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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Competitive Generation Market Study -- California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A growing number of states are unbundling utility services with the objective of creating a competitive open retail market for electric energy and other traditionally regulated utility services. Currently, each state or region has its own approach to unbundling and dealing with various issues such as stranded assets, market power, generation and fuel portfolio requirements, transmission system operation, and electricity pricing. Existing generating asset value and technology choice for new generation pro...

1998-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

2

Next Generation Light Source  

•Next Generation Light Source – Super Thin Light Bulb, Energy Efficient, Long Life, Dimmable, and Uniform Illumination •High Entry Barrier – 71 ...

3

Market concentration and marketing power among electricity generators in Texas  

SciTech Connect

Policy initiatives designed to foster competition among electricity generators in Texas face a special challenge due to the relative isolation of that system. This isolation contributes to high levels of market concentration and market power that could hinder the development of a truly competitive market. This paper examines market concentration and market power in the ERCOT market for electricity generation by calculating the Herfindahl-Hirschman index (HHI) under various assumptions to gauge the degree of market concentration among generators in ERCOT. In addition, some ongoing studies of market power in ERCOT are discussed. The distinction between market concentration and market power is highlighted.

Zarnikau, J.; Lam, A. [Planergy Inc., Austin, TX (United States)

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Transacting generation attributes across market boundaries: Compatible information systems and the treatment of imports and exports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and green power marketing: increased investment ininvestment in renewable generation sources – the underlying goal of market mandates, disclosure requirements, and green

Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Calibrated vapor generator source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

Davies, John P. (Idaho Falls, ID); Larson, Ronald A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Goodrich, Lorenzo D. (Shelley, ID); Hall, Harold J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stoddard, Billy D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davis, Sean G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kaser, Timothy G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Conrad, Frank J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Calibrated vapor generator source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

1995-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

7

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source

8

AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source

9

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module AEOP2011:Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 97, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into Texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, Midwest reliability council and Northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB)

10

AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 96, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses billion kilowatthours. The data is broken down into texas regional entity, Florida reliability coordinating council, midwest reliability council and northeast power coordination council. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Electricity generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 400.2 KiB) Quality Metrics

11

Residential Power Systems for Distributed Generation Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an update to "Technology Assessment of Residential Power Systems for Distributed Generation Markets" (EPRIsolutions report 1000772). That previous report dealt with fuel cells, stirling engine generators, and reciprocating engine generators; this current report focuses on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) power systems fueled with natural gas or propane and sized for residential loads.

2002-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

12

Stochastic Market Equilibrium Model For Generation Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is widely accepted that medium-term generation planning can be advantageously modeled through market equilibrium representation. There exist several methods to define and solve this kind of equilibrium in a deterministic way. Medium-term planning ...

J. Barquín; E. Centeno; J. Reneses

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

4th Generation ECR Ion Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the 1980s. Second generation sources, which operate betweengenerations. First generation ECR sources operate between 5Two superconducting 3 rd generation ECR sources, VENUS and

Lyneis, Claude M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Next Generation Light Source Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the...

15

Fourth Generation Light Source Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Workshop on Scientific Opportunities for Fourth Generation Light The Workshop on Scientific Opportunities for Fourth Generation Light Sources October 27 to 29, 1997 at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. This workshop is being co-hosted by APS, NSLS, SSRL and TJNAF. FGLSlogo This workshop will explore the phenomenology of interactions with ultra-high-power, -brilliance, and -coherence light sources in the DUV, soft x-ray, and x-ray regimes, as well as the scientific opportunities they provide. The workshop will begin with tutorials on the generation and properties of these sources and identify issues in their use in experimentation. Also included will be an overview of current efforts to develop these sources and a review of the scientific opportunities defined by previous research and workshops. These background talks will be followed

16

Next Generation Light Source Workshops  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Light Source Workshops Next Generation Light Source Workshops A series of workshops will be held in late August with the goal of refining the scientific drivers for the facility and translating the scientific needs into the technical performance requirements. Feedback from these workshops will provide important input for advancing the design of the facility. Workshops are planned in the following areas Fundamental Atomic, Molecular, Optical Physics & Combustion Dynamics Mon. Aug. 20 - Tues. Aug 21, 2012 Physical Chemistry, Catalysis, & Photosynthesis Thurs. Aug. 23 - Fri. Aug 24, 2012 Quantum Materials, Magnetism & Spin Dynamics Mon. Aug. 27 - Tues. Aug 28, 2012 Materials & Bio-imaging at the Nanoscale Thurs. Aug. 30 - Fri. Aug 31, 2012 Further information is available on the workshop website:

17

Source codes as random number generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—A random number generator generates fair coin flips by processing deterministically an arbitrary source of nonideal randomness. An optimal random number generator generates asymptotically fair coin flips from a stationary ergodic source at a rate of bits per source symbol equal to the entropy rate of the source. Since optimal noiseless data compression codes produce incompressible outputs, it is natural to investigate their capabilities as optimal random number generators. In this paper we show under general conditions that optimal variable-length source codes asymptotically achieve optimal variable-length random bit generation in a rather strong sense. In particular, we show in what sense the Lempel–Ziv algorithm can be considered an optimal universal random bit generator from arbitrary stationary ergodic random sources with unknown distributions. Index Terms — Data compression, entropy, Lempel–Ziv algorithm, random number generation, universal source coding.

Karthik Visweswariah; Student Member; Sanjeev R. Kulkarni; Senior Member; Sergio Verdú

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Market Offering Strategies for Hydroelectric Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper considers the problem of offering electricity produced by a series of hydroelectric reservoirs to a pool-type central market. The market model is a simplified version of the New Zealand wholesale electricity market, with prices modelled by ... Keywords: Dynamic programming: finite state, markov, Natural resources: energy, water resources, Probability: markov processes

G. Pritchard; G. Zakeri

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and Outlook (Webinar) Focus Area: Water power Topics: Market Analysis Website: www.leonardo-energy.org/webinar-renewable-energy-electricity-generatio Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/renewable-energy-electricity-generati Language: English Policies: "Deployment Programs,Financial Incentives" is not in the list of possible values (Deployment Programs, Financial Incentives, Regulations) for this property. DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This video teaches the viewer about the current status and future

20

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study Title Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study Publication Type Report Refereed Designation Unknown Year of Publication 2011 Authors Cappers, Peter, Andrew D. Mills, Charles A. Goldman, Ryan H. Wiser, and Joseph H. Eto Pagination 76 Date Published 10/2011 Publisher LBNL City Berkeley Keywords demand response, electricity markets and policy group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, renewable generation integration, smart grid Abstract The penetration of renewable generation technology (e.g., wind, solar) is expected to dramatically increase in the United States during the coming years as many states are implementing policies to expand this sector through regulation and/or legislation. It is widely understood, though, that large scale deployment of certain renewable energy sources, namely wind and solar, poses system integration challenges because of its variable and often times unpredictable production characteristics (NERC, 2009). Strategies that rely on existing thermal generation resources and improved wind and solar energy production forecasts to manage this variability are currently employed by bulk power system operators, although a host of additional options are envisioned for the near future. Demand response (DR), when properly designed, could be a viable resource for managing many of the system balancing issues associated with integrating large-scale variable generation (VG) resources (NERC, 2009). However, demand-side options would need to compete against strategies already in use or contemplated for the future to integrate larger volumes of wind and solar generation resources. Proponents of smart grid (of which Advanced Metering Infrastructure or AMI is an integral component) assert that the technologies associated with this new investment can facilitate synergies and linkages between demand-side management and bulk power system needs. For example, smart grid proponents assert that system-wide implementation of advanced metering to mass market customers (i.e., residential and small commercial customers) as part of a smart grid deployment enables a significant increase in demand response capability.1 Specifically, the implementation of AMI allows electricity consumption information to be captured, stored and utilized at a highly granular level (e.g., 15-60 minute intervals in most cases) and provides an opportunity for utilities and public policymakers to more fully engage electricity customers in better managing their own usage through time-based rates and near-real time feedback to customers on their usage patterns while also potentially improving the management of the bulk power system. At present, development of time-based rates and demand response programs and the installation of variable generation resources are moving forward largely independent of each other in state and regional regulatory and policy forums and without much regard to the complementary nature of their operational characteristics.2 By 2020, the electric power sector is expected to add ~65 million advanced meters3 (which would reach ~47% of U.S. households) as part of smart grid and AMI4 deployments (IEE, 2010) and add ~40-80 GW of wind and solar capacity (EIA, 2010). Thus, in this scoping study, we focus on a key question posed by policymakers: what role can the smart grid (and its associated enabling technology) play over the next 5-10 years in helping to integrate greater penetration of variable generation resources by providing mass market customers with greater access to demand response opportunities? There is a well-established body of research that examines variable generation integration issues as well as demand response potential, but the nexus between the two has been somewhat neglected by the industry. The studies that have been conducted are informative concerning what could be accomplished with strong broad-based support for the expansion of demand response opportunities, but typically do not discuss the many barriers that stand in the way of reaching this potential. This study examines how demand side resources could be used to integrate wind and solar resources in the bulk power system, identifies barriers that currently limit the use of demand side strategies, and suggests several factors that should be considered in assessing alternative strategies that can be employed to integrate wind and solar resources in the bulk power system. It is difficult to properly gauge the role that DR could play in managing VG integration issues in the near future without acknowledging and understanding the entities and institutions that govern the interactions between variable generation and mass market customers (see Figure ES-1). Retail entities, like load-serving entities (LSE) and aggregators of retail customers (ARC), harness the demand response opportunities of mass market customers through tariffs (and DR programs) that are approved by state regulatory agencies or local governing entities (in the case of public power). The changes in electricity consumption induced by DR as well as the changes in electricity production due to the variable nature of wind and solar generation technologies is jointly managed by bulk power system operators. Bulk power system operators function under tariffs approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and must operate their systems in accordance with rules set by regional reliability councils. These reliability rules are derived from enforceable standards that are set by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) and approved by federal regulators. Thus, the role that DR can play in managing VG integration issues is contingent on what opportunities state and local regulators are willing to approve and how customers' response to the DR opportunities can be integrated into the bulk power system both electrically (due to reliability rules) and financially (due to market rules).

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Challenges of Third-Generation Synchrotron Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the list of third-generation sources developed by Professorthe design of third-generation sources arise directly fromparameters of the third-generation sources planned, or under

Jackson, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Electric Power Generation Expansion in Deregulated Markets.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The generation expansion problem involves increasing electric power generation capacity in an existing power network. In competitive environment, power producers, distributors, and consumers all make… (more)

KAYMAZ, PINAR

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Role of Electricity Markets and Market Design in Integrating Solar Generation: Solar Integration Series. 2 of 3 (Brochure)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The second out of a series of three fact sheets describing the role of electricity markets and market design in integrating solar generation.

Not Available

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Composition of Electricity Generation Portfolios, Pivotal Dynamics, and Market Prices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use simulations to study how the diversification of electricity generation portfolios influences wholesale prices. We find that the relationship between technological diversification and market prices is mediated by the supply-to-demand ratio. In ... Keywords: electricity, market power, simulations, technology diversification

Albert Banal-Estaòol; Augusto Rupérez Micola

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Competitive electricity markets and investment in new generating capacity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating ...

Joskow, Paul L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

the source. Climate Policy and Labor Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JEL No. J23,Q50 An important component of the debate surrounding climate legislation in the United States is its potential impact on labor markets. Theoretically the connection is ambiguous and depends on the sign of cross-elasticity of labor demand with respect to energy prices, which is a priori unknown. This paper provides some new evidence on this question by estimating the relationship between real electricity prices and indicators of labor market activity using data for 1976-2007. A key contribution of this analysis is that it relies on within-state variation in electricity prices to identify the models and considers all sectors of the U.S. economy rather than focusing only on the manufacturing sector. The main finding is that employment rates are weakly related to electricity prices with implied cross elasticity of full-time equivalent (FTE) employment with respect to electricity prices ranging from-0.16 % to-0.10%. I conclude by interpreting these empirical estimates in the context of increases in electricity prices consistent with H.R. 2454, the American Clean Energy and Security Act of 2009. The preferred estimates in this paper suggest that in the short-run, an increase in electricity price of 4 % would lead to a reduction in aggregate FTE

Olivier Deschenes; Olivier Deschenes; Olivier Deschenes

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

NGLS: Next Generation Light Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lab masthead Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Careers Search DOE logo Lab masthead Berkeley Lab A-Z Index Phone Book Careers Search DOE logo NGLS logo NGLS Science NGLS Technology Seminars Workshop/Reports Related Links Further Info NGLS Facility Combustion Photosynthesis Photosynthesis Photosynthesis Today is a golden age for light sources. Storage ring-based synchrotrons routinely provide X-ray beams exploited by thousands of scientists annually to answer fundamental questions in diverse fields including human health, energy, and electronics and information processing. MORE > NGLS Science Science section chart NGLS CD-0 Proposal NGLS Technology Technology section chart Seminars Science section chart Workshops Science section chart Last updated 06/21/2013 Top A U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratory Operated by the University

28

Generation Portfolio Migration Under Market Uncertainty  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power companies are facing a complex and unprecedented mix of changes in regulations and technologies, forcing them to alter their generation mix and make other significant changes in their energy portfolios at an extraordinary rate. To assess issues and methodologies that can assist decisions during this process of portfolio migration, this study examines the performance of a hypothetical portfolio of generating units undertaking different strategies of unit retrofits, retirements, and replacements exte...

2011-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

29

Using coalitions of wind generators and electric vehicles for effective energy market participation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind power is becoming a significant source of electricity in many countries. However, the inherent uncertainty of wind generators does not allow them to participate in the forward electricity markets. In this paper, we foster a tighter integration of ... Keywords: coalition formation, energy and emissions, organisations

Matteo Vasirani; Sascha Ossowski; Ramachandra Kota; Renato L. G. Cavalcante; Nicholas R. Jennings

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Market Design for Generation Adequacy: Healing Causes rather than Symptoms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.g. the Finnish nuclear reactor representing more than 10% of the installed capacity in Finland) or systems with a large share of nuclear generation in case of a generic problem (e.g. France) (Finon and Pignon, 2007). Another important issue to take... . The paper starts with an overview of the theory of energy and capacity pricing in electricity markets, highlighting the interdependencies in the sequence of markets involved in the provision of reliable electricity supplies in real time. It then details...

Roques, Fabien A

31

Role of Distributed Generation in U.S. Energy Markets, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presentation on EIA's projections of energy markets with particular focus on distributed generation.

Information Center

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Determining market power in deregulated generation markets by measuring price-cost margins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article. the author considers one of the more prominent examples of the SFE type by Aleksandr Rudkevich, Max Duckworth, and Richard Rosen (RDR). The conclusion of their paper, that fewer than 30 competitive firms (or, equivalently, an HHI over 333) likely constitute an impermissibly concentrated market, is a startling one, since it is unlikely that any deregulated electricity market will have this many competitors. In examining the source of the RDR conclusion in some detail and seeing where it goes awry, the author thinks it is possible to glean principles that can guide regulators to draw more sensible conclusions about the number of competitors required in these markets.

Falk, J.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Market Assessment of Retrofit Dual-Fuel Diesel Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reciprocating engines have long played an important role in the distributed resources market and should continue to provide end-use customers and energy companies benefits in both on-site and grid-connected power generation service. This report presents results of collaborative technical and economic market analyses with a major engine manufacturer to examine the prospects for conversion of existing diesel generators in the 500-2000 kW size range to dual-fuel (natural gas and diesel fuel) operation. Thes...

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

Secondary electron ion source neutron generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron generator employing an electron emitter, an ion source bombarded by the electrons from the electron emitter, a plasma containment zone, and a target situated between the plasma containment zone and the electron emitter. The target contains occluded deuterium, tritium, or a mixture thereof

Brainard, John P. (Albuquerque, NM); McCollister, Daryl R. (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A NEXT GENERATION LIGHT SOURCE FACILITY AT LBNL * J.N.FEL PERFORMANCE The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is aStudies for a Next Generation Light Source Facility at

Corlett, J.N.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Distributed Generation Market Study: Advanced Turbine System Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ultra high efficiency, environmental superiority, and cost competitiveness of advanced turbine systems (ATSs) makes them attractive candidates for use in the near future in distributed generation applications. This study found that ATS engines with the cost and performance characteristics provided by Allison Engine Company (Allison) could have a significant regional market in the 2000-2005 time period.

1999-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

37

Microwave generated plasma light source apparatus  

SciTech Connect

A microwave generated plasma light source including a microwave generator, a microwave cavity having a light reflecting member forming at least a portion of the cavity, and a member transparent to light and opaque to microwaves disposed across an opening of the cavity opposite the feeding opening through which the microwave generator is coupled. An electrodeless discharge bulb is disposed at a position in the cavity such that the cavity operates as a resonant cavity at least when the bulb is emitting light. In the bulb is encapsulated at least one discharge light emissive substance. The bulb has a shape and is sufficiently small that the bulb acts substantially as a point light source.

Yoshizawa, K.; Ito, H.; Kodama, H.; Komura, H.; Minowa, Y.

1985-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

38

Electricity generation from non-hydro renewable sources varies ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

May 2, 2012 Electricity generation from non-hydro renewable sources varies by state. Wind accounted for most non-hydro renewable generation in 2011, but sources of ...

39

Modeling the Market Potential of Hydrogen from Wind and Competing Sources: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Developed from the Wind Deployment Systems (WinDS) model, the Hydrogen Deployment Systems (HyDS) model is a computer model of U.S. market expansion of hydrogen production from wind and other sources over the next 50 years. The WinDS model was developed in 2003 to model the expansion of generation and transmission capacity in the U.S. electric sector spanning the next 50 years. It minimizes system-wide costs of meeting loads, reserve requirements, and emission constraints by building and operating new generators and transmission in 26 two-year periods from 2000 to 2050. While it includes all major types of conventional generators, the WinDS model focuses on addressing the market issues of greatest significance to wind-specifically issues of electricity transmission and intermittency.

Short, W.; Blair, N.; Heimiller, D.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Gravity-Capillary Lumps Generated by a Moving Pressure Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nonlinear wave pattern generated by a localized pressure source moving over a liquid free surface

Diorio, James

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Transacting generation attributes across market boundaries: Compatible information systems and the treatment of imports and exports  

SciTech Connect

Voluntary markets for ''green'' power, and mandatory policies such as fuel source disclosure requirements and renewables portfolio standards, each rely on the ability to differentiate electricity by the ''attributes'' of the generation. Throughout North America, electricity markets are devising accounting and verification systems for generation ''attributes'': those characteristics of a power plant's production such as fuel source and emissions that differentiate it from undifferentiated (or ''commodity'') electricity. These accounting and verification systems are intended to verify compliance with market mandates, create accurate disclosure labels, substantiate green power claims, and support emissions markets. Simultaneously, interest is growing in transacting (importing or exporting) generation attributes across electricity market borders, with or without associated electricity. Cross-border renewable attribute transactions have advantages and disadvantages. Broad access to markets may encourage more renewable generation at lower cost, but this result may conflict with desires to assure that at least some renewable resources are built locally to achieve either local policy goals or purchaser objectives. This report is intended to serve as a resource document for those interested in and struggling with cross-border renewable attribute transactions. The report assesses the circumstances under which renewable generation attributes from a ''source'' region might be recognized in a ''sink'' region. The report identifies several distinct approaches that might be used to account for and verify attribute import and export transactions, and assesses the suitability of these alternative approaches. Because policymakers have often made systems ''compatibility'' between market areas a pre-requisite to allowing cross-border renewable transactions, this report develops criteria for ''compatible information systems.'' Where fully compatible information systems do not exist, certain cross-border attribute transactions may still be deemed suitably credible and verifiable to be recognized; this report also identifies possible criteria for such ''compatible transactions.'' The importance of credibly addressing imports and exports of renewable energy attributes should be evident. A lack of clarity as to what generation can and cannot be recognized in various markets can paralyze investment in and contracting for renewable generation. The development of rules for imports and exports will also minimize the potential for ''double counting'' of renewable energy attributes, will help define where and at what cost renewable plants will be built, and will directly impact the location of the benefits that renewable generation provides. This report ultimately concludes that the ''correct'' approach to treating renewable energy imports and exports depends on the context and motivations behind the transaction or the mandate, and that the presence of practical constraints or multiple objectives of ten make selecting the best approach difficult. That said, the report urges those creating market rules to move quickly in defining valid cross-border transaction structures and to consider the implications of their decisions on the creation of viable markets for new renewable generation.

Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Transacting generation attributes across market boundaries: Compatible information systems and the treatment of imports and exports  

SciTech Connect

Voluntary markets for ''green'' power, and mandatory policies such as fuel source disclosure requirements and renewables portfolio standards, each rely on the ability to differentiate electricity by the ''attributes'' of the generation. Throughout North America, electricity markets are devising accounting and verification systems for generation ''attributes'': those characteristics of a power plant's production such as fuel source and emissions that differentiate it from undifferentiated (or ''commodity'') electricity. These accounting and verification systems are intended to verify compliance with market mandates, create accurate disclosure labels, substantiate green power claims, and support emissions markets. Simultaneously, interest is growing in transacting (importing or exporting) generation attributes across electricity market borders, with or without associated electricity. Cross-border renewable attribute transactions have advantages and disadvantages. Broad access to markets may encourage more renewable generation at lower cost, but this result may conflict with desires to assure that at least some renewable resources are built locally to achieve either local policy goals or purchaser objectives. This report is intended to serve as a resource document for those interested in and struggling with cross-border renewable attribute transactions. The report assesses the circumstances under which renewable generation attributes from a ''source'' region might be recognized in a ''sink'' region. The report identifies several distinct approaches that might be used to account for and verify attribute import and export transactions, and assesses the suitability of these alternative approaches. Because policymakers have often made systems ''compatibility'' between market areas a pre-requisite to allowing cross-border renewable transactions, this report develops criteria for ''compatible information systems.'' Where fully compatible information systems do not exist, certain cross-border attribute transactions may still be deemed suitably credible and verifiable to be recognized; this report also identifies possible criteria for such ''compatible transactions.'' The importance of credibly addressing imports and exports of renewable energy attributes should be evident. A lack of clarity as to what generation can and cannot be recognized in various markets can paralyze investment in and contracting for renewable generation. The development of rules for imports and exports will also minimize the potential for ''double counting'' of renewable energy attributes, will help define where and at what cost renewable plants will be built, and will directly impact the location of the benefits that renewable generation provides. This report ultimately concludes that the ''correct'' approach to treating renewable energy imports and exports depends on the context and motivations behind the transaction or the mandate, and that the presence of practical constraints or multiple objectives of ten make selecting the best approach difficult. That said, the report urges those creating market rules to move quickly in defining valid cross-border transaction structures and to consider the implications of their decisions on the creation of viable markets for new renewable generation.

Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

BWR Source Term Generation and Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

This calculation is a revision of a previous calculation (Ref. 7.5) that bears the same title and has the document identifier BBAC00000-01717-0210-00006 REV 01. The purpose of this revision is to remove TBV (to-be-verified) -41 10 associated with the output files of the previous version (Ref. 7.30). The purpose of this and the previous calculation is to generate source terms for a representative boiling water reactor (BWR) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assembly for the first one million years after the SNF is discharged from the reactors. This calculation includes an examination of several ways to represent BWR assemblies and operating conditions in SAS2H in order to quantify the effects these representations may have on source terms. These source terms provide information characterizing the neutron and gamma spectra in particles per second, the decay heat in watts, and radionuclide inventories in curies. Source terms are generated for a range of burnups and enrichments (see Table 2) that are representative of the waste stream and stainless steel (SS) clad assemblies. During this revision, it was determined that the burnups used for the computer runs of the previous revision were actually about 1.7% less than the stated, or nominal, burnups. See Section 6.6 for a discussion of how to account for this effect before using any source terms from this calculation. The source term due to the activation of corrosion products deposited on the surfaces of the assembly from the coolant is also calculated. The results of this calculation support many areas of the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR), which include thermal evaluation, radiation dose determination, radiological safety analyses, surface and subsurface facility designs, and total system performance assessment. This includes MGR items classified as Quality Level 1, for example, the Uncanistered Spent Nuclear Fuel Disposal Container (Ref. 7.27, page 7). Therefore, this calculation is subject to the requirements of the Quality Assurance Requirements and Description (Ref. 7.28). The performance of the calculation and development of this document are carried out in accordance with AP-3.124, ''Design Calculation and Analyses'' (Ref. 7.29).

J.C. Ryman

2003-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Gas Market Transition: Impacts of Power Generation on Gas Pricing Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power sector is beginning to influence the natural gas market, affecting both total natural gas demand and aspects of natural gas price behavior. This report offers a single source that quantifies these influences. With the addition of new gas-fired generating capacity, the use of gas generation in the power sector has grown steadily. However, this progression was arrested after 2002 when the brunt of overbuilding was felt, and gas use in the power sector migrated to ever more efficient units. While ...

2005-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

45

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source? In 2012, the United States generated about 4,054 billion kilowatthours of electricity. About 68% ...

46

Wind Generation in the Future Competitive California Power Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this work is to develop improved methods for assessing the viability of wind generation in competitive electricity markets. The viability of a limited number of possible wind sites is assessed using a geographic information system (GIS) to determine the cost of development, and Elfin, an electric utility production costing and capacity expansion model, to estimate the possible revenues and profits of wind farms at the sites. This approach improves on a simple profitability calculation by using a site-specific development cost calculation and by taking the effect of time varying market prices on revenues into account. The first component of the work is to develop data characterizing wind resources suitable for use in production costing and capacity expansion models, such as Elfin, that are capable of simulating competitive electricity markets. An improved representation of California wind resources is built, using information collected by the California Energy Commission (CE C) in previous site evaluations, and by using a GIS approach to estimating development costs at 36 specific sites. These sites, which have been identified as favorable for wind development, are placed on Digital Elevation Maps (DEMs) and development costs are calculated based on distances to roads and transmission lines. GIS is also used to develop the potential capacity at each site by making use of the physical characteristics of the terrain, such as ridge lengths. In the second part of the effort, using a previously developed algorithm for simulating competitive entry to the California electricity market, the Elfin model is used to gauge the viability of wind farms at the 36 sites. The results of this exercise are forecasts of profitable development levels at each site and the effects of these developments on the electricity system as a whole. Under best guess assumptions, including prohibition of new nuclear and coal capacity, moderate increase in gas prices and some decline in renewable capital costs, about 7.35 GW of the 10 GW potential capacity at the 36 specific sites is profitably developed and 62 TWh of electricity produced per annum by the year 2030. Most of the development happens during the earlier years of the forecast. Sensitivity of these results to future gas price scenarios is also presented. This study also demonstrates that an analysis based on a simple levelized profitability calculation approach does not sufficiently capture the implications of time varying prices in a competitive market.

Sezgen, O.; Marnay, C.; Bretz, S.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Emissions Benefits of Distributed Generation in the Texas Market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One potential benefit of distributed generation (DG) is a net reduction in air emissions. While DG will produce emissions, most notably carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides, the power it displaces might have produced more. This study used a system dispatch model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory to simulate the 2012 Texas power market with and without DG. This study compares the reduction in system emissions to the emissions from the DG to determine the net savings. Some of the major findings are that 85% of the electricity displaced by DG during peak hours will be simple cycle natural gas, either steam or combustion turbine. Even with DG running as baseload, 57% of electricity displaced will be simple cycle natural gas. Despite the retirement of some gas-fired steam units and the construction of many new gas turbine and combined cycle units, the marginal emissions from the system remain quite high (1.4 lb NO{sub x}/MWh on peak and 1.1 lb NO{sub x}/MWh baseload) compared to projected DG emissions. Consequently, additions of DG capacity will reduce emissions in Texas from power generation in 2012. Using the DG exhaust heat for combined heat and power provides an even greater benefit, since it eliminates further boiler emissions while adding none over what would be produced while generating electricity. Further studies are warranted concerning the robustness of the result with changes in fuel prices, demands, and mixes of power generating technology.

Hadley, SW

2005-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

48

A market and engineering study of a 3-kilowatt class gas turbine generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market and engineering studies were performed for the world's only commercially available 3 kW class gas turbine generator, the IHI Aerospace Dynajet. The objectives of the market study were to determine the competitive ...

Monroe, Mark A. (Mark Alan)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mass Market Demand Response and Mass Market Demand Response and Mass Market Demand Response and Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: Variable Generation Integration Issues: Variable Generation Integration Issues: Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study A Scoping Study Peter Cappers, Andrew Mills, Charles Goldman, Ryan Wiser, Joseph H. Eto Report Summary October 2011 Energy Analysis Department  Electricity Markets and Policy Group 1 1 Presentation Overview Presentation Overview  Objectives and Approach  Variable Generation Resources and the Bulk Power System  Demand Response Opportunities  Demand Response as a Strategy to Integrate p gy g Variable Generation Resources  Comparison of Various Strategies to Integrate Variable Generation  Conclusions Energy Analysis Department  Electricity Markets and Policy Group

50

Scenario Generation for Price Forecasting in Restructured Wholesale Power Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In current restructured wholesale power markets, the short length of time series for prices makes it difficult to use empirical price data to test existing price forecasting tools and to develop new price forecasting tools. This study therefore proposes a two-stage approach for generating simulated price scenarios based on the available price data. The first stage consists of an Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) model for determining scenarios of cleared demands and scheduled generator outages (D&O), and a moment-matching method for reducing the number of D&O scenarios to a practical scale. In the second stage, polynomials are fitted between D&O and wholesale power prices in order to obtain price scenarios for a specified time frame. Time series data from the Midwest ISO (MISO) are used as a test system to validate the proposed approach. The simulation results indicate that the proposed approach is able to generate price scenarios for distinct seasons with empirically realistic characteristics.

Qun Zhou; Leigh Tesfatsion; Chen-Ching Liu

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

System Design Document: Hardware Accelerated Market Order Packet Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document specifies the design of Hardware Accelerated Market Order Packet Generator. The designed system aims at accelerating the release of packets on the network. Optimization is acheived in terms of reducing the latency, decreasing the data uploaded on the Avalon bus which will eventually lead to power optimization. A software application running on a soft-processor would change the transaction-data going over the network in runtime. This document describes the overall architecture of the system, along with describing the design of the custom ethernet accelerator. Typically the ethernet controller should be capable of receiving and sending data over the network. Our implementation will accelerate the sending of data to the network. The receiving of data will still be handled in software.

Ankur Gupta; Dhananjay Palshikar; Mithila Paryekar; Sushant Bhardwaj

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

The effect of falling market concentration on prices, generator behaviour and productive efficiency in the England and Wales electricity market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A universal prediction of the various oligopoly models used to predict and explain behaviour in the England and Wales (E&W) electricity wholesale market is that divestiture of plants by the two large incumbent generators ...

Sweeting, Andrew

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Relationship Between Wind Generation and Balancing Energy Market Prices in ERCOT: 2007-2009  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper attempts to measure the average marginal effects of wind generation on the balancing-energy market price in ERCOT with the help of econometric analysis.

Nicholson, E.; Rogers, J.; Porter, K.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Transacting generation attributes across market boundaries: Compatible information systems and the treatment of imports and exports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy attribute laws and market rules have declared that recognizing such generators’ attributes may be contingent on the presence of a “compatible informationinformation system or policy. In any market area where an energyMarket Boundaries: Compatible Information Systems and the Treatment of Imports and Exports Robert Grace Sustainable Energy

Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Unbundling generation and transmission services for competitive electricity markets  

SciTech Connect

Ancillary services are those functions performed by the equipment and people that generate, control, and transmit electricity in support of the basic services of generating capacity, energy supply, and power delivery. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) defined such services as those `necessary to support the transmission of electric power from seller to purchaser given the obligations of control areas and transmitting utilities within those control areas to maintain reliable operations of the interconnected transmission system.` The nationwide cost of ancillary services is about $12 billion a year, roughly 10% of the cost of the energy commodity. More important than the cost, however, is the necessity of these services for bulk-power reliability and for the support of commercial transactions. FERC`s landmark Order 888 included a pro forma tariff with provision for six key ancillary services. The Interconnected Operations Services Working Group identified another six services that it felt were essential to the operation of bulk-power systems. Several groups throughput the United States have created or are forming independent system operators, which will be responsible for reliability and commerce. To date, the electricity industry (including traditional vertically integrated utilities, distribution utilities, power markets and brokers, customers, and state and federal regulators) has paid insufficient attention to these services. Although the industry had made substantial progress in identifying and defining the key services, much remains to be doe to specify methods to measure the production, delivery, and consumption of these services; to identify the costs and cost-allocation factors for these services; and to develop market and operating rules for their provision and pricing. Developing metrics, determining costs, and setting pricing rules are important because most of these ancillary services are produced by the same pieces of equipment that produce the basic electricity commodity. Thus, the production of energy and ancillary services is highly interactive, sometimes complementary and sometimes competing. In contrast to today`s typical time-invariant, embedded-cost prices, competitive prices for ancillary services would vary with system loads and spot prices for energy.

Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Do Generation Firms in Restructured Electricity Markets Have Incentives to Support Socially-Efficient Transmission Investments? *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that generation firms have in restructured electricity markets for supporting long-term transmission investments electricity markets, have the incentives to fund or support social-welfare-improving transmission investments.S. transmission system is under stress (Abraham, 2002). Growth of electricity demand and new generation capacity

57

Potential Applications for Nuclear Energy besides Electricity Generation: AREVA Global Perspective of HTR Potential Market  

SciTech Connect

Energy supply is increasingly showing up as a major issue for electricity supply, transportation, settlement, and process heat industrial supply including hydrogen production. Nuclear power is part of the solution. For electricity supply, as exemplified in Finland and France, the EPR brings an immediate answer; HTR could bring another solution in some specific cases. For other supply, mostly heat, the HTR brings a solution inaccessible to conventional nuclear power plants for very high or even high temperature. As fossil fuels costs increase and efforts to avoid generation of Greenhouse gases are implemented, a market for nuclear generated process heat will develop. Following active developments in the 80's, HTR have been put on the back burner up to 5 years ago. Light water reactors are widely dominating the nuclear production field today. However, interest in the HTR technology was renewed in the past few years. Several commercial projects are actively promoted, most of them aiming at electricity production. ANTARES is today AREVA's response to the cogeneration market. It distinguishes itself from other concepts with its indirect cycle design powering a combined cycle power plant. Several reasons support this design choice, one of the most important of which is the design flexibility to adapt readily to combined heat and power applications. From the start, AREVA made the choice of such flexibility with the belief that the HTR market is not so much in competition with LWR in the sole electricity market but in the specific added value market of cogeneration and process heat. In view of the volatility of the costs of fossil fuels, AREVA's choice brings to the large industrial heat applications the fuel cost predictability of nuclear fuel with the efficiency of a high temperature heat source free of greenhouse gases emissions. The ANTARES module produces 600 MWth which can be split into the required process heat, the remaining power drives an adapted prorated electric plant. Depending on the process heat temperature and power needs, up to 80 % of the nuclear heat is converted into useful power. An important feature of the design is the standardization of the heat source, as independent as possible of the process heat application. This should expedite licensing. The essential conditions for success include: 1. Timely adapted licensing process and regulations, codes and standards for such application and design; 2. An industry oriented R and D program to meet the technological challenges making the best use of the international collaboration. Gen IV could be the vector; 3. Identification of an end user (or a consortium of) willing to fund a FOAK. (authors)

Soutworth, Finis; Gauthier, Jean-Claude; Lecomte, Michel [AREVA, 3315 Old Forest Road, Lynchburg, Virginia, 24506 (United States); Carre, Franck [CEA, Saclay (France)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Source Terms in a Third-Generation Wind Wave Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new third-generation ocean wind wave model is presented. This model is based on previously developed input and nonlinear interaction source terms and a new dissipation source term. It is argued that the dissipation source term has to be modeled ...

Hendrik L. Tolman; Dmitry Chalikov

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity markets in the United States are undergoing unprecedented structural changes as a result of the confluence of regulatory, competitive, and technological forces. This paper will introduce the role of distributed generation technologies in evolving electric markets and will review both current and emerging distributed generation technologies aimed at retail industrial, commercial and residential markets. This paper will draw upon several Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI) and member utility case studies involving the assessment of distributed generation in premium power service, standby power and industrial cogeneration applications. In addition, EPRI products and services which can help evaluate energy service options involving distributed generation will also be briefly reviewed.

Rastler, D. M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Particle beam generator using a radioactive source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

Underwood, D.G.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Particle beam generator using a radioactive source  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The apparatus of the present invention selects from particles emitted by a radioactive source those particles having momentum within a desired range and focuses the selected particles in a beam having at least one narrow cross-dimension, and at the same time attenuates potentially disruptive gamma rays and low energy particles. Two major components of the present invention are an achromatic bending and focusing system, which includes sector magnets and quadrupole, and a quadrupole doublet final focus system. Permanent magnets utilized in the apparatus are constructed of a ceramic (ferrite) material which is inexpensive and easily machined.

Underwood, D.G.

1993-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

62

Soap Manufacturing TechnologyChapter 13 Soap Making Raw Materials: Their Sources, Specifications, Markets, and Handling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soap Manufacturing Technology Chapter 13 Soap Making Raw Materials: Their Sources, Specifications, Markets, and Handling Surfactants and Detergents eChapters Surfactants - Detergents Press Downloadable pdf of\tCha

63

A Next Generation Light Source Facility for LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Next Generation Light Source Facility for LBNL NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab websites are accessible, but may not be updated until Congress...

64

A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL Author: Corlett, J.N. Publication Date: 04-12-2011 Publication Info: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Permalink: http://escholarship.org/uc/item/81t3h97w Keywords: NGLS, FEL, 2 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, high-brightness, highrepetition- rate, high- repetition-rate (1 MHz) Local Identifier: LBNL Paper LBNL-4391E Preferred Citation:

65

generation of renewable energy tech-nologies, now coupled with market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Geller, Energy Revolution: Policies for a Sustainable Future (Island, Washington, DC, 2003). 3. PA generation of renewable energy tech- nologies, now coupled with market mechanisms that make them with the deregulation of energy markets, as well as the California energy crisis, the Enron energy deba- cle

Kammen, Daniel M.

66

Design of novel hybrid controller for automatic generation control of hydrothermal system under open market scenario  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the analysis of Automatic generation control (AGC) of a two-area hydrothermal system under open market scenario by considering a novel hybrid controller which combines the principles of variable structure controller (VSC) and conventional ... Keywords: AGC, VSC, deregulated system, hybrid controller, hydrothermal system, open market system

C. Srinivasa Rao; S. Siva Nagaraju; P. Sangameswara Raju

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Assessment of the Distributed Generation Market Potential for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Distributed the Distributed Generation Market Potential for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells September 29, 2013 DOE/NETL- 342/093013 NETL Contact: Katrina Krulla Analysis Team: Arun Iyengar, Dale Keairns, Dick Newby Contributors: Walter Shelton, Travish Shulltz, Shailesh Vora OFFICE OF FOSSIL ENERGY Table of Contents Executive Summary .........................................................................................................................1 1 Introduction ...................................................................................................................................2 2 DG Market Opportunity ................................................................................................................3 3 SOFC Technology Development Plan ..........................................................................................6

68

Sapphire - A High Peak Brightness X-Ray Source as a Possible Option for a Next Generation UK Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sapphire - A High Peak Brightness X-Ray Source as a Possible Option for a Next Generation UK Light Source

Walker, R P; Christou, C; Han, J H; Kay, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Updating Small Generator Interconnection Procedures for New Market Conditions  

SciTech Connect

Federal and state regulators are faced with the challenge of keeping interconnection procedures updated against a backdrop of evolving technology, new codes and standards, and considerably transformed market conditions. This report is intended to educate policymakers and stakeholders on beneficial reforms that will keep interconnection processes efficient and cost-effective while maintaining a safe and reliable power system.

Coddington, M.; Fox, K.; Stanfield, S.; Varnado, L.; Culley, T.; Sheehan, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Wind Generators and Market Power: Does it matter who owns them?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity production from wind generators holds significant importance in European Union’s 20 % renewable energy target by 2020. In this paper, I show that ownership of wind generators affects market outcomes by using both a Cournot oligopoly model and a real options model. In the Cournot oligopoly model, ownership of the wind generators by owners of fossil-fueled (peakload) generators decreases total peakload production and increases the market price. These effects increase with total wind generation and aggregate wind generator ownership. In the real options model, start up and shut down price thresholds are significantly higher when the monopolist at the peakload level owns both types of generators. Furthermore, when producing electricity with the peakload generator, the monopolist can avoid facing prices below marginal cost by owning a certain share of the wind generators.

Nihat Misir

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Online energy generation scheduling for microgrids with intermittent energy sources and co-generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microgrids represent an emerging paradigm of future electric power systems that can utilize both distributed and centralized generations. Two recent trends in microgrids are the integration of local renewable energy sources (such as wind farms) and the ... Keywords: combined heat and power generation, energy generation scheduling, microgrids, online algorithm

Lian Lu; Jinlong Tu; Chi-Kin Chau; Minghua Chen; Xiaojun Lin

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Market Power and Technological Bias: The Case of Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collective output isQg, and intermittent generators (which we will assume here is wind generation) whose output is assumed to have a fixed and stochastic component Qw,0+ ?w. We assume that E[?w] = 0 and V ar[?w] = ?2w. The intermittent output is produced by a... conventional generation assets. In equilibrium demand matches supply: DT = Qg +Qw,0 + ?w, (2) and using (1) gives: p = D0 ? b(Qg +Qw,0 + ?w). (3) We assume that a conventional generator has a quadratic cost function: Cg(Qg) = ?Qg + ? 2Q 2 g, (4) and thus...

Twomey, Paul; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

73

Fifth-Generation Free-Electron Laser Light Sources  

SciTech Connect

During the past few years, the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) and the Free-Electron Laser in Hamburg (FLASH) have demonstrated the outstanding capability of free-electron lasers (FELs) as sources of coherent radiation in the soft and hard x-ray region. The high intensity, tens of GW, short pulses (few to less than 100 femtoseconds, and the unique transverse coherence properties are opening a new window to study the structure and dynamics of atomic and molecular systems. The LCLS, FLASH, and the other FELs now under construction are only the beginning of the development of these light sources. The next generations will reach new levels of performance: terawatt, atto-second, ultra-small line-width, high repetition rate, full longitudinal and transverse coherence. These future developments and the R&D needed to successfully build and operate the next generation of FEL light sources will be discussed.

Pellegrini, Claudio [UCLA

2011-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

74

Generation reliability assessment in power markets using Monte Carlo simulation and soft computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deregulation policy has caused some changes in the concepts of power systems reliability assessment and enhancement. In the present research, generation reliability is considered, and a method for its assessment is proposed using intelligent systems. ... Keywords: Generation reliability, Intelligent systems, Monte Carlo simulation, Power pool market

H. Haroonabadi; M. -R. Haghifam

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Generation reliability assessment in power pool market using MCS and intelligent systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Deregulation policy has caused some changes in the concepts of power systems reliability assessment and enhancement. In this paper, generation reliability is considered, and a method for its assessment using intelligent systems is proposed. Also, because ... Keywords: generation reliability, intelligent systems, monte carlo simulation, power pool market

H. Haroonabadi; M.-R. Haghifam

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

The Natural Gas Market Model: Equations and data sources  

SciTech Connect

In 1981, EIA began a major study of the impact of natural gas deregulation. Through 1981, the major product of that study was the August 1981 EIA analysis paper entitled ''Analysis of Economic Effects of Accelerated Deregulation of Natural Gas Prices.'' That paper will be referred to as the ''Deregulation Study'' below. The Natural Gas Market Model (NGMM) was the primary model used to produce the forecasts discussed in the Deregulation Study. A modified version of NGMM has been used in the initial runs of the EIA Extended Short-term Forecasting System (ESFS), which is still under development. The purpose of this paper is to provide a comprehensive description of what NGMM is, and of the inputs used with NGMM for the Deregulation Study. The Deregulation Study, and the many documentation reports it cites, contain much information about the substantive studies which led up to the forecasts; however, it does not provide enough detail on how these studies were brought together to permit either a replication or an in-depth evaluation of the forecasts. EIA standards require that models be documented in enough detail to permit replication. This report attempts to fill that gap in documentation, on the basis of a line-by-line audit of the model code, interviews with the model developers, and a replication of the model in the user-oriented system Troll. The report mentions the mechanics of how the solutions are obtained, but not in complete detail. 2 figs., 6 tabs.

Werbos, P.J.

1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

A field evaporation deuterium ion source for neutron generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proof-of-principle experiments have demonstrated an electrostatic field evaporation based deuterium ion source for use in compact, high-output deuterium-tritium neutron generators. The ion source produces principally atomic deuterium and titanium ions. More than 100 monolayers of deuterated titanium thin film can be removed and ionized from a single tip in less than 20 ns. The measurements indicate that with the use of microfabricated tip arrays the deuterium ion source could provide sufficient ion current to produce 10^9 to 10^10 n/cm^2 of tip array area.

Reichenbach, Birk; Schwoebel, P R; 10.1063/1.2913331

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Design of a Nb3Sn Magnet for a 4th Generation ECR Ion Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fourth generation electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (design of a 4th. generation ECR ion source operating at ann Magnet for a 4th Generation E C R Ion Source S. Prestemon,

Prestemon, S,

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Internal Combustion Engine Advances for Distributed Generation Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internal combustion engines (ICEs) can play a potentially significant role as a distributed generation resource. This report provides intelligence on vendor programs and on advances in ICE technology that could lead to commercial offerings within a 2-5 year time frame.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

80

Surface plasma source with saddle antenna radio frequency plasma generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototype RF H{sup -} surface plasma source (SPS) with saddle (SA) RF antenna is developed which will provide better power efficiency for high pulsed and average current, higher brightness with longer lifetime and higher reliability. Several versions of new plasma generators with small AlN discharge chambers and different antennas and magnetic field configurations were tested in the plasma source test stand. A prototype SA SPS was installed in the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) ion source test stand with a larger, normal-sized SNS AlN chamber that achieved unanalyzed peak currents of up to 67 mA with an apparent efficiency up to 1.6 mA/kW. Control experiments with H{sup -} beam produced by SNS SPS with internal and external antennas were conducted. A new version of the RF triggering plasma gun has been designed. A saddle antenna SPS with water cooling is fabricated for high duty factor testing.

Dudnikov, V.; Johnson, R. P. [Muons, Inc., Batavia, Illinios 60510 (United States); Murray, S.; Pennisi, T.; Piller, C.; Santana, M.; Stockli, M.; Welton, R. [ORNL, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Integrating Small Scale Distributed Generation into a Deregulated Market: Control Strategies and Price Feedback  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Small scale power generating technologies, such as gas turbines, small hydro turbines, photovoltaics, wind turbines and fuel cells, are gradually replacing conventional generating technologies, for various applications, in the electric power system. The industry restructuring process in the United States is exposing the power sector to market forces, which is creating competitive structures for generation and alternative regulatory structures for the transmission and distribution systems. The potentially conflicting economic and technical demands of the new, independent generators introduce a set of significant uncertainties. What balance between market forces and centralized control will be found to coordinate distribution system operations? How will the siting of numerous small scale generators in distribution feeders impact the technical operations and control of the distribution system? Who will provide ancillary services (such as voltage support and spinning reserves) in the new competitive environment? This project investigates both the engineering and market integration of distributed generators into the distribution system. On the technical side, this project investigates the frequency performance of a distribution system that has multiple small scale generators. Using IEEE sample distribution systems and new dynamic generator models, this project develops general methods for

Judith Cardell; Marija Ili?; Richard D. Tabors

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Market  

... and its contributions to society and the economy; The marketing group values suggestions from researchers regarding companies to approach.

83

Generating polarization controllable FELs at Dalian coherent light source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The property of the FEL polarization is of great importance to the user community. FEL pulses with ultra-high intensity and flexible polarization control ability will absolutely open up new scientific realms. In this paper, several polarization control approaches are presented to investigate the great potential on Dalian coherent light source, which is a government-approved novel FEL user facility with the capability of wavelength continuously tunable in the EUV regime of 50-150 nm. The numerical simulations show that both circularly polarized FELs with highly modulating frequency and 100 microjoule level pulse energy could be generated at Dalian coherent light source.

Zhang, T; Wang, D; Zhao, Z T; Zhang, W Q; Wu, G R; Dai, D X; Yang, X M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Next-generation building energy management systems and implications for electricity markets.  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. national electric grid is facing significant changes due to aggressive federal and state targets to decrease emissions while improving grid efficiency and reliability. Additional challenges include supply/demand imbalances, transmission constraints, and aging infrastructure. A significant number of technologies are emerging under this environment including renewable generation, distributed storage, and energy management systems. In this paper, we claim that predictive energy management systems can play a significant role in achieving federal and state targets. These systems can merge sensor data and predictive statistical models, thereby allowing for a more proactive modulation of building energy usage as external weather and market signals change. A key observation is that these predictive capabilities, coupled with the fast responsiveness of air handling units and storage devices, can enable participation in several markets such as the day-ahead and real-time pricing markets, demand and reserves markets, and ancillary services markets. Participation in these markets has implications for both market prices and reliability and can help balance the integration of intermittent renewable resources. In addition, these emerging predictive energy management systems are inexpensive and easy to deploy, allowing for broad building participation in utility centric programs.

Zavala, V. M.; Thomas, C.; Zimmerman, M.; Ott, A. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Citizens Utility Board); (BuildingIQ Pty Ltd, Australia); (PJM Interconnection LLC)

2011-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

85

Impacts of Electric Industry Restructuring on Electric Generation and Fuel Markets: Analytical and Business Challenges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Restructuring and increasing competition are likely to have a major impact on electric generating companies and the individuals and organizations that buy, transport, market, or supply fuels. Restructuring may also affect the patterns of coal and gas use. This report, the first in a series by EPRI and the Gas Research Institute (GRI), describes the scope of these potential impacts.

1997-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

86

A multistage model for distribution expansion planning with distributed generation in a deregulated electricity market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distribution systems management is becoming an increasingly complicated issue due to the introduction of new technologies, new energy trading strategies and a new deregulated environment. In the new deregulated energy market and considering the incentives ... Keywords: GAMS-MATLAB interface, distributed generation (DG), distribution company (DISCO), investment payback time, microturbine, social welfare

S. Porkar; A. Abbaspour-Tehrani-Fard; P. Poure; S. Saadate

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

EVALUATION OF PV GENERATION CAPICITY CREDIT FORECAST ON DAY-AHEAD UTILITY MARKETS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EVALUATION OF PV GENERATION CAPICITY CREDIT FORECAST ON DAY-AHEAD UTILITY MARKETS Richard Perez of the NDFD-based solar radiation forecasts for several climatically distinct locations, the evaluation is now continued by testing the forecasts' end-use operational accuracy, focusing on their ability to accurately

Perez, Richard R.

88

Assessment of the technology transfer potential of federal photovoltaic power system applications to commercial markets. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An assessment of the market potential of photovoltaic power supplies is presented. Markets analyzed include the water pumping market, marine navigational aids, cathodic protection, remote general power sources, telecommunications, air navigational aids, mobile generator market, instrumentation, and utility connected applications.

Jaras, T F

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Does large scale penetration of renewable generation such as wind and solar power pose economic and operational burdens on the electricity system? A number of studies have pointed to the potential benefits of renewable generation as a hedge against the volatility and potential escalation of fossil fuel prices. Research also suggests that the lack of correlation of renewable energy costs with fossil fuel prices means that adding large amounts of wind or solar generation may also reduce the volatility of system-wide electricity costs. Such variance reduction of system costs may be of significant value to consumers due to risk aversion. The analysis in this report recognizes that the potential value of risk mitigation associated with wind generation and natural gas generation may depend on whether one considers the consumer's perspective or the investor's perspective and whether the market is regulated or deregulated. We analyze the risk and return trade-offs for wind and natural gas generation for deregulated markets based on hourly prices and load over a 10-year period using historical data in the PJM Interconnection (PJM) from 1999 to 2008. Similar analysis is then simulated and evaluated for regulated markets under certain assumptions.

Bush, B.; Jenkin, T.; Lipowicz, D.; Arent, D. J.; Cooke, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Jacobian code generated by source transformation and vertex elimination is as efficient as hand coding  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jacobian code generated by source transformation and vertex elimination is as efficient as hand coding

Forth, S A; Pryce, J D; Reid, J K

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Dependence of the Photon Beam Characteristics on Electron Beam Parameters in Third Generation Synchrotron Light Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dependence of the Photon Beam Characteristics on Electron Beam Parameters in Third Generation Synchrotron Light Sources

Ivanyan, M I; Tsakanov, V M

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Implications of Energy and Ancillary Service Market Structure for Hydroelectric Generation: A Survey of U.S. ISOs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hydroelectric's superior technical capabilities -- flexibility, fast response, efficiency -- make it especially well suited to providing reserve services in restructured and deregulated markets. A generating unit providing reserves in a deregulated market must understand not only the energy market, but also the interrelated markets for several different classes of reserve services. This report investigates how five U.S. independent service providers (IPOs) provide reserve services.

2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

93

A multilevel voltage-source inverter with separate dc sources for static var generation  

SciTech Connect

A new multilevel voltage-source inverter with a separate dc sources is proposed for high-voltage, high-power applications, such as flexible ac transmission systems (FACTS) including static var generation (SVG), power line conditioning, series compensation, phase shifting, voltage balancing, fuel cell and photovoltaic utility systems interfacing, etc. The new M-level inverter consists of (M-1)/2 single phase full bridges in which each bridge has its own separate dc source. This inverter can generate almost sinusoidal waveform voltage with only one time switching per cycle as the number of levels increases. It can solve the problems of conventional transformer-based multipulse inverters and the problems of the multilevel diode-clamped inverter and the multilevel flying capacitor inverter. To demonstrate the superiority of the new inverter, a SVG system using the new inverter topology is discussed through analysis, simulation and experiment.

Peng, Fang Zheng [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Lai, Jih-Sheng; McKeever, J.; VanCoevering, J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This scoping study focuses on the policy issues inherent in the claims made by some Smart Grid proponents that the demand response potential of mass market customers which is enabled by widespread implementation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) through the Smart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integration issues. In terms of approach, we will: identify key issues associated with integrating large amounts of variable generation into the bulk power system; identify demand response opportunities made more readily available to mass market customers through widespread deployment of AMI systems and how they can affect the bulk power system; assess the extent to which these mass market Demand Response (DR) opportunities can mitigate Variable Generation (VG) integration issues in the near-term and what electricity market structures and regulatory practices could be changed to further expand the ability for DR to mitigate VG integration issues over the long term; and provide a qualitative comparison of DR and other approaches to mitigate VG integration issues.

Cappers, Peter; Mills, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Wiser, Ryan; Eto, Joseph H.

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

95

Do Generation Firms in Restructured Electricity Markets Have Incentives to Support Social-Welfare-Improving Transmission Investments? *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that generation firms have in restructured electricity markets for supporting long-term transmission investments electricity markets, have the incentives to fund or support incremental social-welfare-improving transmission.S. transmission system is under stress (Abraham, 2002). Growth of electricity demand and new generation capacity

96

Multilayers for next generation x-ray sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multilayers are artificially layered structures that can be used to create optics and optical elements for a broad range of x-ray wavelengths, or can be optimized for other applications. The development of next generation x-ray sources (synchrotrons and x-ray free electron lasers) requires advances in x-ray optics. Newly developed multilayer-based mirrors and optical elements enabled efficient band-pass filtering, focusing and time resolved measurements in recent FLASH (Free Electron LASer in Hamburg) experiments. These experiments are providing invaluable feedback on the response of the multilayer structures to high intensity, short pulsed x-ray sources. This information is crucial to design optics for future x-ray free electron lasers and to benchmark computer codes that simulate damage processes.

Bajt, S; Chapman, H N; Spiller, E; Hau-Riege, S; Alameda, J; Nelson, A J; Walton, C C; Kjornrattanawanich, B; Aquila, A; Dollar, F; Gullikson, E; Tarrio, C

2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

97

Entangled state generation with an intrinsically pure single-photon source and a weak coherent source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the experimental generation of an entangled state with a spectrally pure heralded single-photon state and a weak coherent state. By choosing group-velocity matching in the nonlinear crystal, our system for producing entangled photons was 60 times brighter than that in the earlier experiment [Phys. Rev. Lett. 90, 240401 (2003)], with no need of bandpass filters. This entanglement system is useful for quantum information protocols that require indistinguishable photons from independent sources.

Rui-Bo Jin; Ryosuke Shimizu; Fumihiro Kaneda; Yasuyoshi Mitsumori; Hideo Kosaka; Keiichi Edamatsu

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

98

Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variance Analysis of Wind and Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations Brian Bush, Thomas Jenkin, David Lipowicz, and Douglas J. Arent National Renewable Energy Laboratory Roger Cooke Resources for the Future Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-52790 January 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations Brian Bush, Thomas Jenkin, David Lipowicz,

99

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source? - FAQ - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, ... Energy sources and percent share of total electricity generation in 2012 were:

100

A Next Generation Light Source Facility at LBNL  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a design concept, under development at LBNL, for a multibeamline soft x-ray FEL array powered by a ~;;2 GeV superconducting linear accelerator, operating with a 1 MHz bunch repetition rate. The CW superconducting linear accelerator is supplied by a high-brightness, highrepetition- rate photocathode electron gun. Electron bunches are distributed from the linac to the array of independently configurable FEL beamlines with nominal bunch rates up to 100 kHz in each FEL, and with even pulse spacing. Individual FELs may be configured for EEHG, HGHG, SASE, or oscillator mode of operation, and will produce high peak and average brightness x-rays with a flexible pulse format, with pulse durations ranging from sub-femtoseconds to hundreds of femtoseconds.

Corlett, J.N.; Austin, B.; Baptiste, K.M.; Byrd, J.M.; Denes, P.; Donahue, R.; Doolittle, L.; Falcone, R.W.; Filippetto, D.; Fournier, S.; Li, D.; Padmore, H.A.; Papadopoulos, C.; Pappas, C.; Penn, G.; Placidi, M.; Prestemon, S.; Prosnitz, D.; Qiang, J.; Ratti, A.; Reinsch, M.; Sannibale, F.; Schlueter, R.; Schoenlein, R.W.; Staples, J.W.; Vecchione, T.; Venturini, M.; Wells, R.; Wilcox, R.; Wurtele, J.; Charman, A.; Kur, E.; Zholents, A.A.

2011-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

THE IMPACTS OF RENEWABLE ENERGY POLICIES ON RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES FOR ELECTRICITY GENERATING CAPACITY .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Electricity generation from non-hydro renewable sources has increased rapidly in the last decade. For example, Renewable Energy Sources for Electricity (RES-E) generating capacity in the… (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A compact neutron generator using a field ionization source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the gas/oil industry radioactive sources are routinelyreplacement of radioactive sources for oil-well logging withto build a neutron source suit- able for oil-well logging

Persaud, Arun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Market survey of geothermal wellhead power generation systems. Final report, March 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to assess the market potential for a portable geothermal wellhead power conversion device (1-10 MW generating capacity). Major study objectives included identifying the most promising applications for such a system, the potential impediments confronting their industrialization, and the various government actions needed to overcome these impediments. The heart of the study was a series of structured interviews with key decision-making individuals in the various disciplines of the geothermal community. In addition, some technical and economic analyses of a candidate system were performed to support the feasibility of the basic concept.

Leeds, M.W.; Evensizer, J.

1979-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

faced with high energy market prices if they do not procureIf low or negative prices in energy markets are insufficientenergy or reserves in determining schedules and market prices.

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Distributed Generation Source Stiffness and Its Impact on Voltage Distortion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generators with loads that create high harmonics can cause excessive voltage distortion. This report's objective was to evaluate under controlled laboratory conditions voltage distortion resulting from application of nonlinear load for three different types of rotary generators and one inverter-based generator. Test results also were used to verify the analytical model for predicting voltage distortion from nonlinear load application.

2001-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

106

Development of a High Performance Air Source Heat Pump for the US Market  

SciTech Connect

Heat pumps present a significant advantage over conventional residential heating technologies due to higher energy efficiencies and less dependence on imported oil. The US development of heat pumps dates back to the 1930 s with pilot units being commercially available in the 1950 s. Reliable and cost competitive units were available in the US market by the 1960 s. The 1973 oil embargo led to increased interest in heat pumps prompting significant research to improve performance, particularly for cold climate locations. Recent increasing concerns on building energy efficiency and environmental emissions have prompted a new wave of research in heat pump technology with special emphasis on reducing performance degradation at colder outdoor air temperatures. A summary of the advantages and limitations of several performance improvement options sought for the development of high performance air source heat pump systems for cold climate applications is the primary focus of this paper. Some recommendations for a high performance cold climate heat pump system design most suitable for the US market are presented.

Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL; Shen, Bo [ORNL; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Iu, Ipseng [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Geothermal (Ground-Source) Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More effective stewardship of our resources contributes to the security, environmental sustainability, and economic well-being of the nation. Buildings present one of the best opportunities to economically reduce energy consumption and limit greenhouse gas emissions. Geothermal heat pump systems (GHPs), sometimes called ground-source heat pump or Geo-Exchange systems, have been proven capable of producing large reductions in energy use and peak demand in buildings. However, GHPs have received little attention at the policy level as an important component of a national energy and climate strategy. Have policymakers mistakenly overlooked GHPs, or are GHPs simply unable to make a major contribution to the national goals for various reasons? This brief study was undertaken at DOE s request to address this conundrum. The scope of the study includes determining the status of global GHP markets and the status of the GHP industry and technology in the United States, assembling previous estimates of GHP energy savings potential and other benefits, identifying key barriers to application of GHPs, and identifying actions that could accelerate market adoption of GHPs. The findings are documented in a report along with conclusions and recommendations. This paper summarizes the key information from the report.

Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Geothermal(Ground-Source)Heat Pumps: Market Status, Barriers to Adoption, and Actions to Overcome Barriers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More effective stewardship of our resources contributes to the security, environmental sustainability, and economic well-being of the nation. Buildings present one of the best opportunities to economically reduce energy consumption and limit greenhouse gas emissions. Geothermal heat pumps (GHPs), sometimes called ground-source heat pumps, have been proven capable of producing large reductions in energy use and peak demand in buildings. However, GHPs have received little attention at the policy level as an important component of a national strategy. Have policymakers mistakenly overlooked GHPs, or are GHPs simply unable to make a major contribution to the national goals for various reasons? This brief study was undertaken at DOE's request to address this conundrum. The scope of the study includes determining the status of global GHP markets and the status of the GHP industry and technology in the United States, assembling previous estimates of GHP energy savings potential, identifying key barriers to application of GHPs, and identifying actions that could accelerate market adoption of GHPs. The findings are documented in this report along with conclusions and recommendations.

Hughes, Patrick [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Study of an HHG-Seeded Free-Electron Laser for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source Neil Thompson,for the LBNL Next Generation Light Source Neil Thompson,Introduction The Next Generation Light Source (NGLS) is a

Thompson, Neil

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Modeling the Market Potential of Hydrogen from Wind and Competing Sources: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 8 May 2005 Modeling the Market Potential of Hydrogen from Wind and Competing Sources Preprint W. Short, N. Blair, and D. Heimiller To be presented at WINDPOWER 2005 Denver, Colorado May 15-18, 2005 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Midwest Research Institute (MRI), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-99GO10337. Accordingly, the US Government and MRI retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any

111

BEAM DYNAMICS STUDIES OF A HIGH-REPETITION RATE \\\\ LINAC-DRIVER FOR A 4TH GENERATION LIGHT SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DRIVER FOR A 4TH GENERATION LIGHT SOURCE ? M. Venturini † ,of designing a 4th generation light source in the 0.27 ? 1.2

Ventturini, M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Shares of electricity generation from renewable energy sources ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In 2011, the states with the largest shares of generation coming from renewables, including hydro, were: Idaho (93%), Washington (82%), and Oregon ...

113

Shares of electricity generation from renewable energy sources ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Non-hydroelectric renewable generation has increased in many states over the past decade. In 2011, Maine had the highest percentage of non-hydroelectric renewable ...

114

Milliwatt generator heat source. Quarterly technical progress report, April 16, 1976--July 15, 1976  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Activities at MRC associated with the Milliwatt Generator Heat Source efforts over the period April 16, 1976, to July 15, 1976, are presented below.

Amos, W.R.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Title 20, California Code of Regulations Article 5. Electricity Generation Source Disclosure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. (e) "Facility" means one or all generating units at an electric generating station. (f) "Fuel (b)(3)(C) of section 1392. (g) "Generating facility output" means the electrical energy and/or fuel1 Title 20, California Code of Regulations Article 5. Electricity Generation Source Disclosure

116

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

63E 63E Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study Peter Cappers, Andrew Mills, Charles Goldman, Ryan Wiser, Joseph H. Eto Environmental Energy Technologies Division October 2011 The work described in this report was funded by the Permitting, Siting and Analysis Division of the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Contract No. DE-AC02- 05CH11231. ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the

117

Flux compression generators as plasma compression power sources  

SciTech Connect

A survey is made of applications where explosive-driven magnetic flux compression generators have been or can be used to directly power devices that produce dense plasmas. Representative examples are discussed that are specific to the theta pinch, the plasma gun, the dense plasma focus and the Z pinch. These examples are used to illustrate the high energy and power capabilities of explosive generators. An application employing a rocket-borne, generator-powered plasma gun emphasizes the size and weight potential of flux compression power supplies. Recent results from a local effort to drive a dense plasma focus are provided. Imploding liners ae discussed in the context of both the theta and Z pinches.

Fowler, C.M.; Caird, R.S.; Erickson, D.J.; Freeman, B.L.; Thomson, D.B.; Garn, W.B.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

An enhanced load transfer scheme for power distribution systems connected with distributed generation sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an enhanced load transfer scheme for power distribution systems connected with distributed generation sources. Load transfer is an important approach to improve the reliability of power distribution systems. The proposed load transfer ... Keywords: distributed generation source, distribution feeder, distribution system, interconnection, load transfer

Wen-Chih Yang; Wei-Tzer Huang

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2007  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7" 7" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","MultiGenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

120

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2008  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8" 8" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","MultiGenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Experimental generation of ring-shaped beams with random sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have experimentally reproduced ring shaped beams from the scattered Laguerre-Gaussian and Bessel- Gaussian beams. A rotating ground glass plate is used as a scattering medium and a plano convex lens collects the scattered light to generate ring shaped beams at the Fourier plane. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical results of Mei and Korotkova (Opt. Lett. 38, 91{93 (2013)).

Reddy, Salla Gangi; Prabhakar, Shashi; Singh, R P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Limits of heralded single photon sources based on parametric photon pair generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive calculations on the statistics of a heralded single photon source based on parametric photon pair generation. These calculations highlight fundamental and practical limits for these sources, and show which physical parameters can be optimized to improve the quality of a real source.

Virally, Stéphane; Godbout, Nicolas

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Limits of heralded single photon sources based on parametric photon pair generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We derive calculations on the statistics of a heralded single photon source based on parametric photon pair generation. These calculations highlight fundamental and practical limits for these sources, and show which physical parameters can be optimized to improve the quality of a real source.

Stéphane Virally; Suzanne Lacroix; Nicolas Godbout

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

124

Parallel Operation of Wind Turbine, Fuel Cell, and Diesel Generation Sources: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated a small isolated hybrid power system that used a parallel combination of dispatchable and non-dispatchable power generation sources. The non-dispatchable generation came from a nature-dependent wind turbine, and the dispatchable generations were a fuel cell and a diesel generator. On the load side, the non-dispatchable portion was the village load, and the dispatchable portion was the energy storage, which could be in many different forms (e.g., space/water heater, electrolysis, battery charger, etc.) The interaction among different generation sources and the loads was investigated. Simulation results showed the effect of the proposed system on voltage and frequency fluctuations.

Muljadi, E.; Wang, C.; Nehrir, M. H.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

A compact neutron generator using a field ionization source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Field ionization as a means to create ions for compact and rugged neutron sources is pursued. Arrays of carbon nano-#12;bers promise the high #12;eld-enhancement factors required for efficient field ionization. We report on the fabrication of arrays of #12;field emitters with a density up to 10{sup 6} tips/cm{sup 2} and measure their performance characteristics using electron field emission. The critical issue of uniformity is discussed, as are efforts towards coating the nano-fibers to enhance their lifetime and surface properties.

Persaud, Arun; Waldmann, Ole; Kapadia, Rehan; Takei, Kuniharu; Javey, Ali; Schenkel, Thomas

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

126

Do Generation Firms in Restructured Electricity Markets Have Incentives to Support Social-Welfare-Improving Transmission Investments? *  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transmission Grid Study of the U.S. Department of Energy (Abraham, 2002) declares: "Growth in electricity of incentives for investment in the U.S. electricity transmission system are sparse. Moreover, noneDo Generation Firms in Restructured Electricity Markets Have Incentives to Support Social

Oren, Shmuel S.

127

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Toolkit Energy Imbalance Market (EIM): Implementing Tariff.under tariffs approved by the Federal Energy Regulatoryunder tariffs approved by the Federal Energy Regulatory

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prices and quantified how system balancing costs change with high wind energywind energy when mass market customers responded on a 15-minute basis to DR price

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2009  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

09" 09" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

130

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2003  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3" 3" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

131

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5" 5" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

132

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2004  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4" 4" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

133

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2006  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6" 6" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts)","Summer Capacity (Megawatts) ","Winter Capacity (Megawatts) ","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2 ","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year

134

Existing Generating Unit in the United States by State and Energy Source, 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10" 10" "Note: Descriptions of field names and codes can be obtained from the record layout in the Form EIA-860 source data file at www.eia.gov/cneaf/electricity/page/eia860.html." "Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-860, ""Annual Electric Generator Report.""" "State","County","Utility ID","Company","Plant ID","Plant Name","Primary Purpose Code","Generator ID","Nameplate Capacity (Megawatts) ","Summer Capacity (Megawatts)","Winter Capacity (Megawatts)","Multigenerator Code","Prime Mover","Energy Source 1","Energy Source 2","Initial Month of Operation","Initial Year of Operation","Unit Status"

135

Source templates for the automatic generation of adjoint code through static call graph reversal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a new approach to the automatic generation of adjoint codes using automatic differentiation by source transformation. Our method relies on static checkpointing techniques applied to an extended version of the program's call graph. A code ...

Uwe Naumann; Jean Utke

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Two-Dimensional Turbulence Generated by Energy Sources at Two Scales  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observational results and theories suggest that the atmospheric energy spectrum is at least partly produced by quasi-two-dimensional turbulence generated by energy sources at both large and small scales. This hypothesis is investigated further ...

Douglas K. Lilly

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Particle production in field theories coupled to strong external sources. II: Generating functions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss a method for computing the generating function for the multiplicity distribution in field theories with strong time dependent external sources. At leading order, the computation of the generating function reduces to finding a pair of solutions of the classical equations of motion, with non-standard temporal boundary conditions.

Francois Gelis; Raju Venugopalan

2006-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

138

Flexible, extensible, open-source and affordable FPGA-based traffic generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As high-speed links become ubiquitous in current networks, testing new algorithms at high speed is essential for researchers. This task often makes it necessary to generate traffic with some specified features : distribution of packet sizes, payload ... Keywords: FPGA, NetFPGA 10G, combo, flexible, open-source, traffic generator

Tristan Groléat; Matthieu Arzel; Sandrine Vaton; Alban Bourge; Yannick Le Balch; Hicham Bougdal; Manuel Aranaz Padron

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Concentration and plant availability of lead in phosphorus sources marketed in Brazil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

different sources of P: single superphosphate, Araxá rocksource Single superphosphate Triple superphosphate Araxá rock

Freitas, Eriberto; Nascimento, Clistenes; Goulart, Daniel; Siqueira, Joao

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

How Competitive Market Dynamics Affect Coal, Nuclear and Gas Generation and Fuel Use -- A 10-Year Look Ahead  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, the fourth in a series by EPRI and GRI addressing power industry deregulation, examines how restructuring is unleashing a new wave of merchant gas-fired plants. This phenomenon can lead to substantial regional changes in generation and fuel use, energy prices, and profitability-changes that have eluded analysts to date. Focusing on several regions in depth, this report breaks new ground in understanding the effects of turbulent, competitive market dynamics.

1999-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis. Presentation given to PJM Interconnection Markete.g. , ISO-NE, NYISO, PJM, MISO, ERCOT, and CAISO). Co-also elect to participate in PJM’s day-ahead and/or real-

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Transacting generation attributes across market boundaries: Compatible information systems and the treatment of imports and exports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Northeast include the PJM Interconnection, the New Yorkbasic market area (e.g. , the PJM, ISO-NE, or NYISO), this7 Stakeholders in New York, the PJM Power Pool, New England,

Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Generation of Magnetic Fields in the Relativistic Shock of Gamma-Ray-Burst Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the relativistic two-stream instability can naturally generate strong magnetic fields with 1e-5 - 1e-1 of the equipartition energy density, in the collisionless shocks of Gamma-Ray-Burst (GRB) sources. The generated fields are parallel to the shock front and fluctuate on the very short scale of the plasma skin depth. The synchrotron radiation emitted from the limb-brightened source image is linearly polarized in the radial direction relative to the source center. Although the net polarization vanishes under circular symmetry, GRB sources should exhibit polarization scintillations as their radio afterglow radiation gets scattered by the Galactic interstellar medium. Detection of polarization scintillations could therefore test the above mechanism for magnetic field generation.

Mikhail V. Medvedev; Abraham Loeb

1999-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

144

The Wakefield Effects of Pulsed Crab Cavities at the Advanced Photon Source for Short-X-ray Pulse Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Wakefield Effects of Pulsed Crab Cavities at the Advanced Photon Source for Short-X-ray Pulse Generation

Chae, Y C; Dolgashev, V

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Identification and evaluation of data sources for the commercial buildings retrofit market  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this study are to identify data sources that provide information on current and future levels of commercial buildings retrofit activity in the US, and to evaluate the coverage these data sources provide the commercial retrofit industry. Data sources evaluated include reports, magazines, computerized data bases, and surveys. Relevant data sources were identified through a literature review and by telephone and mail contacts with building industry experts and trade associations. A brief summary of each of the data sources is provided and recommendations are made for gathering additional data to supplement the existing data source.

Smith, S.A.; Johnson, D.R.

1986-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Carbon Markets: A Potential Source of Income for Farmers and Ranchers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Agricultural producers may be able to increase their earnings by selling carbon credits to large carbon emitters. This publication explains the origins of the carbon market, the types of projects agriculturists can undertake, and the steps and requirements for participating in the carbon credits marketplace. 9 pp., 2 tables, 2 figures

Ribera, Luis; Zenteno, Joaquin; McCarl, Bruce

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

147

Raw material sources for the long-chain omega-3 market: Trends and sustainability. Part 2.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A recent report from the Global Organization for EPA and DHA (GOED 2008, where EPA is eicosapentaenoic acid and DHA is docosahexaenoic acid) indicates that the omega-3 market has reached $13 billion. Actually, about $180 million covers raw materials, $1.28

148

Green Power Marketing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Green Power Marketing Jump to: navigation, search Gearbox installation at Xcel Energy's Ponnequin Wind Farm in Colorado. Photo from Jeroen van Dam, NREL 19257 Green power marketing provides market-based choices for electricity consumers to purchase power from environmentally preferred sources. The term "green power" defines power generated from renewable energy sources, such as wind power. Green power marketing has the potential to expand domestic markets for renewable energy technologies by fostering greater availability of renewable electric service options in retail markets.

149

Analysis of Coherence Properties of 3-rd Generation Synchrotron Sources and Free-Electron Lasers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A general theoretical approach based on the results of statistical optics is used for the analysis of the transverse coherence properties of 3-rd generation synchrotron sources and x-ray free-electron lasers (XFEL). Correlation properties of the wavefields are calculated at different distances from an equivalent Gaussian Schell-model source. This model is used to describe coherence properties of the five meter undulator source at the synchrotron storage ring PETRA III. In the case of XFEL sources the decomposition of the statistical fields into a sum of independently propagating transverse modes is used for the analysis of the coherence properties of these new sources. A detailed calculation is performed for the parameters of the SASE1 undulator at the European XFEL. It is demonstrated that only a few modes contribute significantly to the total radiation field of that source.

Vartanyants, I A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community In the US DOEnergy, are there calcuations for real cost of energy considering the negative, socialized costs of all commercial large scale power generation soruces ? I am talking about the cost of mountain top removal for coal mined that way, the trip to the power plant, the sludge pond or ash heap, the cost of the gas out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in perpetuity. The plant decomission costs and so on. What I am tring to get at is the 'real cost' per MWh or KWh for the various sources ? I suspect that the costs commonly quoted for fossil fuels and nucelar are

151

SMART II+ : the spot market agent research tool version 2.0 plus natural gas.  

SciTech Connect

Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) can be applied to investigate complex infrastructure interdependencies including those between the electric power and natural gas markets. The electric power and natural gas markets are undergoing fundamental transformations. These transformations include major changes in electric generator fuel sources. Electric generators that use natural gas as a fuel source are rapidly gaining market share. Electric generators using natural gas introduce direct interdependency between the electric power and natural gas markets. The interdependencies between the electric power and natural gas markets introduced by these generators can be investigated using the emergent behavior of CAS model agents.

North, M. J. N.

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

152

Spurious source generation in mapping from noisy phase-self-calibrated data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phase self-calibration (or selfcal) is an algorithm often used in the calibration of interferometric observations in astronomy. Although a powerful tool, this algorithm presents strong limitations when applied to data with a low signal-to-noise ratio. We analyze the artifacts that the phase selfcal algorithm produces when applied to extremely noisy data. We show how the phase selfcal may generate a spurious source in the sky from a distribution of completely random visibilities. This spurious source is indistinguishable from a real one. We numerically and analytically compute the relationship between the maximum spurious flux density generated by selfcal from noise and the particulars of the interferometric observations. Finally, we present two simple tests that can be applied to interferometric data for checking whether a source detection is real or whether the source is an artifact of the phase self-calibration algorithm.

I. Marti-Vidal; J. M. Marcaide

2008-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

153

Widely-tunable mid-IR frequency comb source based on difference frequency generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a mid-infrared frequency comb source of unprecedented tunability covering the entire 3-10 {\\mu}m molecular fingerprint region. The system is based on difference frequency generation in a GaSe crystal pumped by a 151 MHz Yb:fiber frequency comb. The process was seeded with Raman shifted solitons generated in a highly nonlinear suspended-core fiber with the same source. Average powers up to 1.5 mW were achieved at 4.7 {\\mu}m wavelength.

Ruehl, Axel; Hartl, Ingmar; Fermann, Martin E; Eikema, Kjeld S E; Marangoni, Marco

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Small Gas Turbines for Distributed Generation Markets: Technology, Products, and Business Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small gas turbines (300 kW to 5 MW) offer an attractive way for utilities and energy service companies to generate electric power within distribution grids and for consumers to generate their own power. Distributed generation also benefits utilities by deferring or avoiding costly expansion of the power transmission and distribution system, which could allow them to offer customers lower cost power. Gas turbines process more power-generation cycle air per unit size and weight of machine than do reciproca...

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

155

Operating Reserve Reductions from a Proposed Energy Imbalance Market with Wind and Solar Generation in the Western Interconnection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper considers several alternative forms of an energy imbalance market (EIM) proposed in the nonmarket areas of the Western Interconnection. The proposed EIM includes two changes in operating practices that independently reduce variability and increase access to responsive resources: balancing authority cooperation and sub-hourly dispatch. As the penetration of variable generation increases on the power system, additional interest in coordination would likely occur. Several alternative approaches could be used, but consideration of any form of coordinated unit commitment is beyond the scope of this analysis. This report examines the benefits of several possible EIM implementations--both separately and in concert.

King, J.; Kirby, B.; Milligan, M.; Beuning, S.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Generation and characterization of a source of wavelength division multiplexing quantum key distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using spontaneous parametric down-conversion, photon pairs entangled in frequency and polarization were generated. After frequency resolving the photon pairs, the polarization correlations were measured on several polarization basis, and it was confirmed that the frequency resolved photon pairs were entangled in polarization, indicating the photon pairs can be used as a source of wavelength division multiplexing quantum key distribution.

Atsushi Yabushita; Takayoshi Kobayashi

2004-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

157

A Permanent-Magnet Microwave Ion Source for a Compact High-Yield Neutron Generator  

SciTech Connect

We present recent work on the development of a microwave ion source that will be used in a high-yield compact neutron generator for active interrogation applications. The sealed tube generator will be capable of producing high neutron yields, 5x1011 n/s for D-T and ~;;1x1010 n/s for D-D reactions, while remaining transportable. We constructed a microwave ion source (2.45 GHz) with permanent magnets to provide the magnetic field strength of 87.5 mT necessary for satisfying the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) condition. Microwave ion sources can produce high extracted beam currents at the low gas pressures required for sealed tube operation and at lower power levels than previously used RF-driven ion sources. A 100 mA deuterium/tritium beam will be extracted through a large slit (60x6 mm2) to spread the beam power over a larger target area. This paper describes the design of the permanent-magnet microwave ion source and discusses the impact of the magnetic field design on the source performance. The required equivalent proton beam current density of 40 mA/cm2 was extracted at a moderate microwave power of 400 W with an optimized magnetic field.

Waldmann, Ole; Ludewigt, Bernhard

2010-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

158

Transacting generation attributes across market boundaries: Compatible information systems and the treatment of imports and exports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more renewable energy generation at lower costs, and (2) arelative incremental cost of renewable energy is low, and/orin higher costs for regulatory mandates and renewable energy

Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Goldman, G. (2009) Retail demand response in Southwest PowerCoordination of retail demand response with Midwest ISO2010. 110 pages. Demand Response and Variable Generation

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Market Characteristics for Efficient Integration of Variable Generation in the Western Interconnection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overriding purpose of this report is to establish the physical requirements of a power system that can accommodate high levels of variable generation.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Sanderson, P., Memisevic, R., & Wong, B.-L. W. (2004). Analysing cognitive work of hydroelectricity generation in a dynamic deregulated market. Paper to be published in Proceedings of the 48th  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

electrical generation in the developed world is now conducted within deregulated energy markets, providing. The market component of the work domain analysis appears not to be readily amendable to breakdown); (Vicente, 1999) for hydroelectricity generation in a deregulated market in a way that usefully informs

Queensland, University of

162

Characterization of an asynchronous source of heralded single photons generated at a wavelength of 1550 nm  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We make a thorough analysis of heralded single photon sources regarding how factors such as the detector gate-period, the photon rates, the fiber coupling efficiencies, and the system losses affect the performance of the source. In the course of this we give a detailed description of how to determine fiber coupling efficiencies from experimentally measurable quantities. We show that asynchronous sources perform, under most conditions, better than synchronous sources with respect to multiphoton events, but only for nearly perfect coupling efficiencies. We apply the theory to an asynchronous source of heralded single photons based on spontaneous parametric downconversion in a periodically poled, bulk, KTiOPO4 crystal. The source generates light with highly non-degenerate wavelengths of 810 nm and 1550 nm, where the 810 nm photons are used to announce the presence of the 1550 nm photons inside a single-mode optical fiber. For our setup we find the probability of having a 1550 nm photon present in the single-mode fiber, as announced by the 810 nm photon, to be 48%. The probability of multiphoton events is strongly suppressed compared to a Poissonian light source, giving highly sub-Poisson photon statistics.

Maria Tengner; Daniel Ljunggren

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

163

Green Power Network: Green Power Markets Overview  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Green Markets Green Markets Search Search Help More Search Options Search Site Map News TVA Seeks 126 MW of Renewables in 2014 December 2013 More News More News Subscribe to E-Mail Update Subscribe to e-mail update Events EPA Webinar - The Power of Aggregated Purchasing: How to Green Your Electricity Supply & Save Money January 15, 2014 1:00-2:00 p.m. ET Previous Webinars More News Features Green Power Market Status Report (2011 Data) Featured Green Power Reports Green Pricing Green Power Marketing Green Certificates Carbon Offsets State Policies Overview The essence of green power marketing is to provide market-based choices for electricity consumers to purchase power from environmentally preferred sources. The term "green power" is used to define power generated from renewable energy sources, such as wind and solar power, geothermal, hydropower and various forms of biomass. Green power marketing has the potential to expand domestic markets for renewable energy technologies by fostering greater availability of renewable electric service options in retail markets. Although renewable energy development has traditionally been limited by cost considerations, customer choice allows consumer preferences for cleaner energy sources to be reflected in market transactions. In survey after survey, customers have expressed a preference and willingness to pay more, if necessary, for cleaner energy sources. You can find more information about purchase options on our "Buying Green Power" page.

164

Abstract--The integration of variable renewable generation sources continues to be a significant area of focus for power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of additional wind generation into the Northwest Power Pool. It quantifies the number of vehicles required imbalance and variability in power generation caused by renewable generation sources. In this paper, V2G requirements associated with the introduction of 11 GW of additional wind generation into the Northwest Power

165

Classical 5D fields generated by a uniformly accelerated point source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gauge fields associated with the manifestly covariant dynamics of particles in $(3,1)$ spacetime are five-dimensional. In this paper we explore the old problem of fields generated by a source undergoing hyperbolic motion in this framework. The 5D fields are computed numerically using absolute time $\\tau$-retarded Green-functions, and qualitatively compared with Maxwell fields generated by the same motion. We find that although the zero mode of all fields coincides with the corresponding Maxwell problem, the non-zero mode should affect, through the Lorentz force, the observed motion of test particles.

I. Aharonovich; L. P. Horwitz

2009-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

166

Mechanisms for Evaluating the Role of Hydroelectric Generation in Ancillary Service Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New opportunities to provide system support and ancillary services are attracting the interest of hydroelectric generators. This research focuses primarily on three classes of reserve service (regulation, spinning, and supplemental reserves) and their relation to real power production planning.

1998-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

167

An agent-based simulation model for the market diffusion of a second generation biofuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Second generation biofuels are widely considered a promising energy alternative to conventional (fossil) fuels. Although they will not completely replace fossil fuels (e.g., due to the limited availability of biomass), these high-quality biofuels can ...

Elmar Kiesling; Markus Günther; Christian Stummer; Lea M. Wakolbinger

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Design of a Nb3Sn Magnet for a 4th Generation ECR Ion Source  

SciTech Connect

The next generation of Electron Cyclotron Resonant (ECR) ion sources are expected to operate at a heating radio frequency greater than 40 GHz. The existing 3rd generation systems, exemplified by the state of the art system VENUS, operate in the 10-28 GHz range, and use NbTi superconductors for the confinement coils. The magnetic field needed to confine the plasma scales with the rf frequency, resulting in peak fields on the magnets of the 4th generation system in excess of 10 T. High field superconductors such as Nb{sub 3}Sn must therefore be considered. The magnetic design of a 4th. generation ECR ion source operating at an rf frequency of 56 GHz is considered. The analysis considers both internal and external sextupole configurations, assuming commercially available Nb{sub 3}Sn material properties. Preliminary structural design issues are discussed based on the forces and margins associated with the coils in the different configurations, leading to quantitative data for the determination of a final magnet design.

Prestemon, S,; Trillaud, F.; Caspi, S.; Ferracin, P.; Sabbi, G. L.; Lyneis, C. M.; Leitner, D.; Todd, D. S.; Hafalia, R.

2008-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

169

Intrinsic Radiation Source Generation with the ISC Package: Data Comparisons and Benchmarking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characterization of radioactive emissions from unstable isotopes (intrinsic radiation) is necessary for shielding and radiological-dose calculations from radioactive materials. While most radiation transport codes, e.g., MCNP [X-5 Monte Carlo Team, 2003], provide the capability to input user prescribed source definitions, such as radioactive emissions, they do not provide the capability to calculate the correct radioactive-source definition given the material compositions. Special modifications to MCNP have been developed in the past to allow the user to specify an intrinsic source, but these modification have not been implemented into the primary source base [Estes et al., 1988]. To facilitate the description of the intrinsic radiation source from a material with a specific composition, the Intrinsic Source Constructor library (LIBISC) and MCNP Intrinsic Source Constructor (MISC) utility have been written. The combination of LIBISC and MISC will be herein referred to as the ISC package. LIBISC is a statically linkable C++ library that provides the necessary functionality to construct the intrinsic-radiation source generated by a material. Furthermore, LIBISC provides the ability use different particle-emission databases, radioactive-decay databases, and natural-abundance databases allowing the user flexibility in the specification of the source, if one database is preferred over others. LIBISC also provides functionality for aging materials and producing a thick-target bremsstrahlung photon source approximation from the electron emissions. The MISC utility links to LIBISC and facilitates the description of intrinsic-radiation sources into a format directly usable with the MCNP transport code. Through a series of input keywords and arguments the MISC user can specify the material, age the material if desired, and produce a source description of the radioactive emissions from the material in an MCNP readable format. Further details of using the MISC utility can be obtained from the user guide [Solomon, 2012]. The remainder of this report presents a discussion of the databases available to LIBISC and MISC, a discussion of the models employed by LIBISC, a comparison of the thick-target bremsstrahlung model employed, a benchmark comparison to plutonium and depleted-uranium spheres, and a comparison of the available particle-emission databases.

Solomon, Clell J. Jr. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

170

The impact of carbon taxes or allowances on the electric generation market in the Ohio and ECAR region  

SciTech Connect

The North American electricity grid is separated into 11 regional reliability councils, collectively called the North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC). The East Central Area Reliability Coordination Agreement (ECAR) is the reliability council that covers Ohio and Indiana, along with parts of Kentucky, Illinois, Maryland, Michigan, Pennsylvania, Virginia, and West Virginia. Ohio and the rest of the ECAR region rely more heavily on coal-fired generation than any other US region. The purpose of this report is to study the effect of carbon reduction policies on the cost and price of generation in the ECAR region, with an emphasis on Ohio. In order to do that, the author modeled the possible electric generation system for the ECAR and Ohio region for the year 2010 using a model developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory called the Oak Ridge Competitive Electric Dispatch model (ORCED). He let the model optimize the system based on various factors and carbon reduction policies to understand their impact. He then used the electricity prices and assumed demand elasticities to change the demands while also requiring all power plants to be profitable. The author discusses the different potential policies for carbon reduction and issues involving a restructured market; describes the model used for this analysis, the ECAR electricity sector, and the establishment of a base case; and describes the results of applying various carbon emission reduction approaches to the region. 14 figs., 5 tabs.

Hadley, S.W.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Microsoft Word - 20110321_LTI_PPM_Tetra Tech_Cost Effective Wireless Application in Power Generation Markets.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11/1483 11/1483 Cost-Effective Wireless Application in the Power Generation Market 21 March, 2011 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe on privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or

172

Electricity Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Electricity Markets Electricity Markets Researchers in the electricity markets area conduct technical, economic, and policy analysis of energy topics centered on the U.S. electricity sector. Current research seeks to inform public and private decision-making on public-interest issues related to energy efficiency and demand response, renewable energy, electricity resource and transmission planning, electricity reliability and distributed generation resources. Research is conducted in the following areas: Energy efficiency research focused on portfolio planning and market assessment, design and implementation of a portfolio of energy efficiency programs that achieve various policy objectives, utility sector energy efficiency business models, options for administering energy efficiency

173

Next-Generation Photon Sources for Grand Challenges in Science and Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The next generation of sustainable energy technologies will revolve around transformational new materials and chemical processes that convert energy efficiently among photons, electrons, and chemical bonds. New materials that tap sunlight, store electricity, or make fuel from splitting water or recycling carbon dioxide will need to be much smarter and more functional than today's commodity-based energy materials. To control and catalyze chemical reactions or to convert a solar photon to an electron requires coordination of multiple steps, each carried out by customized materials and interfaces with designed nanoscale structures. Such advanced materials are not found in nature the way we find fossil fuels; they must be designed and fabricated to exacting standards, using principles revealed by basic science. Success in this endeavor requires probing, and ultimately controlling, the interactions among photons, electrons, and chemical bonds on their natural length and time scales. Control science - the application of knowledge at the frontier of science to control phenomena and create new functionality - realized through the next generation of ultraviolet and X-ray photon sources, has the potential to be transformational for the life sciences and information technology, as well as for sustainable energy. Current synchrotron-based light sources have revolutionized macromolecular crystallography. The insights thus obtained are largely in the domain of static structure. The opportunity is for next generation light sources to extend these insights to the control of dynamic phenomena through ultrafast pump-probe experiments, time-resolved coherent imaging, and high-resolution spectroscopic imaging. Similarly, control of spin and charge degrees of freedom in complex functional materials has the potential not only to reveal the fundamental mechanisms of high-temperature superconductivity, but also to lay the foundation for future generations of information science. This report identifies two aspects of energy science in which next-generation ultraviolet and X-ray light sources will have the deepest and broadest impact: (1) The temporal evolution of electrons, spins, atoms, and chemical reactions, down to the femtosecond time scale. (2) Spectroscopic and structural imaging of nano objects (or nanoscale regions of inhomogeneous materials) with nanometer spatial resolution and ultimate spectral resolution. The dual advances of temporal and spatial resolution promised by fourth-generation light sources ideally match the challenges of control science. Femtosecond time resolution has opened completely new territory where atomic motion can be followed in real time and electronic excitations and decay processes can be followed over time. Coherent imaging with short-wavelength radiation will make it possible to access the nanometer length scale, where intrinsic quantum behavior becomes dominant. Performing spectroscopy on individual nanometer-scale objects rather than on conglomerates will eliminate the blurring of the energy levels induced by particle size and shape distributions and reveal the energetics of single functional units. Energy resolution limited only by the uncertainty relation is enabled by these advances. Current storage-ring-based light sources and their incremental enhancements cannot meet the need for femtosecond time resolution, nanometer spatial resolution, intrinsic energy resolution, full coherence over energy ranges up to hard X-rays, and peak brilliance required to enable the new science outlined in this report. In fact, the new, unexplored territory is so expansive that no single currently imagined light source technology can fulfill the whole potential. Both technological and economic challenges require resolution as we move forward. For example, femtosecond time resolution and high peak brilliance are required for following chemical reactions in real time, but lower peak brilliance and high repetition rate are needed to avoid radiation damage in high-resolution spatial imaging and to avoid space-charge broadenin

None

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Superluminal Electromagnetic and Gravitational Fields Generated in the Nearfield of Dipole Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper the fields generated by an electric dipole and a gravitational quadrapole are shown to propagate superluminally in the nearfield of the source and reduce to the speed of light as the fields propagate into the farfield. A theoretical derivation of the generated fields using Maxwell's equations is presented followed by a theoretical analysis of the phase and group speed of the propagating fields. This theoretical prediction is then verified by a numerical simulation which demonstrates the superluminal propagation of modulated signals in the nearfield of their sources. An experiment using simple dipole antennas is also presented which verifies the theoretically expected superluminal propagation of transverse electromagnetic fields in the nearfield of the source. The phase speed, group speed, and information speed of these systems are compared and shown to differ. Provided the noise of a signal is small and the modulation method is known, it is shown that the information speed can be approximately the same as the superluminal group speed. According to relativity theory, it is known that between moving reference frames, superluminal signals can propagate backwards in time enabling violations of causality. Several explanations are presented which may resolve this dilemma.

William D. Walker

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

175

Dynamic performance of restructured wholesale power markets with learning generation companies: an agent-based test bed study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In April 2003, the U.S. Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) proposed a new market design for U.S. wholesale power markets. Core features of this design… (more)

Li, Hongyan

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Direct generation of photon triplets using cascaded photon-pair sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-classical states of light, such as entangled photon pairs and number states, are essential for fundamental tests of quantum mechanics and optical quantum technologies. The most widespread technique for creating these quantum resources is the spontaneous parametric down-conversion (SPDC) of laser light into photon pairs. Conservation of energy and momentum in this process, known as phase-matching, gives rise to strong correlations which are used to produce two-photon entanglement in various degrees of freedom. It has been a longstanding goal of the quantum optics community to realise a source that can produce analogous correlations in photon triplets, but of the many approaches considered, none have been technically feasible. In this paper we report the observation of photon triplets generated by cascaded down-conversion. Here each triplet originates from a single pump photon, and therefore quantum correlations will extend over all three photons in a way not achievable with independently created photon pairs. We expect our photon-triplet source to open up new avenues of quantum optics and become an important tool in quantum technologies. Our source will allow experimental interrogation of novel quantum correlations, the post-selection free generation of tripartite entanglement without post- selection and the generation of heralded entangled-photon pairs suitable for linear optical quantum computing. Two of the triplet photons have a wavelength matched for optimal transmission in optical fibres, ideally suited for three-party quantum communication. Furthermore, our results open interesting regimes of non-linear optics, as we observe spontaneous down-conversion pumped by single photons, an interaction also highly relevant to optical quantum computing.

H. Hübel; D. R. Hamel; A. Fedrizzi; S. Ramelow; K. J. Resch; T. Jennewein

2010-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

177

Dynamical mass generation by source inversion: Calculating the mass gap of the Gross-Neveu model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We probe the U(N) Gross-Neveu model with a source-term $J\\bar{\\Psi}\\Psi$. We find an expression for the renormalization scheme and scale invariant source $\\hat{J}$, as a function of the generated mass gap. The expansion of this function is organized in such a way that all scheme and scale dependence is reduced to one single parameter d. We get a non-perturbative mass gap as the solution of $\\hat{J}=0$. In one loop we find that any physical choice for d gives good results for high values of N. In two loops we can determine d self-consistently by the principle of minimal sensitivity and find remarkably accurate results for N>2.

K. Van Acoleyen; H. Verschelde

2001-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

178

Progress in carbon dioxide capture and separation research for gasification-based power generation point sources  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of the present work is to investigate novel approaches, materials, and molecules for the abatement of carbon dioxide (CO2) at the pre-combustion stage of gasification-based power generation point sources. The capture/separation step for CO2 from large point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the Office of Research and Development of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and reduced costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the present research is focused on the capture/separation of carbon dioxide from fuel gas (precombustion gas) from processes such as the Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) process. For such applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical sorption, chemical sorption with solid sorbents, and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an “ideal” solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Pertaining to another separation technology, fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. Finally, processes based on dry, regenerable sorbents are additional techniques for CO2 capture from fuel gas. An overview of these novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of technologies related to membranes and physical solvents.

Pennline, H.; Luebke, D.; Jones, K.; Myers, C.; Morsi, B.; Heintz, Y.; Ilconich, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Design Study of the Extraction System of the 3rd Generation ECR Ion Source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A design study for the extraction system of the 3rd Generation super conducting ECR ion source at LBNL is presented. The magnetic design of the ion source has a mirror field of 4 T at the injection and 3 T at the extraction side and a radial field of 2.4 T at the plasma chamber wall. Therefore, the ion beam formation takes place in a strong axial magnetic field. Furthermore the axial field drops from 3 T to 0.4 T within the first 30 cm. The influence of the high magnetic field on the ion beam extraction and matching to the beam line is investigated. The extraction system is first simulated with the 2D ion trajectory code IGUN with an estimated mean charge state of the extracted ion beam. These results are then compared with the 2D code AXCEL-INP, which can simulate the extraction of ions with different charge states. Finally, the influence of the strong magnetic hexapole field is studied with the three dimensional ion optics code KOBRA. The introduced tool set can be used to optimize the extraction system of the super conducting ECR ion source.

Leitner, M.A.; Lyneis, C.M.; Taylor, C.E.; Wutte, D.; Xie, Z.Q.

1998-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

180

The U.S. Market Potential for Microturbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microturbines may have potential economic applications as on-site power generation sources for commercial and industrial sector customers because of their low cost, small size, modularity, and quiet operation. This analysis identifies the most attractive microturbine unit sizes applicable to each of these markets and provides information on which market segments and geographic regions offer the largest opportunities.

1999-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Generation of acoustic-gravity waves in ionospheric HF heating experiments : simulating large-scale natural heat sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, we investigate the potential role played by large-scale anomalous heat sources (e.g. prolonged heat wave events) in generating acoustic-gravity waves (AGWs) that might trigger widespread plasma turbulence ...

Pradipta, Rezy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Fuel cell market applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is a review of the US (and international) fuel cell development for the stationary power generation market. Besides DOE, GRI, and EPRI sponsorship, the US fuel cell program has over 40% cost-sharing from the private sector. Support is provided by user groups with over 75 utility and other end-user members. Objectives are to develop and demonstrate cost-effective fuel cell power generation which can initially be commercialized into various market applications using natural gas fuel by the year 2000. Types of fuel cells being developed include PAFC (phosphoric acid), MCFC (molten carbonate), and SOFC (solid oxide); status of each is reported. Potential international applications are reviewed also. Fuel cells are viewed as a force in dispersed power generation, distributed power, cogeneration, and deregulated industry. Specific fuel cell attributes are discussed: Fuel cells promise to be one of the most reliable power sources; they are now being used in critical uninterruptible power systems. They need hydrogen which can be generated internally from natural gas, coal gas, methanol landfill gas, or other fuels containing hydrocarbons. Finally, fuel cell development and market applications in Japan are reviewed briefly.

Williams, M.C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

183

Quality Assurance Plan for Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Programs  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to serve as the Quality Assurance Plan for Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (HS/RTG) programs performed at EG&G Mound Applied Technologies. As such, it identifies and describes the systems and activities in place to support the requirements contained in DOE Order 5700.6C as reflected in MD-10334, Mound Quality Policy and Responsibilities and the DOE/RPSD supplement, OSA/PQAR-1, Programmatic Quality Assurance Requirements for Space and Terrestrial Nuclear Power Systems. Unique program requirements, including additions, modifications, and exceptions to these quality requirements, are contained in the appendices of this plan. Additional appendices will be added as new programs and activities are added to Mound's HS/RTG mission assignment.

Gabriel, D. M.; Miller, G. D.; Bohne, W. A.

1995-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

184

Quality Assurance Plan for Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator Programs  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this document is to serve as the Quality Assurance Plan for Heat Source/Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (HS/RTG) programs performed at EG&G Mound Applied Technologies. As such, it identifies and describes the systems and activities in place to support the requirements contained in DOE Order 5700.6C as reflected in MD-10334, Mound Quality Policy and Responsibilities and the DOE/RPSD supplement, OSA/PQAR-1, Programmatic Quality Assurance Requirements for Space and Terrestrial Nuclear Power Systems. Unique program requirements, including additions, modifications, and exceptions to these quality requirements, are contained in the appendices of this plan. Additional appendices will be added as new programs and activities are added to Mound's HS/RTG mission assignment.

Gabriel, D. M.; Miller, G. D.; Bohne, W. A.

1995-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

185

Spectral properties of the nonspherically decaying radiation generated by a rotating superluminal source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The focusing of the radiation generated by a polarization current with a superluminally rotating distribution pattern is of a higher order in the plane of rotation than in other directions. Consequently, our previously published asymptotic approximation to the value of this field outside the equatorial plane breaks down as the line of sight approaches a direction normal to the rotation axis, i.e., is nonuniform with respect to the polar angle. Here we employ an alternative asymptotic expansion to show that, though having a rate of decay with frequency (mu) that is by a factor of order mu^(2/3) slower, the equatorial radiation field has the same dependence on distance as the nonspherically decaying component of the generated field in other directions: it, too, diminishes as the inverse square root of the distance from its source. We also briefly discuss the relevance of these results to the giant pulses received from pulsars: the focused, nonspherically decaying pulses that arise from a superluminal polarization current in a highly magnetized plasma have a power-law spectrum (i.e., a flux density proportional to mu^alpha) whose index (alpha) is given by one of the values -2/3, -2, -8/3, or -4.

Houshang Ardavan; Arzhang Ardavan; John Singleton; Joseph Fasel; Andrea Schmidt

2007-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

186

notice, is given to the source. On the Efficiency of Competitive Electricity Markets With Time-Invariant Retail Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The standard economic model of efficient competitive markets relies on the ability of sellers to charge prices that vary as their costs change. Yet, there is no restructured electricity market in which most retail customers can be charged realtime prices (RTP), prices that can change as frequently as wholesale costs. We analyze the impact of having some share of customers on time-invariant pricing in competitive electricity markets. Not only does time-invariant pricing in competitive markets lead to outcomes (prices and investment) that are not first-best, it even fails to achieve the second-best optimum given the constraint of time-invariant pricing. We then show that attempts to correct the level of investment through taxes or subsidies on electricity or capacity are unlikely to succeed, because these interventions create new inefficiencies. In contrast, increasing the share of customers

Severin Borenstein; Stephen P. Holland; We Thank Jim Bushnell; Joe Farrell; Morten Hviid; Erin Mansur; Michael Riordan; Lawrence White; Severin Borenstein; Stephen P. Holl

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

From the flea market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is about marketplaces in general, and one flea · market in particular. It explores some of the physical potentials the market has for generating a building and some of the social implications of a controversy ...

Krasnow, Ariel Rebecca

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Analytical Modeling of Wave Generation by the Borehole Orbital Vibrator Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the source as a function of wave frequency and rockon the source-fluid boundary and the fluid-rock boundary. ToP2 1731 m/s Rock S velocity c S2 Source/borehole parameters

Nakagawa, Seiji; Daley, Thomas M.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Carbon dioxide capture and separation techniques for advanced power generation point sources  

SciTech Connect

The capture/separation step for carbon dioxide (CO2) from large-point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large-point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the in-house research area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the research has focused on capture/separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas (postcombustion from fossil fuel-fired combustors) and from fuel gas (precombustion, such as integrated gasification combined cycle – IGCC). With respect to fuel gas applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical absorption; chemical absorption with solid sorbents; and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for hybrid membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic silanes incorporated into an alumina support or ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. An overview of two novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of each technology.

Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Morsi, B.I.; Heintz, Y.J.; Jones, K.L.; Ilconich, J.B.

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Carbon Dioxide Capture and Separation Techniques for Gasification-based Power Generation Point Sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The capture/separation step for carbon dioxide (CO2) from large-point sources is a critical one with respect to the technical feasibility and cost of the overall carbon sequestration scenario. For large-point sources, such as those found in power generation, the carbon dioxide capture techniques being investigated by the in-house research area of the National Energy Technology Laboratory possess the potential for improved efficiency and reduced costs as compared to more conventional technologies. The investigated techniques can have wide applications, but the research has focused on capture/separation of carbon dioxide from flue gas (post-combustion from fossil fuel-fired combustors) and from fuel gas (precombustion, such as integrated gasification combined cycle or IGCC). With respect to fuel gas applications, novel concepts are being developed in wet scrubbing with physical absorption; chemical absorption with solid sorbents; and separation by membranes. In one concept, a wet scrubbing technique is being investigated that uses a physical solvent process to remove CO2 from fuel gas of an IGCC system at elevated temperature and pressure. The need to define an ideal solvent has led to the study of the solubility and mass transfer properties of various solvents. Pertaining to another separation technology, fabrication techniques and mechanistic studies for membranes separating CO2 from the fuel gas produced by coal gasification are also being performed. Membranes that consist of CO2-philic ionic liquids encapsulated into a polymeric substrate have been investigated for permeability and selectivity. Finally, dry, regenerable processes based on sorbents are additional techniques for CO2 capture from fuel gas. An overview of these novel techniques is presented along with a research progress status of technologies related to membranes and physical solvents.

Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.; Jones, K.L.; Morsi, B.I. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Heintz, Y.J. (Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA); Ilconich, J.B. (Parsons)

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The convergence of market designs for adequate generating capacity with special attention to the CAISO's resource adequacy problem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper compares market designs intended to solve the resource adequacy (RA) problem, and finds that, in spite of rivalrous claims, the most advanced designs have nearly converged. The original dichotomy between approaches ...

Cramton, Peter C.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Want to Put an End to Capacity Markets? Think Real-Time Pricing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of generation capacity that must be installed to meet resource adequacy requirements often causes the energy market to be suppressed to the point that it fails to produce sufficient revenues to attract new entry. A significant expansion in the use of real-time pricing can, over time, cause the energy market to become a more bountiful source of revenues for generators, allowing the elimination of the capacity market. (author)

Reeder, Mark

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Multipurpose superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source, the European roadmap to third-generation electron cyclotron resonance ion sources  

SciTech Connect

The major infrastructures of nuclear physics in Europe adopted the technology of electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources for the production of heavy-ion beams. Most of them use 14 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs), except at INFN-LNS, where an 18 GHz superconducting ECRIS is in operation. In the past five years it was demonstrated, in the frame of the EU-FP5 RTD project called ''Innovative ECRIS,'' that further enhancement of the performances requires a higher frequency (28 GHz and above) and a higher magnetic field (above 2.2 T) for the hexapolar field. Within the EU-FP6 a joint research activity named ISIBHI has been established to build by 2008 two different ion sources, the A-PHOENIX source at LPSC Grenoble, reported in another contribution, and the multipurpose superconducting ECRIS (MS-ECRIS), based on fully superconducting magnets, able to operate in High B mode at a frequency of 28 GHz or higher. Such a development represents a significant step compared to existing devices, and an increase of typically a factor of 10 for the intensity is expected (e.g., 1 emA for medium charge states of heavy ions, or hundreds of e{mu}A of fully stripped light ions, or even 1 e{mu}A of charge states above 50{sup +} for the heaviest species). The challenging issue is the very high level of magnetic field, never achieved by a minimum B trap magnet system; the maximum magnetic field of MS-ECRIS will be higher than 4 or 5 T for the axial field and close to 2.7 T for the hexapolar field. The detailed description of the MS-ECRIS project and of its major constraints will be given along with the general issues of the developments under way.

Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Celona, L.; Torrisi, L.; Passarello, S.; Ando, L.; Cavenago, M.; Galata, A.; Spaedtke, P.; Tinschert, K.; Lang, R.; Iannucci, R.; Leroy, R.; Barue, C.; Hitz, D.; Seyfert, P.; Koivisto, H.; Suominen, P.; Tarvainen, O.; Beijers, H. [Istituto Nazionale Fisica Nucleare-Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (INFN-LNS), Via S. Sofia 62, 95123 Catania (Italy) and INFN-Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL), 35020 Legnaro (Italy); Gesellschaft fuer Schwerionenforschung mbH (GSI), 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Grand Accelerateur National d'Ions Lourds (GANIL), 14076 Caen (France); CEA-DRFMC-SBT, 38054 Grenoble (France); Department of Physics, University of Jyvaeskylae (JYFL), 40014 Jyvaeskylae (Finland); Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut (KVI), 9747 AA Groningen (Netherlands); Svedberg Laboratory (TSL), 75121 Uppsala (Sweden); CERN AB Department, CERN CH-1211 Geneva (Switzerland); Hahn Meitner Institut Berlin GmbH (HMI), 14109 Berlin (Germany); National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering (NIPNE), MG-6, Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)] (and others)

2006-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

194

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE's Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford's MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford's calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The role of hot electron refluxing in laser-generated K-alpha sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study of the contribution of refluxing electrons in the production of K-alpha radiation from high-intensity laser irradiated thin targets has been performed. Thin copper foils both freestanding, and backed by a thick substrate were irradiated with laser pulses of energies around 100 J at intensities ranging from below 10{sup 17} to above 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}. At high laser intensities we find a strong reduction in the K-alpha yield from targets backed by the substrate. The observed yield reduction is in good agreement with a simple model using hot electron spectra from particle-in-cell simulations or directly inferred from the measured bremsstrahlung emission and can therefore be interpreted as due to the suppression of hot electron refluxing. The study shows that refluxing electrons play a dominant role in high-intensity laser driven K- alpha generation and have to be taken into account in designing targets for laser driven high-flux K-alpha sources.

Neumayer, P. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); FIAS Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, 60325 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Aurand, B. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Basko, M. [Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt am Main, 60325 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Ecker, B. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtz Institut Jena, 07743 Jena (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Gibbon, P.; Karmakar, A. [ExtreMe Matter Institute EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Institute for Advanced Simulation, Juelich Supercomputing Center, Forschungzentrum Juelich GmbH, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Hochhaus, D. C. [ExtreMe Matter Inst. EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Goethe Univ. Frankfurt am Main, 60325 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Kazakov, E. [RRC Kurchatov Inst., 123182 Moscow (Russian Federation); Kuehl, T. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Johannes Gutenberg Univ. Mainz, 55099 Mainz (Germany); Labaune, C. [LULI, Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Rosmej, O. [Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung GSI, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Tauschwitz, An. [ExtreMe Matter Inst. EMMI, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstrasse 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); Goethe Univ. Frankfurt am Main, 60325 Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

Milliwatt generator heat source shelf-life-related pressure-burst capsule evaluations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Three Milliwatt Generator Heat Source (MWGHS) shelf-life-related capsules were pressure-burst tested after thermal aging. Shelf-life capsules PB-08-03 (MC2893) and MPT-11-33 (MC3599) were tested at 1,010 C and capsule PB-07-13 (MC2893) was tested at 1,100 C. Subsequent to pressure-burst testing, each capsule was bubble-leak tested then metallographically examined. Post-mortem evaluation consisted of metallography, microhardness, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and oxygen and nitrogen analysis. Capsules PB-08-03 and PB-07-13 failed by elevated temperature stress-rupture in the coarse-grained cap to body welds, as has been documented for previous capsules. Pressure-burst testing of capsule MPT-11-33 was terminated prior to failure after 739 hours on test at 1,010 C, however, microscopic examination of the weld indicated that similar failure had began to occur in the interior portion of the capsule to body weld. Evidence was obtained indicating that metallurgical changes occurred during the pressure-burst test performed at 1,100 C. The metallurgical observations of a preferred site for elevated temperature deformation and fracture (the coarse-grained weld region) and structural instability (the property changes during testing at 1,100 C) need to be considered in component lifetime prediction and modeling efforts.

Ritchey, B.D.; Eckelmeyer, K.H.; Kilgo, A.C.; McKenzie, B.B.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

A shielded storage and processing facility for radioisotope thermoelectric generator heat source production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses a shielded storage rack which has been installed as part of the Radioisotope Power Systems Facility (RPSF) at the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site in Washington State. The RPSF is designed to replace an existing facility at DOE`s Mound Site near Dayton, Ohio, where General Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules are currently assembled and installed into Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTG). The overall design goal of the RPSF is to increase annual production throughput, while at the same time reducing annual radiation exposure to personnel. The shield rack design successfully achieved this goal for the Module Reduction and Monitoring Facility (MRMF), which process and stores assembled GPHS modules, prior to their installation into RTGS. The shield rack design is simple and effective, with the result that background radiation levels within Hanford`s MRMF room are calculated at just over three percent of those typically experienced during operation of the existing MRMF at Mound, despite the fact that Hanford`s calculations assume five times the GPHS inventory of that assumed for Mound.

Sherrell, D.L.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Impact of Natural Gas Market Conditions on Fuel Flexibility Needs for Existing and New Power Generation: Report Series on Natural Ga s and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ongoing surge in new gas-fired capacity is changing the landscape of how natural gas will be used for power generation, leading to some surprising effects. While the new machines bring greater efficiency, the exit of dual-fuel units leads to a loss in fuel flexibility, greater natural gas price volatility, and less reliability of natural gas-fired generation. This report explores these effects systematically, bringing fresh insight on gas use in the electric sector, its market effects, and the ever-c...

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

199

Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SOURCES Microsoft Corporation. "Gasohol," Microsoft Encarta Online Encyclopedia 2001, http:encarta.msn.com. U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration, A...

200

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy technology. 2011 Wind Technologies Market Report Appendix: Sources of Data Presented in this Report Installation Trends

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

2010 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy technology. 2010 Wind Technologies Market Report Appendix: Sources of Data Presented in this Report Installation Trends

Wiser, Ryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Data Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . December 1999 Propane Market Assessment for Winter 1997-1997 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ....

203

Characteristics of a RF-Driven Ion Source for a Neutron Generator Used for Associated Particle Imaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present recent work on a prototype compact neutron generator for associated particle imaging (API). API uses alpha particles that are produced simultaneously with neutrons in the deuterium-tritium ({sup 2}D({sup 3}T,n){sup 4}{alpha}) fusion reaction to determine the direction of the neutrons upon exiting the reaction. This method determines the spatial position of each neutron interaction and requires the neutrons to be generated from a small spot in order to achieve high spatial resolution. The ion source for API is designed to produce a focused ion beam with a beam spot diameter of 1-mm or less on the target. We use an axial type neutron generator with a predicted neutron yield of 10{sup 8} n/s for a 50 {mu}A D/T ion beam current accelerated to 80 kV. The generator utilizes an RF planar spiral antenna at 13.56 MHz to create a highly efficient inductively coupled plasma at the ion source. Experimental results show that beams with an atomic ion fraction of over 80% can be obtained while utilizing only 100 watts of RF power in the ion source. A single acceleration gap with a secondary electron suppression electrode is used in the tube. Experimental results from ion source testing, such as the current density, atomic ion fraction, electron temperature, and electron density will be discussed.

Wu Ying; Leung, K.-N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California-Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Hurley, John P. [Special Technologies Laboratory, Santa Barbara, CA 93111 (United States); Ji Qing; Kwan, Joe [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, 1 Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

204

Brookhaven National Laboratory Technology Marketing ...  

Brookhaven National Laboratory Technology Marketing ... a critical reaction in a number of growing energy generation and utilization ... Energy Analys ...

205

Steam driven markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The market for steam equipment has been relatively level. Looking ahead, manufacturers anticipate steady market growth worldwide. Steam equipment manufacturers share a similar view of the market for next few years - upward. The steady upward climb is being attributed to a number of factors that will benefit steam turbine and heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) makers.

Anderson, J.L.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

electricity market module region | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

342 342 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281342 Varnish cache server electricity market module region Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

207

Economic implications for the generation of electricity from biomass fuel sources.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study examines the economic theory, geographical implications, and relevant legislative history impacting the use of biomass fuel sources within the electric utility industry. Research… (more)

Curtis, Thomas Wayne

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Control of z-source inverter topologies for distributed generation systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In meeting ever increasing energy demand, it is important to do continuous research in energy sources, their efficient use and distribution of energy. Due to… (more)

Chandana Jayampathi Gajanayake.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Analytical value at risk methods in the financial electricity market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Market risk is among the most important sources of risk for companies in the financial and commodity markets. Proper estimation of market risk has become… (more)

Javanainen, Timo

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Performance of a 14-MeV neutron generator as an in situ calibration source for TFTR  

SciTech Connect

TFTR will soon enter its D-T phase with the introduction of tritium. This will result in the production of neutrons having 14-MeV energy which is significantly greater than the 2.5-MeV neutrons encountered during D-D operation. In preparation for the D-T phase, a calibration of the four neutron detection systems was performed using a 14-MeV neutron generator producing 10{sup 8} n/sec. To account for the spatial extent of the toroidally shaped plasma and for neutrons scattered from surrounding structures, detector responses were determined with the source positioned at many locations inside the vacuum vessel. Before the generator could be used as a calibration source, a characterization of its total yield and angular emission properties was obtained. The total yield was determined by aluminum activation methods to within {plus_minus}6%, while the angular emission was found to be anisotropic in the forward and reverse cones along the generator axis. After the characterization was performed, the generator was mounted on a moveable track inside the vacuum vessel, where it could be remotely moved across the view of each detector. This paper presents details of the methods and results of the source characterization, together with initial results of the in-vessel D-T neutron calibration.

Roquemore, A.L.; Jassby, D.L.; Johnson, L.C.; Strachan, J.D. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.; Barnes, C.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

1993-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

211

High-order harmonic generation in Xe, Kr, and Ar driven by a 2.1-?m source: High-order harmonic spectroscopy under macroscopic effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We experimentally and numerically study the atomic response and pulse propagation effects of high-order harmonics generated in Xe, Kr, and Ar driven by a 2.1-?m infrared femtosecond light source. The light source is an ...

Hong, Kyung-Han

212

Dynamical mass generation by source inversion: calculating the mass gap of the chiral Gross-Neveu model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We probe the U(N) chiral Gross-Neveu model with a source-term $J\\l{\\Psi}\\Psi$. We find an expression for the renormalization scheme and scale invariant source $\\hat{J}$, as a function of the generated mass gap. The expansion of this function is organized in such a way that all scheme and scale dependence is reduced to one single parameter $d$. We obtain a non-perturbative mass gap as the solution of $\\hat{J}=0$. A physical choice for $d$ gives good results for $N>2$. The self-consistent minimal sensitivity condition gives a slight improvement.

K. Van Acoleyen; J. A. Gracey; H. Verschelde

2002-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

213

Novel broadband light sources and pulse generation techniques at 1.5 [mu]m  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A wide diversity of applications, in both fundamental science and practical technology, has come to rely on broadband optical light sources as key enabling tools. In this thesis, we investigate three devices that contribute ...

Shen, Hanfei M, 1979-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Table 8.4a Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

8 Solar thermal and photovoltaic (PV) energy. Sources: - 1949-1988-Table 8.4b for electric power sector, and Tables 8.1 and A6 for industrial sector.

215

Improving the low voltage ride through of doubly fed induction generator during intermittent voltage source converter faults  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The impact of different voltage source converter (VSC) faults on the low voltage ride through (LVRT) capability of the doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) is also investigated. Faults such as fire-through of the VSC switches and short circuit across the DC-link capacitor are considered in this paper. The impact of internal VSC faults when they occur within the grid side converter (GSC)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Generation of polarization entangled photon pairs by a single crystal interferometric source pumped by femtosecond laser pulses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Photon pairs, highly entangled in polarization have been generated under femtosecond laser pulse excitation by a type I crystal source, operating in a single arm interferometric scheme. The relevant effects of temporal walk-off existing in these conditions between the ordinary and extraordinary photons were experimentally investigated. By introducing a suitable temporal compensation between the two orthogonal polarization components highly entangled pulsed states were obtained.

M. Barbieri; C. Cinelli; F. De Martini; P. Mataloni

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Theoretical, Numerical, and Experimental Evidence of Superluminal Electromagnetic and Gravitational Fields Generated in the Nearfield of Dipole Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Theoretical and numerical wave propagation analysis of an oscillating electric dipole is presented. The results show that upon creation at the source, both the longitudinal electric and transverse magnetic fields propagate superluminally and reduce to the speed of light as they propagate about one wavelength from the source. In contrast, the transverse electric field is shown to be created about 1/4 wavelength outside the source and launches superluminal fields both towards and away from the source which reduce to the speed of light as the field propagates about one wavelength from the source. An experiment using simple dipole antennas is shown to verify the predicted superluminal transverse electric field behavior. In addition, it is shown that the fields generated by a gravitational source propagate superluminally and can be modeled using quadrapole electrodynamic theory. The phase speed, group speed, and information speed of these systems are compared and shown to differ. Provided the noise of a signal is small and the modulation method is known, it is shown that the information speed can be approximately the same as the superluminal group speed. According to relativity theory, it is known that between moving reference frames, superluminal signals can propagate backwards in time enabling violations of causality. Several explanations are presented which may resolve this dilemma.

William D. Walker

2005-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

218

Innovative Development of Next Generation and Energy Efficient Solid State Light Sources for General Illumination  

SciTech Connect

This two year program resulted in a novel broadband spectrally dynamic solid state illumination source (BSDLED) that uses a dual wavelength light emitting diode (LED) and combinations of phosphors to create a broadband emission that is real-time controllable. Four major focuses of this work were as follows: (1) creation of a two terminal dual wavelength LED with control of the relative intensities of the two emission peaks, (2) bandgap modeling of the two terminal dual LED to explain operation based on the doping profile, (3) novel use of phosphor combinations with dual LEDs to create a broadband spectral power distribution that can be varied to mimic a blackbody radiator over a certain range and (4) investigation of novel doping schemes to create tunnel junctions or equivalent buried current spreading layers in the III-nitrides. Advances were achieved in each of these four areas which could lead to more efficient solid state light sources with greater functionality over existing devices. The two-terminal BSDLED is an important innovation for the solid-state lighting industry as a variable spectrum source. A three-terminal dual emitter was also investigated and appears to be the most viable approach for future spectrally dynamic solid state lighting sources. However, at this time reabsorption of emission between the two active regions limits the usefulness of this device for illumination applications.

Ian Ferguson

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

Market-Based Valuation of New Coal-Fired Generation: Case Studies of Investment Risk and Profitability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas turbine technology has dominated new generation capacity additions in the United States, yet several years of unexpectedly high natural gas prices are driving interest in alternatives. This report uses case studies of new coal-fired generation to address the question of whether coal can be a good choice for the private investor. The studies give great detail on possible coal plants in Texas and some guidance on possible projects in Virginia, Ohio, and Indiana. The studies provide a comprehens...

2003-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

220

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wyoming" Wyoming" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",39378154,38667162,41852352,40154595,42337169,39683722,40851631,40765087,44699071,42951057,44585709,43764015,42532420,42261405,43059537,44031568,42905244,43144350,43909400,43182207,44738543,98,93 " Coal",38681220,37862584,41153537,39301199,41380267,38804539,39551555,39315335,43287140,41718548,43355361,42560578,41685278,41490825,42372775,43112061,41948761,42204359,42900080,41040274,42126910,95.3,87.5 " Petroleum",45561,60850,54839,56970,47029,67673,59443,58765,42871,46197,35159,33744,38686,41567,43450,40311,44240,46116,43765,49958,55973,0.1,0.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Idaho" Idaho" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",8617977,8281502,6260025,9022654,7303193,10062854,12230805,13511823,11978079,12456120,10114257,6666589,8164140,7732812,7765655,8032438,10495090,8611890,8893983,9977502,8589208,84.9,71.4 " Petroleum",615,311,475,103,31,311,245,95,253,155,2792,3723,65,116,136,5,144,134,120,41,74,"*","*" " Natural Gas","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",76168,61229,27775,73353,94504,240504,230189,286865,170231,"-",1.4

222

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oklahoma" Oklahoma" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",45063182,44850089,45942891,48810720,45380625,47955288,47544649,48380102,51454036,50278792,51403249,50413729,51218320,49776514,48298390,54250814,51917155,54177692,60074823,57516914,57421195,92.5,79.5 " Coal",25188557,26027968,27666494,28990113,27453911,29714368,31876730,33036688,31026837,30588375,32852645,32164601,33444114,34200128,31240478,33604628,32324391,31610751,33625415,31645255,29102532,59.1,40.3 " Petroleum",49422,18533,15180,14027,11456,77528,124951,12568,7541,7622,46637,146375,10311,111555,21008,13181,24187,139391,12600,12433,12606,0.1,"*"

223

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Michigan" Michigan" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",89058681,94567383,82679444,92250107,83720636,92478772,95155261,89564616,85146307,87874695,89572141,97067330,100451718,96634055,99608512,104830689,97373706,96785842,94503953,82787341,89666874,86,80.4 " Coal",65295742,65138291,61434530,61558991,67538611,65425002,66097259,65552021,69142807,69118017,66980252,66931691,65389899,66448916,67253690,69158736,66654737,69406550,68421489,65867455,64766712,64.3,58.1 " Petroleum",689461,553863,498159,619777,655860,687264,651860,602053,1005170,1282696,993932,724313,1090767,883847,714881,788563,272106,445915,281604,215189,195180,1,0.2

224

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Maryland" Maryland" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",31497406,38215120,39586558,43488284,43765565,44658945,44380543,44552905,48513503,49323828,31783195,88150,30734,51722,30023,44235,11941,23712,5856,2294,2996,62.1,"*" " Coal",23299412,22622989,23625314,24890670,25394481,27369905,27780141,27394342,29077013,29352347,20353004,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",39.8,"-" " Petroleum",3328080,3935221,2611820,3953777,4133533,1407598,1401195,1478623,3311978,3897208,1507860,87790,30734,51722,30023,44235,11941,23712,5856,2294,2832,2.9,"*"

225

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts" Massachusetts" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",36478610,35802358,32838301,28163544,27466049,26971667,27758877,33898697,26036881,4359511,1704653,1566491,1156651,2055622,1524169,1622208,942917,493885,507254,447912,802906,4.4,1.9 " Coal",11273069,11861344,10949228,9815909,10209727,10586608,11500536,12488802,8168608,1073628,1094848,1096681,"-",1074514,903789,1025141,"-","-","-","-","-",2.8,"-" " Petroleum",14556403,15612257,13282101,11112574,9561302,5848663,6221378,11586081,10019730,300040,123931,131797,220435,517767,290865,189211,29031,58456,57639,32698,42546,0.3,0.1

226

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Oregon" Oregon" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",49171999,46298021,41220343,40743085,37490089,44031261,47883913,49068279,46352310,51698318,46059938,38059649,39731986,38577937,39092958,37407039,43068822,43202516,44590530,42703218,41142684,88.9,74.6 " Coal",1297978,2814199,3682715,3502742,3814009,1527874,1727583,1500879,3348089,3697900,3785462,4423843,3768531,4285697,3535764,3463644,2370628,4351624,4044319,3196902,4126435,7.3,7.5 " Petroleum",26809,9648,9212,32365,5398,4346,6631,10942,33127,7699,52038,92767,5893,44035,20305,47427,4323,5044,9974,2825,3330,0.1,"*"

227

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware" Delaware" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",7099663,7603723,6267492,8306462,8501043,8324101,8121853,6578599,6317738,6239372,4137127,1872053,170994,31107,23751,25989,16558,47830,19068,12768,30059,69.1,0.5 " Coal",4904473,4598301,3813594,5185396,4754309,4226615,4225125,3925643,3811669,2762460,3319195,1626254,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",55.4,"-" " Petroleum",1436186,1899201,1829938,2094383,1619659,917065,1188294,832577,1234464,1234121,398100,209088,154118,9863,10083,6442,113,4132,512,457,843,6.6,"*"

228

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Rhode Island" Rhode Island" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",591756,171457,109308,53740,68641,653076,3301111,3562833,2061351,9436,10823,"-",11836,11771,12402,10805,11008,11075,10612,10612,10827,0.2,0.1 " Petroleum",158154,54218,74715,28582,33836,50334,61675,16609,8827,9436,10823,"-",11836,11771,12402,10805,11008,11075,10612,10612,10827,0.2,0.1 " Natural Gas",433602,117239,34593,25158,34805,602742,3239436,3546224,2052524,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-"

229

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania" Pennsylvania" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",165682846,162366875,166034292,166200686,169029050,168941707,175022081,177166516,173903236,161595988,97075771,27633966,30537243,30099444,33900004,1058313,1311434,1077389,1224597,1159659,1086500,48.1,0.5 " Coal",101996271,100359157,102198817,100390066,93951561,96799645,100857561,105445514,106516740,85580341,36704124,13863092,15935860,15944113,18396944,"-","-","-","-","-","-",18.2,"-" " Petroleum",4013814,3713606,2220932,4559186,5182491,3072153,3212502,2307411,4097006,3063268,1656505,21609,39420,34944,32129,7717,2942,"-",873,710,525,0.8,"*"

230

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nevada" Nevada" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",19286260,20922439,20962974,19820333,20519076,19997354,21362057,22869773,26552567,26485602,29341675,27896065,25008568,24634871,24246391,24112225,19686302,22376989,22979409,26095005,23710917,82.7,67.5 " Coal",15053277,16365730,16443169,15627860,15324714,13971824,14656868,15250606,17161341,16907530,18931521,17736970,16413025,17085959,18257265,18384261,7253521,7090911,6884521,6376887,5584370,53.4,15.9 " Petroleum",284108,238321,327585,246506,166446,26549,93811,31156,50285,35418,64614,911611,25472,16793,95766,20500,17347,11447,9865,8472,7675,0.2,"*"

231

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota" Minnesota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",41549628,40427575,37783876,41254101,40917280,42502869,41791506,40302526,43976935,44153826,46615673,44798014,48568719,49576276,47232462,46791349,46710674,47793039,46758314,44442211,45428599,90.7,84.6 " Coal",27587603,26186299,24443013,27110850,26399834,26820765,27329077,27081067,29884402,28366977,31731081,31037544,32200713,33157032,31477117,30514512,30600302,31199099,30771207,28582304,27176478,61.7,50.6 " Petroleum",440740,575916,638979,630166,596987,484708,640427,763764,649866,674398,440264,599557,640129,845239,752362,752774,484235,362765,211633,49502,25870,0.9,"*"

232

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut" Connecticut" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",32155574,23552082,25153644,28714867,27201416,26931900,15773738,13227766,15122925,20484367,16992594,2816826,21463,59812,45095,41709,47612,37217,52334,47137,65570,51.5,0.2 " Coal",2351049,2117781,2148078,1907826,2104045,2269352,2367889,2557934,1482608,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-" " Petroleum",8632571,7890483,5297424,4206354,3353897,3397400,5255050,8431425,8608001,5793975,7726,11032,928,13955,9253,695,1282,3325,2597,2465,2604,"*","*"

233

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Colorado" Colorado" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",31312872,31038231,31899303,32687317,33324413,32673972,33971688,34375573,35471294,36167349,40108260,41957723,41509933,41226252,40436218,41014609,42055989,42353281,41176711,37467527,39584166,90.8,78 " Coal",29602738,28922906,30001882,30456351,31401250,30276010,31952337,32002082,33079201,32605202,35101982,35654162,35135198,35807527,35570358,35285966,36003331,35722617,34639561,31454143,34386818,79.5,67.8 " Petroleum",25129,37883,39164,8898,8913,10136,15539,14623,36736,32430,91320,158742,22519,33927,11797,15464,17646,14748,18092,12583,17424,0.2,"*"

234

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

District of Columbia" District of Columbia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",361043,179814,73991,188452,274252,188862,109809,70661,243975,230003,97423,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",67.5,"-" " Petroleum",361043,179814,73991,188452,274252,188862,109809,70661,243975,230003,97423,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",67.5,"-" "Independent Power Producers and Combined Heat and Power","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",46951,123239,261980,74144,36487,226042,81467,75251,72316,35499,199858,32.5,100

235

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California" California" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",114528000,104967938,119309725,125782063,126749186,121881402,114706047,112183063,114926213,87874809,85856285,70132656,74588271,81728209,75177122,89348213,100338454,87348589,83346844,85123706,96939535,41.3,47.5 " Petroleum",4385235,598489,325424,2007674,1862719,488530,674899,141872,121385,51769,144590,316691,43933,50996,51482,57974,58991,65296,58187,50625,40819,0.1,"*" " Natural Gas",45221848,43940427,56609607,46499103,61530357,39089723,30768135,36300778,26385452,13917748,12411961,11918703,8808012,9873371,10759580,12982348,19805412,22896497,26129803,25237449,31251994,6,15.3

236

Interference of outgoing electromagnetic waves generated by two point-like sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An energy-momentum carried by electromagnetic field produced by two point-like charged particles is calculated. Integration region considered in the evaluation of the bound and emitted quantities produced by all points of world lines up to the end points at which particles' trajectories puncture an observation hyperplane $y^0=t$. Radiative part of the energy-momentum contains, apart from usual integrals of Larmor terms, also the sum of work done by Lorentz forces of point-like charges acting on one another. Therefore, the combination of wave motions (retarded Li\\'enard-Wiechert solutions) leads to the interaction between the sources.

Yurij Yaremko

2004-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

237

Compact cryogenic source of periodic hydrogen and argon droplet beams for relativistic laser-plasma generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a cryogenic source of periodic streams of micrometer-sized hydrogen and argon droplets as ideal mass-limited target systems for fundamental intense laser-driven plasma applications. The highly compact design combined with a high temporal and spatial droplet stability makes our injector ideally suited for experiments using state-of-the-art high-power lasers in which a precise synchronization between the laser pulses and the droplets is mandatory. We show this by irradiating argon droplets with multi-terawatt pulses.

Fraga, R. A. Costa; Kalinin, A.; Kuehnel, M.; Schottelius, A. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Hochhaus, D. C.; Neumayer, P. [EMMI Extreme Matter Institute and Research Division, GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany); FIAS Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Ruth-Moufang-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); Polz, J. [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Kaluza, M. C. [Institut fuer Optik und Quantenelektronik, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Froebelstieg 3, 07743 Jena (Germany); Grisenti, R. E. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, J. W. Goethe-Universitaet, Max-von-Laue-Str. 1, 60438 Frankfurt am Main (Germany); GSI Helmholtzzentrum fuer Schwerionenforschung, Planckstr. 1, 64291 Darmstadt (Germany)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

238

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

market trends icon Nuclear market trends icon Nuclear Mkt trends Market Trends After Fukushima, prospects for nuclear power dim in Japan and Europe but not elsewhere.... Read full section Renewable energy sources lead rise in primary energy consumption.... Read full section Coal-fired plants continue to be the largest source of U.S. electricity generation.... Read full section Most new capacity additions use natural gas and renewables.... Read full section Nuclear power plant capacity grows slowly through uprates and new builds.... Read full section issues Issues in Focus Nuclear power in AEO2012.... Read full section figure data Reference Case Tables Table 1. Total Energy Supply, Disposition, and Price Summary XLS Table 9. Electricity Generating Capacity XLS Table 56. Electricity Generation by Electricity Market Module Region and Source XLS

239

Advanced Soldier Thermoelectric Power System for Power Generation from Battlefield Heat Sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The U.S. military uses large amounts of fuel during deployments and battlefield operations. This project sought to develop a lightweight, small form-factor, soldier-portable advanced thermoelectric (TE) system prototype to recover and convert waste heat from various deployed military equipment (i.e., diesel generators/engines, incinerators, vehicles, and potentially mobile kitchens), with the ultimate purpose of producing power for soldier battery charging, advanced capacitor charging, and other battlefield power applications. The technical approach employed microchannel technology, a unique “power panel” approach to heat exchange/TE system integration, and newly-characterized LAST (lead-antimony-silver-telluride) and LASTT (lead-antimony-silver-tin-telluride) TE materials segmented with bismuth telluride TE materials in designing a segmented-element TE power module and system. This project researched never-before-addressed system integration challenges (thermal expansion, thermal diffusion, electrical interconnection, thermal and electrical interfaces) of designing thin “power panels” consisting of alternating layers of thin, microchannel heat exchangers (hot and cold) sandwiching thin, segmented-element TE power generators. The TE properties, structurally properties, and thermal fatigue behavior of LAST and LASTT materials were developed and characterized such that the first segmented-element TE modules using LAST / LASTT materials were fabricated and tested at hot-side temperatures = 400 °C and cold-side temperatures = 40 °C. LAST / LASTT materials were successfully segmented with bismuth telluride and electrically interconnected with diffusion barrier materials and copper strapping within the module electrical circuit. A TE system design was developed to produce 1.5-1.6 kW of electrical energy using these new TE modules from the exhaust waste heat of 60-kW Tactical Quiet Generators as demonstration vehicles.

Hendricks, Terry J.; Hogan, Tim; Case, Eldon D.; Cauchy, Charles J.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Magnetic Processing – A Pervasive Energy Efficient Technology for Next Generation Materials for Aerospace and Specialty Steel Markets  

SciTech Connect

Thermomagnetic Magnetic Processing is an exceptionally fertile, pervasive and cross-cutting technology that is just now being recognized by several major industry leaders for its significant potential to increase energy efficiency and materials performance for a myriad of energy intensive industries in a variety of areas and applications. ORNL has pioneered the use and development of large magnetic fields in thermomagnetically processing (T-MP) materials for altering materials phase equilibria and transformation kinetics. ORNL has discovered that using magnetic fields, we can produce unique materials responses. T-MP can produce unique phase stabilities & microstructures with improved materials performance for structural and functional applications not achieved with traditional processing techniques. These results suggest that there are unprecedented opportunities to produce significantly enhanced materials properties via atomistic level (nano-) microstructural control and manipulation. ORNL (in addition to others) have shown that grain boundary chemistry and precipitation kinetics are also affected by large magnetic fields. This CRADA has taken advantage of ORNL’s unique, custom-designed thermo-magnetic, 9 Tesla superconducting magnet facility that enables rapid heating and cooling of metallic components within the magnet bore; as well as ORNL’s expertise in high magnetic field (HMF) research. Carpenter Technologies, Corp., is a a US-based industrial company, that provides enhanced performance alloys for the Aerospace and Specialty Steel products. In this CRADA, Carpenter Technologies, Corp., is focusing on applying ORNL’s Thermomagnetic Magnetic Processing (TMP) technology to improve their current and future proprietary materials’ product performance and open up new markets for their Aerospace and Specialty Steel products. Unprecedented mechanical property performance improvements have been demonstrated for a high strength bainitic alloy industrial/commercial alloy that is envisioned to provide the potential for new markets for this alloy. These thermomechanical processing results provide these alloys with a major breakthrough demonstrating that simultaneous improvements in yield strength and ductility are achieved: 12 %, 10%, 13%, and 22% increases in yield strength, elongation, reduction-in-area, and impact energy respectively. In addition, TMP appears to overcome detrimental chemical homogeneity impacts on uniform microstructure evolution.

Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Ludtka, G.M.; Ray, P. (Carpenter Technologies, Inc.); Magee, J. (Carpenter Technologies, Inc.)

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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241

The marginal effects of the price for carbon dioxide: quantifying the effects on the market for electric generation in Florida  

SciTech Connect

Greater emphasis on public policy aimed at internalizing the societal cost of carbon dioxide emissions leads to more questions about the economic impacts of that policy. In cooperation with the State of Florida's Department of Environmental Protection, the authors have constructed a model to simulate the dispatch of electric generating units to serve electric load in the state - and obtained some counterintuitive results. (author)

Kury, Theodore J.; Harrington, Julie

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

242

General-purpose heat source: Research and development program, radioisotope thermoelectric generator/thin fragment impact test  

SciTech Connect

The general-purpose heat source provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. This test was designed to provide information on the response of a loaded RTG to impact by a fragment similar to the type of fragment produced by breakup of the spacecraft propulsion module system. The results of this test indicated that impact by a thin aluminum fragment traveling at 306 m/s may result in significant damage to the converter housing, failure of one fueled clad, and release of a small quantity of fuel.

Reimus, M.A.H.; Hinckley, J.E.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

General-purpose heat source: Research and development program. Radioisotope thermoelectric generator impact tests: RTG-1 and RTG-2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of {sup 238}Pu decay to an array of thermoelectric elements in a radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG). Because the potential for a launch abort or return from orbit exists for any space mission, the heat source response to credible accident scenarios is being evaluated. The first two RTG Impact Tests were designed to provide information on the response of a fully loaded RTG to end-on impact against a concrete target. The results of these tests indicated that at impact velocities up to 57 m/s the converter shell and internal components protect the GPHS capsules from excessive deformation. At higher velocities, some of the internal components of the RTG interact with the GPHS capsules to cause excessive localized deformation and failure.

Reimus, M.A.H.; Hinckley, J.E.; George, T.G.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

LS-303 Generation of Bright, Tunable, Polarized ?-Ray Sources by Scattering Laser Pulses from APS Electron Beams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We calculate the performance of possible Advanced Photon Source (APS) ?-ray sources for applications in nuclear physics research. For the APS storage ring, it is possible to generate tagged ?-ray photon fluxes of 10 8, 0.7×10 8, and 0.3×10 8 photons/s at photon energies of 1, 1.7, and 2.8 GeV, respectively. For untagged photons, fluxes higher than 10 8 photons/s are possible for those energies. For the injection booster, an untagged ?-ray photon flux up to 10 8 photons/s at energy ranging from 5 MeV to 1 GeV is possible. This can be achieved using off-the-shelf commercial Ti:Sa laser systems. The photon fluxes predicted here are in general one to two orders of magnitude higher than facilities with similar photon energies. 1.

Y. Li; Y. Chae; L. Emery; Z. Huang; K. Harkay; J. Lewellen; S. V. Milton; V. Sajaev

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

generation capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generation capacity generation capacity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO Electricity electricity market module region generation capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generation Capacity by Electricity Market Module Region and Source- Reference Case (xls, 10.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata Average vote Your vote

246

GPHS-RTG system explosion test direct course experiment 5000. [General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator  

SciTech Connect

The General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (GPHS-RTG) has been designed and is being built to provide electrical power for spacecrafts to be launched on the Space Shuttle. The objective of the RTG System Explosion Test was to expose a mock-up of the GPHS-RTG with a simulated heat source to the overpressure and impulse representative of a potential upper magnitude explosion of the Space Shuttle. The test was designed so that the heat source module would experience an overpressure at which the survival of the fuel element cladding would be expected to be marginal. Thus, the mock-up was placed where the predicted incident overpressure would be 1300 psi. The mock-up was mounted in an orientation representative of the launch configuration on the spacecraft to be used on the NASA Galileo Mission. The incident overpressure measured was in the range of 1400 to 2100 psi. The mock-up and simulated heat source were destroyed and only very small fragments were recovered. This damage is believed to have resulted from a combination of the overpressure and impact by very high velocity fragments from the ANFO sphere. Post-test analysis indicated that extreme working of the iridium clad material occurred, indicative of intensive impulsive loading on the metal.

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

The Nature of Microjansky Radio Sources and Implications for the Design of the Next Generation Very Sensitive Radio Telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Deep radio surveys show a population of very red counterparts of microjansky radio sources, which are unidentified to I = 25 in ground based images and I = 28.5 in the Hubble Deep Field. This population of optically faint radio sources, which comprises about 20% of the microjansky radio samples, may be dust enshrouded starburst galaxies, extreme redshift or dust reddened AGN, or due to displaced radio lobes. Even deeper radio surveys, which will be made possible by next generation radio telescopes such as the Expanded VLA or the Square Kilometer Array, will reach to nanojansky levels which may be dominated by this new population, but only if special care is taken to achieve high angular resolution and dynamic range better than 60 dB. This will reuire array dimensions up to 1000 km to achieve confusion limited performance at 1.4 GHz and up to 10,000 km at 300 MHz. But, even then, the ability to study individual nanojanksy radio sources may be limited by the finite extent of the sources and consequential blending of their images.

K. I. Kellermann; E. A. Richards

1999-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

248

Replacing a 252Cf source with a neutron generator in a shuffler - a conceptual design performed with MCNPX  

SciTech Connect

The {sup 252}Cf shuffler has been widely used in nuclear safeguards and radioactive waste management to assay fissile isotopes, such as {sup 235}U or {sup 239}Pu, present in a variety of samples, ranging from small cans of uranium waste to metal samples weighing several kilograms. Like other non-destructive assay instruments, the shuffler uses an interrogating neutron source to induce fissions in the sample. Although shufflers with {sup 252}Cf sources have been reliably used for several decades, replacing this isotopic source with a neutron generator presents some distinct advantages. Neutron generators can be run in a continuous or pulsed mode, and may be turned off, eliminating the need for shielding and a shuffling mechanism in the shuffler. There is also essentially no dose to personnel during installation, and no reliance on the availability of {sup 252}Cf. Despite these advantages, the more energetic neutrons emitted from the neutron generator (141 MeV for D-T generators) present some challenges for certain material types. For example when the enrichment of a uranium sample is unknown, the fission of {sup 238}U is generally undesirable. Since measuring uranium is one of the main uses of a shuffler, reducing the delayed neutron contribution from {sup 238}U is desirable. Hence, the shuffler hardware must be modified to accommodate a moderator configuration near the source to tailor the interrogating spectrum in a manner which promotes sub-threshold fissions (below 1 MeV) but avoids the over-moderation of the interrogating neutrons so as to avoid self-shielding. In this study, where there are many material and geometry combinations, the Monte Carlo N-Particle eXtended (MCNPX) transport code was used to model, design, and optimize the moderator configuration within the shuffler geometry. The code is then used to evaluate and compare the assay performances of both the modified shuffler and the current {sup 252}Cf shuffler designs for different test samples. The matrix effect and the non-uniformity of the interrogating flux are investigated and quantified in each case. The modified geometry proposed by this study can serve s a guide in retrofitting shufflers that are already in use.

Schear, Melissa A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tobin, Stephen J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vermont" Vermont" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",4992578,5258829,4698045,4300537,5293892,4839820,5004219,5323432,4393537,4734555,5307016,4734002,2971224,626337,643426,673607,802680,701474,752800,711507,720853,84.2,10.9 " Petroleum",2543,5244,2581,4805,5764,13357,3428,9816,41265,22392,60660,31740,9406,22607,17800,10179,7371,7811,4266,2439,4509,1,0.1 " Natural Gas",65281,95341,63120,20558,5806,6593,97,93,827,18291,90790,11000,3275,2029,3224,2240,1875,1889,2655,4431,3783,1.4,0.1 " Nuclear",3616268,4108314,3734594,3372148,4315544,3858509,3798790,4266866,3357696,4059107,4548065,4171120,2367209,"-","-","-","-","-","-","-","-",72.2,"-"

250

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee" Tennessee" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",73902614,73931670,75396209,71614268,74853548,82277534,88647111,93293232,94142638,89682569,92311813,92937315,92570929,88678127,94371964,93942273,90960035,92474664,88262641,77432806,79816049,96.3,96.9 " Coal",50186951,46671234,49995747,59559596,52132070,57971909,55504189,58899058,55120297,55220519,60675314,58166973,58080553,53376149,56583558,57560600,59146323,58849255,55752210,40426487,42259569,63.3,51.3 " Petroleum",134397,160072,127282,234545,295961,252611,257586,192880,699233,502286,539784,379703,250325,379007,166943,201121,137187,155646,207233,182291,211654,0.6,0.3

251

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin" Wisconsin" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",45550958,47148818,46463756,47762861,49437481,51012390,51651435,48560127,52529065,54704370,55665471,54959426,54773666,56068698,56142364,55169108,51914755,44284480,45536712,41375366,45579970,93.3,70.9 " Coal",32144557,33489286,32740540,33558049,35282695,36863872,38144842,40819517,39785759,39899142,41057919,40185649,38583501,40579973,40981609,40506086,38866178,38719363,40452933,36238643,39185565,68.8,60.9 " Petroleum",47444,62162,54332,105173,171563,147493,124088,169863,200225,220944,191091,170443,162990,185625,494535,470219,591486,725019,647602,458848,478866,0.3,0.7

252

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dakota" Dakota" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",26824491,27535034,28592323,28499824,29003713,28842021,30769712,29719764,30518976,31259830,31122917,30135733,31147221,31075012,29526814,31512768,30328375,30402807,30852784,31375152,31343796,99.4,90.2 " Coal",25092696,25750792,26864520,27048924,27099914,26336456,27529906,26314471,28176015,28610457,28952976,28769721,29518865,29298347,27938264,30133242,28761820,29041826,29551647,29486194,28349079,92.5,81.6 " Petroleum",20682,27636,28951,35795,47340,49107,88834,85698,47091,40300,47457,33850,35728,45648,36565,32480,39269,47332,40977,41475,35855,0.2,0.1

253

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kentucky" Kentucky" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",73807286,75505081,77351259,84997718,84097034,86161578,88438224,91558046,86151121,81658150,81349922,83677982,80161524,80696982,82921402,85679912,86816479,85259079,86012151,90029962,97472144,87.5,99.2 " Coal",70500461,71713851,73476309,81722246,79897442,82539467,84659818,87875331,82412216,78544604,78598836,79381504,75308162,76367048,78574428,81188722,83068626,81877334,83197690,84037596,91053858,84.5,92.7 " Petroleum",118646,111558,83886,96727,154819,130598,135437,125625,127062,103755,118876,120418,135412,130280,93651,96557,79520,96733,106853,2016282,2284852,0.1,2.3

254

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska" Nebraska" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",21630677,22971934,22387247,22724286,21945525,25279277,27322697,28388030,28720209,29980967,29045739,30411669,31550226,30367879,31944127,31391643,31599046,32403289,32355676,33776062,36242921,99.8,98.9 " Coal",12658464,13562815,12402148,14739783,14002015,16079519,16040775,17209080,18335965,17794136,18424799,20193542,19899803,20907970,20414960,20772590,20632855,19611849,21479723,23307746,23214616,63.3,63.4 " Petroleum",12981,13459,9482,19035,18201,26679,19973,31059,41892,28807,53715,25154,18410,47971,21004,30026,18914,35552,34655,22869,30849,0.2,0.1

255

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina" South Carolina" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",69259815,69837984,71478648,75588386,74193685,78439814,76325556,78374450,84396897,87347364,90421081,86734778,93689257,91544429,94406828,99104373,95872763,99997011,97921204,97336653,100610887,96.9,96.6 " Coal",22874805,23165807,23013743,26532193,26993543,25801600,30307236,31042658,32377814,35246389,38664405,36302690,36490769,37065509,38516633,39352428,39140908,41270230,41184319,34146526,37340392,41.4,35.9 " Petroleum",71997,83385,68375,95193,108250,129854,125657,188326,331357,300739,265931,225008,205664,289474,690071,484181,135522,174663,160102,490911,178378,0.3,0.2

256

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Georgia" Georgia" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",97565058,90809416,91779352,95737505,98752712,102015724,98729242,101780433,108716930,110536794,116176834,110564676,111855967,115755114,117918895,126444777,127367613,132831987,126031263,115074702,120425913,93.8,87.5 " Coal",67564750,59985395,58235454,63295811,64727519,65880095,63230856,66179551,69871150,74067633,79007166,73443695,77288328,77858022,79185166,86358096,85700960,89532913,84652246,68863420,72550375,63.8,52.7 " Petroleum",164987,107662,128485,237473,161235,218515,292018,200873,670924,662699,641415,275630,233940,278618,156672,189819,86798,82380,67971,64833,70781,0.5,0.1

257

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mexico" Mexico" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",28491171,25064613,27707513,28364368,30018011,29431903,29364389,30568142,31428332,31654480,32855587,32210683,29926241,31770151,32242728,33561875,35411074,34033374,33844547,34245148,30848406,96.6,85.1 " Coal",25826928,22129312,25348413,25507029,26752349,26121447,26357179,27078660,27537426,28067704,29065954,28402187,26902880,28812844,29263899,29947248,29859008,27603647,27014233,29117308,25617789,85.4,70.7 " Petroleum",34081,32240,35614,35337,22929,23073,22452,21075,23020,40133,29529,30210,30710,47860,30321,32528,40634,42969,52012,44599,49394,0.1,0.1

258

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

United States" United States" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",2808151009,2825022865,2797219151,2882524766,2910712079,2994528592,3077442152,3122523144,3212170791,3173673550,3015383376,2629945673,2549457170,2462280615,2505231152,2474845558,2483655548,2504130899,2475366697,2372775997,2471632103,79.3,59.9 " Coal",1559605707,1551166838,1575895394,1639151186,1635492971,1652914466,1737453477,1787806344,1807479829,1767679446,1696619307,1560145542,1514669950,1500281112,1513640806,1484855188,1471421060,1490984698,1466395192,1322092036,1378028414,44.6,33.4 " Petroleum",117016961,111462979,88916308,99538857,91038583,60844256,67346095,77752652,110157895,86929098,72179917,78907846,59124871,69930457,73693695,69722196,40902849,40719414,28123785,25216814,26064909,1.9,0.6

259

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Missouri" Missouri" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",59010858,60120689,56627107,53202268,61519090,65400254,67827241,71073239,74894188,73504882,76283550,78990878,79796801,86102107,86419717,90159045,91118304,89925724,89178555,86704766,90176805,99.6,97.7 " Coal",48501751,47907503,46829678,40688696,48592766,53582211,57176084,59903073,62488551,61249846,62624807,65445161,67147996,73904272,74711159,77123580,77113165,74745712,73246599,71401581,74829029,81.8,81.1 " Petroleum",89342,118645,80522,634432,730820,682321,95980,125449,309734,280945,247622,637504,528353,155968,195098,168258,59958,59611,56620,87081,124866,0.3,0.1

260

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

North Carolina" North Carolina" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",79845217,83520063,83007307,88753614,91454784,96109819,102786590,107371092,113112235,109882388,114433191,109807278,115597653,118433112,118328694,121674733,117797331,123215621,118778090,112961309,121251138,93.6,94.2 " Coal",46631040,46762330,54011457,59383147,53234497,55698342,64097781,70181392,69000633,68569499,71719489,68775284,71223313,70630278,71956852,74915235,72311023,76611703,72625233,62765545,69274374,58.7,53.8 " Petroleum",186899,174136,147134,165175,199418,234263,259252,211974,285902,284400,468482,412765,376170,459947,250402,231141,219114,236042,232446,232119,245987,0.4,0.2

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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261

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Mississippi" Mississippi" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",22923971,23305127,20487946,23234028,26222313,26395165,28838302,31227619,31991676,32212133,33896003,47550273,35099283,31358938,32838145,30619168,34158706,34426533,33796221,34759024,40841436,90.1,75 " Coal",9445584,8750253,7796112,8819755,8889624,9259980,12010196,12500586,11747963,13037100,13877065,19196065,12483658,13742273,14274786,13389906,14907777,14422788,14033627,9610808,10309709,36.9,18.9 " Petroleum",705474,370130,371568,3545055,1106209,23738,1173503,2633109,5417924,3141934,2970676,5120602,26357,1620395,2763630,1432077,395330,397080,71597,12475,76832,7.9,0.1

262

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arkansas" Arkansas" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",37053436,38365135,37369823,38049072,39547768,39526825,43677535,42789637,43198908,44130705,41486451,44728133,42873364,41636514,45055455,40545220,42068467,45522928,45880232,45423149,47108063,94.6,77.2 " Coal",19160989,19573925,20030355,18025615,19780738,21506397,24339185,22760970,23140020,24612079,24073573,24678344,22986650,23422401,25248810,22940659,24095405,25642175,25993257,24986333,26421729,54.9,43.3 " Petroleum",73856,64278,49640,65624,96439,53208,98250,66622,143834,141475,206991,846105,136134,263982,476133,162961,135291,76212,57158,80962,37140,0.5,0.1

263

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Indiana" Indiana" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",97738497,98199986,97299582,99951149,103485409,105188892,105557018,110466291,112771878,114182827,119721399,114666355,112029989,112395725,114690471,117373699,117643504,116727908,115887993,103594020,107852560,93.7,86.2 " Coal",96012872,96526976,95745949,98776088,102043025,103774522,104413600,108911799,110696190,112336883,117619535,113135350,109441044,109839659,112899892,115413188,116284183,114974642,114321205,101000267,103204599,92,82.4 " Petroleum",673984,354297,287064,197848,209379,213051,320566,606905,821530,813232,845481,371623,470976,407648,393135,244554,134035,155132,165142,132655,137977,0.7,0.1

264

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida" Florida" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",123623905,130743964,133976775,140066943,141790885,147156684,145140217,147983676,169447167,166914264,169888638,170966177,182346629,188034719,193383664,196096285,200015227,200533885,196524348,195063261,206062185,88.6,89.9 " Coal",59073203,61122819,61631012,61889050,60770030,61864438,65782399,66034628,65470151,62680522,67143257,63090794,60997142,62094661,60013823,57559411,60413597,62633944,59731231,49942611,56074369,35,24.5 " Petroleum",25092296,30115618,28176184,34277523,33330039,21583186,22890565,25742149,40952580,36697343,34337080,39075398,32449236,35545897,35824155,36122039,22508349,19841026,11830552,9028865,8867397,17.9,3.9

265

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Arizona" Arizona" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",62288980,66767347,70108979,68025039,71203728,68966538,70877043,78060498,81299241,83095924,88149792,85807868,81710063,80348246,81351521,82914964,84355976,88825573,94452931,89640192,91232664,99.1,81.6 " Coal",31636037,32306088,34602347,37020817,38072165,31710476,30780575,34219281,36225373,37994159,40662627,39731623,37957468,37739559,39419177,39750729,40056468,40911234,43505012,39464060,43347748,45.7,38.8 " Petroleum",116407,88935,72838,59875,128437,63610,65097,60927,61227,46287,189396,311787,51061,46706,39414,41127,71761,46137,48324,61381,63439,0.2,0.1

266

Table 5. Electric Power Industry Generation by Primary Energy Source, 1990 Throu  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Hawaii" Hawaii" "Energy Source",1990,1991,1992,1993,1994,1995,1996,1997,1998,1999,2000,2001,2002,2003,2004,2005,2006,2007,2008,2009,2010,"Percentage Share" ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,2000,2010 "Electric Utilities",7996096,7333192,6861255,6083815,6055087,6190584,6420195,6212643,6301169,6452068,6534692,6383088,7513051,6493205,6982469,6915159,7040473,6928397,6700636,6509550,6416068,61.7,59.2 " Petroleum",7967354,7312791,6851432,6070063,6036282,6174627,6402329,6193852,6287107,6429429,6516929,6362846,7502913,6489565,6971259,6904293,7015977,6913231,6682593,6262182,6178666,61.5,57 " Hydroelectric",22743,20401,9823,13752,18805,15957,17866,18791,13750,18844,15114,18132,8533,2078,9724,9169,23656,14729,17872,28608,16719,0.1,0.2

267

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

market trends icon Renewables market trends icon Renewables exec summary Executive Summary Power generation from renewables and natural gas continues to increase ...Read full section Mkt trends Market Trends Wind power leads rise in world renewable generation, solar power also grows rapidly.... Read full section Renewable energy sources lead rise in primary energy consumption.... Read full section Sales of alternative fuel, fuel flexible, and hybrid vehicles rise.... Read full section Coal-fired plants continue to be the largest source of U.S. electricity generation.... Read full section Most new capacity additions use natural gas and renewables.... Read full section Wind dominates renewable capacity grow, but solar and biomass gain market share.... Read full section Nonhydropower renewable generation surpasses hydropower by 2020....

268

Mastering the Markets -- Gencos in Transition: Business and Organizational Change in Power Generation and Energy Trading Companies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Generation assets are being divested or spun off into unregulated businesses at a rapid pace, and new plants are being built on a merchant basis. More and more companies are establishing regulated and unregulated energy trading floors. Just how different are operations and planning in these new companies? What combinations of assets and trading make sense? Weaving insights from a series of interviews, this study takes a snapshot of an industry in transition.

1999-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

269

Market-Based Valuation of Coal Generation and Coal R&D in the U.S. Electric Sector  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The payoff from accelerated research and development (R&D) in coal generation technology could be enormous, over $300-$1,300 billion. The prime beneficiary is the power-consuming public. This conclusion is supported by a comprehensive quantitative analysis of the U.S. electric sector. Cosponsored by LCG Consulting, this study provides a large-scale financial, technical, and operational analysis of the electric sector, applying techniques of modern business analysis at an unprecedented scale.

2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

270

Second law analysis of advanced power generation systems using variable temperature heat sources  

SciTech Connect

Many systems produce power using variable temperature (sensible) heat sources. The Heat Cycle Research Program is currently investigating the potential improvements to such power cycles utilizing moderate temperature geothermal resources to produce electrical power. It has been shown that mixtures of saturated hydrocarbons (alkanes) or halogenated hydrocarbons operating with a supercritical Rankine cycle gave improved performance over boiling Rankine cycles with the pure working fluids for typical applications. Recently, in addition to the supercritical Rankine Cycle, other types of cycles have been proposed for binary geothermal service. This paper explores the limits on efficiency of a feasible plant and discusses the methods used in these advanced concept plants to achieve the maximum possible efficiency. The advanced plants considered appear to be approaching the feasible limit of performance so that the designer must weigh all considerations to fine the best plant for a given service. These results would apply to power systems in other services as well as to geothermal power plants. 17 refs., 15 figs.

Bliem, C.J.; Mines, G.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Ultracompact Accelerator Technology for a Next-Generation Gamma-Ray Source  

SciTech Connect

This presentation reported on the technology choices and progress manufacturing and testing the injector and accelerator of the 250 MeV ultra-compact Compton Scattering gamma-ray Source under development at LLNL for homeland security applications. This paper summarizes the status of various facets of current accelerator activities at LLNL. The major components for the X-band test station have been designed, fabricated, and await installation. The XL-4 klystron has been delivered, and will shortly be dressed and installed in the ScandiNova modulator. High power testing of the klystron into RF loads will follow, including adjustment of the modulator for the klystron load as necessary. Assembly of RF transport, test station supports, and accelerator components will follow. Commissioning will focus on processing the RF gun to full operating power, which corresponds to 200 MV/m peak electric field on the cathode surface. Single bunch benchmarking of the Mark 1 design will provide confidence that this first structure operates as designed, and will serve as a solid starting point for subsequent changes, such as a removable photocathode, and the use of various cathode materials for enhanced quantum efficiency. Charge scaling experiments will follow, partly to confirm predictions, as well as to identify important causes of emittance growth, and their scaling with charge. Multi-bunch operation will conclude testing of the Mark 1 RF gun, and allow verification of code predictions, direct measurement of bunch-to-bunch effects, and initial implementation compensation mechanisms. Modeling will continue and focus on supporting the commissioning and experimental program, as well as seeking to improve all facets of linac produced Compton gamma-rays.

Marsh, R A; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Wu, S S; Hartemann, F V; Barty, C J

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

272

Market Structure and Competition: A Cross-Market Analysis of U.S. Electricity Deregulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy into the restructured markets behave as price takersEnergy Clearing Price (ECP) for the New England market priceISO at below market prices. nuclear energy sources. Unlike

Bushnell, James; Mansur, Erin T.; Saravia, Celeste

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Model documentation: Electricity Market Module, Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the objectives, analytical approach and development of the National Energy Modeling System Electricity Fuel Dispatch Submodule (EFD), a submodule of the Electricity Market Module (EMM). The report catalogues and describes the model assumptions, computational methodology, parameter estimation techniques, model source code, and forecast results generated through the synthesis and scenario development based on these components.

Not Available

1994-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

274

2009 Fuel Cell Market Report, November 2010  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general.

Not Available

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

An observability study for the tentatively identified 3EG sources likely to be detected by the next-generation Cherenkov telescopes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a compilation of data on the 22 tentatively identified gamma-ray sources from the Third EGRET Catalog which may be detected by the next-generation imaging atmospheric Cherenkov telescopes.

D. Petry; O. Reimer

2001-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

276

Market power in the England and Wales wholesale electricity [market, 1995-2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper shows that generators exercised increasing market power in the England and Wales wholesale electricity market in the second half of the 1990s despite declining market concentration. It examines whether this was ...

Sweeting, Andrew

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Numerical simulation of multiconstituent diffusion and helium release characteristics of the /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/ heat source used in radioisotopic thermoelectric generators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An analytical model is described that was developed to simulate multiconstituent diffusion within a heat source sphere, helium generation within a heat source sphere, and helium release from the surface of a heat source sphere into the surrounding environment. The model represents the first attempt to simulate multiconstituent mass transport using the continuum thermomechanical theory of mixtures and demonstrates that this theory is a viable alternative to irreversible thermodynamics.

McLaughlin, B.D.

1976-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Open Source Software for Materials and Process Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Though open source engineering analysis tools have not been widely deployed, ... over half of websites,3 and the market share of the open source Firefox web ... 10 kWh of energy per kg of product.7 The magnesium (hydr)oxide dissolves in a ... to post-process the information generated by the ATAT code, which consists of

279

Transaction Costs and Smallholder Farmers’ Participation in Banana Markets in the Great Lakes Region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of households, market information sources and travel time tothey lack reliable market information as well as informationin the cost of market information and transport flows due to

Jagwe, John; Ouma, Emily; Machethe, Charles

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Creep properties of forged 2219 T6 aluminum alloy shell of general-purpose heat source-radioisotope thermoelectric generator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The shell (2219 T6 aluminum forging) of the General Purpose Heat Source-Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator was designed to retain the generator under sufficient elastic stress to secure it during space flight. A major concern was the extent to which the elastic stress would relax by creep. To determine acceptability of the shell construction material, the following proof tests simulating service were performed: 600 h of testing at 270/sup 0/C under 24.1 MPa stress followed by 10,000 h of storage at 177/sup 0/C under 55.1 MPa, both on the ground; and 10,000 h of flight in space at 270/sup 0/C under 34.4 MPa stress. Additionally, systematic creep testing was performed at 177 and 260/sup 0/C to establish creep design curves. The creep tests performed at 177/sup 0/C revealed comparatively large amounts of primary creep followed by small amounts of secondary creep. The early creep is believed to be abetted by unstable substructures that are annealed out during testing at this temperature. The creep tests performed at 270/sup 0/C showed normal primary creep followed by large amounts of secondary creep. Duplicate proof tests simulating the ground exposure conditions gave results that were in good agreement. The proof test simulating space flight at 270/sup 0/C gave 0.11% primary creep followed by 0.59% secondary creep. About 10% of the second-stage creep was caused by four or five instantaneous strains, which began at the 4500-h mark. One or two of these strain bursts, occurred in each of several other tests at 177 and 260/sup 0/C but were assessed as very moderate in magnitude. The effect is attributable to a slightly microsegregated condition remaining from the original cast structure.

Hammond, J.P.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

GENERATING CAPACITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating capacity consistent with mandatory reliability criteria. A large part of the problem can be associated with the failure of wholesale spot market prices for energy and operating reserves to rise to high enough levels during periods when generating capacity is fully utilized. Reforms to wholesale energy markets, the introduction of well-design forward capacity markets, and symmetrical treatment of demand response and generating capacity resources to respond to market and institutional imperfections are discussed. This policy reform program is compatible with improving the efficiency of spot wholesale electricity markets, the continued evolution of competitive retail markets, and restores incentives for efficient investment in generating capacity consistent with operating reliability criteria applied by system operators. It also responds to investment disincentives that have been associated with volatility in wholesale energy prices, limited hedging opportunities and to concerns about regulatory opportunism. 1

Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Liquid Fuels Market Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Liquid Fuels Market Module Liquid Fuels Market Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 145 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Liquid Fuels Market Module The NEMS Liquid Fuels Market Module (LFMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, esters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the LFMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The LFMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. petroleum refining

283

SOURCE TERMS IN THE TRANSIENT SEEPAGE EQUATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Equation; Pore Pressure Generation; Sources; Source Terms)In this paper, sources involving the generation of mass areincludes source terms for both fluid mass generation and

Narasimhan, T.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Electricity Market Module  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Market Module Market Module This page inTenTionally lefT blank 101 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2013, DOE/EIA-M068(2013). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

285

Implications of a New Source Performance Standard for New Fossil Generation: A High-Level Bounding Analysis Based on the US-REGEN Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has undertaken a bounding analysis of the impact to the electric sector of the proposed New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) for new generating units, recently put forward by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The purpose of the analysis is to look at the coal generation option, under various plausible policy and uncertainty scenarios, and not to create a singular forecast of future outcomes. The primary assumed implication of the proposed ...

2013-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

286

Electricity Market Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the Electricity Market Module as it was used for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013. The Electricity Market Module (EMM) is the electricity supply component of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). The EMM represents the generation, transmission, and pricing of electricity. It consists of four submodules: the Electricity Capacity Planning (ECP) Submodule, the Electricity Fuel Dispatch (EFD) Submodule, the Electricity Finance and Pricing (EFP) Submodule, and the Electricity Load and Demand (ELD) Submodule.

Jeff Jones

2013-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

287

Voluntary Green Power Market Forecast through 2015  

SciTech Connect

Various factors influence the development of the voluntary 'green' power market--the market in which consumers purchase or produce power from non-polluting, renewable energy sources. These factors include climate policies, renewable portfolio standards (RPS), renewable energy prices, consumers' interest in purchasing green power, and utilities' interest in promoting existing programs and in offering new green options. This report presents estimates of voluntary market demand for green power through 2015 that were made using historical data and three scenarios: low-growth, high-growth, and negative-policy impacts. The resulting forecast projects the total voluntary demand for renewable energy in 2015 to range from 63 million MWh annually in the low case scenario to 157 million MWh annually in the high case scenario, representing an approximately 2.5-fold difference. The negative-policy impacts scenario reflects a market size of 24 million MWh. Several key uncertainties affect the results of this forecast, including uncertainties related to growth assumptions, the impacts that policy may have on the market, the price and competitiveness of renewable generation, and the level of interest that utilities have in offering and promoting green power products.

Bird, L.; Holt, E.; Sumner, J.; Kreycik, C.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Voluntary Green Power Market Forecast through 2015  

SciTech Connect

Various factors influence the development of the voluntary 'green' power market--the market in which consumers purchase or produce power from non-polluting, renewable energy sources. These factors include climate policies, renewable portfolio standards (RPS), renewable energy prices, consumers' interest in purchasing green power, and utilities' interest in promoting existing programs and in offering new green options. This report presents estimates of voluntary market demand for green power through 2015 that were made using historical data and three scenarios: low-growth, high-growth, and negative-policy impacts. The resulting forecast projects the total voluntary demand for renewable energy in 2015 to range from 63 million MWh annually in the low case scenario to 157 million MWh annually in the high case scenario, representing an approximately 2.5-fold difference. The negative-policy impacts scenario reflects a market size of 24 million MWh. Several key uncertainties affect the results of this forecast, including uncertainties related to growth assumptions, the impacts that policy may have on the market, the price and competitiveness of renewable generation, and the level of interest that utilities have in offering and promoting green power products.

Bird, L.; Holt, E.; Sumner, J.; Kreycik, C.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Market Transformation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Summarizes the goals and activities of the DOE Solar Energy Technologies Program efforts within its market transformation subprogram.

Not Available

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Online energy generation scheduling for microgrids with intermittent energy sources and cogeneration. arXiv preprint arXiv:1211.4473  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Microgrids represent an emerging paradigm of future electric power systems that can utilize both distributed and centralized generations. Two recent trends in microgrids are the integration of local renewable energy sources (such as wind farms) and the use of co-generation (i.e., to supply both electricity and heat). However, these trends also bring unprecedented challenges to the design of intelligent control strategies for microgrids. Traditional generation scheduling paradigms rely on perfect prediction of future electricity supply and demand. They are no longer applicable to microgrids with unpredictable renewable energy supply and with co-generation (that needs to consider both electricity and heat demand). In this paper, we study online algorithms for the microgrid generation scheduling problem with intermittent

Lian Lu; Jinlong Tu; Chi-kin Chau; Minghua Chen; Xiaojun Lin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

2008 WIND TECHNOLOGIES MARKET REPORT  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. wind industry experienced a banner year in 2008, again surpassing even optimistic growth projections from years past. At the same time, the last year has been one of upheaval, with the global financial crisis impacting near-term growth prospects for the wind industry, and with federal policy changes enacted to push the industry towards continued aggressive expansion. This rapid pace of development has made it difficult to keep up with trends in the marketplace. Yet, the need for timely, objective information on the industry and its progress has never been greater. This report - the third of an ongoing annual series - attempts to meet this need by providing a detailed overview of developments and trends in the U.S. wind power market, with a particular focus on 2008. As with previous editions, this report begins with an overview of key wind power installation-related trends: trends in wind capacity growth in the U.S., how that growth compares to other countries and generation sources, the amount and percentage of wind in individual states and serving specific utilities, and the quantity of proposed wind capacity in various interconnection queues in the United States. Next, the report covers an array of wind industry trends, including developments in turbine manufacturer market share, manufacturing and supply-chain investments, wind turbine and wind project size, project financing developments, and trends among wind power developers, project owners, and power purchasers. The report then turns to a discussion of wind project price, cost, and performance trends. In so doing, it reviews the price of wind power in the United States, and how those prices compare to the cost of fossil-fueled generation, as represented by wholesale power prices. It also describes trends in installed wind project costs, wind turbine transaction prices, project performance, and operations and maintenance expenses. Next, the report examines other policy and market factors impacting the domestic wind power market, including federal and state policy drivers, transmission issues, and grid integration. Finally, the report concludes with a preview of possible near- to medium-term market developments. This version of the Annual Report updates data presented in the previous editions, while highlighting key trends and important new developments from 2008. New to this edition is an executive summary of the report and an expanded final section on near- to medium-term market development. The report concentrates on larger-scale wind applications, defined here as individual turbines or projects that exceed 50 kW in size. The U.S. wind power sector is multifaceted, however, and also includes smaller, customer-sited wind turbines used to power the needs of residences, farms, and businesses. Data on these applications are not the focus of this report, though a brief discussion on Distributed Wind Power is provided on page 4. Much of the data included in this report were compiled by Berkeley Lab, and come from a variety of sources, including the American Wind Energy Association (AWEA), the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC). The Appendix provides a summary of the many data sources used in the report. Data on 2008 wind capacity additions in the United States are based on information provided by AWEA; some minor adjustments to those data may be expected. In other cases, the data shown here represent only a sample of actual wind projects installed in the United States; furthermore, the data vary in quality. As such, emphasis should be placed on overall trends, rather than on individual data points. Finally, each section of this document focuses on historical market information, with an emphasis on 2008; with the exception of the final section, the report does not seek to forecast future trends.

Wiser, Ryan H.; Bolinger, Mark; Barbose, G.; Mills, A.; Rosa, A.; Porter, K.; Fink, S.; Tegen, S.; Musial, W.; Oteri, F.; Heimiller, D.; Rberts, B.; Belyeu, K.; Stimmel, R.

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Capacity Markets and Market Stability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The good news is that market stability can be achieved through a combination of longer-term contracts, auctions for far enough in the future to permit new entry, a capacity management system, and a demand curve. The bad news is that if and when stable capacity markets are designed, the markets may seem to be relatively close to where we started - with integrated resource planning. Market ideologues will find this anathema. (author)

Stauffer, Hoff

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

293

How Power Marketing Administrations Market Power and Work with Tribes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How Power Marketing Administrations Market Power and Work with How Power Marketing Administrations Market Power and Work with Tribes Webinar How Power Marketing Administrations Market Power and Work with Tribes Webinar April 24, 2013 11:00AM MDT Webinar The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Tribal Energy Program, and Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) are pleased to continue their sponsorship of the Tribal Renewable Energy Webinar Series. The country's federal Power Marketing Administrations (PMAs) have valuable generation and transmission assets and have the potential to promote renewable energy development within their respective footprints. Get information on PMA assets and operations, examples of past cooperation with Tribes, and how to work with PMAs to promote future economic growth

294

Wind energy as a significant source of electricity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind energy is a commercially available renewable energy source, with state-of-the-art wind plants producing electricity at about $0.05 per kWh. However, even at that production cost, wind-generated electricity is not yet fully cost-competitive with coal- or natural-gas-produced electricity for the bulk electricity market. The wind is a proven energy source; it is not resource-limited in the US, and there are no insolvable technical constraints. This paper describes current and historical technology, characterizes existing trends, and describes the research and development required to reduce the cost of wind-generated electricity to full competitiveness with fossil-fuel-generated electricity for the bulk electricity market. Potential markets are described.

Nix, R.G.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of fuel is supplied. Moreover, fuel cells do not burn fuel, making the process quiet, pollution-free and two to three times more efficient than combustion. Fuel cell systems can be a truly zero-emission source of electricity, if the hydrogen is produced from non-polluting sources. Global concerns about climate change, energy security, and air pollution are driving demand for fuel cell technology. More than 630 companies and laboratories in the United States are investing $1 billion a year in fuel cells or fuel cell component technologies. This report provides an overview of trends in the fuel cell industry and markets, including product shipments, market development, and corporate performance. It also provides snapshots of select fuel cell companies, including general business strategy and market focus, as well as, financial information for select publicly-traded companies.

DOE

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Energy & Financial Markets: What Drives Crude Oil Prices? - Energy  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

& Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) & Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels

297

The Impact of Market Rules and Market Structure on the Price Determination Process in the England and Wales Electricity Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper argues that the market rules governing the operation of the England and Wales electricity market in combination with the structure of this market presents the two major generators---National Power and PowerGen---with opportunities to earn revenues substantially in excess of their costs of production for short periods of time. Generators competing to serve this market have two strategic weapons at their disposal: (1) the price bid for each generation set and (2) the capacity of each generation set made available to supply the market each half-hour period during the day. We argue that because of the rules governing the price determination process in this market, by the strategic use of capacity availability declarations, when conditions exogenous to the behavior of the two major generators favor it, these two generators are able to obtain prices for their output substantially in excess of their marginal costs of generation. The paper establishes these points in the following manner. First, we provide a description of the market structure and rules governing the operation of the England and Wales electricity market, emphasizing those aspects that are important to the success of the strategy we believe the two generators use to exercise market power. We then summarize the time series properties of the price of electricity emerging from this market structure and price-setting process. By analyzing four fiscal years of actual market prices, quantities and generator bids into the market, we provide various pieces of evidence in favor of the strategic use of the market rules by the two major participants. The paper closes with a discussion of the lessons that the England and Wales experience can provide for the design of competitive power markets in the US, particula...

Frank A. Wolak; Robert H. Patrick

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Auction approaches of long-term contracts to ensure generation investment in electricity markets: Lessons from the Brazilian and Chilean experiences$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy purchase, correct risk allocation among investors and consumers, and the politico.g. renewables, in the developed world and therefore achieve a clean electricity supply. & 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All of electricity markets. This includes the establishment of correct mechanisms and incentives to allow

Rudnick, Hugh

299

Coal Market Module  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Documents the objectives and the conceptual and methodological approach used in the development of the National Energy Modeling System's (NEMS) Coal Market Module (CMM) used to develop the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013). This report catalogues and describes the assumptions, methodology, estimation techniques, and source code of CMM's two submodules. These are the Coal Production Submodule (CPS) and the Coal Distribution Submodule (CDS).

Michael Mellish

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

300

Application of Spatial Data Modeling and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Identification of Potential Siting Options for Various Electrical Generation Sources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) initiated an internal National Electric Generation Siting Study, which is an ongoing multiphase study addressing several key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. This effort has led to the development of a tool, OR-SAGE (Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion), to support siting evaluations. The objective in developing OR-SAGE was to use industry-accepted approaches and/or develop appropriate criteria for screening sites and employ an array of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data sources at ORNL to identify candidate areas for a power generation technology application. The initial phase of the study examined nuclear power generation. These early nuclear phase results were shared with staff from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which formed the genesis and support for an expansion of the work to several other power generation forms, including advanced coal with carbon capture and storage (CCS), solar, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). Wind generation was not included in this scope of work for EPRI. The OR-SAGE tool is essentially a dynamic visualization database. The results shown in this report represent a single static set of results using a specific set of input parameters. In this case, the GIS input parameters were optimized to support an economic study conducted by EPRI. A single set of individual results should not be construed as an ultimate energy solution, since US energy policy is very complex. However, the strength of the OR-SAGE tool is that numerous alternative scenarios can be quickly generated to provide additional insight into electrical generation or other GIS-based applications. The screening process divides the contiguous United States into 100 x 100 m (1-hectare) squares (cells), applying successive power generation-appropriate site selection and evaluation criteria (SSEC) to each cell. There are just under 700 million cells representing the contiguous United States. If a cell meets the requirements of each criterion, the cell is deemed a candidate area for siting a specific power generation form relative to a reference plant for that power type. Some SSEC parameters preclude siting a power plant because of an environmental, regulatory, or land-use constraint. Other SSEC assist in identifying less favorable areas, such as proximity to hazardous operations. All of the selected SSEC tend to recommend against sites. The focus of the ORNL electrical generation source siting study is on identifying candidate areas from which potential sites might be selected, stopping short of performing any detailed site evaluations or comparisons. This approach is designed to quickly screen for and characterize candidate areas. Critical assumptions supporting this work include the supply of cooling water to thermoelectric power generation; a methodology to provide an adequate siting footprint for typical power plant applications; a methodology to estimate thermoelectric plant capacity while accounting for available cooling water; and a methodology to account for future ({approx}2035) siting limitations as population increases and demands on freshwater sources change. OR-SAGE algorithms were built to account for these critical assumptions. Stream flow is the primary thermoelectric plant cooling source evaluated in this study. All cooling was assumed to be provided by a closed-cycle cooling (CCC) system requiring makeup water to account for evaporation and blowdown. Limited evaluations of shoreline cooling and the use of municipal processed water (gray) cooling were performed. Using a representative set of SSEC as input to the OR-SAGE tool and employing the accompanying critical assumptions, independent results for the various power generation sources studied were calculated.

Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL; Blevins, Brandon R [ORNL; Hadley, Stanton W [ORNL; Harrison, Thomas J [ORNL; Jochem, Warren C [ORNL; Neish, Bradley S [ORNL; Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Rose, Amy N [ORNL

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Power Marketing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Remarketing Effort Hoover Coordinating Committee Meeting FY2011 - June 7 Mead Transformer Presentation Navajo Navajo Surplus Marketing Parker-Davis Parker-Davis Project...

302

Market Transformation  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

This Fuel Cell Technologies Program fact sheet outlines current status and challenges in the market transformation of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies.

303

Power Marketing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Certificate Solicitations Benefit Review Energy Services Rates and Repayment WindHydro Integration Feasibility Study Send correspondence to: Power Marketing Manager Western...

304

Market power and electricity market reform in Northeast China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Northeast region of China has been used as a testing ground for creation of a functioning wholesale electric power market. We describe the ownership structure of the generation assets for those plants participating in ...

Zhang, Xiaochun

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Figure F2. Electricity market module regions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration Annual Energy Outlook 2013 227 Regional maps Figure F2. Electricity market module regions Source: U.S. Energy Information ...

306

Coal market fundamentals changed, yet spot prices remained stable ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy companies. ... Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Weekly Coal Production, ...

307

Energy Procurement Strategies in the Presence of Intermittent Sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by the uncertainty in wind generation. However, current electricity markets that govern energy procurement wereEnergy Procurement Strategies in the Presence of Intermittent Sources Jayakrishnan Nair Electrical for Mathematics of Information, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA, 91125, adlakha@caltech.edu Adam

Adlakha, Sachin

308

Electricity markets in the western United States  

SciTech Connect

This article introduces the use of rigorous econometric tools to understand the geographic scope of the market for generation services. These tools are applied to data from the current wholesale electricity market in the western United States. The behavior of the current wholesale electricity market and the methods used to assess the expanse of the geographic market in the current wholesale electricity market can go a long way toward informing the discussion of pricing behavior and performance in a restructured electricity industry. First, the current wholesale electricity market is already effectively unregulated and suffers from the same technical complexities that face a retail electricity market. Consequently, understanding the supply and demand conditions that cause the extent of the geographic market for generation services to narrow in the current wholesale electricity market can shed light on which times the geographic expanse of the market may narrow in a restructures electricity market. Second, the techniques developed in this paper to assess the extent of the current wholesale electricity market can be applied readily to a restructured electricity market. Finally, because market conditions in the electricity industry are likely to change significantly in the next few years, as the structure of the electricity sector changes dramatically, this analysis of the geographic expanse of the market can provide a useful benchmark against which to compare post-restructuring wholesale price relationships.

Bailey, E.M.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

An Upgrade for the Advanced Light Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of an optimized third generation source not only translatesfirst third-generation synchrotron light sources, the ALS,of a third-generation synchrotron light source translates

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

market for new wind power additions in 2011. India, Germany,wind-powered generating sets were: Denmark (42%), Spain (16%), Japan (13%), India (Wind Power Capacity Annual Capacity (2011, MW) China U.S. India

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Market theories evolve, and so do markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Study of Competitive Market Behavior," Journal of PoliticalContinuous Double Auction Markets. International Journal ofeds. ), The Dynamics of Market Exchange, North-Holland, 115-

Friedman, Daniel

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Practice of Internet Marketing in Destination Branding.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study provides information about destination branding and the effect of Internet marketing on tourism. Tourism branding generates interest in a destination as well as,… (more)

Duong, Linh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Energy Imbalance Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

utilities are therefore considering the adoption of a large-scale energy imbalance market to address fluctuations in electricity generation and load. In an energy imbalance...

314

Diagnosing Market Power in California's Deregulated Wholesale Electricity Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Effective competition in wholesale electricity markets is a necessary feature of a successful electricity supply industry restructuring. We examine the degree of competition in the California wholesale electricity market during the period June 1998 to September 1999 by comparing the market prices with estimates of the prices that would have resulted if owners of instate fossil fuel generating facilities behaved as price takers. We find that there were significant departures from competitive pricing and that these departures are most pronounced during the highest demand periods, which tend to occur during the months of July through September. Through most of the winter and spring of 1999 there was little evidence of the exercise of market power. We find a significantly lower amount of market power exercised during summer 1999 than for the same months in summer 1998. Overall, the exercise of market power raised the cost of power purchases by about 16% above the competitive level. Following the p...

Severin Borenstein; Severin Borenstein; James Bushnell; James Bushnell; Frank Wolak; Frank Wolak

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

market data | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

market data market data Dataset Summary Description The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) publishes a wide selection of data and statistics on renewable energy power technologies from a variety of sources (e.g. EIA, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, EPRI and AWEA). In 2006, NREL published the 4th edition, presenting market and performance data for over a dozen technologies from publications from 1997 - 2004. Source NREL Date Released March 01st, 2006 (8 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords advanced energy storage batteries biomass csp fuel cells geothermal Hydro market data NREL performance data PV wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Technology Profiles (market and performance data) (xls, 207.4 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

316

Economical operation of thermal generating units integrated with smart houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an economic optimal operation strategy for thermal power generation units integrated with smart houses. With the increased competition in retail and power sector reasoned by the deregulation and liberalization of power market make ... Keywords: particle swarm optimization, renewable energy sources, smart grid, smart house, thermal unit commitment

Shantanu Chakraborty; Takayuki Ito; Tomonobu Senjyu

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Improving the low voltage ride through of doubly fed induction generator during intermittent voltage source converter faults  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the low voltage ride through (LVRT) capability of the doubly fed induction generator (DFIG) is also) controller to mitigate the effects of these faults is proposed. The DFIG compliance with numerous and compared. Simulation results indicate that these types of faults have a severe impact on the DFIG voltage

Pota, Himanshu Roy

318

Power marketing and renewable energy  

SciTech Connect

Power marketing refers to wholesale and retail transactions of electric power made by companies other than public power entities and the regulated utilities that own the generation and distribution lines. The growth in power marketing has been a major development in the electric power industry during the last few years, and power marketers are expected to realize even more market opportunities as electric industry deregulation proceeds from wholesale competition to retail competition. This Topical Issues Brief examines the nature of the power marketing business and its relationship with renewable power. The information presented is based on interviews conducted with nine power marketing companies, which accounted for almost 54% of total power sales by power marketers in 1995. These interviews provided information on various viewpoints of power marketers, their experience with renewables, and their respective outlooks for including renewables in their resource portfolios. Some basic differences exist between wholesale and retail competition that should be recognized when discussing power marketing and renewable power. At the wholesale level, the majority of power marketers stress the commodity nature of electricity. The primary criteria for developing resource portfolios are the same as those of their wholesale customers: the cost and reliability of power supplies. At the retail level, electricity may be viewed as a product that includes value-added characteristics or services determined by customer preferences.

Fang, J.M.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Decommissioning and safety issues of liquid-mercury waste generated from high power spallation sources with particle accelerators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Large spallation sources are intended to be constructed in Europe (EURISOL nuclear physics facility and ESS-European Spallation Source). These facilities accumulate more than 20 metric tons of irradiated mercury in the target, which has to be treated as highly radioactive and chemo-toxic waste. Because solids are the only appropriate (immobile) form for this radiotoxic and toxic type of waste solidification is required for irradiated mercury. Our irradiation experimental studies on mercury waste revealed that mercury sulfide is a reasonable solid for disposal and shows larger stability in assumed accidents with water ingress in a repository compared to amalgams. For preparation of mercury sulfide a wet process is more suitable than a dry one. It is easier to perform under hot cell conditions and allows complete Hg-conversion. Embedding HgS in a cementitious matrix increases its stability.

Chiriki, S; Odoj, R; Moormann, R; Hinssen, H. K; Bukaemskiy, A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Non-ambipolar radio-frequency plasma electron source and systems and methods for generating electron beams  

SciTech Connect

An electron generating device extracts electrons, through an electron sheath, from plasma produced using RF fields. The electron sheath is located near a grounded ring at one end of a negatively biased conducting surface, which is normally a cylinder. Extracted electrons pass through the grounded ring in the presence of a steady state axial magnetic field. Sufficiently large magnetic fields and/or RF power into the plasma allow for helicon plasma generation. The ion loss area is sufficiently large compared to the electron loss area to allow for total non-ambipolar extraction of all electrons leaving the plasma. Voids in the negatively-biased conducting surface allow the time-varying magnetic fields provided by the antenna to inductively couple to the plasma within the conducting surface. The conducting surface acts as a Faraday shield, which reduces any time-varying electric fields from entering the conductive surface, i.e. blocks capacitive coupling between the antenna and the plasma.

Hershkowitz, Noah (Madison, WI); Longmier, Benjamin (Madison, WI); Baalrud, Scott (Madison, WI)

2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Abstract--We formulate a three-period model for studying how the exercise of local market power by generation firms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generally leads to social losses. Since the existing US electricity transmission network was designed to 1 by generation firms affects the equilibrium investment between the generation and the transmission sectors. Using a 30-bus network example, we compare the transmission investment decisions made by a "proactive

322

Coal Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

page intentionally left blank page intentionally left blank 153 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M060(2011) (Washington, DC, 2011). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

323

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 95 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2011, DOE/EIA-M068(2011). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

324

Electricity Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page inTenTionally lefT blank 91 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Electricity Market Module The NEMS Electricity Market Module (EMM) represents the capacity planning, dispatching, and pricing of electricity. It is composed of four submodules-electricity capacity planning, electricity fuel dispatching, electricity load and demand, and electricity finance and pricing. It includes nonutility capacity and generation, and electricity transmission and trade. A detailed description of the EMM is provided in the EIA publication, Electricity Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M068(2012). Based on fuel prices and electricity demands provided by the other modules of the NEMS, the EMM determines the most

325

Coal Market Module This  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

51 51 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Coal Market Module The NEMS Coal Market Module (CMM) provides projections of U.S. coal production, consumption, exports, imports, distribution, and prices. The CMM comprises three functional areas: coal production, coal distribution, and coal exports. A detailed description of the CMM is provided in the EIA publication, Coal Market Module of the National Energy Modeling System 2012, DOE/EIA-M060(2012) (Washington, DC, 2012). Key assumptions Coal production The coal production submodule of the CMM generates a different set of supply curves for the CMM for each year of the projection. Forty-one separate supply curves are developed for each of 14 supply regions, nine coal types (unique combinations

326

Residential Ground Source Heat Pumps with Integrated Domestic Hot Water Generation: Performance Results from Long-Term Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

Ground source heat pumps (GSHPs) show promise for reducing house energy consumption, and a desuperheater can potentially further reduce energy consumption where the heat pump from the space conditioning system creates hot water. Two unoccupied houses were instrumented to document the installed operational space conditioning and water heating efficiency of their GSHP systems. This paper discusses instrumentation methods and field operation characteristics of the GSHPs, compares manufacturers' values of the coefficients of performance calculated from field measured data for the two GSHPs, and compares the measured efficiency of the desuperheater system to other domestic hot water systems.

Stecher, D.; Allison, K.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Market power analysis in the EEX electricity market : an agent-based simulation approach.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, an agent-based modeling and simulation (ABMS) approach is used to model the German wholesale electricity market. The spot market prices in the European Energy Exchange (EEX) are studied as the wholesale market prices. Each participant in the market is modeled as an individual rationality-bounded agent whose objective is to maximize its own profit. By simulating the market clearing process, the interaction among agents is captured. The market clearing price formed by agentspsila production cost bidding is regarded as the reference marginal cost. The gap between the marginal cost and the real market price is measured as an indicator of possible market power exertion. Various bidding strategies such as physical withholding and economic withholding can be simulated to represent strategic bidding behaviors of the market participants. The preliminary simulation results show that some generation companies (GenCos) are in the position of exerting market power by strategic bidding.

Wang, J.; Botterud, A.; Conzelmann, G.; Koritarov, V.; Decision and Information Sciences

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page intentionally left blank This page intentionally left blank 137 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2011 Petroleum Market Module The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, bioesters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining activities in the five Petroleum Administration for

329

Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

This page inTenTionally lefT blank 135 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 Petroleum Market Module The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, unfinished oil imports, other refinery inputs (including alcohols, ethers, esters, corn, biomass, and coal), natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM projects capacity expansion and fuel consumption at domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming (LP) representation of U.S. refining activities in the five Petroleum Administration for

330

Revenue model innovations in the Chinese online game market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines how incumbent firms with different levels of market dominance respond to revenue model innovation, i.e. the process by which revenues are generated and captured, and investigates the relationship between market dominance and different ... Keywords: chinese online game market, evolutionary model innovation, levels of market dominance, revenue model innovation, revolutionary model innovation

Jessie Qun Ren; Philip Hardwick

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Northeast Heating Fuel Market The, Assessment and Options  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In response to the President's request, this study examineshow the distillate fuel oil market (and related energy markets) in the Northeast behaved in the winter of 1999-2000, explains the role played by residential,commercial, industrial, and electricity generation sectorconsumers in distillate fuel oil markets and describes how that role is influenced by the structure of the energy markets in the Northeast

Joan Heinkel

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Enertech Marketing Services | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Enertech Marketing Services Enertech Marketing Services Jump to: navigation, search Name Enertech Marketing Services Place Bangalore, Karnataka, India Zip 560041 Sector Services, Solar Product Enertech Marketing Services was established in the year 1997 with the purpose of providing products, services and solutions in the fields of energy conservation and alternative sources of energy, especially solar. References Enertech Marketing Services[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Enertech Marketing Services is a company located in Bangalore, Karnataka, India . References ↑ "Enertech Marketing Services" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Enertech_Marketing_Services&oldid=344933"

333

Integrated Modeling of Electric Power System Operations and Electricity Market Risks with Applications .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Through integrated modeling of power system operations and market risks, this thesis addresses a variety of important issues on market signals modeling, generation capacity scheduling,… (more)

Sun, Haibin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Mobile Permission Marketing: Framing the Market Inquiry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The emergence of a mobile data infrastructure interconnected with the Internet and television marks the advent of a new marketing channel based on mobile messaging and complementary to traditional marketing channels and the Internet. Mobile marketing ... Keywords: Case Studies, Disruptive Technologies, Emerging Technologies, Firm Competencies, Mobile Internet, New Market Entrants, Permission-Based Marketing, Public Policy

Petros Kavassalis; Ntina Spyropoulou; Dimitris Drossos; Evangelos Mitrokostas; Gregory Gikas; Antonis Hatzistamatiou

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Analysis of accident sequences and source terms at treatment and storage facilities for waste generated by US Department of Energy waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the methodology, computational framework, and results of facility accident analyses performed for the US Department of Energy (DOE) Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (WM PEIS). The accident sequences potentially important to human health risk are specified, their frequencies assessed, and the resultant radiological and chemical source terms evaluated. A personal-computer-based computational framework and database have been developed that provide these results as input to the WM PEIS for the calculation of human health risk impacts. The WM PEIS addresses management of five waste streams in the DOE complex: low-level waste (LLW), hazardous waste (HW), high-level waste (HLW), low-level mixed waste (LLMW), and transuranic waste (TRUW). Currently projected waste generation rates, storage inventories, and treatment process throughputs have been calculated for each of the waste streams. This report summarizes the accident analyses and aggregates the key results for each of the waste streams. Source terms are estimated, and results are presented for each of the major DOE sites and facilities by WM PEIS alternative for each waste stream. Key assumptions in the development of the source terms are identified. The appendices identify the potential atmospheric release of each toxic chemical or radionuclide for each accident scenario studied. They also discuss specific accident analysis data and guidance used or consulted in this report.

Mueller, C.; Nabelssi, B.; Roglans-Ribas, J.; Folga, S.; Policastro, A.; Freeman, W.; Jackson, R.; Mishima, J.; Turner, S.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

LNG links remote supplies and markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) has established a niche for itself by matching remote gas supplies to markets that both lacked indigenous gas reserves and felt threatened in the aftermath of the energy crises of the 1970s and 1980s. It has provided a cost-effective energy source for these markets, while also offering an environmentally friendly fuel long before that was fashionable. The introduction of natural-gas use via LNG in the early years (mostly into France and Japan) has also allowed LNG to play a major role in developing gas infrastructure. Today, natural gas, often supplied as LNG, is particularly well-suited for use in the combined cycle technology used in independent power generation projects (IPPs). Today, LNG players cannot simply focus on monetizing gas resources. Instead, they must adapt their projects to meet the needs of changing markets. The impact of these changes on the LNG industry has been felt throughout the value chain from finding and producing gas, gas treatment, liquefaction, transport as a liquid, receiving terminals and regasification, and finally, to consumption by power producers, industrial users, and households. These factors have influenced the evolution of the LNG industry and have implications for the future of LNG, particularly in the context of worldwide natural gas.

Avidan, A.A.; Gardner, R.E.; Nelson, D.; Borrelli, E.N. [Mobil LNG Inc., Houston, TX (United States); Rethore, T.J. [Arthur D. Little Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

337

Transportation Market Distortions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transport Prices and Markets, Victoria Transport PolicySurvey: Survey Suggests Market-Based Vision of Smart Growth,G. 1996. Roads in a Market Economy, Avebury (Aldershot).

Litman, Todd

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Designing Markets for Electricity. Wiley IEEE Press. [25]in the England and Wales Electricity Market”, Power WorkingFelder (1996), “Should Electricity Markets Have a Capacity

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Information Markets and Aggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Markets and Aggregation by Narahari Mohan PhatakSpring 2012 Information Markets and Aggregation CopyrightMohan Phatak Abstract Information Markets and Aggregation by

Phatak, Narahari Mohan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the prevailing PJM energy market price. The demand in thethe prevailing national energy market price. Last, suppliersraising the national energy market price cap P up to f, in

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Economics of Operating Reserve Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In electricity markets, the tradable products are energy services, reserve services, and their derivatives. Although the lion's share of the dollars is in energy-related services, the cost and value of reserve-related services can be large enough to affect the achieved returns on equity of regulated utilities and to be the difference between profit and loss for competitive generation and merchant firms. This report will help electric power firms understand how reserve markets work, how reserve prices dep...

2003-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

342

Geographic market delineation in LMP electric power markets  

SciTech Connect

The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has jurisdiction over sales of electric generation assets in the United States, and it has found that generation on the high-priced side of transmission constraints provides competition for generators on the low-priced side. This article shows that this reasoning is correct in locational marginal price (LMP) electric power markets now prevalent in the U.S. (author)

Morris, John R.; Accordino, Megan H.

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Distributed Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Untapped Value of Backup Generation Untapped Value of Backup Generation While new guidelines and regulations such as IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) 1547 have come a long way in addressing interconnection standards for distributed generation, utilities have largely overlooked the untapped potential of these resources. Under certain conditions, these units (primarily backup generators) represent a significant source of power that can deliver utility services at lower costs than traditional centralized solutions. These backup generators exist today in large numbers and provide utilities with another option to reduce peak load, relieve transmission congestion, and improve power reliability. Backup generation is widely deployed across the United States. Carnegie Mellon's Electricity

344

Obtaining and Using USDA Market and Production Reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Producers who have superior information hold a distinct marketing advantage over those who do not. This publication lists various sources of marketing and production information and where to obtain them.

Bevers, Stan; Amosson, Stephen H.; Smith, Jackie; O'Brien, Daniel

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

345

Optimization of time-based rates in forward energy markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents a new two-step design approach of Time-Based Rate (TBR) programs for markets with a high penetration of variable energy sources such as wind power. First, an optimal market time horizon must be determined ...

Wang, J.

346

New England Wind Forum: Markets  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Markets Markets Selling Wind Power Wind generators interconnected directly to the transmission or distribution grid, or sized in excess of the load of a host end-user, interact with either well-developed or developing markets for the products produced by wind generators: electricity and generation attributes. Buying Wind Power Individuals, companies, institutions, and governments throughout New England have a number of opportunities to buying wind power or support the development of wind power. The links below take you to information on opportunities and guidance for buying wind power in New England. Motivations for Buying Wind Power Buying Wind Power Resources and Tools for Large Energy Users Printable Version Skip footer navigation to end of page. New England Wind Forum Home | Wind Program Home | EERE Home | U.S. Department of Energy

347

Development of New England Power Pool's Proposed Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the bidding procedures proposed by NEPOOL for the Energy, Reserve, Automatic Generation Control (AGC), and Operable Capability markets. Experience with the Installed Capability market is also described. On October 29, 1997 FERC ...

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Market failures and government policies in gas markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This memorandum analyses the fundamental characteristics of the natural gas market and its consequences for government policies. In the past, the European gas market was dominated by state-owned monopolists but since the start of the liberalisation, privatisation and re-regulation in the early 1990s, the market has fundamentally changed. Nevertheless, governments are still involved in the gas industry, not only in gas exporting countries such as Russia, but also in a country like the Netherlands where the government has imposed a cap on production from the main gas field (Groningen) as well as owns shares in the main wholesale trader (Gasunie Trade & Supply) which has the obligation to accept all gas offered by producers on the small fields. In the main report of this project we present a cost-benefit analysis of the Dutch gas-depletion policy. In this memorandum we explore the natural-gas market more broadly, looking for factors why government intervention may be needed using the welfare-economic approach according to which government intervention should be based on the presence of market failures. After a brief description of the main characteristics of the gas industry, we systematically analyse sources of market failures, such as geopolitical factors, economies of scale and externalities, and finally go into the question which policy options may be chosen to address those market failures.

Machiel Mulder; Gijsbert Zwart

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Nanograting-based compact VUV spectrometer and beam profiler for in-situ characterization of high-order harmonic generation light sources  

SciTech Connect

A compact, versatile device for VUV beam characterization is presented. It combines the functionalities of a VUV spectrometer and a VUV beam profiler in one unit and is entirely supported by a standard DN200 CF flange. The spectrometer employs a silicon nitride transmission nanograting in combination with a micro-channel plate based imaging detector. This enables the simultaneous recording of wavelengths ranging from 10 nm to 80 nm with a resolution of 0.25 nm to 0.13 nm. Spatial beam profiles with diameters up to 10 mm are imaged with 0.1 mm resolution. The setup is equipped with an in-vacuum translation stage that allows for in situ switching between the spectrometer and beam profiler modes and for moving the setup out of the beam. The simple, robust design of the device is well suited for non-intrusive routine characterization of emerging laboratory- and accelerator-based VUV light sources. Operation of the device is demonstrated by characterizing the output of a femtosecond high-order harmonic generation light source.

Kornilov, Oleg; Wilcox, Russell; Gessner, Oliver

2010-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

350

Marketer List  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

KeySpan Energy Services, Inc. (now National Grid) Lakeshore Energy Services, LLC ... Smart OneEnergy SourceGas Energy Services South Jersey Energy Co.

351

Solar PV Market Update: Volume 1 - Spring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Solar PV Market Update provides a snapshot of photovoltaic (PV) market information, along with brief EPRI analyses, to inform EPRI members about economic-, policy-, and technology-related developments in the segment. Delivered on a quarterly basis, the document synthesizes data reporting gleaned from a variety of primary and secondary sources, highlighting specific industry issuesincluding market outlooks, equipment cost and pricing trends, system design and e...

2012-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

352

Gas reactor international cooperative program interim report. HTR Multiplex market assessment  

SciTech Connect

The HTR Multiplex utilizes the HTR as an energy source to produce multiple forms of energy. A specific type of multiplex utilizing a high temperature chemical heat pipe (CHP) is examined. Forecasts of the US electric energy markets and industrial heat markets are developed for the 1995-2010 time period. Costs of multiplexes in these markets are compared to costs of the conventional forecast mix of electric generation systems and to costs of fluidized bed combustors in the industrial heat market. The comparisons are by National Electric Reliability Council (NERC) region. The major finding of the study is that a large potential US market exists for the HTR Multiplex in two segments of the electric and industrial heat markets. It is concluded that the HTR Multiplex can provide peaking and mid-range electricity plus industrial heat for one and two-shift operations at costs approximately 50 percent lower than available alternatives. This market is estimated to be at least 300 GW/sub t/ (about 7 quads per year) in the 1995 to 2010 time period.

Leeth, G.G.; Meyer, C.F.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Technology Maturity and Market Penetration Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents technology maturity curves and market penetration charts that were developed to assess the current and future state of development for a range of technologies. Technology maturity curves were developed for 17 technology categories covering the generation, transmission, and distribution of electricity and customer technologies. Market penetration charts were then developed for a subset of "game-changing" technologies to show the key steps to market entry for these technologies. Antici...

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

354

Market Acceleration | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Market Acceleration Market Acceleration Market Acceleration Photo of the Wanapum Dam. Hydropower contributes significantly to the nation's renewable energy portfolio; over the last decade, the United States obtained nearly 7% of its electricity from hydropower sources. Already the largest source of renewable electricity in the United States, there remains a vast untapped resource potential in hydropower. To achieve its vision of supporting 15% of our nation's electricity needs from water power by 2030, the Water Power Program works to address environmental and regulatory barriers that prevent significant amounts of deployment; to assess and quantify the value of hydropower to the nation's electric grid and its ability to integrate other variable renewable energy technologies; and to develop a vibrant U.S.

355

Market Integration, Efficiency, and Interconnectors: The Irish Single Electricity Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). Interconnecting fossil dominated electricity systems such as SEM with hydro based systems could reduce price volatility and mitigate subsequent market uncertainties (Matsukawa and Mulder, 2004). A stable wholesale price, on the other hand, provides stability... as shown in Table 1. Only 1% of scheduled generation in SEM was obtained via the interconnector in 2008 (UREGNI, 2009). Figure one shows the scheduled generation mix for the first three quarters of 2009 (January-September). The fuel mix is dominated...

Nepal, Rabindra; Jamasb, Tooraj

356

STM Stirling Engine-Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stirling engines have recently been introduced to the distributed generation market. This project summarizes the experience of three projects implementing Stirling engine-generators from one manufacturer in applications where they are fueled with digester gas.

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Use of Biomass for Power Generation in the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historically, biomass has been man's principal source of energy, mainly used in the form of wood for cooking and heating. With the industrial revolution and the introduction of motorized transportation and electricity, fossil fuels became the dominant source of energy. Today, biomass is the largest domestic source of renewable energy providing over 3% of total U.S. energy consumption, and surpassing hydropower. Yet, recent increases in the price and volatility of fossil fuel supplies and the financial impacts from a number of financially distressed investments in natural gas combined cycle power plants have led to a renewed interest in electricity generation from biomass. The biomass-fueled generation market is a dynamic one that is forecast to show significant growth over the next two decades as environmental drivers are increasingly supported by commercial ones. The most significant change is likely to come from increases in energy prices, as decreasing supply and growing demand increase the costs of fossil fuel-generated electricity and improve the competitive position of biomass as a power source. The report provides an overview of the renewed U.S. market interest in biomass-fueled power generation and gives a concise look at what's driving interest in biomass-fueled generation, the challenges faced in implementing biomass-fueled generation projects, and the current and future state of biomass-fueled generation. Topics covered in the report include: an overview of biomass-fueled generation including its history, the current market environment, and its future prospects; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving renewed interest in biomass-fueled generation; an analysis of the challenges that are hindering the implementation of biomass-fueled generation projects; a description of the various feedstocks that can be used for biomass-fueled generation; an evaluation of the biomass supply chain; a description of biomass-fueled generation technologies; and, a review of the economic drivers of biomass-fueled generation project success.

none

2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

358

Hydroelectric reservoir optimization in a pool market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For a price-taking generator operating a hydro-electric reservoir in a pool electricity market, the optimal stack to offer in each trading period over a planning horizon can be computed using dynamic programming. However, the market trading period (usually ...

G. Pritchard; A. B. Philpott; P. J. Neame

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Existing distributed generation sources are more difficultfrom all electricity generation sources using a standarda co-located distributed generation source. It reads in text

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Qualifying RPS Market States (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Saskatchewan, Canada) Saskatchewan, Canada) Qualifying RPS Market States (Saskatchewan, Canada) < Back Eligibility Developer Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Saskatchewan Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals This entry lists the states with RPS policies that accept generation located in Saskatchewan, Canada as eligible sources towards their Renewable Portfolio Standard targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Qualifying RPS Market States (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada) Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada) Qualifying RPS Market States (Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada) < Back Eligibility Developer Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Newfoundland and Labrador Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals This entry lists the states with RPS policies that accept generation located in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada as eligible sources towards their Renewable Portfolio Standard targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be

362

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Florida) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Florida) Florida) Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Florida) < Back Eligibility Commercial Developer Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Florida Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Florida as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the

363

Green Power Marketing in the United States: A Status Report ...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

some REC products blend other renewable energy sources, such as biomass (typically biogas) and solar. Green Power Sales According to data provided by marketers, about 6,000...

364

Employment Impacts of Early Markets for Hydrogen and Fuel Cell...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Source: Kurtz, J., K. Wipke, S. Sprik, T. Ramsden and C. Ainscough, Early Fuel Cell Market Deployments: ARRA and Combined (IAA, DLA, ARRA) NREL Composite Data Products, March...

365

U.S. Energy Information Administration / 2012 Uranium Marketing...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

rounding. Weighted-average prices are not adjusted for inflation. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Form EIA-858 "Uranium Marketing Annual Survey" (2012)....

366

Gray Markets, A Product of Demand Uncertainty and Excess Inventory.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

two-market stochastic inventory system, Management Science.M. , P. Kouvelis. 2007. Inventory, speculation, and sourcing2001. A two-location inventory model with transshipment and

Ahmadi, R.; Carr, S. M.; Dasu, S.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Northeast electricity markets react to hot weather in late May ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tools; Glossary › All ... Northeast electricity markets react to hot weather in late May. Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, based on New York ...

368

Solid-State Lighting: Orchestrating Market Success: Seattle Market...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Orchestrating Market Success: Seattle Market Introduction Workshop Video to someone by E-mail Share Solid-State Lighting: Orchestrating Market Success: Seattle Market Introduction...

369

The investigation of the market disequilibrium in the stock market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigated stock market disequilibrium focusing on two topics: the impact of multiple market makers on the market disequilibrium at the market microstructure level,… (more)

Park, Jin Suk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Markets for compost  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table of Contents: Introduction; Characteristics and Benefits of Compost and Competing/Complementary Products; Compost Uses and Markets; Factors Pertinent to Developing Compost Markets; Compost Specifications; Compost Testing Requirements; Compost Distribution; Compost Policies; Economic and Noneconomic Barriers to Developing Compost Markets; Strategies to Mitigate/Overcome Barriers to Developing Compost Markets; and Examples of Existing Programs and Markets (as of 1989).

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Residential gas heat pump assessment: A market-based approach  

SciTech Connect

There has been considerable activity in recent years to develop technologies that could reduce or levelize residential and light-commercial building space cooling electrical use and heating/cooling energy use. For example, variable or multi-speed electric heat pumps, electric ground-source heat pumps, dual-fuel heat pumps, multi-function heat pumps, and electric cool storage concepts have been developed; and several types of gas heat pumps are emerging. A residential gas heat pump (GHP) benefits assessment is performed to assist gas utility and equipment manufacturer decision making on level of commitment to this technology. The methodology and generic types of results that can be generated are described. National market share is estimated using a market segmentation approach. The assessment design requires dividing the 334 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSAS) of the US into 42 market segments of relatively homogeneous weather and gas/electric rates (14 climate groupings by 3 rate groupings). Gas and electric rates for each MSA are evaluated to arrive at population-weighted rates for the market segments. GHPs are competed against 14 conventional equipment options in each homogeneous segment.

Hughes, P.J.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Auction market simulator for price based operation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through the passage of new public utility regulatory policies, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) encourages an open market system for price based operation. A previous paper describes a framework for price based operation and the associated technical issues in an auction market structure. This paper presents an auction market simulator to experimentally study the aspects of power system operation in price-based environment. The proposed simulator can also be used as a tool to train the system operators how to perform electric power transaction in the deregulated environment. This paper presents the simulation results of auction market for price based operation in the 24-bus, 10-generator IEEE Reliability Test System.

Kumar, J.; Sheble, G. [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States). Dept. of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Natural Gas Marketed Production  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wellhead Price Marketed Production Period: Monthly Annual Wellhead Price Marketed Production Period: Monthly Annual Download Series History Download Series History Definitions, Sources & Notes Definitions, Sources & Notes Show Data By: Data Series Area Apr-13 May-13 Jun-13 Jul-13 Aug-13 Sep-13 View History U.S. 2,085,518 2,166,183 2,097,434 2,188,208 2,188,379 2,104,808 1973-2013 Federal Offshore Gulf of Mexico 116,480 112,975 102,113 109,113 102,493 105,284 1997-2013 Alabama NA NA NA NA NA NA 1989-2013 Alaska 29,725 27,904 25,445 23,465 23,613 25,916 1989-2013 Arizona NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 Arkansas NA NA NA NA NA NA 1991-2013 California NA NA NA NA NA NA 1989-2013 Colorado NA NA NA NA NA NA 1989-2013 Florida NA NA NA NA NA NA 1989-2013

374

Market Organization and Market Efficiency in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity markets in the United States exhibit two different forms of organization: decentralized bilateral trading and centralized auction markets. Using detailed data on prices, quantities, and production costs, we examine how market outcomes changed when a large region in the Eastern US rapidly switched from a bilateral system of trade to a well-designed centralized auction market in 2004. Although economic theory yields ambiguous predictions, the empirical evidence indicates that shifting the venue of trade substantially improved overall market efficiency, and that these efficiency gains far exceeded implementation costs. Our analysis points to the merits of organized market institutions for electricity, a central issue in policy debates over market-oriented regulatory reforms.

Erin T. Mansur; Matthew W. White

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reliability Assessment [19] PJM, Monitoring Market Unit (at http://www.pjm.com. [20] PJM, Monitoring Market Unit (at http://www.pjm.com. [21] PJM, Monitoring Market Unit (

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A review of market monitoring activities at U.S. independent system operators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of generators (e.g. , baseload, peakers) so that consumersits role in the market (baseload, intermediate, peaker) and

Goldman, Charles; Lesieutre, Bernie C.; Bartholomew, Emily

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

CRSP Power Marketing and Contracts default  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Financial Data Environmental Review-NEPA Operations Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates Financial Data Environmental Review-NEPA Operations Planning & Projects Power Marketing Rates CRSP's Marketing Service Area Power Marketing As a marketer of Federal power, Colorado River Storage Project Management Center's Power Marketing staff provides a variety of services for customers and the utility industry, including long term power purchases and transmission contracts. Energy Services Power Allocations FY2009 & After Current Customer Seasonal Summary (pdf) FY2009 & After New Customer Seasonal Summary (pdf) Post 2004 SHP Energy Determination Documents and Meeting Handouts Customer Meetings & Rate Adjustment Schedule For Long-Term Solution (pdf) GC Lake Elevations Graph - 8/2003 Hydrology Study (pdf) Generation Forecast Graph - 8/2003 Hydrology Study(pdf)

378

Petroleum Marketing Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

ii U.S. Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Monthly August 2011 Preface The Petroleum Marketing Monthly (PMM) provides information and statistical ...

379

Propane Market Status Report  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Propane Market Status Report 07272000 Click here to start Table of Contents Propane Market Status Report Propane Prices Follow Crude Oil Propane Demand by Sector Demand Impacted...

380

Capacity Markets for Electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ternative Approaches for Power Capacity Markets”, Papers andand Steven Stoft, “Installed Capacity and Price Caps: Oil onElectricity Markets Have a Capacity requirement? If So, How

Creti, Anna; Fabra, Natalia

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Photovoltaics as a worldwide energy source  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Photovoltaic energy systems have historically been treated as a bulk power generation source for the future. However, utilities and other agencies involved with electrification throughout the world are beginning to find photovoltaics a least-cost option to meet specific loads both for themselves and their customers, in both off-grid and grid-connected applications. These expanding markets offer the potential of hundreds of megawatts of sales in the coming decade, but a strategy addressing both industrial growth and user acceptance is necessary to capitalize on this opportunity. 11 refs.

Jones, G.J.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

382

Market Organization and Efficiency in Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and information about market procedures, and to Frank Wolak for comments on an earlier draft. v7.55 #12). It seeks to identify specific market rules and pro- tocols that can speed information revelation, discover involved in energy production and its delivery. During the past decade, this heterogeneity in market

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

383

Super Energy Saver Ground Source Heat Pump  

Source: US Energy Information Administration . 11 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy ... GSHPs are very energy efficient, and the market is

384

Ensuring Generation Adequacy in Competitive Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concern for the future. FERC’s NOPR on Standard Marketreserves. However, the recent FERC White Paper articulatinga vision for a Whole Sale FERC Notice of Proposed Rule

Oren, Shmuel S.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

National need for utilizing nuclear energy for process heat generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nuclear reactors are potential sources for generating process heat, and their applications for such use economically competitive. They help satisfy national needs by helping conserve and extend oil and natural gas resources, thus reducing energy imports and easing future international energy concerns. Several reactor types can be utilized for generating nuclear process heat; those considered here are light water reactors (LWRs), heavy water reactors (HWRs), gas-cooled reactors (GCRs), and liquid metal reactors (LMRs). LWRs and HWRs can generate process heat up to 280/sup 0/C, LMRs up to 540/sup 0/C, and GCRs up to 950/sup 0/C. Based on the studies considered here, the estimated process heat markets and the associated energy markets which would be supplied by the various reactor types are summarized.

Gambill, W.R.; Kasten, P.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

An Experiment on Prediction Markets in Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prediction markets are powerful forecasting tools. They have the potential to aggregate private information, to generate and disseminate a consensus among the market participants, and to provide incentives for information acquisition. These market functionalities can be very valuable for scientific research. Here, we report an experiment that examines the compatibility of prediction markets with the current practice of scientific publication. We investigated three settings. In the first setting, different pieces of information were disclosed to the public during the experiment. In the second setting, participants received private information. In the third setting, each piece of information was private at first, but was subsequently disclosed to the public. An automated, subsidizing market maker provided additional incentives for trading and mitigated liquidity problems. We find that the third setting combines the advantages of the first and second settings. Market performance was as good as in the setting with public information, and better than in the setting with private information. In contrast to the first setting, participants could benefit from information advantages. Thus the publication of information does not detract from the functionality of prediction markets. We conclude that for integrating prediction markets into the practice of scientific research it is of advantage to use subsidizing market makers, and to keep markets aligned with current publication practice.

Johan Almenberg; Ken Kittlitz; Thomas Pfeiffer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

market trends icon Renewables market trends icon Renewables exec summary Executive Summary Renewable fuel use grows at a faster rate than fossil fuel use...Read full section Mkt trends Market Trends Production of liquid fuels from biomass, coal, and natural gas increases.... Read full section Renewables and natural gas lead rise in primary energy consumption.... Read full section Reliance on natural gas, natural gas liquids, and renewables rises as industrial energy use grows.... Read full section Sales of alternative fuel, fuel flexible, and hybrid vehicles rise.... Read full section Coal-fired plants continue to be the largest source of U.S. electricity generation.... Read full section Most new capacity additions use natural gas and renewables.... Read full section Additions to power plant capacity slow after 2012 but accelerate

388

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

market trends icon Renewables market trends icon Renewables exec summary Executive Summary Renewable fuel use grows at a faster rate than fossil fuel use...Read full section Mkt trends Market Trends Production of liquid fuels from biomass, coal, and natural gas increases.... Read full section Renewables and natural gas lead rise in primary energy consumption.... Read full section Reliance on natural gas, natural gas liquids, and renewables rises as industrial energy use grows.... Read full section Sales of alternative fuel, fuel flexible, and hybrid vehicles rise.... Read full section Coal-fired plants continue to be the largest source of U.S. electricity generation.... Read full section Most new capacity additions use natural gas and renewables.... Read full section Additions to power plant capacity slow after 2012 but accelerate

389

Thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectric generator having a rigid coupling or stack'' between the heat source and the hot strap joining the thermoelements is described. The stack includes a member of an insulating material, such as ceramic, for electrically isolating the thermoelements from the heat source, and a pair of members of a ductile material, such as gold, one each on each side of the insulating member, to absorb thermal differential expansion stresses in the stack. (Official Gazette)

Pryslak, N.E.

1974-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

390

Markets & Finance - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Markets & Finance Markets & Finance Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Market Prices and Uncertainty Charts Archive Analysis & Projections Most Requested Electricity Financial Markets Financial Reporting System Working Papers Market Prices and Uncertainty Report What Drives Crude Oil Prices All Reports Don't miss: EIA's monthly Market Prices and Uncertainty Report or What Drives Crude Oil Prices? (an analysis of 7 key factors that may influence oil prices, physical market factorsand factors related to trading and financial markets). Crude oil price volatility and uncertainty› Evolution of WTI futures Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Short-Term Energy Outlook, Market Prices and Uncertainty Report. Heating oil price volatility and uncertainty› RBOB and Heating oil implied volatility

391

Cascading Closed Loop Cycle Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

WOW Energies was issued Patent 6,857,268 B2 on Feb 22, 2005 titled “CASCADING CLOSED LOOP CYCLE (CCLC) and Patent 7,096,665 B2 on August 29, 2006 titled “CASCADING CLOSED LOOP CYCLE POWER GENERATION”. These patented technologies are collectively marketed as WOWGen®. The WOW Energies patents represent the production of efficient power from low, medium and high temperature heat generated from the combustion of fuels; heat from renewable energy sources such as solar and geothermal heat; or waste heat sources. Waste heat sources can be in the form of exhaust stack flue gases; waste heat from vented steam or steam discharged from steam turbines; hot water; hot oils or combined waste heat sources. A major advantage of the WOWGen® power plant is the ability to produce power without the use, consumption or contamination of valuable water resources. Production of power from waste heat and renewable energy sources is the most viable path to energy independence from foreign oil and reduced emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels. The WOWGen® power plant inherently reduces emissions and Greenhouse Gases (GHG) by producing power from waste heat without consuming fuel, thus increasing the overall energy efficiency of any industrial plant or power generation facility. The presentation will focus on the technology and provide case studies of its application.

Romero, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Competitive Electricity Markets and System Reliability: The Case for New England's Proposed Locational Capacity Market  

SciTech Connect

Clear evidence exists that the existing wholesale markets in New England are failing to provide sufficient incentives to invest. The ISO-NE LICAP proposal is designed to ensure that New England markets attract sufficient generation resources to protect reliability while being mindful of the added cost burden that it will produce.

Farr, John G.; Felder, Frank A.

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Impact of Imperfect Permit Market on Congested Electricity Market Equilibrium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Impact of Imperfect Permit Market on Congested Electricity Market Equilibrium Tanachai Limpaitoon, Yihsu Chen, Shmuel S. Oren The impact and efficacy of a cap-and-trade regulation on electric, and strategic behavior of generation firms. This paper develops an equilibrium model of an oligopoly electricity

Oren, Shmuel S.

394

Power Market Simulation Workshop  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's first seminar on electricity market simulation provided a forum for discussion of potential modifications and applications for this new technology, specifically in the areas of market design and operations. The resounding messages heard from both speakers and participants were as follows: o The use of simulation for electricity markets has the potential to help society avoid devastating costs due to market flaws. o Market simulation can be broadly applied with a diverse set of potential users. o C...

2002-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

395

Long-term Planning and Investment for Transmission and Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and generating capacity. Long-term Planning and Investment for Transmission and Generation More Documents & Publications 2012 Reliability & Markets Peer Review -...

396

EA-345 New Brunswick Power Generation Corporation | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home EA-345 New Brunswick Power Generation Corporation EA-345 New Brunswick Power Generation Corporation Order...

397

EA-290-A Ontario Power Generation, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home EA-290-A Ontario Power Generation, Inc. EA-290-A Ontario Power Generation, Inc. Order authorizing Ontario...

398

EA-290 Ontario Power Generation, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home EA-290 Ontario Power Generation, Inc. EA-290 Ontario Power Generation, Inc. Order authorizing Ontario...

399

EA-290-B Ontario Power Generation, Inc. | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home EA-290-B Ontario Power Generation, Inc. EA-290-B Ontario Power Generation, Inc. Order authorizing Ontario...

400

Modeling strategic forward contracting in transmission constrained power markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Taking the effects of transmission network into account, strategic forward contracting induced by the interaction of generation firms' strategies in the spot and forward markets is investigated. A two-stage game model is proposed to describe generation ... Keywords: equilibrium problem with equilibrium constraints (EPEC), nonlinear complementarity method, power market, strategic forward contracting

Wang Xian; Zhang Shaohua

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electric Power Electric Power exec summary Executive Summary Power generation from renewables and natural gas continues to increase ...Read full section Mkt trends Market Trends After Fukushima, prospects for nuclear power dim in Japan and Europe but not elsewhere.... Read full section Wind power leads rise in world renewable generation, solar power also grows rapidly.... Read full section Investment tax credits could increase distributed generation in commercial sector.... Read full section Coal-fired plants continue to be the largest source of U.S. electricity generation.... Read full section Most new capacity additions use natural gas and renewables.... Read full section Additions to power plant capacity slow after 2012 but accelerate beyond 2020.... Read full section Growth in generating capacity parallels rising demand for

402

Energy Imbalance Markets (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The anticipated increase in variable renewable generation, such as wind and solar power, over the next several years has raised concerns about how system operators will maintain balance between electricity production and demand in the Western Interconnection, especially in its smaller balancing authority areas (BAAs). Given renewable portfolio standards in the West, it is possible that more than 50 gigawatts of wind capacity will be installed by 2020. Significant quantities of solar generation are likely to be added as well. Meanwhile, uncertainties about future load growth and challenges siting new transmission and generation resources may add additional stresses on the Western Interconnection of the future. One proposed method of addressing these challenges is an energy imbalance market (EIM). An EIM is a means of supplying and dispatching electricity to balance fluctuations in generation and load. It aggregates the variability of generation and load over multiple balancing areas (BAs).

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Illinois) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Illinois) Illinois) Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Illinois) < Back Eligibility Developer Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Illinois Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Illinois as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance targets may be met by out-of-state generation. In addition to geographic

404

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Indiana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Indiana) Indiana) Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Developer Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Indiana as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance targets may be met by out-of-state generation. In addition to geographic

405

Annual Energy Outlook with Projections to 2025-Market Trends - Electricity  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Electricity Index (click to jump links) Electricity Sales Electricity Generating Capacity Electricity Fuel Costs and Prices Nuclear Power Electricity from Renewable Sources Electricity Alternative Cases Electricity Sales Electricity Use Is Expected To Grow More Slowly Than GDP As generators and combined heat and power plants adjust to the evolving structure of the electricity market, they face slower growth in demand than in the past. Historically, demand for electricity has been related to economic growth; that positive relationship is expected to continue, but the ratio is uncertain. Figure 67. Population gross domestic product, and electricity sales, 1965-2025 (5-year moving average annual percent growth). Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help.

406

Distributed Wind Power Generation - National Renewable Energy ...  

Technology breakthrough in roof-top distributed wind power generation Multi-billion $ market opportunity in next 10 years – recent venture capital investments

407

Using Market Simulations to Support Plant Budgeting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power plant budgeting requires an exhaustive knowledge of generating assets/components and maintenance, yet it also requires knowledge of the dispatch and profitability of generating units. This report illustrates some of the ways that market and operational simulations can inform power plant budgeting strategy and may reveal opportunities possible by changing the mission or performance of units.

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

408

Structural Features that Contribute to Market Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we report an experiment that examines a primary concern of policy makers: how a structural feature of electric power networks can contribute to the exercise of market power by well-positioned players in deregulated markets. One such feature is the distribution of ownership of a given set of generating assets. For example, two large firms could be allocated baseload and intermediate generators such that either firm would be willing to withhold unilaterally the capacity of its intermediate generators from the market, to benefit from the supra-competitive prices which would result from only selling its baseload units. Conversely, ownership of the some of the intermediate generators from each of these firms could be transferred to two other firms, so that no one firm can unilaterally restrict output to spawn supra-competitive prices.

Stephen J. Rassenti; Vernon L. Smith; Bart J. Wilson

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

2009 Fuel Cell Market Report  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that combine hydrogen and oxygen to produce electricity, water, and heat. Unlike batteries, fuel cells continuously generate electricity, as long as a source of

410

Spanish Power Exchange Market and Information System Design concepts, and operating experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spanish Power Exchange Market and Information System Design concepts, and operating experience Jose Market started operations. All generators, distributors, commercialization companies, and final consumers negotiate all power exchanges through the spot market. The Spanish Power Exchange Market Operator (Compañia

Tesfatsion, Leigh

411

Diagnosing Unilateral Market Power in Electricity Reserves Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Machado, M.P. , “Bilateral Market Power and VerticalSpanish Electricity Spot Market,” 2004, CEMFI Working PaperEquilibrium in Electricity Markets,” 2004, Journal of

Knittel, Christopher R; Metaxoglou, Konstantinos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Market versus Non-Market Assignment of Initial Ownership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Each According To? Markets, Tournaments, and the MatchingIntervention on Housing Markets in Korea,” mimeo, Sogang1993), “Moving toward a Market for Spectrum,” Regu- lation,

Che, Yeon-Koo; Gale, Ian

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Diagnosing Unilateral Market Power in Electricity Reserves Market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cal- ifornia Power Exchange Energy Markets: Prepared for theCalifornia’s Wholesale Energy Market,” 2001, Department ofpower in the state’s energy markets (Hildebrandt [2001];

Knittel, Christopher R; Metaxoglou, Konstantinos

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

A Market for all Farmers: Market Institutions and Smallholder Participation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information, such as market information systems and gradesIn many countries, market information systems perform poorlyagencies to collect reliable market information. Following

Gabre-Madhin, Eleni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

U.S. Solar Market Trends  

SciTech Connect

Grid-connected photovoltaic installations grew by 60% in 2006. California and New Jersey have the largest markets and installations more than doubled in New Jersey, Nevada, Colorado, Connecticut, and many other states with smaller markets. The off-grid growth has been steady, but significantly lower. For the first time in more than a decade, a solar thermal electric plant was installed in 2006. More than 350 MW installed in the 1990's still generates electricity today. Solar water heating and solar space heating installations grew in 2006 after years offlat installation numbers. Hawaii dominates this market, with nearly half of the market. Solar pool heating accounts for the largest number of installations and has grown at an average rate of 10% since 1998. However, installations decreased by 7% in 2006. Installations in California and Florida together are 73% of the pool heating market.

Larry Sherwood

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

U.S. Solar Market Trends  

SciTech Connect

Grid-connected photovoltaic installations grew by 60% in 2006. California and New Jersey have the largest markets and installations more than doubled in New Jersey, Nevada, Colorado, Connecticut, and many other states with smaller markets. The off-grid growth has been steady, but significantly lower. For the first time in more than a decade, a solar thermal electric plant was installed in 2006. More than 350 MW installed in the 1990's still generates electricity today. Solar water heating and solar space heating installations grew in 2006 after years offlat installation numbers. Hawaii dominates this market, with nearly half of the market. Solar pool heating accounts for the largest number of installations and has grown at an average rate of 10% since 1998. However, installations decreased by 7% in 2006. Installations in California and Florida together are 73% of the pool heating market.

Larry Sherwood

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Pollution Markets with Imperfectly Observed Emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Another example with similar monitoring requirements is the Southern California RECLAIM program that implemented separated markets for nitrogen oxide (NOx) and SO2 emissions from power plants, refineries and other large stationary sources. This program did... to the allocation of permits, an emission standard specific to buses. It may also be optimal to use 28 I thank one of the referees for pointing out this case and its relevance for the Los Angeles’ RECLAIM market. 26 different utilization factors (eq) for each group...

Montero, Juan-Pablo

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

418

Solar PV Market Update, October 2013  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Volume 7 of EPRI’s quarterly Solar PV Market Update provides continued insight into some of the front line trends that are afoot throughout the photovoltaic segment. Like previous Updates, it synthesizes primary and secondary data from multiple sources in an effort to highlight economic, policy, and technology developments that are likely to impact utility solar PV investment and planning efforts.This report investigates some of the recent PV market and policy developments that ...

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Solar Renewable Energy Certificate (SREC) Markets: Status and Trends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines experience in solar renewable energy certificate (SREC) markets in the United States. It describes how SREC markets function--key policy design provisions, eligible technologies, state and regional eligibility rules, solar alternative compliance payments, measurement and verification methods, long-term contracting provisions, and rate caps. It also examines the trends of SREC markets--trading volumes, sourcing trends, trends in the size of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems driven by these markets, and trends in price and compliance. Throughout, the paper explores key issues and challenges facing SREC markets and attempts by policymakers to address some of these market barriers. Data and information presented in this report are derived from SREC tracking systems, brokers and auctions, published reports, and information gleaned from market participants and interviews with state regulators responsible for SREC market implementation. The last section summarizes key findings.

Bird, L.; Heeter, J.; Kreycik, C.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Energy Information Administration/Petroleum Marketing Annual  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Articles Feature articles on energy-related subjects are frequently included in this publication. The following ar- ticles and special focus items have appeared in previous issues. Propane Market Assessment for Winter 1997-1997 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . December 1997 A Contrast Between Distillate Fuel Oil Markets in Autumn 1996 and 1997 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . December 1997 A Comparison of Selected EIA-782 Data With Other Data Sources . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . November 1997 Distillate Fuel Oil Assessment for Winter 1996-1997 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . December 1996 Propane Market Assessment for Winter 1996-1997 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . December 1996 Recent Distillate Fuel Oil Inventory Trends . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . June 1996 Recent Trends in Motor Gasoline Stock Levels .

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Optimization Online - Survivable Energy Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mar 9, 2006... at the same time, the dayahead energy market and the reserve market in order to price through the market, beside energy, the overall cost of ...

422

Reliability and Competitive Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Behavior in a Competitive Electricity Market,” InternationalDemand Response in Electricity Markets,” Hewlett FoundationGreen, R. (1999) “The Electricity Contract Market in England

Joskow, Paul; Tirole, Jean

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

2011 Wind Technologies Market Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study. Regions with fast energy markets, for example, changeis set aside in one energy market interval is then releasedto be dispatched in a later energy market interval, whereas

Bolinger, Mark

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

The world oil market and OPEC behavior: The leak-producer price leader model  

SciTech Connect

This is an economic study of the world's oil market in which OPEC plays the central role in determining the oil supply and price. Understanding OPEC's behavior is at the core of understanding the world's oil market. However, oil is a resource belonging to the family of natural resources known as exhaustible. We do not produce oil; we only extract and distribute a fixed amount of the resource over generations. Optimal extraction is a matter of concern to both suppliers and consumers. First, it is shown that using the traditional theory of producers behavior in the conventional commodity markets to explain extractors behavior in exhaustible resource markets is completely wrong. Second, current models of OPEC behavior are reviewed. Third, an alternative model is introduced. Previous authors have not directed their models to give explanations to the peculiar observations in oil market. This model divides the world's oil suppliers into: the free riders (non-OPEC oil producers), the OPEC hawks (a group within OPEC) and the leak-producer price leader (Saudi Arabia). Three factors, namely relatively big oil reserves, no other sources of income, and the avoidance of the so-called backstop technology make Saudi Arabia more interested in lower oil prices than are other oil extractors.

Aboalela, A.A.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook - Petroleum Market Module  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Petroleum Market Module Petroleum Market Module Assumption to the Annual Energy Outlook Petroleum Market Module Figure 8. Petroleum Administration for Defense Districts. Having problems, call our National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800 for help. The NEMS Petroleum Market Module (PMM) forecasts petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil (both domestic and imported), petroleum product imports, other refinery inputs including alcohols, ethers, and bioesters natural gas plant liquids production, and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates capacity expansion and fuel consumption of domestic refineries. The PMM contains a linear programming representation of U.S. refining

426

Radioisotope Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioisotope Power Generation Long lived power sources are needed for equipment that is too remote or inaccessible for replacement. By choosing a radioactive element with a long...

427

Nordic Market Report 2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

....................................................................17 5 ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION..................................................19 5.1 TRANSMISSION..............................................................................................20 5.3 ELECTRICITY TRANSMISSION: CONCLUSIONSNordic Market Report 2009 Development in the Nordic Electricity Market Report 4/2009 #12;Nordic

428

Marketing alternative fueled automobiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Marketing alternative fueled vehicles is a difficult challenge for automakers. The foundation of the market, the terms of competition, and the customer segments involved are still being defined. But automakers can draw ...

Zheng, Alex (Yi Alexis)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

2025 Power Marketing Initiative  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and is in the process of developing a plan for marketing and allocating LAP hydroelectric power after the FES contracts expire. We call this plan our 2025 Power Marketing...

430

A Market for all Farmers: Market Institutions and Smallholder Participation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bakken, H. (1953). Theory of Markets and Marketing. Madison,1988). The Firm, the Market and the Law. Chicago: UniversityPolicies: The Case of Cereal Markets in West Africa’, in

Gabre-Madhin, Eleni

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

The Advanced Light Source at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (ALS, LBL)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is a third-generation synchrotron light source designed toas a third-generation synchrotron radiation source, that is,latest generation of synchrotron light sources, l extremely

Jackson, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

MAGNETIC PARAMETERS OF A NB3SN SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNET FOR A 56 HGz ECR ION SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While third generation sources use NbTi superconductingfor a fourth generation ECR source", IEEE. Trans. Appl.magnet for a fourth generation ECR source operating at a

Ferracin, P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

LUX - A design study for a linac/laser-based ultrafast X-ray source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

comparable to third generation light sources, to multipleexisting third generation light sources. The x-ray pulseof existing 3 rd generation light sources. The position of

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Assessing U.S. ESCO industry performance and market trends: Results from the NAESCO database project  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information source on industry trends, market activity and business practices of companies involved in energy-information on market activity of 63 companies that have national or regional operations in the energy-

Osborn, Julie; Goldman, Chuck; Hopper, Nicole; Singer, Terry

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Cross-Market Discounts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Firms in several markets attract consumers by offering discounts in other unrelated markets. This promotion strategy, which we call “cross-market discounts,” has been successfully adopted in the last few years by many grocery retailers in ... Keywords: competition, fuelperks!, game theory, nonlinear pricing, retail promotions

Marcel Goi?; Kinshuk Jerath; Kannan Srinivasan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Market Research Berkeley FIRST  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market Research Berkeley FIRST i dDevi Prasad Dt: 03/25/2008 #12;2 Customer Survey Goalsy 1 has > 50% natural gas component ( l di l t i h ) 38 9% 82 d t(excluding electric charges) 38.9% 82 Determine market barriers and purchase factors1.Determine market barriers and purchase factors 2.Relation

Kammen, Daniel M.

437

Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program: FY1999 Grant Descriptions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FY1999 Grant FY1999 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program: FY1999 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information Public Benefits and Distributed Generation Outreach Project The National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) will hold collaborative workshops with key stakeholders to build consensus on effective policy options for emerging competitive distributed generation markets. FY1999 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information More Documents & Publications Electric Restructuring Outreach Activities and Information Dissemination to State Public Utility Regulators Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program: FY2001 Grant Descriptions and Contact Information Electric Markets Technical Assistance Program: FY2003 Grant Descriptions

438

Energy Efficiency and Emerging Markets for Greenhouse Gas Trading  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy industry is evolving into a competitive and globally integrated commodity market. The development of the Ozone Transport Commission NOx market has closely followed that of the SO2 market. The cost of these commodities has become an important economic input into the generation of electricity in the United States. The commoditization of the Greenhouse Gases will likely develop in a similar fashion but on a global scale, becoming another economic input into electricity generation. It will be critical to the future competitiveness of each energy related company to closely monitor the Greenhouse Gas Market.

Ferguson, M.

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Petroleum Market Model of the National Energy Modeling System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to define the objectives of the Petroleum Market Model (PMM), describe its basic approach, and provide detail on how it works. This report is intended as a reference document for model analysts, users, and the public. The PMM models petroleum refining activities, the marketing of petroleum products to consumption regions. The production of natural gas liquids in gas processing plants, and domestic methanol production. The PMM projects petroleum product prices and sources of supply for meeting petroleum product demand. The sources of supply include crude oil, both domestic and imported; other inputs including alcohols and ethers; natural gas plant liquids production; petroleum product imports; and refinery processing gain. In addition, the PMM estimates domestic refinery capacity expansion and fuel consumption. Product prices are estimated at the Census division level and much of the refining activity information is at the Petroleum Administration for Defense (PAD) District level. This report is organized as follows: Chapter 2, Model Purpose; Chapter 3, Model Overview and Rationale; Chapter 4, Model Structure; Appendix A, Inventory of Input Data, Parameter Estimates, and Model Outputs; Appendix B, Detailed Mathematical Description of the Model; Appendix C, Bibliography; Appendix D, Model Abstract; Appendix E, Data Quality; Appendix F, Estimation methodologies; Appendix G, Matrix Generator documentation; Appendix H, Historical Data Processing; and Appendix I, Biofuels Supply Submodule.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Coal Coal exec summary Executive Summary Assuming no additional constraints on CO2 emissions, coal remains the largest source of electricity generation in the AEO2011 Reference case because of continued reliance on existing coal-fired plants. EIA projects few new central-station coal-fired power plants, however, beyond those already under construction or supported by clean coal incentives. Generation from coal increases by 25 percent from 2009 to 2035, largely as a result of increased use of existing capacity; however, its share of the total generation mix falls from 45 percent to 43 percent as a result of more rapid increases in generation from natural gas and renewables over the same period. See more Mkt trends Market Trends U.S. coal production declined by 2.3 quadrillion Btu in 2009. In the

442

Probability-Weighted LMP and RCP for Day-Ahead Energy Markets using Stochastic Security-Constrained Unit Commitment: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Variable renewable generation resources are increasing their penetration on electric power grids. These resources have weather-driven fuel sources that vary on different time scales and are difficult to predict in advance. These characteristics create challenges for system operators managing the load balance on different timescales. Research is looking into new operational techniques and strategies that show great promise on facilitating greater integration of variable resources. Stochastic Security-Constrained Unit Commitment models are one strategy that has been discussed in literature and shows great benefit. However, it is rarely used outside the research community due to its computational limits and difficulties integrating with electricity markets. This paper discusses how it can be integrated into day-ahead energy markets and especially on what pricing schemes should be used to ensure an efficient and fair market.

Ela, E.; O'Malley, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Winning in electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

Should you be a buyer or a seller of generation? In general, spot buyers should do very well, while many generation owners will be fortunate to recover their stranded costs. Successful generators will capitalize on superior operating performance and market knowledge. The smartest natural gas strategy in the early 1980`s was to short natural gas. Will this lesson of restructuring be written again of the electricity generation business of the late 1990`s? The authors will examine whether and how winners might emerge in the generation business of the future. The U.S. electric generation market, already marked by intense competition for new capacity and industrial demand, will become even more competitive as it makes the transition from regulated local monopoly to marketbased commodity pricing. At risk is up to $150 billion of shareholder equity and the future viability of half of the country`s investor-owned utilities. The winners in year 2005 will be those who early on developed strategies that simultaneously recovered existing generation investments while restructuring their asset portfolios and repositioning their plants to compete in the new market. Losers will have spent the time mired in indecision, their strategies ultimately forced upon them by regulators or competitors.

Hashimoto, L. [McKinsey & Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Jansen, P. [McKinsey & Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., San Francisco, CA (United States); Geyn, G. van [McKinsey & Co., Toronto (Canada)] [McKinsey & Co., Toronto (Canada)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Market Transformation Fact Sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transformation Market Transformation is based on the concept that federal support can catalyze a market to achieve economic and environmental benefits that can reduce costs through economies of scale. Adoption of fuel cells in emerging markets expands the growth of green jobs, with new opportunities in manufacturing, fuel cell maintenance and support systems, and domestic hydrogen fuel production and delivery. By providing reliable field operations data and increasing user confidence, early market deployments help overcome non-technical challenges like developing appropriate safety codes and standards and reducing high insurance costs. Strategies Market Transformation's primary goal is to accelerate the expansion of hydrogen and fuel cell use by lowering the life

445

Collusion MARKET PERFORMANCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advocates of deregulating electricity markets claimed that allowing competition would benefit consumers by increasing efficiency and reducing costs. They viewed electricity as a commodity much like any other, and overlooked the ways in which electricity’s many distinct features hinder the development of competitive market structures. While competitive features were introduced into electricity markets in the last 10 years, the necessary elements for the market structure of competition—large number of sellers, ease of entry, and transparency of information—are still not in place. 1 This bibliography was prepared as an addendum to the 2006 Performance Review of Electric Power Markets

Kenneth Rose, Ph.D.; Karl Meeusen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Market, Legislation Make Wind an Attractive Investment in Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This brochure, part of the SEP Stellar Projects series, covers development of wind energy in Texas due to favorable legislation and public policy and favorable market forces. Those odd shaped structures popping up out in West Texas aren't funny looking oil rigs and they're not genetically altered cotton plants. They're wind turbines, an old technology with a 21st century update. Once too expensive for commercial production, the addition of computers to wind turbines and the rise in fossil fuel prices has brought the cost of wind-generated electricity in line with other power sources. A push by the 1999 Legislature to restructure the retail electric power market put in place rules that encourage wind generation. One rule requires Texas utilities to get an additional 2,000 megawatts of their power from renewable resources such as wind and solar power by 2009. Rules easing the cost of transmitting electricity from remote areas also aid the development of wind farms in West Texas.

Not Available

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

PLASMA GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

Foster, J.S. Jr.

1958-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

448

An algorithmic game theory study of wholesale electricity markets based on central auction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deregulation of the electricity markets produced significant economic benefits. Improving their efficiency is a prominent scientific challenge. We focus on wholesale electricity markets, in which generators sell electricity to a public agency by ...

Sofia Ceppi; Nicola Gatti

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

The portfolio diversification value of nuclear power in liberalized electricity markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The key difference between a regulated and a liberalized electricity market is the establishment of a competitive generation marketplace via spot markets, day-ahead auctions, and over-the-counter trading activity. In a ...

Bean, Malcolm (Malcolm K.)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

An order flow model and a liquidity measure of financial markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The thesis seeks a better understanding of liquidity generation process of financial markets and attempts to find a quantitative measure of market liquidity. Various statistical modeling techniques are introduced to model ...

Kim, Adlar Jeewook

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

District heating and cooling market assessment  

SciTech Connect

For more than 10 years, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has supported research on and development of district steam, hot-water, and chilled-water systems in the residential and commercial sectors. In 1991, DOE sponsored a research project at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to reestimate the national market for district heating and cooling (DHC) systems to the year 2010. ANL had previously developed a DHC market-penetration model and used it to project future market penetration. The first step in the project was to conduct a literature search to identify major data sources on historical DHC markets and any past studies on the future market potential of DHC systems. On the basis of an evaluation of the available data and methodologies for estimating market penetration of new technologies, it was concluded that ANL should develop a new econometric model for forecasting DHC markets. By using the 1989 DOE/Energy Information Administration Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Surveys (CBECS) public-use-tape data, a model was estimated for steam, hot-water, and chilled-water demand in the buildings surveyed. The model provides estimates of building steam, hot-water, and chilled-water consumption and expenditures between now and the year 2010. The analysis shows that the total U.S. market for district steam, hot water, and chilled water could grow from 0.8 quadrillion British thermal units (quad) in 1989 to 1.0 quad by 2000 and 1.25 quad by 2010. The demand for chilled water could nearly double in the forecast period, and its share could approach one-third of the total DHC market. This model, and the results, should be of use to policymakers, researchers, and market participants involved in the planning and implementation of community-based, energy-conserving, and environmentally beneficial energy systems.

Teotia, A.P.S.; Karvelas, D.E.; Daniels, E.J.; Anderson, J.L.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Green Functions For Wave Propagation on a 5D manifold and the Associated Gauge Fields Generated by a Uniformly Moving Point Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gauge fields associated with the manifestly covariant dynamics of particles in (3,1) spacetime are five-dimensional. We provide solutions of the classical 5D gauge field equations in both (4,1) and (3,2) flat spacetime metrics for the simple example of a uniformly moving point source. Green functions for the 5D field equations are obtained, which are consistent with the solutions for uniform motion obtained directly from the field equations with free asymptotic conditions.

I. Aharonovich; L. P. Horwitz

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Missouri as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

454

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Michigan)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Michigan as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

455

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Minnesota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Minnesota as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

456

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Arkansas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Arkansas as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

457

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Wisconsin)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Wisconsin as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

458

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Pennsylvania)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Pennsylvania as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

459

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Maryland as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

460

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Montana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Montana as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generator source market" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Louisiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Louisiana as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

462

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Mississippi)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Mississippi as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

463

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Nebraska)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Nebraska as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

464

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Texas)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Texas as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific...

465

Bank Security Prices and Market Discipline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, policymakers and bank regulators have been warming up to the idea of leveraging market forces to enhance banking supervision.This is partly motivated by the growing complexity of large banking organizations and by concerns about limiting the cost of bank supervision as well as avoiding unduly extending the bank safety net (see Kwan 2002). In order for market discipline to work, the market prices of banking securities must contain accurate and timely information about bank risk. Researchers in banking have been studying this issue for quite some time.This Economic Letter reviews the empirical evidence on the informativeness of bank security prices, focusing on the two most obvious sources of market information—stock and

unknown authors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Internal split field generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

Thundat; ,Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

467

Generative model transformer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Generative Model Transformer (GMT) project is an Open Source initiative to build a Model Driven Architecure™ tool that allows fully customisable Platform Independent Models, Platform Description Models, Texture Mappings, and Refinement Transformations. ... Keywords: QVT, domain-specific languages, generative model transformer (GMT), model driven architecture (MDA), model transformation, open source

Jorn Bettin; Ghica van Emde Boas

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Optimal operational strategies for a day-ahead electricity market in the presence of market power using multi-objective evolutionary algorithm.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation introduces a novel approach for optimally operating a day-ahead electricity market not only by economically dispatching the generation resources but also by minimizing… (more)

Rodrigo, Deepal

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Hanbury Brown-Ttiss Correlation Functions from Event Generators: A Reliable Approach to Determine the Size of the Emitting Source in Ultrarelativistic Heavy Ion Collisions?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Employing NEXUS, one of the most recent simulation programs for heavy ions collisions, we investigate in detail the Hanbury-Twiss correlation function for charged pions for reactions 158 GeV Pb+Pb. For this study we supplement the standard simulation program by electromagnetic interactions. We find that the string fragmentation introduces strong space-momentum correlations and the freeze out times of the correlated pairs have a wide distribution. Both has a strong influence on the apparent source radius determined from the measured correlation correlation function.An equally strong influence is observed for the final state electromagnetic interaction.

F. Gastineau; J. Aichelin

2000-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

470

Introduction slide 2 Biofuels and Algae Markets, Systems,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biofuels Targets Federal RFS ­ 36 billion gallons by 2022 21 Billion Gallons from Advanced Biofuels US'S BIODIESEL MARKET OVERVIEW #12;SOURCE - BIODIESEL 2020: A GLOBAL MARKET SURVEY China's Biofuels Targets · 2010 - to increase biofuels production to nearly 4 million MT by 2010 · 2020 - target to replace 15

471

FESAC White Paper Path to Market for Compact Systems July 2012 The Path to Market for Compact Modular Fusion Power Cores1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FESAC White Paper Path to Market for Compact Systems July 2012 The Path to Market for Compact of Representatives (2010) #12;FESAC White Paper Path to Market for Compact Systems July 2012 (TRL) of a technology) distributed power generation. These units can be added to existing facilities when and where needed, or phased

472

Managing electricity reliability risk through the futures markets  

SciTech Connect

In competitive electricity markets, the vertically integrated utilities that were responsible for ensuring system reliability in their own service territories, or groups of territories, often cease to exist. Typically, the burden falls to an independent system operator (ISO) to insure that enough ancillary services (AS) are available for safe, stable, and reliable operation of the grid, typically defined, in part, as compliance with officially approved engineering specifications for minimum levels of AS. In order to characterize the behavior of market participants (generators, retailers, and an ISO) in a competitive electricity market with reliability requirements, we model a spot market for electricity and futures markets for both electricity and AS. By assuming that each participant seeks to maximize its expected utility of wealth and that all markets clear, we solve for the optional quantities of electricity and AS traded in each market by all participants, as well as the corresponding market-clearing prices. We show that future prices for both electricity and AS depend on expectations of the spot price, statistical aspects of system demand, and production cost parameters. More important, our model captures the fact that electricity and AS are substitute products for the generators, implying that anticipated changes in the spot market will affect the equilibrium futures positions of both electricity and AS. We apply our model to the California electricity and AS markets to test its viability.

Siddiqui, Afzal S.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Using Forward Markets to Improve Electricity Market Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forward markets, both medium term and long term, complement the spot market for wholesale electricity. The forward markets reduce risk, mitigate market power, and coordinate new investment. In the medium term, a forward energy market lets suppliers and demanders lock in energy prices and quantities for one to three years. In the long term, a forward reliability market assures adequate resources are available when they are needed most. The forward markets reduce risk for both sides of the market, since they reduce the quantity of energy that trades at the more volatile spot price. Spot market power is mitigated by putting suppliers and demanders in a more balanced position at the time of the spot market. The markets also reduce transaction costs and improve liquidity and transparency. Recent innovations to the Colombia market illustrate the basic elements of the forward markets and their beneficial role. 1

Lawrence M. Ausubel; Peter Cramton

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Derived enriched uranium market  

SciTech Connect

The potential impact on the uranium market of highly enriched uranium from nuclear weapons dismantling in the Russian Federation and the USA is analyzed. Uranium supply, conversion, and enrichment factors are outlined for each country; inventories are also listed. The enrichment component and conversion components are expected to cause little disruption to uranium markets. The uranium component of Russian derived enriched uranium hexafluoride is unresolved; US legislation places constraints on its introduction into the US market.

Rutkowski, E.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

source | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 17, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into marketed renewable energy, residential, commercial, industrial, transportation and electric power. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Commercial Electric Power Industrial Renewable Energy Consumption Residential sector source transportation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Consumption by Sector and Source- Reference Case (xls, 105 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

476

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Kansas) Kansas) Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Developer Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Kansas as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance

477

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (New York) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New York) New York) Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (New York) < Back Eligibility Developer Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State New York Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in New York as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance

478

Qualifying RPS Market States (Nova Scotia, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nova Scotia, Canada) Nova Scotia, Canada) Qualifying RPS Market States (Nova Scotia, Canada) < Back Eligibility Developer Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Nova Scotia Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals This entry lists the states with RPS policies that accept generation located in Nova Scotia, Canada as eligible sources towards their Renewable Portfolio Standard targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance

479

Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Maine) Maine) Qualifying RPS State Export Markets (Maine) < Back Eligibility Developer Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Maine Program Type Renewables Portfolio Standards and Goals This entry lists the states with Renewable Portfolio Standard (RPS) policies that accept generation located in Maine as eligible sources towards their RPS targets or goals. For specific information with regard to eligible technologies or other restrictions which may vary by state, see the RPS policy entries for the individual states, shown below in the Authority listings. Typically energy must be delivered to an in-state utility or Load Serving Entity, and often only a portion of compliance

480

Qualifying RPS Market States (Prince Edward Island, Canada) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Prince Edward Island, Canada) Prince Edward Island, Canada) Qualifying RPS Market States (Prince Edward Island, Canada) < Back Eligibility Developer Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Prince Edward Isl