAR), CCT La Plata (CONICET), C.C.5, 1894 Villa Elisa, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Albacete-Colombo, J. F. [Centro Universitario Regional Zona Atlantica (CURZA), Universidad Nacional del COMAHUE, Monsenor Esandi y Ayacucho, 8500 Viedma, Rio Negro (Argentina); Damiani, F. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, I-90134 Palermo (Italy)

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

155

AE Aurigae: first detection of non-thermal X-ray emission from a bow shock produced by a runaway star  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Runaway stars produce shocks when passing through interstellar medium at supersonic velocities. Bow shocks have been detected in the mid-infrared for several high-mass runaway stars and in radio waves for one star. Theoretical models predict the production of high-energy photons by non-thermal radiative processes in a number sufficiently large to be detected in X-rays. To date, no stellar bow shock has been detected at such energies. We present the first detection of X-ray emission from a bow shock produced by a runaway star. The star is AE Aur, which was likely expelled from its birthplace by the encounter of two massive binary systems and now is passing through the dense nebula IC 405. The X-ray emission from the bow shock is detected at 30" to the northeast of the star, coinciding with an enhancement in the density of the nebula. From the analysis of the observed X-ray spectrum of the source and our theoretical emission model, we confirm that the X-ray emission is produced mainly by inverse Compton upscatt...

Lopez-Santiago, J; del Valle, M V; Romero, G E; Bonito, R; Albacete-Colombo, J F; Pereira, V; de Castro, E; Damiani, F

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Thermal Fluids  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Thermal Fluids The Thermal Fluids and Heat Transfer program works on thermal hydraulic reactor safety code development and experimental heat transferthermal hydraulics. The...

157

GEO-SEQ Best Practices Manual. Geologic Carbon Dioxide Sequestration: Site Evaluation to Implementation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The first phase of the GEO-SEQ project was a multidisciplinary effort focused on investigating ways to lower the cost and risk of geologic carbon sequestration. Through our research in the GEO-SEQ project, we have produced results that may be of interest to the wider geologic carbon sequestration community. However, much of the knowledge developed in GEO-SEQ is not easily accessible because it is dispersed in the peer-reviewed literature and conference proceedings in individual papers on specific topics. The purpose of this report is to present key GEO-SEQ findings relevant to the practical implementation of geologic carbon sequestration in the form of a Best Practices Manual. Because our work in GEO-SEQ focused on the characterization and project development aspects, the scope of this report covers practices prior to injection, referred to as the design phase. The design phase encompasses activities such as selecting sites for which enhanced recovery may be possible, evaluating CO{sub 2} capacity and sequestration feasibility, and designing and evaluating monitoring approaches. Through this Best Practices Manual, we have endeavored to place our GEO-SEQ findings in a practical context and format that will be useful to readers interested in project implementation. The overall objective of this Manual is to facilitate putting the findings of the GEO-SEQ project into practice.

Benson, Sally M.; Myer, Larry R.; Oldenburg, Curtis M.; Doughty, Christine A.; Pruess, Karsten; Lewicki, Jennifer; Hoversten, Mike; Gasperikova, Erica; Daley, Thomas; Majer, Ernie; Lippmann, Marcelo; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Knauss, Kevin; Johnson, James; Foxall, William; Ramirez, Abe; Newmark, Robin; Cole, David; Phelps, Tommy J.; Parker, J.; Palumbo, A.; Horita, J.; Fisher, S.; Moline, Gerry; Orr, Lynn; Kovscek, Tony; Jessen, K.; Wang, Y.; Zhu, J.; Cakici, M.; Hovorka, Susan; Holtz, Mark; Sakurai, Shinichi; Gunter, Bill; Law, David; van der Meer, Bert

2004-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

158

TR 2006/002 ISSN 0874-338X GeoThms -Geometry Framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

& Montenegro Centre for Informatics and Systems of the University of Coimbra #12;GeoThms - Geometry Framework 11000 Belgrade, SERBIA & MONTENEGRO e-mail: janicic@matf.bg.ac.yu April 24, 2006 1 This work

Almeida, Pedro Quaresma de

159

GeoEnergy is Beautiful 2014 Apply by April 5th!  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

GeoEnergy Is Beautiful 2014 is a student competition promoting awareness of geothermal energy as a key player in the nation's renewable energy mix. Student teams from leading colleges and...

160

Sea spray geoengineering experiments in the geoengineering model intercomparison project (GeoMIP): Experimental design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sea spray geoengineering experiments in the geoengineering model intercomparison project (Geo geoengineering. We outline here a proposal for three coordinated climate modeling experiments to test aspects of sea spray geoengineering, to be conducted under the auspices of the Geoengineering Model

Robock, Alan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

"Foundation Challenges in Urban Environment" Presented by ASCE Metropolitan Section / Geo-Institute Chapter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Foundation Challenges in Urban Environment" Presented by ASCE Metropolitan Section / Geo EXCAVATION STABILITY: A CRITICAL FOUNDATION CONSIDERATION IN URBAN ENVIRONMENTS Daniel A. Vellone, PG, M: Urban construction environments in rock present unique foundation challenges. Owners, design

Merguerian, Charles

162

GeoF: Geodesic Forests for Learning Coupled Predictors P. Kontschieder  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GeoF: Geodesic Forests for Learning Coupled Predictors P. Kontschieder P. Kohli J. Shotton A are captured via new long-range, soft connectivity features, computed via generalized geodesic distance trans

Kohli, Pushmeet

163

Goldschmidt Conference Abstracts 2008A360 Mineralogical coevolution of the geo-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Goldschmidt Conference Abstracts 2008A360 Mineralogical coevolution of the geo- and biospheres R, USA The mineralogy of terrestrial planets evolves as a consequence of varied physical, chemical 1500 different mineral species. Biological processes began to affect Earth's surface mineralogy

Downs, Robert T.

164

The climatology of parameterized physical processes in the GEOS-1 GCM and their impact on the GEOS-1 data assimilation system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS) General Circulation Model (GCM) is part of the GEOS Data Assimilation System (DAS), which is being developed at the Goddard Data Assimilation Office for the production of climate datasets. This study examines Version 1 of the GEOS GCM by evaluating the quality of the fields that relate most closely to the GCM physical parameterizations and examines the impact of the GCM climate errors on the climate of the DAS assimilated fields. The climate characteristics are evaluated using independent satellite and ground-based data for comparison. The GEOS-1 GCM shows reasonably good agreement with available observations in terms of general global distribution and seasonal cycles. The major biases or systematic errors are a tendency toward a dry tropical atmosphere and an inadequate cloud radiative impact in the extratropics. Other systematic errors are a generally wet subtropical atmosphere, slightly excess precipitation over the continents, and excess cloud radiative effects over the Tropics. There is also an underestimation of surface sensible and latent heat fluxes over the area of maximum flux. The DAS climate characteristics, in general, show better agreement with available observations than the GCM. Four distinct ways that the GCM impacts the DAS have been identified, ranging from a DAS climate with little or no impact form the GCM bias to a DAS climate with a greater bias than the GCM due to a spurious feedback between the GCM and the input data. 59 refs., 26 figs.

Molod, A.; Helfand, H.M.; Takacs, L.L. [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)] [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (United States)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

GEO-ENGINEERING MODELING THROUGH INTERNET INFORMATICS (GEMINI)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GEMINI (Geo-Engineering Modeling through Internet Informatics) is a public-domain web application focused on analysis and modeling of petroleum reservoirs and plays (http://www.kgs.ukans.edu/Gemini/index.html). GEMINI creates a virtual project by ''on-the-fly'' assembly and analysis of on-line data either from the Kansas Geological Survey or uploaded from the user. GEMINI's suite of geological and engineering web applications for reservoir analysis include: (1) petrofacies-based core and log modeling using an interactive relational rock catalog and log analysis modules; (2) a well profile module; (3) interactive cross sections to display ''marked'' wireline logs; (4) deterministic gridding and mapping of petrophysical data; (5) calculation and mapping of layer volumetrics; (6) material balance calculations; (7) PVT calculator; (8) DST analyst, (9) automated hydrocarbon association navigator (KHAN) for database mining, and (10) tutorial and help functions. The Kansas Hydrocarbon Association Navigator (KHAN) utilizes petrophysical databases to estimate hydrocarbon pay or other constituent at a play- or field-scale. Databases analyzed and displayed include digital logs, core analysis and photos, DST, and production data. GEMINI accommodates distant collaborations using secure password protection and authorized access. Assembled data, analyses, charts, and maps can readily be moved to other applications. GEMINI's target audience includes small independents and consultants seeking to find, quantitatively characterize, and develop subtle and bypassed pays by leveraging the growing base of digital data resources. Participating companies involved in the testing and evaluation of GEMINI included Anadarko, BP, Conoco-Phillips, Lario, Mull, Murfin, and Pioneer Resources.

W. Lynn Watney; John H. Doveton

2004-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

166

Non-contact, Wavelet-based Measurement of Vital Signs using Thermal Imaging S. Yu. Chekmenev, H. Rara, and Aly A. Farag  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

be measured and used to assess the person's level of physical functioning. Normal ranges of vital signs vary with ECG data as the baseline measurement. Geisheimer [6] developed a Radar Vital Signs Monitor (RVSMNon-contact, Wavelet-based Measurement of Vital Signs using Thermal Imaging S. Yu. Chekmenev, H

Farag, Aly A.

167

Dynamometer testing of the U.S. Electricar Geo Prizm conversion electric vehicle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Geo Prizm electric vehicle conversion by U.S. Electricar was tested in the INEL HEV Laboratory over several standard driving regimes. The vehicle, owned by the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP), was loaned to the INEL for performance testing under a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the California Air Resources Board (CARB). The Prizm conversion is the fourth vehicle in the planned test series. A summary of the test results is presented as Table ES-1. For the LA-92 and the Highway Fuel Economy Test cycles, the driving cycle ranges were 71 and 95 km, respectively. The net DC energy consumption during these cycles was measured at 199 and 154 W-h/km, respectively. During the constant-current-discharge test, the vehicle was driven 150 km at an average steady speed of 43 km/h. Energy consumption at various steady-state speeds, averaged over two tests, was approximately 108 W-h/km at 40 km/hr and 175 W-h/km at 96 km/h at 80T state-of-charge (SOC). Gradeability-at-speed tests indicated that the vehicle can be driven at 80 km/h up a simulated 5% grade for periods up to 15 minutes beginning at an initial 100% SOC, and 3 minutes beginning at 80% battery depth-of-discharge (DOD). Maximum-effort vehicle acceleration times were determined at five different battery DODs and speeds from 24 to 104 km/h. The acceleration is approximately linear up to 48 km/h, with no DOD effect; at higher speeds the curve becomes non-linear, and the effect of DOD becomes increasingly evident. Gradeability at each of these speeds was also determined, showing a decrease from the initial 26% at 24 km/h to 4% at 104 km/h.

Richardson, R.A.; Yarger, E.J.; Cole, G.H.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

GeoExchange for Public Housing Authority Low,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;Geothermal Heat Pump Efficiency One unit of energy from the grid Plus: 3-5 units of energy from the earth home is used to meet thermal loads 14 #12;Typical Residential Site Energy Usage Geothermal Heat Pump kWhperM2 Geothermal Gas Furnace w A/C 50% Site Energy Savings 16 #12;Large Scale Application Energy

169

How much Uranium is in the Earth? Predictions for geo-neutrinos at KamLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Geo-neutrino detection can determine the amount of long-lived radioactive elements within our planet, thus providing a direct test of the Bulk Silicate Earth (BSE) model and fixing the radiogenic contribution to the terrestrial heat. We present a prediction for the geo-neutrino signal at KamLAND as a function of the Uranium mass in the Earth. The prediction is based on global mass balance, supplemented by a detailed geochemical and geophysical study of the region near the detector. The prediction is weakly dependent on mantle modeling. If BSE is correct, Uranium geo-neutrinos will produce between 25 and 35 events per year and 10^32 protons at Kamioka.

Gianni Fiorentini; Marcello Lissia; Fabio Mantovani; Riccardo Vannucci

2005-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

170

Long-term surveillance and maintenance Geo-spatial Environmental Mapping System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For sites currently under the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) and for sites transitioning to LM, technical, operational, and environmental monitoring information continues to be of great interest to stakeholders. The Web-based Geo-spatial Environmental Mapping System (GEMS) developed by LM provides stakeholders, DOE, regulators, project staff, and the public with a user-friendly mechanism for retrieving geo-spatial and environmental monitoring information about the sites. This paper discusses GEMS and its use by LM stakeholders. (authors)

Appetta, J. [U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); MacMillan, S.; Miller, K.; LaBonte, E. [S.M. Stoller Corporation, Junction, CO (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

GeoTriples: a Tool for Publishing Geospatial Data as RDF Graphs Using R2RML Mappings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GeoTriples: a Tool for Publishing Geospatial Data as RDF Graphs Using R2RML Mappings Kostis the linked data paradigm. Therefore, Earth Ob- servation data and other kinds of geospatial data and geospatial data into RDF graphs. GeoTriples goes beyond the state of the art by extending the R2RML mapping

Koubarakis, Manolis

172

Investigation and Analysis of Winter Classroom Thermal Environment in Chongqing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the thermal sense value of the occupants, the winter classroom thermal environment was evaluated. Measures for improving the classroom indoor thermal environmental quality were also given. The lower limit air temperature of the non-air conditioned classrooms...

Liu, J.; Li, B.; Yao, R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Fuel Cell Generation in Geo-Distributed Cloud Services: A Quantitative Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fuel Cell Generation in Geo-Distributed Cloud Services: A Quantitative Study Zhi Zhou1 Fangming Liu of fuel cell energy in cloud computing, yet it is unclear what and how much benefit it may bring. This paper, for the first time, attempts to quantitatively examine the benefits brought by fuel cell

Li, Baochun

174

Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the GeoMIP G1 scenario  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Arctic sea ice and atmospheric circulation under the GeoMIP G1 scenario John C. Moore1 , Annette Rinke1,2 , Xiaoyong Yu1 , Duoying Ji1 , Xuefeng Cui1 , Yan Li3 , Kari Alterskjær4 , Jón Egill Centre, Danish Meteorological Institute, Copenhagen, Denmark Abstract We analyze simulated sea ice

Robock, Alan

175

Climate model response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate model response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) Ben Kravitz,1 geoengineering--deliberate reduction in the amount of solar radiation retained by the Earth--has been proposed present results from Experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, in which 12

Robock, Alan

176

Climate model response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate model response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP) Ben Kravitz,1 Received 7 January 2013; revised 3 July 2013; accepted 10 July 2013. [1] Solar geoengineering Experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, in which 12 climate models have simulated

Moore, John

177

Carbon-aware Load Balancing for Geo-distributed Cloud Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon-aware Load Balancing for Geo-distributed Cloud Services Zhi Zhou1 Fangming Liu1 Yong Xu1 Chinese University of Hong Kong. Abstract--Recently, datacenter carbon emission has become an emerging of the electricity carbon footprint can be fully exploited to further green the cloud running on top

Lui, John C.S.

178

GeoDaze 2008 The University of Arizona Department of Geosciences  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contributions. Organizations Applied Geoscience LLC Arizona Geological Society BP Chevron ConocoPhillips Errol C. Melton Megan Anderson Miles Shaw Nancy Naeser Patrick Gisler Paul Martin Peter Kresan Richard Pfirman Terrence Gerlach Vance Haynes William, Jr. Jenny i #12;GeoDaze 2008 Committee Co-Chairs Treasurer Field

Holliday, Vance T.

179

An Open GeoSpatial Standards-Enabled Google Earth Application to Support Crisis Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Open GeoSpatial Standards-Enabled Google Earth Application to Support Crisis Management Scott-863-7943 Email: @psu.edu ABSTRACT Google Earth (GE) and related open geospatial technologies have changed both the accessibility of and audience for geospatial information dramatically

Klippel, Alexander

180

Visualization of Heterogeneous GeoSpatial Intelligence in a Mobile Environment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Visualization of Heterogeneous GeoSpatial Intelligence in a Mobile Environment Srikumar Ramalingam for visualization of heterogeneous geospatial information in a synchronous manner. Geospatial reg- istration between to enable location awareness for the mobile agents. Querying of geospatial databases is supported to obtain

Lodha, Suresh K.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

GEO-PROCESSING IN CYBERINFRASTRUCTURE: MAKING THE WEB AN EASY TO USE GEOSPATIAL COMPUTATIONAL PLATFORM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GEO-PROCESSING IN CYBERINFRASTRUCTURE: MAKING THE WEB AN EASY TO USE GEOSPATIAL COMPUTATIONAL Geospatial Consortium, Crofton, MD 21114, USA gpercivall@opengeospatial.org b MINES ParisTech, Sophia standards from IETF and W3C. Access to explicitly geospatial data is routinely done using data access

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

182

"Foundation Challenges in Urban Environments" Presented by ASCE Metropolitan Section / Geo-Institute Chapter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

"Foundation Challenges in Urban Environments" Presented by ASCE Metropolitan Section / Geo-Institute Chapter May 16, 2013, New York City FOUNDATION CHALLENGES IN THE NEW YORK CITY METROPOLITAN AREA CAUSED by foundation engineers and constructors in the New York City metropolitan area are the result of a complex

Horvath, John S.

183

ORIGINAL ARTICLE GeoChip 3.0 as a high-throughput tool for analyzing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significantly changed with the plant species diversity. As expected, GeoChip 3.0 is a high-throughput powerful Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA and 8 Virtual Institute Keywords: microarray; functional genes; microbial community; plant diversity Introduction Microorganisms

Hazen, Terry

184

ORIGINAL ARTICLE GeoChip 3.0 as a high-throughput tool for analyzing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

significantly changed with the plant species diversity. As expected, GeoChip 3.0 is a high-throughput powerful Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA, USA and 8 Virtual Institute in microbial ecology Keywords: microarray; functional genes; microbial community; plant diversity Introduction

Weiblen, George D

185

Visualizing Multivariate Network Using GeoSOM and Spherical Disk Layout School of Information Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Connections in the network describe relationships/activities between the data points. Many real world data countries are repre- sented as nodes, each country has properties like gross domestic product (GDP), GDP Previously, we treat each graph node as a point in high-dimensional space and use GeoSOM to project the nodes

Hong,Seokhee

186

2006 GeoX Conference, pages 1 to 6 Characterisation of hydraulic fractures in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006 GeoX Conference, pages 1 to 6 Characterisation of hydraulic fractures in limestones using X, France Jacques.Desrues@hmg.inpg.fr ABSTRACT: Hydraulic tension fractures were produced in porous, hydraulic fracture, permeability tensor MOTS-CL?S: microtomographie, fracturation hydraulique, tenseur de

187

Forcings and feedbacks in the GeoMIP ensemble for a reduction in solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to better understand the impact of solar radiation management on the energy budget. In spite of their veryForcings and feedbacks in the GeoMIP ensemble for a reduction in solar irradiance and increase, Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China, 7 Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter, UK, 8 Atmospheric Sciences

Robock, Alan

188

The scientific,technical,and sociopolitical challenges of finding a secure site for a geo-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The scientific,technical,and sociopolitical challenges of finding a secure site for a geo- logical,vitrified residue from reprocessing power reactor fuel) 2 years ago.Over the next 10­20 years,NUMO hopes to find in a comprehensive, scenario-based safety assessment,a repository will be located to avoid direct penetration

Connor, Charles

189

Experimental and theoretical study of exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by a non-thermal arc discharge for syngas production  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental and theoretical study of exhaust gas fuel reforming of Diesel fuel by a non Abstract: An experimental set-up has been developed to study two typical operating points of Diesel powered that the oxygen from CO2 and H2O almost does not intervene in the exhaust gas Diesel fuel reforming

Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

190

Property:ModernGeoFeatures | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to:FieldProceduresFY JumpThis

191

Towards a Better Understanding of the GRB Phenomenon: a New Model for GRB Prompt Emission and its effects on the New Non-Thermal L$_\\mathrm{i}^\\mathrm{NT}$-E$_\\mathrm{peak,i}^\\mathrm{rest,NT}$ relation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We reanalyze the prompt emission of two of the brightest Fermi GRBs (080916C and 090926A) with a new model composed of 3 components: (i) a thermal-like component--approximated with a black body (BB)--interpreted as the jet photosphere emission of a magnetized relativistic outflow, (ii) a non-thermal component--approximated with a Band function--interpreted as synchrotron radiation in an optically thin region above the photosphere either from internal shocks or magnetic field dissipation, and (iii) an extra power law (PL) extending from low to high energies likely of inverse Compton origin, even though it remains challenging. Through fine-time spectroscopy down to the 100 ms time scale, we follow the smooth evolution of the various components. From this analysis the Band function is globally the most intense component, although the additional PL can overpower the others in sharp time structures. The Band function and the BB component are the most intense at early times and globally fade across the burst durati...

Guiriec, S; Daigne, F; Zhang, B; Hascoet, R; Nemmen, R; Thompson, D; Bhat, N; Gehrels, N; Gonzalez, M; Kaneko, Y; McEnery, J; Mochkovitch, R; Racusin, J; Ryde, F; Sacahui, J; Unsal, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

RAPID/Roadmap/Geo/Flowcharts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant of Access Permit5-ID-a Drilling7-HI-ce

193

All-sky search for gravitational-wave bursts in the first joint LIGO-GEO-Virgo run  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present results from an all-sky search for unmodeled gravitational-wave bursts in the data collected by the LIGO, GEO 600 and Virgo detectors between November 2006 and October 2007. The search is performed by three ...

Weiss, Rainer

194

THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

2004-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

195

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

Selkowitz, Stephen E. (Piedmont, CA); Arasteh, Dariush K. (Oakland, CA); Hartmann, John L. (Seattle, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Thermal insulated glazing unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

1988-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

197

Thermal Comfort under Transient Metabolic and Dynamic Localized Airflow Conditions Combined with Neutral and Warm Ambient Temperatures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human thermal environments constitute complex combinations of various interacting thermal factors. The transient and non-uniform nature of those thermal factors further increases the complexity of the thermal comfort problem. The conventional...

Ugursal, Ahmet

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

198

Underground Coal Thermal Treatment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The long-term objective of this work is to develop a transformational energy production technology by insitu thermal treatment of a coal seam for the production of substitute natural gas (SNG) while leaving much of the coal??s carbon in the ground. This process converts coal to a high-efficiency, low-GHG emitting gas fuel. It holds the potential of providing environmentally acceptable access to previously unusable coal resources. This topical report discusses the development of experimental capabilities, the collection of available data, and the development of simulation tools to obtain process thermo-chemical and geo-thermal parameters in preparation for the eventual demonstration in a coal seam. It also includes experimental and modeling studies of CO{sub 2} sequestration. Efforts focused on: ? Constructing a suite of three different coal pyrolysis reactors. These reactors offer the ability to gather heat transfer, mass transfer and kinetic data during coal pyrolysis under conditions that mimic in situ conditions (Subtask 6.1). ? Studying the operational parameters for various underground thermal treatment processes for oil shale and coal and completing a design matrix analysis for the underground coal thermal treatment (UCTT). This analysis yielded recommendations for terms of targeted coal rank, well orientation, rubblization, presence of oxygen, temperature, pressure, and heating sources (Subtask 6.2). ? Developing capabilities for simulating UCTT, including modifying the geometry as well as the solution algorithm to achieve long simulation times in a rubblized coal bed by resolving the convective channels occurring in the representative domain (Subtask 6.3). ? Studying the reactive behavior of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with limestone, sandstone, arkose (a more complex sandstone) and peridotite, including mineralogical changes and brine chemistry for the different initial rock compositions (Subtask 6.4). Arkose exhibited the highest tendency of participating in mineral reactions, which can be attributed to the geochemical complexity of its initial mineral assemblage. In experiments with limestone, continuous dissolution was observed with the release of CO{sub 2} gas, indicated by the increasing pressure in the reactor (formation of a gas chamber). This occurred due to the lack of any source of alkali to buffer the solution. Arkose has the geochemical complexity for permanent sequestration of CO{sub 2} as carbonates and is also relatively abundant. The effect of including NH{sub 3} in the injected gas stream was also investigated in this study. Precipitation of calcite and trace amounts of ammonium zeolites was observed. A batch geochemical model was developed using Geochemists Workbench (GWB). Degassing effect in the experiments was corrected using the sliding fugacity model in GWB. Experimental and simulation results were compared and a reasonable agreement between the two was observed.

P. Smith; M. Deo; E. Eddings; A. Sarofim; K. Gueishen; M. Hradisky; K. Kelly; P. Mandalaparty; H. Zhang

2011-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

199

GeoChip 3.0 as a high-thoughput tool for analyzing microbial community composition, structure, and functional activity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 The design pipeline for GeoChip 3.0 construction. Thepipeline have been developed for sequence retrieval and verification, probe design and validation, array construction,

He, Z.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Rapid thermal processing by stamping  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rapid thermal processing device and methods are provided for thermal processing of samples such as semiconductor wafers. The device has components including a stamp (35) having a stamping surface and a heater or cooler (40) to bring it to a selected processing temperature, a sample holder (20) for holding a sample (10) in position for intimate contact with the stamping surface; and positioning components (25) for moving the stamping surface and the stamp (35) in and away from intimate, substantially non-pressured contact. Methods for using and making such devices are also provided. These devices and methods allow inexpensive, efficient, easily controllable thermal processing.

Stradins, Pauls; Wang, Qi

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

E-Print Network 3.0 - ablative thermal protection Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of fused silica Summary: is considered as "thermal" ablation because it is caused by the high temperature in the material. On the other... " ablation. Both thermal and non-thermal...

202

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Economic assessment of proposed electric-discharge non-thermal plasma field-pilot demonstration units for NO{sub x} removal in jet-engine exhaust: White paper for SERDP Project CP-1038  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project is currently evaluating non-thermal plasma (NTP) technologies for treating jet-engine exhaust arising from DoD test facilities. In the past, some economic analyses for NTP de-NO{sub x} have shown that it is not economical, compared to other techniques. The main reasons for this conclusion was that the previous analyses examined stand-alone, or less mature electrical-discharge reactors, or electron-beam based systems that incorporated both chemical additives and quite expensive electron accelerators. Also, in contrast to more recent developments, both the discharge and electron-beam techniques of the past did not extensively incorporate methods to increase the yields of active NO{sub x}-decomposing species. In an earlier White paper and a Project Report, the authors have analyzed the costs of more mature NTP systems incorporating chemical additives and new-concept NTP technologies for jet-engine emissions control and have shown lower exhaust-gas treatment costs for NTP systems compared to baseline standard de-NO{sub x} technologies like Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) combined with a wet scrubber or SCR combined with an electrostatic precipitator (ESP). In this paper, the authors will examine their most-promising candidate NTP reactor systems for a field-pilot demonstration on jet-engine exhaust and discuss the economic analyses for these hybrid units, which show that the economics of the proposed candidate systems are more favorable than earlier NTP reactor economic-assessment conclusions for NO{sub x} removal.

Rosocha, L.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chang, J.S.; Urashima, Kuniko; Kim, S.J. [McMaster Univ. (Canada); Miziolek, A.W. [Army Research Lab. (United States)

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

206

Thermally switchable dielectrics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Precursor polymers to conjugated polymers, such as poly(phenylene vinylene), poly(poly(thiophene vinylene), poly(aniline vinylene), and poly(pyrrole vinylene), can be used as thermally switchable capacitor dielectrics that fail at a specific temperature due to the non-conjugated precursor polymer irreversibly switching from an insulator to the conjugated polymer, which serves as a bleed resistor. The precursor polymer is a good dielectric until it reaches a specific temperature determined by the stability of the leaving groups. Conjugation of the polymer backbone at high temperature effectively disables the capacitor, providing a `built-in` safety mechanism for electronic devices.

Dirk, Shawn M.; Johnson, Ross S.

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

207

Practical Solar Thermal Chilled Water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the potential to impact America's use of non-renewable energy beyond its own design capacity by applying it to the optimization of an existing building's system. Solar-thermal chilling systems are not new. However, few of them can be described as a practical...

Leavell, B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Page 330 Courses: Geology (GEOL) Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog geoL 301 nAturAL HiStory of tHe HAWAiiAn iSLAndS (3)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 330 Courses: Geology (GEOL) Sonoma State University 2013-2014 Catalog geoL 301 nAturAL Hi isolated archipelago in the world; geologic history and context of volcanic oceanic islands; conservation in Natural Sciences). Prerequisite: BIOL 115 or 121/122. geoL 302 geoLogy of CLiMAte CHAnge (3) Lecture, 3

Ravikumar, B.

209

Thermally induced photon splitting  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate thermal corrections to the non-linear QED effective action for low-energy photon interactions in a background electromagnetic field. The high-temperature expansion shows that at $T \\gg m$ the vacuum contribution is exactly cancelled to all orders in the external field except for a non-trivial two-point function contribution. The high-temperature expansion derived reveals a remarkable cancellation of infrared sensitive contributions. As a result photon-splitting in the presence of a magnetic field is suppressed in the presence of an electron-positron QED-plasma at very high temperatures. In a cold and dense plasma a similar suppression takes place. At the same time Compton scattering dominates for weak fields and the suppression is rarely important in physical situations.

Per Elmfors; Bo-Sture Skagerstam

1998-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

210

Implementation of FracTracker.org: A GeoWeb platform to manage and communicate shale gas information  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Implementation of FracTracker.org: A GeoWeb platform to manage and communicate shale gas Health, GSPH. Background Natural gas drilling in shale formations worldwide employs relatively new drilling in the Marcellus Shale (See Figure 1.) of the northeastern United States necessitates better

Sibille, Etienne

211

Geo-neutrinos and silicate earth enrichment of U and Th Hawaii Pacific University, Kaneohe, Hawaii, USA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Frontiers Geo-neutrinos and silicate earth enrichment of U and Th S.T. Dye Hawaii Pacific of refractory lithophile elements, including U and Th, in the silicate earth by 1.5. Global removal of volatile elements potentially increases this enrichment to 2.8. The K content of the silicate earth follows from

Mcdonough, William F.

212

Geo-neutrino Observation S.T. Dye^'^ M. Alderman^, M. Batygov^ J.G. Learned^ S. Matsuno^  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-neutrino observation and describes the scientific capabilities of the deep ocean observatory, with emphasis on geology are in the decay series of uranium-238 and thorium-232. Terrestrial antineutrino observation relies on detecting comprehensive reviews of geo-neutrinos exist in the literature''^. Uranium-238 and thorium-232, the parent

Mcdonough, William F.

213

Global Environmental Change 14 (2004) 105123 Downscaling and geo-spatial gridding of socio-economic projections  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Environmental Change 14 (2004) 105­123 Downscaling and geo-spatial gridding of socio Broadway, New York, NY 10025, USA b Center for International Earth Science Information Network (CIESIN), 61 work. r 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Greenhouse gas emissions scenarios

214

A Global Volcano Product for Thermal Emission and Effusion Rate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for solar reflectance component #12;Hyperion Thermal Product: Basic ­Extract hot pixelsA Global Volcano Product for Thermal Emission and Effusion Rate: Hyperion of these have non-zero thermal signatures Geographical Distribution of Volcano Sensorweb Targets #12

Schaffer, Steven

215

Thermal conductivity of thermal-battery insulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal conductivities of a variety of insulating materials used in thermal batteries were measured in atmospheres of argon and helium using several techniques. (Helium was used to simulate the hydrogen atmosphere that results when a Li(Si)/FeS{sub 2} thermal battery ages.) The guarded-hot-plate method was used with the Min-K insulation because of its extremely low thermal conductivity. For comparison purposes, the thermal conductivity of the Min-K insulating board was also measured using the hot-probe method. The thermal-comparator method was used for the rigid Fiberfrax board and Fiberfrax paper. The thermal conductivity of the paper was measured under several levels of compression to simulate the conditions of the insulating wrap used on the stack in a thermal battery. The results of preliminary thermal-characterization tests with several silica aerogel materials are also presented.

Guidotti, R.A.; Moss, M.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production This...

217

Yngve Kristoffersen, University of Bergen, Allegaten 41, Bergen, 5007 Norway, yngve.kristoffersen@geo.uib.no Coen Hofstede, AWI, Bremerhaven, Germany  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.kristoffersen@geo.uib.no Coen Hofstede, AWI, Bremerhaven, Germany Olaf Eisen, AWI, Bremerhaven, Germany Lomonosov Canada Basin Coen Hofstede, AWI, Bremerhaven, Germany Olaf Eisen, AWI, Bremerhaven, Germany Richard Blenkner, Dept

Kristoffersen, Yngve

218

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Thermal unobtainiums? The perfect thermal conductor and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

contribute to thermal resistance · Isotopically pure diamond has highest thermal conductivity of any material materials: disordered layered crystals Conclude with some thoughts on promising, high-risk, research even in a computer model. #12;Thermal resistance is created by Umklapp scattering (U

Braun, Paul

220

Advanced Thermal Simulator Testing: Thermal Analysis and Test Results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Work at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center seeks to develop high fidelity, electrically heated thermal simulators that represent fuel elements in a nuclear reactor design to support non-nuclear testing applicable to the potential development of a space nuclear power or propulsion system. Comparison between the fuel pins and thermal simulators is made at the outer fuel clad surface, which corresponds to the outer sheath surface in the thermal simulator. The thermal simulators that are currently being tested correspond to a liquid metal cooled reactor design that could be applied for Lunar surface power. These simulators are designed to meet the geometric and power requirements of a proposed surface power reactor design, accommodate testing of various axial power profiles, and incorporate imbedded instrumentation. This paper reports the results of thermal simulator analysis and testing in a bare element configuration, which does not incorporate active heat removal, and testing in a water-cooled calorimeter designed to mimic the heat removal that would be experienced in a reactor core.

Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M.; Dickens, Ricky; Dixon, David; Reid, Robert; Adams, Mike; Davis, Joe [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Nuclear Systems Branch/ER24, MSFC, AL 35812 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Thermal Control & System Integration  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The thermal control and system integration activity focuses on issues such as the integration of motor and power control technologies and the development of advanced thermal control technologies....

222

EPR investigation of defects in Bi12GeO20:Cr single crystal irradiated by high energy uranium ions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The results of investigations of EPR spectra of chromium doped $Bi_{12} GeO_{20} (BGO)$ single crystals are presented. The crystals were studied before and after irradiation by the $^{235}U$ ions with energy 9.47 MeV/u and fluency $5 \\cdot 10^{2} cm^{-2}$. The effect of heating irradiated samples in air on the EPR spectra is also studied.

Stefaniuk, I; Rogalska, I; Wrbel, D

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Results for Custom Reaction Intensity and Total Dead Fuels.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report of the geostatistical analysis results of the fire fuels response variables, custom reaction intensity and total dead fuels is but a part of an SRS 2010 vegetation inventory project. For detailed description of project, theory and background including sample design, methods, and results please refer to USDA Forest Service Savannah River Site internal report SRS 2010 Vegetation Inventory GeoStatistical Mapping Report, (Edwards & Parresol 2013).

Edwards, Lloyd A. [Leading Solutions, LLC.; Paresol, Bernard [U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Pacific Northwest Research Station, Portland, OR.

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Thermal Management of Solar Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a better thermal conductance and when ceramic particles areor ceramic fillers that enhances thermal conductivity. Solid

Saadah, Mohammed Ahmed

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Entanglement from thermal black body radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Two non--interacting quantum systems which couple to a common environment with many degrees of freedom initially in thermal equilibrium can become entangled due to the indirect interaction mediated through this heat bath. I examine here the dynamics of reservoir induced entanglement for a heat bath consisting of a thermal electro--magnetic radiation field, such as black body radiation or the cosmic microwave background, and show how the effect can be understood as result of an effective induced interaction.

Daniel Braun

2005-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

226

A boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The precise guidance of heat from one specific location to another is paramount in many industrial and commercial applications, including thermal management and thermoelectric generation. One of the cardinal requirements is a preferential conduction of thermal energy, also known as thermal rectification, in the materials. This study introduces a novel nanomaterial for rectifying heatthe boron nitride nanotube peapod thermal rectifier. Classical non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations are performed on this nanomaterial, and interestingly, the strength of the rectification phenomenon is dissimilar at different operating temperatures. This is due to the contingence of the thermal flux on the conductance at the localized region around the scatterer, which varies with temperature. The rectification performance of the peapod rectifier is inherently dependent on its asymmetry. Last but not least, the favourable rectifying direction in the nanomaterial is established.

Loh, G. C., E-mail: jgloh@mtu.edu [Department of Physics, Michigan Technological University, Houghton, Michigan 49931 (United States); Institute of High Performance Computing, 1 Fusionopolis Way, #16-16 Connexis, Singapore 138632 (Singapore); Baillargeat, D. [CNRS-International-NTU-Thales Research Alliance (CINTRA), 50 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637553 (Singapore)

2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

227

The Hydrological Impact of Geoengineering in the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract: The hydrologic impact of enhancing Earths albedo due to solar radiation management (SRM) is investigated using simulations from 12 models contributing to the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP). An artificial experiment is investigated, where global mean temperature is preserved at pre-industrial conditions, while atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations are quadrupled. The associated reduction of downwelling surface solar radiation in a high CO2 environment leads to a reduction of global evaporation of 10% and 4% and precipitation of 6.1% and 6.3% over land and ocean, respectively. An initial reduction of latent heat flux at the surface is largely driven by reduced evapotranspiration over land with instantly increasing CO2 concentrations in both experiments. A warming surface associated with the transient adjustment in the 4xCO2 experiment further generates an increase of global precipitation, with considerable regional changes, such as a significant precipitation reduction of 7% for the North American summer monsoon. Reduced global precipitation persists in the geoengineered experiment where temperatures are stabilized, with considerable regional rainfall deficits. Precipitation reductions that are consistent in sign across models are identified in the geoengineered experiment over monsoonal land regions of East Asia (6%), North America (7%), South America (6%) and South Africa (5%). In contrast to the 4xCO2 experiment, where the frequency of months with heavy precipitation intensity is increased by over 50%, it is reduced by up to 20% in the geoengineering scenario . The reduction in heavy precipitation is more pronounced over land than over the ocean, and accompanies a stronger reduction in evaporation over land. For northern mid-latitudes, maximum precipitation reduction over land ranges from 1 to 16% for individual models. For 45-65N, the frequency of median to high intensity precipitation in summer is strongly reduced. These changes in precipitation in both total amount and frequency of extremes, point to a considerable weakening of the hydrological cycle in a geoengineered world.

Tilmes, S.; Fasullo, John; Lamarque, J.-F.; Marsh, D.; Mills, Mike; Alterskjaer, Kari; Muri, Helene O.; Kristjansson, Jon E.; Boucher, Olivier; Schulz, M.; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Jones, A.; Haywood, J.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Moore, John; Bou Karam, Diana; Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Rasch, Philip J.; Singh, Balwinder; Yoon, Jin-Ho; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Robock, Alan; Yang, Shuting; Watanabe, Shingo

2013-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

228

Holographic thermalization patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the behaviour of various correlators in N=4 super Yang Mills theory, taking finite coupling corrections into account. In the thermal limit we investigate the flow of the quasinormal modes as a function of the 't Hooft coupling. Then by using a specific model of holographic thermalization we investigate the deviation of the spectral densities from their thermal limit in an out-of-equilibrium situation. The main focus lies on the thermalization pattern with which the various plasma constituents of different energies approach their final thermal distribution as the coupling constant decreases from the infinite coupling limit. All results point towards the weakening of the usual top down thermalization pattern.

Stefan Stricker

2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

229

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-Es HEATS program, short for High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage, seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Insulation products promote thermal efficiency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The judicious use of thermal insulation products in non-residential buildings can provide a number of advantages including increased energy efficiency, lower first costs (by avoiding overside HVAC systems), improved fire safety and better acoustics. Thermal insulation products are those products which retard the flow of heat energy. Materials include glass, plastics, and organic materials such as wood fibers, vermiculite and perlite. Forms range from the familiar batts and blankets of glass fibers to foamed plastic, rigid boards, losse fill and systems combining two or more products, such as polystyrene boards covered with insulating plaster. The R values of selected insulation materials with a cost/sq. ft. of each material at R 10 are given. Costs cover both the material and installation and may vary depending on local conditions.

Chalmers, R.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Thermal contact resistance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This work deals with phenomena of thermal resistance for metallic surfaces in contact. The main concern of the work is to develop reliable and practical methods for prediction of the thermal contact resistance for various ...

Mikic, B. B.

1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Thermal Processes | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen Production Current Technology Thermal Processes Thermal Processes Some thermal processes use the energy in various resources, such as natural gas, coal, or biomass,...

233

Thermal Performance Benchmarking (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project will benchmark the thermal characteristics of automotive power electronics and electric motor thermal management systems. Recent vehicle systems will be benchmarked to establish baseline metrics, evaluate advantages and disadvantages of different thermal management systems, and identify areas of improvement to advance the state-of-the-art.

Moreno, G.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Thermal neutron detection system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

According to the present invention, a system for measuring a thermal neutron emission from a neutron source, has a reflector/moderator proximate the neutron source that reflects and moderates neutrons from the neutron source. The reflector/moderator further directs thermal neutrons toward an unmoderated thermal neutron detector.

Peurrung, Anthony J. (Richland, WA); Stromswold, David C. (West Richland, WA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Phase change thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal energy storge composition is disclosed. The composition comprises a non-chloride hydrate having a phase change transition temperature in the range of 70.degree.-95.degree. F. and a latent heat of transformation of at least about 35 calories/gram.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

STANDARD DATA FILES FOR COMPUTER THERMAL SIMULATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STANDARD DATA FILES FOR COMPUTER THERMAL SIMULATION OF SOLAR LOW ENERGY NON-RESIDENTIAL BUILDINGS has been collated into descriptions of standard buildings to provide starting points for designers); Weather File Analyses (6) Standard Model Building Descriptions 6 Testing of Model Buildings 7 Summary 7

Amor, Robert

237

Thermal comfort during surgery  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THERMAL COMFORT DURING SURGERY A Thesis by DAVID HAROLD MANNING Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject: Industrial... Engineering THERMAL COMFORT DURING SURGERY A Thesis by DAVID HAROLD MANNING Approved as to style and content by: airman of C it ee Head of Department Member Me er December 1978 ABSTRACT Thermal Comfort During Surgery (December 1978) David Harold...

Manning, David Harold

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing #12;0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4 and x-ray Ultraviolet Infrared Microwave and radio waves Wavelength in meters (m) Electromagnetic.77 700 red limit 30k0.041 2.48 green500 near-infrared far infrared ultraviolet Thermal Infrare refers

239

Non-Darcy flow in geothermal reservoirs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of non-Darcy flow laws are investigated for two geothermal reservoir types: multiphase and Hot Dry Rock (HDR). Long-term thermal behavior is emphasized as short-term pressure transient behavior is addressed in the oil field literature. Comparisons of Darcy and non-Darcy flow laws are made.

Zyvoloski, G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Riad, EPS Structures Innovations on Central Artery/Tunnel (CA/T) Project 2005 BSCES-GEO-INSTITUTE RECENT ADVANCES IN GEOTECHNICAL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Riad, EPS Structures Innovations on Central Artery/Tunnel (CA/T) Project 2005 BSCES-GEO-INSTITUTE RECENT ADVANCES IN GEOTECHNICAL ENGINEERING Seminar 1 EPS STRUCTURES INNOVATIONS ON CENTRAL ARTERY/TUNNEL (CA/T) PROJECT Hany L. Riad, Ph.D., P.E. (1) Abstract The use of Expanded Polystyrene (EPS) in block

Horvath, John S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A concept for marine shallow drilling Drill test from R/V Hkom Mosby in Nov. 1995 Commercial rig built by GeoDrilling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A concept for marine shallow drilling Drill test from R/V Håkom Mosby in Nov. 1995 Commercial rig built by GeoDrilling BACKGROUND There is a quantum leap between the costs of marine operations using conventional sediment coring devices with or without piston for 10-15 m of core recovery and drilling from

Kristoffersen, Yngve

242

Partially Crystalline Zn2GeO4 Nanorod/Graphene Composites as Anode Materials for High Performance Lithium Ion Batteries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-step hydrothermal processing. Crystalline and amorphous regions were found to coexist in a single Zn2GeO4 nanorod change during the charge and discharge processes. These advantageous attributes make ZGCs the potential expansion and eliminate the stress during the charge and discharge processes. Clearly, it remains

Lin, Zhiqun

243

Web tool for energy policy decision-making through geo-localized LCA models: A focus on offshore wind farms in Northern Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

accord- ing to different pilots dealing with fossil fuel, biomass, solar energy and wind energy, Ener generated by energy resources exploitations. This paper reports the outcomes of the EnerGEO wind pilot whose main objective is to support environ- mental policy regarding wind energy. As a renewable energy source

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

244

Methods and results of a search for gravitational waves associated with gamma-ray bursts using the GEO 600, LIGO, and Virgo detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we report on a search for short-duration gravitational wave bursts in the frequency range 64 Hz1792 Hz associated with gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), using data from GEO 600 and one of the LIGO or Virgo detectors. ...

Aggarwal, Nancy

245

Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

246

REACTOR GROUT THERMAL PROPERTIES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Savannah River Site has five dormant nuclear production reactors. Long term disposition will require filling some reactor buildings with grout up to ground level. Portland cement based grout will be used to fill the buildings with the exception of some reactor tanks. Some reactor tanks contain significant quantities of aluminum which could react with Portland cement based grout to form hydrogen. Hydrogen production is a safety concern and gas generation could also compromise the structural integrity of the grout pour. Therefore, it was necessary to develop a non-Portland cement grout to fill reactors that contain significant quantities of aluminum. Grouts generate heat when they set, so the potential exists for large temperature increases in a large pour, which could compromise the integrity of the pour. The primary purpose of the testing reported here was to measure heat of hydration, specific heat, thermal conductivity and density of various reactor grouts under consideration so that these properties could be used to model transient heat transfer for different pouring strategies. A secondary purpose was to make qualitative judgments of grout pourability and hardened strength. Some reactor grout formulations were unacceptable because they generated too much heat, or started setting too fast, or required too long to harden or were too weak. The formulation called 102H had the best combination of characteristics. It is a Calcium Alumino-Sulfate grout that contains Ciment Fondu (calcium aluminate cement), Plaster of Paris (calcium sulfate hemihydrate), sand, Class F fly ash, boric acid and small quantities of additives. This composition afforded about ten hours of working time. Heat release began at 12 hours and was complete by 24 hours. The adiabatic temperature rise was 54 C which was within specification. The final product was hard and displayed no visible segregation. The density and maximum particle size were within specification.

Steimke, J.; Qureshi, Z.; Restivo, M.; Guerrero, H.

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

247

NANO REVIEW Open Access Thermal conductivity and thermal boundary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NANO REVIEW Open Access Thermal conductivity and thermal boundary resistance of nanostructures and the thermal transport prop- erties is a key point to design materials with preferred thermal properties with the heat dissipation on them. The influence of the interfacial roughness on the thermal conductivity

Boyer, Edmond

248

IM-GEO: Impact of R and D on cost of geothermal power: Documentation of Model Version 2. 09  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IM-GEO is an analysis used to estimate the impact of technology improvements on the relative cost of hydrothermal power. The analysis is available in a tutorial program for use on personal computers. It is designed for use by R and D program managers to evaluate R and D options. Only the potential impact of technologies is considered with all economic factors being held constant. This analysis has one unique feature. The economic impact of reducing risk by improving reservoir characterization is included using a strategy currently employed by financial institutions. This report describes the basis of the calculations, documents the code, and describes the operational procedures. Application of the code to study potential cost reductions due to R and D success will be done by R and D managers to evaluate and direct their own programs.

Petty, S.; Entingh, D.; Livesay, B.J.

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Quantum thermal machines with single nonequilibrium environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a scheme for a quantum thermal machine made by atoms interacting with a single non-equilibrium electromagnetic field. The field is produced by a simple configuration of macroscopic objects held at thermal equilibrium at different temperatures. We show that these machines can deliver all thermodynamic tasks (cooling, heating and population inversion), and this by establishing quantum coherence with the body on which they act. Remarkably, this system allows to reach efficiencies at maximum power very close to the Carnot limit, much more than in existing models. Our findings offer a new paradigm for efficient quantum energy flux management, and can be relevant for both experimental and technological purposes.

Bruno Leggio; Bruno Bellomo; Mauro Antezza

2015-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

250

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for thermally protecting sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components such as electronics to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, G.A.; Elder, M.G.; Kemme, J.E.

1984-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mechanical Engineering & Thermal Group The Mechanical Engineering (ME) & Thermal Group at LASP has, and ground- based mechanical systems. Instrument Design Building on decades of design experience that has evolved with the complexity of instrument design demands, LASP mechanical engineers develop advanced

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

252

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus which thermally protects sensitive components in tools used in a geothermal borehole. The apparatus comprises a Dewar within a housing. The Dewar contains heat pipes such as brass heat pipes for thermally conducting heat from heat sensitive components to a heat sink such as ice.

Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Elder, Michael G. (Los Alamos, NM); Kemme, Joseph E. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Solar thermal aircraft  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solar thermal powered aircraft powered by heat energy from the sun. A heat engine, such as a Stirling engine, is carried by the aircraft body for producing power for a propulsion mechanism, such as a propeller. The heat engine has a thermal battery in thermal contact with it so that heat is supplied from the thermal battery. A solar concentrator, such as reflective parabolic trough, is movably connected to an optically transparent section of the aircraft body for receiving and concentrating solar energy from within the aircraft. Concentrated solar energy is collected by a heat collection and transport conduit, and heat transported to the thermal battery. A solar tracker includes a heliostat for determining optimal alignment with the sun, and a drive motor actuating the solar concentrator into optimal alignment with the sun based on a determination by the heliostat.

Bennett, Charles L. (Livermore, CA)

2007-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

254

Tunable thermal link  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a device whereby the thermal conductance of a multiwalled nanostructure such as a multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) can be controllably and reversibly tuned by sliding one or more outer shells with respect to the inner core. As one example, the thermal conductance of an MWCNT dropped to 15% of the original value after extending the length of the MWCNT by 190 nm. The thermal conductivity returned when the tube was contracted. The device may comprise numbers of multiwalled nanotubes or other graphitic layers connected to a heat source and a heat drain and various means for tuning the overall thermal conductance for applications in structure heat management, heat flow in nanoscale or microscale devices and thermal logic devices.

Chang, Chih-Wei; Majumdar, Arunava; Zettl, Alexander K.

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Thermal Recovery Methods  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal Recovery Methods describes the basic concepts of thermal recovery and explains the injection patterns used to exploit reservoir conditions. Basic reservoir engineering is reviewed with an emphasis on changes in flow characteristics caused by temperature. The authors discuss an energy balance for steam and combustion drive, and they explain in situ reactions. Heat loss, combustion drive, and steam displacement also are examined in detail, as well as cyclic steam injection, downhole ignition, well heating, and low-temperature oxidation. Contents: Thermal processes; Formation and reservoir evaluations; Well patterns and spacing; Flow and process equations; Laboratory simulation of thermal recovery; Heat loss and transmission; Displacement and production; Equipment; Basic data for field selection; Laboratory evaluation of combustion characteristics; Thermal properties of reservoirs and fluids.

White, P.D.; Moss, J.T.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Thermal treatment wall  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal treatment wall emplaced to perform in-situ destruction of contaminants in groundwater. Thermal destruction of specific contaminants occurs by hydrous pyrolysis/oxidation at temperatures achievable by existing thermal remediation techniques (electrical heating or steam injection) in the presence of oxygen or soil mineral oxidants, such as MnO.sub.2. The thermal treatment wall can be installed in a variety of configurations depending on the specific objectives, and can be used for groundwater cleanup, wherein in-situ destruction of contaminants is carried out rather than extracting contaminated fluids to the surface, where they are to be cleaned. In addition, the thermal treatment wall can be used for both plume interdiction and near-wellhead in-situ groundwater treatment. Thus, this technique can be utilized for a variety of groundwater contamination problems.

Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Knauss, Kevin G. (Livermore, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Microsecond switchable thermal antenna  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a thermal antenna that can be actively switched on and off at the microsecond scale by means of a phase transition of a metal-insulator material, the vanadium dioxide (VO{sub 2}). This thermal source is made of a periodically patterned tunable VO{sub 2} nanolayer, which support a surface phonon-polariton in the infrared range in their crystalline phase. Using electrodes properly registered with respect to the pattern, the VO{sub 2} phase transition can be locally triggered by ohmic heating so that the surface phonon-polariton can be diffracted by the induced grating, producing a highly directional thermal emission. Conversely, when heating less, the VO{sub 2} layers cool down below the transition temperature, the surface phonon-polariton cannot be diffracted anymore so that thermal emission is inhibited. This switchable antenna could find broad applications in the domain of active thermal coatings or in those of infrared spectroscopy and sensing.

Ben-Abdallah, Philippe, E-mail: pba@institutoptique.fr; Benisty, Henri; Besbes, Mondher [Laboratoire Charles Fabry, UMR 8501, Institut d'Optique, CNRS, Universit Paris-Sud 11, 2, Avenue Augustin Fresnel, 91127 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

258

Method of operating a thermal engine powered by a chemical reaction  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention involves a novel method of increasing the efficiency of a thermal engine. Heat is generated by a non-linear chemical reaction of reactants, said heat being transferred to a thermal engine such as Rankine cycle power plant. The novel method includes externally perturbing one or more of the thermodynamic variables of said non-linear chemical reaction. 7 figs.

Ross, J.; Escher, C.

1988-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

259

High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production Award Number: DE-EE00025828 Report Date: March 15, 2013 PI: Stephen Obrey * Technical approach is focused on...

260

Bernstein instability driven by thermal ring distribution  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The classic Bernstein waves may be intimately related to banded emissions detected in laboratory plasmas, terrestrial, and other planetary magnetospheres. However, the customary discussion of the Bernstein wave is based upon isotropic thermal velocity distribution function. In order to understand how such waves can be excited, one needs an emission mechanism, i.e., an instability. In non-relativistic collision-less plasmas, the only known Bernstein wave instability is that associated with a cold perpendicular velocity ring distribution function. However, cold ring distribution is highly idealized. The present Brief Communication generalizes the cold ring distribution model to include thermal spread, so that the Bernstein-ring instability is described by a more realistic electron distribution function, with which the stabilization by thermal spread associated with the ring distribution is demonstrated. The present findings imply that the excitation of Bernstein waves requires a sufficiently high perpendicular velocity gradient associated with the electron distribution function.

Yoon, Peter H., E-mail: yoonp@umd.edu [Institute for Physical Science and Technology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States); School of Space Research, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-Si, Gyeonggi-Do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Hadi, Fazal; Qamar, Anisa [Institute of Physics and Electronics, University of Peshawar, Peshawar 25000 (Pakistan)

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Multilayer thermal barrier coating systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention generally describes multilayer thermal barrier coating systems and methods of making the multilayer thermal barrier coating systems. The thermal barrier coating systems comprise a first ceramic layer, a second ceramic layer, a thermally grown oxide layer, a metallic bond coating layer and a substrate. The thermal barrier coating systems have improved high temperature thermal and chemical stability for use in gas turbine applications.

Vance, Steven J. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Sloan, Kelly M. (Longwood, FL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Solar Thermal Conversion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal conversion process of solar energy is based on well-known phenomena of heat transfer (Kreith 1976). In all thermal conversion processes, solar radiation is absorbed at the surface of a receiver, which contains or is in contact with flow passages through which a working fluid passes. As the receiver heats up, heat is transferred to the working fluid which may be air, water, oil, or a molten salt. The upper temperature that can be achieved in solar thermal conversion depends on the insolation, the degree to which the sunlight is concentrated, and the measures taken to reduce heat losses from the working fluid.

Kreith, F.; Meyer, R. T.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Thermal insulations using vacuum panels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thermal insulation vacuum panels are formed of an inner core of compressed low thermal conductivity powders enclosed by a ceramic/glass envelope evaluated to a low pressure.

Glicksman, Leon R. (Lynnfield, MA); Burke, Melissa S. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

264

Non-planar chemical preconcentrator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A non-planar chemical preconcentrator comprises a high-surface area, low mass, three-dimensional, flow-through sorption support structure that can be coated or packed with a sorptive material. The sorptive material can collect and concentrate a chemical analyte from a fluid stream and rapidly release it as a very narrow temporal plug for improved separations in a microanalytical system. The non-planar chemical preconcentrator retains most of the thermal and fabrication benefits of a planar preconcentrator, but has improved ruggedness and uptake, while reducing sorptive coating concerns and extending the range of collectible analytes.

Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Sokolowski, Sara S. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

265

Manipulation of Thermal Phonons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to manipulate the behavior of phonons is crucial for both energy applications and the cooling of integrated circuits. A novel class of artificially periodic structured materials phononic crystals might make manipulation of thermal phonons possible. In many...

Hsu, Chung-Hao

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

266

Thermally Polymerized Rylene Nanoparticles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rylene dyes functionalized with varying numbers of phenyl trifluorovinyl ether (TFVE) moieties were subjected to a thermal emulsion polymerization to yield shape-persistent, water-soluble chromophore nanoparticles. Perylene ...

Andrew, Trisha Lionel

267

Thermal Insulation Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal insulation systems are receiving a high degree of attention in view of increasing energy cost. Industrial, commercial and residential energy users are all well aware of energy cost increases and great emphasis is being directed to energy...

Stanley, T. F.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Thermally driven circulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several problems connected by the theme of thermal forcing are addressed herein. The main topic is the stratification and flow field resulting from imposing a specified heat flux on a fluid that is otherwise confined to a ...

Nelken, Haim

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Contact thermal lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contact thermal lithography is a method for fabricating microscale patterns using heat transfer. In contrast to photolithography, where the minimum achievable feature size is proportional to the wavelength of light used ...

Schmidt, Aaron Jerome, 1979-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Photovoltaic-thermal collectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A photovoltaic-thermal solar cell including a semiconductor body having antireflective top and bottom surfaces and coated on each said surface with a patterned electrode covering less than 10% of the surface area. A thermal-absorbing surface is spaced apart from the bottom surface of the semiconductor and a heat-exchange fluid is passed between the bottom surface and the heat-absorbing surface.

Cox, III, Charles H. (Carlisle, MA)

1984-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

271

Mayne, P.W., Coop, M.R., Springman, S., Huang, A-B., and Zornberg, J. (2009). State-of-the-Art Paper (SOA-1): GeoMaterial Behavior and Testing. Proc. 17th Intl. Conf. Soil Mechanics & Geotechnical  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mayne, P.W., Coop, M.R., Springman, S., Huang, A-B., and Zornberg, J. (2009). State-of-the-Art Paper (SOA-1): GeoMaterial Behavior and Testing. Proc. 17th Intl. Conf. Soil Mechanics & Geotechnical

Mayne, Paul W.

272

Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic modelling for thermal micro-actuators using thermal networks Beatriz L´opez-Wallea,1 and analytical calculations. Key words: Micro-actuators, Thermal modelling, Electrical analogy, Thermal network 1 and MicroMechatronic Systems Department (AS2M), 24 rue Alain Savary, 25000 Besan¸con, France Abstract

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

273

THE ALL-SKY GEOS RR Lyr SURVEY WITH THE TAROT TELESCOPES: ANALYSIS OF THE BLAZHKO EFFECT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We used the GEOS database to study the Blazhko effect of galactic RRab stars. The database is continuously enriched by maxima supplied by amateur astronomers and by a dedicated survey by means of the two TAROT robotic telescopes. The same value of the Blazhko period is observed at different values of the pulsation periods and different values of the Blazhko periods are observed at the same value of the pulsation period. There are clues suggesting that the Blazhko effect is changing from one cycle to the next. The secular changes in the pulsation and Blazhko periods of Z CVn are anticorrelated. The diagrams of magnitudes against phases of the maxima clearly show that the light curves of Blazhko variables can be explained as modulated signals, both in amplitude and in frequency. The closed curves describing the Blazhko cycles in such diagrams have different shapes, reflecting the phase shifts between the epochs of the brightest maximum and the maximum O - C. Our sample shows that both clockwise and counterclockwise directions are possible for similar shapes. The improved observational knowledge of the Blazhko effect, in addition to some peculiarities of the light curves, has yet to be explained by a satisfactory physical mechanism.

Le Borgne, J.-F.; Klotz, A.; Poretti, E. [Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, 31400 Toulouse (France); Boeer, M. [ARTEMIS, Universite Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Nice (France); Butterworth, N.; Dvorak, S. [American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO), 49 Bay State Rd., Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dumont, M.; Hambsch, F.-J.; Vandenbroere, J. [Groupe Europeen d'Observations Stellaires (GEOS), 23 Parc de Levesville, 28300 Bailleau l'Eveque (France); Hund, F. [Bundesdeutsche Arbeitsgemeinschaft fuer Veraenderliche Sterne e.V. (BAV), Munsterdamm 90, 12169 Berlin (Germany); Kugel, F. [Observatoire Chante-Perdrix, 04150 Banon (France); Vilalta, J. M. [Agrupacio Astronomica de Sabadell (AAS), Apartat de Correus, 50, 08200 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

274

GeoChip-based analysis of functional microbial communities during the reoxidation of a bioreduced uranium-contaminated aquifer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A pilot-scale system was established for in situ biostimulation of U(VI) reduction by ethanol addition at the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Field Research Center (Oak Ridge, TN). After achieving U(VI) reduction, stability of the bioreduced U(IV) was evaluated under conditions of (i) resting (no ethanol injection), (ii) reoxidation by introducing dissolved oxygen (DO), and (iii) reinjection of ethanol. GeoChip, a functional gene array with probes for N, S and C cycling, metal resistance and contaminant degradation genes, was used for monitoring groundwater microbial communities. High diversity of all major functional groups was observed during all experimental phases. The microbial community was extremely responsive to ethanol, showing a substantial change in community structure with increased gene number and diversity after ethanol injections resumed. While gene numbers showed considerable variations, the relative abundance (i.e. percentage of each gene category) of most gene groups changed little. During the reoxidation period, U(VI) increased, suggesting reoxidation of reduced U(IV). However, when introduction of DO was stopped, U(VI) reduction resumed and returned to pre-reoxidation levels. These findings suggest that the community in this system can be stimulated and that the ability to reduce U(VI) can be maintained by the addition of electron donors. This biostimulation approach may potentially offer an effective means for the bioremediation of U(VI)-contaminated sites.

Van Nostrand, Joy [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Wu, Weimin [ORNL; Wu, Liyou [University of Oklahoma, Norman; Deng, Ye [University of Oklahoma; Carley, Jack M [ORNL; Carroll, Sue L [ORNL; He, Zhili [University of Oklahoma; Gu, Baohua [ORNL; Luo, Jian [ORNL; Criddle, Craig [ORNL; Watson, David B [ORNL; Jardine, Philip M [ORNL; Marsh, Terence [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Tiedje, James [Michigan State University, East Lansing; Hazen, T. C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Zhou, Jizhong [University of Oklahoma, Norman

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Article for thermal energy storage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

276

Non-thermal plasma based technologies for the aftertreatment...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DPF Dielectric barrier discharge Copyright Accentus 2003 Improved Filtration Pellets 50-60% filtration Cordierite Monoliths Ceramic Fibres and Foams Meshes & Sintered...

277

High resolution non-contact thermal characterization of semiconductor devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

imaging can have spatial resolution better than the diffraction limit of an infrared camera and can work infrared microscopes. Also, since the thermoreflectance technique does not rely upon the emitted black body measured the heating on a 35x35 micron MOS transistor, and Mansanares5 who measured temperature

278

Thermal trim for luminaire  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A luminaire with a thermal pathway to reduce the junction temperature of the luminaire's light source, and methods for so doing, are disclosed. The luminaire includes a can, a light engine, and a trim, that define a substantially continuous thermal pathway from the light engine to a surrounding environment. The can defines a can cavity and includes a can end region. The light engine is within the can cavity and includes a light source and a heat sink, including a heat sink end region, coupled thereto. The trim is at least partially disposed within the can cavity and includes a first trim end region coupled to the heat sink end region and a second trim end region coupled to the can end region. Thermal interface material may be located between: the heat sink and the trim, the trim and the can, and/or the heat sink and the light source.

Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel; Harrison, Robert; Jeswani, Anil

2013-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

279

Thermal test options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shipping containers for radioactive materials must be qualified to meet a thermal accident environment specified in regulations, such at Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 71. Aimed primarily at the shipping container design, this report discusses the thermal testing options available for meeting the regulatory requirements, and states the advantages and disadvantages of each approach. The principal options considered are testing with radiant heat, furnaces, and open pool fires. The report also identifies some of the facilities available and current contacts. Finally, the report makes some recommendations on the appropriate use of these different testing methods.

Koski, J.A.; Keltner, N.R.; Sobolik, K.B.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Scattering Solar Thermal Concentrators  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

"This fact sheet describes a scattering solar thermal concentrators project awarded under the DOE's 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D award program. The team, led by the Pennsylvania State University, is working to demonstrate a new, scattering-based approach to concentrating sunlight that aims to improve the overall performance and reliability of the collector field. The research team aims to show that scattering solar thermal collectors are capable of achieving optical performance equal to state-of-the-art parabolic trough systems, but with the added benefits of immunity to wind-load tracking error, more efficient land use, and utilization of stationary receivers."

282

Systems analysis of thermal storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During FY 1981, analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include estimates of both the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, an in-depth study evaluated thermal storage concepts for water/steam, organic fluid, and gas/Brayton solar thermal receivers. Promising and nonpromising concepts were identified. A study to evaluate thermal storage concepts for a liquid metal receiver was initiated. The value of thermal storage in a solar thermal industrial process heat application was analyzed. Several advanced concepts are being studied, including ground-mounted thermal storage for parabolic dishes with Stirling engines.

Copeland, R.J.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Low thermal distortion extreme-UV lithography reticle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thermal distortion of reticles or masks can be significantly reduced by emissivity engineering, i.e., the selective placement or omission of coatings on the reticle. Reflective reticles so fabricated exhibit enhanced heat transfer thereby reducing the level of thermal distortion and ultimately improving the quality of the transcription of the reticle pattern onto the wafer. Reflective reticles include a substrate having an active region that defines the mask pattern and non-active region(s) that are characterized by a surface that has a higher emissivity than that of the active region. The non-active regions are not coated with the radiation reflective material.

Gianoulakis, Steven E. (Albuquerque, NM); Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Low thermal distortion extreme-UV lithography reticle  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thermal distortion of reticles or masks can be significantly reduced by emissivity engineering, i.e., the selective placement or omission of coatings on the reticle. Reflective reticles so fabricated exhibit enhanced heat transfer thereby reducing the level of thermal distortion and ultimately improving the quality of the transcription of the reticle pattern onto the wafer. Reflective reticles include a substrate having an active region that defines the mask pattern and non-active region(s) that are characterized by a surface that has a higher emissivity than that of the active region. The non-active regions are not coated with the radiation reflective material.

Gianoulakis, Steven E. (Albuquerque, NM); Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Low thermal distortion Extreme-UV lithography reticle and method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Thermal distortion of reticles or masks can be significantly reduced by emissivity engineering, i.e., the selective placement or omission of coatings on the reticle. Reflective reticles so fabricated exhibit enhanced heat transfer thereby reducing the level of thermal distortion and ultimately improving the quality of the transcription of the reticle pattern onto the wafer. Reflective reticles include a substrate having an active region that defines the mask pattern and non-active region(s) that are characterized by a surface that has a higher emissivity than that of the active region. The non-active regions are not coated with the radiation reflective material.

Gianoulakis, Steven E. (Albuquerque, NM); Ray-Chaudhuri, Avijit K. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Thermoelectric efficiency of three-terminal quantum thermal machines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The efficiency of a thermal engine working in linear response regime in a multi-terminals configuration is discussed. For the generic three-terminal case, we provide a general definition of local and non-local transport coefficients: electrical and thermal conductances, and thermoelectric powers. Within the Onsager formalism, we derive analytical expressions for the efficiency at maximum power, which can be written in terms of generalized figures of merit. Also, using two examples, we investigate numerically how a third terminal could improve the performance of a quantum system, and under which conditions non-local thermoelectric effects can be observed.

Francesco Mazza; Riccardo Bosisio; Giuliano Benenti; Vittorio Giovannetti; Rosario Fazio; Fabio Taddei

2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

287

Thermal Reactor Safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning fire risk and protection; transient thermal-hydraulic analysis and experiments; class 9 accidents and containment; diagnostics and in-service inspection; risk and cost comparison of alternative electric energy sources; fuel behavior and experiments on core cooling in LOCAs; reactor event reporting analysis; equipment qualification; post facts analysis of the TMI-2 accident; and computational methods.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Thermal management of nanoelectronics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-state thermoelectric on- spot cooling, requiring efficient thermoelectric materials that can be integrated with the IC are further complicated by the fact that the material's ability to conduct heat deteriorates when at the packaging level but also at the nanoscale materials and device levels. THERMAL CHALLENGES AT NANOSCALE One

289

Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to us, like reflective ("nearreflective ("near--" infrared (0.7" infrared (0.7 -- 3.03.0 m)m) andand near-infrared far infrared ultraviolet Thermal Infrared refers to region o EM spectrum from ~3 - 14 m.landscape. IMPORTANT: NEARIMPORTANT: NEAR--INFRARED is short enough wavelength toINFRARED is short enough wavelength

290

Low thermal conductivity skutterudites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent experimental results on semiconductors with the skutterudite crystal structure show that these materials possess attractive transport properties and have a good potential for achieving ZT values substantially larger than for state-of-the-art thermoelectric materials. Both n-type and p-type conductivity samples have been obtained, using several preparation techniques. Associated with a low hole effective mass, very high carrier mobilities, low electrical resistivities and moderate Seebeck coefficients are obtained in p-type skutterudites. For a comparable doping level, the carrier mobilities of n-type samples are about an order of magnitude lower than the values achieved on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients on p-type samples. However, the much larger electron effective masses and Seebeck coefficients make n-type skutterudite promising candidates as well. Unfortunately, the thermal conductivities of the binary skutterudites compounds are too large, particularly at low temperatures, to be useful for thermoelectric applications. Several approaches to the reduction of the lattice thermal conductivity in skutterudites are being pursued: heavy doping, formation of solid solutions and alloys, study of novel ternary and filled skutterudite compounds. All those approaches have already resulted in skutterudite compositions with substantially lower thermal conductivity values in these materials. Recently, superior thermoelectric properties in the moderate to high temperature range were achieved for compositions combining alloying and filling of the skutterudite structure. Experimental results and mechanisms responsible for low thermal conductivity in skutterudites are discussed.

Fleurial, J.P.; Caillat, T.; Borshchevsky, A.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Thermal barrier coating  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal barrier coating for hot gas path components of a combustion turbine based on a zirconia-scandia system. A layer of zirconium scandate having the hexagonal Zr.sub.3 Sc.sub.4 O.sub.12 structure is formed directly on a superalloy substrate or on a bond coat formed on the substrate.

Bowker, Jeffrey Charles (Gibsonia, PA); Sabol, Stephen M. (Orlando, FL); Goedjen, John G. (Oviedo, FL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

3 Q1 High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production - FY13 Q1 This document summarizes the progress of this Los Alamos National Laboratory...

293

Preliminary requirements for thermal storage subsystems in solar thermal applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methodologies for the analysis of value and comparing thermal storage concepts are presented. Value is a measure of worth and is determined by the cost of conventional fuel systems. Value data for thermal storage in large solar thermal electric power applications are presented. Thermal storage concepts must be compared when all are performing the same mission. A method for doing that analysis, called the ranking index, is derived. Necessary data to use the methodology are included.

Copeland, R.J.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Thermal quantum electrodynamics of nonrelativistic charged fluids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The theory relevant to the study of matter in equilibrium with the radiation field is thermal quantum electrodynamics (TQED). We present a formulation of the theory, suitable for non relativistic fluids, based on a joint functional integral representation of matter and field variables. In this formalism cluster expansion techniques of classical statistical mechanics become operative. They provide an alternative to the usual Feynman diagrammatics in many-body problems which is not perturbative with respect to the coupling constant. As an application we show that the effective Coulomb interaction between quantum charges is partially screened by thermalized photons at large distances. More precisely one observes an exact cancellation of the dipolar electric part of the interaction, so that the asymptotic particle density correlation is now determined by relativistic effects. It has still the $r^{-6}$ decay typical for quantum charges, but with an amplitude strongly reduced by a relativistic factor.

Pascal R. Buenzli; Philippe A. Martin; Marc D. Ryser

2007-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

295

Thermal dilepton rates from quenched lattice QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present new lattice results on the continuum extrapolation of the vector current correlation function. Lattice calculations have been carried out in the deconfined phase at a temperature of 1.1 Tc, extending our previous results at 1.45 Tc, utilizing quenched non-perturbatively clover-improved Wilson fermions and light quark masses. A systematic analysis on multiple lattice spacings allows to perform the continuum limit of the correlation function and to extract spectral properties in the continuum limit. Our current analysis suggests the results for the electrical conductivity are proportional to the temperature and the thermal dilepton rates in the quark gluon plasma are comparable for both temperatures. Preliminary results of the continuum extrapolated correlation function at finite momenta, which relates to thermal photon rates, are also presented.

H. -T. Ding; A. Francis; O. Kaczmarek; F. Karsch; E. Laermann; S. Mukherjee; M. Mller; W. Soeldner

2013-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Thermal and Non-thermal Physiochemical Processes in Nanoscale Films of  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism in Layered NbS2 andThe1 MembersStability of MnBi Magneticand

297

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withconcept of thermal energy storage in aquifers was suggestedLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak Ridge

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

300

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftin Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology haveThe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 2rogrammatic

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Liquid metal thermal electric converter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A liquid metal thermal electric converter which converts heat energy to electrical energy. The design of the liquid metal thermal electric converter incorporates a unique configuration which directs the metal fluid pressure to the outside of the tube which results in the structural loads in the tube to be compressive. A liquid metal thermal electric converter refluxing boiler with series connection of tubes and a multiple cell liquid metal thermal electric converter are also provided.

Abbin, Joseph P. (Albuquerque, NM); Andraka, Charles E. (Albuquerque, NM); Lukens, Laurance L. (Albuquerque, NM); Moreno, James B. (Albuquerque, NM)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Cavitation and thermal photon production in relativistic heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the thermal photon production-rates using one dimensional boost-invariant second order relativistic hydrodynamics to find proper time evolution of the energy density and the temperature. The effect of bulk-viscosity and non-ideal equation of state are taken into account in a manner consistent with recent lattice QCD estimates. It is shown that the \\textit{non-ideal} gas equation of state i.e $\\epsilon-3 P \

Jitesh R. Bhatt; Hiranmaya Mishra; V. Sreekanth

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

304

Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Low Conductivity Thermal Barrier Coatings A Dissertation Presented to The Faculty of the School conductivity of the coatings. The minimum thermal conductivity occurs at a low rotation rate and is 0.8 W intrinsic thermal conductivity, good phase stability and greater resistance to sintering and CMAS attack

Wadley, Haydn

305

Thermal Stabilization Blend Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Blend Plan documents the feed material items that are stored in 2736-2 vaults, the 2736-ZB 638 cage, the 192C vault, and the 225 vault that will be processed through the thermal stabilization furnaces. The purpose of thermal stabilization is to heat the material to 1000 degrees Celsius to drive off all water and leave the plutonium and/or uranium as oxides. The stabilized material will be sampled to determine the Loss On Ignition (LOI) or percent water. The stabilized material must meet water content or LOI of less than 0.5% to be acceptable for storage under DOE-STD-3013-99 specifications. Out of specification material will be recycled through the furnaces until the water or LOI limits are met.

RISENMAY, H.R.

2000-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

306

Thermal synthesis apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for thermal conversion of one or more reactants to desired end products includes an insulated reactor chamber having a high temperature heater such as a plasma torch at its inlet end and, optionally, a restrictive convergent-divergent nozzle at its outlet end. In a thermal conversion method, reactants are injected upstream from the reactor chamber and thoroughly mixed with the plasma stream before entering the reactor chamber. The reactor chamber has a reaction zone that is maintained at a substantially uniform temperature. The resulting heated gaseous stream is then rapidly cooled by passage through the nozzle, which "freezes" the desired end product(s) in the heated equilibrium reaction stage, or is discharged through an outlet pipe without the convergent-divergent nozzle. The desired end products are then separated from the gaseous stream.

Fincke, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Detering, Brent A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

307

Thermal reactor safety  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Information is presented concerning new trends in licensing; seismic considerations and system structural behavior; TMI-2 risk assessment and thermal hydraulics; statistical assessment of potential accidents and verification of computational methods; issues with respect to improved safety; human factors in nuclear power plant operation; diagnostics and activities in support of recovery; LOCA transient analysis; unresolved safety issues and other safety considerations; and fission product transport.

Not Available

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Cermet fuel thermal conductivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CERMET FUEL THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY A Thesis by JOHN MARK ALVIS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&. M University in partial fulfilment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1988 Major Subject: Nuclear... particles of low conductivity dispersed in a metal matrix of high conductivity. A computer code was developed in order to compute the conductivity of cermet fuels as predicted by existing models and an additional model derived in this work...

Alvis, John Mark

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Thermally actuated thermionic switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermally actuated thermionic switch which responds to an increase of temperature by changing from a high impedance to a low impedance at a predictable temperature set point. The switch has a bistable operation mode switching only on temperature increases. The thermionic material may be a metal which is liquid at the desired operation temperature and held in matrix in a graphite block reservoir, and which changes state (ionizes, for example) so as to be electrically conductive at a desired temperature.

Barrus, D.M.; Shires, C.D.

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

310

Methods of forming thermal management systems and thermal management methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

311

Multiscale thermal transport.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A concurrent computational and experimental investigation of thermal transport is performed with the goal of improving understanding of, and predictive capability for, thermal transport in microdevices. The computational component involves Monte Carlo simulation of phonon transport. In these simulations, all acoustic modes are included and their properties are drawn from a realistic dispersion relation. Phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering events are treated independently. A new set of phonon-phonon scattering coefficients are proposed that reflect the elimination of assumptions present in earlier analytical work from the simulation. The experimental component involves steady-state measurement of thermal conductivity on silicon films as thin as 340nm at a range of temperatures. Agreement between the experiment and simulation on single-crystal silicon thin films is excellent, Agreement for polycrystalline films is promising, but significant work remains to be done before predictions can be made confidently. Knowledge gained from these efforts was used to construct improved semiclassical models with the goal of representing microscale effects in existing macroscale codes in a computationally efficient manner.

Graham, Samuel Jr. (; .); Wong, C. C.; Piekos, Edward Stanley

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Thermal Effects Induced by Laser Irradiation of Solids  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A part of incident energy is absorbed within the irradiated sample when a solid is exposed to the influence of laser radiation, to more general electromagnetic radiation within the wide range of wavelengths (from microwaves, to infrared radiation to X-rays), or to the energy of particle beams (electronic, protonic, or ionic). The absorption process signifies a highly selective excitation of the electronic state of atoms or molecules, followed by thermal and non-thermal de-excitation processes. Non-radiation de-excitation-relaxation processes induce direct sample heating. In addition, a great number of non-thermal processes (e.g., photoluminescence, photochemistry, photovoltage) may also induce heat generation as a secondary process. This method of producing heat is called the photothermal effect.The photothermal effect and subsequent propagation of thermal waves on the surface and in the volume of the solid absorbing the exciting beam may produce the following: variations in the temperature on the surfaces of the sample; deformation and displacement of surfaces; secondary infrared radiation (photothermal radiation); the formation of the gradient of the refractivity index; changes in coefficients of reflection and absorbtion; the generation of sound (photoacoustic generation), etc. These phenomena may be used in the investigation and measurement of various material properties since the profile and magnitude of the generated signal depend upon the nature of material absorbing radiation. A series of non-destructive spectroscopic, microscopic and defectoscopic detecting techniques, called photothermal methods, is developed on the basis of the above-mentioned phenomena.This paper outlines the interaction between the intensity modulated laser beam and solids, and presents a mathematical model of generated thermal sources. Generalized models for a photothermal response of optically excited materials have been obtained, including thermal memory influence on the propagation of thermal perturbation. Focus is on optically opaque media. The derived models are compared to existing models neglecting the thermal memory effect. In this way it has been possible to determine the range of value of existing models and to indicate the additional employment of photothermal methods in determining through experimentation the thermal memory properties of solids. These properties have not as yet been experimentally determined in any medium, nor has the methodology for the experimental measurement of thermal memory parameters been suggested in the literature. Their recognition is highly significant not only for further fundamental research, but for many modern applications as well.

Galovic, S. [Vinca Institute of Nuclear Sciences, P. O. Box 522, 11001 Belgrade, Serbia (Serbia and Montenegro)

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Solar Thermal Incentive Program  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA) offers incentives for the installation of solar water heating systems to residential and non-residential customers of the...

314

Thermal control structure and garment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A flexible thermally conductive structure. The structure generally includes a plurality of thermally conductive yarns, at least some of which are at least partially disposed adjacent to an elastomeric material. Typically, at least a portion of the plurality of thermally conductive yarns is configured as a sheet. The yarns may be constructed from graphite, metal, or similar materials. The elastomeric material may be formed from urethane or silicone foam that is at least partially collapsed, or from a similar material. A thermal management garment is provided, the garment incorporating a flexible thermally conductive structure.

Klett, James W. (Knoxville, TN); Cameron, Christopher Stan (Sanford, NC)

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

315

Thermal fluctuations of free standing graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We use non-perturbative renormalization group techniques to calculate the momentum dependence of thermal fluctuations of graphene, based on a self-consistent calculation of the momentum dependent elastic constants of a tethered membrane. We find a sharp crossover from the perturbative to the anomalous regime, in excellent agreement with Monte Carlo results for graphene, and give an accurate value for the crossover scale. Our work strongly supports the notion that graphene is well described as a tethered membrane. Ripples emerge naturally from our analysis.

F. L. Braghin; N. Hasselmann

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

316

Thermal and Optical Characterization of Photonic Integrated Circuits by Thermoreflectance Microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report high resolution, non-invasive, thermal and optical characterization of semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) and SOA-based photonic integrated circuits (PICs) using thermoreflectance microscopy. Chip-scale ...

Hudgings, Janice A.

317

Cyanophycin Mediates the Accumulation and Storage of Fixed Carbon in Non-Heterocystous Filamentous Cyanobacteria from Coniform Mats  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thin, filamentous, non-heterocystous, benthic cyanobacteria (Subsection III) from some marine, lacustrine and thermal environments aggregate into macroscopic cones and conical stromatolites. We investigate the uptake and ...

Liang, Biqing

318

THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF MANAGED WINDOW SYSTEMS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on Thermal Performance of the Exterior Envelopes ofof thermal loads resulting from the building envelope areThermal Test Facility, LhL-9653, prepared for the ASHRAE/DOE Conference-on"t:heThermal Performance the Exterior Envelope

Selkowitz, S. E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Mesoscopic simulations of phase distribution effects on the effective thermal conductivity of microgranular porous media.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of transport in open-cell metal foam. J. Heat Transfer ASMEopen-celled metal foam model for thermal applications. J. Heat Transferheat transfer is a non-negligible factor for thermal transports in high-porosity low-conductivity open-

Wang, Moran; Pan, Ning; Wang, Jinku; Chen, Shiyi

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Thermal management systems and methods  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal management system for a vehicle includes a heat exchanger having a thermal energy storage material provided therein, a first coolant loop thermally coupled to an electrochemical storage device located within the first coolant loop and to the heat exchanger, and a second coolant loop thermally coupled to the heat exchanger. The first and second coolant loops are configured to carry distinct thermal energy transfer media. The thermal management system also includes an interface configured to facilitate transfer of heat generated by an internal combustion engine to the heat exchanger via the second coolant loop in order to selectively deliver the heat to the electrochemical storage device. Thermal management methods are also provided.

Gering, Kevin L.; Haefner, Daryl R.

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Systems (VTMS) Analysis...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Integrated Vehicle Thermal Management Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration Characterization and Development of Advanced Heat Transfer Technologies...

322

Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline Diamond/Silicon...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline DiamondSilicon Carbide Nanocomposites for Drill Bits Ultratough, Thermally Stable Polycrystalline DiamondSilicon Carbide...

323

Report on workshop on thermal property measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of thermogravimetric analysis of basalt is discussed. Heat capacity, thermal conductivity and thermal expansion are specifically addressed. (CBS)

Robertson, E.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Thermal indicator for wells  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Thermal network reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is presented for reducing the number of elements required in a thermal network representation of a building. The method is based on matching the actual building response at two frequencies, the diurnal response and 3-day response. The procedure provides a straightforward methodology for combining all the various materials inside a discrete building zone into a few nodes while retaining a high degree of accuracy in the dynamic response. An example is given showing a comparison between a large network and the reduced network.

Balcomb, J.D.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Thermal network reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method is presented for reducing the number of elements required in a thermal network representation of a building. The method is based on matching the actual building response at two frequencies, the diurnal response and 3-day response. The procedure provides a straightforward methodology for combining all the various materials inside a discrete building zone into a few nodes while retaining a high degree of accuracy in the dynamic response. An example is given showing a comparison between a large network and the reduced network.

Balcomb, J.D.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

High Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

A 10% increase in shaft work is directly attributable to modified thermal heat capacity Engineering HTF Specific heat yields modified power output. 27 127 227 327 427 527...

328

Electric Vehicle Battery Thermal Issues and Thermal Management Techniques (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation examines the issues concerning thermal management in electric drive vehicles and management techniques for improving the life of a Li-ion battery in an EDV.

Rugh, J. P.; Pesaran, A.; Smith, K.

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Solar thermal power system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solar thermal power generator includes an inclined elongated boiler tube positioned in the focus of a solar concentrator for generating steam from water. The boiler tube is connected at one end to receive water from a pressure vessel as well as connected at an opposite end to return steam back to the vessel in a fluidic circuit arrangement that stores energy in the form of heated water in the pressure vessel. An expander, condenser, and reservoir are also connected in series to respectively produce work using the steam passed either directly (above a water line in the vessel) or indirectly (below a water line in the vessel) through the pressure vessel, condense the expanded steam, and collect the condensed water. The reservoir also supplies the collected water back to the pressure vessel at the end of a diurnal cycle when the vessel is sufficiently depressurized, so that the system is reset to repeat the cycle the following day. The circuital arrangement of the boiler tube and the pressure vessel operates to dampen flow instabilities in the boiler tube, damp out the effects of solar transients, and provide thermal energy storage which enables time shifting of power generation to better align with the higher demand for energy during peak energy usage periods.

Bennett, Charles L.

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

330

Systems analysis of thermal storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During FY80 analyses were conducted on thermal storage concepts for solar thermal applications. These studies include both estimates of the obtainable costs of thermal storage concepts and their worth to a user (i.e., value). Based on obtainable costs and performance, promising thermal storage concepts are being identified. A preliminary screening was completed in FY80 and a more in-depth study was initiated. Value studies are being conducted to establish cost goals. A ranking of storage concepts based on value in solar thermal electric plants was conducted for both diurnal and long duration applications. Ground mounted thermal storage concepts for a parabolic dish/Stirling systtem are also being evaluated.

Copeland, R. J.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

THERMAL ANALYSIS OF 3013/9975 CONFIGURATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 3013 containers are designed in accordance with the DOE-STD-3013-2004 and are qualified to store plutonium (Pu) bearing materials for 50 years. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) certified Model 9975 shipping package is used to transport the 3013 containers to the K-Area Material Storage (KAMS) facility at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and to store the containers until the plutonium can be properly dispositioned. Detailed thermal analyses to support the storage in the KAMS facility are given in References 2, 3, and 4. The analyses in this paper serve to provide non-accident condition, non-bounding, specific 3013 container temperatures for use in the surveillance activities. This paper presents a methodology where critical component temperatures are estimated using numerical methods over a range of package and storage parameters. The analyses include factors such as ambient storage temperature and the content weight, density, heat generation rate, and fill height, that may impact the thermal response of the packages. Statistical methods are used to develop algebraic equations for ease of computations to cover the factor space. All computations were performed in BTU-FT-Hr-{sup o}F units.

Gupta, N.

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

332

Non-stoichiometric mixed-phase titania photocatalyst  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mixed anatase-rutile phase, non-stoichiometric titania photocatalyst material is a highly reactive and is a UV and visible light responsive photocastalyst in the as-deposited condition (i.e. without the need for a subsequent thermal treatment). The mixed phase, non-stoichiometric titania thin film material is non-stoichiometric in terms of its oxygen content such that the thin film material shows a marked red-shift in photoresponse.

Chen, Le (Lakewood, CO); Gray, Kimberly A. (Evanston, IL); Graham, Michael E. (Evanston, IL)

2012-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

333

Thermal desorption for passive dosimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ ~ ~ \\ ~ ~ ~ ~ Flare Tubes for Thermal Desorber . . . . . ~. . . . . . ~ ~ . 27 4. 5 ~ Thermal Desorber Manufactured by Century System Sample Flow from Thermal Desorber to Gas Chromatograph 29 6. Direct Injection Port for Therma1 Desorber . . . . . $2... the gas badges and. providing additional guidance in conducting the study. DEDICATZOil This thesis is cedicated to my parents and my wife, Unice, for their support during the last t', o years AHSTHACT ACKI;ODL DG~~. 'ITS D' DICATICI'. LIST OF TABL...

Liu, Wen-Chen

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Microviscometric studies on thermal diffusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HICROVISCKStTRIC STUDIES THERMAL DIFFUSION A Thesis Eddie Reyfls Submitted to the Grsducte School of the Agricultursl sfld Mechanical College of Texas in partisl fulfillment of the requireeeflts far the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August... microliter samples to 1'/ reproduceability, This equipment is used to observe the thermal diffusion effects of polystyrene in toluene solutions in c 01uslus-Dickel thermal diffusion column. An inversion in the values of concentration and molecular veight...

Reyna, Eddie

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

335

Enhanced Thermal Conductivity Oxide Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

the purpose of this project was to investigate the feasibility of increasing the thermal conductivity of oxide fuels by adding small fractions of a high conductivity solid phase.

Alvin Solomon; Shripad Revankar; J. Kevin McCoy

2006-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

336

Actively driven thermal radiation shield  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

Madden, Norman W. (Livermore, CA); Cork, Christopher P. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Becker, John A. (Alameda, CA); Knapp, David A. (Livermore, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Measuring Thermal Transport in Extreme Environments: Thermal Conductivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chen California Institute of Technology Jackie Li University of Michigan supported by CarnegieMeasuring Thermal Transport in Extreme Environments: Thermal Conductivity of Water Ice VII to 20 GPa David G. Cahill, Wen-Pin Hsieh, Dallas Trinkle, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Bin

Braun, Paul

338

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in ConcentratedChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

including cost, energy and thermal comfort analysis, whichfor greatest energy benefits, prioritize thermal comfortSetting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use

Regnier, Cindy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Thermally stabilized heliostat  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improvement in a heliostat having a main support structure and pivoting and tilting motors and gears and a mirror module for reflecting solar energy onto a collector, the improvement being characterized by an internal support structure within each mirror module and front and back sheets attached to the internal support structure, the front and back sheets having the same coefficient of thermal expansion such that no curvature is induced by temperature change, and a layer of adhesive adhering the mirror to the front sheet. The adhesive is water repellent and has adequate set strength to support the mirror but has sufficient shear tolerance to permit the differential expansion of the mirror and the front sheet without inducing stresses or currature effect. The adhesive also serves to dampen fluttering of the mirror and to protect the mirror backside against the adverse effects of weather. Also disclosed are specific details of the preferred embodiment.

Anderson, Alfred J. (Littleton, CO)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Thermal protection apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus for thermally protecting heat sensitive components of tools. The apparatus comprises a Dewar for holding the heat sensitive components. The Dewar has spaced-apart inside and outside walls, an open top end and a bottom end. An insulating plug is located in the top end. The inside wall has portions defining an inside wall aperture located at the bottom of the Dewar and the outside wall has portions defining an outside wall aperture located at the bottom of the Dewar. A bottom connector has inside and outside components. The inside component sealably engages the inside wall aperture and the outside component sealably engages the outside wall aperture. The inside component is operatively connected to the heat sensitive components and to the outside component. The connections can be made with optical fibers or with electrically conducting wires.

Bennett, Gloria A. (Los Alamos, NM); Moore, Troy K. (Los Alamos, NM)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Thermal barrier coatings  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This disclosure addresses the issue of providing a metallic-ceramic overlay coating that potentially serves as an interface or bond coat layer to provide enhanced oxidation resistance to the underlying superalloy substrate via the formation of a diffusion barrier regime within the supporting base material. Furthermore, the metallic-ceramic coating is expected to limit the growth of a continuous thermally grown oxide (TGO) layer that has been primarily considered to be the principal cause for failure of existing TBC systems. Compositional compatibility of the metallic-ceramic with traditional yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) top coats is provided to further limit debond or spallation of the coating during operational use. A metallic-ceramic architecture is disclosed wherein enhanced oxidation resistance is imparted to the surface of nickel-based superalloy or single crystal metal substrate, with simultaneous integration of the yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) within the metallic-ceramic overlayer.

Alvin, Mary Anne (Pittsburg, PA)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

343

Strings at Finite Temperature: Wilson Lines, Free Energies, and the Thermal Landscape  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

According to the standard prescriptions, zero-temperature string theories can be extended to finite temperature by compactifying their time directions on a so-called "thermal circle" and implementing certain orbifold twists. However, the existence of a topologically non-trivial thermal circle leaves open the possibility that a gauge flux can pierce this circle --- i.e., that a non-trivial Wilson line (or equivalently a non-zero chemical potential) might be involved in the finite-temperature extension. In this paper, we concentrate on the zero-temperature heterotic and Type I strings in ten dimensions, and survey the possible Wilson lines which might be introduced in their finite-temperature extensions. We find a rich structure of possible thermal string theories, some of which even have non-traditional Hagedorn temperatures, and we demonstrate that these new thermal string theories can be interpreted as extrema of a continuous thermal free-energy "landscape". Our analysis also uncovers a unique finite-temperature extension of the heterotic SO(32) and $E_8\\times E_8$ strings which involves a non-trivial Wilson line, but which --- like the traditional finite-temperature extension without Wilson lines --- is metastable in this thermal landscape.

Keith R. Dienes; Michael Lennek; Menika Sharma

2012-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

344

Holographic thermal field theory on curved spacetimes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The AdS/CFT correspondence relates certain strongly coupled CFTs with large effective central charge $c_\\text{eff}$ to semi-classical gravitational theories with AdS asymptotics. We describe recent progress in understanding gravity duals for CFTs on non-trivial spacetimes at finite temperature, both in and out of equilibrium. Such gravity methods provide powerful new tools to access the physics of these strongly coupled theories, which often differs qualitatively from that found at weak coupling. Our discussion begins with basic aspects of AdS/CFT and progresses through thermal CFTs on the Einstein Static Universe and on periodically identified Minkowski spacetime. In the latter context we focus on states describing so-called plasma balls, which become stable at large $c_\\text{eff}$. We then proceed to out-of-equilibrium situations associated with dynamical bulk black holes. In particular, the non-compact nature of these bulk black holes allows stationary solutions with non-Killing horizons that describe time-independent flows of CFT plasma. As final a topic we consider CFTs on black hole spacetimes. This discussion provides insight into how the CFT transports heat between general heat sources and sinks of finite size. In certain phases the coupling to small sources can be strongly suppressed, resulting in negligible heat transport despite the presence of a deconfined plasma with sizeable thermal conductivity. We also present a new result, explaining how this so-called droplet behaviour is related to confinement via a change of conformal frame.

Donald Marolf; Mukund Rangamani; Toby Wiseman

2014-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

345

Thermalization of isolated quantum systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Understanding the evolution towards thermal equilibrium of an isolated quantum system is at the foundation of statistical mechanics and a subject of interest in such diverse areas as cold atom physics or the quantum mechanics of black holes. Since a pure state can never evolve into a thermal density matrix, the Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis (ETH) has been put forward by Deutsch and Srednicki as a way to explain this apparent thermalization, similarly to what the ergodic theorem does in classical mechanics. In this paper this hypothesis is tested numerically. First, it is observed that thermalization happens in a subspace of states (the Krylov subspace) with dimension much smaller than that of the total Hilbert space. We check numerically the validity of ETH in such a subspace, for a system of hard core bosons on a two-dimensional lattice. We then discuss how well the eigenstates of the Hamiltonian projected on the Krylov subspace represent the true eigenstates. This discussion is aided by bringing the projected Hamiltonian to the tridiagonal form and interpreting it as an Anderson localization problem for a finite one-dimensional chain. We also consider thermalization of a subsystem and argue that generation of a large entanglement entropy can lead to a thermal density matrix for the subsystem well before the whole system thermalizes. Finally, we comment on possible implications of ETH in quantum gravity.

Sergei Khlebnikov; Martin Kruczenski

2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

346

Peg supported thermal insulation panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprising high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

Nowobilski, Jeffert J. (Orchard Park, NY); Owens, William J. (Kenmore, NY)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Peg supported thermal insulation panel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprises high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 2 figs.

Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

1985-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

348

Advanced thermal imaging of composites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Composite materials were studied by Scanning Thermal Conductivity Microscope (STCM) and high speed thermography. The STCM is a qualitative technique which is used to study thermal conductivity variations on a sub-micrometer scale. High speed thermography is a quantitative technique for measuring thermal diffusivity with a variable spatial resolution from centimeters down to less than 25 gm. A relative thermal conductivity contrast map was obtained from a SiC/Si3N4 continuous fiber ceramic composite using the STCM. Temperature changes of a carbon/carbon composite after a heat pulse were captured by an IR camera to generate a thermal diffusivity map of the specimen. Line profiles of the temperature distribution showed significant variations as a result of fiber orientation.

Wang, H.; Dinwiddie, R.B.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Thermal Conductivity and Noise Attenuation in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.3.4 Corrosion-resistant and high-temperature filters 9 1.3.5 Acoustic Applications 9 2. THERMAL CONDUCTIVITY 2.1 THERMAL RESISTANCE 2.1.1 Thermal Conductors in Series 12 2.1.2 Thermal conductors in parallel 13 2 difference RTH Thermal resistance of conductor sb Stefan's constant T4 Temperature difference K* Total

Cambridge, University of

350

Nanoscale Thermal Transport andMicrorefrigeratorsonaChip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are promising candidates as thermal vias and thermal interface materials due to their inherently high thermal; superlattices; thermal boundary resistance; thermionics; thermotunneling; thermoelectrics I. INTRODUCTIONINVITED P A P E R Nanoscale Thermal Transport andMicrorefrigeratorsonaChip Devices for cooling high

351

Experimental Analysis of the Effect of Vibrational Non-Equilibrium on the Decay of Grid-Generated Turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the fundamental scientific question: ?Does thermal non-equilibrium alter the decay rate of turbulence?? The results of this study show that the answer is ?Yes.? The results demonstrate a clear coupling between thermal non-equilibrium and turbulence transport... ................................................................... 86 2.70 Macor-aluminum test section (exploded view) ....................................... 87 2.71 Upwind flange .......................................................................................... 88 2.72 Macor slab...

Fuller, T. J.

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

MINIMIZING THE BONDLINE THERMAL RESISTANCE IN THERMAL INTERFACE MATERIALS WITHOUT AFFECTING RELIABILITY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MINIMIZING THE BONDLINE THERMAL RESISTANCE IN THERMAL INTERFACE MATERIALS WITHOUT AFFECTING microstructure, and bondline thermal resistance with the tradeoffs between material systems, manufacturability of devices to heat sinks using existing commercial thermal interface materials (TIMs). The present study

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

353

Thermal to electricity conversion using thermal magnetic properties  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system for the generation of Electricity from Thermal Energy using the thermal magnetic properties of a Ferromagnetic, Electrically Conductive Material (FECM) in one or more Magnetic Fields. A FECM is exposed to one or more Magnetic Fields. Thermal Energy is applied to a portion of the FECM heating the FECM above its Curie Point. The FECM, now partially paramagnetic, moves under the force of the one or more Magnetic Fields. The movement of the FECM induces an electrical current through the FECM, generating Electricity.

West, Phillip B [Idaho Falls, ID; Svoboda, John [Idaho Falls, ID

2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

354

Solar Thermal Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HVAC Retrofit and Energy Efficiency Upgrades at Clark High School, Las Vegas, Nevada The overall objectives of this project are to increase usage of alternative/renewable fuels, create a better and more reliable learning environment for the students, and reduce energy costs. Utilizing the grant resources and local bond revenues, the District proposes to reduce electricity consumption by installing within the existing limited space, one principal energy efficient 100 ton adsorption chiller working in concert with two 500 ton electric chillers. The main heating source will be primarily from low nitrogen oxide (NOX), high efficiency natural gas fired boilers. With the use of this type of chiller, the electric power and cost requirements will be greatly reduced. To provide cooling to the information technology centers and equipment rooms of the school during off-peak hours, the District will install water source heat pumps. In another measure to reduce the cooling requirements at Clark High School, the District will replace single pane glass and metal panels with ??Kalwall?? building panels. An added feature of the ??Kalwall? system is that it will allow for natural day lighting in the student center. This system will significantly reduce thermal heat/cooling loss and control solar heat gain, thus delivering significant savings in heating ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) costs.

Biesinger, K.; Cuppett, D.; Dyer, D.

2012-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Microelectromechanical (MEM) thermal actuator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Microelectromechanical (MEM) buckling beam thermal actuators are disclosed wherein the buckling direction of a beam is constrained to a desired direction of actuation, which can be in-plane or out-of-plane with respect to a support substrate. The actuators comprise as-fabricated, linear beams of uniform cross section supported above the substrate by supports which rigidly attach a beam to the substrate. The beams can be heated by methods including the passage of an electrical current through them. The buckling direction of an initially straight beam upon heating and expansion is controlled by incorporating one or more directional constraints attached to the substrate and proximal to the mid-point of the beam. In the event that the beam initially buckles in an undesired direction, deformation of the beam induced by contact with a directional constraint generates an opposing force to re-direct the buckling beam into the desired direction. The displacement and force generated by the movement of the buckling beam can be harnessed to perform useful work, such as closing contacts in an electrical switch.

Garcia, Ernest J. (Albuquerque, NM); Fulcher, Clay W. G. (Sandia Park, NM)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

356

Technical resource document for assured thermal processing of wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a concise compendium of resource material covering assured thermal processing of wastes (ATPW), an area in which Sandia aims to develop a large program. The ATPW program at Sandia is examining a wide variety of waste streams and thermal processes. Waste streams under consideration include municipal, chemical, medical, and mixed wastes. Thermal processes under consideration range from various incineration technologies to non-incineration processes such as supercritical water oxidation or molten metal technologies. Each of the chapters describes the element covered, discusses issues associated with its further development and/or utilization, presents Sandia capabilities that address these issues, and indicates important connections to other ATPW elements. The division of the field into elements was driven by the team`s desire to emphasize areas where Sandia`s capabilities can lead to major advances and is therefore somewhat unconventional. The report will be valuable to Sandians involved in further ATPW program development.

Farrow, R.L.; Fisk, G.A.; Hartwig, C.M.; Hurt, R.H.; Ringland, J.T.; Swansiger, W.A.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Integrated EM & Thermal Simulations with Upgraded VORPAL Software  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear physics accelerators are powered by microwaves which must travel in waveguides between room-temperature sources and the cryogenic accelerator structures. The ohmic heat load from the microwaves is affected by the temperature-dependent surface resistance and in turn affects the cryogenic thermal conduction problem. Integrated EM & thermal analysis of this difficult non-linear problem is now possible with the VORPAL finite-difference time-domain simulation tool. We highlight thermal benchmarking work with a complex HOM feed-through geometry, done in collaboration with researchers at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Laboratory, and discuss upcoming design studies with this emerging tool. This work is part of an effort to generalize the VORPAL framework to include generalized PDE capabilities, for wider multi-physics capabilities in the accelerator, vacuum electronics, plasma processing and fusion R&D fields, and we will also discuss user interface and algorithmic upgrades which facilitate this emerging multiphysics capability.

D.N. Smithe, D. Karipides, P. Stoltz, G. Cheng, H. Wang

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersLow Temperature Thermal Energy Storage Program of Oak RidgeAquifers for Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage: An Overview of

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~June 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Advanced nanofabrication of thermal emission devices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanofabricated thermal emission devices can be used to modify and modulate blackbody thermal radiation. There are many areas in which altering thermal radiation is extremely useful, especially in static power conversion, ...

Hurley, Fergus (Fergus Gerard)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA SOLAR INITIATIVE-THERMAL PROGRAMHANDBOOK CALIFORNIA PUBLIC UTILITIES California Solar Initiative Thermal Program Handbook i 1. Introduction to CSI-Thermal Program COMMISSION May 2010 #12; The California Public

362

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftr:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersB. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Ceramic thermal barrier coating for rapid thermal cycling applications  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal barrier coating for metal articles subjected to rapid thermal cycling includes a metallic bond coat deposited on the metal article, at least one MCrAlY/ceramic layer deposited on the bond coat, and a ceramic top layer deposited on the MCrAlY/ceramic layer. The M in the MCrAlY material is Fe, Ni, Co, or a mixture of Ni and Co. The ceramic in the MCrAlY/ceramic layer is mullite or Al.sub.2 O.sub.3. The ceramic top layer includes a ceramic with a coefficient of thermal expansion less than about 5.4.times.10.sup.-6 .degree.C.sup.-1 and a thermal conductivity between about 1 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1 and about 1.7 J sec.sup.-1 m.sup.-1 .degree.C.sup.-1.

Scharman, Alan J. (Hebron, CT); Yonushonis, Thomas M. (Columbus, IN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Thermal performance of the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the Brookhaven natural thermal storage house, an energy-efficient envelope, passive solar collectors, and a variety of energy conservation methods are incorporated. The thermal characteristics of the house during the tested heating season are evaluated. Temperature distributions at different zones are displayed, and the effects of extending heating supply ducts only to the main floor and heating return ducts only from the second floor are discussed. The thermal retrievals from the structure and the passive collectors are assessed, and the total conservation and passive solar contributions are outlined. Several correlation factors relating these thermal behaviors are introduced, and their diurnal variations are displayed. Finally, the annual energy requirements, and the average load factors are analyzed and discussed.

Ghaffari, H.T.; Jones, R.F.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Integrated External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis for Heavy Vehicles Integrated External Aerodynamic and Underhood Thermal Analysis for Heavy Vehicles 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

368

Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene Fibers and Sheets Continuous Processing of High Thermal Conductivity Polyethylene Fibers and Sheets Massachusetts Institute of...

369

Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment: A BestPractices Process Heating Technical Brief Materials Selection Considerations for Thermal Process Equipment:...

370

Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse Develop & evaluate materials & additives that enhance thermal & overcharge abuse 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program...

371

Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse Develop & Evaluate Materials & Additives that Enhance Thermal & Overcharge Abuse 2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel...

372

Power Electronic Thermal System Performance and Integration ...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

2010 -- Washington D.C. ape016bennion2010o.pdf More Documents & Publications Motor Thermal Control Thermal Stress and Reliability for Advanced Power Electronics and Electric...

373

Duality of the Interfacial Thermal Conductance in Graphene-based Nanocomposites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal conductance of graphene-matrix interfaces plays a key role in controlling the thermal transport properties of graphene-based nanocomposites. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we found that the interfacial thermal conductance depends strongly on the mode of heat transfer at the graphene-matrix interfaces: if heat enters graphene from one side of its basal plane and immediately leaves the graphene through the other side, the corresponding interfacial thermal conductance, G(across), is large; if heat enters graphene from both sides of its basal plane and leaves the graphene at a position far away on its basal plane, the corresponding interfacial thermal conductance, G(non-across), is small. For a single-layer graphene immersed in liquid octane, G(across) is ~150 MW/m2K while Gnon-across is ~5 MW/m2K. G(across) decreases with increasing multi-layer graphene thickness (i.e., number of layers in graphene) and approaches an asymptotic value of 100 MW/m2K for 7-layer graphenes. G(non-across) increases only marginally as the graphene sheet thickness increases. Such a duality of the interface thermal conductance for different probing methods and its dependence on graphene sheet thickness can be traced ultimately to the unique physical and chemical structure of graphene materials. The ramifications of these results in areas such as experimental measurement of thermal conductivity of graphene and the design of graphene-based thermal nanocomposites are discussed.

Liu, Ying [Clemson University] [Clemson University; Huang, Jingsong [ORNL] [ORNL; Yang, Bao [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL] [ORNL; Qiao, Rui [Clemson University] [Clemson University

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Thermalization in External Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the AdS/CFT framework meson thermalization in the presence of a constant external magnetic field in a strongly coupled gauge theory has been studied. In the gravitational description the thermalization of mesons corresponds to the horizon formation on the flavour D7-brane which is embedded in the AdS_5 x S^5 background in the probe limit. The apparent horizon forms due to the time-dependent change in the baryon number chemical potential, the injection of baryons in the gauge theory. We will numerically show that the thermalization happens even faster in the presence of the magnetic field on the probe brane. We observe that this reduction in the thermalization time sustains up to a specific value of the magnetic field.

Ali-Akbari, Mohammad

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Thermal analysis of vascular reactivity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dysfunction. Given the promising nature of thermal monitoring to study VR, this thesis focuses on the analysis of the underlying physics affecting fingertip temperature during vascular occlusion and subsequent hyperemia. I will quantify the contribution...

Deshpande, Chinmay Vishwas

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

376

Thermal processes for heavy oil recovery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This status report summarizes the project BE11B (Thermal Processes for Heavy Oil Recovery) research activities conducted in FY93 and completes milestone 7 of this project. A major portion of project research during FY93 was concentrated on modeling and reservoir studies to determine the applicability of steam injection oil recovery techniques in Texas Gulf Coast heavy oil reservoirs. In addition, an in-depth evaluation of a steamflood predictive model developed by Mobil Exploration and Production Co. (Mobil E&P) was performed. Details of these two studies are presented. A topical report (NIPER-675) assessing the NIPER Thermal EOR Research Program over the past 10 years was also written during this fiscal year and delivered to DOE. Results of the Gulf Coast heavy oil reservoir simulation studies indicated that though these reservoirs can be successfully steamflooded and could recover more than 50% of oil-in-place, steamflooding may not be economical at current heavy oil prices. Assessment of Mobil E&P`s steamflood predictive model capabilities indicate that the model in its present form gives reasonably good predictions of California steam projects, but fails to predict adequately the performance of non-California steam projects.

Sarkar, A.K.; Sarathi, P.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Solar thermal electric power information user study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of a series of telephone interviews with groups of users of information on solar thermal electric power are described. These results, part of a larger study on many different solar technologies, identify types of information each group needed and the best ways to get information to each group. The report is 1 of 10 discussing study results. The overall study provides baseline data about information needs in the solar community. An earlier study identified the information user groups in the solar community and the priority (to accelerate solar energy commercialization) of getting information to each group. In the current study only high-priority groups were examined. Results from five solar thermal electric power groups of respondents are analyzed: DOE-Funded Researchers, Non-DOE-Funded Researchers, Representatives of Utilities, Electric Power Engineers, and Educators. The data will be used as input to the determination of information products and services the Solar Energy Research Institute, the Solar Energy Information Data Bank Network, and the entire information outreach community should be preparing and disseminating.

Belew, W.W.; Wood, B.L.; Marle, T.L.; Reinhardt, C.L.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To support a potential future development of a nuclear thermal rocket engine, a state-of-the-art non nuclear experimental test setup has been constructed to evaluate the performance characteristics of candidate fuel element materials and geometries in representative environments. The test device simulates the environmental conditions (minus the radiation) to which nuclear rocket fuel components could be subjected during reactor operation. Test articles mounted in the simulator are inductively heated in such a manner as to accurately reproduce the temperatures and heat fluxes normally expected to occur as a result of nuclear fission while at the same time being exposed to flowing hydrogen. This project is referred to as the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environment Simulator or NTREES. The NTREES device is located at the Marshall Space flight Center in a laboratory which has been modified to accommodate the high powers required to heat the test articles to the required temperatures and to handle the gaseous hydrogen flow required for the tests. Other modifications to the laboratory include the installation of a nitrogen gas supply system and a cooling water supply system. During the design and construction of the facility, every effort was made to comply with all pertinent regulations to provide assurance that the facility could be operated in a safe and efficient manner. The NTREES system can currently supply up to 50 kW of inductive heating to the fuel test articles, although the facility has been sized to eventually allow test article heating levels of up to several megawatts.

Emrich, William J. Jr. [NASA--Marshall Space Flight Center, M.S. ER24, Huntsville, Alabama 35812 (United States)

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

379

Power Electronics Thermal Control (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal management plays an important part in the cost of electric drives in terms of power electronics packaging. Very promising results have been obtained by using microporous coatings and skived surfaces in conjunction with single-phase and two-phase flows. Sintered materials and thermoplastics with embedded fibers show significant promise as thermal interface materials, or TIMs. Appropriate cooling technologies depend on the power electronics package application and reliability.

Narumanchi, S.

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

380

Lih thermal energy storage device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

DIRECT MEASUREMENT OF HEAT FLUX FROM COOLING LAKE THERMAL IMAGERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Laboratory experiments show a linear relationship between the total heat flux from a water surface to air and the standard deviation of the surface temperature field, {sigma}, derived from thermal images of the water surface over a range of heat fluxes from 400 to 1800 Wm{sup -2}. Thermal imagery and surface data were collected at two power plant cooling lakes to determine if the laboratory relationship between heat flux and {sigma} exists in large heated bodies of water. The heat fluxes computed from the cooling lake data range from 200 to 1400 Wm{sup -2}. The linear relationship between {sigma} and Q is evident in the cooling lake data, but it is necessary to apply band pass filtering to the thermal imagery to remove camera artifacts and non-convective thermal gradients. The correlation between {sigma} and Q is improved if a correction to the measured {sigma} is made that accounts for wind speed effects on the thermal convection. Based on more than a thousand cooling lake images, the correlation coefficients between {sigma} and Q ranged from about 0.8 to 0.9.

Garrett, A; Eliel Villa-Aleman, E; Robert Kurzeja, R; Malcolm Pendergast, M; Timothy Brown, T; Saleem Salaymeh, S

2007-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

382

Nonlocal probes of thermalization in holographic quenches with spectral methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe the application of pseudo-spectral methods to problems of holographic thermal quenches of relevant couplings in strongly coupled gauge theories. We focus on quenches of a fermionic mass term in a strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma, and the subsequent equilibration of the system. From the dual gravitational perspective, we study gravitational collapse of a massive scalar field in asymptotically anti-de-Sitter geometry with a prescribed boundary condition for its non-normalizable mode. Access to the full background geometry of the gravitational collapse allows for the study of nonlocal probes of the thermalization process. We discuss the evolution of the apparent and the event horizons, the two-point correlation functions of operators of large conformal dimensions, and the evolution of the entanglement entropy of the system. We compare the thermalization process from the viewpoint of local (the one-point) correlation functions and these nonlocal probes, finding that the thermalization time as measured by the probes is length dependent, and can exceed that of the one-point function. We further discuss how the different energy scales of the problem contribute to its thermalization.

Alex Buchel; Robert C. Myers; Anton van Niekerk

2014-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

383

Thermal Batteries for Electric Vehicles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

HEATS Project: UT Austin will demonstrate a high-energy density and low-cost thermal storage system that will provide efficient cabin heating and cooling for EVs. Compared to existing HVAC systems powered by electric batteries in EVs, the innovative hot-and-cold thermal batteries-based technology is expected to decrease the manufacturing cost and increase the driving range of next-generation EVs. These thermal batteries can be charged with off-peak electric power together with the electric batteries. Based on innovations in composite materials offering twice the energy density of ice and 10 times the thermal conductivity of water, these thermal batteries are expected to achieve a comparable energy density at 25% of the cost of electric batteries. Moreover, because UT Austins thermal energy storage systems are modular, they may be incorporated into the heating and cooling systems in buildings, providing further energy efficiencies and positively impacting the emissions of current building heating/cooling systems.

None

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

384

Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant- Residential and Non-Profit Weatherization Program (Massachusetts)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Taunton Municipal Lighting Plant (TMLP) offers the 'House N Home' Thermal Rebate Program which provides financial incentives to residential and non-Profit customers for making buildings more energy...

385

NUMERICAL DESIGN TOOLS FOR THERMAL REPLICATION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by heating Ceramic block Glass workpiece before heating Figure 1: Thermal Replication (after Smith et al. [14NUMERICAL DESIGN TOOLS FOR THERMAL REPLICATION OF OPTICAL­QUALITY SURFACES Y.M. Stokes 1 Department. #12; Thermal replication of optical surfaces 1 1 Introduction Thermal replication is an industrial

Stokes, Yvonne

386

Thermal storage module for solar dynamic receivers  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A thermal energy storage system comprising a germanium phase change material and a graphite container.

Beatty, Ronald L. (Farragut, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Device for thermal transfer and power generation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is provided. The system includes a device that includes top and bottom thermally conductive substrates positioned opposite to one another, wherein a top surface of the bottom thermally conductive substrate is substantially atomically flat and a thermal blocking layer disposed between the top and bottom thermally conductive substrates. The device also includes top and bottom electrodes separated from one another between the top and bottom thermally conductive substrates to define a tunneling path, wherein the top electrode is disposed on the thermal blocking layer and the bottom electrode is disposed on the bottom thermally conductive substrate.

Weaver, Stanton Earl (Northville, NY); Arik, Mehmet (Niskayuna, NY)

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

388

Active Thermal Extraction of Near-field Thermal Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiative heat transport between materials supporting surface-phonon polaritons is greatly enhanced when the materials are placed at sub-wavelength separation as a result of the contribution of near-field surface modes. However, the enhancement is limited to small separations due to the evanescent decay of the surface waves. In this work, we propose and numerically demonstrate an active scheme to extract these modes to the far-field. Our approach exploits the monochromatic nature of near-field thermal radiation to drive a transition in a laser gain medium, which, when coupled with external optical pumping, allows the resonant surface mode to be emitted into the far-field. Our study demonstrates a new approach to manipulate thermal radiation that could find applications in thermal management.

Ding, Ding

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

A correlation of air-coupled ultrasonic and thermal diffusivity data for CFCC materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An air-coupled (non contact) through-transmission ultrasonic investigation has been conducted on 2D multiple ply Nicalon{trademark} SiC fiber/SiNC CFCC panels as a function of number of processing cycles. Corresponding thermal diffusivity imaging was also conducted. The results of the air-coupled ultrasonic investigation correlated with thermal property variations determined via infrared methods. Areas of delaminations were detected and effects of processing cycles were also detected.

Pillai, T.A.K. [Univ. of Wisconsin, LaCrosse, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics; Easler, T.E.; Szweda, A. [Dow Corning Corp., Midland, MI (United States). Advanced Ceramics Program] [and others

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

A new mineralogical approach to predict coefficient of thermal expansion of aggregate and concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the construction allows for accurate prediction of the potential thermal change on crack development and crack width and enhances the overall design process. Siliceous gravel use results in larger crack width than does the limestone and at low temperature... increment between the contacts to the flask volume, the amount of aggregate in the flask, and the thermal characteristics of the aggregate. For measurements made below the freezing point of water, a non-reactive liquid, such as toluene, which does...

Neekhra, Siddharth

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

391

Validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents technical work performed to complete the ASC Level 2 Milestone 2841: validation of thermal models for a prototypical MEMS thermal actuator. This effort requires completion of the following task: the comparison between calculated and measured temperature profiles of a heated stationary microbeam in air. Such heated microbeams are prototypical structures in virtually all electrically driven microscale thermal actuators. This task is divided into four major subtasks. (1) Perform validation experiments on prototypical heated stationary microbeams in which material properties such as thermal conductivity and electrical resistivity are measured if not known and temperature profiles along the beams are measured as a function of electrical power and gas pressure. (2) Develop a noncontinuum gas-phase heat-transfer model for typical MEMS situations including effects such as temperature discontinuities at gas-solid interfaces across which heat is flowing, and incorporate this model into the ASC FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (3) Develop a noncontinuum solid-phase heat transfer model for typical MEMS situations including an effective thermal conductivity that depends on device geometry and grain size, and incorporate this model into the FEM heat-conduction code Calore to enable it to simulate these effects with good accuracy. (4) Perform combined gas-solid heat-transfer simulations using Calore with these models for the experimentally investigated devices, and compare simulation and experimental temperature profiles to assess model accuracy. These subtasks have been completed successfully, thereby completing the milestone task. Model and experimental temperature profiles are found to be in reasonable agreement for all cases examined. Modest systematic differences appear to be related to uncertainties in the geometric dimensions of the test structures and in the thermal conductivity of the polycrystalline silicon test structures, as well as uncontrolled nonuniform changes in this quantity over time and during operation.

Gallis, Michail A.; Torczynski, John Robert; Piekos, Edward Stanley; Serrano, Justin Raymond; Gorby, Allen D.; Phinney, Leslie Mary

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

High Performance Thermal Interface Technology Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An overview on recent developments in thermal interfaces is given with a focus on a novel thermal interface technology that allows the formation of 2-3 times thinner bondlines with strongly improved thermal properties at lower assembly pressures. This is achieved using nested hierarchical surface channels to control the particle stacking with highly particle-filled materials. Reliability testing with thermal cycling has also demonstrated a decrease in thermal resistance after extended times with longer overall lifetime compared to a flat interface.

R. Linderman; T. Brunschwiler; B. Smith; B. Michel

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

393

High Performance Thermal Interface Technology Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An overview on recent developments in thermal interfaces is given with a focus on a novel thermal interface technology that allows the formation of 2-3 times thinner bondlines with strongly improved thermal properties at lower assembly pressures. This is achieved using nested hierarchical surface channels to control the particle stacking with highly particle-filled materials. Reliability testing with thermal cycling has also demonstrated a decrease in thermal resistance after extended times with longer overall lifetime compared to a flat interface.

Linderman, R; Smith, B; Michel, B

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Thermal-wave resonator cavity design and measurements of the thermal diffusivity of liquids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal-wave resonator cavity design and measurements of the thermal diffusivity of liquids J. A for the measurement of the thermal diffusivity of liquids. The thermal diffusivities of distilled water, glycerol the thermal diffusivity of gases, particularly air,8,9 and vapors10 to a high degree of precision. Although

Mandelis, Andreas

395

Ultralow thermal conductivity and the thermal d t f i t fconductance of interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are critical at the nanoscale · Low thermal conductivity in nanostructured materials ­ improved thermoelectric to the thermal conductivity of materials. · Ultralow thermal conductivity: beating the amorphous limitUltralow thermal conductivity and the thermal d t f i t fconductance of interfaces David G. Cahill

Braun, Paul

396

Thermal trim for a luminaire  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A luminaire with a thermal pathway to reduce the junction temperature of the luminaire's light source, and methods for so doing, are disclosed. The luminaire includes a can, a light engine, and a trim, that define a substantially continuous thermal pathway from the light engine to a surrounding environment. The can defines a can cavity and includes a can end region. The light engine is within the can cavity and includes a light source and a heat sink, including a heat sink end region, coupled thereto. The trim is at least partially disposed within the can cavity and includes a first trim end region coupled to the heat sink end region and a second trim end region coupled to the can end region. Thermal interface material may be located between: the heat sink and the trim, the trim and the can, and/or the heat sink and the light source.

Bazydola, Sarah; Ghiu, Camil-Daniel; Harrison, Robert; Jeswani, Anil

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

397

Transition Region Emission and Energy Input to Thermal Plasma During the Impulsive Phase of Solar Flares  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy released in a solar flare is partitioned between thermal and non-thermal particle energy and lost to thermal conduction and radiation over a broad range of wavelengths. It is difficult to determine the conductive losses and the energy radiated at transition region temperatures during the impulsive phases of flares. We use UVCS measurements of O VI photons produced by 5 flares and subsequently scattered by O VI ions in the corona to determine the 5.0 thermal energy and the conductive losses deduced from RHESSI and GOES X-ray data using areas from RHESSI images to estimate the loop volumes, cross-sectional areas and scale lengths. The transition region luminosities during the impulsive phase exceed the X-ray luminosities for the first few minutes, but they are smaller than the rates of increase of thermal energy unless the filling factor of the X-ray emitting gas is ~ 0.01. The estimated conductive losses from the hot gas are too large to be balanced by radiative losses or heating of evaporated plasma, and we conclude that the area of the flare magnetic flux tubes is much smaller than the effective area measured by RHESSI during this phase of the flares. For the 2002 July 23 flare, the energy deposited by non-thermal particles exceeds the X-ray and UV energy losses and the rate of increase of the thermal energy.

J. C. Raymond; G. Holman; A. Ciaravella; A. Panasyuk; Y. -K. Ko; J. Kohl

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

398

Thermal-spectrum recriticality energetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Large computer codes have been created in the past to predict the energy release in hypothetical core disruptive accidents (CDA), postulated to occur in liquid metal reactors (LMR). These codes, such as SIMMER, are highly specific to LMR designs. More recent attention has focused on thermal-spectrum criticality accidents, such as for fuel storage basins and waste tanks containing fissile material. This paper resents results from recent one-dimensional kinetics simulations, performed for a recriticality accident in a thermal spectrum. Reactivity insertion rates generally are smaller than in LMR CDAs, and the energetics generally are more benign. Parametric variation of input was performed, including reactivity insertion and initial temperature.

Schwinkendorf, K.N.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Thermal treatment for VOC control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalytic and thermal oxidation are well-established technologies for controlling volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Oxidation destroys pollutants, rather than capturing them. Oxidation units can destroy nearly 100% of VOC and toxic emissions targeted by the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990--some systems attain destruction efficiencies over 99.99%. To assist in the design of these systems, an engineer will often look a/t the heat of combustion of the gas stream, along with the type of pollutant, to best determine the correct type of oxidation device to use. The paper discusses catalytic and thermal oxidation, energy recovery, and equipment for these processes.

Cloud, R.A. [Huntington Environmental Systems, Schaumburg, IL (United States)

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Nanoscale thermal transport and the thermal conductance of interfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-8 2008 #12;Er-fiber laser system, UIUC Nov. 2007 #12;Solid-liquid interfaces: Two approaches · Transient-wide: ­ thermal interface materials ­ so-called "nanofluids" (suspensions in liquids) ­ polymer composites absorption depends on temperature of the nanotube · Assume heat capacity is comparable to graphite · Cooling

Braun, Paul

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Effective Thermal Conductivity of Graded Nanocomposites with Interfacial Thermal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.M. Yin", G. H. Paulino", W.G. Buttlar", and L.Z. Sun'' '^Department of Civil and Environmental the effective thermal conductivity distribution in functionally graded materials (FGMs) considering the Kapitza is developed to derive the averaged heat flux field of the particle phase. Then the temperature gradient can

Paulino, Glaucio H.

402

Proceedings of Thermal VII, Thermal Performance of the Exterior Envelopes of Buildings,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-42871 BS-400 Proceedings of Thermal VII, Thermal Performance of the Exterior Envelopes locations. The user describes the physical, thermal and optical properties of the windows in each

403

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants A ThesisStorage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants by Corey

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

APPLIED THERMAL ENGINEERING Manuscript Draft  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the heat pump from the grid during the two hours of electrical peak power · Design of a new heat exchangerAPPLIED THERMAL ENGINEERING Manuscript Draft TITLE: Experimental assessment of a PCM to air heat This paper presents a heat exchanger prototype containing PCM material designed to provide a 1kW heating

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

405

Solar mechanics thermal response capabilities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In many applications, the thermal response of structures exposed to solar heat loads is of interest. Solar mechanics governing equations were developed and integrated with the Calore thermal response code via user subroutines to provide this computational simulation capability. Solar heat loads are estimated based on the latitude and day of the year. Vector algebra is used to determine the solar loading on each face of a finite element model based on its orientation relative to the sun as the earth rotates. Atmospheric attenuation is accounted for as the optical path length varies from sunrise to sunset. Both direct and diffuse components of solar flux are calculated. In addition, shadowing of structures by other structures can be accounted for. User subroutines were also developed to provide convective and radiative boundary conditions for the diurnal variations in air temperature and effective sky temperature. These temperature boundary conditions are based on available local weather data and depend on latitude and day of the year, consistent with the solar mechanics formulation. These user subroutines, coupled with the Calore three-dimensional thermal response code, provide a complete package for addressing complex thermal problems involving solar heating. The governing equations are documented in sufficient detail to facilitate implementation into other heat transfer codes. Suggestions for improvements to the approach are offered.

Dobranich, Dean D.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Thermo Tracer Infrared Thermal Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as production lines, electric power facilities, petrochemical plants and public institutions, etc. by thermal in electric power, petrochemical plant facilities G Intruder monitoring Important facilities (nuclear power, harbor, airport, dam, river, water purification plant, etc.) G Fire monitoring Important facilities, wide

Walker, D. Greg

407

Space Science: Atmosphere Thermal Structure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Space Science: Atmosphere Part -2 Thermal Structure Review tropospheres Absorption of Radiation Adiabatic Lapse Rate ~ 9 K/km Slightly smaller than our estimate Pressure ~3000ft under ocean surface thickness (positive up) is the solar zenith angle Fs is the solar energy flux at frequency (when

Johnson, Robert E.

408

Solar energy thermalization and storage device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A passive solar thermalization and thermal energy storage assembly which is visually transparent. The assembly consists of two substantial parallel, transparent wall members mounted in a rectangular support frame to form a liquid-tight chamber. A semitransparent thermalization plate is located in the chamber, substantially paralled to and about equidistant from the transparent wall members to thermalize solar radiation which is stored in a transparent thermal energy storage liquid which fills the chamber. A number of the devices, as modules, can be stacked together to construct a visually transparent, thermal storage wall for passive solar-heated buildings.

McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Method and apparatus for thermal processing of semiconductor substrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved apparatus and method for thermal processing of semiconductor wafers. The apparatus and method provide the temperature stability and uniformity of a conventional batch furnace as well as the processing speed and reduced time-at-temperature of a lamp-heated rapid thermal processor (RTP). Individual wafers are rapidly inserted into and withdrawn from a furnace cavity held at a nearly constant and isothermal temperature. The speeds of insertion and withdrawal are sufficiently large to limit thermal stresses and thereby reduce or prevent plastic deformation of the wafer as it enters and leaves the furnace. By processing the semiconductor wafer in a substantially isothermal cavity, the wafer temperature and spatial uniformity of the wafer temperature can be ensured by measuring and controlling only temperatures of the cavity walls. Further, peak power requirements are very small compared to lamp-heated RTPs because the cavity temperature is not cycled and the thermal mass of the cavity is relatively large. Increased speeds of insertion and/or removal may also be used with non-isothermal furnaces.

Griffiths, Stewart K. (Danville, CA); Nilson, Robert H. (Cardiss, CA); Mattson, Brad S. (Los Gatos, CA); Savas, Stephen E. (Alameda, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Method and apparatus for thermal processing of semiconductor substrates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved apparatus and method for thermal processing of semiconductor wafers. The apparatus and method provide the temperature stability and uniformity of a conventional batch furnace as well as the processing speed and reduced time-at-temperature of a lamp-heated rapid thermal processor (RTP). Individual wafers are rapidly inserted into and withdrawn from a furnace cavity held at a nearly constant and isothermal temperature. The speeds of insertion and withdrawal are sufficiently large to limit thermal stresses and thereby reduce or prevent plastic deformation of the wafer as it enters and leaves the furnace. By processing the semiconductor wafer in a substantially isothermal cavity, the wafer temperature and spatial uniformity of the wafer temperature can be ensured by measuring and controlling only temperatures of the cavity walls. Further, peak power requirements are very small compared to lamp-heated RTPs because the cavity temperature is not cycled and the thermal mass of the cavity is relatively large. Increased speeds of insertion and/or removal may also be used with non-isothermal furnaces.

Griffiths, Stewart K. (Danville, CA); Nilson, Robert H. (Cardiss, CA); Mattson, Brad S. (Los Gatos, CA); Savas, Stephen E. (Alameda, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Thermal Characterization of Graphitic Carbon Foams for Use in Thermal Storage Applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Highly conductive graphitic foams are currently being studied for use as thermal conductivity enhancers (TCEs) in thermal energy storage (TES) systems. TES systems store (more)

Drummond, Kevin P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Experimental studies are presented that aim to utilize phase change materials (PCM's) to enhance thermal energy storage systems for concentrated solar thermal power (CSP) systems. (more)

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLAR POWER PLANTS, Eurosun 2010,COST REDUCTION STUDY FOR SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANTS, Ottawa,heat transfer in solar thermal power plants utilizing phase

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pennsylvania State University program in advanced thermally stable coal-based jet fuels has five broad objectives: (1) Development of mechanisms of degradation and solids formation; (2) Quantitative measurement of growth of sub-micrometer and micrometer-sized particles suspended in fuels during thermal stressing; (3) Characterization of carbonaceous deposits by various instrumental and microscopic methods; (4) Elucidation of the role of additives in retarding the formation of carbonaceous solids; (5) Assessment of the potential of production of high yields of cycloalkanes by direct liquefaction of coal. Future high-Mach aircraft will place severe thermal demands on jet fuels, requiring the development of novel, hybrid fuel mixtures capable of withstanding temperatures in the range of 400--500 C. In the new aircraft, jet fuel will serve as both an energy source and a heat sink for cooling the airframe, engine, and system components. The ultimate development of such advanced fuels requires a thorough understanding of the thermal decomposition behavior of jet fuels under supercritical conditions. Considering that jet fuels consist of hundreds of compounds, this task must begin with a study of the thermal degradation behavior of select model compounds under supercritical conditions. The research performed by The Pennsylvania State University was focused on five major tasks that reflect the objectives stated above: Task 1: Investigation of the Quantitative Degradation of Fuels; Task 2: Investigation of Incipient Deposition; Task 3: Characterization of Solid Gums, Sediments, and Carbonaceous Deposits; Task 4: Coal-Based Fuel Stabilization Studies; and Task 5: Exploratory Studies on the Direct Conversion of Coal to High Quality Jet Fuels. The major findings of each of these tasks are presented in this executive summary. A description of the sub-tasks performed under each of these tasks and the findings of those studies are provided in the remainder of this volume (Sections 1 through 5).

Schobert, H.H.

1999-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

Prater, L.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

On the thermalization of the $?$-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam system  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study theoretically the original $\\alpha$-Fermi-Pasta-Ulam (FPU) system with $N=16,32$ and $64$ masses connected by a nonlinear quadratic spring. Our approach is based on resonant wave-wave interaction theory. We show that the route to thermalization consists of three stages. The first one is associated with non-resonant three-wave interactions. At this short time scale, the dynamics is reversible; this stage coincides with the observation of recurrent phenomena in numerical simulations of the $\\alpha$-FPU. On a larger time scale, exact four-wave resonant interactions start to take place; however, we find that all quartets are isolated, preventing a full mixing of energy in the spectrum and thermalization. The last stage corresponds to six-wave resonant interactions. Those are responsible for the energy equipartition recently observed in numerical simulations. A key role in our finding is played by the {\\it Umklapp} (flip over) resonant interactions, typical of discrete systems.

Miguel Onorato; Lara Vozella; Davide Proment; Yuri V. Lvov

2014-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

417

High temperature solar thermal technology: The North Africa Market  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature solar thermal (HTST) technology offers an attractive option for both industrialized and non-industrialized countries to generate electricity and industrial process steam. The purpose of this report is to assess the potential market for solar thermal applications in the North African countries of Algeria, Egypt, Morocco and Tunisia. North Africa was selected because of its outstanding solar resource base and the variety of applications to be found there. Diminishing oil and gas resources, coupled with expanding energy needs, opens a large potential market for the US industry. The US high temperature solar trough industry has little competition globally and could build a large market in these areas. The US is already familiar with certain solar markets in North Africa due to the supplying of substantial quantities of US-manufactured flat plate collectors to this region.

Not Available

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Reduced Thermal Conductivity of Compacted Silicon Nanowires  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal-Barrier-Coating Applications, Journa of American Ceramicthermal conductivity materials are typically found among ceramicsThermal Conductivity of Porous Materials: Application to Thick Barrier Coatings, Journal of the European Ceramic

Yuen, Taylor S.

419

City of Dubuque- Solar Thermal Licensing Requirement  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The City of Dubuque requires a Solar Thermal License in order for a person to install a solar thermal project on a home or business. The requirement does not apply to solar photovoltaics. The...

420

Absorption Cooling Optimizes Thermal Design for Cogeneration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Contrary to popular concept, in most cases, thermal energy is the real VALUE in cogeneration and not the electricity. The proper consideration of the thermal demands is equal to or more important than the electrical demands. High efficiency two...

Hufford, P. E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Successfully Marketing Thermal Storage in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper first reviews the key hurdles to thermal energy storage. Next, case studies of three electric utility thermal storage marketing programs are reviewed. The results of these case studies. as well as advice and experiences from other...

McDonald, C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

A COMPUTATIONAL STUDY ON THERMAL CONDUCITIVITY OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

aspect ratio, weight fraction, and thermal resistance at the interface between the SWNTsA COMPUTATIONAL STUDY ON THERMAL CONDUCITIVITY OF CARBON NANOTUBE DISPERSED BIOLOGICAL NANOFLUIDS: Massachusetts Institute of Technology 2: School of Chemical, Biological and Materials Engineering, Oklahoma

Maruyama, Shigeo

423

Thermal pumping of light-emitting diodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The work presented here is a study of thermally enhanced injection in light-emitting diodes (LEDs). This effect, which we refer to as "thermal pumping", results from Peltier energy exchange from the lattice to charge ...

Gray, Dodd (Dodd J.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermal envelope..Branch Duct -Hot-Air Duct Outside Thermal Envelope. - - -Cold-Air Duct Outside Thermal Envelope =="-"Hot-Air Duct

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of thermal expansion between polymers and ceramics. However,of thermal expansion for selected ceramics, metals, andof thermal expansion for selected ceramics, metals, and

Warren, Clinton Gregory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT Thomas F.CENTRAL RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE progressCorporation, RECEIVER SOLAR THERMAL POWER SYSTEM, PHASE I,

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ADVANCED THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE CONCEPT DEFINITION STUDY FORSchilling. F. E. , Thermal Energy Storage Using PrestressedNo ~cumulate thermal energy storage. Estimate ESTrof2(

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

density, making direct thermal energy storage methods, e.g.reduced. Conventional thermal energy harvesting and storageharvesting, storage, and utilization of thermal energy has

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byand M.D. Sands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotCommercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, FebruarySixth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, June 19-Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, February

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, Februarythe Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. OceanSixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference. June 19-

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, FebruaryFifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference, FebruarySixth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. June 19-

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEAN Countries,"Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling," SeminarTHERMAL FOR COOLING ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGS OF COMMERCIAL

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor Fluctuating Low-GradeThermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor for Fluctuating Low-Thermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor for Fluctuating Low-

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALM.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion DraftDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryCompany. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission analysis

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

442

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants bySands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,development of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant-impact assessment ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants bySands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plantof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)field of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the portion of thermal energy that can be converted toof high-performance thermal energy harvesting systems, butreferred to as the thermal energy from low- temperature heat

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

A Magnetomechanical Thermal Energy Harvester With A Reversible Liquid Interface  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Mechanical Model of a Thermal Energy Harvesting Device,M, and Ferrari V. , Thermal energy harvesting throughand G. P. Carman, Thermal energy harvesting device using

He, Hong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionE. Hathaway. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. AElectric Company. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)the intermediate field of ocean thermal energy conversionII of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,and M.D. Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

Sullivan, S.M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Thermal Conductivity of Polycrystalline Semiconductors and Ceramics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Brown, C. M. ; Zhang, Q. ; Tritt, T. M. Nano Letters 2010,Monteiro, O. Microelectronics journal Tritt, T. M. , Thermal

Wang, Zhaojie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Battery Thermal Modeling and Testing (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation summarizes NREL battery thermal modeling and testing work for the DOE Annual Merit Review, May 9, 2011.

Smith, K.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Thermal Storage Options for HVAC Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THERMAL STORAGE OPTIONS FOR HVAC SYSTEMS B. N. Gidwani, P.E. Roy F. Weston, Inc. West Chester, Pennsylvania ABSTRACT With the ever-increasing cost of electricity and the high demand charges levied by utility compa nies, thermal storage... for cooling is rapidly becom ing a widely recognized method to lower cooling costs. There are three maior types of thermal stor age systems: ? Ice Storage: This utilizes the latent heat of fusion of ice for thermal storage. During off Deak periods...

Weston, R. F.; Gidwani, B. N.

457

Battery Thermal Management System Design Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Looks at the impact of cooling strategies with air and both direct and indirect liquid cooling for battery thermal management.

Pesaran, A.; Kim, G. H.

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Measurements of the Thermal Neutron Scattering Kernel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of the Thermal Neutron Scattering Kernel Li (Emily) Liu, Yaron Danon, Bjorn Becker and discussions Problems and Future study Questions #12;3 M. Mattes and J. Keinert, Thermal Neutron Scattering experimental data used was from 1973-1974! M. Mattes and J. Keinert, Thermal Neutron Scattering Data

Danon, Yaron

459

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA Hawaii Natural Energy Institute, School of Ocean depths of 20 m (surface water) and 1,000 m. OTEC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, the process of converting the ocean thermal energy into electricity. OTEC transfer function The relationship between

460

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene-vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments. 3 figs.

Salyer, I.O.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

462

Coshcous turbulence and its thermalization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Dissipation rate {mu}[cosh(k/k{sub c}) - 1] in Fourier space, which reduces to the Newtonian viscosity dissipation rate {nu}k{sup 2} for small k/k{sub c}, can be scaled to make a hydrodynamic system either actually or potentially converge to its Galerkin truncation. The former case acquires convergence to the truncation at a finite wavenumber k{sub G}; the latter realizes as the wavenumber grows to infinity. Intermittency reduction and vitiation of extended self-similarity (ESS) in the partially thermalized regime of turbulence are confirmed and clarified. Onsager's pictures of intermittent versus nonintermittent flows are visualized from thermalized numerical fields, showing cleanly spotty versus mistily uniform properties, the latter of which destroys self-organization and so the ESS property.

Zhu, Jian-zhou [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Taylor, Mark [SNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Solar Thermal Reactor Materials Characterization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current research into hydrogen production through high temperature metal oxide water splitting cycles has created a need for robust high temperature materials. Such cycles are further enhanced by the use of concentrated solar energy as a power source. However, samples subjected to concentrated solar radiation exhibited lifetimes much shorter than expected. Characterization of the power and flux distributions representative of the High Flux Solar Furnace(HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory(NREL) were compared to ray trace modeling of the facility. In addition, samples of candidate reactor materials were thermally cycled at the HFSF and tensile failure testing was performed to quantify material degradation. Thermal cycling tests have been completed on super alloy Haynes 214 samples and results indicate that maximum temperature plays a significant role in reduction of strength. The number of cycles was too small to establish long term failure trends for this material due to the high ductility of the material.

Lichty, P. R.; Scott, A. M.; Perkins, C. M.; Bingham, C.; Weimer, A. W.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Calculate thermal-expansion coefficients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To properly design and use process equipment, an engineer needs a sound knowledge of physical and thermodynamic property data. A lack of such knowledge can lead to design or operating mistakes that can be dangerous, costly or even fatal. One useful type of property data is the thermal-expansion coefficient. This article presents equations and tables to find the thermal-expansion coefficients of many liquids that contain carbon. These data are useful in process-engineering applications, including the design of relief systems which are crucial to safeguarding process equipment. Data are provided for approximately 350 compounds. A computer software program, which contains the thermophysical property data for all of the compounds discussed in this article, is available for $43 prepaid from the author (Carl L. Yaws, Box 10053, Lamar University, beaumont, TX 77710; Tel. 409-880-8787; fax 409-880-8404). The program is in ASCII format, which can be accessed by most other types of computer software.

Yaws, C.L. [Lamar Univ., Beaumont, TX (United States)

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Permanent magnet thermal energy system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved rotary magnet thermal generator system of the type having an array of magnets in alternating disposition coaxially disposed about and parallel with the shaft of a motor driving the rotary array and having a copper heat absorber and a ferro-magnetic plate fixed on a face of the heat absorber, includes as efficiency improver a plurality of heat sink plates extending beyond the ferro-magnet plate into a plenum through a respective plurality of close-fitting apertures. In a further embodimetn the heat sink plates are in thermal contact with sinusoidally convoluted tubing that both increases surface area and provides for optional heating of gases and/or fluids at the same time.

Gerard, F.

1985-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

466

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

Not Available

1992-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Electric thermal storage demonstration program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In early 1989, MMWEC, a joint action agency comprised of 30 municipal light departments in Massachusetts and one affiliate in Rhode Island, responded to a Department of Energy request to proposal for the Least Cost Utility Planning program. The MMWEC submission was for the development of a program, focused on small rural electric utilities, to promote the use of electric thermal storage heating systems in residential applications. In this progress report, cost savings at Bolyston light department is discussed. (JL)

Not Available

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

GCFR thermal-hydraulic experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal-hydraulic experimental studies performed and planned for the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) core assemblies are described. The experiments consist of basic studies performed to obtain correlations, and bundle experiments which provide input for code validation and design verification. These studies have been performed and are planned at European laboratories, US national laboratories, Universities in the US, and at General Atomic Company

Schlueter, G.; Baxi, C.B.; Dalle Donne, M.; Gat, U.; Fenech, H.; Hanson, D.; Hudina, M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

W-320 Project thermal modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of thermal analysis performed to provide a technical basis in support of Project W-320 to retrieve by sluicing the sludge in Tank 241-C-106 and to transfer into Tank 241-AY-102. Prior theraml evaluations in support of Project W-320 safety analysis assumed the availability of 2000 to 3000 CFM, as provided by Tank Farm Operations, for tank floor cooling channels from the secondary ventilation system. As this flow availability has no technical basis, a detailed Tank 241-AY-102 secondary ventilation and floor coating channel flow model was developed and analysis was performed. The results of the analysis show that only about 150 cfm flow is in floor cooLing channels. Tank 241-AY-102 thermal evaluation was performed to determine the necessary cooling flow for floor cooling channels using W-030 primary ventilation system for different quantities of Tank 241-C-106 sludge transfer into Tank 241-AY-102. These sludge transfers meet different options for the project along with minimum required modification of the ventilation system. Also the results of analysis for the amount of sludge transfer using the current system is presented. The effect of sludge fluffing factor, heat generation rate and its distribution between supernatant and sludge in Tank 241-AY-102 on the amount of sludge transfer from Tank 241-C-106 were evaluated and the results are discussed. Also transient thermal analysis was performed to estimate the time to reach the steady state. For a 2 feet sludge transfer, about 3 months time will be requirad to reach steady state. Therefore, for the purpose of process control, a detailed transient thermal analysis using GOTH Computer Code will be required to determine transient response of the sludge in Tank 241-AY-102. Process control considerations are also discussed to eliminate the potential for a steam bump during retrieval and storage in Tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102 respectively.

Sathyanarayana, K., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

470

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, Chin-Fu (Albany, CA); Doughty, Christine A. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Sandia National Laboratories: solar thermal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1developmentturbineredox-activeNational Solar Thermal Test Facilitysolarsolar

472

Odne Stokke Burheim Thermal Signature and Thermal Conductivities of PEM Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Odne Stokke Burheim Thermal Signature and Thermal Conductivities of PEM Fuel Cells Thesis-Holst for believing in me and for giving me the opportunity to join the work on the "Thermal Effects in Fuel cell The work presented here gives estimates on thermal gradients within the PEM fuel cell, an experimental

Kjelstrup, Signe

473

Simple, accurate, and precise measurements of thermal diffusivity in liquids using a thermal-wave cavity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simple, accurate, and precise measurements of thermal diffusivity in liquids using a thermal, and its application to the evaluation of the thermal diffusivity of liquids is described. The simplicity agreement was found with reported results in the literature. The accuracy of the thermal diffusivity

Mandelis, Andreas

474

The Need for a Full-Chip and Package Thermal Model for Thermally Optimized IC Designs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ceramic ball-grid array (CBGA) pack- age consisting of the chip (die), thermal interface material, heatThe Need for a Full-Chip and Package Thermal Model for Thermally Optimized IC Designs Wei Huang detailed die temperature with a full-chip thermal model at early design stages is important to discover

Skadron, Kevin

475

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA RIVERSIDE Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Thermal Stability Of Formohydroxamic Acid  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal stability of formohydroxamic acid (FHA) was evaluated to address the potential for exothermic decomposition during storage and its use in the uranium extraction process. Accelerating rate calorimetry showed rapid decomposition at a temperature above 65 {degree}?C; although, the rate of pressure rise was greater than two orders of magnitude less than the lower bound for materials which have no explosive properties with respect to transportation. FHA solutions in water and nitric acid did not reach runaway conditions until 150 {degree}?C. Analysis by differential scanning calorimetry showed that FHA melted at 67 {degree}?C and thermally decomposed at 90 {degree}?C with an enthalpy of -1924 J/g. The energics of the FHA thermal decomposition are comparable to those measured for aqueous solutions of hydroxylamine nitrate. Solid FHA should be stored in a location where the temperature does not exceed 20-25 {degree}?C. As a best practice, the solid material should be stored in a climate-controlled environment such as a refrigerator or freezer. FHA solutions in water are not susceptible to degradation by acid hydrolysis and are the preferred way to handle FHA prior to use.

Fondeur, F. F.; Rudisill, T. S.

2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

477

Thermal wake/vessel detection technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A computer-automated method for detecting a vessel in water based on an image of a portion of Earth includes generating a thermal anomaly mask. The thermal anomaly mask flags each pixel of the image initially deemed to be a wake pixel based on a comparison of a thermal value of each pixel against other thermal values of other pixels localized about each pixel. Contiguous pixels flagged by the thermal anomaly mask are grouped into pixel clusters. A shape of each of the pixel clusters is analyzed to determine whether each of the pixel clusters represents a possible vessel detection event. The possible vessel detection events are represented visually within the image.

Roskovensky, John K. (Albuquerque, NM); Nandy, Prabal (Albuquerque, NM); Post, Brian N (Albuquerque, NM)

2012-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

478

Thermal-treatment effect on the photoluminescence and gas-sensing properties of tungsten oxide nanowires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single-crystalline non-stoichiometric tungsten oxide nanowires were initially prepared using a simple solvothermal method. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) investigations indicate that the tungsten oxide nanowires exhibit various crystal defects, including stacking faults, dislocations, and vacancies. A possible defect-induced mechanism was proposed to account for the temperature-dependent morphological evolution of the tungsten oxide nanowires under thermal processing. Due to the high specific surface areas and non-stoichiometric crystal structure, the original tungsten oxide nanowires were highly sensitive to ppm level ethanol at room temperature. Thermal treatment under dry air condition was found to deteriorate the selectivity of room-temperature tungsten oxide sensors, and 400 {sup o}C may be considered as the top temperature limit in sensor applications for the solvothermally-prepared nanowires. The photoluminescence (PL) characteristics of tungsten oxide nanowires were also strongly influenced by thermal treatment.

Sun, Shibin [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061, Shandong (China)] [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061, Shandong (China); Chang, Xueting [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, Shandong (China)] [Institute of Materials Science and Engineering, Ocean University of China, Qingdao 266100, Shandong (China); Li, Zhenjiang, E-mail: zjli126@126.com [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061, Shandong (China)] [College of Electromechanical Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266061, Shandong (China)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

479

Thermal Dileptons as Fireball Thermometer and Chronometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermal dilepton radiation from the hot fireballs created in high-energy heavy-ion collisions provides unique insights into the properties of the produced medium. We first show how the predictions of hadronic many-body theory for a melting $\\rho$ meson, coupled with QGP emission utilizing a modern lattice-QCD based equation of state, yield a quantitative description of dilepton spectra in heavy-ion collisions at the SPS and the RHIC beam energy scan program. We utilize these results to systematically extract the excess yields and their invariant-mass spectral slopes to predict the excitation function of fireball lifetimes and (early) temperatures, respectively. We thereby demonstrate that future measurements of these quantities can yield unprecedented information on basic fireball properties. Specifically, our predictions quantify the relation between the measured and maximal fireball temperatures, and the proportionality of excess yields and total lifetime. This information can serve as a "caloric" curve to search for a first-order QCD phase transition, and to detect non-monotonous lifetime variations possibly related to critical phenomena.

Ralf Rapp; Hendrik van Hees

2014-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

480

Process of making cryogenically cooled high thermal performance crystal optics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed for constructing a cooled optic wherein one or more cavities are milled, drilled or formed using casting or ultrasound laser machining techniques in a single crystal base and filled with porous material having high thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. A non-machined strain-free single crystal can be bonded to the base to produce superior optics. During operation of the cooled optic, N[sub 2] is pumped through the porous material at a sub-cooled cryogenic inlet temperature and with sufficient system pressure to prevent the fluid bulk temperature from reaching saturation. 7 figs.

Kuzay, T.M.

1992-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "geo thermal non" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Process of making cryogenically cooled high thermal performance crystal optics  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for constructing a cooled optic wherein one or more cavities are milled, drilled or formed using casting or ultrasound laser machining techniques in a single crystal base and filled with porous material having high thermal conductivity at cryogenic temperatures. A non-machined strain-free single crystal can be bonded to the base to produce superior optics. During operation of the cooled optic, N.sub.2 is pumped through the porous material at a sub-cooled cryogenic inlet temperature and with sufficient system pressure to prevent the fluid bulk temperature from reaching saturation.

Kuzay, Tuncer M. (Naperville, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Novel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety Standard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

acceptance; o power and energy capability; o reliability; o lifetime and life cycle cost. ThereofNovel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety,Denmark. Temperature excursions and non-uniformity of the temperature inside the battery systems are the main concern

Andreasen, Søren Juhl

483

Lattice thermal conductivity of UO{sub 2} using ab-initio and classical molecular dynamics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We applied the non-equilibrium ab-initio molecular dynamics and predict the lattice thermal conductivity of the pristine uranium dioxide for up to 2000?K. We also use the equilibrium classical molecular dynamics and heat-current autocorrelation decay theory to decompose the lattice thermal conductivity into acoustic and optical components. The predicted optical phonon transport is temperature independent and small, while the acoustic component follows the Slack relation and is in good agreement with the limited single-crystal experimental results. Considering the phonon grain-boundary and pore scatterings, the effective lattice thermal conductivity is reduced, and we show it is in general agreement with the sintered-powder experimental results. The charge and photon thermal conductivities are also addressed, and we find small roles for electron, surface polaron, and photon in the defect-free structures and for temperatures below 1500?K.

Kim, Hyoungchul [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); High-Temperature Energy Materials Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136791 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Moo Hwan [Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Kaviany, Massoud, E-mail: kaviany@umich.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 (United States); Division of Advanced Nuclear Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

484

Kinetic evolution of the glasma and thermalization in heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In relativistic heavy ion collisions, a highly occupied gluonic matter is created shortly after initial impact, which is in a non-thermal state and often referred to as the Glasma. Successful phenomenology suggests that the glasma evolves rather quickly toward the thermal quark-gluon plasma and a hydrodynamic behavior emerges at very early time $\\sim \\hat{o}(1)$ fm/c. Exactly how such "apparent thermalization" occurs and connects the initial conditions to the hydrodynamic onset, remains a significant challenge for theory as well as phenomenology. We briefly review various ideas and recent progress in understanding the approach of the glasma to the thermalized quark-gluon plasma, with an emphasis on the kinetic theory description for the evolution of such far-from-equilibrium and highly overpopulated, thus weakly-coupled yet strongly interacting glasma.

Xu-Guang Huang; Jinfeng Liao

2014-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

485

Nanoscale thermal transport. II. 20032012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A diverse spectrum of technology drivers such as improved thermal barriers, higher efficiency thermoelectric energy conversion, phase-change memory, heat-assisted magnetic recording, thermal management of nanoscale electronics, and nanoparticles for thermal medical therapies are motivating studies of the applied physics of thermal transport at the nanoscale. This review emphasizes developments in experiment, theory, and computation in the past ten years and summarizes the present status of the field. Interfaces become increasingly important on small length scales. Research during the past decade has extended studies of interfaces between simple metals and inorganic crystals to interfaces with molecular materials and liquids with systematic control of interface chemistry and physics. At separations on the order of ?1?nm, the science of radiative transport through nanoscale gaps overlaps with thermal conduction by the coupling of electronic and vibrational excitations across weakly bonded or rough interfaces between materials. Major advances in the physics of phonons include first principles calculation of the phonon lifetimes of simple crystals and application of the predicted scattering rates in parameter-free calculations of the thermal conductivity. Progress in the control of thermal transport at the nanoscale is critical to continued advances in the density of information that can be stored in phase change memory devices and new generations of magnetic storage that will use highly localized heat sources to reduce the coercivity of magnetic media. Ultralow thermal conductivitythermal conductivity below the conventionally predicted minimum thermal conductivityhas been observed in nanolaminates and disordered crystals with strong anisotropy. Advances in metrology by time-domain thermoreflectance have made measurements of the thermal conductivity of a thin layer with micron-scale spatial resolution relatively routine. Scanning thermal microscopy and thermal analysis using proximal probes has achieved spatial resolution of 10?nm, temperature precision of 50 mK, sensitivity to heat flows of 10 pW, and the capability for thermal analysis of sub-femtogram samples.

Cahill, David G., E-mail: d-cahill@illinois.edu; Braun, Paul V. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering and the Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Chen, Gang [Department of Mechanical Engineering, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Clarke, David R. [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Fan, Shanhui [Department of Electrical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Goodson, Kenneth E. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States); Keblinski, Pawel [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States); King, William P. [Department of Mechanical Sciences and Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Mahan, Gerald D. [Department of Physics, Penn State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); Majumdar, Arun [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Maris, Humphrey J. [Department of Physics, Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island 02912 (United States); Phillpot, Simon R. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Florida, Gainseville, Florida 32611 (United States); Pop, Eric [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States); Shi, Li [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Texas, Autin, Texas 78712 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

486

Entropy current for non-relativistic fluid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study transport properties of a parity-odd, non-relativistic charged fluid in presence of background electric and magnetic fields. To obtain stress tensor and charged current for the non-relativistic system we start with the most generic relativistic fluid, living in one higher dimension and reduce the constituent equations along the light-cone direction. We also reduce the equation satisfied by the entropy current of the relativistic theory and obtain a consistent entropy current for the non-relativistic system (we call it "canonical form" of the entropy current). Demanding that the non-relativistic fluid satisfies the second law of thermodynamics we impose constraints on various first order transport coefficients. For parity even fluid, this is straight forward; it tells us positive definiteness of different transport coefficients like viscosity, thermal conductivity, electric conductivity etc. However for parity-odd fluid, canonical form of the entropy current fails to confirm the second law of thermodynamics. Therefore, we need to add two parity-odd vectors to the entropy current with arbitrary coefficients. Upon demanding the validity of second law, we see that one can fix these two coefficients exactly.

Nabamita Banerjee; Suvankar Dutta; Akash Jain; Dibakar Roychowdhury

2014-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

487

Thermal Strategies for High Efficiency Thermoelectric Power Generation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Strategies for High Efficiency Thermoelectric Power Generation Thermal Strategies for High Efficiency Thermoelectric Power Generation Developing integrated TE system...

488

Molecular Dynamic Study of Thermal Conductivity of Amorphous Nanoporous Silica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

as a thermal isolation layer. Ceramics International, 34(Thermal conductivity of highly porous zirconia. Journal of the European Ceramic

Coquil, Thomas; Fang, Jin; Pilon, Laurent

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Optimized Structures for Low-Profile Phase Change Thermal Spreaders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of High-Thermal-Conductivity Aluminum Nitride Ceramics,for a ceramic isolating material and the associated thermal

Sharratt, Stephen A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Thermal Interface Materials for Power Electronics Applications: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal resistance of the thermal interface material layer greatly affects the maximum temperature of the power electronics.

Narumanchi, S.; Mihalic, M.; Kelly, K.; Eesley, G.

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Thermal Performance of Phase Change Wallboard for Residential Cooling Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the discharge of thermal energy storage without releasingto low-energy cooling sources. Large thermal storage devices

Feustel, H.E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Recycling of Wasted Energy : ThermalOF THE DISSERTATION Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Commercial thermal distribution systems, Final report for CIEE/CEC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to the California Energy Commission (CEC 1998a), California commercial buildings account for 35% of statewide electricity consumption, and 16% of statewide gas consumption. Space conditioning accounts for roughly 16,000 GWh of electricity and 800 million therms of natural gas annually, and the vast majority of this space conditioning energy passes through thermal distribution systems in these buildings. In addition, 8600 GWh per year is consumed by fans and pumps in commercial buildings, most of which is used to move the thermal energy through these systems. Research work at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been ongoing over the past five years to investigate the energy efficiency of these thermal distribution systems, and to explore possibilities for improving that energy efficiency. Based upon that work, annual savings estimates of 1 kWh/ft{sup 2} for light commercial buildings, and 1-2 kWh/ft{sup 2} in large commercial buildings have been developed for the particular aspects of thermal distribution system performance being addressed by this project. Those savings estimates, combined with a distribution of the building stock based upon an extensive stock characterization study (Modera et al. 1999a), and technical penetration estimates, translate into statewide saving potentials of 2000 GWh/year and 75 million thermal/year, as well as an electricity peak reduction potential of 0.7 GW. The overall goal of this research program is to provide new technology and application knowledge that will allow the design, construction, and energy services industries to reduce the energy waste associated with thermal distribution systems in California commercial buildings. The specific goals of the LBNL efforts over the past year were: (1) to advance the state of knowledge about system performance and energy losses in commercial-building thermal distribution systems; (2) to evaluate the potential of reducing thermal losses through duct sealing, duct insulation, and improved equipment sizing; and (3) to develop and evaluate innovative techniques applicable to large buildings for sealing ducts and encapsulating internal duct insulation. In the UCB fan project, the goals were: (1) to develop a protocol for testing, analyzing and diagnosing problems in large commercial building built-up air handling systems, and (2) to develop low-cost measurement techniques to improve short term monitoring practices. To meet our stated goals and objectives, this project: (1) continued to investigate and characterize the performance of thermal distribution systems in commercial buildings; (2) performed energy analyses and evaluation for duct-performance improvements for both small and large commercial buildings; (3) developed aerosol injection technologies for both duct sealing and liner encapsulation in commercial buildings; and (4) designed energy-related diagnostic protocols based on short term measurement and used a benchmarking database to compare subject systems with other measured systems for certain performance metrics. This year's efforts consisted of the following distinct tasks: performing characterization measurements for five light commercial building systems and five large-commercial-building systems; analyzing the potential for including duct performance in California's Energy Efficiency Standards for Residential and Non-Residential Buildings (Title 24), including performing energy and equipment sizing analyses of air distribution systems using DOE 2.1E for non-residential buildings; conducting laboratory experiments, field experiments, and modeling of new aerosol injection technologies concepts for sealing and coating, including field testing aerosol-based sealing in two large commercial buildings; improving low-cost fan monitoring techniques measurements, and disseminating fan tools by working with energy practitioners directly where possible and publishing the results of this research and the tools developed on a web-site. The final report consists of five sections listed below. Each section includes its related

Xu, Tengfang; Bechu, Olivier; Carrie, Remi; Dickerhoff, Darryl; Fisk, William; Franconi, Ellen; Kristiansen, Oyvind; Levinson, Ronnen; McWilliams, Jennifer; Wang, Duo; Modera, Mark; Webster, Tom; Ring, Erik; Zhang, Qiang; Huizenga, Charlie; Bauman, Fred; Arens, Ed

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

ON THERMALIZATION IN GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS AND THE PEAK ENERGIES OF PHOTOSPHERIC SPECTRA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The low-energy spectral slopes of the prompt emission of most gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are difficult to reconcile with radiatively efficient optically thin emission models irrespective of the radiation mechanism. An alternative is to ascribe the radiation around the spectral peak to a thermalization process occurring well inside the Thomson photosphere. This quasi-thermal spectrum can evolve into the observed non-thermal shape by additional energy release at moderate to small Thomson optical depths, which can readily give rise to the hard spectral tail. The position of the spectral peak is determined by the temperature and Lorentz factor of the flow in the thermalization zone, where the total number of photons carried by the jet is established. To reach thermalization, dissipation alone is not sufficient and photon generation requires an efficient emission/absorption process in addition to scattering. We perform a systematic study of all relevant photon production mechanisms searching for possible conditions in which thermalization can take place. We find that a significant fraction of the available energy should be dissipated at intermediate radii, {approx}10{sup 10} to a few Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm, and the flow there should be relatively slow: the bulk Lorentz factor could not exceed a few tens for all but the most luminous bursts with the highest E {sub pk} values. The least restrictive constraint for successful thermalization, {Gamma} {approx}< 20, is obtained if synchrotron emission acts as the photon source. This requires, however, a non-thermal acceleration deep below the Thomson photosphere transferring a significant fraction of the flow energy to relativistic electrons with Lorentz factors between 10 and 100. Other processes require bulk flow Lorentz factors of order of a few for typical bursts. We examine the implications of these results to different GRB photospheric emission models.

Vurm, Indrek; Piran, Tsvi [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel)] [Racah Institute of Physics, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Lyubarsky, Yuri, E-mail: indrek.vurm@gmail.com [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)] [Physics Department, Ben-Gurion University, P.O. Box 653, Beer-Sheva 84105 (Israel)

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

495

Thermal blooming experiments. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goals of this program were to design an experiment for determining the effect of stimulated thermal Brillouin scattering (STBS) on single pulse laser propagation and to establish the ability of both a wave optics code and of linearized theory to predict the results of the experiment accurately. The second goal is particularly important because no experimental verification of analytical tools currently in use for single pulse high power laser propagation is available. When a high power laser propagates through the atmosphere, a small fraction of the laser energy is absorbed, creating acoustic waves that may move a significant distance transverse to the propagation direction during the pulse. Such waves lead to the well-known t{sup 3}-blooming refractive-index variations. When such blooming is sufficiently strong, the induced refractive-index alters the intensity profile of the beam farther along the propagation path. This altered intensity profile induces a somewhat different refractive-index profile that may reinforce the path-integrated t{sup 3} blooming. This self-enhancement may be called near-forward stimulated thermal Brillouin scattering (STBS). The design effort described here was carried out much like the proposed experimental program, which calls for the interaction of experimental work with analytical theory and with a wave optics code, A linearized theory of STBS was developed. Results from this theory were compared to output from a wave optics propagation code for several well defined sets of operating conditions. Once good agreement between theory and code simulation was obtained for these test conditions, the theory was used to define and operating regime for a laboratory scale thermal blooming experiment that would provide information relevant to high power laser propagation. A conceptual design for this experiment was then generated and, finally, and experimental set-up, including diagnostics, was proposed.

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Thermal Shock-resistant Cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We studied the effectiveness of sodium silicate-activated Class F fly ash in improving the thermal shock resistance and in extending the onset of hydration of Secar #80 refractory cement. When the dry mix cement, consisting of Secar #80, Class F fly ash, and sodium silicate, came in contact with water, NaOH derived from the dissolution of sodium silicate preferentially reacted with Class F fly ash, rather than the #80, to dissociate silicate anions from Class F fly ash. Then, these dissociated silicate ions delayed significantly the hydration of #80 possessing a rapid setting behavior. We undertook a multiple heating -water cooling quenching-cycle test to evaluate the cements resistance to thermal shock. In one cycle, we heated the 200 and #61616;C-autoclaved cement at 500 and #61616;C for 24 hours, and then the heated cement was rapidly immersed in water at 25 and #61616;C. This cycle was repeated five times. The phase composition of the autoclaved #80/Class F fly ash blend cements comprised four crystalline hydration products, boehmite, katoite, hydrogrossular, and hydroxysodalite, responsible for strengthening cement. After a test of 5-cycle heat-water quenching, we observed three crystalline phase-transformations in this autoclaved cement: boehmite and #61614; and #61543;-Al2O3, katoite and #61614; calcite, and hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite. Among those, the hydroxysodalite and #61614; carbonated sodalite transformation not only played a pivotal role in densifying the cementitious structure and in sustaining the original compressive strength developed after autoclaving, but also offered an improved resistance of the #80 cement to thermal shock. In contrast, autoclaved Class G well cement with and without Class F fly ash and quartz flour failed this cycle test, generating multiple cracks in the cement. The major reason for such impairment was the hydration of lime derived from the dehydroxylation of portlandite formed in the autoclaved cement, causing its volume to expand.

Sugama T.; Pyatina, T.; Gill, S.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Photon Clusters in Thermal Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Within the framework of Bose-Einstein statistics, it is shown that the blackbody radiation, in addition to single photons, contains photon clusters, or coalescent photons. The probability to find a k-photon cluster versus radiation frequency and temperature is found, as well as the statistics of clusters. Spectra of photon-cluster radiation are calculated as functions of blackbody temperature. The Planck's radiation law is derived based on the existence of photon clusters. The possibility of experimental observation of photon clusters in thermal radiation is discussed.

Aleksey Ilyin

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

498

Thermal well-test method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

499

Neutrino Physics with Thermal Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The investigation of fundamental neutrino properties like its mass and its nature calls for the design of a new generation of experiments. High sensitivity, high energy resolution, and versatility together with the possibility of a simple multiplexing scheme are the key features of future detectors for these experiments. Thermal detectors can combine all these features. This paper reviews the status and the perspectives for what concerns the application of this type of detectors to neutrino physics, focusing on direct neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double beta decay searches.

Nucciotti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano Bicocca and INFN Sezione di Milano-Bicocca Piazza della Scienza, 3, 20126 Milano (Italy)

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

500

Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:EnergyOpenTheOceanThermal