National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for generator response models

  1. Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wang, Zhiguo; Prange, Micah P.; Wu, Dangxin

    2014-12-01

    This Final Report presents work carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators” (Project number: PL10-Scin-theor-PD2Jf) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project was divided into four tasks: 1) Electronic response functions (ab initio data model) 2) Electron-hole yield, variance, and spatial distribution 3) Ab initio calculations of information carrier properties 4) Transport of electron-hole pairs and scintillation efficiency Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the four tasks is provided in this Final Report. Furthermore, published peer-reviewed articles based on the work carried under this project are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  2. Next Generation Calibration Models with Dimensional Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Calibration Models with Dimensional Modeling Next Generation Calibration Models with ... Calibration Optimization for Next Generation Diesel Engines An Accelerated Aging ...

  3. SPECTRA: A subroutine for response spectra generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, D.B.

    1991-11-01

    A simple Fortran subroutine for generation of response spectra has been written and implemented on a Sun Sparc2 workstation. The routine generates absolute acceleration spectra, relative velocity spectra and relative displacement spectra for a given input acceleration time history. The subroutine will automatically set the period (i.e. the abscissa values of the spectra) at which spectral quantities are determined, and the user can select one of three options for determining the period values: Periods correspond to the periods utilized by the California Department of Mines and Geology strong motion instrumentation program (CSMIP) in generating the spectra which they distribute; periods correspond to the periods suggested by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures and Commentary on Standard for Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures'' (ASCE 4-86) for in-structure spectra; periods correspond closely to the periods utilized by CSMIP, but a higher density of periods are utilized, resulting in a very high resolution spectra. To enable the use of the subroutine on any platform, simplicity has been maintained in the Fortran coding of the subroutine. The methodology utilized in generating the spectra, a discussion of the limitations of the spectra in the high frequency regime, and a listing of the subroutine are included in this report.

  4. SPECTRA: A subroutine for response spectra generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, D.B.

    1991-11-01

    A simple Fortran subroutine for generation of response spectra has been written and implemented on a Sun Sparc2 workstation. The routine generates absolute acceleration spectra, relative velocity spectra and relative displacement spectra for a given input acceleration time history. The subroutine will automatically set the period (i.e. the abscissa values of the spectra) at which spectral quantities are determined, and the user can select one of three options for determining the period values: Periods correspond to the periods utilized by the California Department of Mines and Geology strong motion instrumentation program (CSMIP) in generating the spectra which they distribute; periods correspond to the periods suggested by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) ``Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures and Commentary on Standard for Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures`` (ASCE 4-86) for in-structure spectra; periods correspond closely to the periods utilized by CSMIP, but a higher density of periods are utilized, resulting in a very high resolution spectra. To enable the use of the subroutine on any platform, simplicity has been maintained in the Fortran coding of the subroutine. The methodology utilized in generating the spectra, a discussion of the limitations of the spectra in the high frequency regime, and a listing of the subroutine are included in this report.

  5. Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-04-25

    The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GENSIM) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration ofmore » a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercury. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emission trade-offs. The base case results using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8 cents/kwhr.« less

  6. Current responsive devices for synchronous generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karlicek, Robert F.

    1983-01-01

    A device for detecting current imbalance between phases of a polyphase alternating current generator. A detector responds to the maximum peak current in the generator, and detecting means generates an output for each phase proportional to the peak current of each phase. Comparing means generates an output when the maximum peak current exceeds the phase peak current.

  7. Current responsive devices for synchronous generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karlicek, R.F.

    1983-09-27

    A device for detecting current imbalance between phases of a polyphase alternating current generator. A detector responds to the maximum peak current in the generator, and detecting means generates an output for each phase proportional to the peak current of each phase. Comparing means generates an output when the maximum peak current exceeds the phase peak current. 11 figs.

  8. Taxonomy for Modeling Demand Response Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olsen, Daniel; Kiliccote, Sila; Sohn, Michael; Dunn, Laura; Piette, Mary, A

    2014-08-01

    Demand response resources are an important component of modern grid management strategies. Accurate characterizations of DR resources are needed to develop systems of optimally managed grid operations and to plan future investments in generation, transmission, and distribution. The DOE Demand Response and Energy Storage Integration Study (DRESIS) project researched the degree to which demand response (DR) and energy storage can provide grid flexibility and stability in the Western Interconnection. In this work, DR resources were integrated with traditional generators in grid forecasting tools, specifically a production cost model of the Western Interconnection. As part of this study, LBNL developed a modeling framework for characterizing resource availability and response attributes of DR resources consistent with the governing architecture of the simulation modeling platform. In this report, we identify and describe the following response attributes required to accurately characterize DR resources: allowable response frequency, maximum response duration, minimum time needed to achieve load changes, necessary pre- or re-charging of integrated energy storage, costs of enablement, magnitude of controlled resources, and alignment of availability. We describe a framework for modeling these response attributes, and apply this framework to characterize 13 DR resources including residential, commercial, and industrial end-uses. We group these end-uses into three broad categories based on their response capabilities, and define a taxonomy for classifying DR resources within these categories. The three categories of resources exhibit different capabilities and differ in value to the grid. Results from the production cost model of the Western Interconnection illustrate that minor differences in resource attributes can have significant impact on grid utilization of DR resources. The implications of these findings will be explored in future DR valuation studies.

  9. Generation and Transmission Maximization Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2001-04-05

    GTMax was developed to study complex marketing and system operational issues facing electric utility power systems. The model maximizes the value of the electric system taking into account not only a single system''s limited energy and transmission resources but also firm contracts, independent power producer (IPP) agreements, and bulk power transaction opportunities on the spot market. GTMax maximizes net revenues of power systems by finding a solution that increases income while keeping expenses at amore » minimum. It does this while ensuring that market transactions and system operations are within the physical and institutional limitations of the power system. When multiple systems are simulated, GTMax identifies utilities that can successfully compete on the market by tracking hourly energy transactions, costs, and revenues. Some limitations that are modeled are power plant seasonal capabilities and terms specified in firm and IPP contracts. GTMax also considers detaile operational limitations such as power plant ramp rates and hydropower reservoir constraints.« less

  10. Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 2: Modeling Demand Response in a Production Cost Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renewable integration studies have evaluated many challenges associated with deploying large amounts of variable wind and solar generation technologies. These studies can evaluate operational impacts associated with variable generation, benefits of improved wind and solar resource forecasting, and trade-offs between institutional changes, including increasing balancing area cooperation and technical changes such as installing new flexible generation. Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility and can aid in integrating variable generation; however, integration analyses have not yet incorporated these resources explicitly into grid simulation models as part of a standard toolkit for resource planners.

  11. NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Generator Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generator Modeling Renewable power plants (RPPs) are different from conventional power plants (CPPs) in several ways. While a 300-megawatt (MW) CPP may consist of one or two large generators (e.g., two 150-MW synchronous generators), an RPP may consist of hundreds of 1.5-MW solar photovoltaic (PV) inverters or wind turbine generators. In addition, many RPPs have a power-electronics-based interface with the grid; thus, the time constant of a RPP system is a lot faster than that of the

  12. Modeling a Helical-coil Steam Generator in RELAP5-3D for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan V. Hoffer; Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan A. Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Options for the primary heat transport loop heat exchangers for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant are currently being evaluated. A helical-coil steam generator is one heat exchanger design under consideration. Safety is an integral part of the helical-coil steam generator evaluation. Transient analysis plays a key role in evaluation of the steam generators safety. Using RELAP5-3D to model the helical-coil steam generator, a loss of pressure in the primary side of the steam generator is simulated. This report details the development of the steam generator model, the loss of pressure transient, and the response of the steam generator primary and secondary systems to the loss of primary pressure. Back ground on High Temperature Gas-cooled reactors, steam generators, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant is provided to increase the readers understanding of the material presented.

  13. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines You are accessing ...

  14. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines This study ...

  15. New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Agency...

  16. Building a next-generation community ice sheet model: meeting...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Building a next-generation community ice sheet model: meeting summary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Building a next-generation community ice sheet ...

  17. Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation Diesel Engines Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine...

  18. Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling methodology, projected market penetration, and impact of distributed generation with respect to offsetting future electricity needs and carbon dioxide emissions in the residential and commercial buildings sector in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) reference case.

  19. Aeras: A next generation global atmosphere model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spotz, William F.; Smith, Thomas M.; Demeshko, Irina P.; Fike, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing a new global atmosphere model named Aeras that is performance portable and supports the quantification of uncertainties. These next-generation capabilities are enabled by building Aeras on top of Albany, a code base that supports the rapid development of scientific application codes while leveraging Sandia's foundational mathematics and computer science packages in Trilinos and Dakota. Embedded uncertainty quantification (UQ) is an original design capability of Albany, and performance portability is a recent upgrade. Other required features, such as shell-type elements, spectral elements, efficient explicit and semi-implicit time-stepping, transient sensitivity analysis, and concurrent ensembles, were not components of Albany as the project began, and have been (or are being) added by the Aeras team. We present early UQ and performance portability results for the shallow water equations.

  20. Aeras: A next generation global atmosphere model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Spotz, William F.; Smith, Thomas M.; Demeshko, Irina P.; Fike, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing a new global atmosphere model named Aeras that is performance portable and supports the quantification of uncertainties. These next-generation capabilities are enabled by building Aeras on top of Albany, a code base that supports the rapid development of scientific application codes while leveraging Sandia's foundational mathematics and computer science packages in Trilinos and Dakota. Embedded uncertainty quantification (UQ) is an original design capability of Albany, and performance portability is a recent upgrade. Other required features, such as shell-type elements, spectral elements, efficient explicit and semi-implicit time-stepping, transient sensitivity analysis, and concurrent ensembles, were not componentsmore » of Albany as the project began, and have been (or are being) added by the Aeras team. We present early UQ and performance portability results for the shallow water equations.« less

  1. Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

    2014-04-14

    Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

  2. Modeling Distributed Generation in the Buildings Sectors

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01

    This report focuses on how the Energy Information Administrationmodels residential and commercial sector distributed generation, including combined heat and power, for the Annual Energy Outlook.

  3. Electric Water Heater Modeling and Control Strategies for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Samaan, Nader A.

    2012-07-22

    Abstract Demand response (DR) has a great potential to provide balancing services at normal operating conditions and emergency support when a power system is subject to disturbances. Effective control strategies can significantly relieve the balancing burden of conventional generators and reduce investment on generation and transmission expansion. This paper is aimed at modeling electric water heaters (EWH) in households and tests their response to control strategies to implement DR. The open-loop response of EWH to a centralized signal is studied by adjusting temperature settings to provide regulation services; and two types of decentralized controllers are tested to provide frequency support following generator trips. EWH models are included in a simulation platform in DIgSILENT to perform electromechanical simulation, which contains 147 households in a distribution feeder. Simulation results show the dependence of EWH response on water heater usage . These results provide insight suggestions on the need of control strategies to achieve better performance for demand response implementation. Index Terms Centralized control, decentralized control, demand response, electrical water heater, smart grid

  4. Power System Generation and Inter-Connection Planning Model ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation and Inter-Connection Planning Model (SUPER) AgencyCompany Organization: Latin American Energy Organization Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Hydro...

  5. Distributed generation capabilities of the national energy modeling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-01-01

    This report describes Berkeley Lab's exploration of how the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) models distributed generation (DG) and presents possible approaches for improving how DG is modeled. The on-site electric generation capability has been available since the AEO2000 version of NEMS. Berkeley Lab has previously completed research on distributed energy resources (DER) adoption at individual sites and has developed a DER Customer Adoption Model called DER-CAM. Given interest in this area, Berkeley Lab set out to understand how NEMS models small-scale on-site generation to assess how adequately DG is treated in NEMS, and to propose improvements or alternatives. The goal is to determine how well NEMS models the factors influencing DG adoption and to consider alternatives to the current approach. Most small-scale DG adoption takes place in the residential and commercial modules of NEMS. Investment in DG ultimately offsets purchases of electricity, which also eliminates the losses associated with transmission and distribution (T&D). If the DG technology that is chosen is photovoltaics (PV), NEMS assumes renewable energy consumption replaces the energy input to electric generators. If the DG technology is fuel consuming, consumption of fuel in the electric utility sector is replaced by residential or commercial fuel consumption. The waste heat generated from thermal technologies can be used to offset the water heating and space heating energy uses, but there is no thermally activated cooling capability. This study consists of a review of model documentation and a paper by EIA staff, a series of sensitivity runs performed by Berkeley Lab that exercise selected DG parameters in the AEO2002 version of NEMS, and a scoping effort of possible enhancements and alternatives to NEMS current DG capabilities. In general, the treatment of DG in NEMS is rudimentary. The penetration of DG is determined by an economic cash-flow analysis that determines adoption based on the n umber of years to a positive cash flow. Some important technologies, e.g. thermally activated cooling, are absent, and ceilings on DG adoption are determined by some what arbitrary caps on the number of buildings that can adopt DG. These caps are particularly severe for existing buildings, where the maximum penetration for any one technology is 0.25 percent. On the other hand, competition among technologies is not fully considered, and this may result in double-counting for certain applications. A series of sensitivity runs show greater penetration with net metering enhancements and aggressive tax credits and a more limited response to lowered DG technology costs. Discussion of alternatives to the current code is presented in Section 4. Alternatives or improvements to how DG is modeled in NEMS cover three basic areas: expanding on the existing total market for DG both by changing existing parameters in NEMS and by adding new capabilities, such as for missing technologies; enhancing the cash flow analysis but incorporating aspects of DG economics that are not currently represented, e.g. complex tariffs; and using an external geographic information system (GIS) driven analysis that can better and more intuitively identify niche markets.

  6. Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Fuel Efficient, Low Emissions Diesel Engines | Department of Energy Fully model-based, practically-mapless engine control concept is viable PDF icon deer09_allain.pdf More Documents & Publications Increased Engine Efficiency via Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems Integration of Control System Components for Optimum Engine Response Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation Diesel Engines

  7. Transient Stability and Frequency Response of the US Western Interconnection under conditions of High Wind and Solar Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, Kara; Miller, Nicholas W.; Shao, Miaolei; Pajic, Slobodan; D'Aquila, Robert

    2015-04-15

    Adding large amounts of wind and solar generation to bulk power systems that are traditionally subject to operating constraints set by transient stability and frequency response limitations is the subject of considerable concern in the industry. The US Western Interconnection (WI) is expected to experience substantial additional growth in both wind and solar generation. These plants will, to some extent, displace large central station thermal generation, both coal and gas-fired, which have traditionally helped maintain stability. Our paper reports the results of a study that investigated the transient stability and frequency response of the WI with high penetrations of wind and solar generation. Moreover, the main goals of this work were to (1) create a realistic, baseline model of the WI, (2) test selected transient stability and frequency events, (3) investigate the impact of large amounts of wind and solar generation, and (4) examine means to improve performance.

  8. Technical Manual for the SAM Biomass Power Generation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgenson, J.; Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

    2011-09-01

    This technical manual provides context for the implementation of the biomass electric power generation performance model in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). Additionally, the report details the engineering and scientific principles behind the underlying calculations in the model. The framework established in this manual is designed to give users a complete understanding of behind-the-scenes calculations and the results generated.

  9. DOE Project Taps HPC for Next-Generation Climate Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE Project Taps HPC for Next-Generation Climate Modeling DOE Project Taps HPC for Next-Generation Climate Modeling Berkeley Lab, NERSC to help accelerate development of state-of-the-science Earth system models August 25, 2014 Contact: Dan Krotz 510-486-4019 billcollins.jpg Bill Collins, ACME's Chief Scientist and head of the Earth Sciences Division's Climate Sciences Department at Berkeley Lab. Image: Roy Kaltschmidt High performance computing (HPC) will be used to develop and apply the most

  10. Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident This Transportation Emergency...

  11. Modeling and simulation of consumer response to dynamic pricing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenzuela, J.; Thimmapuram, P.; Kim, J (Decision and Information Sciences); (Auburn Univ.)

    2012-08-01

    Assessing the impacts of dynamic-pricing under the smart grid concept is becoming extremely important for deciding its full deployment. In this paper, we develop a model that represents the response of consumers to dynamic pricing. In the model, consumers use forecasted day-ahead prices to shift daily energy consumption from hours when the price is expected to be high to hours when the price is expected to be low while maintaining the total energy consumption as unchanged. We integrate the consumer response model into the Electricity Market Complex Adaptive System (EMCAS). EMCAS is an agent-based model that simulates restructured electricity markets. We explore the impacts of dynamic-pricing on price spikes, peak demand, consumer energy bills, power supplier profits, and congestion costs. A simulation of an 11-node test network that includes eight generation companies and five aggregated consumers is performed for a period of 1 month. In addition, we simulate the Korean power system.

  12. NREL: dGen: Distributed Generation Market Demand Model - Documentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Documentation The Distributed Generation Market Demand (dGen) model documentation summarizes the default data inputs and assumptions for the model. Input data for the model are regularly updated and include recent EIA Annual Energy Outlook projections, state-level net metering and incentive policies, and utility-level retail electricity rates. Note that the dGen model builds on, extends, and provides significant advances over NREL's deprecated SolarDS model. Documentation Outline Introduction

  13. Aggregate Model for Heterogeneous Thermostatically Controlled Loads with Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Kalsi, Karanjit; Fuller, Jason C.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Chassin, David P.

    2012-07-22

    Due to the potentially large number of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) demand response, distributed generation, distributed storage - that are expected to be deployed, it is impractical to use detailed models of these resources when integrated with the transmission system. Being able to accurately estimate the fast transients caused by demand response is especially important to analyze the stability of the system under different demand response strategies. On the other hand, a less complex model is more amenable to design feedback control strategies for the population of devices to provide ancillary services. The main contribution of this paper is to develop aggregated models for a heterogeneous population of Thermostatic Controlled Loads (TCLs) to accurately capture their collective behavior under demand response and other time varying effects of the system. The aggregated model efficiently includes statistical information of the population and accounts for a second order effect necessary to accurately capture the collective dynamic behavior. The developed aggregated models are validated against simulations of thousands of detailed building models using GridLAB-D (an open source distribution simulation software) under both steady state and severe dynamic conditions caused due to temperature set point changes.

  14. Predictive Models for Target Response During Penetration (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Predictive Models for Target Response During Penetration Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Predictive Models for Target Response During Penetration You are accessing a...

  15. System level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Uses a model to predict and analyze the system-level performance of a thermoelectric generator in terms of the power output and the power density at the element, module and ...

  16. Value of Demand Response: Quantities from Production Cost Modeling (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.

    2014-04-01

    Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility particularly on future systems with high penetrations of variable wind and solar power generation. However, managed loads in grid models are limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the value of co-optimized DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model. There are significant variations in the availabilities of different types of DR resources, which affect both the operational savings as well as the revenue for each DR resource. The results presented include the system-wide avoided fuel and generator start-up costs as well as the composite revenue for each DR resource by energy and operating reserves. In addition, the revenue is characterized by the capacity, energy, and units of DR enabled.

  17. Modeling the mechanical response of PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragaswamy, Partha; Lewis, Matthew W; Liu, Cheng; Thompson, Darla G

    2010-01-01

    An engineering overview of the mechanical response of Plastic-Bonded eXplosives (PBXs), specifically PBX 9501, will be provided with emphasis on observed mechanisms associated with different types of mechanical testing. Mechanical tests in the form of uniaxial tension, compression, cyclic loading, creep (compression and tension), and Hopkinson bar show strain rate and temperature dependence. A range of mechanical behavior is observed which includes small strain recoverable response in the form of viscoelasticity; change in stiffness and softening beyond peak strength due to damage in the form microcracks, debonding, void formation and the growth of existing voids; inelastic response in the form of irrecoverable strain as shown in cyclic tests, and viscoelastic creep combined with plastic response as demonstrated in creep and recovery tests. The main focus of this paper is to elucidate the challenges and issues involved in modeling the mechanical behavior of PBXs for simulating thermo-mechanical responses in engineering components. Examples of validation of a constitutive material model based on a few of the observed mechanisms will be demonstrated against three point bending, split Hopkinson pressure bar and Brazilian disk geometry.

  18. Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportati...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents This part should...

  19. System level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Uses a model to predict and analyze the system-level performance of a thermoelectric generator in terms of the power output and the power density … at the element, module and system-level and for a wide range of operating conditions.

  20. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidball, Rick; Bluestein, Joel; Rodriguez, Nick; Knoke, Stu

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

  1. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Electricity Generation and Fuel Consumption Models

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Model Documentation: Electricity Generation and Fuel Consumption Models January 2014 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | STEO Model Documentation: Electricity Generation and Fuel Consumption Models i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts

  2. Grid System Planning for Wind: Wind Generator Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    System Planning for Wind: Wind Generator Modeling - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste

  3. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 *

  4. NREL: dGen: Distributed Generation Market Demand Model - Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Publications The following are publications-including technical reports, journal articles, conference papers, and posters-focusing on the Distributed Generation Market Demand Model (dGen) and its predecessor, the Solar Deployment System (SolarDS) model. Cole, Wesley, Haley Lewis, Ben Sigrin, and Robert Margolis. 2016. "Interactions of rooftop PV deployment with the capacity expansion of the bulk power system." Applied Energy 168 (April 2016) 473-81. doi:10.1016/j.apenergy.2016.02.004

  5. Diagnostic and Prognostic Models for Generator Step-Up Transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J. Lybeck; Binh T. Pham

    2014-09-01

    In 2014, the online monitoring (OLM) of active components project under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) focused on diagnostic and prognostic capabilities for generator step-up transformers. INL worked with subject matter experts from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to augment and revise the GSU fault signatures previously implemented in the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software. Two prognostic models were identified and implemented for GSUs in the FW-PHM Suite software. INL and EPRI demonstrated the use of prognostic capabilities for GSUs. The complete set of fault signatures developed for GSUs in the Asset Fault Signature Database of the FW-PHM Suite for GSUs is presented in this report. Two prognostic models are described for paper insulation: the Chendong model for degree of polymerization, and an IEEE model that uses a loading profile to calculates life consumption based on hot spot winding temperatures. Both models are life consumption models, which are examples of type II prognostic models. Use of the models in the FW-PHM Suite was successfully demonstrated at the 2014 August Utility Working Group Meeting, Idaho Falls, Idaho, to representatives from different utilities, EPRI, and the Halden Research Project.

  6. Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste heat recovery applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Model developed provides effective guidelines to designing thermoelectric generation systems for automotive waste heat recovery applications

  7. Gravitational-wave generation in hybrid quintessential inflationary models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sa, Paulo M.; Henriques, Alfredo B.

    2010-06-15

    We investigate the generation of gravitational waves in the hybrid quintessential inflationary model. The full gravitational-wave energy spectrum is calculated using the method of continuous Bogoliubov coefficients. The postinflationary kination period, characteristic of quintessential inflationary models, leaves a clear signature on the spectrum, namely, a peak at high frequencies. The maximum of the peak is firmly located at the megahertz-gigahertz region of the spectrum and corresponds to {Omega}{sub GW{approx_equal}}10{sup -12}. This peak is substantially smaller than the one appearing in the gravitational-wave energy spectrum of the original quintessential inflationary model, therefore avoiding any conflict with the nucleosynthesis constraint on {Omega}{sub GW}.

  8. The generation of shared cryptographic keys through channel impulse response estimation at 60 GHz.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Derek P.; Forman, Michael A.; Dowdle, Donald Ryan

    2010-09-01

    Methods to generate private keys based on wireless channel characteristics have been proposed as an alternative to standard key-management schemes. In this work, we discuss past work in the field and offer a generalized scheme for the generation of private keys using uncorrelated channels in multiple domains. Proposed cognitive enhancements measure channel characteristics, to dynamically change transmission and reception parameters as well as estimate private key randomness and expiration times. Finally, results are presented on the implementation of a system for the generation of private keys for cryptographic communications using channel impulse-response estimation at 60 GHz. The testbed is composed of commercial millimeter-wave VubIQ transceivers, laboratory equipment, and software implemented in MATLAB. Novel cognitive enhancements are demonstrated, using channel estimation to dynamically change system parameters and estimate cryptographic key strength. We show for a complex channel that secret key generation can be accomplished on the order of 100 kb/s.

  9. COMBINED MODELING OF ACCELERATION, TRANSPORT, AND HYDRODYNAMIC RESPONSE IN

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SOLAR FLARES. I. THE NUMERICAL MODEL (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect COMBINED MODELING OF ACCELERATION, TRANSPORT, AND HYDRODYNAMIC RESPONSE IN SOLAR FLARES. I. THE NUMERICAL MODEL Citation Details In-Document Search Title: COMBINED MODELING OF ACCELERATION, TRANSPORT, AND HYDRODYNAMIC RESPONSE IN SOLAR FLARES. I. THE NUMERICAL MODEL Acceleration and transport of high-energy particles and fluid dynamics of atmospheric plasma are interrelated aspects of solar flares, but for convenience

  10. A Model of U.S. Commercial Distributed Generation Adoption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Ryan Firestone; Zhou, Nan; Maribu,Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-10

    Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems over the next two decades. Forecasts of DG adoption published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) are made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. NEMS is also used for estimating the future benefits of Department of Energy research and development used in support of budget requests and management decisionmaking. The NEMS approach to modeling DG has some limitations, including constraints on the amount of DG allowed for retrofits to existing buildings and a small number of possible sizes for each DG technology. An alternative approach called Commercial Sector Model (ComSeM) is developed to improve the way in which DG adoption is modeled. The approach incorporates load shapes for specific end uses in specific building types in specific regions, e.g., cooling in hospitals in Atlanta or space heating in Chicago offices. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) uses these load profiles together with input cost and performance DG technology assumptions to model the potential DG adoption for four selected cities and two sizes of five building types in selected forecast years to 2022. The Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model (DER-MaDiM) is then used to then tailor the DER-CAM results to adoption projections for the entire U.S. commercial sector for all forecast years from 2007-2025. This process is conducted such that the structure of results are consistent with the structure of NEMS, and can be re-injected into NEMS that can then be used to integrate adoption results into a full forecast.

  11. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Mills, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Wiser, Ryan; Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-09-10

    This scoping study focuses on the policy issues inherent in the claims made by some Smart Grid proponents that the demand response potential of mass market customers which is enabled by widespread implementation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) through the Smart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integration issues. In terms of approach, we will: identify key issues associated with integrating large amounts of variable generation into the bulk power system; identify demand response opportunities made more readily available to mass market customers through widespread deployment of AMI systems and how they can affect the bulk power system; assess the extent to which these mass market Demand Response (DR) opportunities can mitigate Variable Generation (VG) integration issues in the near-term and what electricity market structures and regulatory practices could be changed to further expand the ability for DR to mitigate VG integration issues over the long term; and provide a qualitative comparison of DR and other approaches to mitigate VG integration issues.

  12. Integration of MHD load models with circuit representations the Z generator.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Jones, Brent Manley; McBride, Ryan D.; Bailey, James E.; Jones, Michael C.; Gomez, Matthew Robert.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Nakhleh, Charles; Stygar, William A.; Savage, Mark Edward; Wagoner, Timothy C.; Moore, James K.

    2013-03-01

    MHD models of imploding loads fielded on the Z accelerator are typically driven by reduced or simplified circuit representations of the generator. The performance of many of the imploding loads is critically dependent on the current and power delivered to them, so may be strongly influenced by the generators response to their implosion. Current losses diagnosed in the transmission lines approaching the load are further known to limit the energy delivery, while exhibiting some load dependence. Through comparing the convolute performance of a wide variety of short pulse Z loads we parameterize a convolute loss resistance applicable between different experiments. We incorporate this, and other current loss terms into a transmission line representation of the Z vacuum section. We then apply this model to study the current delivery to a wide variety of wire array and MagLif style liner loads.

  13. Analytical thermal model validation for Cassini radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, E.I.

    1997-12-31

    The Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft is designed to rely, without precedent, on the waste heat from its three radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) to warm the propulsion module subsystem, and the RTG end dome temperature is a key determining factor of the amount of waste heat delivered. A previously validated SINDA thermal model of the RTG was the sole guide to understanding its complex thermal behavior, but displayed large discrepancies against some initial thermal development test data. A careful revalidation effort led to significant modifications and adjustments of the model, which result in a doubling of the radiative heat transfer from the heat source support assemblies to the end domes and bring up the end dome and flange temperature predictions to within 2 C of the pertinent test data. The increased inboard end dome temperature has a considerable impact on thermal control of the spacecraft central body. The validation process offers an example of physically-driven analytical model calibration with test data from not only an electrical simulator but also a nuclear-fueled flight unit, and has established the end dome temperatures of a flight RTG where no in-flight or ground-test data existed before.

  14. Comparison of two generation-recombination terms in the Poisson-Nernst-Planck model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lelidis, I.; Barbero, G.; Sfarna, A.

    2012-10-21

    Two phenomenological forms proposed to take into account the generation-recombination phenomenon of ions are investigated. The first form models the phenomenon as a chemical reaction, containing two coefficients describing the dissociation of neutral particles in ions, and the recombination of ions to give neutral particles. The second form is based on the assumption that in thermodynamical equilibrium, a well-defined density of ions is stable. Any deviation from the equilibrium density gives rise to a source term proportional to the deviation, whose phenomenological coefficient plays the role of a life time. The analysis is performed by evaluating the electrical response of an electrolytic cell to an external stimulus for both forms. For simplicity we assume that the electrodes are blocking, that there is only a group of negative and positive ions, and that the negative ions are immobile. For the second form, two cases are considered: (i) the generation-recombination phenomenon is due to an intrinsic mechanism, and (ii) the production of ions is triggered by an external source of energy, as in a solar cell. We show that the predictions of the two models are different at the impedance as well as at the admittance level. In particular, the first model predicts the existence of two plateaux for the real part of the impedance, whereas the second one predicts just one. It follows that impedance spectroscopy measurements could give information on the model valid for the generation-recombination of ions.

  15. Modeling Framework and Validation of a Smart Grid and Demand Response System for Wind Power Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broeer, Torsten; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, David P.; Djilali, Ned

    2014-01-31

    Electricity generation from wind power and other renewable energy sources is increasing, and their variability introduces new challenges to the power system. The emergence of smart grid technologies in recent years has seen a paradigm shift in redefining the electrical system of the future, in which controlled response of the demand side is used to balance fluctuations and intermittencies from the generation side. This paper presents a modeling framework for an integrated electricity system where loads become an additional resource. The agent-based model represents a smart grid power system integrating generators, transmission, distribution, loads and market. The model incorporates generator and load controllers, allowing suppliers and demanders to bid into a Real-Time Pricing (RTP) electricity market. The modeling framework is applied to represent a physical demonstration project conducted on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA, and validation simulations are performed using actual dynamic data. Wind power is then introduced into the power generation mix illustrating the potential of demand response to mitigate the impact of wind power variability, primarily through thermostatically controlled loads. The results also indicate that effective implementation of Demand Response (DR) to assist integration of variable renewable energy resources requires a diversity of loads to ensure functionality of the overall system.

  16. Modeling of Electric Water Heaters for Demand Response: A Baseline PDE Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhijie; Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Lian, Jianming; Zhang, Yu

    2014-09-05

    Demand response (DR)control can effectively relieve balancing and frequency regulation burdens on conventional generators, facilitate integrating more renewable energy, and reduce generation and transmission investments needed to meet peak demands. Electric water heaters (EWHs) have a great potential in implementing DR control strategies because: (a) the EWH power consumption has a high correlation with daily load patterns; (b) they constitute a significant percentage of domestic electrical load; (c) the heating element is a resistor, without reactive power consumption; and (d) they can be used as energy storage devices when needed. Accurately modeling the dynamic behavior of EWHs is essential for designing DR controls. Various water heater models, simplified to different extents, were published in the literature; however, few of them were validated against field measurements, which may result in inaccuracy when implementing DR controls. In this paper, a partial differential equation physics-based model, developed to capture detailed temperature profiles at different tank locations, is validated against field test data for more than 10 days. The developed model shows very good performance in capturing water thermal dynamics for benchmark testing purposes

  17. Response of Simple, Model Systems to Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ewing, Rodney C.; Lang, Maik

    2015-07-30

    The focus of the research was on the application of high-pressure/high-temperature techniques, together with intense energetic ion beams, to the study of the behavior of simple oxide systems (e.g., SiO2, GeO2, CeO2, TiO2, HfO2, SnO2, ZnO and ZrO2) under extreme conditions. These simple stoichiometries provide unique model systems for the analysis of structural responses to pressure up to and above 1 Mbar, temperatures of up to several thousands of kelvin, and the extreme energy density generated by energetic heavy ions (tens of keV/atom). The investigations included systematic studies of radiation- and pressure-induced amorphization of high P-T polymorphs. By studying the response of simple stoichiometries that have multiple structural “outcomes”, we have established the basic knowledge required for the prediction of the response of more complex structures to extreme conditions. We especially focused on the amorphous state and characterized the different non-crystalline structure-types that result from the interplay of radiation and pressure. For such experiments, we made use of recent technological developments, such as the perforated diamond-anvil cell and in situ investigation using synchrotron x-ray sources. We have been particularly interested in using extreme pressures to alter the electronic structure of a solid prior to irradiation. We expected that the effects of modified band structure would be evident in the track structure and morphology, information which is much needed to describe theoretically the fundamental physics of track-formation. Finally, we investigated the behavior of different simple-oxide, composite nanomaterials (e.g., uncoated nanoparticles vs. core/shell systems) under coupled, extreme conditions. This provided insight into surface and boundary effects on phase stability under extreme conditions.

  18. 3D model generation using an airborne swarm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, R. A.; Punzo, G.; Macdonald, M.; Dobie, G.; MacLeod, C. N.; Summan, R.; Pierce, G.; Bolton, G.

    2015-03-31

    Using an artificial kinematic field to provide co-ordination between multiple inspection UAVs, the authors herein demonstrate full 3D modelling capability based on a photogrammetric system. The operation of the system is demonstrated by generating a full 3D surface model of an intermediate level nuclear waste storage drum. Such drums require periodic inspection to ensure that drum distortion or corrosion is carefully monitored. Performing this inspection with multiple airborne platforms enables rapid inspection of structures that are inaccessible to on-surface remote vehicles and are in human-hazardous environments. A three-dimensional surface-meshed model of the target can then be constructed in post-processing through photogrammetry analysis of the visual inspection data. The inspection environment uses a tracking system to precisely monitor the position of each aerial vehicle within the enclosure. The vehicles used are commercially available Parrot AR. Drone quadcopters, controlled through a computer interface connected over an IEEE 802.11n (WiFi) network, implementing a distributed controller for each vehicle. This enables the autonomous and distributed elements of the control scheme to be retained, while alleviating the vehicles of the control algorithms computational load. The control scheme relies on a kinematic field defined with the target at its centre. This field defines the trajectory for all the drones in the volume relative to the central target, enabling the drones to circle the target at a set radius while avoiding drone collisions. This function enables complete coverage along the height of the object, which is assured by transitioning to another inspection band only after completing circumferential coverage. Using a swarm of vehicles, the time until complete coverage can be significantly reduced.

  19. Triangle geometry processing for surface modeling and cartesian grid generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aftosmis, Michael J. [San Mateo, CA; Melton, John E. [Hollister, CA; Berger, Marsha J. [New York, NY

    2002-09-03

    Cartesian mesh generation is accomplished for component based geometries, by intersecting components subject to mesh generation to extract wetted surfaces with a geometry engine using adaptive precision arithmetic in a system which automatically breaks ties with respect to geometric degeneracies. During volume mesh generation, intersected surface triangulations are received to enable mesh generation with cell division of an initially coarse grid. The hexagonal cells are resolved, preserving the ability to directionally divide cells which are locally well aligned.

  20. Molecular modeling of responsive polymer films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Calvo, Ernesto J; Szleifer, Igal

    2010-06-29

    In this perspective, we have shown three different cases of responsive polymers at surfaces where the properties of the surface can be varied in response to cues from the bulk solution or in the presence of an external field. The most important conclusion in all three cases is that the chemical reaction equilibrium, physical interactions and molecular organization are strongly coupled, and it is imperative to consider the global and local changes that occur to the surface structure and properties due to this coupling. In particular acid-base and redox equilibrium are very different in polymer-modified surfaces than in the corresponding bulk solutions. Moreover, the definition of apparent redox potentials and apparent pKaresults from the averaging over highly inhomogeneous values,and, therefore, they do not necessarily represent the state of the layer and the local values and their variation are very important for the design of functional surfaces. The very large variation on chemical equilibrium results from the optimization of all the interactions. The picture that emerges is that trying to deduce what the final state of the system is by looking at the individual optimization of each contribution leads to qualitative incorrect assumptions and only the minimization of the complete free energy leads to the proper behavior in these complex systems.In the cases where domain formation is possible in grafted weak polyacid layers charge regulation may lead to regimes of coexistence between aggregates with relatively low fraction of charged polymer segments surrounded by highly stretched chains that have a relatively high fraction of charged groups.Therefore, one can control the state of charge, local electrostatic potential and local pH in all three dimensions with im-portant gradients on length scales of nanometers. For hydrophobic redox polymers we show how the application of an electrode potential can lead to changes in the structure and type of morphological aggregates that can form on the surface.Again, these structures result from the optimization of chemical redox equilibrium, conformational entropy, electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Furthermore, changes in domains structure can manifest themselves in the capacitance-potential curves and then provide a link between macroscopic measurements and the formation of nanoscopic domains. It is clear that chemical engineers are in a unique position to use these switchable surfaces in the molecular design of sensors, biosensors, separation devices, microfluidic devices with on-off environmental switches and drug delivery systems among many others. Finally, we want to stress that the application of molecular theories, where the coupling between chemical equilibrium, physical interactions and molecular organization are explicitly included provide with quantitative predictions of the layers properties, as compared with experimental observations, and enable the fundamental understanding of the observed behavior. Moreover, the theory provides with a detailed microscopic picture and should be used as an integral part in the design of functional and responsive surfaces. It is important to emphasize that the molecular approaches are not exact, and, therefore, there is a need to continue their development and the incorporation of improved approximations to further broaden their applicability.

  1. NDA SYSTEM RESPONSE MODELING AND ITS APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinson, D.

    2010-03-01

    The Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plant (PORTS) is a uranium enrichment facility that was historically used to enrich uranium to levels that range from 2% to greater than 97%. The feed material for PORTS was obtained from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) that produced uranium in the form of UF6 that was enriched to about 1 to 2%. The enrichment process involves a multistage process by which gaseous UF{sub 6} passed through a diffusion barrier in each stage. The porous diffusion barrier in each stage retards the rate of the diffusion of the heavier {sup 238}U atoms relative to the diffusion of the lighter {sup 235}U atoms. By this process the product stream is slightly enriched by each stage of the process. Each stage consists of a compressor, converter and a motor. There are more than 4000 stages that are linked together with piping of various diameters to form the PORTS cascade. The cascade spans three interconnected buildings and comprises miles of piping, thousands of seals, converters, valves, motors, and compressors. During operation, PORTS process equipment contained UF{sub 6} gas with uranium enrichment that increased in the process stream from the first to the last stage in a known manner. Gaseous UF{sub 6} moving through the PORTS process equipment had potential to form deposits within the process equipment by several mechanisms, including solidification due to incorrect temperature and pressure conditions during the process, inleakage of atmospheric moisture that chemically reacts with UF{sub 6} to form hydrated uranyl fluoride solids, reduction reactions of UF{sub 6} with cascade metals, and UF{sub 6} condensation on the internal equipment surfaces. As a result, the process equipment of the PORTS contains a variable and unknown quantity of uranium with variable enrichment that has been deposited within the equipment during plant operations. The exact chemical form of this uranium is variable, although it is expected that the bulk of the material is of the form of uranyl fluoride that will become hydrated on exposure to moisture in air when the systems are no longer buffered. The deposit geometry and thickness is uncertain and variable. However, a reasonable assessment of the level of material holdup in this equipment is necessary to support decommissioning efforts. The assessment of nuclear material holdup in process equipment is a complex process that requires integration of process knowledge, nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements, and computer modeling to maximize capabilities and minimize uncertainty. The current report is focused on the use of computer modeling and simulation of NDA measurements.

  2. Report of tritide study at the Responsive Neutron Generator Product Deployment Center.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burkhart, Robert; Coffey, Jaime

    2008-11-01

    This report documents a study of sample counting results for wipes from routine surface area monitoring conducted at the Responsive Neutron Generator Product Deployment Center (RNGPDC) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The study was initiated in November 2006, with two samples suspected of containing erbium tritide, after some samples were found to exhibit higher tritium counting rates upon recount at a later time. The main goal of the study was to determine whether the current practice of analyzing tritium wipe samples once, within a few days of sample collection, is adequate to accurately quantify the amount of tritium on the sample when tritides may be present. Recommendations are made toward routine recounting of vials suspected of containing particulate forms of tritium.

  3. Model-Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials Model-Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program ...

  4. Modeling an Application's Theoretical Minimum and Average Transactional Response Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paiz, Mary Rose

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical minimum transactional response time of an application serves as a ba- sis for the expected response time. The lower threshold for the minimum response time represents the minimum amount of time that the application should take to complete a transaction. Knowing the lower threshold is beneficial in detecting anomalies that are re- sults of unsuccessful transactions. On the converse, when an application's response time falls above an upper threshold, there is likely an anomaly in the application that is causing unusual performance issues in the transaction. This report explains how the non-stationary Generalized Extreme Value distribution is used to estimate the lower threshold of an ap- plication's daily minimum transactional response time. It also explains how the seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average time series model is used to estimate the upper threshold for an application's average transactional response time.

  5. Generative model selection using a scalable and size-independent complex network classifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motallebi, Sadegh, E-mail: motallebi@ce.sharif.edu; Aliakbary, Sadegh, E-mail: aliakbary@ce.sharif.edu; Habibi, Jafar, E-mail: jhabibi@sharif.edu [Department of Computer Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Computer Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Real networks exhibit nontrivial topological features, such as heavy-tailed degree distribution, high clustering, and small-worldness. Researchers have developed several generative models for synthesizing artificial networks that are structurally similar to real networks. An important research problem is to identify the generative model that best fits to a target network. In this paper, we investigate this problem and our goal is to select the model that is able to generate graphs similar to a given network instance. By the means of generating synthetic networks with seven outstanding generative models, we have utilized machine learning methods to develop a decision tree for model selection. Our proposed method, which is named Generative Model Selection for Complex Networks, outperforms existing methods with respect to accuracy, scalability, and size-independence.

  6. Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Model-Based Controller for Fuel Efficient, Low Emissions Diesel Engines Fully model-based, practically-mapless engine control concept is viable PDF icon deer09allain.pdf...

  7. Functional approach to exploring climatic and landscape controls on runoff generation. 2. Timing of runoff storm response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Hongyi; Sivapalan, Murugesu

    2014-12-09

    Hortonian overland flow, Dunne overland flow and subsurface stormflow are the three dominant mechanisms contributing to both the volume and timing of streamflow. A previous study quantified the climatic and landscape controls on the relative dominance of the volumes of the different runoff components. In this paper we explore the impacts of climate, soil and topography on the timing of these runoff components in small catchments within the framework of the Connected Instantaneous Response Functions (CIRF). The CIRF here is viewed as a probability density function of travel times of water droplets associated with a given runoff generation mechanism (from the locations where they are generated to the catchment outlet). CIRF is a refinement of the traditional catchment IRF in that it explicitly accounts for variable contributing areas: only those partial areas of runoff generation which are hydrologically connected to the outlet are regarded as contributing areas. The CIRFs are derived for each runoff mechanism through the numerical simulations with a spatially distributed hydrological model which accounts for spatially distributed runoff generation and routing, involving all three mechanisms, under multiple combinations of climate, soil and topographic properties. The advective and dispersive aspects of catchments runoff routing response are captured through the use of, respectively, the mean travel times and dimensionless forms of the CIRFs (i.e., scaled by their respective mean travel times). It was found that the CIRFs, upon non-dimensionalization, collapsed to common characteristic shapes, which could be explained in terms of the relative contributions of hillslope and channel network flows, and especially of the size of the runoff contributing areas. The contributing areas are themselves governed by the competition between drainage and recharge to the water table, and could be explained by a dimensionless drainage index which quantifies this competition. On the other hand, the mean residence times were vastly different in each case, and are governed by relative lengths of the flow pathways, flow velocities (and their variability) and the study also revealed simple indicators based on landscape properties that can explain their magnitudes in different catchments.

  8. Polish plant beats the odds to become model EU generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neville, A.

    2009-03-15

    Once a Soviet satellite, Poland is now transforming into a thoroughly modern nation. To support its growing economy, this recent European Union member country is modernizing its power industry. Exemplifying the advances in the Polish electricity generation market is the 460 MW Patnow II power plant - the largest, most efficient (supercritical cycle) and environmentally cleanest lignite-fired unit in the country. 3 photos.

  9. Adiabatic electron response and solitary wave generation by trapped particle nonlinearity in a hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, Debraj; Sharma, Devendra [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-10-15

    The finite amplitude ion acoustic waves that trap electrons modify the structure of the evolving nonlinear soliton solutions. In the numerical simulations, self-consistently generated solitary waves are studied that emerge as a result of a current driven microinstability growing the ion acoustic mode in a collisionless Vlasov plasma. The growth saturates as a result of nonlinear effects governed by a combination of nonlinearities originating from the hydrodynamic model and kinetic particle trapping effects. The resulting solitary waves also coexist with a finite current and an electron plasma wave capable of perturbing the trapping potential. The results of multiscale simulation are analyzed and characterized following the kinetic prescription of undamped trapped particle mode in the form of phase space vortex solutions that are generalized form of Sagdeev's solitons and obey the solutions of a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation, accounting for a stronger nonlinearity originating from the electron trapping.

  10. Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation Diesel

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy These Model Repair Specifications are intended to cover routine repair and rewind of low-voltage random-wound three-phase AC squirrel cage induction motors. PDF icon Model Repair Specifications for Low Voltage Induction Motors (November 1999) More Documents & Publications DOE Navigant Master Presentation Improving Motor and Drive System Performance - A Sourcebook for Industry Novel Flux Coupling Machine without Permanent Magnets Innovation | Department of Energy

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  11. Advancements in Distributed Generation Issues: Interconnection, Modeling, and Tariffs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, H.; Kroposki, B.; Basso, T.; Treanton, B. G.

    2007-01-01

    The California Energy Commission is cost-sharing research with the Department of Energy through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory to address distributed energy resources (DER) topics. These efforts include developing interconnection and power management technologies, modeling the impacts of interconnecting DER with an area electric power system, and evaluating possible modifications to rate policies and tariffs. As a result, a DER interconnection device has been developed and tested. A workshop reviewed the status and issues of advanced power electronic devices. Software simulations used validated models of distribution circuits that incorporated DER, and tests and measurements of actual circuits with and without DER systems are being conducted to validate these models. Current policies affecting DER were reviewed and rate making policies to support deployment of DER through public utility rates and policies were identified. These advancements are expected to support the continued and expanded use of DER systems.

  12. Modeling thermal/chemical/mechanical response of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; Gross, R.J.

    1995-07-01

    An overview of modeling at Sandia National Laboratories is presented which describes coupled thermal, chemical and mechanical response of energetic materials. This modeling addresses cookoff scenarios for safety assessment studies in systems containing energetic materials. Foundation work is discussed which establishes a method for incorporating chemistry and mechanics into multidimensional analysis. Finite element analysis offers the capabilities to simultaneously resolve reactive heat transfer and structural mechanics in complex geometries. Nonlinear conduction heat transfer, with multiple step finite-rate chemistry, is resolved using a thermal finite element code. Rate equations are solved element-by-element using a modified matrix-free stiff solver This finite element software was developed for the simulation of systems requiring large numbers of finite elements. An iterative implicit scheme, based on the conjugate gradient method, is used and a hemi-cube algorithm is employed for the determination of view factors in surface-to-surface radiation transfer The critical link between the reactive heat transfer and mechanics is the introduction of an appropriate constitutive material model providing a stress-strain relationship for quasi-static mechanics analysis. This model is formally derived from bubble nucleation theory, and parameter variations of critical model parameters indicate that a small degree of decomposition leads to significant mechanical response. Coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical analysis is presented which simulates experiments designed to probe cookoff thermal-mechanical response of energetic materials.

  13. Data Integration for the Generation of High Resolution Reservoir Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Reynolds; Dean Oliver; Gaoming Li; Yong Zhao; Chaohui Che; Kai Zhang; Yannong Dong; Chinedu Abgalaka; Mei Han

    2009-01-07

    The goal of this three-year project was to develop a theoretical basis and practical technology for the integration of geologic, production and time-lapse seismic data in a way that makes best use of the information for reservoir description and reservoir performance predictions. The methodology and practical tools for data integration that were developed in this research project have been incorporated into computational algorithms that are feasible for large scale reservoir simulation models. As the integration of production and seismic data require calibrating geological/geostatistical models to these data sets, the main computational tool is an automatic history matching algorithm. The following specific goals were accomplished during this research. (1) We developed algorithms for calibrating the location of the boundaries of geologic facies and the distribution of rock properties so that production and time-lapse seismic data are honored. (2) We developed and implemented specific procedures for conditioning reservoir models to time-lapse seismic data. (3) We developed and implemented algorithms for the characterization of measurement errors which are needed to determine the relative weights of data when conditioning reservoir models to production and time-lapse seismic data by automatic history matching. (4) We developed and implemented algorithms for the adjustment of relative permeability curves during the history matching process. (5) We developed algorithms for production optimization which accounts for geological uncertainty within the context of closed-loop reservoir management. (6) To ensure the research results will lead to practical public tools for independent oil companies, as part of the project we built a graphical user interface for the reservoir simulator and history matching software using Visual Basic.

  14. A Full Demand Response Model in Co-Optimized Energy and

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guodong; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that demand response will play an important role in reliable and economic operation of future power systems and electricity markets. Demand response can not only influence the prices in the energy market by demand shifting, but also participate in the reserve market. In this paper, we propose a full model of demand response in which demand flexibility is fully utilized by price responsive shiftable demand bids in energy market as well as spinning reserve bids in reserve market. A co-optimized day-ahead energy and spinning reserve market is proposed to minimize the expected net cost under all credible system states, i.e., expected total cost of operation minus total benefit of demand, and solved by mixed integer linear programming. Numerical simulation results on the IEEE Reliability Test System show effectiveness of this model. Compared to conventional demand shifting bids, the proposed full demand response model can further reduce committed capacity from generators, starting up and shutting down of units and the overall system operating costs.

  15. Theoretical model for plasma expansion generated by hypervelocity impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingming Zhang, Dongjiang; Long, Renrong; Chen, Li; Huang, Fenglei; Gong, Zizheng

    2014-09-15

    The hypervelocity impact experiments of spherical LY12 aluminum projectile diameter of 6.4?mm on LY12 aluminum target thickness of 23?mm have been conducted using a two-stage light gas gun. The impact velocity of the projectile is 5.2, 5.7, and 6.3?km/s, respectively. The experimental results show that the plasma phase transition appears under the current experiment conditions, and the plasma expansion consists of accumulation, equilibrium, and attenuation. The plasma characteristic parameters decrease as the plasma expands outward and are proportional with the third power of the impact velocity, i.e., (T{sub e}, n{sub e})???v{sub p}{sup 3}. Based on the experimental results, a theoretical model on the plasma expansion is developed and the theoretical results are consistent with the experimental data.

  16. NREL: Energy Analysis - dGen: Distributed Generation Market Demand Model

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Distributed Generation Market Demand (dGen) model is a geospatially rich, bottom-up, market-penetration model that simulates the potential adoption of distributed energy resources (DERs) for residential, commercial, and industrial entities in the continental United States through 2050. The dGen model builds on and provides significant advances over NREL's deprecated Solar Deployment System (SolarDS) model. The dGen model can help develop deployment forecasts for distributed resources,

  17. Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugiyama, Gayle; Nasstrom, John; Pobanz, Brenda; Foster, Kevin; Simpson, Matthew; Vogt, Phil; Aluzzi, Fernando; Homann, Steve

    2012-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This work encompassed: weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions, estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases, predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations, and source estimation and plume model refinement. An overview of NARAC response activities is provided, along with a more in-depth discussion of some of NARAC’s preliminary source reconstruction analyses. NARAC optimized the overall agreement of model predictions to dose rate measurements using statistical comparisons of data and model values paired in space and time. Estimated emission rates varied depending on the choice of release assumptions (e.g., time-varying vs. constant release rates), the radionuclide mix, meteorology, and/or the radiological data used in the analysis. Results were found to be consistent with other studies within expected uncertainties, despite the application of different source estimation methodologies and the use of significantly different radiological measurement data. A discussion of some of the operational and scientific challenges encountered during the response, along with recommendations for future work, is provided.

  18. High-throughput generation, optimization and analysis of genome-scale metabolic models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, C. S.; DeJongh, M.; Best, A. A.; Frybarger, P. M.; Linsay, B.; Stevens, R. L.

    2010-09-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models have proven to be valuable for predicting organism phenotypes from genotypes. Yet efforts to develop new models are failing to keep pace with genome sequencing. To address this problem, we introduce the Model SEED, a web-based resource for high-throughput generation, optimization and analysis of genome-scale metabolic models. The Model SEED integrates existing methods and introduces techniques to automate nearly every step of this process, taking {approx}48 h to reconstruct a metabolic model from an assembled genome sequence. We apply this resource to generate 130 genome-scale metabolic models representing a taxonomically diverse set of bacteria. Twenty-two of the models were validated against available gene essentiality and Biolog data, with the average model accuracy determined to be 66% before optimization and 87% after optimization.

  19. Water demands for electricity generation in the U.S.: Modeling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Water demands for electricity generation in the U.S.: Modeling different scenarios for the water-energy nexus This content will become publicly available on March 11, 2018 Title: ...

  20. Water demands for electricity generation in the U.S.: Modeling different

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    scenarios for the water-energy nexus (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Water demands for electricity generation in the U.S.: Modeling different scenarios for the water-energy nexus Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on March 11, 2018 Title: Water demands for electricity generation in the U.S.: Modeling different scenarios for the water-energy nexus Authors: Liu, Lu ; Hejazi, Mohamad ; Patel, Pralit ; Kyle, Page ; Davies, Evan ; Zhou, Yuyu ;

  1. Building a next-generation community ice sheet model: meeting summary

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Building a next-generation community ice sheet model: meeting summary Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Building a next-generation community ice sheet model: meeting summary No abstract prepared. Authors: Lipscomb, William [1] ; Price, Stephen [1] ; Bueler, Ed [2] ; Holland, David [3] ; Johnson, Jesse [4] + Show Author Affiliations Los Alamos National Laboratory UNIV OF ALASKA NEW YORK UNIV UNIV OF MONTANA Publication Date:

  2. Water demands for electricity generation in the U.S.: Modeling different

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    scenarios for the water-energy nexus (Journal Article) | DOE PAGES Water demands for electricity generation in the U.S.: Modeling different scenarios for the water-energy nexus This content will become publicly available on March 11, 2018 Title: Water demands for electricity generation in the U.S.: Modeling different scenarios for the water-energy nexus Authors: Liu, Lu ; Hejazi, Mohamad ; Patel, Pralit ; Kyle, Page ; Davies, Evan ; Zhou, Yuyu ; Clarke, Leon ; Edmonds, James Publication

  3. Managing Model Data Introduced Uncertainties in Simulator Predictions for Generation IV Systems via Optimum Experimental Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turinsky, Paul J; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S; Stover, Tracy E

    2011-03-31

    An optimization technique has been developed to select optimized experimental design specifications to produce data specifically designed to be assimilated to optimize a given reactor concept. Data from the optimized experiment is assimilated to generate posteriori uncertainties on the reactor concept’s core attributes from which the design responses are computed. The reactor concept is then optimized with the new data to realize cost savings by reducing margin. The optimization problem iterates until an optimal experiment is found to maximize the savings. A new generation of innovative nuclear reactor designs, in particular fast neutron spectrum recycle reactors, are being considered for the application of closing the nuclear fuel cycle in the future. Safe and economical design of these reactors will require uncertainty reduction in basic nuclear data which are input to the reactor design. These data uncertainty propagate to design responses which in turn require the reactor designer to incorporate additional safety margin into the design, which often increases the cost of the reactor. Therefore basic nuclear data needs to be improved and this is accomplished through experimentation. Considering the high cost of nuclear experiments, it is desired to have an optimized experiment which will provide the data needed for uncertainty reduction such that a reactor design concept can meet its target accuracies or to allow savings to be realized by reducing the margin required due to uncertainty propagated from basic nuclear data. However, this optimization is coupled to the reactor design itself because with improved data the reactor concept can be re-optimized itself. It is thus desired to find the experiment that gives the best optimized reactor design. Methods are first established to model both the reactor concept and the experiment and to efficiently propagate the basic nuclear data uncertainty through these models to outputs. The representativity of the experiment to the design concept is quantitatively determined. A technique is then established to assimilate this data and produce posteriori uncertainties on key attributes and responses of the design concept. Several experiment perturbations based on engineering judgment are used to demonstrate these methods and also serve as an initial generation of the optimization problem. Finally, an optimization technique is developed which will simultaneously arrive at an optimized experiment to produce an optimized reactor design. Solution of this problem is made possible by the use of the simulated annealing algorithm for solution of optimization problems. The optimization examined in this work is based on maximizing the reactor cost savings associated with the modified design made possible by using the design margin gained through reduced basic nuclear data uncertainties. Cost values for experiment design specifications and reactor design specifications are established and used to compute a total savings by comparing the posteriori reactor cost to the a priori cost plus the cost of the experiment. The optimized solution arrives at a maximized cost savings.

  4. Modeling aspects of the dynamic response of heterogeneous materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ionita, Axinte; Clements, Brad; Mas, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In numerical simulations of engineering applications involving heterogeneous materials capturing the local response coming from a distribution of heterogeneities can lead to a very large model thus making simulations difficult. The use of homogenization techniques can reduce the size of the problem but will miss the local effects. Homogenization can also be difficult if the constituents obey different types of constitutive laws. Additional complications arise if inelastic deformation. In such cases a two-scale approach is prefened and tills work addresses these issues in the context of a two-scale Finite Element Method (FEM). Examples of using two-scale FEM approaches are presented.

  5. SPUF - a simple polyurethane foam mass loss and response model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hobbs, Michael L.; Lemmon, Gordon H.

    2003-07-01

    A Simple PolyUrethane Foam (SPUF) mass loss and response model has been developed to predict the behavior of unconfined, rigid, closed-cell, polyurethane foam-filled systems exposed to fire-like heat fluxes. The model, developed for the B61 and W80-0/1 fireset foam, is based on a simple two-step mass loss mechanism using distributed reaction rates. The initial reaction step assumes that the foam degrades into a primary gas and a reactive solid. The reactive solid subsequently degrades into a secondary gas. The SPUF decomposition model was implemented into the finite element (FE) heat conduction codes COYOTE [1] and CALORE [2], which support chemical kinetics and dynamic enclosure radiation using 'element death.' A discretization bias correction model was parameterized using elements with characteristic lengths ranging from 1-mm to 1-cm. Bias corrected solutions using the SPUF response model with large elements gave essentially the same results as grid independent solutions using 100-{micro}m elements. The SPUF discretization bias correction model can be used with 2D regular quadrilateral elements, 2D paved quadrilateral elements, 2D triangular elements, 3D regular hexahedral elements, 3D paved hexahedral elements, and 3D tetrahedron elements. Various effects to efficiently recalculate view factors were studied -- the element aspect ratio, the element death criterion, and a 'zombie' criterion. Most of the solutions using irregular, large elements were in agreement with the 100-{micro}m grid-independent solutions. The discretization bias correction model did not perform as well when the element aspect ratio exceeded 5:1 and the heated surface was on the shorter side of the element. For validation, SPUF predictions using various sizes and types of elements were compared to component-scale experiments of foam cylinders that were heated with lamps. The SPUF predictions of the decomposition front locations were compared to the front locations determined from real-time X-rays. SPUF predictions of the 19 radiant heat experiments were also compared to a more complex chemistry model (CPUF) predictions made with 1-mm elements. The SPUF predictions of the front locations were closer to the measured front locations than the CPUF predictions, reflecting the more accurate SPUF prediction of mass loss. Furthermore, the computational time for the SPUF predictions was an order of magnitude less than for the CPUF predictions.

  6. Modeling the Impacts of Solar Distributed Generation on U.S. Water Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amanda, Smith; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Jaron, Peck

    2015-01-01

    Distributed electric power generation technologies typically use little or no water per unit of electrical energy produced; in particular, renewable energy sources such as solar PV systems do not require cooling systems and present an opportunity to reduce water usage for power generation. Within the US, the fuel mix used for power generation varies regionally, and certain areas use more water for power generation than others. The need to reduce water usage for power generation is even more urgent in view of climate change uncertainties. In this paper, we present an example case within the state of Tennessee, one of the top four states in water consumption for power generation and one of the states with little or no potential for developing centralized renewable energy generations. The potential for developing PV generation within Knox County, Tennessee, is studied, along with the potential for reducing water withdrawal and consumption within the Tennessee Valley stream region. Electric power generation plants in the region are quantified for their electricity production and expected water withdrawal and consumption over one year, where electrical generation data is provided over one year and water usage is modeled based on the cooling system(s) in use. Potential solar PV electrical production is modeled based on LiDAR data and weather data for the same year. Our proposed methodology can be summarized as follows: First, the potential solar generation is compared against the local grid demand. Next, electrical generation reductions are specified that would result in a given reduction in water withdrawal and a given reduction in water consumption, and compared with the current water withdrawal and consumption rates for the existing fuel mix. The increase in solar PV development that would produce an equivalent amount of power, is determined. In this way, we consider how targeted local actions may affect the larger stream region through thoughtful energy development. This model can be applied to other regions, other types of distributed generation, and used as a framework for modeling alternative growth scenarios in power production capacity in addition to modeling adjustments to existing capacity.

  7. Atmospheric dispersion modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugiyama, Gayle; Nasstrom, John; Pobanz, Brenda; Foster, Kevin; Simpson, Matthew; Vogt, Phil; Aluzzi, Fernando; Homann, Steve

    2012-05-01

    In this research, the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident including: daily Japanese weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions to inform planning for field monitoring operations and to provide U.S. government agencies with ongoing situational awareness of meteorological conditions; estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases to support protective action planning for U.S. citizens; predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations; and source estimation and plume model refinement based on atmospheric dispersion modeling and available monitoring data.

  8. Integration of Renewables Via Demand Management: Highly Dispatchable and Distributed Demand Response for the Integration of Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-02-11

    GENI Project: AutoGrid, in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Columbia University, will design and demonstrate automated control software that helps manage real-time demand for energy across the electric grid. Known as the Demand Response Optimization and Management System - Real-Time (DROMS-RT), the software will enable personalized price signal to be sent to millions of customers in extremely short timeframesincentivizing them to alter their electricity use in response to grid conditions. This will help grid operators better manage unpredictable demand and supply fluctuations in short time-scales making the power generation process more efficient and cost effective for both suppliers and consumers. DROMS-RT is expected to provide a 90% reduction in the cost of operating demand response and dynamic pricing Projects in the U.S.

  9. Response of the Los Azufres Geothermal Field to Four Years of 25 MW Wellhead Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, P.; Ortiz, J.; Miranda, G.; Gallardo, M.

    1987-01-20

    Production and chemical data have been compiled and analyzed on a six-month averaged basis for the first four years of electric energy generation with five 5-MW wellhead generators at the Los Azufres geothermal field. The data were evaluated with respect to the extent of observable thermal drawdown of the reservoir from 25 MW of generation in relation to the estimated capacity of the field of several hundred megawatts of power. The analysis updates the previous one compiled after the first two years of continuous production, at which time the results indicated that differences in reservoir temperature estimated from geochemical thermometers and wellhead production data were not statistically significant based on the number of data and the standard deviations. Analysis of the data after four years of operation were made for the larger number of data and smaller standard deviations. The results review the adequacy of the sampling frequency and the reliability of the measurements from statistical t-Test of the means of the first and second two-year periods. 3 figs., 5 tabs., 20 refs.

  10. A model for estimation of potential generation of waste electrical and electronic equipment in Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araujo, Marcelo Guimaraes; Magrini, Alessandra; Mahler, Claudio Fernando; Bilitewski, Bernd

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Literature of WEEE generation in developing countries is reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyse existing estimates of WEEE generation for Brazil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a model for WEEE generation estimate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer WEEE generation of 3.77 kg/capita year for 2008 is estimated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of constant lifetime should be avoided for non-mature market products. - Abstract: Sales of electrical and electronic equipment are increasing dramatically in developing countries. Usually, there are no reliable data about quantities of the waste generated. A new law for solid waste management was enacted in Brazil in 2010, and the infrastructure to treat this waste must be planned, considering the volumes of the different types of electrical and electronic equipment generated. This paper reviews the literature regarding estimation of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), focusing on developing countries, particularly in Latin America. It briefly describes the current WEEE system in Brazil and presents an updated estimate of generation of WEEE. Considering the limited available data in Brazil, a model for WEEE generation estimation is proposed in which different methods are used for mature and non-mature market products. The results showed that the most important variable is the equipment lifetime, which requires a thorough understanding of consumer behavior to estimate. Since Brazil is a rapidly expanding market, the 'boom' in waste generation is still to come. In the near future, better data will provide more reliable estimation of waste generation and a clearer interpretation of the lifetime variable throughout the years.

  11. Improving models to predict phenological responses to global change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richardson, Andrew D.

    2015-11-25

    The term phenology describes both the seasonal rhythms of plants and animals, and the study of these rhythms. Plant phenological processes, including, for example, when leaves emerge in the spring and change color in the autumn, are highly responsive to variation in weather (e.g. a warm vs. cold spring) as well as longer-term changes in climate (e.g. warming trends and changes in the timing and amount of rainfall). We conducted a study to investigate the phenological response of northern peatland communities to global change. Field work was conducted at the SPRUCE experiment in northern Minnesota, where we installed 10 digital cameras. Imagery from the cameras is being used to track shifts in plant phenology driven by elevated carbon dioxide and elevated temperature in the different SPRUCE experimental treatments. Camera imagery and derived products (“greenness”) is being posted in near-real time on a publicly available web page (http://phenocam.sr.unh.edu/webcam/gallery/). The images will provide a permanent visual record of the progression of the experiment over the next 10 years. Integrated with other measurements collected as part of the SPRUCE program, this study is providing insight into the degree to which phenology may mediate future shifts in carbon uptake and storage by peatland ecosystems. In the future, these data will be used to develop improved models of vegetation phenology, which will be tested against ground observations collected by a local collaborator.

  12. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Undrill, John; Mackin, Peter; Daschmans, Ron; Williams, Ben; Haney, Brian; Hunt, Randall; Ellis, Jeff; Illian, Howard; Martinez, Carlos; O'Malley, Mark; Coughlin, Katie; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi

    2010-12-20

    An interconnected electric power system is a complex system that must be operated within a safe frequency range in order to reliably maintain the instantaneous balance between generation and load. This is accomplished by ensuring that adequate resources are available to respond to expected and unexpected imbalances and restoring frequency to its scheduled value in order to ensure uninterrupted electric service to customers. Electrical systems must be flexible enough to reliably operate under a variety of"change" scenarios. System planners and operators must understand how other parts of the system change in response to the initial change, and need tools to manage such changes to ensure reliable operation within the scheduled frequency range. This report presents a systematic approach to identifying metrics that are useful for operating and planning a reliable system with increased amounts of variable renewable generation which builds on existing industry practices for frequency control after unexpected loss of a large amount of generation. The report introduces a set of metrics or tools for measuring the adequacy of frequency response within an interconnection. Based on the concept of the frequency nadir, these metrics take advantage of new information gathering and processing capabilities that system operators are developing for wide-area situational awareness. Primary frequency response is the leading metric that will be used by this report to assess the adequacy of primary frequency control reserves necessary to ensure reliable operation. It measures what is needed to arrest frequency decline (i.e., to establish frequency nadir) at a frequency higher than the highest set point for under-frequency load shedding within an interconnection. These metrics can be used to guide the reliable operation of an interconnection under changing circumstances.

  13. Canonical formalism for a 2n-dimensional model with topological mass generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deguchi, Shinichi [Institute of Quantum Science, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    The four-dimensional model with topological mass generation that was found by Dvali, Jackiw, and Pi has recently been generalized to any even number of dimensions (2n dimensions) in a nontrivial manner in which a Stueckelberg-type mass term is introduced [S. Deguchi and S. Hayakawa, Phys. Rev. D 77, 045003 (2008)]. The present paper deals with a self-contained model, called here a modified hybrid model, proposed in this 2n-dimensional generalization and considers the canonical formalism for this model. For the sake of convenience, the canonical formalism itself is studied for a model equivalent to the modified hybrid model by following the recipe for treating constrained Hamiltonian systems. This formalism is applied to the canonical quantization of the equivalent model in order to clarify observable and unobservable particles in the model. The equivalent model (with a gauge-fixing term) is converted to the modified hybrid model (with a corresponding gauge-fixing term) in a Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin-invariant manner. Thereby it is shown that the Chern-Pontryagin density behaves as an observable massive particle (or field). The topological mass generation is thus verified at the quantum-theoretical level.

  14. ReEDS Modeling of the President's 2020 U.S. Renewable Electricity Generation Goal (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinaman, O.; Mai, T.; Lantz, E.; Gelman, R.; Porro, G.

    2014-05-01

    President Obama announced in 2012 an Administration Goal for the United States to double aggregate renewable electricity generation from wind, solar, and geothermal sources by 2020. This analysis, using the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, explores a full range of future renewable deployment scenarios out to 2020 to assess progress and outlook toward this goal. Under all modeled conditions, consisting of 21 scenarios, the Administration Goal is met before 2020, and as early as 2015.

  15. Isotropic octupolar second harmonic generation response in LaBGeO{sub 5} glass-ceramic with spherulitic precipitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truong, Lo Nhat; Fargin, Evelyne E-mail: fargin@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr Vigouroux, Hélène; Fargues, Alexandre; Dussauze, Marc E-mail: fargin@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr Adamietz, Frédéric; Rodriguez, Vincent E-mail: fargin@icmcb-bordeaux.cnrs.fr; Santos, Luis

    2015-04-20

    A spherulitic crystallization of the crystalline phase LaBGeO{sub 5} is generated in the 25La{sub 2}O{sub 3}-25B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-50 GeO{sub 2} glass system. Linear and nonlinear optical properties of lanthanum borogermanate glass-ceramic have been investigated at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. Polarized μ-Raman analysis has evidenced a radial distribution of the crystallites along the c-axis inside spherulites, whereas polarized μ-Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) analysis revealed intensity maxima perpendicularly to the c-axis crystallites orientation. Polarized SHG mapping of a spherulite indicate that no dipolar response along the c-axis oriented crystallites occurs despite the individual dipolar symmetry C{sub 3} of the crystallites. At a larger mm scale, the isotropic scattering of spherulites recorded from macroscopic SHG experiment in the forward direction is consistent with an average coherent octupolar response per spherulite. These SHG analyses at different scale are both in accordance with radial antiferroelectric orientation along the c-axis of crystallites inside each spherulite.

  16. System for generating two-dimensional masks from a three-dimensional model using topological analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schiek, Richard (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-06-20

    A method of generating two-dimensional masks from a three-dimensional model comprises providing a three-dimensional model representing a micro-electro-mechanical structure for manufacture and a description of process mask requirements, reducing the three-dimensional model to a topological description of unique cross sections, and selecting candidate masks from the unique cross sections and the cross section topology. The method further can comprise reconciling the candidate masks based on the process mask requirements description to produce two-dimensional process masks.

  17. Efficiency and accuracy of the perturbation response coefficient generation method for whole core comet calculations in BWR and CANDU configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, D.; Rahnema, F.

    2013-07-01

    The coarse mesh transport method (COMET) is a highly accurate and efficient computational tool which predicts whole-core neutronics behaviors for heterogeneous reactor cores via a pre-computed eigenvalue-dependent response coefficient (function) library. Recently, a high order perturbation method was developed to significantly improve the efficiency of the library generation method. In that work, the method's accuracy and efficiency was tested in a small PWR benchmark problem. This paper extends the application of the perturbation method to include problems typical of the other water reactor cores such as BWR and CANDU bundles. It is found that the response coefficients predicted by the perturbation method for typical BWR bundles agree very well with those directly computed by the Monte Carlo method. The average and maximum relative errors in the surface-to-surface response coefficients are 0.02%-0.05% and 0.06%-0.25%, respectively. For CANDU bundles, the corresponding quantities are 0.01%-0.05% and 0.04% -0.15%. It is concluded that the perturbation method is highly accurate and efficient with a wide range of applicability. (authors)

  18. Gene expression responses of HeLa cells to chemical species generated by an atmospheric plasma flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokoyama, Mayo; Johkura, Kohei; Sato, Takehiko

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Response of HeLa cells to a plasma-irradiated medium was revealed by DNA microarray. • Gene expression pattern was basically different from that in a H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-added medium. • Prominently up-/down-regulated genes were partly shared by the two media. • Gene ontology analysis showed both similar and different responses in the two media. • Candidate genes involved in response to ROS were detected in each medium. - Abstract: Plasma irradiation generates many factors able to affect the cellular condition, and this feature has been studied for its application in the field of medicine. We previously reported that hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) was the major cause of HeLa cell death among the chemical species generated by high level irradiation of a culture medium by atmospheric plasma. To assess the effect of plasma-induced factors on the response of live cells, HeLa cells were exposed to a medium irradiated by a non-lethal plasma flow level, and their gene expression was broadly analyzed by DNA microarray in comparison with that in a corresponding concentration of 51 μM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. As a result, though the cell viability was sufficiently maintained at more than 90% in both cases, the plasma-medium had a greater impact on it than the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-medium. Hierarchical clustering analysis revealed fundamentally different cellular responses between these two media. A larger population of genes was upregulated in the plasma-medium, whereas genes were downregulated in the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-medium. However, a part of the genes that showed prominent differential expression was shared by them, including an immediate early gene ID2. In gene ontology analysis of upregulated genes, the plasma-medium showed more diverse ontologies than the H{sub 2}O{sub 2}-medium, whereas ontologies such as “response to stimulus” were common, and several genes corresponded to “response to reactive oxygen species.” Genes of AP-1 proteins, e.g., JUN and FOS, were detected and notably elevated in the plasma-medium. These results showed that the medium irradiated with a non-lethal level of plasma flow altered various gene expressions of HeLa cells by giving not only common effects with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} but also some distinctive actions. This study suggests that in addition to H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, other chemical species able to affect the cellular responses exist in the plasma-irradiated medium and provide unique features for it, probably increasing the oxidative stress level.

  19. Generation IV benchmarking of TRISO fuel performance models under accident conditions. Modeling input data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    This document presents the benchmark plan for the calculation of particle fuel performance on safety testing experiments that are representative of operational accidental transients. The benchmark is dedicated to the modeling of fission product release under accident conditions by fuel performance codes from around the world, and the subsequent comparison to post-irradiation experiment (PIE) data from the modeled heating tests. The accident condition benchmark is divided into three parts: the modeling of a simplified benchmark problem to assess potential numerical calculation issues at low fission product release; the modeling of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis safety testing experiments; and, the comparison of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis modeling results with PIE data. The simplified benchmark case, thereafter named NCC (Numerical Calculation Case), is derived from ''Case 5'' of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on coated particle fuel technology [IAEA 2012]. It is included so participants can evaluate their codes at low fission product release. ''Case 5'' of the IAEA CRP-6 showed large code-to-code discrepancies in the release of fission products, which were attributed to ''effects of the numerical calculation method rather than the physical model''[IAEA 2012]. The NCC is therefore intended to check if these numerical effects subsist. The first two steps imply the involvement of the benchmark participants with a modeling effort following the guidelines and recommendations provided by this document. The third step involves the collection of the modeling results by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the comparison of these results with the available PIE data. The objective of this document is to provide all necessary input data to model the benchmark cases, and to give some methodology guidelines and recommendations in order to make all results suitable for comparison with each other. The participants should read this document thoroughly to make sure all the data needed for their calculations is provided in the document. Missing data will be added to a revision of the document if necessary.

  20. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A; Hand, Maureen; Blair, Nate; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Hern, Tracy; Miller, Bart; O'Connell, R.

    2008-06-09

    The Wind Energy Deployment System model was used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030. This generation capacity expansion model selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, nuclear plants, and wind technology to meet projected demand in future years. Technology cost and performance projections, as well as transmission operation and expansion costs, are assumed. This study demonstrates that producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology is technically feasible, not cost-prohibitive, and provides benefits in the forms of carbon emission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water savings.

  1. Modeling Hydrogen Generation Rates in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Hallen, Richard T.; Sherwood, David J.; Stock, Leon M.

    2004-03-29

    This presentation describes a project in which Hanford Site and Environmental Management Science Program investigators addressed issues concerning hydrogen generation rates in the Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant. The hydrogen generation rates of radioactive wastes must be estimated to provide for safe operations. While an existing model satisfactorily predicts rates for quiescent wastes in Hanford underground storage tanks, pretreatment operations will alter the conditions and chemical composition of these wastes. Review of the treatment process flowsheet identified specific issues requiring study to ascertain whether the model would provide conservative values for waste streams in the plant. These include effects of adding hydroxide ion, alpha radiolysis, saturation with air (oxygen) from pulse-jet mixing, treatment with potassium permanganate, organic compounds from degraded ion exchange resins and addition of glass-former chemicals. The effects were systematically investigated through literature review, technical analyses and experimental work.

  2. SU-F-BRE-03: Consideration of a Track-Interaction Model for Radiochromic Film Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosen, B; DeWerd, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Conventional methods for characterizing the energy response of radiochromic film (RCF) typically involve assessing changes in response when exposed to various beam qualities and use Monte Carlo to determine absorbed dose. These methods represent RCF as a dose integrator of a homogeneous energy deposition volume. Apparent film saturation, nonlinearity, and intrinsic energy dependence are unpredicted with conventional methods. Recent work has shown significant RCF intrinsic energy dependence, which limits its use in absolute dosimetry. This work introduces a track-interaction model (TIM) for RCF and assesses its ability to predict total energy response. Methods: A TIM based on Katz single-hit theory was developed to accumulate energy flux along particle tracks within active crystals, represented as (1120)um{sup 3} prisms about the Gafchromic EBT3 active volume using MCNP5 and Matlab. Energy flux contributed to film response only if near the threshold energy for polymerization in polydiacetylenes (2.5eV/monomer). Energy deposition in excess of maximum efficiency represented crystal saturation and did not contribute to film response. The TIM was applied to RCF exposed in air to various monoenergetic photon beams and Co-60. Geometric distribution of energy flux was found for each beam quality in a (11)mm{sup 2} RCF area. RCF response relative to Co-60 absorbed dose-to-water (S-TIM) was determined and compared to published values (S-PUB). Results: TIM successfully predicted that lower energy radiation is less effective at inducing polymerization, though the magnitude of the phenomenon was overpredicted. S-TIM was ?29% and +20% for 20 and 40 keV, respectively. This agreed qualitatively with S-PUB of ?27% and +16%. TIM-generated sensitometric curves contained the non-linearity and saturation apparent in RCF. Conclusion: This work indicates the possibility for TIMs to predict changes in RCF response to various energies. Future work will refine TIM by considering size distributions of active elements, other RCF formulations, and response in complex treatment fields. Acknowledgements: The authors wish to thank Dr. Christopher Soares at NIST (Gaithersburg, MD) for performing film measurements and Dr. David Lewis of Ashland, Inc. (Wayne, NJ) for making the EBT3 film available to us.

  3. Grid Generator for Two, Three-dimensional Finite Element Subsurface Flow Models

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-04-28

    GRIDMAKER serves as a preprocessor for finite element models in solving two- and three-dimensional subsurface flow and pollutant transport problems. It is designed to generate three-point triangular or four-point quadrilateral elements for two-dimensional domains and eight-point hexahedron elements for three-dimensional domains. A two-dimensional domain of an aquifer with a variable depth layer is treated as a special case for depth-integrated two-dimensional, finite element subsurface flow models. The program accommodates the need for aquifers with heterogeneousmore » systems by identifying the type of material in each element.« less

  4. Modeling of reciprocating internal combustion engines for power generation and heat recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, Kyung Tae; Cho, Heejin; Luck, Rogelio; Mago, Pedro J.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents a power generation and heat recovery model for reciprocating internal combustion engines (ICEs). The purpose of the proposed model is to provide realistic estimates of performance/efficiency maps for both electrical power output and useful thermal output for various capacities of engines for use in a preliminary CHP design/simulation process. The proposed model will serve as an alternative to constant engine efficiencies or empirical efficiency curves commonly used in the current literature for simulations of CHP systems. The engine performance/efficiency calculation algorithm has been coded to a publicly distributed FORTRAN Dynamic Link Library (DLL), and a user friendly tool has been developed using Visual Basic programming. Simulation results using the proposed model are validated against manufacturer’s technical data.

  5. NREL: dGen: Distributed Generation Market Demand Model - Model Description

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Model Description A map of the continental United States showing a range of color based on available photovoltaic solar resources for using flat plate tilted at latitude. The highest intensity is through the southwestern states and the lowest being through the Great Lakes region and northeastern states. Enlarge image A map of the United States showing a range of color based on the annual gross capacity factor. The states along the Rocky Mountains out to the Mississippi River show the highest

  6. Modeling the effect of glacier recession on streamflow response using a coupled glacio-hydrological model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naz, Bibi S [ORNL] [ORNL; Frans, Chris [University of Washington, Seattle] [University of Washington, Seattle; Clarke, Garry [University of British Columbia, Vancouver] [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Burns, [Watershed Sciences Inc. (WSI), Portland] [Watershed Sciences Inc. (WSI), Portland; Lettenmaier, Dennis [University of Washington, Seattle] [University of Washington, Seattle

    2014-01-01

    We describe an integrated spatially distributed hydrologic and glacier dynamic model, and use it to investigate the effect of glacier recession on streamflow variations for the Upper Bow River basin, a tributary of the South Saskatchewan River. Several recent studies have suggested that observed decreases in summer flows in the South Saskatchewan River are partly due to the retreat of glaciers in the river's headwaters. Modeling the effect of glacier changes on streamflow response in river basins such as the South Saskatchewan is complicated due to the inability of most existing physically-based distributed hydrologic models to represent glacier dynamics. We compare predicted variations in glacier extent, snow water equivalent and streamflow discharge made with the integrated model with satellite estimates of glacier area and terminus position, observed streamflow and snow water equivalent measurements over the period of 1980 2007. Simulations with the coupled hydrology-glacier model reduce the uncertainty in streamflow predictions. Our results suggested that on average, the glacier melt contribution to the Bow River flow upstream of Lake Louise is about 30% in summer. For warm and dry years, however, the glacier melt contribution can be as large as 50% in August, whereas for cold years, it can be as small as 20% and the timing of glacier melt signature can be delayed by a month.

  7. Bulalo field, Philippines: Reservoir modeling for prediction of limits to sustainable generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strobel, Calvin J.

    1993-01-28

    The Bulalo geothermal field, located in Laguna province, Philippines, supplies 12% of the electricity on the island of Luzon. The first 110 MWe power plant was on line May 1979; current 330 MWe (gross) installed capacity was reached in 1984. Since then, the field has operated at an average plant factor of 76%. The National Power Corporation plans to add 40 MWe base load and 40 MWe standby in 1995. A numerical simulation model for the Bulalo field has been created that matches historic pressure changes, enthalpy and steam flash trends and cumulative steam production. Gravity modeling provided independent verification of mass balances and time rate of change of liquid desaturation in the rock matrix. Gravity modeling, in conjunction with reservoir simulation provides a means of predicting matrix dry out and the time to limiting conditions for sustainable levelized steam deliverability and power generation.

  8. Climate Model Response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Caldeira, Ken; Boucher, Olivier; Robock, Alan; Rasch, Philip J.; Alterskjaer, Kari; Bou Karam, Diana; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Haywood, J.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Jones, A.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Lunt, Daniel; Moore, John; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Schulz, M.; Singh, Balwinder; Tilmes, S.; Watanabe, Shingo; Yang, Shuting; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2013-08-09

    Solar geoengineeringdeliberate reduction in the amount of solar radiation retained by the Earthhas been proposed as a means of counteracting some of the climatic effects of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. We present results from Experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, in which 12 climate models have simulated the climate response to an abrupt quadrupling of CO2 from preindustrial concentrations brought into radiative balance via a globally uniform reduction in insolation. Models show this reduction largely offsets global mean surface temperature increases due to quadrupled CO2 concentrations and prevents 97% of the Arctic sea ice loss that would otherwise occur under high CO2 levels but, compared to the preindustrial climate, leaves the tropics cooler (-0.3 K) and the poles warmer (+0.8 K). Annual mean precipitation minus evaporation anomalies for G1 are less than 0.2mmday-1 in magnitude over 92% of the globe, but some tropical regions receive less precipitation, in part due to increased moist static stability and suppression of convection. Global average net primary productivity increases by 120% in G1 over simulated preindustrial levels, primarily from CO2 fertilization, but also in part due to reduced plant heat stress compared to a high CO2 world with no geoengineering. All models show that uniform solar geoengineering in G1 cannot simultaneously return regional and global temperature and hydrologic cycle intensity to preindustrial levels.

  9. A simple cohesive zone model that generates a mode-mixity dependent toughness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Reedy, Jr., E. D.; Emery, J. M.

    2014-07-24

    A simple, mode-mixity dependent toughness cohesive zone model (MDGc CZM) is described. This phenomenological cohesive zone model has two elements. Mode I energy dissipation is defined by a traction–separation relationship that depends only on normal separation. Mode II (III) dissipation is generated by shear yielding and slip in the cohesive surface elements that lie in front of the region where mode I separation (softening) occurs. The nature of predictions made by analyses that use the MDGc CZM is illustrated by considering the classic problem of an elastic layer loaded by rigid grips. This geometry, which models a thin adhesive bondmore » with a long interfacial edge crack, is similar to that which has been used to measure the dependence of interfacial toughness on crack-tip mode-mixity. The calculated effective toughness vs. applied mode-mixity relationships all display a strong dependence on applied mode-mixity with the effective toughness increasing rapidly with the magnitude of the mode-mixity. The calculated relationships also show a pronounced asymmetry with respect to the applied mode-mixity. As a result, this dependence is similar to that observed experimentally, and calculated results for a glass/epoxy interface are in good agreement with published data that was generated using a test specimen of the same type as analyzed here.« less

  10. Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation Incident

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Transportation Emergency Preparedness Program (TEPP) Model Recovery Procedure contains the recommended elements for developing and conducting recovery planning at transportation incident scene...

  11. Self-consistent modeling of radio-frequency plasma generation in stellarators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moiseenko, V. E. Stadnik, Yu. S.; Lysoivan, A. I.; Korovin, V. B.

    2013-11-15

    A self-consistent model of radio-frequency (RF) plasma generation in stellarators in the ion cyclotron frequency range is described. The model includes equations for the particle and energy balance and boundary conditions for Maxwells equations. The equation of charged particle balance takes into account the influx of particles due to ionization and their loss via diffusion and convection. The equation of electron energy balance takes into account the RF heating power source, as well as energy losses due to the excitation and electron-impact ionization of gas atoms, energy exchange via Coulomb collisions, and plasma heat conduction. The deposited RF power is calculated by solving the boundary problem for Maxwells equations. When describing the dissipation of the energy of the RF field, collisional absorption and Landau damping are taken into account. At each time step, Maxwells equations are solved for the current profiles of the plasma density and plasma temperature. The calculations are performed for a cylindrical plasma. The plasma is assumed to be axisymmetric and homogeneous along the plasma column. The system of balance equations is solved using the Crank-Nicholson scheme. Maxwells equations are solved in a one-dimensional approximation by using the Fourier transformation along the azimuthal and longitudinal coordinates. Results of simulations of RF plasma generation in the Uragan-2M stellarator by using a frame antenna operating at frequencies lower than the ion cyclotron frequency are presented. The calculations show that the slow wave generated by the antenna is efficiently absorbed at the periphery of the plasma column, due to which only a small fraction of the input power reaches the confinement region. As a result, the temperature on the axis of the plasma column remains low, whereas at the periphery it is substantially higher. This leads to strong absorption of the RF field at the periphery via the Landau mechanism.

  12. NARAC Modeling During the Response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Emergency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J S; Probanz, B; Foster, K T; Simpson, M; Vogt, P; Aluzzi, F; Dillon, M; Homann, S

    2012-02-14

    This paper summarizes the activities of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) during the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant crisis. NARAC provided a wide range of products and analyses as part of its support including: (1) Daily Japanese weather forecasts and hypothetical release (generic source term) dispersion predictions to provide situational awareness and inform planning for U.S. measurement data collection and field operations; (2) Estimates of potential dose in Japan for hypothetical scenarios developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to inform federal government considerations of possible actions that might be needed to protect U.S. citizens in Japan; (3) Estimates of possible plume arrival times and dose for U.S. locations; and (4) Plume model refinement and source estimation based on meteorological analyses and available field data. The Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) deployed personnel to Japan and stood up 'home team' assets across the DOE complex to aid in assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The DOE Nuclear Incident Team (NIT) coordinated response activities, while DOE personnel provided predictive modeling, air and ground monitoring, sample collection, laboratory analysis, and data assessment and interpretation. DOE deployed the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) personnel, and the Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) to Japan. DOE/NNSA home team assets included the Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT); National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS); and Radiological Triage. NARAC was activated by the DOE/NNSA on March 11, shortly after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami occurred. The center remained on active operations through late May when DOE ended its deployment to Japan. Over 32 NARAC staff members, supplemented by other LLNL scientists, invested over 5000 person-hours of time and generated over 300 analyses and predictions.

  13. Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressure Responses...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada Citation Details In-Document Search ... the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada This paper presents numerical modeling of ...

  14. Modeling of leachate generation from MSW landfills by a 2-dimensional 2-domain approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fellner, Johann

    2010-11-15

    The flow of water through Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) landfills is highly non-uniform and dominated by preferential pathways. Thus, concepts to simulate landfill behavior require that a heterogeneous flow regime is considered. Recent models are based on a 2-domain approach, differentiating between channel domain with high hydraulic conductivity, and matrix domain of slow water movement with high water retention capacity. These models focus on the mathematical description of rapid water flow in channel domain. The present paper highlights the importance of water exchange between the two domains, and expands the 1-dimensional, 2-domain flow model by taking into account water flows in two dimensions. A flow field consisting of a vertical path (channel domain) surrounded by the waste mass (matrix domain) is defined using the software HYDRUS-2D. When the new model is calibrated using data sets from a MSW-landfill site the predicted leachate generation corresponds well with the observed leachate discharge. An overall model efficiency in terms of r{sup 2} of 0.76 was determined for a simulation period of almost 4 years. The results confirm that water in landfills follows a preferential path way characterized by high permeability (K{sub s} = 300 m/d) and zero retention capacity, while the bulk of the landfill (matrix domain) is characterized by low permeability (K{sub s} = 0.1 m/d) and high retention capacity. The most sensitive parameters of the model are the hydraulic conductivities of the channel domain and the matrix domain, and the anisotropy of the matrix domain.

  15. Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Chang, Chin-Yao; Kalsi, Karanjit; Sun, Yannan

    2012-12-12

    Demand Response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid control strategies. Modeling the behavior of populations of appliances under demand response is especially important to evaluate the effectiveness of these demand response programs. In this paper, an aggregated model is proposed for a class of Thermostatically Controlled Loads (TCLs). The model efficiently includes statistical information of the population, systematically deals with heterogeneity, and accounts for a second-order effect necessary to accurately capture the transient dynamics in the collective response. However, an accurate characterization of the collective dynamics however requires the aggregate model to have a high state space dimension. Most of the existing model reduction techniques require the stability of the underlying system which does not hold for the proposed aggregated model. In this work, a novel model reduction approach is developed for the proposed aggregated model, which can significantly reduce its complexity with small performance loss. The original and the reducedorder aggregated models are validated against simulations of thousands of detailed building models using GridLAB-D, which is a realistic open source distribution simulation software. Index Terms demand response, aggregated model, ancillary

  16. Three Dimensional Response Spectrum Soil Structure Modeling Versus Conceptual Understanding To Illustrate Seismic Response Of Structures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Touqan, Abdul Razzaq

    2008-07-08

    Present methods of analysis and mathematical modeling contain so many assumptions that separate them from reality and thus represent a defect in design which makes it difficult to analyze reasons of failure. Three dimensional (3D) modeling is so superior to 1D or 2D modeling, static analysis deviates from the true nature of earthquake load which is 'a dynamic punch', and conflicting assumptions exist between structural engineers (who assume flexible structures on rigid block foundations) and geotechnical engineers (who assume flexible foundations supporting rigid structures). Thus a 3D dynamic soil-structure interaction is a step that removes many of the assumptions and thus clears reality to a greater extent. However such a model cannot be analytically analyzed. We need to anatomize and analogize it. The paper will represent a conceptual (analogical) 1D model for soil structure interaction and clarifies it by comparing its outcome with 3D dynamic soil-structure finite element analysis of two structures. The aim is to focus on how to calculate the period of the structure and to investigate effect of variation of stiffness on soil-structure interaction.

  17. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Permalink Wind Generator Modeling Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, Energy Surety, Grid Integration, Infrastructure Security, Modeling, Modeling & Analysis, News, News & Events, Renewable Energy, SMART Grid, Systems Analysis, Transmission Grid Integration, Wind Energy Wind Generator Modeling This modular block diagram represents the major components of the generic dynamic wind turbine generator models. Model blocks and parameters are used to represent the different wind

  18. Evaluation of an emergency response model for the Rocky Flats Plant: Charter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This Charter provides a basis for a cooperative, interagency effort to evaluate the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code for emergency response and emergency planning for the Rocky Flats Plant. This document establishes the foundation for the project entitled, Evaluation of an Emergency Response Model for the Rocky Flats Plant'' (to be referred to as the Project). This document meets the following objectives: Identify the Project; establish the project management structure, organizational responsibilities, and organizational commitments for reaching the goals of the Project, and identify a process for model revision and revelation for acceptance. 2 figs.

  19. PROJECT PROFILE: Frequency Response Assessment and Improvement of Three Major North American Interconnections due to High Penetrations of Photovoltaic Generation (SuNLaMP)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As the number of solar photovoltaic (PV) installations continues to grow exponentially, one of the major challenges to grid stability will be mitigating decreasing system inertia and deteriorating frequency response. Preliminary independent studies on two North American interconnections have already demonstrated that the overall frequency response will deteriorate significantly with increasing renewable generation. This project will investigate the frequency response and system inertia impacts with high PV penetration levels for all three major interconnections, namely the Eastern Interconnection, Western Interconnection, and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas.

  20. Methane for Power Generation in Muaro Jambi: A Green Prosperity Model Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, K.; Elchinger, M.; Hill, G.; Katz, J.; Barnett, J.

    2014-07-01

    NREL conducted eight model projects for Millennium Challenge Corporation's (MCC) Compact with Indonesia. Green Prosperity, the largest project of the Compact, seeks to address critical constraints to economic growth while supporting the Government of Indonesia's commitment to a more sustainable, less carbon-intensive future. This study evaluates electricity generation from the organic content of wastewater at a palm oil mill in Muaro Jambi, Sumatra. Palm mills use vast amounts of water in the production process resulting in problematic waste water called palm oil mill effluent (POME). The POME releases methane to the atmosphere in open ponds which could be covered to capture the methane to produce renewable electricity for rural villages. The study uses average Indonesia data to determine the economic viability of methane capture at a palm oil mill and also evaluates technology as well as social and environmental impacts of the project.

  1. Model predictive control system and method for integrated gasification combined cycle power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Kumar, Rajeeva; Dokucu, Mustafa

    2013-04-09

    Control system and method for controlling an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system may include a controller coupled to a dynamic model of the plant to process a prediction of plant performance and determine a control strategy for the IGCC plant over a time horizon subject to plant constraints. The control strategy may include control functionality to meet a tracking objective and control functionality to meet an optimization objective. The control strategy may be configured to prioritize the tracking objective over the optimization objective based on a coordinate transformation, such as an orthogonal or quasi-orthogonal projection. A plurality of plant control knobs may be set in accordance with the control strategy to generate a sequence of coordinated multivariable control inputs to meet the tracking objective and the optimization objective subject to the prioritization resulting from the coordinate transformation.

  2. Non-Gaussian density fluctuations from entropically generated curvature perturbations in ekpyrotic models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehners, Jean-Luc; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2008-03-15

    We analyze the non-Gaussian density perturbations generated in ekpyrotic/cyclic models based on heterotic M theory. In this picture, two scalar fields produce nearly scale-invariant entropic perturbations during an ekpyrotic phase that are converted into curvature modes after the ekpyrotic phase is complete and just before the big bang. Both intrinsic nonlinearity in the entropy perturbation and the conversion process contribute to non-Gaussianity. The range of the non-Gaussianity parameter f{sub NL} depends on how gradual the conversion process is and the steepness of the scalar field potential during the ekpyrotic phase. Although a wider range is possible, in principle, natural values of the ekpyrotic parameters combined with a gradual conversion process lead to values of -50 < or approx. f{sub NL} < or approx. +200, typically much greater than slow-roll inflation but within the current observational bounds.

  3. Collider Signals of a Composite Higgs in the Standard Model with Four Generations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soni, A.; Bar-Shalom, S.; Eilam, G.

    2010-03-20

    Recent fits of electroweak precision data to the StandardModel (SM) with a 4th sequential family (SM4) point to a possible 'three-prong composite solution': (1) the Higgs mass is at the TeV-scale, (2) the masses of the 4th family quarks t{prime}, b{prime} are of {Omicron}(500) GeV and (3) the mixing angle between the 4th and 3rd generation quarks is of the order of the Cabibbo angle, {theta}{sub 34} {approx} {Omicron}(0.1). Such a manifestation of the SM4 is of particular interest as it may suggest that the Higgs is a composite state, predominantly of the 4th generation heavy quarks. Motivated by the above, we show that the three-prong composite solution to the SM4 can have interesting new implications for Higgs phenomenology. For example, the Higgs can decay to a single heavy 4th generation quark via the 3-body decays (through an off-shell t{prime} or b{prime}) H {yields} {bar t}{prime}t{prime}* {yields} {bar t}{prime}bW{sup +} and H {yields} {bar b}{prime}b{prime}* {yields} {bar b}{prime}tW{sup -}. These flavor diagonal decays can be dramatically enhanced at the LHC (by several orders of magnitudes) due to the large width effects of the resonating heavy Higgs in the processes gg {yields} H {yields} {bar t}{prime}t{prime}* {yields} {bar t}{prime}bW{sup +} and gg {yields} H {yields} {bar b}{prime}b{prime}* {yields} {bar b}{prime}tW{sup -}, thus yielding a viable signal above the corresponding continuum QCD production rates. In addition, the Higgs can decay to a single t{prime} and b{prime} in the loop-generated flavor changing (FC) channels H {yields} b{prime}{bar b}, t{prime}{bar t}. These FC decays are essentially 'GIM-free' and can, therefore, have branching ratios as large as 10{sup -4} - 10{sup -3}.

  4. Modeling the viscoplastic micromechanical response of two-phase materials using fast Fourier transforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebensohn, Ricardo A; Lee, Sukbin; Rollett, Anthony D

    2009-01-01

    A viscoplastic approach using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method for obtaining local mechanical response is utilized to study microstructure-property relationships in composite materials. Specifically, three-dimensional, two-phase digital materials containing isotropically coarsened particles surrounded by a matrix phase, generated through a Kinetic Monte Carlo Potts model for Ostwald ripening, are used as instantiations in order to calculate the stress and strain rate fields under uniaxial tension. The effects of the morphology of the matrix phase, the volume fraction and the contiguity of particles, and the polycrystallinity of matrix phase, on the stress and strain rate fields under uniaxial tension are examined. It is found that the first moments of the stress and strain rate fields have a different dependence on the particle volume fraction and the particle contiguity from their second moments. The average stresses and average strain rates of both phases and of the overall composite have rather simple relationships with the particle volume fraction whereas their standard deviations vary strongly, especially when the particle volume fraction is high, and the contiguity of particles has a noticeable effect on the mechanical response. It is also found that the shape of stress distribution in the BCC hard particle phase evolves as the volume fraction of particles in the composite varies, such that it agrees with the stress field in the BCC polycrystal as the volume of particles approaches unity. Finally, it is observed that the stress and strain rate fields in the microstructures with a polycrystalline matrix are less sensitive to changes in volume fraction and contiguity of particles.

  5. A systems model and potential leverage points for base load electric generating options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Price, L.G.; Sebo, D.E.

    1993-09-01

    The mission and structure of electric utilities may change significantly to meet the challenges on the next several decades. In addition, providing electrical energy in an environmentally responsible manner will continue to be a major challenge. The methods of supplying electrical power may change dramatically in the future as utilities search for ways to improve the availability and reliability of electrical power systems. The role of large, base load generating capacity to supply the bulk of a utility`s electrical power is evolving, but it will continue to be important for many years to come. The objective of this study is to examine the systems structure of five base load capacity options available to a utility and identify areas where technological improvements could produce significant changes in their systems. These improvements would enhance the likelihood that these options would be selected for providing future electrical capacity. Technology improvements are identified and discussed, but it was beyond the scope of this work to develop strategies for specific Idaho National Engineering Laboratory involvement.

  6. Final report for %22High performance computing for advanced national electric power grid modeling and integration of solar generation resources%22, LDRD Project No. 149016.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, Matthew J.; Riehm, Andrew Charles; Hoekstra, Robert John; Munoz-Ramirez, Karina; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Phillips, Laurence R.; Adams, Brian M.; Russo, Thomas V.; Oldfield, Ron A.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Hansen, Clifford W.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stein, Joshua S.; Schoenwald, David Alan; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.

    2011-02-01

    Design and operation of the electric power grid (EPG) relies heavily on computational models. High-fidelity, full-order models are used to study transient phenomena on only a small part of the network. Reduced-order dynamic and power flow models are used when analysis involving thousands of nodes are required due to the computational demands when simulating large numbers of nodes. The level of complexity of the future EPG will dramatically increase due to large-scale deployment of variable renewable generation, active load and distributed generation resources, adaptive protection and control systems, and price-responsive demand. High-fidelity modeling of this future grid will require significant advances in coupled, multi-scale tools and their use on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. This LDRD report demonstrates SNL's capability to apply HPC resources to these 3 tasks: (1) High-fidelity, large-scale modeling of power system dynamics; (2) Statistical assessment of grid security via Monte-Carlo simulations of cyber attacks; and (3) Development of models to predict variability of solar resources at locations where little or no ground-based measurements are available.

  7. THE TRANSITION REGION RESPONSE TO A CORONAL NANOFLARE: FORWARD MODELING AND

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    OBSERVATIONS IN SDO/AIA (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect THE TRANSITION REGION RESPONSE TO A CORONAL NANOFLARE: FORWARD MODELING AND OBSERVATIONS IN SDO/AIA Citation Details In-Document Search Title: THE TRANSITION REGION RESPONSE TO A CORONAL NANOFLARE: FORWARD MODELING AND OBSERVATIONS IN SDO/AIA The corona and transition region (TR) are fundamentally coupled through the processes of thermal conduction and mass exchange. It is not possible to understand one without the other. Yet the

  8. The Effect of the Contact Model on Predicting Impact-Vibration Response.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Conference: The Effect of the Contact Model on Predicting Impact-Vibration Response. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Effect of the Contact Model on Predicting Impact-Vibration Response. Authors: Brake, Matthew Robert Publication Date: 2012-06-01 OSTI Identifier: 1064253 Report Number(s): SAND2012-5215C DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Proposed for presentation at the ASME 2012

  9. Modeling Transient Response of Forests to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H; Tharp, M Lynn; Lannom, Karen O.; Hodges, Donald G

    2010-01-01

    Our hypothesis is that a high diversity of dominant life forms in Tennessee forests conveys resilience to disturbance such as climate change. Because of uncertainty in climate change and their effects, three climate change scenarios for 2030 and 2080 from three General Circulation Models (GCMs) were used to simulate a range of potential climate conditions for the state. These climate changes derive from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) A1B storyline that assumes rapid global economic growth. The precipitation and temperature projections from the three GCMs for 2030 and 2080 were related to changes in five ecological provinces using the monthly record of temperature and precipitation from 1980 to 1997 for each 1 km cell across the state as aggregated into the provinces. Temperatures are projected to increase in all ecological provinces in all months for all three GCMs for both 2030 and 2080. Precipitation differences from the long-term average are more complex but less striking. The forest ecosystem model LINKAGES was used to simulate conditions for five ecological provinces from 1989 to 2300. Average output projects changes in tree diversity and species composition in all ecological provinces in Tennessee with the greatest changes in the Southern Mixed Forest province. Projected declines in total tree biomass are followed by biomass recovery as species replacement occurs in stands. The Southern Mixed Forest province results in less diversity in dominant trees as well as lower overall biomass than projections for the other four provinces. The biomass and composition changes projected in this study differ from forest dynamics expected without climate change. These results suggest that biomass recovery following climate change is linked to dominant tree diversity in the southeastern forest of the US. The generality of this observation warrants further investigation, for it relates to ways that forest management may influence climate change effects.

  10. Generation of defects in model lubricant monolayers and their contribution to energy dissipation in friction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmeron, Miquel

    2000-06-15

    The structural, mechanical (friction) and spectroscopic properties of model lubricant films made of self-assembled and Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers on quartz, mica and gold have been investigated with atomic force microscopy, surface forces apparatus and sum frequency generation. In these films, the molecules tend to form densely packed structures, with the alkane chains mostly vertical and parallel to each other. The SFG results suggest that under moderate pressures of a few tens of MPa, the methyl end group of the alkane chains is rotated to accommodate a terminal gauche distortion. The molecule,however, retains its upright close packed structure with a lattice periodicity when ordered, which can be resolved by AFM. At pressures above 0.1 GPa, changes in the form of collective molecular tilts take place that lower the height of the monolayer. Only certain angles of tilt are allowed that are explained by the interlocking of methylene units in neighboring chains. The discrete angular tilts are accompanied by increases in friction. A model based on the van derWaals attractive energy between chains is used to explain the stability of the films and to estimate the cohesive energy changes during tilt and, from that, the increases in friction force.

  11. Microsoft Word - NRAP-TRS-III-002-2014_Second-Generation Reduced-Order Model for Calculation of Groundwater Impacts_20140407.do

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Second-Generation Reduced-Order Model for Calculation of Groundwater Impacts as a Function pH, Total Dissolved Solids, and Trace Metal Concentrations 7 April 2014 Office of Fossil Energy NRAP-TRS-III-002-2014 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility

  12. A non-linear dimension reduction methodology for generating data-driven stochastic input models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Zabaras, Nicholas

    2008-06-20

    Stochastic analysis of random heterogeneous media (polycrystalline materials, porous media, functionally graded materials) provides information of significance only if realistic input models of the topology and property variations are used. This paper proposes a framework to construct such input stochastic models for the topology and thermal diffusivity variations in heterogeneous media using a data-driven strategy. Given a set of microstructure realizations (input samples) generated from given statistical information about the medium topology, the framework constructs a reduced-order stochastic representation of the thermal diffusivity. This problem of constructing a low-dimensional stochastic representation of property variations is analogous to the problem of manifold learning and parametric fitting of hyper-surfaces encountered in image processing and psychology. Denote by M the set of microstructures that satisfy the given experimental statistics. A non-linear dimension reduction strategy is utilized to map M to a low-dimensional region, A. We first show that M is a compact manifold embedded in a high-dimensional input space R{sup n}. An isometric mapping F from M to a low-dimensional, compact, connected set A is contained in R{sup d}(d<model of the material topology and thermal diffusivity variations is subsequently used as an input in the solution of stochastic partial differential equations that describe the evolution of dependant variables. A sparse grid collocation strategy (Smolyak algorithm) is utilized to solve these stochastic equations efficiently. We showcase the methodology by constructing low-dimensional input stochastic models to represent thermal diffusivity in two-phase microstructures. This model is used in analyzing the effect of topological variations of two-phase microstructures on the evolution of temperature in heat conduction processes.

  13. Steam Generator Component Model in a Combined Cycle of Power Conversion Unit for Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oh, Chang H; Han, James; Barner, Robert; Sherman, Steven R

    2007-06-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. A combined cycle is considered as one of the power conversion units to be coupled to the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). The combined cycle configuration consists of a Brayton top cycle coupled to a Rankine bottoming cycle by means of a steam generator. A detailed sizing and pressure drop model of a steam generator is not available in the HYSYS processes code. Therefore a four region model was developed for implementation into HYSYS. The focus of this study was the validation of a HYSYS steam generator model of two phase flow correlations. The correlations calculated the size and heat exchange of the steam generator. To assess the model, those calculations were input into a RELAP5 model and its results were compared with HYSYS results. The comparison showed many differences in parameters such as the heat transfer coefficients and revealed the different methods used by the codes. Despite differences in approach, the overall results of heat transfer were in good agreement.

  14. Aggregated Modeling and Control of Air Conditioning Loads for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Chang, Chin-Yao; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2013-06-21

    Demand response is playing an increasingly important role in the efficient and reliable operation of the electric grid. Modeling the dynamic behavior of a large population of responsive loads is especially important to evaluate the effectiveness of various demand response strategies. In this paper, a highly-accurate aggregated model is developed for a population of air conditioning loads. The model effectively includes statistical information of the population, systematically deals with load heterogeneity, and accounts for second-order dynamics necessary to accurately capture the transient dynamics in the collective response. Based on the model, a novel aggregated control strategy is designed for the load population under realistic conditions. The proposed controller is fully responsive and achieves the control objective without sacrificing end-use performance. The proposed aggregated modeling and control strategies are validated through realistic simulations using GridLAB-D. Extensive simulation results indicate that the proposed approach can effectively manage a large number of air conditioning systems to provide various demand response services, such as frequency regulation and peak load reduction.

  15. Response Response

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Attachment 7 Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Response Percent of Mentors that are People with Disabilities 9.00% Total number of Mentors (The count used to calculate the Mentor percentages) 252 Demographic Information Percent of Mentors Two or More Races Not reported Percent of White Mentors 63.00% Percent of Female Mentors 39.00% Percent of Male Mentors 61.00% Percent of Veteran Mentors 21.00% Percent of Asian American Mentors

  16. Modeling the Structural Response from a Propagating High Explosive Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margraf, J

    2012-06-12

    This report primarily concerns the use of two massively parallel finite element codes originally written and maintained at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. ALE3D is an explicit hydrodynamics code commonly employed to simulate wave propagation from high energy scenarios and the resulting interaction with nearby structures. This coupled response ensures that a structure is accurately applied with a blast loading varying both in space and time. Figure 1 illustrates the radial outward propagation of a pressure wave due to a center detonated spherical explosive originating from the lower left. The radial symmetry seen in this scenario is lost when instead a cylindrocal charge is detonated. Figure 2 indicates that a stronger, faster traveling pressure wave occurs in the direction of the normal axis to the cylinder. The ALE3D name is derived because of the use of arbitrary-Lagrange-Eulerian elements in which the mesh is allowed to advect; a process through which the mesh is modified to alleviate tanlging and general mesh distortion often cuased by high energy scenarios. The counterpart to an advecting element is a Lagrange element, whose mesh moves with the material. Ideally all structural components are kept Lagrange as long as possible to preserve accuracy of material variables and minimize advection related errors. Advection leads to mixed zoning, so using structural Lagrange elements also improves the visualization when post processing the results. A simplified representation of the advection process is shown in Figure 3. First the mesh is distorted due to material motion during the Lagrange step. The mesh is then shifted to an idealized and less distorted state to prevent irregular zones caused by the Lagrange motion. Lastly, the state variables are remapped to the elements of the newly constructed mesh. Note that Figure 3 represents a purely Eulerian mesh relaxation because the mesh is relocated back to the pre-Lagrange position. This is the case when the material flows through a still mesh. This is not typically done in an ALE3D analysis, especially if Lagrange elements exist. Deforming Lagrange elements would certainly tangle with a Eulerian mesh eventually. The best method in this case is to have an advecting mesh positioned as some relaxed version of the pre and post Lagrange step; this gives the best opportunity of modeling a high energy event with a combination of Lagrange and ALE elements. Dyne3D is another explicit dynamic analysis code, ParaDyn being the parallel version. ParaDyn is used for predicting the transient response of three dimensional structures using Lagrangian solid mechanics. Large deformation and mesh tangling is often resolved through the use of an element deletion scheme. This is useful to accommodate component failure, but if it is done purely as a means to preserve a useful mesh it can lead to problems because it does not maintain continuity of the material bulk response. Whatever medium exists between structural components is typically not modeled in ParaDyn. Instead, a structure either has a known loading profile applied or given initial conditions. The many included contact algorithms can calculate the loading response of materials if and when they collide. A recent implementation of an SPH module in which failed or deleted material nodes are converted to independent particles is currently being utilized for a variety of spall related problems and high velocity impact scenarios. Figure 4 shows an example of a projectile, given an initial velocity, and how it fails the first plate which generates SPH particles which then interact with and damage the second plate.

  17. Quantifying and Generalizing Hydrologic Responses to Dam Regulation using a Statistical Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A

    2014-01-01

    Despite the ubiquitous existence of dams within riverscapes, much of our knowledge about dams and their environmental effects remains context-specific. Hydrology, more than any other environmental variable, has been studied in great detail with regard to dam regulation. While much progress has been made in generalizing the hydrologic effects of regulation by large dams, many aspects of hydrology show site-specific fidelity to dam operations, small dams (including diversions), and regional hydrologic regimes. A statistical modeling framework is presented to quantify and generalize hydrologic responses to varying degrees of dam regulation. Specifically, the objectives were to 1) compare the effects of local versus cumulative dam regulation, 2) determine the importance of different regional hydrologic regimes in influencing hydrologic responses to dams, and 3) evaluate how different regulation contexts lead to error in predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Overall, model performance was poor in quantifying the magnitude of hydrologic responses, but performance was sufficient in classifying hydrologic responses as negative or positive. Responses of some hydrologic indices to dam regulation were highly dependent upon hydrologic class membership and the purpose of the dam. The opposing coefficients between local and cumulative-dam predictors suggested that hydrologic responses to cumulative dam regulation are complex, and predicting the hydrology downstream of individual dams, as opposed to multiple dams, may be more easy accomplished using statistical approaches. Results also suggested that particular contexts, including multipurpose dams, high cumulative regulation by multiple dams, diversions, close proximity to dams, and certain hydrologic classes are all sources of increased error when predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Statistical models, such as the ones presented herein, show promise in their ability to model the effects of dam regulation effects at large spatial scales as to generalize the directionality of hydrologic responses.

  18. On the Inclusion of Energy-Shifting Demand Response in Production Cost Models: Methodology and a Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, Niamh; Hale, Elaine; Doebber, Ian; Jorgenson, Jennie

    2015-07-20

    In the context of future power system requirements for additional flexibility, demand response (DR) is an attractive potential resource. Its proponents widely laud its prospective benefits, which include enabling higher penetrations of variable renewable generation at lower cost than alternative storage technologies, and improving economic efficiency. In practice, DR from the commercial and residential sectors is largely an emerging, not a mature, resource, and its actual costs and benefits need to be studied to determine promising combinations of physical DR resource, enabling controls and communications, power system characteristics, regulatory environments, market structures, and business models. The work described in this report focuses on the enablement of such analysis from the production cost modeling perspective. In particular, we contribute a bottom-up methodology for modeling load-shifting DR in production cost models. The resulting model is sufficiently detailed to reflect the physical characteristics and constraints of the underlying flexible load, and includes the possibility of capturing diurnal and seasonal variations in the resource. Nonetheless, the model is of low complexity and thus suitable for inclusion in conventional unit commitment and market clearing algorithms. The ability to simulate DR as an operational resource on a power system over a year facilitates an assessment of its time-varying value to the power system.

  19. Development and Validation of Aggregated Models for Thermostatic Controlled Loads with Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Fuller, Jason C.; Lu, Shuai; Chassin, David P.

    2012-01-04

    Demand response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid research and technologies being examined in recently undertaken demonstration projects. The behavior of load as it is affected by various load control strategies is important to understanding the degree to which different classes of end-use load can contribute to demand response programs at various times. This paper focuses on developing aggregated control models for a population of thermostatically controlled loads. The effects of demand response on the load population dynamics are investigated.

  20. The Effect of the Contact Model on the Impact-Vibration Response of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Continuous and Discrete Systems. (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: The Effect of the Contact Model on the Impact-Vibration Response of Continuous and Discrete Systems. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: The Effect of the Contact Model on the Impact-Vibration Response of Continuous and Discrete Systems. Authors: Brake, Matthew Robert Publication Date: 2012-07-01 OSTI Identifier: 1064318 Report Number(s): SAND2012-5619J DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource

  1. Response Surface Energy Modeling of an Electric Vehicle over a Reduced Composite Drive Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jehlik, Forrest; LaClair, Tim J.

    2014-04-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) techniques were applied to develop a predictive model of electric vehicle (EV) energy consumption over the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) standardized drive cycles. The model is based on measurements from a synthetic composite drive cycle. The synthetic drive cycle is a minimized statistical composite of the standardized urban (UDDS), highway (HWFET), and US06 cycles. The composite synthetic drive cycle is 20 minutes in length thereby reducing testing time of the three standard EPA cycles by over 55%. Vehicle speed and acceleration were used as model inputs for a third order least squared regression model predicting vehicle battery power output as a function of the drive cycle. The approach reduced three cycles and 46 minutes of drive time to a single test of 20 minutes. Application of response surface modeling to the synthetic drive cycle is shown to predict energy consumption of the three EPA cycles within 2.6% of the actual measured values. Additionally, the response model may be used to predict energy consumption of any cycle within the speed/acceleration envelope of the synthetic cycle. This technique results in reducing test time, which additionally provides a model that may be used to expand the analysis and understanding of the vehicle under consideration.

  2. Understanding the Effect of Baseline Modeling Implementation Choices on Analysis of Demand Response Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of California, Berkeley; Addy, Nathan; Kiliccote, Sila; Mathieu, Johanna; Callaway, Duncan S.

    2012-06-13

    Accurate evaluation of the performance of buildings participating in Demand Response (DR) programs is critical to the adoption and improvement of these programs. Typically, we calculate load sheds during DR events by comparing observed electric demand against counterfactual predictions made using statistical baseline models. Many baseline models exist and these models can produce different shed calculations. Moreover, modelers implementing the same baseline model can make different modeling implementation choices, which may affect shed estimates. In this work, using real data, we analyze the effect of different modeling implementation choices on shed predictions. We focused on five issues: weather data source, resolution of data, methods for determining when buildings are occupied, methods for aligning building data with temperature data, and methods for power outage filtering. Results indicate sensitivity to the weather data source and data filtration methods as well as an immediate potential for automation of methods to choose building occupied modes.

  3. Response Model for Kodak Biomax-MS Film to X Rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knauer, J.P.; Marshall, F.J.; Yaakobi, B.; Anderson, D.; Schmitt, B.A.; Chandler, K.M.; Pikuz, S.A.; Shelkovenko, T.A.; Mitchell, M.D.; Hammer, D.A.

    2007-01-24

    X-raysensitive film is used for a variety of imaging and spectroscopic diagnostics for high-temperature plasmas. New film becomes available as older films are phased out of production. Biomax-MS is a T-grain class of film that is proposed as a replacement for Kodak DEF film. A model of its response to x rays is presented. Data from dimensional measurements of the film, x-ray transmission measurements, SEM micrograph images, and x-ray calibration are used to develop this sensitivity model of Biomax-MS film as a function of x-ray energy and angle of incidence. Relative response data provide a check of the applicability of this model to determine the x-ray flux from spectrum data. This detailed film characterization starts with simple mathematical models and extends them to T-grain type film.

  4. Response model for Kodak Biomax-MS film to x rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knauer, J. P.; Marshall, F. J.; Yaakobi, B.; Anderson, D.; Schmitt, B. A.; Chandler, K. M.; Pikuz, S. A.; Shelkovenko, T. A.; Mitchell, M. D.; Hammer, D. A.

    2006-10-15

    X-ray-sensitive film is used for a variety of imaging and spectroscopic diagnostics for high-temperature plasmas. Replacement film must be found as older films are phased out of production. Biomax-MS is a 'T-grain' class of film that is proposed as a replacement for Kodak DEF and a model of its response to x rays is presented. Data from dimensional measurements of the film, x-ray transmission measurements, scanning electron microscopy micrograph images, and x-ray calibration are used to develop this sensitivity model of Biomax-MS film as a function of x-ray energy and angle of incidence. Relative response data provide a check of the applicability of this model to determine the x-ray flux from spectrum data. This detailed film characterization starts with simple mathematical models and extends them to T-grain-type film.

  5. Results of an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model comparison using a state accepted statistical protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciolek, J.T. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant, located approximately 26 km northwest of downtown Denver, Colorado, has developed an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model for complex terrain applications. Plant personnel would use the model, known as the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) (Hodgin 1985) to project plume impacts and provide off-site protective action recommendations to the State of Colorado should a hazardous material release occur from the facility. The Colorado Department of Health (CDH) entered into an interagency agreement with the Rocky Flats Plant prime contractor, EG&G Rocky Flats, and the US Department of Energy to evaluate TRAC as an acceptable emergency response tool. After exhaustive research of similar evaluation processes from other emergency response and regulatory organizations, the interagency committee devised a formal acceptance process. The process contains an evaluation protocol (Hodgin and Smith 1992), descriptions of responsibilities, an identified experimental data set to use in the evaluation, and judgment criteria for model acceptance. The evaluation protocol is general enough to allow for different implementations. This paper explains one implementation, shows protocol results for a test case, and presents results of a comparison between versions of TRAC with different wind Field codes: a two dimensional mass consistent code called WINDS (Fosberg et al. 1976) that has been extended to three dimensions, and a fully 3 dimensional mass conserving code called NUATMOS (Ross and Smith 1987, Ross et al. 1988).

  6. An analytic model for the response of a CZT detector in diagnostic energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeClair, Robert J.; Wang Yinkun; Zhao Peiying; Boileau, Michel; Wang, Lilie; Fleurot, Fabrice [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada) and Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2006-05-15

    A CdZnTe detector (CZTD) can be very useful for measuring diagnostic x-ray spectra. The semiconductor detector does, however, exhibit poor hole transport properties and fluorescence generation upon atomic de-excitations. This article describes an analytic model to characterize these two phenomena that occur when a CZTD is exposed to diagnostic x rays. The analytical detector response functions compare well with those obtained via Monte Carlo calculations. The response functions were applied to 50, 80, and 110 kV x-ray spectra. Two 50 kV spectra were measured; one with no filtration and the other with 1.35 mm Al filtration. The unfiltered spectrum was numerically filtered with 1.35 mm of Al in order to see whether the recovered spectrum resembled the filtered spectrum actually measured. A deviation curve was obtained by subtracting one curve from the other on an energy bin by bin basis. The deviation pattern fluctuated around the zero line when corrections were applied to both spectra. Significant deviations from zero towards the lower energies were observed when the uncorrected spectra were used. Beside visual observations, the exposure obtained using the numerically attenuated unfiltered beam was compared to the exposure calculated with the actual filtered beam. The percent differences were 0.8% when corrections were applied and 25% for no corrections. The model can be used to correct diagnostic x-ray spectra measured with a CdZnTe detector.

  7. Aggregated Modeling of Thermostatic Loads in Demand Response: A Systems and Control Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Chassin, Forrest S.; Chassin, David P.

    2011-12-12

    Demand response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid research and technologies being examined in recently undertaken demonstration projects. The behavior of load as it is affected by various load control strategies is important to understanding the degree to which different classes of end-use load can contribute to demand response programs at various times. This paper focuses on developing aggregated models for a homogeneous population of thermostatically controlled loads. The different types of loads considered in this paper include, but are not limited to, water heaters and HVAC units. The effects of demand response and user over-ride on the load population dynamics are investigated. The controllability of the developed lumped models is validated which forms the basis for designing different control strategies.

  8. Price Responsiveness in the AEO2003 NEMS Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Models

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the demand responses to changes in energy prices in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 versions of the Residential and Commercial Demand Modules of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It updates a similar paper completed for the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 version of the NEMS.

  9. Verification of voltage/frequency requirement for emergency diesel generator in nuclear power plant using dynamic modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hur, Jin-Suk; Roh, Myung- Sub

    2014-02-12

    One major cause of the plant shutdown is the loss of electrical power. The study is to comprehend the coping action against station blackout including emergency diesel generator, sequential loading of safety system and to ensure that the emergency diesel generator should meet requirements, especially voltage and frequency criteria using modeling tool. This paper also considered the change of the sequencing time and load capacity only for finding electrical design margin. However, the revision of load list must be verified with safety analysis. From this study, it is discovered that new load calculation is a key factor in EDG localization and in-house capability increase.

  10. INGRID: a three-dimensional mesh generator for modeling nonlinear systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stillman, D.W.; Hallquist, J.O.

    1985-07-01

    INGRID generates complete input files for the codes DYNA3D, NIKE3D, FACET, and TOPAZ3D. Geometries are described primarily using index space concepts which came from the program INGEN. The ideas used in INGEN were reworked into a new method which is both simple and powerful. Interactive graphics in INGRID are patterned after TAURUS, a three-dimensional post-processor, and MAZE, a two-dimensional mesh generator. Much of the coding from MAZE is directly incorporated in INGRID.

  11. Response of a laminar premixed flame to flow oscillations: A kinematic model and thermoacoustic instability results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleifil, M.; Annaswamy, A.M.; Ghoneim, A.F.; Ghoneim, Z.A.

    1996-09-01

    Combustion instability is a resonance phenomenon that arises due to the coupling between the system acoustics and the unsteady heat release. The constructive feedback between the two processes, which is known to occur as a certain phase relationship between the pressure and the unsteady heat release rate is satisfied, depends on many parameters among which is the acoustic mode, the flame holder characteristics, and the dominant burning pattern. In this paper, the authors construct an analytical model to describe the dynamic response of a laminar premixed flame stabilized on the rim of a tube to velocity oscillation. They consider uniform and nonuniform velocity perturbations superimposed on a pipe flow velocity profile. The model results show that the magnitude of heat release perturbation and its phase with respect to the dynamic perturbation dependent primarily on the flame Strohal number, representing the ratio of the dominant frequency times the tube radius to the laminar burning velocity. In terms of this number, high-frequency perturbations pass through the flame while low frequencies lead to a strong response. The phase with respect to the velocity perturbation behaves in the opposite way. Results of this model are shown to agree with experimental observations and to be useful in determining how the combustion excited model is selected among all the acoustic unstable modes. The model is then used to obtain a time-domain differential equation describing the relationship between the velocity perturbation and the heat release response over the entire frequency range.

  12. Models the Electromagnetic Response of a 3D Distribution using MP COMPUTERS

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1999-05-01

    EM3D models the electromagnetic response of a 3D distribution of conductivity, dielectric permittivity and magnetic permeability within the earth for geophysical applications using massively parallel computers. The simulations are carried out in the frequency domain for either electric or magnetic sources for either scattered or total filed formulations of Maxwell''s equations. The solution is based on the method of finite differences and includes absorbing boundary conditions so that responses can be modeled up into themore » radar range where wave propagation is dominant. Recent upgrades in the software include the incorporation of finite size sources, that in addition to dipolar source fields, and a low induction number preconditioner that can significantly reduce computational run times. A graphical user interface (GUI) is bundled with the software so that complicated 3D models can be easily constructed and simulated with the software. The GUI also allows for plotting of the output.« less

  13. Modeling and Analysis of The Pressure Die Casting Using Response Surface Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kittur, Jayant K.; Herwadkar, T. V. [KLS Gogte Institute of Technology, Belgaum -590 008, Karnataka (India); Parappagoudar, M. B. [Chhatrapati Shivaji Institute of Technology, Durg (C.G)-491001 (India)

    2010-10-26

    Pressure die casting is successfully used in the manufacture of Aluminum alloys components for automobile and many other industries. Die casting is a process involving many process parameters having complex relationship with the quality of the cast product. Though various process parameters have influence on the quality of die cast component, major influence is seen by the die casting machine parameters and their proper settings. In the present work, non-linear regression models have been developed for making predictions and analyzing the effect of die casting machine parameters on the performance characteristics of die casting process. Design of Experiments (DOE) with Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been used to analyze the effect of effect of input parameters and their interaction on the response and further used to develop nonlinear input-output relationships. Die casting machine parameters, namely, fast shot velocity, slow shot to fast shot change over point, intensification pressure and holding time have been considered as the input variables. The quality characteristics of the cast product were determined by porosity, hardness and surface rough roughness (output/responses). Design of experiments has been used to plan the experiments and analyze the impact of variables on the quality of casting. On the other-hand Response Surface Methodology (Central Composite Design) is utilized to develop non-linear input-output relationships (regression models). The developed regression models have been tested for their statistical adequacy through ANOVA test. The practical usefulness of these models has been tested with some test cases. These models can be used to make the predictions about different quality characteristics, for the known set of die casting machine parameters, without conducting the experiments.

  14. Fuel Cell Tri-Generation System Case Study using the H2A Stationary Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Overview of H2A stationary model concept, results, strategy for analysis, Federal incentives for fuel cells, and summary of next steps

  15. Systems and methods that generate height map models for efficient three dimensional reconstruction from depth information

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frahm, Jan-Michael; Pollefeys, Marc Andre Leon; Gallup, David Robert

    2015-12-08

    Methods of generating a three dimensional representation of an object in a reference plane from a depth map including distances from a reference point to pixels in an image of the object taken from a reference point. Weights are assigned to respective voxels in a three dimensional grid along rays extending from the reference point through the pixels in the image based on the distances in the depth map from the reference point to the respective pixels, and a height map including an array of height values in the reference plane is formed based on the assigned weights. An n-layer height map may be constructed by generating a probabilistic occupancy grid for the voxels and forming an n-dimensional height map comprising an array of layer height values in the reference plane based on the probabilistic occupancy grid.

  16. Generating meshes for finite-difference analysis using a solid modeler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laguna, G.W.; White, W.T.; Cabral, B.K.

    1987-09-01

    One tool used by the Engineering Research Division of LLNL to help analyze the behavior of electronic systems in hostile environments is 3D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computation. FDTD codes solve Maxwell's equations,the differential equations of electromagnetism, on a uniform lattice of points. It is this uniform lattice, or ''mesh,'' that distinguishes finite-difference codes from other codes. The simple mesh makes FDTD codes computationally more efficient than other codes, which enables them to run larger problems and to run faster (up to thirty times faster than finite-element codes, for example). Therefore, within the Engineering Department at LLNL, Electronics Engineering (EE) has initiated a project to develop a mesh generator that will provide meshes suitable for FDTD analysis. This report describes the results of the first year of EE's FDTD Mesh Generation Project. During this year a preliminary version of an automated mesh generator was built and used to create a mesh of an object of interest to the High-Power Microwave Program, namely an electrically detonatable land mine. The code was verified by meshing basic solids such as spheres and cylinders. Because of the design of the code, there is no software limitation to the size of meshes that can be accommodated. The algorithm with a mesh space of approximately 500,000 cells has been demonstrated. The mesh generator can detect certain objects with walls that are thinner than the width of a cell. The code has internal graphics for viewing objects as they appear prior to being converted to a finite-difference representation. Additionally, via data files, the code is coupled to two external graphics packages for visually checking the meshes, namely TAURUS on the Cray and a new code, IMAGE, on the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation.

  17. Hydrogen Gas Generation Model for Fuel Based Remote Handled TRU Waste Stored at INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soli T. Khericha; Rajiv N. Bhatt; Kevin Liekhus

    2003-02-01

    The Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) initiated efforts to calculate the hydrogen gas generation in remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) containers in order to evaluate continued storage of unvented RH-TRU containers in vaults and to identify any potential problems during retrieval and aboveground storage. A computer code is developed to calculate the hydrogen concentration in the stored RH-TRU waste drums for known configuration, waste matrix, and radionuclide inventories as a function of time.

  18. Equilibrium Response and Transient Dynamics Datasets from VEMAP: Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Users of the VEMAP Portal can access input files of numerical data that include monthly and daily files of geographic data, soil and site files, scenario files, etc. Model results from Phase I, the Equilibrium Response datasets, are available through the NCAR anonymous FTP site at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/vresults.html. Phase II, Transient Dynamics, include climate datasets, models results, and analysis tools. Many supplemental files are also available from the main data page at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html.

  19. Value of Demand Response: Quantities from Production Cost Modeling (Presentation), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Value Study Desk Manual Value Study Desk Manual Updated September 26, 2012. PDF icon Memo from Robert Myers regarding DOE Benefit Value Desk Manual PDF icon Value Study Desk Manual More Documents & Publications Contractor Human Resources Management VALUE STUDY VALUE STUDY

    Value of Demand Response: Quantities from Production Cost Modeling Marissa Hummon PLMA Spring 2014 April 15-16, 2014 Denver, CO NREL/PR-6A20-61815 2 Background DOE-led, multiple national laboratory research project

  20. A voxel-based multiscale model to simulate the radiation response of hypoxic tumors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Espinoza, I.; Peschke, P.; Karger, C. P.

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: In radiotherapy, it is important to predict the response of tumors to irradiation prior to the treatment. This is especially important for hypoxic tumors, which are known to be highly radioresistant. Mathematical modeling based on the dose distribution, biological parameters, and medical images may help to improve this prediction and to optimize the treatment plan. Methods: A voxel-based multiscale tumor response model for simulating the radiation response of hypoxic tumors was developed. It considers viable and dead tumor cells, capillary and normal cells, as well as the most relevant biological processes such as (i) proliferation of tumor cells, (ii) hypoxia-induced angiogenesis, (iii) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor growth, (iv) oxygen-dependent cell survival after irradiation, (v) resorption of dead cells, and (vi) spatial exchange of cells leading to tumor shrinkage. Oxygenation is described on a microscopic scale using a previously published tumor oxygenation model, which calculates the oxygen distribution for each voxel using the vascular fraction as the most important input parameter. To demonstrate the capabilities of the model, the dependence of the oxygen distribution on tumor growth and radiation-induced shrinkage is investigated. In addition, the impact of three different reoxygenation processes is compared and tumor control probability (TCP) curves for a squamous cells carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSSC) are simulated under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. Results: The model describes the spatiotemporal behavior of the tumor on three different scales: (i) on the macroscopic scale, it describes tumor growth and shrinkage during radiation treatment, (ii) on a mesoscopic scale, it provides the cell density and vascular fraction for each voxel, and (iii) on the microscopic scale, the oxygen distribution may be obtained in terms of oxygen histograms. With increasing tumor size, the simulated tumors develop a hypoxic core. Within the model, tumor shrinkage was found to be significantly more important for reoxygenation than angiogenesis or decreased oxygen consumption due to an increased fraction of dead cells. In the studied HNSSC-case, the TCD{sub 50} values (dose at 50% TCP) decreased from 71.0 Gy under hypoxic to 53.6 Gy under the oxic condition. Conclusions: The results obtained with the developed multiscale model are in accordance with expectations based on radiobiological principles and clinical experience. As the model is voxel-based, radiological imaging methods may help to provide the required 3D-characterization of the tumor prior to irradiation. For clinical application, the model has to be further validated with experimental and clinical data. If this is achieved, the model may be used to optimize fractionation schedules and dose distributions for the treatment of hypoxic tumors.

  1. Power System Modeling of 20% Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; Blair, N.; Bolinger, M.; Wiser, R.; O'Connell, R.; Hern, T.; Miller, B.

    2008-06-01

    This paper shows the results of the Wind Energy Deployment System model used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030.

  2. CPUF - a chemical-structure-based polyurethane foam decomposition and foam response model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, Thomas H. (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Thompson, Kyle Richard; Erickson, Kenneth L.; Dowding, Kevin J.; Clayton, Daniel (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Chu, Tze Yao; Hobbs, Michael L.; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III

    2003-07-01

    A Chemical-structure-based PolyUrethane Foam (CPUF) decomposition model has been developed to predict the fire-induced response of rigid, closed-cell polyurethane foam-filled systems. The model, developed for the B-61 and W-80 fireset foam, is based on a cascade of bondbreaking reactions that produce CO2. Percolation theory is used to dynamically quantify polymer fragment populations of the thermally degrading foam. The partition between condensed-phase polymer fragments and gas-phase polymer fragments (i.e. vapor-liquid split) was determined using a vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The CPUF decomposition model was implemented into the finite element (FE) heat conduction codes COYOTE and CALORE, which support chemical kinetics and enclosure radiation. Elements were removed from the computational domain when the calculated solid mass fractions within the individual finite element decrease below a set criterion. Element removal, referred to as ?element death,? creates a radiation enclosure (assumed to be non-participating) as well as a decomposition front, which separates the condensed-phase encapsulant from the gas-filled enclosure. All of the chemistry parameters as well as thermophysical properties for the CPUF model were obtained from small-scale laboratory experiments. The CPUF model was evaluated by comparing predictions to measurements. The validation experiments included several thermogravimetric experiments at pressures ranging from ambient pressure to 30 bars. Larger, component-scale experiments were also used to validate the foam response model. The effects of heat flux, bulk density, orientation, embedded components, confinement and pressure were measured and compared to model predictions. Uncertainties in the model results were evaluated using a mean value approach. The measured mass loss in the TGA experiments and the measured location of the decomposition front were within the 95% prediction limit determined using the CPUF model for all of the experiments where the decomposition gases were vented sufficiently. The CPUF model results were not as good for the partially confined radiant heat experiments where the vent area was regulated to maintain pressure. Liquefaction and flow effects, which are not considered in the CPUF model, become important when the decomposition gases are confined.

  3. A Generic Biogeochemical Module for Earth System Models: Next Generation BioGeoChemical Module (NGBGC), Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yilin; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-11-13

    Physical and biogeochemical processes regulate soil carbon dynamics and CO2 flux to and from atmosphere, influencing global climate changes. Integration of these processes into earth system models (e.g., community land models (CLM)), however, currently faces three major challenges: 1) extensive efforts are required to modify modeling structures and to rewrite computer programs to incorporate new or updated processes as new knowledge is being generated, 2) computational cost is prohibitively expensive to simulate biogeochemical processes in land models due to large variations in the rates of biogeochemical processes, and 3) various mathematical representations of biogeochemical processes exist to incorporate different aspects of fundamental mechanisms, but systematic evaluation of the different mathematical representations is difficult, if not possible. To address these challenges, we propose a new computational framework to easily incorporate physical and biogeochemical processes into land models. The new framework consists of a new biogeochemical module with a generic algorithm and reaction database so that new and updated processes can be incorporated into land models without the need to manually set up the ordinary differential equations to be solved numerically. The reaction database consists of processes of nutrient flow through the terrestrial ecosystems in plants, litter and soil. This framework facilitates effective comparison studies of biogeochemical cycles in an ecosystem using different conceptual models under the same land modeling framework. The approach was first implemented in CLM and benchmarked against simulations from the original CLM-CN code. A case study was then provided to demonstrate the advantages of using the new approach to incorporate a phosphorus cycle into the CLM model. To our knowledge, the phosphorus-incorporated CLM is a new model that can be used to simulate phosphorus limitation on the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems.

  4. SU-E-J-73: Generation of Volumetric Images with a Respiratory Motion Model Based On An External Surrogate Signal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurwitz, M; Williams, C; Mishra, P; Dhou, S; Lewis, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion during radiotherapy treatment can differ significantly from motion observed during imaging for treatment planning. Our goal is to use an initial 4DCT scan and the trace of an external surrogate marker to generate 3D images of patient anatomy during treatment. Methods: Deformable image registration is performed on images from an initial 4DCT scan. The deformation vectors are used to develop a patient-specific linear relationship between the motion of each voxel and the trajectory of an external surrogate signal. Correlations in motion are taken into account with principal component analysis, reducing the number of free parameters. This model is tested with digital phantoms reproducing the breathing patterns of ten measured patient tumor trajectories, using five seconds of data to develop the model and the subsequent thirty seconds to test its predictions. The model is also tested with a breathing physical anthropomorphic phantom programmed to reproduce a patient breathing pattern. Results: The error (mean absolute, 95th percentile) over 30 seconds in the predicted tumor centroid position ranged from (0.8, 1.3) mm to (2.2, 4.3) mm for the ten patient breathing patterns. The model reproduced changes in both phase and amplitude of the breathing pattern. Agreement between prediction and truth over the entire image was confirmed by assessing the global voxel intensity RMS error. In the physical phantom, the error in the tumor centroid position was less than 1 mm for all images. Conclusion: We are able to reconstruct 3D images of patient anatomy with a model correlating internal respiratory motion with motion of an external surrogate marker, reproducing the expected tumor centroid position with an average accuracy of 1.4 mm. The images generated by this model could be used to improve dose calculations for treatment planning and delivered dose estimates. This work was partially funded by a research grant from Varian Medical Systems.

  5. A system dynamic modeling approach for evaluating municipal solid waste generation, landfill capacity and related cost management issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kollikkathara, Naushad; Feng Huan; Yu Danlin

    2010-11-15

    As planning for sustainable municipal solid waste management has to address several inter-connected issues such as landfill capacity, environmental impacts and financial expenditure, it becomes increasingly necessary to understand the dynamic nature of their interactions. A system dynamics approach designed here attempts to address some of these issues by fitting a model framework for Newark urban region in the US, and running a forecast simulation. The dynamic system developed in this study incorporates the complexity of the waste generation and management process to some extent which is achieved through a combination of simpler sub-processes that are linked together to form a whole. The impact of decision options on the generation of waste in the city, on the remaining landfill capacity of the state, and on the economic cost or benefit actualized by different waste processing options are explored through this approach, providing valuable insights into the urban waste-management process.

  6. Next Generation Models for Storage and Representation of Microbial Biological Annotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quest, Daniel J; Land, Miriam L; Brettin, Thomas S; Cottingham, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Background Traditional genome annotation systems were developed in a very different computing era, one where the World Wide Web was just emerging. Consequently, these systems are built as centralized black boxes focused on generating high quality annotation submissions to GenBank/EMBL supported by expert manual curation. The exponential growth of sequence data drives a growing need for increasingly higher quality and automatically generated annotation. Typical annotation pipelines utilize traditional database technologies, clustered computing resources, Perl, C, and UNIX file systems to process raw sequence data, identify genes, and predict and categorize gene function. These technologies tightly couple the annotation software system to hardware and third party software (e.g. relational database systems and schemas). This makes annotation systems hard to reproduce, inflexible to modification over time, difficult to assess, difficult to partition across multiple geographic sites, and difficult to understand for those who are not domain experts. These systems are not readily open to scrutiny and therefore not scientifically tractable. The advent of Semantic Web standards such as Resource Description Framework (RDF) and OWL Web Ontology Language (OWL) enables us to construct systems that address these challenges in a new comprehensive way. Results Here, we develop a framework for linking traditional data to OWL-based ontologies in genome annotation. We show how data standards can decouple hardware and third party software tools from annotation pipelines, thereby making annotation pipelines easier to reproduce and assess. An illustrative example shows how TURTLE (Terse RDF Triple Language) can be used as a human readable, but also semantically-aware, equivalent to GenBank/EMBL files. Conclusions The power of this approach lies in its ability to assemble annotation data from multiple databases across multiple locations into a representation that is understandable to researchers. In this way, all researchers, experimental and computational, will more easily understand the informatics processes constructing genome annotation and ultimately be able to help improve the systems that produce them.

  7. Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McMahon, James E.

    2009-05-29

    This paper presents efforts to date and prospective goals towards development of a modelling and analysis framework which is comprehensive enough to address the global climate crisis, and detailed enough to provide policymakers with concrete targets and achievable outcomes. In terms of energy efficiency policy, this requires coverage of the entire world, with emphasis on countries and regions with large and/or rapidly growing energy-related emissions, and analysis at the 'technology' level-building end use, transport mode or industrial process. These elements have not been fully addressed by existing modelling efforts, which usually take either a top-down approach, or concentrate on a few fully industrialized countries where energy demand is well-understood. Inclusion of details such as appliance ownership rates, use patterns and efficiency levels throughout the world allows for a deeper understanding of the demand for energy today and, more importantly, over the coming decades. This is a necessary next step for energy analysts and policy makers in assessment of mitigation potentials. The modelling system developed at LBNL over the past 3 years takes advantage of experience in end use demand and in forecasting markets for energy-consuming equipment, in combination with known technology-based efficiency opportunities and policy types. A particular emphasis has been placed on modelling energy growth in developing countries. Experiences to date include analyses covering individual countries (China and India), end uses (refrigerators and air conditioners) and policy types (standards and labelling). Each of these studies required a particular effort in data collection and model refinement--they share, however, a consistent approach and framework which allows comparison, and forms the foundation of a comprehensive analysis system leading to a roadmap to address the greenhouse gas mitigation targetslikely to be set in the coming years.

  8. Vibratory response modeling and verification of a high precision optical positioning system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barraza, J.; Kuzay, T.; Royston, T. J.; Shu, D.

    1999-06-18

    A generic vibratory-response modeling program has been developed as a tool for designing high-precision optical positioning systems. Based on multibody dynamics theory, the system is modeled as rigid-body structures connected by linear elastic elements, such as complex actuators and bearings. The full dynamic properties of each element are determined experimentally or theoretically, then integrated into the program as inertial and stiffness matrices. Utilizing this program, the theoretical and experimental verification of the vibratory behavior of a double-multilayer monochromator support and positioning system is presented. Results of parametric design studies that investigate the influence of support floor dynamics and highlight important design issues are also presented. Overall, good matches between theory and experiment demonstrate the effectiveness of the program as a dynamic modeling tool.

  9. A Numerical Model Without Truncation Error for a Steady-State Analysis of a Once-Through Steam Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sim, Yoon Sub; Kim, Eui Kwang; Eoh, Jae Hyuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    To overcome the drawbacks of conventional schemes for a numerical analysis of a steam generator (SG), an efficient numerical model has been developed to analyze the steady state of a once-through-type SG where the feedwater is heated to superheated steam. In the developed model, the temperature and enthalpy are defined at the boundary of a calculation cell, and the exact solutions for the temperature distribution in a calculation cell are utilized. This feature of the developed model frees calculation from the undesirable effects of numerical diffusion, and only a small number of nodes are required. Also, the developed model removes the ambiguity from the parameter values at the inlet and exit of a calculation.The BoSupSG-SS computer code was developed by using the analysis model, and it performed well with only three calculation nodes to analyze a superheated SG. The developed model can be effectively used for the cases where a fast one-dimensional calculation is required such as an SG or system design analysis.

  10. From Physics Model to Results: An Optimizing Framework for Cross-Architecture Code Generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blazewicz, Marek; Hinder, Ian; Koppelman, David M.; Brandt, Steven R.; Ciznicki, Milosz; Kierzynka, Michal; Löffler, Frank; Schnetter, Erik; Tao, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Starting from a high-level problem description in terms of partial differential equations using abstract tensor notation, the Chemora framework discretizes, optimizes, and generates complete high performance codes for a wide range of compute architectures. Chemora extends the capabilities of Cactus, facilitating the usage of large-scale CPU/GPU systems in an efficient manner for complex applications, without low-level code tuning. Chemora achieves parallelism through MPI and multi-threading, combining OpenMP and CUDA. Optimizations include high-level code transformations, efficient loop traversal strategies, dynamically selected data and instruction cache usage strategies, and JIT compilation of GPU code tailored to the problem characteristics. The discretizationmore » is based on higher-order finite differences on multi-block domains. Chemora's capabilities are demonstrated by simulations of black hole collisions. This problem provides an acid test of the framework, as the Einstein equations contain hundreds of variables and thousands of terms.« less

  11. Isotopic Generation and Confirmation of the PWR Application Model 

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.B. Wimmer

    2003-11-10

    The objective of this calculation is to establish an isotopic database to represent commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF) from pressurized water reactors (PWRs) in criticality analyses performed for the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. Confirmation of the conservatism with respect to criticality in the isotopic concentration values represented by this isotopic database is performed as described in Section 3.5.3.1.2 of the ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2000). The isotopic database consists of the set of 14 actinides and 15 fission products presented in Section 3.5.2.1.1 of YMP 2000 for use in CSNF burnup credit. This set of 29 isotopes is referred to as the principal isotopes. The oxygen isotope from the UO{sub 2} fuel is also included in the database. The isotopic database covers enrichments of {sup 235}U ranging from 1.5 to 5.5 weight percent (wt%) and burnups ranging from approximately zero to 75 GWd per metric ton of uranium (mtU). The choice of fuel assembly and operating history values used in generating the isotopic database are provided is Section 5. Tables of isotopic concentrations for the 29 principal isotopes (plus oxygen) as a function of enrichment and burnup are provided in Section 6.1. Results of the confirmation of the conservatism with respect to criticality in the isotopic concentration values are provided in Section 6.2.

  12. Sulfur mustard induces an endoplasmic reticulum stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Yoke-Chen; Wang, James D.; Svoboda, Kathy K.; Casillas, Robert P.; Laskin, Jeffrey D.; Gordon, Marion K.; Gerecke, Donald R.

    2013-04-15

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress response is a cell survival pathway upregulated when cells are under severe stress. Severely damaged mouse ear skin exposed to the vesicant, sulfur mustard (bis-2-chloroethyl sulfide, SM), resulted in increased expression of ER chaperone proteins that accompany misfolded and incorrectly made proteins targeted for degradation. Time course studies with SM using the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) showed progressive histopathologic changes including edema, separation of the epidermis from the dermis, persistent inflammation, upregulation of laminin ?2 (one of the chains of laminin-332, a heterotrimeric skin glycoprotein required for wound repair), and delayed wound healing from 24 h to 168 h post exposure. This was associated with time related increased expression of the cell survival ER stress marker, GRP78/BiP, and the ER stress apoptosis marker, GADD153/CHOP, suggesting simultaneous activation of both cell survival and non-mitochondrial apoptosis pathways. Dual immunofluorescence labeling of a keratinocyte migration promoting protein, laminin ?2 and GRP78/BIP, showed colocalization of the two molecules 72 h post exposure indicating that the laminin ?2 was misfolded after SM exposure and trapped within the ER. Taken together, these data show that ER stress is induced in mouse skin within 24 h of vesicant exposure in a defensive response to promote cell survival; however, it appears that this response is rapidly overwhelmed by the apoptotic pathway as a consequence of severe SM-induced injury. - Highlights: ? We demonstrated ER stress response in the mouse ear vesicant model. ? We described the asymmetrical nature of wound repair in the MEVM. ? We identified the distribution of various ER stress markers in the MEVM.

  13. Renewable Power Options for Electrical Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, K.; Keller, J.; Kroposki, B.; Lilienthal, P.; Slaughter, R.; Glassmire, J.

    2011-11-01

    The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is working with a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy in Hawaii. This part of the HCEI project focuses on working with Kaua'i Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) to understand how to integrate higher levels of renewable energy into the electric power system of the island of Kaua'i. NREL partnered with KIUC to perform an economic and technical analysis and discussed how to model PV inverters in the electrical grid.

  14. Water demands for electricity generation in the U.S.: Modeling different scenarios for the water–energy nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Lu; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Patel, Pralit L.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

    2015-05-01

    Water withdrawal for electricity generation in the United States accounts for approximately half the total freshwater withdrawal. With steadily growing electricity demands, a changing climate, and limited water supplies in many water-scarce states, meeting future energy and water demands poses a significant socio-economic challenge. Employing an integrated modeling approach that can capture the energy-water interactions at regional and national scales is essential to improve our understanding of the key drivers that govern those interactions and the role of national policies. In this study, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a technologically-detailed integrated model of the economy, energy, agriculture and land use, water, and climate systems, was extended to model the electricity and water systems at the state level in the U.S. (GCAM-USA). GCAM-USA was employed to estimate future state-level electricity generation and consumption, and their associated water withdrawals and consumption under a set of six scenarios with extensive details on the generation fuel portfolio, cooling technology mix, and their associated water use intensities. Six scenarios of future water demands of the U.S. electric-sector were explored to investigate the implications of socioeconomics development and growing electricity demands, climate mitigation policy, the transition of cooling systems, electricity trade, and water saving technologies. Our findings include: 1) decreasing water withdrawals and substantially increasing water consumption from both climate mitigation and the conversion from open-loop to closed-loop cooling systems; 2) open trading of electricity benefiting energy scarce yet demand intensive states; 3) within state variability under different driving forces while across state homogeneity under certain driving force ; 4) a clear trade-off between water consumption and withdrawal for the electricity sector in the U.S. The paper discusses this withdrawal-consumption trade-off in the context of current national policies and regulations that favor decreasing withdrawals (increasing consumptive use), and the role of water saving technologies. The highly-resolved nature of this study both geographically and technologically provides a useful platform to address scientific and policy relevant and emerging issues at the heart of the water-energy nexus in the U.S.

  15. Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

    2013-06-01

    This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

  16. One- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation using experimentally generated reversing flow turbuulence models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, L.F.

    1990-08-01

    The activities described in this report do not constitute a continuum but rather a series of linked smaller investigations in the general area of one- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation. The initial impetus for these investigations was the development and construction of the Mechanical Engineering Test Rig (METR) under a grant awarded by NASA to Dr. Terry Simon at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota. The purpose of the METR is to provide experimental data on oscillating turbulent flows in Stirling machine working fluid flow path components (heater, cooler, regenerator, etc.) with particular emphasis on laminar/turbulent flow transitions. Hence, the initial goals for the grant awarded by NASA were, broadly, to provide computer simulation backup for the design of the METR and to analyze the results produced. This was envisaged in two phases: First, to apply an existing one-dimensional Stirling machine simulation code to the METR and second, to adapt a two-dimensional fluid mechanics code which had been developed for simulating high Rayleigh number buoyant cavity flows to the METR. The key aspect of this latter component was the development of an appropriate turbulence model suitable for generalized application to Stirling simulation. A final-step was then to apply the two-dimensional code to an existing Stirling machine for which adequate experimental data exist. The work described herein was carried out over a period of three years on a part-time basis. Forty percent of the first year`s funding was provided as a match to the NASA funds by the Underground Space Center, University of Minnesota, which also made its computing facilities available to the project at no charge.

  17. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Moraes de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid; Silva Mendes, Diego da; Melo, Christianne Bandeira; Martins, Marco Aurlio; Silva Dias, Celidarque da; Piuvezam, Mrcia Regina; and others

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca{sup ++} influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. Curine mechanisms involve inhibition of Ca{sup 2+} influx, and IL-13 and eotaxin secretion. No significant toxicity was observed in mice orally treated with curine for 7 days. Curine has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs.

  18. Preliminary studies of tunnel interface response modeling using test data from underground storage facilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Bartel, Lewis Clark

    2010-11-01

    In attempting to detect and map out underground facilities, whether they be large-scale hardened deeply-buried targets (HDBT's) or small-scale tunnels for clandestine border or perimeter crossing, seismic imaging using reflections from the tunnel interface has been seen as one of the better ways to both detect and delineate tunnels from the surface. The large seismic impedance contrast at the tunnel/rock boundary should provide a strong, distinguishable seismic response, but in practice, such strong indicators are often lacking. One explanation for the lack of a good seismic reflection at such a strong contrast boundary is that the damage caused by the tunneling itself creates a zone of altered seismic properties that significantly changes the nature of this boundary. This report examines existing geomechanical data that define the extent of an excavation damage zone around underground tunnels, and the potential impact on rock properties such as P-wave and S-wave velocities. The data presented from this report are associated with sites used for the development of underground repositories for the disposal of radioactive waste; these sites have been excavated in volcanic tuff (Yucca Mountain) and granite (HRL in Sweden, URL in Canada). Using the data from Yucca Mountain, a numerical simulation effort was undertaken to evaluate the effects of the damage zone on seismic responses. Calculations were performed using the parallelized version of the time-domain finitedifference seismic wave propagation code developed in the Geophysics Department at Sandia National Laboratories. From these numerical simulations, the damage zone does not have a significant effect upon the tunnel response, either for a purely elastic case or an anelastic case. However, what was discovered is that the largest responses are not true reflections, but rather reradiated Stoneley waves generated as the air/earth interface of the tunnel. Because of this, data processed in the usual way may not correctly image the tunnel. This report represents a preliminary step in the development of a methodology to convert numerical predictions of rock properties to an estimation of the extent of rock damage around an underground facility and its corresponding seismic velocity, and the corresponding application to design a testing methodology for tunnel detection.

  19. A process for evaluation and state approval of an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model for Rocky Flats, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.

    1991-11-06

    This document contains copies of the vugraphs used by C. R. Hodgin for the November 6, 1991 presentation summarizing the process to be used for evaluation of the Emergency Response Dispersion Model. (MHB)

  20. Responses of estuarine circulation and salinity to the loss of intertidal flats – A modeling study

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Wang, Taiping

    2015-08-25

    Intertidal flats in estuaries are coastal wetlands that provide critical marine habitats to support wide ranges of marine species. Over the last century many estuarine systems have experienced significant loss of intertidal flats due to anthropogenic impacts. This paper presents a modeling study conducted to investigate the responses of estuarine hydrodynamics to the loss of intertidal flats caused by anthropogenic actions in Whidbey Basin of Puget Sound on the northwest coast of North America. Changes in salinity intrusion limits in the estuaries, salinity stratification, and circulation in intertidal flats and estuaries were evaluated by comparing model results under the existingmore » baseline condition and the no-flat condition. Model results showed that loss of intertidal flats results in an increase in salinity intrusion, stronger mixing, and a phase shift in salinity and velocity fields in the bay front areas. Model results also indicated that loss of intertidal flats enhances two-layer circulation, especially the bottom water intrusion. Loss of intertidal flats increases the mean salinity but reduces the salinity range in the subtidal flats over a tidal cycle because of increased mixing. Salinity intrusion limits extend upstream in all three major rivers discharging into Whidbey Basin when no intertidal flats are present. Changes in salinity intrusion and estuarine circulation patterns due to loss of intertidal flats affect the nearshore habitat and water quality in estuaries and potentially increase risk of coastal hazards, such as storm surge and coastal flooding. Furthermore, model results suggested the importance of including intertidal flats and the wetting-and-drying process in hydrodynamic simulations when intertidal flats are present in the model domain.« less

  1. The ArcSDE GIS Dynamic Population Model Tool for Savannah River Site Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCLANE, TRACY; JONES, DWIGHT

    2005-10-03

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile Department of Energy site located near Aiken, South Carolina. With a workforce of over 10,000 employees and subcontractors, SRS emergency personnel must be able to respond to an emergency event in a timely and effective manner, in order to ensure the safety and security of the Site. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provides the technology needed to give managers and emergency personnel the information they need to make quick and effective decisions. In the event of a site evacuation, knowing the number of on-site personnel to evacuate from a given area is an essential piece of information for emergency staff. SRS has developed a GIS Dynamic Population Model Tool to quickly communicate real-time information that summarizes employee populations by facility area and building and then generates dynamic maps that illustrate output statistics.

  2. Assessing the nonlinear response of fine particles to precursor emissions: Development and application of an extended response surface modeling technique v1.0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, B.; Wang, S. X.; Xing, J.; Fu, K.; Fu, J. S.; Jang, C.; Zhu, Y.; Dong, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Wu, W. J.; et al

    2015-01-30

    An innovative extended response surface modeling technique (ERSM v1.0) is developed to characterize the nonlinear response of fine particles (PM₂̣₅) to large and simultaneous changes of multiple precursor emissions from multiple regions and sectors. The ERSM technique is developed based on the conventional response surface modeling (RSM) technique; it first quantifies the relationship between PM₂̣₅ concentrations and the emissions of gaseous precursors from each single region using the conventional RSM technique, and then assesses the effects of inter-regional transport of PM₂̣₅ and its gaseous precursors on PM₂̣₅ concentrations in the target region. We apply this novel technique with a widelymore » used regional chemical transport model (CTM) over the Yangtze River delta (YRD) region of China, and evaluate the response of PM₂̣₅ and its inorganic components to the emissions of 36 pollutant–region–sector combinations. The predicted PM₂̣₅ concentrations agree well with independent CTM simulations; the correlation coefficients are larger than 0.98 and 0.99, and the mean normalized errors (MNEs) are less than 1 and 2% for January and August, respectively. It is also demonstrated that the ERSM technique could reproduce fairly well the response of PM₂̣₅ to continuous changes of precursor emission levels between zero and 150%. Employing this new technique, we identify the major sources contributing to PM₂̣₅ and its inorganic components in the YRD region. The nonlinearity in the response of PM₂̣₅ to emission changes is characterized and the underlying chemical processes are illustrated.« less

  3. Assessing the nonlinear response of fine particles to precursor emissions: Development and application of an extended response surface modeling technique v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, B.; Wang, S. X.; Xing, J.; Fu, K.; Fu, J. S.; Jang, C.; Zhu, Y.; Dong, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Wu, W. J.; Wang, J. D.; Hao, J. M.

    2015-01-30

    An innovative extended response surface modeling technique (ERSM v1.0) is developed to characterize the nonlinear response of fine particles (PM₂̣₅) to large and simultaneous changes of multiple precursor emissions from multiple regions and sectors. The ERSM technique is developed based on the conventional response surface modeling (RSM) technique; it first quantifies the relationship between PM₂̣₅ concentrations and the emissions of gaseous precursors from each single region using the conventional RSM technique, and then assesses the effects of inter-regional transport of PM₂̣₅ and its gaseous precursors on PM₂̣₅ concentrations in the target region. We apply this novel technique with a widely used regional chemical transport model (CTM) over the Yangtze River delta (YRD) region of China, and evaluate the response of PM₂̣₅ and its inorganic components to the emissions of 36 pollutant–region–sector combinations. The predicted PM₂̣₅ concentrations agree well with independent CTM simulations; the correlation coefficients are larger than 0.98 and 0.99, and the mean normalized errors (MNEs) are less than 1 and 2% for January and August, respectively. It is also demonstrated that the ERSM technique could reproduce fairly well the response of PM₂̣₅ to continuous changes of precursor emission levels between zero and 150%. Employing this new technique, we identify the major sources contributing to PM₂̣₅ and its inorganic components in the YRD region. The nonlinearity in the response of PM₂̣₅ to emission changes is characterized and the underlying chemical processes are illustrated.

  4. Moment-Based Probability Modeling and Extreme Response Estimation, The FITS Routine Version 1.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANUEL,LANCE; KASHEF,TINA; WINTERSTEIN,STEVEN R.

    1999-11-01

    This report documents the use of the FITS routine, which provides automated fits of various analytical, commonly used probability models from input data. It is intended to complement the previously distributed FITTING routine documented in RMS Report 14 (Winterstein et al., 1994), which implements relatively complex four-moment distribution models whose parameters are fit with numerical optimization routines. Although these four-moment fits can be quite useful and faithful to the observed data, their complexity can make them difficult to automate within standard fitting algorithms. In contrast, FITS provides more robust (lower moment) fits of simpler, more conventional distribution forms. For each database of interest, the routine estimates the distribution of annual maximum response based on the data values and the duration, T, over which they were recorded. To focus on the upper tails of interest, the user can also supply an arbitrary lower-bound threshold, {chi}{sub low}, above which a shifted distribution model--exponential or Weibull--is fit.

  5. A CFD-based wind solver for a fast response transport and dispersion model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gowardhan, Akshay A; Brown, Michael J; Pardyjak, Eric R; Senocak, Inanc

    2010-01-01

    In many cities, ambient air quality is deteriorating leading to concerns about the health of city inhabitants. In urban areas with narrow streets surrounded by clusters of tall buildings, called street canyons, air pollution from traffic emissions and other sources is difficult to disperse and may accumulate resulting in high pollutant concentrations. For various situations, including the evacuation of populated areas in the event of an accidental or deliberate release of chemical, biological and radiological agents, it is important that models should be developed that produce urban flow fields quickly. For these reasons it has become important to predict the flow field in urban street canyons. Various computational techniques have been used to calculate these flow fields, but these techniques are often computationally intensive. Most fast response models currently in use are at a disadvantage in these cases as they are unable to correlate highly heterogeneous urban structures with the diagnostic parameterizations on which they are based. In this paper, a fast and reasonably accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for complex urban areas has been developed called QUIC-CFD (Q-CFD). This technique represents an intermediate balance between fast (on the order of minutes for a several block problem) and reasonably accurate solutions. The paper details the solution procedure and validates this model for various simple and complex urban geometries.

  6. Modeling of electrodes and implantable pulse generator cases for the analysis of implant tip heating under MR imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acikel, Volkan Atalar, Ergin; Uslubas, Ali

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The authors’ purpose is to model the case of an implantable pulse generator (IPG) and the electrode of an active implantable medical device using lumped circuit elements in order to analyze their effect on radio frequency induced tissue heating problem during a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Methods: In this study, IPG case and electrode are modeled with a voltage source and impedance. Values of these parameters are found using the modified transmission line method (MoTLiM) and the method of moments (MoM) simulations. Once the parameter values of an electrode/IPG case model are determined, they can be connected to any lead, and tip heating can be analyzed. To validate these models, both MoM simulations and MR experiments were used. The induced currents on the leads with the IPG case or electrode connections were solved using the proposed models and the MoTLiM. These results were compared with the MoM simulations. In addition, an electrode was connected to a lead via an inductor. The dissipated power on the electrode was calculated using the MoTLiM by changing the inductance and the results were compared with the specific absorption rate results that were obtained using MoM. Then, MRI experiments were conducted to test the IPG case and the electrode models. To test the IPG case, a bare lead was connected to the case and placed inside a uniform phantom. During a MRI scan, the temperature rise at the lead was measured by changing the lead length. The power at the lead tip for the same scenario was also calculated using the IPG case model and MoTLiM. Then, an electrode was connected to a lead via an inductor and placed inside a uniform phantom. During a MRI scan, the temperature rise at the electrode was measured by changing the inductance and compared with the dissipated power on the electrode resistance. Results: The induced currents on leads with the IPG case or electrode connection were solved for using the combination of the MoTLiM and the proposed lumped circuit models. These results were compared with those from the MoM simulations. The mean square error was less than 9%. During the MRI experiments, when the IPG case was introduced, the resonance lengths were calculated to have an error less than 13%. Also the change in tip temperature rise at resonance lengths was predicted with less than 4% error. For the electrode experiments, the value of the matching impedance was predicted with an error less than 1%. Conclusions: Electrical models for the IPG case and electrode are suggested, and the method is proposed to determine the parameter values. The concept of matching of the electrode to the lead is clarified using the defined electrode impedance and the lead Thevenin impedance. The effect of the IPG case and electrode on tip heating can be predicted using the proposed theory. With these models, understanding the tissue heating due to the implants becomes easier. Also, these models are beneficial for implant safety testers and designers. Using these models, worst case conditions can be determined and the corresponding implant test experiments can be planned.

  7. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

    1992-03-01

    While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth`s surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society`s ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

  8. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO sub 2 and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

    1992-03-01

    While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth's surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society's ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

  9. SOFTWARE QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE CONSEQUENCE ASSESSMENT MODELS AT DOE'S SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, C

    2007-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Atmospheric Technologies Group develops, maintains, and operates computer-based software applications for use in emergency response consequence assessment at DOE's Savannah River Site. These applications range from straightforward, stand-alone Gaussian dispersion models run with simple meteorological input to complex computational software systems with supporting scripts that simulate highly dynamic atmospheric processes. A software quality assurance program has been developed to ensure appropriate lifecycle management of these software applications. This program was designed to meet fully the overall structure and intent of SRNL's institutional software QA programs, yet remain sufficiently practical to achieve the necessary level of control in a cost-effective manner. A general overview of this program is described.

  10. Quasi-static and dynamic responses of advanced high strength steels: Experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, Akhtar; Baig, Muneer; Choi, Shi Hoon; Yang, Hoe Seok; Sun, Xin

    2012-03-01

    Measured responses of advanced high strength steels (AHSS) and their tailor welded blanks (TWBs), over a wide range of strain-rates (10*4 to 103 s*1) are presented. The steels investigated include transformation induced plasticity (TRIP), dual phase (DP), and drawing quality (DQ) steels. The TWBs include DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds. A tensile split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) was used for the dynamic experiments. AHSS and their TWB's were found to exhibit positive strain-rate sensitivity. The Khan-Huang-Liang (KHL) constitutive model is shown to correlate and predict the observed responses reasonably well. Micro-texture characterization of DQ steels, DQ-DQ and DP-DP laser welds were performed to investigate the effect of strain-rate on texture evolution of these materials. Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) technique was used to analyze the micro-texture evolution and kernel average misorientation (KAM) map. Measurement of micro-hardness profile across the cross section of tensile samples was conducted to understand the effect of initial microstructure on ductility of laser weld samples.

  11. An Evaluation of Parametric and Nonparametric Models of Fish Population Response.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Timothy C.; Peterson, James T.; Lee, Danny C.

    1999-11-01

    Predicting the distribution or status of animal populations at large scales often requires the use of broad-scale information describing landforms, climate, vegetation, etc. These data, however, often consist of mixtures of continuous and categorical covariates and nonmultiplicative interactions among covariates, complicating statistical analyses. Using data from the interior Columbia River Basin, USA, we compared four methods for predicting the distribution of seven salmonid taxa using landscape information. Subwatersheds (mean size, 7800 ha) were characterized using a set of 12 covariates describing physiography, vegetation, and current land-use. The techniques included generalized logit modeling, classification trees, a nearest neighbor technique, and a modular neural network. We evaluated model performance using out-of-sample prediction accuracy via leave-one-out cross-validation and introduce a computer-intensive Monte Carlo hypothesis testing approach for examining the statistical significance of landscape covariates with the non-parametric methods. We found the modular neural network and the nearest-neighbor techniques to be the most accurate, but were difficult to summarize in ways that provided ecological insight. The modular neural network also required the most extensive computer resources for model fitting and hypothesis testing. The generalized logit models were readily interpretable, but were the least accurate, possibly due to nonlinear relationships and nonmultiplicative interactions among covariates. Substantial overlap among the statistically significant (P<0.05) covariates for each method suggested that each is capable of detecting similar relationships between responses and covariates. Consequently, we believe that employing one or more methods may provide greater biological insight without sacrificing prediction accuracy.

  12. Wind Generator Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power ... Laboratory PV Regional Test Centers Scaled Wind Farm Technology Facility Climate & Earth ...

  13. Modeling a Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger with RELAP5-3D for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-01

    The main purpose of this report is to design a printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant and carry out Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) simulation using RELAP5-3D. Helium was chosen as the coolant in the primary and secondary sides of the heat exchanger. The design of PCHE is critical for the LOCA simulations. For purposes of simplicity, a straight channel configuration was assumed. A parallel intermediate heat exchanger configuration was assumed for the RELAP5 model design. The RELAP5 modeling also required the semicircular channels in the heat exchanger to be mapped to rectangular channels. The initial RELAP5 run outputs steady state conditions which were then compared to the heat exchanger performance theory to ensure accurate design is being simulated. An exponential loss of pressure transient was simulated. This LOCA describes a loss of coolant pressure in the primary side over a 20 second time period. The results for the simulation indicate that heat is initially transferred from the primary loop to the secondary loop, but after the loss of pressure occurs, heat transfers from the secondary loop to the primary loop.

  14. The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

    2012-12-01

    Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-?, IL-2, MIP-1?, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-?, MIP-1?, TNF ?, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1?, IL-8, MIP-1?, MIP-1?, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

  15. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

  16. Experimentally validated long-term energy production prediction model for solar dish/Stirling electric generating systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stine, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    Dish/Stirling solar electric systems are currently being tested for performance and longevity in order to bring them to the electric power generation market. Studies both in Germany and the United States indicate that a significant market exists for these systems if they perform in actual installations according to tested conditions, and if, when produced in large numbers their cost will drop to goals currently being projected. In the 1980`s, considerable experience was gained operating eight dish/Stirling systems of three different designs. One of these recorded the world`s record for converting solar energy into electricity of 29.4%. The approach to system performance prediction taken in this presentation results from lessons learned in testing these early systems, and those currently being tested. Recently the IEA through the SolarPACES working group, has embarked on a program to develop uniform guidelines for measuring and presenting performance data. These guidelines are to help potential buyers who want to evaluate a specific system relative to other dish/Stirling systems, or relative to other technologies such as photovoltaic, parabolic trough or central receiver systems. In this paper, a procedure is described that permits modeling of long-term energy production using only a few experimentally determined parameters. The benefit of using this technique is that relatively simple tests performed over a period of a few months can provide performance parameters that can be used in a computer model requiring only the input of insolation and ambient temperature data to determine long-term energy production information. A portion of this analytical procedure has been tested on the three 9-kW(e) systems in operation in Almeria, Spain. Further evaluation of these concepts is planned on a 7.5-kW(e) system currently undergoing testing at Cal Poly University in Pomona, California and later on the 25 kW(e) USJVP systems currently under development.

  17. Modeling and Control System Design for an Integrated Solar Generation and Energy Storage System with a Ride-Through Capability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.; Yue, M.; Muljadi, E.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a generic approach for PV panel modeling. Data for this modeling can be easily obtained from manufacturer datasheet, which provides a convenient way for the researchers and engineers to investigate the PV integration issues. A two-stage power conversion system (PCS) is adopted in this paper for the PV generation system and a Battery Energy Storage System (BESS) can be connected to the dc-link through a bi-directional dc/dc converter. In this way, the BESS can provide some ancillary services which may be required in the high penetration PV generation scenario. In this paper, the fault ride-through (FRT) capability is specifically focused. The integrated BESS and PV generation system together with the associated control systems is modeled in PSCAD and Matlab platforms and the effectiveness of the controller is validated by the simulation results.

  18. Predicting long-term carbon sequestration in response to CO2 enrichment: How and why do current ecosystem models differ?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walker, Anthony P.; Zaehle, Sönke; Medlyn, Belinda E.; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Asao, Shinichi; Hickler, Thomas; Parton, William; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Wang, Ying -Ping; Wårlind, David; et al

    2015-01-01

    Large uncertainty exists in model projections of the land carbon (C) sink response to increasing atmospheric CO2. Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments lasting a decade or more have investigated ecosystem responses to a step change in atmospheric CO2 concentration. To interpret FACE results in the context of gradual increases in atmospheric CO2 over decades to centuries, we used a suite of seven models to simulate the Duke and Oak Ridge FACE experiments extended for 300 years of CO2 enrichment. We also determine key modeling assumptions that drive divergent projections of terrestrial C uptake and evaluate whether these assumptions can bemore » constrained by experimental evidence. All models simulated increased terrestrial C pools resulting from CO2 enrichment, though there was substantial variability in quasi-equilibrium C sequestration and rates of change. In two of two models that assume that plant nitrogen (N) uptake is solely a function of soil N supply, the net primary production response to elevated CO2 became progressively N limited. In four of five models that assume that N uptake is a function of both soil N supply and plant N demand, elevated CO2 led to reduced ecosystem N losses and thus progressively relaxed nitrogen limitation. Many allocation assumptions resulted in increased wood allocation relative to leaves and roots which reduced the vegetation turnover rate and increased C sequestration. Additionally, self-thinning assumptions had a substantial impact on C sequestration in two models. As a result, accurate representation of N process dynamics (in particular N uptake), allocation, and forest self-thinning is key to minimizing uncertainty in projections of future C sequestration in response to elevated atmospheric CO2.« less

  19. Modeling the hydro-mechanical responses of strip and circular punch loadings on water-saturated collapsible geomaterials

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sun, WaiChing; Chen, Qiushi; Ostien, Jakob T.

    2013-11-22

    A stabilized enhanced strain finite element procedure for poromechanics is fully integrated with an elasto-plastic cap model to simulate the hydro-mechanical interactions of fluid-infiltrating porous rocks with associative and non-associative plastic flow. We present a quantitative analysis on how macroscopic plastic volumetric response caused by pore collapse and grain rearrangement affects the seepage of pore fluid, and vice versa. Results of finite element simulations imply that the dissipation of excess pore pressure may significantly affect the stress path and thus alter the volumetric plastic responses.

  20. MO-G-BRF-05: Determining Response to Anti-Angiogenic Therapies with Monte Carlo Tumor Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valentinuzzi, D; Simoncic, U; Jeraj, R; Titz, B

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Patient response to anti-angiogenic therapies with vascular endothelial growth factor receptor - tyrosine kinase inhibitors (VEGFR TKIs) is heterogeneous. This study investigates key biological characteristics that drive differences in patient response via Monte Carlo computational modeling capable of simulating tumor response to therapy with VEGFR TKI. Methods: VEGFR TKIs potently block receptors, responsible for promoting angiogenesis in tumors. The model incorporates drug pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, as well as patientspecific data of cellular proliferation derived from [18F]FLT-PET data. Sensitivity of tumor response was assessed for multiple parameters, including initial partial oxygen tension (pO{sub 2}), cell cycle time, daily vascular growth fraction, and daily vascular regression fraction. Results were benchmarked to clinical data (patient 2 weeks on VEGFR TKI, followed by 1-week drug holiday). The tumor pO{sub 2} was assumed to be uniform. Results: Among the investigated parameters, the simulated proliferation was most sensitive to the initial tumor pO{sub 2}. Initial change of 5 mmHg can already Result in significantly different levels of proliferation. The model reveals that hypoxic tumors (pO{sub 2} ? 20 mmHg) show the highest decrease of proliferation, experiencing mean FLT standardized uptake value (SUVmean) decrease for at least 50% at the end of the clinical trial (day 21). Oxygenated tumors (pO{sub 2} 20 mmHg) show a transient SUV decrease (3050%) at the end of the treatment with VEGFR TKI (day 14) but experience a rapid SUV rebound close to the pre-treatment SUV levels (70110%) at the time of a drug holiday (day 1421) - the phenomenon known as a proliferative flare. Conclusion: Model's high sensitivity to initial pO{sub 2} clearly emphasizes the need for experimental assessment of the pretreatment tumor hypoxia status, as it might be predictive of response to antiangiogenic therapies and the occurrence of proliferative flare. Experimental assessment of other model parameters would further improve understanding of patient response.

  1. Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi; Bakule, Pavel; Yokoyama, Koji; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko

    2011-09-15

    We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

  2. ReEDS Modeling of the President’s 2020 U.S. Renewable Electricity Generation Goal

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The primary objective of the analysis is to project future contributions from wind, solar, and geothermal technologies to the U.S. electricity generation mix in the 2020 time period. While this exercise is motivated by an interest in assessing the feasibility of achieving the Obama's Administration's goal of doubling renewable generation during that timeframe, the analysis only evaluates one interpretation of the goal and does not comprehensively evaluate others. The report introduction provides further background for this motivation. The analysis presented in this report was requested by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy in the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. ALE3D Model Predictions and Materials Characterization for the Cookoff Response of PBXN-109

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Nichols, A L; Wardell, J F; Atwood, A I; Curran, P O

    2002-03-19

    ALE3D simulations are presented for the thermal explosion of PBXN-109 (RDX, AI, HTPB, DOA) in support of an effort by the U. S. Navy and Department of Energy (DOE) to validate computational models. The U.S. Navy is performing benchmark tests for the slow cookoff of PBXN-109 in a sealed tube. Candidate models are being tested using the ALE3D code, which can simulate the coupled thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior during heating, ignition, and explosion. The strength behavior of the solid constituents is represented by a Steinberg-Guinan model while polynomial and gamma-law expressions are used for the Equation Of State (EOS) for the solid and gas species, respectively. A void model is employed to represent the air in gaps. ALE3D model 'parameters are specified using measurements of thermal and mechanical properties including thermal expansion, heat capacity, shear modulus, and bulk modulus. A standard three-step chemical kinetics model is used during the thermal ramp, and a pressure-dependent burn front model is employed during the rapid expansion. Parameters for the three-step kinetics model are specified using measurements of the One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX), while measurements for burn rate of pristine and thermally damaged material are employed to determine parameters in the burn front model. Results are given for calculations in which heating, ignition, and explosion are modeled in a single simulation. We compare model results to measurements for the cookoff temperature and tube wall strain.

  4. Modeling the thermal and structural response of engineered systems to abnormal environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skocypec, R.D.; Thomas, R.K.; Moya, J.L.

    1993-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is engaged actively in research to improve the ability to accurately predict the response of engineered systems to thermal and structural abnormal environments. Abnormal environments that will be addressed in this paper include: fire, impact, and puncture by probes and fragments, as well as a combination of all of the above. Historically, SNL has demonstrated the survivability of engineered systems to abnormal environments using a balanced approach between numerical simulation and testing. It is necessary to determine the response of engineered systems in two cases: (1) to satisfy regulatory specifications, and (2) to enable quantification of a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). In a regulatory case, numerical simulation of system response is generally used to guide the system design such that the system will respond satisfactorily to the specified regulatory abnormal environment. Testing is conducted at the regulatory abnormal environment to ensure compliance.

  5. Improvements in fast-response flood modeling: desktop parallel computing and domain tracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judi, David R; Mcpherson, Timothy N; Burian, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to have the ability to accurately forecast flooding, as flooding accounts for the most losses due to natural disasters in the world and the United States. Flood inundation modeling has been dominated by one-dimensional approaches. These models are computationally efficient and are considered by many engineers to produce reasonably accurate water surface profiles. However, because the profiles estimated in these models must be superimposed on digital elevation data to create a two-dimensional map, the result may be sensitive to the ability of the elevation data to capture relevant features (e.g. dikes/levees, roads, walls, etc...). Moreover, one-dimensional models do not explicitly represent the complex flow processes present in floodplains and urban environments and because two-dimensional models based on the shallow water equations have significantly greater ability to determine flow velocity and direction, the National Research Council (NRC) has recommended that two-dimensional models be used over one-dimensional models for flood inundation studies. This paper has shown that two-dimensional flood modeling computational time can be greatly reduced through the use of Java multithreading on multi-core computers which effectively provides a means for parallel computing on a desktop computer. In addition, this paper has shown that when desktop parallel computing is coupled with a domain tracking algorithm, significant computation time can be eliminated when computations are completed only on inundated cells. The drastic reduction in computational time shown here enhances the ability of two-dimensional flood inundation models to be used as a near-real time flood forecasting tool, engineering, design tool, or planning tool. Perhaps even of greater significance, the reduction in computation time makes the incorporation of risk and uncertainty/ensemble forecasting more feasible for flood inundation modeling (NRC 2000; Sayers et al. 2000).

  6. RELAP5-3D Modeling of Heat Transfer Components (Intermediate Heat Exchanger and Helical-Coil Steam Generator) for NGNP Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. A. Anderson; P. Sabharwall

    2014-01-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is aimed at the research and development of a helium-cooled high-temperature gas reactor that could generate both electricity and process heat for the production of hydrogen. The heat from the high-temperature primary loop must be transferred via an intermediate heat exchanger to a secondary loop. Using RELAP5-3D, a model was developed for two of the heat exchanger options a printed-circuit heat exchanger and a helical-coil steam generator. The RELAP5-3D models were used to simulate an exponential decrease in pressure over a 20 second period. The results of this loss of coolant analysis indicate that heat is initially transferred from the primary loop to the secondary loop, but after the decrease in pressure in the primary loop the heat is transferred from the secondary loop to the primary loop. A high-temperature gas reactor model should be developed and connected to the heat transfer component to simulate other transients.

  7. Hydrogen Gas Generation Model for Fuel-Based Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Stored at the INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khericha, S.; Bhatt, R.; Liekhus, K.

    2003-01-14

    The Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) initiated efforts to calculate the hydrogen gas generation in remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) containers in order to evaluate continued storage of unvented RH-TRU containers in vaults and to identify any potential problems during retrieval and aboveground storage. A computer code is developed to calculate the hydrogen concentration in the stored RH-TRU waste drums for known configuration, waste matrix, and radionuclide inventories as a function of time.

  8. Exclusive B{yields}{rho}l{sup +}l{sup -} decay in the standard model with fourth-generation quarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeynali, K.; Bashiry, V.

    2008-08-01

    We investigate the influence of the fourth generation of quarks on the branching ratio, the CP asymmetry, and the polarization asymmetries in B{yields}{rho}l{sup +}l{sup -} decay. Taking |V{sub t{sup '}}{sub d}V{sub t{sup '}}{sub b}|{approx}0.001 with phase about 10 deg., which is consistent with the sin2{phi}{sub 1} of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix and the B{sub d} mixing parameter {delta}m{sub B{sub d}}, we obtain that for both ({mu},{tau}) channels the branching ratio is increased and the magnitude of CP asymmetry and polarization asymmetries decreased by the mass and mixing parameters of the 4th generation of quarks. These results can serve as a good tool to search for new physics effects, precisely, to search for the fourth generation of quarks (t{sup '},b{sup '}) via its indirect manifestations in loop diagrams.

  9. Modeling and Field Test Planning Activities in Support of Disposal of Heat-Generating Waste in Salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-09-26

    The modeling efforts in support of the field test planning conducted at LBNL leverage on recent developments of tools for modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. These are modeling capabilities that will be suitable for assisting in the design of field experiment, especially related to multiphase flow processes coupled with mechanical deformations, at high temperature. In this report, we first examine previous generic repository modeling results, focusing on the first 20 years to investigate the expected evolution of the different processes that could be monitored in a full-scale heater experiment, and then present new results from ongoing modeling of the Thermal Simulation for Drift Emplacement (TSDE) experiment, a heater experiment on the in-drift emplacement concept at the Asse Mine, Germany, and provide an update on the ongoing model developments for modeling brine migration. LBNL also supported field test planning activities via contributions to and technical review of framework documents and test plans, as well as participation in workshops associated with field test planning.

  10. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and implement a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of demand response resources and to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to assess economic value of the realizable potential of demand response for ancillary services.

  11. Application for managing model-based material properties for simulation-based engineering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Edward L.

    2009-03-03

    An application for generating a property set associated with a constitutive model of a material includes a first program module adapted to receive test data associated with the material and to extract loading conditions from the test data. A material model driver is adapted to receive the loading conditions and a property set and operable in response to the loading conditions and the property set to generate a model response for the material. A numerical optimization module is adapted to receive the test data and the model response and operable in response to the test data and the model response to generate the property set.

  12. Modeling of the Reactor Core Isolation Cooling Response to Beyond Design Basis Operations - Interim Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, Kyle; Cardoni, Jeffrey N.; Wilson, Chisom Shawn; Morrow, Charles; Osborn, Douglas; Gauntt, Randall O.

    2015-12-01

    Efforts are being pursued to develop and qualify a system-level model of a reactor core isolation (RCIC) steam-turbine-driven pump. The model is being developed with the intent of employing it to inform the design of experimental configurations for full-scale RCIC testing. The model is expected to be especially valuable in sizing equipment needed in the testing. An additional intent is to use the model in understanding more fully how RCIC apparently managed to operate far removed from its design envelope in the Fukushima Daiichi Unit 2 accident. RCIC modeling is proceeding along two avenues that are expected to complement each other well. The first avenue is the continued development of the system-level RCIC model that will serve in simulating a full reactor system or full experimental configuration of which a RCIC system is part. The model reasonably represents a RCIC system today, especially given design operating conditions, but lacks specifics that are likely important in representing the off-design conditions a RCIC system might experience in an emergency situation such as a loss of all electrical power. A known specific lacking in the system model, for example, is the efficiency at which a flashing slug of water (as opposed to a concentrated jet of steam) could propel the rotating drive wheel of a RCIC turbine. To address this specific, the second avenue is being pursued wherein computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analyses of such a jet are being carried out. The results of the CFD analyses will thus complement and inform the system modeling. The system modeling will, in turn, complement the CFD analysis by providing the system information needed to impose appropriate boundary conditions on the CFD simulations. The system model will be used to inform the selection of configurations and equipment best suitable of supporting planned RCIC experimental testing. Preliminary investigations with the RCIC model indicate that liquid water ingestion by the turbine decreases the developed turbine torque; the RCIC speed then slows, and thus the pump flow rate to the RPV decreases. Subsequently, RPV water level decreases due to continued boiling and the liquid fraction flowing to the RCIC decreases, thereby accelerating the RCIC and refilling the RPV. The feedback cycle then repeats itself and/or reaches a quasi-steady equilibrium condition. In other words, the water carry-over is limited by cyclic RCIC performance degradation, and hence the system becomes self-regulating. The indications achieved to date with the system model are more qualitative than quantitative. The avenues being pursued to increase the fidelity of the model are expected to add quantitative realism. The end product will be generic in the sense that the RCIC model will be incorporable within the larger reactor coolant system model of any nuclear power plant or experimental configuration.

  13. Model Calibration and Optics Correction Using Orbit Response Matrix in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, V.A.; Prebys, E.; Petrenko, A.V.; Kopp, S.E.; McAteer, M.J.; /Texas U.

    2012-05-01

    We have calibrated the lattice model and measured the beta and dispersion functions in Fermilab's fast-ramping Booster synchrotron using the Linear Optics from Closed Orbit (LOCO) method. We used the calibrated model to implement ramped coupling, dispersion, and beta-beating corrections throughout the acceleration cycle, reducing horizontal beta beating from its initial magnitude of {approx}30% to {approx}10%, and essentially eliminating vertical beta-beating and transverse coupling.

  14. CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response): A Generic Transportation Network Model for the Calculation of Evacuation Time Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, M. P.; Urbanik, II, T.; Desrosiers, A. E.

    1982-03-01

    This paper describes the methodology and application of the computer model CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response) which estimates the time required for a specific population density and distribution to evacuate an area using a specific transportation network. The CLEAR model simulates vehicle departure and movement on a transportation network according to the conditions and consequences of traffic flow. These include handling vehicles at intersecting road segments, calculating the velocity of travel on a road segment as a function of its vehicle density, and accounting for the delay of vehicles in traffic queues. The program also models the distribution of times required by individuals to prepare for an evacuation. In order to test its accuracy, the CLEAR model was used to estimate evacuatlon tlmes for the emergency planning zone surrounding the Beaver Valley Nuclear Power Plant. The Beaver Valley site was selected because evacuation time estimates had previously been prepared by the licensee, Duquesne Light, as well as by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency. A lack of documentation prevented a detailed comparison of the estimates based on the CLEAR model and those obtained by Duquesne Light. However, the CLEAR model results compared favorably with the estimates prepared by the other two agencies.

  15. Models and the paleo record of biome responses to glacial climate and CO2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prentice; Colin, I.; Haxeltine

    1995-06-01

    Continental-scale reconstructions of the distribution of biomes at the last glacial maximum (LGM) indicate big changes, which can primarily be explained by climate. The climate was different from today mainly because of a combination of low concentrations of CO{sub 2} and other greenhouse gases and the presence of large continental ice sheets. Atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) simulations, driven by these factors and linked to simple biome models in {open_quotes}diagnostic{close_quotes} mode, account for the broad outlines of the changes in vegetation patterns, including encroachment of C4 grasslands and savannas on what are now tropical forests. Physiological effects of low CO{sub 2} might also have played a role by altering the partitioning of precipitation to evapotranspiration and runoff, and altering the competitive balance of C3 and C4 plants. Such effects have not been quantified until recently, with the development of integrated biome/biochemistry models like those used in the VEMAP project. In these models, vegetation composition affects the coupled C and H{sub 2}O fluxes, which in turn influence the competitive balance of the constituent plant types. The relative importance of climatic and physiological effects of CO{sub 2} on biome distributions is a key issue for the future. This is gives added impetus to research that aims to exploit the potential of palaeo, data, through global data synthesis projects like BIOME 6000, to provide objective benchmarks against which to test models of the biosphere and climate.

  16. Dynamic model verification studies for the thermal response of the Fort St. Vrain HTGR Core

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, S J

    1980-01-01

    The safety research program for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors at ORNL is directed primarily at addressing licensing questions on the Fort St. Vrain reactor near Denver, CO. An important part of the program is to make use of experimental data from the reactor to at least partially verify the dynamic simulations that are used to predict the effects of postulated accident sequences. Comparisons were made of predictions with data from four different reactor scram (trip) events from operating power levels between 30 and 50%. An optimization program was used to rationalize the differences between predictions and measurements, and, in general, excellent agreement can be obtained by adjustment of models and parameters within their uncertainty ranges. Although the optimized models are not necessarily unique, results of the study have identified areas in which some of the models were deficient.

  17. Generation Planning (pbl/generation)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generation Hydro Power Wind Power Monthly GSP BPA White Book Dry Year Tools Firstgov Generation Planning Thumbnail image of BPA White Book BPA White Book (1998-2014) Draft Dry...

  18. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01

    The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

  19. Solar thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Toberer, Eric S.; Baranowski, Lauryn L.; Warren, Emily L.

    2016-05-03

    Solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) are solid state heat engines that generate electricity from concentrated sunlight. A novel detailed balance model for STEGs is provided and applied to both state-of-the-art and idealized materials. STEGs can produce electricity by using sunlight to heat one side of a thermoelectric generator. While concentrated sunlight can be used to achieve extremely high temperatures (and thus improved generator efficiency), the solar absorber also emits a significant amount of black body radiation. This emitted light is the dominant loss mechanism in these generators. In this invention, we propose a solution to this problem that eliminates virtually all of the emitted black body radiation. This enables solar thermoelectric generators to operate at higher efficiency and achieve said efficient with lower levels of optical concentration. The solution is suitable for both single and dual axis solar thermoelectric generators.

  20. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung Ruby; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  1. Biomass for Electricity Generation

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines issues affecting the uses of biomass for electricity generation. The methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System to account for various types of biomass is discussed, and the underlying assumptions are explained.

  2. Progress in model development to quantify High Explosive Violent Response (HEVR) to mechancial insult

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaugh, J E

    2008-07-29

    The rapid release of chemical energy has found application for industrial and military purposes since the invention of gunpowder. Black powder, smokeless powder of various compositions, and pyrotechnics all exhibit the rapid release of energy without detonation when they are being used as designed. The rapidity of energy release for these materials is controlled by adjustments to the particle surface area (propellant grain configuration or powder particle size) in conjunction with the measured pressure-dependent burning rate, which is very subsonic. In this way a manufacturing process can be used to engineer the desired violence of the explosion. Detonations in molecular explosives, in contrast, propagate with a supersonic velocity that depends on the loading density, but is independent of the surface area. In ideal detonations, the reaction is complete within a small distance of the propagating shock front. Non-ideal detonations in molecular and composite explosives proceed with a slower velocity, and the reaction may continue well behind the shock front. We are developing models to describe the circumstances when molecular and composite explosives undergo a rapid release of energy without detonating. The models also apply to the behavior of rocket propellants subject to mechanical insult, whether for accidents (Hazards) or the suite of standardized tests used to assess whether the system can be designated an Insensitive Munition (IM). In the application described here, we are studying an HMX (1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane) explosive developed in the UK, which is 91% by weight HMX and 9% binder-plasticizer. Most explosives and propellants, when subjected to a mechanical insult, drop or impact that is well below the threshold for detonation have been observed to react violently. This behavior is known as High Explosive Violent Reaction (HEVR). The basis of our model is the observation that the mechanical insult produces damage in a volume of the explosive near the trajectory of the impactor. The damage is manifest as surface area through the creation of cracks and fragments, and also as porosity through the separation of crack faces and isolation of the fragments. Open porosity permits a flame to spread easily and so ignite the surface area that was created. The surface area itself leads to in increase in the mass-burning rate. As the kinetic energy and power of the insult increases, the degree of damage and the volume of damage both increase. Upon a localized ignition, the flame spreads to envelop the damaged volume, and the pressure rises at an accelerated rate until neither mechanical strength nor inertial confinement can successfully contain the pressure. The confining structure begins to expand. This reduces the pressure and may even extinguish the flame. Both the mass of explosive involved and the rate at which the gas is produced contribute to each of several different measures of violence. Such measures include damage to the confinement, the velocity and fragment size distributions from what was the confinement, and air blast. Figure 1 illustrates the interaction of the various phenomena described above. Our model comprises several interacting elements. The production of damage, the ignition criterion, the mass rate of burning (reaction rate), the equations of state and constitutive models of the solid explosive reactant (unburned) and gas products, flame propagation in damaged reactant, and the progressive failure of the confinement are all elements of the model. The model is intended for implementation in a general-purpose simulation program (hydrocode) that solves the partial differential equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in conjunction with equations of state and strength.

  3. Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2010-03-01

    Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous studies of mine water and power plant cooling. Visual basic software was used to create general information/evaluation modules for a range of power plant water needs that were tested/verified against the Beech Hollow project. The program allows for consideration of blending mine water as needed as well as considering potential thermal and environmental benefits that can be derived from using constant temperature mine water. Users input mine water flow, quality, distance to source, elevations to determine collection, transport and treatment system design criteria. The program also evaluates low flow volumes and sustainable yields for various sources. All modules have been integrated into a seamless user friendly computer design aid and user's manual for evaluating the capital and operating costs of mine water use. The framework will facilitate the use of mine water for thermoelectric generation, reduce demand on freshwater resources and result in environmental benefits from reduced emissions and abated mine discharges.

  4. Modeling Long-term Creep Performance for Welded Nickel-base Superalloy Structures for Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Chen

    2015-01-01

    We report here a constitutive model for predicting long-term creep strain evolution in ’ strengthened Ni-base superalloys. Dislocation climb-bypassing ’, typical in intermediate ’ volume fraction (~20%) alloys, is considered as the primary deformation mechanism. Dislocation shearing ’ to anti-phase boundary (APB) faults and diffusional creep are also considered for high-stress and high-temperature low-stress conditions, respectively. Additional damage mechanism is taken into account for rapid increase in tertiary creep strain. The model has been applied to Alloy 282, and calibrated in a temperature range of 1375-1450˚F, and stress range of 15-45ksi. The model parameters and a MATLAB code are provided. This report is prepared by Monica Soare and Chen Shen at GE Global Research. Technical discussions with Dr. Vito Cedro are greatly appreciated. This work was supported by DOE program DE-FE0005859

  5. Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudley, Junqiao Han; Black, Doug; Apte, Mike; Piette, Mary Ann; Berkeley, Pam

    2010-05-14

    We have studied a low energy building on a campus of the University of California. It has efficient heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, consisting of a dual-fan/dual-duct variable air volume (VAV) system. As a major building on the campus, it was included in two demand response (DR) events in the summers of 2008 and 2009. With chilled water supplied by thermal energy storage in the central plant, cooling fans played a critical role during DR events. In this paper, an EnergyPlus model of the building was developed and calibrated. We compared both whole-building and HVAC fan energy consumption with model predictions to understand why demand savings in 2009 were much lower than in 2008. We also used model simulations of the study building to assess pre-cooling, a strategy that has been shown to improve demand saving and thermal comfort in many types of building. This study indicates a properly calibrated EnergyPlus model can reasonably predict demand savings from DR events and can be useful for designing or optimizing DR strategies.

  6. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to CO{sub 2} and climate change. Final technical report, September 1, 1992--August 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.

    1998-04-10

    Objectives can be divided into those for plant modeling and those for ecosystem modeling and experimental work in support of both. The author worked in a variety of ecosystem types, including pine, arctic, desert, and grasslands. Plant modeling objectives are: (1) to construct generic models of leaf, canopy, and whole-plant response to elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change; (2) to validate predictions of whole-plant response against various field studies of elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change; (3) to use these models to test specific hypotheses and to make predictions about primary, secondary and tertiary effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change on individual plants for conditions and time frames beyond those used to calibrate the model; and (4) to provide information to higher-level models, such as community models and ecosystem models. Ecosystem level modeling objectives are: (1) to incorporate models of plant responses to elevated CO{sub 2} into a generic ecosystem model in order to predict the direct and indirect effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change on ecosystems; (2) to validate model predictions of total system-level response (including decomposition) against various ecosystem field studies of elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change; (3) to use the ecosystem model to test specific hypotheses and to make predictions about primary, secondary and tertiary effects of elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change on ecosystems for conditions and time frames beyond those used to calibrate the model; and (4) to use the ecosystem model to study effects of change in CO{sub 2} and climate at regional and global scales. Occasionally the author conducted some experimental work that was deemed important to the development of the models. This work was mainly physiological work that could be performed in the Duke University Phytotron, using existing facilities.

  7. Sensitive response of a model of symbiotic ecosystem to seasonal periodic drive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rekker, A.; Lumi, N.; Mankin, R.

    2014-11-12

    A symbiotic ecosysytem (metapopulation) is studied by means of the stochastic Lotka-Volterra model with generalized Verhulst self-regulation. The effect of variable environment on the carrying capacities of populations is taken into account as an asymmetric dichotomous noise and as a deterministic periodic stimulus. In the framework of the mean-field theory an explicit self-consistency equation for the system in the long-time limit is presented. Also, expressions for the probability distribution and for the moments of the population size are found. In certain cases the mean population size exhibits large oscillations in time, even if the amplitude of the seasonal environmental drive is small. Particularly, it is shown that the occurrence of large oscillations of the mean population size can be controlled by noise parameters (such as amplitude and correlation time) and by the coupling strength of the symbiotic interaction between species.

  8. An integrated model supporting histological and biometric responses as predictive biomarkers of fish health status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres Junior, Audalio Rebelo; Sousa, Débora Batista Pinheiro; Neta, Raimunda Nonata Fortes Carvalho

    2014-10-06

    In this work, an experimental system of histological (branchial lesions) biomarkers and biometric data in catfish (Sciades herzbergii) was modeled. The fish were sampled along known pollution areas (S1) and from environmental protect areas (S2) in São Marcos' Bay, Brazil. Gills were fixed in 10% formalin and usual histological techniques were used in the first gill arch right. The lesions were observed by light microscopy. There were no histopathological changes in animals captured at reference site (S1). However, in the catfish collected in the potentially contaminated area (S2) was observed several branchial lesions, such as lifting of the lamellar epithelium, fusion of some secondary lamellae, hypertrophy of epithelial cells and lamellar aneurysm. The analysis using the biometric data showed significant differences, being highest in fish analyzed in the reference area. This approach revealed spatial differences related with biometric patterns and morphological modifications of catfish.

  9. Current generation by helicons and LH waves in modern tokamaks and reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vdovin, V.

    2014-02-12

    The Innovative concept and 3D full wave code modeling Off-axis current drive by RF waves in large scale tokamaks, reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO for steady state operation with high efficiency was proposed [1] to overcome problems well known for LH method [2]. The scheme uses the helicons radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20–40) IC frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500–1000 MHz, propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by Helicons will help to have regimes with negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure β{sub N} > 3 (the so-called Advanced scenarios) of interest for FNSF and the commercial reactor. Modeling with full wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC2 showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER, FNSF-AT and DEMO [2,3], using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal waves slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in tokamaks DIII-D, T-15MD and JT-60SA [3]. In DEMO and Power Plant antenna is strongly simplified, being some analoge of mirrors based ECRF launcher, as will be shown. For spherical tokamaks the Helicons excitation scheme does not provide efficient Off-axis CD profile flexibility due to strong coupling of helicons with O-mode, also through the boundary conditions in low aspect machines, and intrinsic large amount of trapped electrons, as is shown by STELION modeling for the NSTX tokamak. Brief history of Helicons experimental and modeling exploration in straight plasmas, tokamaks and tokamak based fusion Reactors projects is given, including planned joint DIII-D – Kurchatov Institute experiment on helicons CD [1].

  10. Method of grid generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnette, Daniel W.

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of grid generation that uses the geometry of the problem space and the governing relations to generate a grid. The method can generate a grid with minimized discretization errors, and with minimal user interaction. The method of the present invention comprises assigning grid cell locations so that, when the governing relations are discretized using the grid, at least some of the discretization errors are substantially zero. Conventional grid generation is driven by the problem space geometry; grid generation according to the present invention is driven by problem space geometry and by governing relations. The present invention accordingly can provide two significant benefits: more efficient and accurate modeling since discretization errors are minimized, and reduced cost grid generation since less human interaction is required.

  11. Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David P. Colton

    2007-02-28

    The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time.

  12. High-energy x-ray response of photographic films: models and measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henke, B.L.; Uejio, J.Y.; Stone, G.F.; Dittmore, C.H.; Fujiwara, F.G.

    1986-11-01

    A detailed characterization has been established for the new, high-sensitivity double-emulsion Kodak Direct Exposure Film (DEF). The experimental data base consisted of density-versus-exposure measurements that were duplicated at several laboratories for x radiations in the 1000-10,000-eV region. The absortpion and geometric properties of the film were determined, which, along with the density-exposure data, permitted the application of a relatively simple analytical model description for the optical density, D, as a function of the intensity, I (photons/..mu..m/sup 2/), the photon energy, E (eV), and the angle of incidence, 0, of the exposing radiation. A detailed table is presented for the I values corresponding to optical densities in the 0.2--2.0 range and to photon energies, E (eV), in the 1000-10,000-eV region. Experimentally derived conversion relations have been obtained that allow the density values to be expressed as either diffuse of specular. Also presented here is a similar characterization of the complementary, single-emulsion x-ray film, Kodak SB-5 (or 392). For the 1000-10,000-eV region this x-ray film is appreciably less sensitive but has higher resolution.

  13. A mass balance model for the hydrologic response of fine-grained hillside soils to rainfall

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haneberg, W.C. . New Mexico Bureau of Mines and Mineral Resources)

    1992-01-01

    For a sloping soil layer of uniform thickness D, length L, and angle of inclination B, slope-normal influx per unit breadth is given by Q[sub in] = R L cos B, where R is net recharge. Slope-parallel discharge is given by Q[sub out] = K D sin B, where K is saturated hydraulic conductivity. If the long-term ratio of discharge to influx is > 1, then the slope is self-draining. If the ratio is < 1, then the slope is self-filling. Self-filling slopes will be more susceptible to failure because they cannot easily dissipate infiltration-induced pore pressure increases. For time-variant recharge, the rate of change in volumetric soil moisture content is given by d[Theta]/dt = (R/D) cos B--(K/L) sin B. Calculations using data from a thin colluvium landslide along the Ohio River give an average annual steady-state value of Q[sub out]/Q[sub in] = 1.06. A finite difference solution of the transient mass balance equation agrees fairly well with observed daily mean pressure heads from spring 1988. Stochastic simulations using temporally uncorrelated rainfall distributions fitted to the observed data tend to produce smoother hydrographs than simulations using observed rainfall values. This is due to a mismatch between the observed and fitted distributions, which caused the frequency of large storms to be underestimated and the frequency of small storms to be overestimated. Long-term trends in the stochastic simulations, however, were self-draining in three out of five trials. The mildly self-draining nature of thin colluvium hillsides along the Ohio River may explain why these slopes are marginally stable to unstable, and the general agreement between observed and simulated values suggests that mass balance models may be useful for assessing the susceptibility of hillside soils to precipitation-induced landsliding.

  14. PROGRESS TOWARDS NEXT GENERATION, WAVEFORM BASED THREE-DIMENSIONAL MODELS AND METRICS TO IMPROVE NUCLEAR EXPLOSION MONITORING IN THE MIDDLE EAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, B; Peter, D; Covellone, B; Rodgers, A; Tromp, J

    2009-07-02

    Efforts to update current wave speed models of the Middle East require a thoroughly tested database of sources and recordings. Recordings of seismic waves traversing the region from Tibet to the Red Sea will be the principal metric in guiding improvements to the current wave speed model. Precise characterizations of the earthquakes, specifically depths and faulting mechanisms, are essential to avoid mapping source errors into the refined wave speed model. Errors associated with the source are manifested in amplitude and phase changes. Source depths and paths near nodal planes are particularly error prone as small changes may severely affect the resulting wavefield. Once sources are quantified, regions requiring refinement will be highlighted using adjoint tomography methods based on spectral element simulations [Komatitsch and Tromp (1999)]. An initial database of 250 regional Middle Eastern events from 1990-2007, was inverted for depth and focal mechanism using teleseismic arrivals [Kikuchi and Kanamori (1982)] and regional surface and body waves [Zhao and Helmberger (1994)]. From this initial database, we reinterpreted a large, well recorded subset of 201 events through a direct comparison between data and synthetics based upon a centroid moment tensor inversion [Liu et al. (2004)]. Evaluation was done using both a 1D reference model [Dziewonski and Anderson (1981)] at periods greater than 80 seconds and a 3D model [Kustowski et al. (2008)] at periods of 25 seconds and longer. The final source reinterpretations will be within the 3D model, as this is the initial starting point for the adjoint tomography. Transitioning from a 1D to 3D wave speed model shows dramatic improvements when comparisons are done at shorter periods, (25 s). Synthetics from the 1D model were created through mode summations while those from the 3D simulations were created using the spectral element method. To further assess errors in source depth and focal mechanism, comparisons between the three methods were made. These comparisons help to identify problematic stations and sources which may bias the final solution. Estimates of standard errors were generated for each event's source depth and focal mechanism to identify poorly constrained events. A final, well characterized set of sources and stations will be then used to iteratively improve the wave speed model of the Middle East. After a few iterations during the adjoint inversion process, the sources will be reexamined and relocated to further reduce mapping of source errors into structural features. Finally, efforts continue in developing the infrastructure required to 'quickly' generate event kernels at the n-th iteration and invert for a new, (n+1)-th, wave speed model of the Middle East. While development of the infrastructure proceeds, initial tests using a limited number of events shows the 3D model, while showing vast improvement compared to the 1D model, still requires substantial modifications. Employing our new, full source set and iterating the adjoint inversions at successively shorter periods will lead to significant changes and refined wave speed structures of the Middle East.

  15. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung Ruby; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubsmore » and an increase in surface air temperature.« less

  16. Ductile Tearing of Thin Aluminum Plates Under Blast Loading. Predictions with Fully Coupled Models and Biaxial Material Response Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corona, Edmundo; Gullerud, Arne S.; Haulenbeek, Kimberly K.; Reu, Phillip L.

    2015-06-01

    The work presented in this report concerns the response and failure of thin 2024- T3 aluminum alloy circular plates to a blast load produced by the detonation of a nearby spherical charge. The plates were fully clamped around the circumference and the explosive charge was located centrally with respect to the plate. The principal objective was to conduct a numerical model validation study by comparing the results of predictions to experimental measurements of plate deformation and failure for charges with masses in the vicinity of the threshold between no tearing and tearing of the plates. Stereo digital image correlation data was acquired for all tests to measure the deflection and strains in the plates. The size of the virtual strain gage in the measurements, however, was relatively large, so the strain measurements have to be interpreted accordingly as lower bounds of the actual strains in the plate and of the severity of the strain gradients. A fully coupled interaction model between the blast and the deflection of the structure was considered. The results of the validation exercise indicated that the model predicted the deflection of the plates reasonably accurately as well as the distribution of strain on the plate. The estimation of the threshold charge based on a critical value of equivalent plastic strain measured in a bulge test, however, was not accurate. This in spite of efforts to determine the failure strain of the aluminum sheet under biaxial stress conditions. Further work is needed to be able to predict plate tearing with some degree of confidence. Given the current technology, at least one test under the actual blast conditions where the plate tears is needed to calibrate the value of equivalent plastic strain when failure occurs in the numerical model. Once that has been determined, the question of the explosive mass value at the threshold could be addressed with more confidence.

  17. Ecological Impacts of the Cerro Grande Fire: Predicting Elk Movement and Distribution Patterns in Response to Vegetative Recovery through Simulation Modeling October 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Rupp

    2005-10-01

    In May 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned approximately 17,200 ha in north-central New Mexico as the result of an escaped prescribed burn initiated by Bandelier National Monument. The interaction of large-scale fires, vegetation, and elk is an important management issue, but few studies have addressed the ecological implications of vegetative succession and landscape heterogeneity on ungulate populations following large-scale disturbance events. Primary objectives of this research were to identify elk movement pathways on local and landscape scales, to determine environmental factors that influence elk movement, and to evaluate movement and distribution patterns in relation to spatial and temporal aspects of the Cerro Grande Fire. Data collection and assimilation reflect the collaborative efforts of National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, and Department of Energy (Los Alamos National Laboratory) personnel. Geographic positioning system (GPS) collars were used to track 54 elk over a period of 3+ years and locational data were incorporated into a multi-layered geographic information system (GIS) for analysis. Preliminary tests of GPS collar accuracy indicated a strong effect of 2D fixes on position acquisition rates (PARs) depending on time of day and season of year. Slope, aspect, elevation, and land cover type affected dilution of precision (DOP) values for both 2D and 3D fixes, although significant relationships varied from positive to negative making it difficult to delineate the mechanism behind significant responses. Two-dimensional fixes accounted for 34% of all successfully acquired locations and may affect results in which those data were used. Overall position acquisition rate was 93.3% and mean DOP values were consistently in the range of 4.0 to 6.0 leading to the conclusion collar accuracy was acceptable for modeling purposes. SAVANNA, a spatially explicit, process-oriented ecosystem model, was used to simulate successional dynamics. Inputs to the SAVANNA included a land cover map, long-term weather data, soil maps, and a digital elevation model. Parameterization and calibration were conducted using field plots. Model predictions of herbaceous biomass production and weather were consistent with available data and spatial interpolations of snow were considered reasonable for this study. Dynamic outputs generated by SAVANNA were integrated with static variables, movement rules, and parameters developed for the individual-based model through the application of a habitat suitability index. Model validation indicated reasonable model fit when compared to an independent test set. The finished model was applied to 2 realistic management scenarios for the Jemez Mountains and management implications were discussed. Ongoing validation of the individual-based model presented in this dissertation provides an adaptive management tool that integrates interdisciplinary experience and scientific information, which allows users to make predictions about the impact of alternative management policies.

  18. Steam generator tube failures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  19. Waste Classification based on Waste Form Heat Generation in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles Using the Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denia Djokic; Steven J. Piet; Layne F. Pincock; Nick R. Soelberg

    2013-02-01

    This study explores the impact of wastes generated from potential future fuel cycles and the issues presented by classifying these under current classification criteria, and discusses the possibility of a comprehensive and consistent characteristics-based classification framework based on new waste streams created from advanced fuel cycles. A static mass flow model, Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT), was used to calculate the composition of waste streams resulting from different nuclear fuel cycle choices. This analysis focuses on the impact of waste form heat load on waste classification practices, although classifying by metrics of radiotoxicity, mass, and volume is also possible. The value of separation of heat-generating fission products and actinides in different fuel cycles is discussed. It was shown that the benefits of reducing the short-term fission-product heat load of waste destined for geologic disposal are neglected under the current source-based radioactive waste classification system , and that it is useful to classify waste streams based on how favorable the impact of interim storage is in increasing repository capacity.

  20. Diversity in short-to-intermediate range order in pure forms of amorphous silicon generated by a variety of experimental and modeling techniques

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Holmstrom, Eero; Haberl, Bianca; Pakarinen, Olli H; Nordlund, Kai; Djurabekova, Flyura; Arenal, Raul; Williams, James S.; Bradby, Jodie E.; Petersen, Timothy C.; Liu, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Variability in the short-to-intermediate range order of pure amorphous silicon prepared by different experimental and computational techniques is probed by measuring mass density, atomic coordination, bond-angle deviation, and dihedral angle deviation. It is found that there is significant variability in order parameters at these length scales in this archetypal covalently bonded, monoatomic system. This diversity strongly reflects preparation technique and thermal history in both experimental and simulated systems. Experiment and simulation do not fully quantitatively agree, partly due to differences in the way parameters are accessed. However, qualitative agreement in the trends is identified. Relaxed forms of amorphous silicon closelymore » resemble continuous random networks generated by a hybrid method of bond-switching Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation. As-prepared ion implanted amorphous silicon can be adequately modeled using a structure generated from amorphization via ion bombardement using energetic recoils. Preparation methods which narrowly avoid crystallization such as experimental pressure-induced amorphization or simulated melt-quenching result in inhomogeneous structures that contain regions with significant variations in atomic ordering. Ad hoc simulated structures containing small (1 nm) diamond cubic crystal inclusions were found to possess relatively high bond-angle deviations and low dihedral angle deviations, a trend that could not be reconciled with any experimental material.« less

  1. Diversity in short-to-intermediate range order in pure forms of amorphous silicon generated by a variety of experimental and modeling techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmstrom, Eero; Haberl, Bianca; Pakarinen, Olli H; Nordlund, Kai; Djurabekova, Flyura; Arenal, Raul; Williams, James S.; Bradby, Jodie E.; Petersen, Timothy C.; Liu, Amelia

    2016-01-01

    Variability in the short-to-intermediate range order of pure amorphous silicon prepared by different experimental and computational techniques is probed by measuring mass density, atomic coordination, bond-angle deviation, and dihedral angle deviation. It is found that there is significant variability in order parameters at these length scales in this archetypal covalently bonded, monoatomic system. This diversity strongly reflects preparation technique and thermal history in both experimental and simulated systems. Experiment and simulation do not fully quantitatively agree, partly due to differences in the way parameters are accessed. However, qualitative agreement in the trends is identified. Relaxed forms of amorphous silicon closely resemble continuous random networks generated by a hybrid method of bond-switching Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics simulation. As-prepared ion implanted amorphous silicon can be adequately modeled using a structure generated from amorphization via ion bombardement using energetic recoils. Preparation methods which narrowly avoid crystallization such as experimental pressure-induced amorphization or simulated melt-quenching result in inhomogeneous structures that contain regions with significant variations in atomic ordering. Ad hoc simulated structures containing small (1 nm) diamond cubic crystal inclusions were found to possess relatively high bond-angle deviations and low dihedral angle deviations, a trend that could not be reconciled with any experimental material.

  2. Waste Classification based on Waste Form Heat Generation in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles Using the Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT) Model - 13413

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djokic, Denia [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California - Berkeley, 4149 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California - Berkeley, 4149 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Piet, Steven J.; Pincock, Layne F.; Soelberg, Nick R. [Idaho National Laboratory - INL, 2525 North Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)] [Idaho National Laboratory - INL, 2525 North Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2013-07-01

    This study explores the impact of wastes generated from potential future fuel cycles and the issues presented by classifying these under current classification criteria, and discusses the possibility of a comprehensive and consistent characteristics-based classification framework based on new waste streams created from advanced fuel cycles. A static mass flow model, Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT), was used to calculate the composition of waste streams resulting from different nuclear fuel cycle choices. This analysis focuses on the impact of waste form heat load on waste classification practices, although classifying by metrics of radiotoxicity, mass, and volume is also possible. The value of separation of heat-generating fission products and actinides in different fuel cycles is discussed. It was shown that the benefits of reducing the short-term fission-product heat load of waste destined for geologic disposal are neglected under the current source-based radioactive waste classification system, and that it is useful to classify waste streams based on how favorable the impact of interim storage is in increasing repository capacity. (authors)

  3. Microwave generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1987-03-31

    A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

  4. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  5. A Test Bed for Self-regulating Distribution Systems: Modeling Intergrated Renewable Energy and Demand Response in the GridLAB-D/MATLAB Environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Dan; de Wit, Braydon; Parkinson, Simon; Fuller, Jason C.; Chassin, David P.; Crawford, Curran; Djilali, Ned

    2012-01-16

    This paper discusses the development of a simulation test bed permitting the study of integrated renewable energy generators and controlled distributed heat pumps operating within distribution systems. The test bed is demonstrated in this paper by addressing the important issue of the self-regulating effect of consumer-owned air-source heat pumps on the variability induced by wind power integration, particularly when coupled with increased access to demand response realized through a centralized load control strategy.

  6. Sidetone generator flowmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritz, Robert J.

    1986-01-01

    A flowmeter is provided which uses the sidetones generated in a cavity formed in the wall of a flowpipe or the like in response to fluid flowing past the cavity to provide a measure of the flow velocity of that fluid. The dimensions of the cavity are such as to provide a dominant vibratory frequency which is sensed by a pressure sensor. The flowmeter is adapted for use for a range of frequencies in which the Strouhal number is constant and under these conditions the vibratory frequency is directly related to the flow rate. The tone generator cavity and pressure transducer form a unit which is connected in-line in the flowpipe.

  7. Sidetone generator flowmeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fritz, R.J.

    1983-11-03

    A flowmeter is provided which uses the sidetones generated in a cavity formed in the wall of a flowpipe or the like in response to fluid flowing past the cavity to provide a measure of the flow velocity of that fluid. The dimensions of the cavity are such as to provide a dominant vibratory frequency which is sensed by a pressure sensor. The flowmeter is adapted for use for a range of frequencies in which the Strouhal number is constant and under these conditions the vibratory frequency is directly related to the flow rate. The tone generator cavity and pressure transducer form a unit which is connected in-line in the flowpipe.

  8. External split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-02-21

    A generator includes a coil disposed about a core. A first stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a first end portion of the core and a second stationary magnetic field source may be disposed on a second end portion of core. The first and second stationary magnetic field sources apply a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An external magnetic field source may be disposed outside the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. Electrical energy is generated in response to an interaction between the coil, the moving magnetic field, and the stationary magnetic field.

  9. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg -> H -> W^+W^- and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Adelman, J.; Aguilo, E.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.

    2010-05-01

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.o6 TeV. With 4.8 fb{sup -1} of itnegrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 5.4 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% Confidence Level upper limit on {sigma}(gg {yields} H) x {Beta}(H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.75 pb at m{sub H} = 120 GeV, 0.38 pb at m{sub H} = 165 GeV, and 0.83 pb at m{sub H} = 200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, they exclude at the 95% Confidence Level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 131 and 204 Gev.

  10. Combined Tevatron upper limit on gg{yields}H{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aaltonen, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van; Abazov, V. M.; Alexeev, G. D.; Artikov, A.; Budagov, J.; Chokheli, D.; Glagolev, V.; Golovanov, G.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Malyshev, V. L.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Semenov, A.; Simonenko, A.; Sisakyan, A.

    2010-07-01

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the process gg{yields}H{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -} in pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV. With 4.8 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 5.4 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% confidence level upper limit on {sigma}(gg{yields}H)xB(H{yields}W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.75 pb at m{sub H}=120 GeV, 0.38 pb at m{sub H}=165 GeV, and 0.83 pb at m{sub H}=200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, we exclude at the 95% confidence level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 131 and 204 GeV.

  11. SummitView 1.0: a code to automatically generate 3D solid models of surface micro-machining based MEMS designs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McBride, Cory L. (Elemental Technologies, American Fort, UT); Yarberry, Victor R.; Schmidt, Rodney Cannon; Meyers, Ray J.

    2006-11-01

    This report describes the SummitView 1.0 computer code developed at Sandia National Laboratories. SummitView is designed to generate a 3D solid model, amenable to visualization and meshing, that represents the end state of a microsystem fabrication process such as the SUMMiT (Sandia Ultra-Planar Multilevel MEMS Technology) V process. Functionally, SummitView performs essentially the same computational task as an earlier code called the 3D Geometry modeler [1]. However, because SummitView is based on 2D instead of 3D data structures and operations, it has significant speed and robustness advantages. As input it requires a definition of both the process itself and the collection of individual 2D masks created by the designer and associated with each of the process steps. The definition of the process is contained in a special process definition file [2] and the 2D masks are contained in MEM format files [3]. The code is written in C++ and consists of a set of classes and routines. The classes represent the geometric data and the SUMMiT V process steps. Classes are provided for the following process steps: Planar Deposition, Planar Etch, Conformal Deposition, Dry Etch, Wet Etch and Release Etch. SummitView is built upon the 2D Boolean library GBL-2D [4], and thus contains all of that library's functionality.

  12. Magnetocumulative generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pettibone, J.S.; Wheeler, P.C.

    1981-06-08

    An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing providing a housing chamber with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber, from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

  13. Thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pryslak, N.E.

    1974-02-26

    A thermoelectric generator having a rigid coupling or stack'' between the heat source and the hot strap joining the thermoelements is described. The stack includes a member of an insulating material, such as ceramic, for electrically isolating the thermoelements from the heat source, and a pair of members of a ductile material, such as gold, one each on each side of the insulating member, to absorb thermal differential expansion stresses in the stack. (Official Gazette)

  14. PLASMA GENERATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foster, J.S. Jr.

    1958-03-11

    This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

  15. Cluster generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Donchev, Todor I.; Petrov, Ivan G.

    2011-05-31

    Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

  16. Photon generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni

    2002-01-01

    A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

  17. Electric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foster, Jr., John S.; Wilson, James R.; McDonald, Jr., Charles A.

    1983-01-01

    1. In an electrical energy generator, the combination comprising a first elongated annular electrical current conductor having at least one bare surface extending longitudinally and facing radially inwards therein, a second elongated annular electrical current conductor disposed coaxially within said first conductor and having an outer bare surface area extending longitudinally and facing said bare surface of said first conductor, the contiguous coaxial areas of said first and second conductors defining an inductive element, means for applying an electrical current to at least one of said conductors for generating a magnetic field encompassing said inductive element, and explosive charge means disposed concentrically with respect to said conductors including at least the area of said inductive element, said explosive charge means including means disposed to initiate an explosive wave front in said explosive advancing longitudinally along said inductive element, said wave front being effective to progressively deform at least one of said conductors to bring said bare surfaces thereof into electrically conductive contact to progressively reduce the inductance of the inductive element defined by said conductors and transferring explosive energy to said magnetic field effective to generate an electrical potential between undeformed portions of said conductors ahead of said explosive wave front.

  18. Final Report of project entitled "A metabolomics and mouse models approach to study inflammatory and immune responses to radiation"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fornace, Albert J.; Li, Henghong

    2013-12-02

    The three-year project entitled ?A Metabolomics and Mouse Models Approach to Study Inflammatory and Immune Responses to Radiation? was initiated in September 2009. The overall objectives of this project were to investigate the acute and persistent effects of low dose radiation on T cell lymphocyte function and physiology, as well the contributions of these cells to radiation-induced inflammatory responses. Inflammation after ionizing radiation (IR), even at low doses, may impact a variety of disease processes, including infectious disease, cardiovascular disease, cancer, and other potentially inflammatory disorders. There were three overall specific aims: 1. To investigate acute and persistent effects of low dose radiation on T cell subsets and function; 2. A genetic approach with mouse models to investigate p38 MAPK pathways that are involved in radiation-induced inflammatory signaling; 3. To investigate the effect of radiation quality on the inflammatory response. We have completed the work proposed in these aims. Below are our major accomplishments: ? Our data show that T cells from low dose irradiated animals have lower proliferation potency and cytokine production upon T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation. This effect was observed as early as 4 hours after radiation, and lasted up to two weeks. ? Using our ultraperformance liquid chromatography coupled with highly sensitive time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-QTOF) metabolomics method, we demonstrated the global changes of metabolites in T cells upon TCR stimulation in a time-dependent pattern. ? We found that the TCR activation induced metabolome changes are remarkably altered in a dose-dependent manner after radiation. At a dose of 0.5 Gy and above, IR mitigated TCR activation induced metabolome changes while at the dose of as low as 0.1Gy IR had a mild stimulatory effect on some of the metabolome changes. ? We revealed the mechanism for how radiation affects T cell activation by showing that the energy supply pathways in activated T cells are greatly compromised after radiation. ? We demonstrated that low dose ionizing radiation has a variety of effects on different T cell subsets, and p38 plays an important role in these effects. ? The study with low dose proton radiation shows similar effects on T cell proliferation upon TCR activation. Our dose rate study with proton radiation indicates that at low dose rates, proton exposure has less detrimental effects on T cell activation. ? We have one published paper and several manuscripts submitted or in preparation. ? We presented our findings at multiple DOE low dose program workshops, RRS annual meetings and other conferences. Our project is the first to apply a cutting-edge metabolomics approach to study the effects of radiation on immune cell function. Our findings demonstrate that metabolomics is a powerful method, which not only has higher sensitivity than the classical immune cell biology endpoints, but also helps to reveal the underlying mechanisms providing evidence that T cell activation is a metabolically dynamic process. Our T cell subset study sheds light on the effects of radiation on different T cell subsets and relevant signaling pathways mediating these effects. We have proved that our metabolomics platform and the T cell subset differentiation methods are useful and informative approaches for investigation and assessment of immune cell function after radiation. Our mechanistic findings on metabolic pathways may help to identify potential targets for intervention.

  19. Centralized and Decentralized Control for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Kirkham, Harold

    2011-04-29

    Demand response has been recognized as an essential element of the smart grid. Frequency response, regulation and contingency reserve functions performed traditionally by generation resources are now starting to involve demand side resources. Additional benefits from demand response include peak reduction and load shifting, which will defer new infrastructure investment and improve generator operation efficiency. Technical approaches designed to realize these functionalities can be categorized into centralized control and decentralized control, depending on where the response decision is made. This paper discusses these two control philosophies and compares their relative advantages and disadvantages in terms of delay time, predictability, complexity, and reliability. A distribution system model with detailed household loads and controls is built to demonstrate the characteristics of the two approaches. The conclusion is that the promptness and reliability of decentralized control should be combined with the predictability and simplicity of centralized control to achieve the best performance of the smart grid.

  20. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Noah A.

    2012-08-14

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  1. Satellite Collision Modeling with Physics-Based Hydrocodes: Debris Generation Predictions of the Iridium-Cosmos Collision Event and Other Impact Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Springer, H K; Miller, W O; Levatin, J L; Pertica, A J; Olivier, S S

    2010-09-06

    Satellite collision debris poses risks to existing space assets and future space missions. Predictive models of debris generated from these hypervelocity collisions are critical for developing accurate space situational awareness tools and effective mitigation strategies. Hypervelocity collisions involve complex phenomenon that spans several time- and length-scales. We have developed a satellite collision debris modeling approach consisting of a Lagrangian hydrocode enriched with smooth particle hydrodynamics (SPH), advanced material failure models, detailed satellite mesh models, and massively parallel computers. These computational studies enable us to investigate the influence of satellite center-of-mass (CM) overlap and orientation, relative velocity, and material composition on the size, velocity, and material type distributions of collision debris. We have applied our debris modeling capability to the recent Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 collision event. While the relative velocity was well understood in this event, the degree of satellite CM overlap and orientation was ill-defined. In our simulations, we varied the collision CM overlap and orientation of the satellites from nearly maximum overlap to partial overlap on the outermost extents of the satellites (i.e, solar panels and gravity boom). As expected, we found that with increased satellite overlap, the overall debris cloud mass and momentum (transfer) increases, the average debris size decreases, and the debris velocity increases. The largest predicted debris can also provide insight into which satellite components were further removed from the impact location. A significant fraction of the momentum transfer is imparted to the smallest debris (< 1-5mm, dependent on mesh resolution), especially in large CM overlap simulations. While the inclusion of the smallest debris is critical to enforcing mass and momentum conservation in hydrocode simulations, there seems to be relatively little interest in their disposition. Based on comparing our results to observations, it is unlikely that the Iridium 33-Cosmos 2251 collision event was a large mass-overlap collision. We also performed separate simulations studying the debris generated by the collision of 5 and 10 cm spherical projectiles on the Iridium 33 satellite at closing velocities of 5, 10, and 15 km/s. It is important to understand the vulnerability of satellites to small debris threats, given their pervasiveness in orbit. These studies can also be merged with probabilistic conjunction analysis to better understand the risk to space assets. In these computational studies, we found that momentum transfer, kinetic energy losses due to dissipative mechanisms (e.g., fracture), fragment number, and fragment velocity increases with increasing velocity for a fixed projectile size. For a fixed velocity, we found that the smaller projectile size more efficiently transfers momentum to the satellite. This latter point has an important implication: Eight (spaced) 5 cm debris objects can impart more momentum to the satellite, and likely cause more damage, than a single 10 cm debris object at the same velocity. Further studies are required to assess the satellite damage induced by 1-5 cm sized debris objects, as well as multiple debris objects, in this velocity range.

  2. Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... responsible for a required UFLS program, UVLS program, Special Protection System or Transmission Protection System. Generator OwnerOperator Individual Plant > 20 MVA ...

  3. Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    various aspects of demand response, distributed generation, smart grid and energy storage. Annex 9 is a list of pilot programs and case studies, with links to those...

  4. Monthly Generation System Peak (pbl/generation)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generation > Generation Hydro Power Wind Power Monthly GSP BPA White Book Dry Year Tools Firstgov Monthly Generation System Peak (GSP) This site is no longer maintained. Page last...

  5. Magnetocumulative generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pettibone, Joseph S. (Livermore, CA); Wheeler, Paul C. (Livermore, CA)

    1983-01-01

    An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing (100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105) providing a housing chamber (106) with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber (106) forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber (106), from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers (107, 108) disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber (106) which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

  6. Predicting long-term carbon sequestration in response to CO2 enrichment: How and why do current ecosystem models differ?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Anthony P.; Zaehle, Sönke; Medlyn, Belinda E.; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Asao, Shinichi; Hickler, Thomas; Parton, William; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Wang, Ying -Ping; Wårlind, David; Norby, Richard J.

    2015-04-27

    Large uncertainty exists in model projections of the land carbon (C) sink response to increasing atmospheric CO2. Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments lasting a decade or more have investigated ecosystem responses to a step change in atmospheric CO2 concentration. To interpret FACE results in the context of gradual increases in atmospheric CO2 over decades to centuries, we used a suite of seven models to simulate the Duke and Oak Ridge FACE experiments extended for 300 years of CO2 enrichment. We also determine key modeling assumptions that drive divergent projections of terrestrial C uptake and evaluate whether these assumptions can be constrained by experimental evidence. All models simulated increased terrestrial C pools resulting from CO2 enrichment, though there was substantial variability in quasi-equilibrium C sequestration and rates of change. In two of two models that assume that plant nitrogen (N) uptake is solely a function of soil N supply, the net primary production response to elevated CO2 became progressively N limited. In four of five models that assume that N uptake is a function of both soil N supply and plant N demand, elevated CO2 led to reduced ecosystem N losses and thus progressively relaxed nitrogen limitation. Many allocation assumptions resulted in increased wood allocation relative to leaves and roots which reduced the vegetation turnover rate and increased C sequestration. Additionally, self-thinning assumptions had a substantial impact on C sequestration in two models. As a result, accurate representation of N process dynamics (in particular N uptake), allocation, and forest self-thinning is key to minimizing uncertainty in projections of future C sequestration in response to elevated atmospheric CO2.

  7. Triboelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zhong L; Fan, Fengru; Lin, Long; Zhu, Guang; Pan, Caofeng; Zhou, Yusheng

    2015-11-03

    A generator includes a thin first contact charging layer and a thin second contact charging layer. The thin first contact charging layer includes a first material that has a first rating on a triboelectric series. The thin first contact charging layer has a first side with a first conductive electrode applied thereto and an opposite second side. The thin second contact charging layer includes a second material that has a second rating on a triboelectric series that is more negative than the first rating. The thin first contact charging layer has a first side with a first conductive electrode applied thereto and an opposite second side. The thin second contact charging layer is disposed adjacent to the first contact charging layer so that the second side of the second contact charging layer is in contact with the second side of the first contact charging layer.

  8. Final Report: Detection and Characterization of Underground Facilities by Stochastic Inversion and Modeling of Data from the New Generation of Synthetic Aperture Satellites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foxall, W; Cunningham, C; Mellors, R; Templeton, D; Dyer, K; White, J

    2012-02-27

    Many clandestine development and production activities can be conducted underground to evade surveillance. The purpose of the study reported here was to develop a technique to detect underground facilities by broad-area search and then to characterize the facilities by inversion of the collected data. This would enable constraints to be placed on the types of activities that would be feasible at each underground site, providing a basis the design of targeted surveillance and analysis for more complete characterization. Excavation of underground cavities causes deformation in the host material and overburden that produces displacements at the ground surface. Such displacements are often measurable by a variety of surveying or geodetic techniques. One measurement technique, Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), uses data from satellite-borne (or airborne) synthetic aperture radars (SARs) and so is ideal for detecting and measuring surface displacements in denied access regions. Depending on the radar frequency and the acquisition mode and the surface conditions, displacement maps derived from SAR interferograms can provide millimeter- to centimeter-level measurement accuracy on regional and local scales at spatial resolution of {approx}1-10 m. Relatively low-resolution ({approx}20 m, say) maps covering large regions can be used for broad-area detection, while finer resolutions ({approx}1 m) can be used to image details of displacement fields over targeted small areas. Surface displacements are generally expected to be largest during or a relatively short time after active excavation, but, depending on the material properties, measurable displacement may continue at a decreasing rate for a considerable time after completion. For a given excavated volume in a given geological setting, the amplitude of the surface displacements decreases as the depth of excavation increases, while the area of the discernable displacement pattern increases. Therefore, the ability to detect evidence for an underground facility using InSAR depends on the displacement sensitivity and spatial resolution of the interferogram, as well as on the size and depth of the facility and the time since its completion. The methodology development described in this report focuses on the exploitation of synthetic aperture radar data that are available commercially from a number of satellite missions. Development of the method involves three components: (1) Evaluation of the capability of InSAR to detect and characterize underground facilities ; (2) inversion of InSAR data to infer the location, depth, shape and volume of a subsurface facility; and (3) evaluation and selection of suitable geomechanical forward models to use in the inversion. We adapted LLNL's general-purpose Bayesian Markov Chain-Monte Carlo procedure, the 'Stochastic Engine' (SE), to carry out inversions to characterize subsurface void geometries. The SE performs forward simulations for a large number of trial source models to identify the set of models that are consistent with the observations and prior constraints. The inverse solution produced by this kind of stochastic method is a posterior probability density function (pdf) over alternative models, which forms an appropriate input to risk-based decision analyses to evaluate subsequent response strategies. One major advantage of a stochastic inversion approach is its ability to deal with complex, non-linear forward models employing empirical, analytical or numerical methods. However, while a geomechanical model must incorporate adequate physics to enable sufficiently accurate prediction of surface displacements, it must also be computationally fast enough to render the large number of forward realizations needed in stochastic inversion feasible. This latter requirement prompted us first to investigate computationally efficient empirical relations and closed-form analytical solutions. However, our evaluation revealed severe limitations in the ability of existing empirical and analytical forms to predict deformations from undergro

  9. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Caterpillar, Sandia CRADA Opens Door to Multiple Research Projects Capabilities, Computational Modeling & Simulation, CRF, Materials Science, Modeling, Modeling, Modeling & ...

  10. A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight detector response in current mode to inertial confinement fusion experiments (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, A. J.; Cooper, G. W. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Ruiz, C. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Fehl, D. L.; Hahn, K. D.; Leeper, R. J.; Smelser, R.; Torres, J. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)

    2012-10-15

    A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight (nTOF) detector response in current mode for inertial confinement fusion experiments has been applied to the on-axis nTOF detectors located in the basement of the Z-Facility. It will be shown that this method can identify sources of neutron scattering, and is useful for predicting detector responses in future experimental configurations, and for identifying potential sources of neutron scattering when experimental set-ups change. This method can also provide insight on how much broadening neutron scattering contributes to the primary signals, which is then subtracted from them. Detector time responses are deconvolved from the signals, allowing a transformation from dN/dt to dN/dE, extracting neutron spectra at each detector location; these spectra are proportional to the absolute yield.

  11. Systems Biology Model of Interactions Between Tissue Growth Factors and DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFbeta and ATM Signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neill, Peter; Anderson, Jennifer

    2014-10-02

    The etiology of radiation carcinogenesis has been described in terms of aberrant changes that span several levels of biological organization. Growth factors regulate many important cellular and tissue functions including apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic changes of growth factors have been shown to contribute to cancer initiation and progression. It is known that cellular and tissue damage to ionizing radiation is in part initiated by the production of reactive oxygen species, which can activate cytokine signaling, and the DNA damage response pathways, most notably the ATM signaling pathway. Recently the transforming growth factor ? (TGF?) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation. The relevance of this interaction with the ATM pathway is not known although p53 becomes phosphorylated and DNA damage responses are involved. However, growth factor interactions with DNA damage responses have not been elucidated particularly at low doses and further characterization of their relationship to cancer processes is warranted. Our goal will be to use a systems biology approach to mathematically and experimentally describe the low dose responses and cross-talk between the ATM and TGF? pathways initiated by low and high LET radiation. We will characterize ATM and TGF? signaling in epithelial and fibroblast cells using 2D models and ultimately extending to 3D organotypic cell culture models to begin to elucidate possible differences that may occur for different cell types and/or inter-cellular communication. We will investigate the roles of the Smad and Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) proteins as the potential major contributors to cross- talk between the TGF? and ATM pathways, and links to cell cycle control and/or the DNA damage response, and potential differences in their responses at low and high doses. We have developed various experimental approaches to apply to these problems using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry to detail changes at low dose/dose-rate in order to understand individual cell responses, and will establish our mathematical models based on the experimental findings resulting from changes in DNA repair, apoptosis and proliferation.

  12. TH-E-BRF-03: A Multivariate Interaction Model for Assessment of Hippocampal Vascular Dose-Response and Early Prediction of Radiation-Induced Neurocognitive Dysfunction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farjam, R; Pramanik, P; Srinivasan, A; Chapman, C; Tsien, C; Lawrence, T; Cao, Y

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Vascular injury could be a cause of hippocampal dysfunction leading to late neurocognitive decline in patients receiving brain radiotherapy (RT). Hence, our aim was to develop a multivariate interaction model for characterization of hippocampal vascular dose-response and early prediction of radiation-induced late neurocognitive impairments. Methods: 27 patients (17 males and 10 females, age 31–80 years) were enrolled in an IRB-approved prospective longitudinal study. All patients were diagnosed with a low-grade glioma or benign tumor and treated by 3-D conformal or intensity-modulated RT with a median dose of 54 Gy (50.4–59.4 Gy in 1.8− Gy fractions). Six DCE-MRI scans were performed from pre-RT to 18 months post-RT. DCE data were fitted to the modified Toft model to obtain the transfer constant of gadolinium influx from the intravascular space into the extravascular extracellular space, Ktrans, and the fraction of blood plasma volume, Vp. The hippocampus vascular property alterations after starting RT were characterized by changes in the hippocampal mean values of, μh(Ktrans)τ and μh(Vp)τ. The dose-response, Δμh(Ktrans/Vp)pre->τ, was modeled using a multivariate linear regression considering integrations of doses with age, sex, hippocampal laterality and presence of tumor/edema near a hippocampus. Finally, the early vascular dose-response in hippocampus was correlated with neurocognitive decline 6 and 18 months post-RT. Results: The μh(Ktrans) increased significantly from pre-RT to 1 month post-RT (p<0.0004). The multivariate model showed that the dose effect on Δμh(Ktrans)pre->1M post-RT was interacted with sex (p<0.0007) and age (p<0.00004), with the dose-response more pronounced in older females. Also, the vascular dose-response in the left hippocampus of females was significantly correlated with memory function decline at 6 (r = − 0.95, p<0.0006) and 18 (r = −0.88, p<0.02) months post-RT. Conclusion: The hippocampal vascular response to radiation could be sex and age dependent. The early hippocampal vascular dose-response could predict late neurocognitive dysfunction. (Support: NIH-RO1NS064973)

  13. Recovery and Resilience After a Nuclear Power Plant Disaster: A Medical Decision model for Managing an Effective, Timely, and Balanced Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, C. Norman; Blumenthal, Daniel J.

    2013-05-01

    Based on experiences in Tokyo responding to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant crisis, a real-time, medical decision model is presented by which to make key health-related decisions given the central role of health and medical issues in such disasters. Focus is on response and recovery activities that are safe, timely, effective, and well-organized. This approach empowers on-site decision makers to make interim decisions without undue delay using readily available and high-level scientific, medical, communication, and policy expertise. Key features of this approach include ongoing assessment, consultation, information, and adaption to the changing conditions. This medical decision model presented is compatible with the existing US National Response Framework structure.

  14. Application of Spatial Data Modeling and Geographical Information Systems (GIS) for Identification of Potential Siting Options for Various Electrical Generation Sources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mays, Gary T; Belles, Randy; Blevins, Brandon R; Hadley, Stanton W; Harrison, Thomas J; Jochem, Warren C; Neish, Bradley S; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Rose, Amy N

    2012-05-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) initiated an internal National Electric Generation Siting Study, which is an ongoing multiphase study addressing several key questions related to our national electrical energy supply. This effort has led to the development of a tool, OR-SAGE (Oak Ridge Siting Analysis for power Generation Expansion), to support siting evaluations. The objective in developing OR-SAGE was to use industry-accepted approaches and/or develop appropriate criteria for screening sites and employ an array of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) data sources at ORNL to identify candidate areas for a power generation technology application. The initial phase of the study examined nuclear power generation. These early nuclear phase results were shared with staff from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), which formed the genesis and support for an expansion of the work to several other power generation forms, including advanced coal with carbon capture and storage (CCS), solar, and compressed air energy storage (CAES). Wind generation was not included in this scope of work for EPRI. The OR-SAGE tool is essentially a dynamic visualization database. The results shown in this report represent a single static set of results using a specific set of input parameters. In this case, the GIS input parameters were optimized to support an economic study conducted by EPRI. A single set of individual results should not be construed as an ultimate energy solution, since US energy policy is very complex. However, the strength of the OR-SAGE tool is that numerous alternative scenarios can be quickly generated to provide additional insight into electrical generation or other GIS-based applications. The screening process divides the contiguous United States into 100 x 100 m (1-hectare) squares (cells), applying successive power generation-appropriate site selection and evaluation criteria (SSEC) to each cell. There are just under 700 million cells representing the contiguous United States. If a cell meets the requirements of each criterion, the cell is deemed a candidate area for siting a specific power generation form relative to a reference plant for that power type. Some SSEC parameters preclude siting a power plant because of an environmental, regulatory, or land-use constraint. Other SSEC assist in identifying less favorable areas, such as proximity to hazardous operations. All of the selected SSEC tend to recommend against sites. The focus of the ORNL electrical generation source siting study is on identifying candidate areas from which potential sites might be selected, stopping short of performing any detailed site evaluations or comparisons. This approach is designed to quickly screen for and characterize candidate areas. Critical assumptions supporting this work include the supply of cooling water to thermoelectric power generation; a methodology to provide an adequate siting footprint for typical power plant applications; a methodology to estimate thermoelectric plant capacity while accounting for available cooling water; and a methodology to account for future ({approx}2035) siting limitations as population increases and demands on freshwater sources change. OR-SAGE algorithms were built to account for these critical assumptions. Stream flow is the primary thermoelectric plant cooling source evaluated in this study. All cooling was assumed to be provided by a closed-cycle cooling (CCC) system requiring makeup water to account for evaporation and blowdown. Limited evaluations of shoreline cooling and the use of municipal processed water (gray) cooling were performed. Using a representative set of SSEC as input to the OR-SAGE tool and employing the accompanying critical assumptions, independent results for the various power generation sources studied were calculated.

  15. Sandia Unstructured Triangle Table Generator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-09-16

    The software generates data tables for thermodynamic and transport properties of materials as described by a set of input models. For each input model parameterization, an associated table is created on an unstructured triangular grid. These grids all conform to the same topology. A statistical accuracy guarantee is provided for the tabular representation of the model. Details of the model and table specification are given in a XML input deck.

  16. Lexicon generation methods, lexicon generation devices, and lexicon generation articles of manufacture

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carter, Richard J [Richland, WA; McCall, Jonathon D [West Richland, WA; Whitney, Paul D [Richland, WA; Gregory, Michelle L [Richland, WA; Turner, Alan E [Kennewick, WA; Hetzler, Elizabeth G [Kennewick, WA; White, Amanda M [Kennewick, WA; Posse, Christian [Seattle, WA; Nakamura, Grant C [Kennewick, WA

    2010-10-26

    Lexicon generation methods, computer implemented lexicon editing methods, lexicon generation devices, lexicon editors, and articles of manufacture are described according to some aspects. In one aspect, a lexicon generation method includes providing a seed vector indicative of occurrences of a plurality of seed terms within a plurality of text items, providing a plurality of content vectors indicative of occurrences of respective ones of a plurality of content terms within the text items, comparing individual ones of the content vectors with respect to the seed vector, and responsive to the comparing, selecting at least one of the content terms as a term of a lexicon usable in sentiment analysis of text.

  17. SU-E-I-07: Response Characteristics and Signal Conversion Modeling of KV Flat-Panel Detector in Cone Beam CT System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Yu; Cao, Ruifen; Pei, Xi; Wang, Hui; Hu, Liqin

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The flat-panel detector response characteristics are investigated to optimize the scanning parameter considering the image quality and less radiation dose. The signal conversion model is also established to predict the tumor shape and physical thickness changes. Methods: With the ELEKTA XVI system, the planar images of 10cm water phantom were obtained under different image acquisition conditions, including tube voltage, electric current, exposure time and frames. The averaged responses of square area in center were analyzed using Origin8.0. The response characteristics for each scanning parameter were depicted by different fitting types. The transmission measured for 10cm water was compared to Monte Carlo simulation. Using the quadratic calibration method, a series of variable-thickness water phantoms images were acquired to derive the signal conversion model. A 20cm wedge water phantom with 2cm step thickness was used to verify the model. At last, the stability and reproducibility of the model were explored during a four week period. Results: The gray values of image center all decreased with the increase of different image acquisition parameter presets. The fitting types adopted were linear fitting, quadratic polynomial fitting, Gauss fitting and logarithmic fitting with the fitting R-Square 0.992, 0.995, 0.997 and 0.996 respectively. For 10cm water phantom, the transmission measured showed better uniformity than Monte Carlo simulation. The wedge phantom experiment show that the radiological thickness changes prediction error was in the range of (-4mm, 5mm). The signal conversion model remained consistent over a period of four weeks. Conclusion: The flat-panel response decrease with the increase of different scanning parameters. The preferred scanning parameter combination was 100kV, 10mA, 10ms, 15frames. It is suggested that the signal conversion model could effectively be used for tumor shape change and radiological thickness prediction. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (81101132, 11305203) and Natural Science Foundation of Anhui Province (11040606Q55, 1308085QH138)

  18. A cascaded model of spectral distortions due to spectral response effects and pulse pileup effects in a photon-counting x-ray detector for CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cammin, Jochen E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Taguchi, Katsuyuki E-mail: ktaguchi@jhmi.edu; Xu, Jennifer; Barber, William C.; Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Hartsough, Neal E.

    2014-04-15

    Purpose: Energy discriminating, photon-counting detectors (PCDs) are an emerging technology for computed tomography (CT) with various potential benefits for clinical CT. The photon energies measured by PCDs can be distorted due to the interactions of a photon with the detector and the interaction of multiple coincident photons. These effects result in distorted recorded x-ray spectra which may lead to artifacts in reconstructed CT images and inaccuracies in tissue identification. Model-based compensation techniques have the potential to account for the distortion effects. This approach requires only a small number of parameters and is applicable to a wide range of spectra and count rates, but it needs an accurate model of the spectral distortions occurring in PCDs. The purpose of this study was to develop a model of those spectral distortions and to evaluate the model using a PCD (model DXMCT-1; DxRay, Inc., Northridge, CA) and various x-ray spectra in a wide range of count rates. Methods: The authors hypothesize that the complex phenomena of spectral distortions can be modeled by: (1) separating them into count-rate independent factors that we call the spectral response effects (SRE), and count-rate dependent factors that we call the pulse pileup effects (PPE), (2) developing separate models for SRE and PPE, and (3) cascading the SRE and PPE models into a combined SRE+PPE model that describes PCD distortions at both low and high count rates. The SRE model describes the probability distribution of the recorded spectrum, with a photo peak and a continuum tail, given the incident photon energy. Model parameters were obtained from calibration measurements with three radioisotopes and then interpolated linearly for other energies. The PPE model used was developed in the authors previous work [K. Taguchi et al., Modeling the performance of a photon counting x-ray detector for CT: Energy response and pulse pileup effects, Med. Phys. 38(2), 10891102 (2011)]. The agreement between the x-ray spectra calculated by the cascaded SRE+PPE model and the measured spectra was evaluated for various levels of deadtime loss ratios (DLR) and incident spectral shapes, realized using different attenuators, in terms of the weighted coefficient of variation (COV{sub W}), i.e., the root mean square difference weighted by the statistical errors of the data and divided by the mean. Results: At low count rates, when DLR < 10%, the distorted spectra measured by the DXMCT-1 were in agreement with those calculated by SRE only, with COV{sub W}'s less than 4%. At higher count rates, the measured spectra were also in agreement with the ones calculated by the cascaded SRE+PPE model; with PMMA as attenuator, COV{sub W} was 5.6% at a DLR of 22% and as small as 6.7% for a DLR as high as 55%. Conclusions: The x-ray spectra calculated by the proposed model agreed with the measured spectra over a wide range of count rates and spectral shapes. The SRE model predicted the distorted, recorded spectra with low count rates over various types and thicknesses of attenuators. The study also validated the hypothesis that the complex spectral distortions in a PCD can be adequately modeled by cascading the count-rate independent SRE and the count-rate dependent PPE.

  19. Dielectric spectroscopy at the nanoscale by atomic force microscopy: A simple model linking materials properties and experimental response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miccio, Luis A. Colmenero, Juan; Kummali, Mohammed M.; Alegra, ngel; Schwartz, Gustavo A.

    2014-05-14

    The use of an atomic force microscope for studying molecular dynamics through dielectric spectroscopy with spatial resolution in the nanometer scale is a recently developed approach. However, difficulties in the quantitative connection of the obtained data and the material dielectric properties, namely, frequency dependent dielectric permittivity, have limited its application. In this work, we develop a simple electrical model based on physically meaningful parameters to connect the atomic force microscopy (AFM) based dielectric spectroscopy experimental results with the material dielectric properties. We have tested the accuracy of the model and analyzed the relevance of the forces arising from the electrical interaction with the AFM probe cantilever. In this way, by using this model, it is now possible to obtain quantitative information of the local dielectric material properties in a broad frequency range. Furthermore, it is also possible to determine the experimental setup providing the best sensitivity in the detected signal.

  20. Microelectromechanical power generator and vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Christenson, Todd R.

    2006-11-28

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which can be used to generate electrical power in response to an external source of vibrations, or to sense the vibrations and generate an electrical output voltage in response thereto. The MEM apparatus utilizes a meandering electrical pickup located near a shuttle which holds a plurality of permanent magnets. Upon movement of the shuttle in response to vibrations coupled thereto, the permanent magnets move in a direction substantially parallel to the meandering electrical pickup, and this generates a voltage across the meandering electrical pickup. The MEM apparatus can be fabricated by LIGA or micromachining.

  1. Capturing the response of Clostridium acetobutylicum to chemical stressors using a regulated genome-scale metabolic model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dash, Satyakam; Mueller, Thomas J.; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2014-10-14

    Clostridia are anaerobic Gram-positive Firmicutes containing broad and flexible systems for substrate utilization, which have been used successfully to produce a range of industrial compounds. Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used to produce butanol on an industrial scale through acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. A genome-scale metabolic (GSM) model is a powerful tool for understanding the metabolic capacities of an organism and developing metabolic engineering strategies for strain development. The integration of stress related specific transcriptomics information with the GSM model provides opportunities for elucidating the focal points of regulation.

  2. A Clustering Graph Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winlaw, Manda; De Sterck, Hans; Sanders, Geoffrey

    2015-10-26

    In very simple terms a network can be de ned as a collection of points joined together by lines. Thus, networks can be used to represent connections between entities in a wide variety of elds including engi- neering, science, medicine, and sociology. Many large real-world networks share a surprising number of properties, leading to a strong interest in model development research and techniques for building synthetic networks have been developed, that capture these similarities and replicate real-world graphs. Modeling these real-world networks serves two purposes. First, building models that mimic the patterns and prop- erties of real networks helps to understand the implications of these patterns and helps determine which patterns are important. If we develop a generative process to synthesize real networks we can also examine which growth processes are plausible and which are not. Secondly, high-quality, large-scale network data is often not available, because of economic, legal, technological, or other obstacles [7]. Thus, there are many instances where the systems of interest cannot be represented by a single exemplar network. As one example, consider the eld of cybersecurity, where systems require testing across diverse threat scenarios and validation across diverse network structures. In these cases, where there is no single exemplar network, the systems must instead be modeled as a collection of networks in which the variation among them may be just as important as their common features. By developing processes to build synthetic models, so-called graph generators, we can build synthetic networks that capture both the essential features of a system and realistic variability. Then we can use such synthetic graphs to perform tasks such as simulations, analysis, and decision making. We can also use synthetic graphs to performance test graph analysis algorithms, including clustering algorithms and anomaly detection algorithms.

  3. Is the misalignment of the Local Group velocity and the dipole generated by the 2MASS Redshift Survey typical in {lambda} cold dark matter and the halo model of galaxies?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Erdogdu, Pirin; Lahav, Ofer

    2009-08-15

    We predict the acceleration of the Local Group generated by the 2MASS Redshift Survey within the framework of {lambda} cold dark matter and the halo model of galaxies. We show that as the galaxy fluctuations derived from the halo model have more power on small scales compared with the mass fluctuations, the misalignment angle between the CMB velocity vector and the 2MASS Redshift Survey dipole is in reasonable agreement with the observed 21 deg. This statistical analysis suggests that it is not necessary to invoke a hypothetical nearby galaxy or a distant cluster to explain this misalignment.

  4. The Chemistry of Flammable Gas Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ZACH, J.J.

    2000-10-30

    The document collects information from field instrumentation, laboratory tests, and analytical models to provide a single source of information on the chemistry of flammable gas generation at the Hanford Site. It considers the 3 mechanisms of formation: radiolysis, chemical reactions, and thermal generation. An assessment of the current models for gas generation is then performed. The results are that the various phenomena are reasonably understood and modeled compared to field data.

  5. Response of precipitation extremes to idealized global warming in an aqua-planet climate model: Towards robust projection across different horizontal resolutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, F.; Collins, W.D.; Wehner, M.F.; Williamson, D.L.; Olson, J.G.

    2011-04-15

    Current climate models produce quite heterogeneous projections for the responses of precipitation extremes to future climate change. To help understand the range of projections from multimodel ensembles, a series of idealized 'aquaplanet' Atmospheric General Circulation Model (AGCM) runs have been performed with the Community Atmosphere Model CAM3. These runs have been analysed to identify the effects of horizontal resolution on precipitation extreme projections under two simple global warming scenarios. We adopt the aquaplanet framework for our simulations to remove any sensitivity to the spatial resolution of external inputs and to focus on the roles of model physics and dynamics. Results show that a uniform increase of sea surface temperature (SST) and an increase of low-to-high latitude SST gradient both lead to increase of precipitation and precipitation extremes for most latitudes. The perturbed SSTs generally have stronger impacts on precipitation extremes than on mean precipitation. Horizontal model resolution strongly affects the global warming signals in the extreme precipitation in tropical and subtropical regions but not in high latitude regions. This study illustrates that the effects of horizontal resolution have to be taken into account to develop more robust projections of precipitation extremes.

  6. MELTER: A model of the thermal response of cargos transported in the Safe-Secure Trailer subject to fire environments for risk assessment applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Larsen, M.E.

    1994-08-01

    MELTER is an analysis of cargo responses inside a fire-threatened Safe-Secure Trailer (SST) developed for the Defense Program Transportation Risk Assessment (DPTRA). Many simplifying assumptions are required to make the subject problem tractable. MELTER incorporates modeling which balances the competing requirements of execution speed, generality, completeness of essential physics, and robustness. Input parameters affecting the analysis include those defining the fire scenario, those defining the cargo loaded in the SST, and those defining properties of the SST. For a specified fire, SST, and cargo geometry MELTER predicts the critical fire duration that will lead to a failure. The principal features of the analysis include: (a) Geometric considerations to interpret fire-scenario descriptors in terms of a thermal radiation boundary condition, (b) a simple model of the SST`s wall combining the diffusion model for radiation through optically-thick media with an endothermic reaction front to describe the charring of dimensional, rigid foam in the SST wall, (c) a transient radiation enclosure model, (d) a one-dimensional, spherical idealization of the shipped cargos providing modularity so that cargos of interest can be inserted into the model, and (e) associated numerical methods to integrate coupled, differential equations and find roots.

  7. Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across U.S. Regions of the Western Interconnection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demand response has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles for demand response that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study.

  8. Thermoelectric Generator (TEG) Fuel Displacement Potential using...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    model of GM-developed TEG as part of the engine connected to a dynamometer that emulates ... Establishing Thermo-Electric Generator (TEG) Design Targets for Hybrid Vehicles ...

  9. Quaternary history of the northeastern Bighorn Basin based on a climatically-controlled process-response model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Birdseye, R.U.

    1985-01-01

    The highest surfaces and oldest Pleistocene sediments in the northeastern Bighorn Basin are associated with the 600 kya North Kane Ash. Subsequent climatically-induced periods of aggradation and incision produced the remaining geomorphic elements. Processes associated with a typical interglacial-glacial cycle include: (1) interglacial stability with Bighorn River alluviation, pedimentation, and eolian deposition; (2) late-interglacial to early-glacial incision; (3) alluvial fan extension and increased landslide development during glacial intervals; and (4) an early-interglacial return to more stable conditions. Frequent stream captures during interglacial times were caused by the out-of-phase relationships between the Bighorn River and its tributaries. Quaternary climates of a given type have not been of equal magnitude or duration in the northeastern Bighorn Basin. The most intense glacial climates from which sediments are preserved are believed to have occurred ca. 600 kya, 440 kya an d140 kya. An abnormally dry climate existed between 400 kya and 275 kya, while extremely wet interglacial conditions prevailed about 100 kya. The last complete climatic cycle was the Bull Lake. The subsequent Holocene interglacial has been unusually dry. Thus not all Pleistocene climates have been capable of generating terraces of extensive alluvial fans.

  10. Final Technical Report for Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models, DE-FG02-07ER64429

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smyth, Padhraic

    2013-07-22

    This is the final report for a DOE-funded research project describing the outcome of research on non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. The main results consist of extensive development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes.

  11. Specific absorption rate calculations of magnetite, using a modified linear response model for applications in magnetic hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernández S, A. E-mail: meduardo2001@hotmail.com; Cano, M. E. E-mail: meduardo2001@hotmail.com; Torres-Arenas, J.

    2014-11-07

    Currently the absorption of electromagnetic radiation by magnetic nanoparticles is studied for biomedical applications of cancer thermotherapy. Several experiments are conduced following the framework of the Rosensweig model, in order to estimate their specific absorption rate. Nevertheless, this linear approximation involves strong simplifications which constrain their accuracy and validity range. The main aim of this work is to incorporate the deviation of the sphericity assumption in particles shapes, to improve the determination of their specific absorption rate. The correction to the effective particles volume is computed as a measure of the apparent amount of magnetic material, interacting with the external AC magnetic field. Preliminary results using the physical properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles, exhibit an important correction in their estimated specific absorption rate, as a function of the apparent mean particles radius. Indeed, we have observed using a small deviation (6% of the apparent radius), up to 40% of the predicted specific absorption rate by the Rosensweig linear approximation.

  12. Control system for fluid heated steam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boland, James F.; Koenig, John F.

    1985-01-01

    A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

  13. Control system for fluid heated steam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boland, J.F.; Koenig, J.F.

    1984-05-29

    A control system for controlling the location of the nucleate-boiling region in a fluid heated steam generator comprises means for measuring the temperature gradient (change in temperature per unit length) of the heating fluid along the steam generator; means for determining a control variable in accordance with a predetermined function of temperature gradients and for generating a control signal in response thereto; and means for adjusting the feedwater flow rate in accordance with the control signal.

  14. Cluster generator (Patent) | DOEPatents

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Cluster generator Title: Cluster generator Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow ...

  15. Biomass: Biogas Generator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    BIOGAS GENERATOR Curriculum: Biomass Power (organic chemistry, chemicalcarbon cycles, ... to burn Summary: Students build a simple digester to generate a quantity of gas to burn. ...

  16. Thermoelectric Generator (TEG) Fuel Displacement Potential using

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Engine-in-the-Loop and Simulation | Department of Energy Assessment of fuel savings with thermoelectric generators (TEGs) using detailed model of GM-developed TEG as part of the engine connected to a dynamometer that emulates the rest of the vehicle PDF icon vijayagopal.pdf More Documents & Publications Establishing Thermo-Electric Generator (TEG) Design Targets for Hybrid Vehicles Thermoelectric Generator Performance for Passenger Vehicles Skutterudite Thermoelectric Generator For

  17. Response to Comment on General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation [Phys. Fluids 26, 119101 (2014)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Gorder, Robert A.

    2014-11-15

    In R. A. Van Gorder, General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation, Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014) I discussed properties of generalized vortex filaments exhibiting purely rotational motion under the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation. Such solutions are stationary in terms of translational motion. In the Comment [N. Hietala, Comment on General rotating quantum vortex filaments in the low-temperature Svistunov model of the local induction approximation [Phys. Fluids 26, 065105 (2014)], Phys. Fluids 26, 119101 (2014)], the author criticizes my paper for not including translational motion (although it was clearly stated that the filament motion was assumed rotational). As it turns out, if one is interested in studying the geometric structure of solutions (which was the point of my paper), one obtains the needed qualitative results on the structure of such solutions by studying the purely rotational case. Nevertheless, in this Response I shall discuss the vortex filaments that have both rotational and translational motions. I then briefly discuss why one might want to study such generalized rotating filament solutions, in contrast to simple the standard helical or planar examples (which are really special cases). I also discuss how one can study the time evolution of filaments which exhibit more complicated dynamics than pure translation and rotation. Doing this, one can study non-stationary solutions which initially appear purely rotational and gradually display other dynamics as the filaments evolve.

  18. Strong Second Harmonic Generation from the Tantalum Thioarsenates...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Strong Second Harmonic Generation from the Tantalum Thioarsenates A3Ta2AsS11 (A K and ... and exhibit strong nonlinear optical (NLO) second harmonic generation (SHG) response. ...

  19. Response model and activity analysis of the revenue reconciliation problem in the marginal cost pricing of electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassig, N.L.

    1980-01-01

    The objective of the research was to determine if feasible reconciliation procedures exist that meet the multiple (and sometimes competing) goals of the electricity pricing problem while staying within the constraints of the problem. The answer was that such procedures do exist. Selection among the alternative, feasible procedures depends on the weighting factors placed on the goals. One procedure did not universally satisfy all the goals; the various procedures satisfied the alternative goals to varying degrees. The selection process was sensitive to the initial conditions of the model and to the band width of the constraint boundary conditions. Discriminate analysis was used to identify the variables that contribute the most to the optimal selection process. The results of the research indicated that the variables that are the most effective in selecting among the various procedures were the following: the ratio of peak to off-peak prices, the amount of revenue adjustment required, the constraint on equity, the constraint on peak price stability, and the constraint on meeting the revenue requirement. The poicy recommendations that can be derived from this research are very relevant in light of today's energy problems. Time-of-use pricing of electricity is needed in order to signal to the consumer the true cost of electricity by season and by time of day. Marginal costs capture such costs and rates should be based on such costs. Revenue reconciliation procedures make marginal cost-based rates feasible from a regulatory requirement perspective. This research showed that such procedures are available and selection among alternative procedures depends on the preference rankings placed on the multiple, and sometimes competing goals of electricity pricing.

  20. Macromodel for assessing residential concentrations of combustion-generated pollutants: Model development and preliminary predictions for CO, NO/sub 2/, and respirable suspended particles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Traynor, G.W.; Aceti, J.C.; Apte, M.G.; Smith, B.V.; Green, L.L.; Smith-Reiser, A.; Novak, K.M.; Moses, D.O.

    1989-01-01

    A simulation model (also called a ''macromodel'') has been developed to predict residential air pollutant concentration distributions for specified populations. The model inputs include the market penetration of pollution sources, pollution source characteristics (e.g., emission rates, source usage rates), building characteristics (e.g., house volume, air exchange rates), and meteorological parameters (e.g., outside temperature). Four geographically distinct regions of the US have been modeled using Monte Carlo and deterministic simulation techniques. Single-source simulations were also conducted. The highest predicted CO and NO/sub 2/ residential concentrations were associated with the winter-time use of unvented gas and kerosene space heaters. The highest predicted respirable suspended particulate concentrations were associated with indoor cigarette smoking and the winter-time use of non-airtight wood stoves, radiant kerosene heaters, convective unvented gas space heaters, and oil forced-air furnaces. Future field studies in this area should (1) fill information gaps identified in this report, and (2) collect information on the macromodel input parameters to properly interpret the results. It is almost more important to measure the parameters that affect indoor concentration than it is to measure the concentrations themselves.

  1. System Impact Study of the Eastern Grid of Sumba Island, Indonesia: Steady-State and Dynamic System Modeling for the Integration of One and Two 850-kW Wind Turbine Generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oswal, R.; Jain, P.; Muljadi, Eduard; Hirsch, Brian; Castermans, B.; Chandra, J.; Raharjo, S.; Hardison, R.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this project was to study the impact of integrating one and two 850-kW wind turbine generators into the eastern power system network of Sumba Island, Indonesia. A model was created for the 20-kV distribution network as it existed in the first quarter of 2015 with a peak load of 5.682 MW. Detailed data were collected for each element of the network. Load flow, short-circuit, and transient analyses were performed using DIgSILENT PowerFactory 15.2.1.

  2. Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across Western Interconnect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R; Ma, Ookie

    2013-11-01

    Demand response (DR) has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study. The developed framework utilizes a number of different informational resources, algorithms, and real-world measurements to perform a bottom-up approach in the development of a new database with representation of the potential demand response resource in the industrial sector across the U.S. This tool houses statistical values of energy and demand response (DR) potential by industrial plant and geospatially locates the information for aggregation for different territories without proprietary information. This report will discuss this framework and the analyzed quantities of demand response for Western Interconnect (WI) in support of evaluation of the cost production modeling with power grid modeling efforts of demand response.

  3. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PVLibMatlab Permalink Gallery Sandia Labs Releases New Version of PVLib Toolbox Modeling, News, Photovoltaic, Solar Sandia Labs Releases New Version of PVLib Toolbox Sandia has released version 1.3 of PVLib, its widely used Matlab toolbox for modeling photovoltaic (PV) power systems. The version 1.3 release includes the following added functions: functions to estimate parameters for popular PV module models, including PVsyst and the CEC '5 parameter' model a new model of the effects of solar

  4. Gamma ray generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  5. Response margins of the dynamic analysis of piping systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.J.; Benda, B.J.; Chuang, T.Y.; Smith, P.D.

    1984-04-01

    This report is organized as follows: Section 2 describes the three piping systems of the Zion nuclear power plant which formed the basis of the present study. The auxiliary feedwater (AFW) piping from steam generator to containment, the residual heat removal (RHR) and safety injection piping in the auxiliary building, and the reactor coolant loops (RCL) including a portion of the branch lines were analyzed. Section 3 describes the analysis methods and the analyses performed. Section 4 presents the numerical results; the principal results presented as comparisons of response calculated by best estimate time history analysis methods vs. the SRP response spectrum technique. Section 5 draws conclusions from the results. Appendix A contains a brief description of the mathematical models that defined the structures containing the three piping systems. Response from these models provided input to the piping models. Appendix B provides a detailed derivation of the pseudostatic mode approach to the multisupport time history analysis method used in this study.

  6. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-06-14

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  7. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2008-04-22

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  8. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2009-12-29

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  9. Demand Response Dispatch Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-08-31

    The Demand Response (DR) Dispatch Tool uses price profiles to dispatch demand response resources and create load modifying profiles. These annual profiles are used as inputs to production cost models and regional planning tools (e.g., PROMOD). The tool has been effectively implemented in transmission planning studies conducted by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council via its Transmission Expansion Planning and Policy Committee. The DR Dispatch Tool can properly model the dispatch of DR resources for both reliability and economic conditions.

  10. Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Homeowners Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Homeowners Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Homeowners Determine the amount ...

  11. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Engine Combustion/Modeling Modelingadmin2015-10-28T01:54:52+00:00 Modelers at the CRF are developing high-fidelity simulation tools for engine combustion and detailed micro-kinetic, surface chemistry modeling tools for catalyst-based exhaust aftertreatment systems. The engine combustion modeling is focused on developing Large Eddy Simulation (LES). LES is being used with closely coupled key target experiments to reveal new understanding of the fundamental processes involved in engine combustion

  12. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Reacting Flow/Modeling Modelingadmin2015-10-28T02:39:13+00:00 Turbulence models typically involve coarse-graining and/or time averaging. Though adequate for modeling mean transport, this approach does not address turbulence-microphysics interactions that are important in combustion processes. Subgrid models are developed to represent these interactions. The CRF has developed a fundamentally different representation of these interactions that does not involve distinct coarse-grained and subgrid

  13. Demand Response and Energy Storage Integration Study

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demand response and energy storage resources present potentially important sources of bulk power system services that can aid in integrating variable renewable generation. While renewable...

  14. Analyzing Effects of Turbulence on Power Generation Using Wind Plant Monitoring Data: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, J.; Chowdhury, S.; Hodge, B. M.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a methodology is developed to analyze how ambient and wake turbulence affects the power generation of a single wind turbine within an array of turbines. Using monitoring data from a wind power plant, we selected two sets of wind and power data for turbines on the edge of the wind plant that resemble (i) an out-of-wake scenario (i.e., when the turbine directly faces incoming winds) and (ii) an in-wake scenario (i.e., when the turbine is under the wake of other turbines). For each set of data, two surrogate models were then developed to represent the turbine power generation (i) as a function of the wind speed; and (ii) as a function of the wind speed and turbulence intensity. Support vector regression was adopted for the development of the surrogate models. Three types of uncertainties in the turbine power generation were also investigated: (i) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the published/reported power curve, (ii) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the estimated power response that accounts for only mean wind speed; and (iii) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the estimated power response that accounts for both mean wind speed and turbulence intensity. Results show that (i) under the same wind conditions, the turbine generates different power between the in-wake and out-of-wake scenarios, (ii) a turbine generally produces more power under the in-wake scenario than under the out-of-wake scenario, (iii) the power generation is sensitive to turbulence intensity even when the wind speed is greater than the turbine rated speed, and (iv) there is relatively more uncertainty in the power generation under the in-wake scenario than under the out-of-wake scenario.

  15. CO2 exposure at pressure impacts metabolism and stress responses in the model sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfovibrio vulgaris strain Hildenborough

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Hoyt, David W.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Alderson, Paul A.; Plymale, Andrew E.; Markillie, Lye Meng; Tucker, Abigail E.; Walter, Eric D.; Linggi, Bryan E.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Taylor, Ronald C.

    2014-09-01

    Geologic carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration drives physical and geochemical changes in deep subsurface environments that impact indigenous microbial activities. The combined effects of pressurized CO2 on a model sulfate-reducing microorganism, Desulfovibrio vulgaris, have been assessed using a suite of genomic and kinetic measurements. Novel high-pressure NMR time-series measurements using 13C-lactate were used to track D. vulgaris metabolism. We identified cessation of respiration at CO2 pressures of 10 bar, 25 bar, 50 bar, and 80 bar. Concurrent experiments using N2 as the pressurizing phase had no negative effect on microbial respiration, as inferred from reduction of sulfate to sulfide. Complementary pressurized batch incubations and fluorescence microscopy measurements supported NMR observations, and indicated that non-respiring cells were mostly viable at 50 bar CO2 for at least four hours, and at 80 bar CO2 for two hours. The fraction of dead cells increased rapidly after four hours at 80 bar CO2. Transcriptomic (RNA-Seq) measurements on mRNA transcripts from CO2-incubated biomass indicated that cells up-regulated the production of certain amino acids (leucine, isoleucine) following CO2 exposure at elevated pressures, likely as part of a general stress response. Evidence for other poorly understood stress responses were also identified within RNA-Seq data, suggesting that while pressurized CO2 severely limits the growth and respiration of D. vulgaris cells, biomass retains intact cell membranes at pressures up to 80 bar CO2. Together, these data show that geologic sequestration of CO2 may have significant impacts on rates of sulfate reduction in many deep subsurface environments where this metabolism is a key respiratory process.

  16. Demand Response Resources for Energy and Ancillary Services (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.

    2014-04-01

    Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility particularly on future systems with high penetrations of variable wind an solar power generation. However, DR in grid models is limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the co-optimization of DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model of the Colorado test system. We assume each DR resource can provide energy services by either shedding load or shifting its use between different times, as well as operating

  17. Underwater power generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowley, W.W.

    1983-05-10

    Apparatus and method for generating electrical power by disposing a plurality of power producing modules in a substantially constant velocity ocean current and mechanically coupling the output of the modules to drive a single electrical generator is disclosed.

  18. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    WVMinputs-outputs Permalink Gallery Sandia Labs releases wavelet variability model (WVM) Modeling, News, Photovoltaic, Solar Sandia Labs releases wavelet variability model (WVM) When a single solar photovoltaic (PV) module is in full sunlight, then is shaded by a cloud, and is back in full sunlight in a matter of seconds, a sharp dip then increase in power output will result. However, over an entire PV plant, clouds will often uncover some modules even as they cover others, [...] By Andrea

  19. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A rail tank car of the type used to transport crude oil across North America. Recent incidents have raised concerns about the safety of this practice, which the DOE-DOT-sponsored team is investigating. (photo credit: Harvey Henkelmann) Permalink Gallery Expansion of DOE-DOT Tight Oil Research Work Capabilities, Carbon Capture & Storage, Carbon Storage, Energy, Energy Assurance, Energy Assurance, Fuel Options, Infrastructure Assurance, Infrastructure Security, Modeling, Modeling, Modeling

  20. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Monte Carlo modeling it was found that for noisy signals with a significant background component, accuracy is improved by fitting the total emission data which includes the...

  1. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Renewable Energy, Research & Capabilities, Wind Energy, Wind News|0 Comments Read More ... Energy, Research & Capabilities, Water Power Sandia Modifies Delft3D Turbine Model ...

  2. Improving in vitro Sertoli cell/gonocyte co-culture model for assessing male reproductive toxicity: Lessons learned from comparisons of cytotoxicity versus genomic responses to phthalates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu Xiaozhong; Hong, Sung Woo; Moreira, Estefania G.; Faustman, Elaine M.

    2009-09-15

    Gonocytes exist in the neonatal testis and represent a transient population of male germ-line stem cells. It has been shown that stem cell self-renewal and progeny production is probably controlled by the neighboring differentiated cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) in vivo known as niches. Recently, we developed an in vitro three-dimensional (3D) Sertoli cell/gonocyte co-culture (SGC) model with ECM overlay, which creates an in vivo-like niche and supports germ-line stem cell functioning within a 3D environment. In this study, we applied morphological and cytotoxicity evaluations, as well as microarray-based gene expression to examine the effects of different phthalate esters (PE) on this model. Known in vivo male developmentally toxic PEs (DTPE) and developmentally non-toxic PEs (DNTPE) were evaluated. We observed that DTPE induced significantly greater dose-dependent morphological changes, a decrease in cell viability and an increase in cytotoxicity compared to those treated with DNTPE. Moreover, the gene expression was more greatly altered by DTPE than by DNTPE and non-supervised cluster analysis allowed the discrimination of DTPE from the DNTPE. Our systems-based GO-Quant analysis showed significant alterations in the gene pathways involved in cell cycle, phosphate transport and apoptosis regulation with DTPE but not with DNTPE treatment. Disruptions of steroidogenesis related-gene expression such as Star, Cyp19a1, Hsd17b8, and Nr4a3 were observed in the DTPE group, but not in the DNTPE group. In summary, our observation on cell viability, cytotoxicity, and microarray-based gene expression analysis induced by PEs demonstrate that our in vitro 3D-SGC system mimicked in vivo responses for PEs and suggests that the 3D-SGC system might be useful in identifying developmental reproductive toxicants.

  3. Motor/generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hickam, Christopher Dale (Glasford, IL)

    2008-05-13

    A motor/generator is provided for connecting between a transmission input shaft and an output shaft of a prime mover. The motor/generator may include a motor/generator housing, a stator mounted to the motor/generator housing, a rotor mounted at least partially within the motor/generator housing and rotatable about a rotor rotation axis, and a transmission-shaft coupler drivingly coupled to the rotor. The transmission-shaft coupler may include a clamp, which may include a base attached to the rotor and a plurality of adjustable jaws.

  4. Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 1: Load Availability Profiles and Constraints for the Western Interconnection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Demand response (DR) has the potential to improve electric grid reliability and reduce system operation costs. However, including DR in grid modeling can be difficult due to its variable and non-traditional response characteristics, compared to traditional generation. Therefore, efforts to value the participation of DR in procurement of grid services have been limited. In this report, we present methods and tools for predicting demand response availability profiles, representing their capability to participate in capacity, energy, and ancillary services. With the addition of response characteristics mimicking those of generation, the resulting profiles will help in the valuation of the participation of demand response through production cost modeling, which informs infrastructure and investment planning.

  5. Utility Solar Generation Valuation Methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Thomas N.; Dion, Phillip J.

    2009-06-30

    Tucson Electric Power (TEP) developed, tested and verified the results of a new and appropriate method for accurately evaluating the capacity credit of time variant solar generating sources and reviewed new methods to appropriately and fairly evaluate the value of solar generation to electric utilities. The project also reviewed general integrated approaches for adequately compensating owners of solar generation for their benefits to utilities. However, given the limited funding support and time duration of this project combined with the significant differences between utilities regarding rate structures, solar resource availability and coincidence of solar generation with peak load periods, it is well beyond the scope of this project to develop specific rate, rebate, and interconnection approaches to capture utility benefits for all possible utilities. The project developed computer software based evaluation method models to compare solar generation production data measured in very short term time increments called Sample Intervals over a typical utility Dispatch Cycle during an Evaluation Period against utility system load data. Ten second resolution generation production data from the SGSSS and actual one minute resolution TEP system load data for 2006 and 2007, along with data from the Pennington Street Garage 60 kW DC capacity solar unit installed in downtown Tucson will be applied to the model for testing and verification of the evaluation method. Data was provided by other utilities, but critical time periods of data were missing making results derived from that data inaccurate. The algorithms are based on previous analysis and review of specific 2005 and 2006 SGSSS production data. The model was built, tested and verified by in house TEP personnel. For this phase of the project, TEP communicated with, shared solar production data with and collaborated on the development of solar generation valuation tools with other utilities, including Arizona Public Service, Salt River Project, Xcel and Nevada Power Company as well as the Arizona electric cooperatives. In the second phase of the project, three years of 10 second power output data of the SGSSS was used to evaluate the effectiveness of frequency domain analysis, normal statistical distribution analysis and finally maximum/minimum differential output analysis to test the applicability of these mathematic methods in accurately modeling the output variations produced by clouds passing over the SGSSS array.

  6. Emergency generator facility noise control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cass, G.R.

    1982-01-01

    In the past decade, great strides have been made in the adoption of noise control regulations and implementation of noise control measures; however, still prevelant are problems in the interpretation and enforcement of these regulations. Many planning commissions, building departments, and other local government officials are not aware of acoustical nomenclature and principles, although their responsibilities include making binding decisions regarding their community's noise control programs. This paper discusses a project undertaken by Dames and Moore to aid a developer to comply with strict noise regulation. Construction called for a computer/office complex in a light industrial park, located adjacent to an established suburban residential neighborhood. The major noise source consisted of an emergency generating facility including twelve-1200 kw diesel generators, twelve rooftop-mounted radiator units, six rooftop-mounted 20-hp, 50,000 cfm vaneaxial exhaust fans, and four 100-hp cooling towers.

  7. Utility Static Generation Reliability

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-03-05

    PICES (Probabilistic Investigation of Capacity and Energy Shortages) was developed for estimating an electric utility''s expected frequency and duration of capacity deficiencies on a daily on and off-peak basis. In addition to the system loss-of-load probability (LOLP) and loss-of-load expectation (LOLE) indices, PICES calculates the expected frequency and duration of system capacity deficiencies and the probability, expectation, and expected frequency and duration of a range of system reserve margin states. Results are aggregated and printedmore » on a weekly, monthly, or annual basis. The program employs hourly load data and either the two-state (on/off) or a more sophisticated three-state (on/partially on/fully off) generating unit representation. Unit maintenance schedules are determined on a weekly, levelized reserve margin basis. In addition to the 8760-hour annual load record, the user provides the following information for each unit: plant capacity, annual maintenance requirement, two or three-state unit failure and repair rates, and for three-state models, the partial state capacity deficiency. PICES can also supply default failure and repair rate values, based on the Edison Electric Institute''s 1979 Report on Equipment Availability for the Ten-Year Period 1968 Through 1977, for many common plant types. Multi-year analysis can be performed by specifying as input data the annual peak load growth rates and plant addition and retirement schedules for each year in the study.« less

  8. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NASA Earth at Night Video EC, Energy, Energy Efficiency, Global, Modeling, News & Events, Solid-State Lighting, Videos NASA Earth at Night Video Have you ever wondered what the ...

  9. Steam generator support system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moldenhauer, J.E.

    1987-08-25

    A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source is disclosed. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances. 4 figs.

  10. Steam generator support system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moldenhauer, James E.

    1987-01-01

    A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances.

  11. Frequency Response Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2014-03-13

    According to the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) definition: “Frequency response is a measure of an Interconnection’s ability to stabilize frequency immediately following the sudden loss of generation or load, and is a critical component of the reliable operation of the Bulk-Power System, particularly during disturbances and recoveries. Failure to maintain frequency can disrupt the operation of equipment and initiate disconnection of power plant equipment to prevent it from being damaged, which could leadmore » to wide-spread blackouts.” Frequency Response Tool automates the power system frequency response analysis process. The tool performs initial estimation of the system frequency parameters (initial frequency, minimum frequency, settling point). User can visually inspect and adjust these parameters. The tool also calculates the frequency response performance metrics of the system, archives the historic events and baselines the system performance. Frequency response performance characteristics of the system are calculated using phasor measurement unit (PMU) information. Methodology of the frequency response performance assessment implemented in the tool complies with the NERC Frequency response standard.« less

  12. Frequency Response Analysis Tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etingov, Pavel V.; Kosterev, Dmitry; Dai, T.

    2014-12-31

    Frequency response has received a lot of attention in recent years at the national level, which culminated in the development and approval of North American Electricity Reliability Corporation (NERC) BAL-003-1 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting Reliability Standard. This report is prepared to describe the details of the work conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in collaboration with the Bonneville Power Administration and Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) Joint Synchronized Information Subcommittee (JSIS) to develop a frequency response analysis tool (FRAT). The document provides the details on the methodology and main features of the FRAT. The tool manages the database of under-frequency events and calculates the frequency response baseline. Frequency response calculations are consistent with frequency response measure (FRM) in NERC BAL-003-1 for an interconnection and balancing authority. The FRAT can use both phasor measurement unit (PMU) data, where available, and supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) data. The tool is also capable of automatically generating NERC Frequency Response Survey (FRS) forms required by BAL-003-1 Standard.

  13. Generation and Transmission Maximization Model | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    its limited energy and transmission resources, but also firm contracts, independent power producer (IPP) agreements, and bulk power transaction opportunities on the spot...

  14. Next generation Programming Models-042114.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Types of Parallelism Memory Data Representation Acceler ator affinity Motivation DEGAS Extensions to Fortran(CAF 2.0), C (Habanero C and UPC) and Python Tasks and Asynch...

  15. Nuclear Energy Response in the EMF27 Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Son H.; Wada, Kenichi; Kurosawa, Atsushi; Roberts, Matthew

    2014-03-25

    The nuclear energy response for mitigating global climate change across eighteen participating models of the EMF27 study is investigated. Diverse perspectives on the future role of nuclear power in the global energy system are evident in the broad range of nuclear power contributions from participating models of the study. In the Baseline scenario without climate policy, nuclear electricity generation and shares span 0 – 66 EJ/ year and 0 - 25% in 2100 for all models, with a median nuclear electricity generation of 39 EJ/year (1,389 GWe at 90% capacity factor) and median share of 9%. The role of nuclear energy increased under the climate policy scenarios. The median of nuclear energy use across all models doubled in the 450 ppm CO2e scenario with a nuclear electricity generation of 67 EJ/year (2,352 GWe at 90% capacity factor) and share of 17% in 2100. The broad range of nuclear electricity generation (11 – 214 EJ/year) and shares (2 - 38%) in 2100 of the 450 ppm CO2e scenario reflect differences in the technology choice behavior, technology assumptions and competitiveness of low carbon technologies. Greater clarification of nuclear fuel cycle issues and risk factors associated with nuclear energy use are necessary for understanding the nuclear deployment constraints imposed in models and for improving the assessment of the nuclear energy potential in addressing climate change.

  16. Generation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generation Generation Southeastern’s Power Operations employees perform the tasks of declaring, scheduling, dispatching, and accounting for capacity and energy generated at the 22 hydroelectric projects in the agency’s 11-state marketing area. Southeastern has Certified System Operators, meeting the criteria set forth by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation. Southeastern's Power Operations employees perform the tasks of declaring, scheduling, dispatching, and accounting

  17. Next Generation Materials:

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Research & Development Projects » Next Generation Manufacturing Processes Next Generation Manufacturing Processes New process technologies can rejuvenate U.S. manufacturing. Novel processing concepts can open pathways to double net energy productivity, enabling rapid manufacture of energy-efficient, high-quality products at competitive cost. Four process technology areas are expected to generate large energy, carbon, and economic benefits across the manufacturing sector. Click the areas

  18. Distributed generation hits market

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The pace at which vendors are developing and marketing gas turbines and reciprocating engines for small-scale applications may signal the widespread growth of distributed generation. Loosely defined to refer to applications in which power generation equipment is located close to end users who have near-term power capacity needs, distributed generation encompasses a broad range of technologies and load requirements. Disagreement is inevitable, but many industry observers associate distributed generation with applications anywhere from 25 kW to 25 MW. Ten years ago, distributed generation users only represented about 2% of the world market. Today, that figure has increased to about 4 or 5%, and probably could settle in the 20% range within a 3-to-5-year period, according to Michael Jones, San Diego, Calif.-based Solar Turbines Inc. power generation marketing manager. The US Energy Information Administration predicts about 175 GW of generation capacity will be added domestically by 2010. If 20% comes from smaller plants, distributed generation could account for about 35 GW. Even with more competition, it`s highly unlikely distributed generation will totally replace current market structures and central stations. Distributed generation may be best suited for making market inroads when and where central systems need upgrading, and should prove its worth when the system can`t handle peak demands. Typical applications include small reciprocating engine generators at remote customer sites or larger gas turbines to boost the grid. Additional market opportunities include standby capacity, peak shaving, power quality, cogeneration and capacity rental for immediate demand requirements. Integration of distributed generation systems--using gas-fueled engines, gas-fired combustion engines and fuel cells--can upgrade power quality for customers and reduce operating costs for electric utilities.

  19. Isolated trigger pulse generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aaland, Kristian (Livermore, CA) [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-19

    A trigger pulse generation system capable of delivering a multiplicity of isolated 100 kV trigger pulses with picosecond simultaneity.

  20. Renewable Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

  1. Isolated trigger pulse generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aaland, K.

    1980-02-19

    A trigger pulse generation system capable of delivering a multiplicity of isolated 100 kV trigger pulses with picosecond simultaneity. 2 figs.

  2. Thermophotovoltaic energy generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Celanovic, Ivan; Chan, Walker; Bermel, Peter; Yeng, Adrian Y. X.; Marton, Christopher; Ghebrebrhan, Michael; Araghchini, Mohammad; Jensen, Klavs F.; Soljacic, Marin; Joannopoulos, John D.; Johnson, Steven G.; Pilawa-Podgurski, Robert; Fisher, Peter

    2015-08-25

    Inventive systems and methods for the generation of energy using thermophotovoltaic cells are described. Also described are systems and methods for selectively emitting electromagnetic radiation from an emitter for use in thermophotovoltaic energy generation systems. In at least some of the inventive energy generation systems and methods, a voltage applied to the thermophotovoltaic cell (e.g., to enhance the power produced by the cell) can be adjusted to enhance system performance. Certain embodiments of the systems and methods described herein can be used to generate energy relatively efficiently.

  3. SNE TRAFIC GENERATOR

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003027MLTPL00 Network Traffic Generator for Low-rate Small Network Equipment Software http://eln.lbl.gov/sne_traffic_gen.html

  4. " Generation, by Program Sponsorship...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    by Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation, by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected" " Industries, and Type of Energy-Management Program, ...

  5. " Generation by Program Sponsorship...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    A49. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity" " Generation by Program Sponsorship, Industry Group, Selected" " Industries, and Type of Energy-Management Program, ...

  6. NEGATIVE GATE GENERATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jones, C.S.; Eaton, T.E.

    1958-02-01

    This patent relates to pulse generating circuits and more particularly to rectangular pulse generators. The pulse generator of the present invention incorporates thyratrons as switching elements to discharge a first capacitor through a load resistor to initiate and provide the body of a Pulse, and subsequently dlscharge a second capacitor to impress the potential of its charge, with opposite potential polarity across the load resistor to terminate the pulse. Accurate rectangular pulses in the millimicrosecond range are produced across a low impedance by this generator.

  7. Talkin Bout Wind Generation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The amount of electricity generated by the wind industry started to grow back around 1999, and since 2007 has been increasing at a rapid pace.

  8. Combined CDF and D0 upper limits on $gg\\to H\\to W^+W^-$ and constraints on the Higgs boson mass in fourth-generation fermion models with up to 8.2 fb$^{-1}$ of data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, Doug; /Tufts U.

    2011-08-01

    We combine results from searches by the CDF and D0 Collaborations for a standard model Higgs boson (H) in the processes gg {yields} H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -} and gg {yields} H {yields} ZZ in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. With 8.2 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity analyzed at CDF and 8.1 fb{sup -1} at D0, the 95% C.L. upper limit on {sigma}(gg {yields} H) x {Beta}(H {yields} W{sup +}W{sup -}) is 1.01 pb at m{sub H} = 120 GeV, 0.40 pb at m{sub H} = 165 GeV, and 0.47 pb at m{sub H} = 200 GeV. Assuming the presence of a fourth sequential generation of fermions with large masses, we exclude at the 95% Confidence Level a standard-model-like Higgs boson with a mass between 124 and 286 GeV.

  9. modeling-sediment-html

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modeling of Sediment Transport and Porous Medium Response Under Current ad Waves

  10. Estimation of unsaturated zone traveltimes for Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, using a source-responsive preferential-flow model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brian A. Ebel; John R. Nimmo

    2009-09-11

    Traveltimes for contaminant transport by water from a point in the unsaturated zone to the saturated zone are a concern at Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site, Nevada. Where nuclear tests were conducted in the unsaturated zone, contaminants must traverse hundreds of meters of variably saturated rock before they enter the saturated zone in the carbonate rock, where the regional groundwater system has the potential to carry them substantial distances to a location of concern. The unsaturated-zone portion of the contaminant transport path may cause a significant delay, in addition to the time required to travel within the saturated zone, and thus may be important in the overall evaluation of the potential hazard from contamination. Downward contaminant transport through the unsaturated zone occurs through various processes and pathways; this can lead to a broad distribution of contaminant traveltimes, including exceedingly slow and unexpectedly fast extremes. Though the bulk of mobile contaminant arrives between the time-scale end members, the fastest contaminant transport speed, in other words the speed determined by the combination of possible processes and pathways that would bring a measureable quantity of contaminant to the aquifer in the shortest time, carries particular regulatory significance because of its relevance in formulating the most conservative hazard-prevention scenarios. Unsaturated-zone flow is usually modeled as a diffusive process responding to gravity and pressure gradients as mediated by the unsaturated hydraulic properties of the materials traversed. The mathematical formulation of the diffuse-flow concept is known as Richards' equation, which when coupled to a solute transport equation, such as the advection-dispersion equation, provides a framework to simulate contaminant migration in the unsaturated zone. In recent decades awareness has increased that much fluid flow and contaminant transport within the unsaturated zone takes place as preferential flow, faster than would be predicted by the coupled Richards' and advection-dispersion equations with hydraulic properties estimated by traditional means. At present the hydrologic community has not achieved consensus as to whether a modification of Richards' equation, or a fundamentally different formulation, would best quantify preferential flow. Where the fastest contaminant transport speed is what needs to be estimated, there is the possibility of simplification of the evaluation process. One way of doing so is by a two-step process in which the first step is to evaluate whether significant preferential flow and solute transport is possible for the media and conditions of concern. The second step is to carry out (a) a basic Richards' and advection-dispersion equation analysis if it is concluded that preferential flow is not possible or (b) an analysis that considers only the fastest possible preferential-flow processes, if preferential flow is possible. For the preferential-flow situation, a recently published model describable as a Source-Responsive Preferential-Flow (SRPF) model is an easily applied option. This report documents the application of this two-step process to flow through the thick unsaturated zones of Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain in the Nevada Test Site. Application of the SRPF model involves distinguishing between continuous and intermittent water supply to preferential flow paths. At Rainier Mesa and Shoshone Mountain this issue is complicated by the fact that contaminant travel begins at a location deep in the subsurface, where there may be perched water that may or may not act like a continuous supply, depending on such features as the connectedness of fractures and the nature of impeding layers. We have treated this situation by hypothesizing both continuous and intermittent scenarios for contaminant transport to the carbonate aquifer and reporting estimation of the fastest speed for both of these end members.

  11. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in warm dense matter experiments with diffuse interface methods in the ALE-AMR code Wangyi Liu ∗ , John Barnard, Alex Friedman, Nathan Masters, Aaron Fisher, Velemir Mlaker, Alice Koniges, David Eder † August 4, 2011 Abstract In this paper we describe an implementation of a single-fluid inter- face model in the ALE-AMR code to simulate surface tension effects. The model does not require explicit information on the physical state of the two phases. The only change to the existing fluid

  12. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

    1994-01-01

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

  13. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

    1993-01-01

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

  14. Internal split field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat; Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2012-01-03

    A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

  15. Solid aerosol generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prescott, Donald S.; Schober, Robert K.; Beller, John

    1992-01-01

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

  16. Improved solid aerosol generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1988-07-19

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  17. Solid aerosol generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

    1992-03-17

    An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration is disclosed. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

  18. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1994-02-15

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

  19. Laser beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

    1993-12-28

    Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

  20. Geothermal Generation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Generation This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Global Geothermal Energy Generation Global Geothermal Electricity Generation in 2007 (in millions...

  1. A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight (nTOF) detector response in current mode to inertial confinement fusion experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Alan J.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Fehl, David Lee; Hahn, Kelly Denise; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Smelser, Ruth Marie; Torres, Jose A.

    2013-09-01

    There are several machines in this country that produce short bursts of neutrons for various applications. A few examples are the Zmachine, operated by Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, NM; the OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester in Rochester, NY; and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) operated by the Department of Energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in Livermore, California. They all incorporate neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors which measure neutron yield, and the shapes of the waveforms from these detectors contain germane information about the plasma conditions that produce the neutrons. However, the signals can also be %E2%80%9Cclouded%E2%80%9D by a certain fraction of neutrons that scatter off structural components and also arrive at the detectors, thereby making analysis of the plasma conditions more difficult. These detectors operate in current mode - i.e., they have no discrimination, and all the photomultiplier anode charges are integrated rather than counted individually as they are in single event counting. Up to now, there has not been a method for modeling an nTOF detector operating in current mode. MCNPPoliMiwas developed in 2002 to simulate neutron and gammaray detection in a plastic scintillator, which produces a collision data output table about each neutron and photon interaction occurring within the scintillator; however, the postprocessing code which accompanies MCNPPoliMi assumes a detector operating in singleevent counting mode and not current mode. Therefore, the idea for this work had been born: could a new postprocessing code be written to simulate an nTOF detector operating in current mode? And if so, could this process be used to address such issues as the impact of neutron scattering on the primary signal? Also, could it possibly even identify sources of scattering (i.e., structural materials) that could be removed or modified to produce %E2%80%9Ccleaner%E2%80%9D neutron signals? This process was first developed and then applied to the axial neutron time of flight detectors at the ZFacility mentioned above. First, MCNPPoliMi was used to model relevant portions of the facility between the source and the detector locations. To obtain useful statistics, variance reduction was utilized. Then, the resulting collision output table produced by MCNPPoliMi was further analyzed by a MATLAB postprocessing code. This converted the energy deposited by neutron and photon interactions in the plastic scintillator (i.e., nTOF detector) into light output, in units of MeVee%D1%84 (electron equivalent) vs time. The time response of the detector was then folded into the signal via another MATLAB code. The simulated response was then compared with experimental data and shown to be in good agreement. To address the issue of neutron scattering, an %E2%80%9CIdeal Case,%E2%80%9D (i.e., a plastic scintillator was placed at the same distance from the source for each detector location) with no structural components in the problem. This was done to produce as %E2%80%9Cpure%E2%80%9D a neutron signal as possible. The simulated waveform from this %E2%80%9CIdeal Case%E2%80%9D was then compared with the simulated data from the %E2%80%9CFull Scale%E2%80%9D geometry (i.e., the detector at the same location, but with all the structural materials now included). The %E2%80%9CIdeal Case%E2%80%9D was subtracted from the %E2%80%9CFull Scale%E2%80%9D geometry case, and this was determined to be the contribution due to scattering. The time response was deconvolved out of the empirical data, and the contribution due to scattering was then subtracted out of it. A transformation was then made from dN/dt to dN/dE to obtain neutron spectra at two different detector locations.

  2. Characterizing the Response of Commercial and Industrial Facilities to Dynamic Pricing Signals from the Utility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Gadgil, Ashok J.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Price, Phillip N.; Kiliccote, Sila

    2010-07-01

    We describe a method to generate statistical models of electricity demand from Commercial and Industrial (C&I) facilities including their response to dynamic pricing signals. Models are built with historical electricity demand data. A facility model is the sum of a baseline demand model and a residual demand model; the latter quantifies deviations from the baseline model due to dynamic pricing signals from the utility. Three regression-based baseline computation methods were developed and analyzed. All methods performed similarly. To understand the diversity of facility responses to dynamic pricing signals, we have characterized the response of 44 C&I facilities participating in a Demand Response (DR) program using dynamic pricing in California (Pacific Gas and Electric's Critical Peak Pricing Program). In most cases, facilities shed load during DR events but there is significant heterogeneity in facility responses. Modeling facility response to dynamic price signals is beneficial to the Independent System Operator for scheduling supply to meet demand, to the utility for improving dynamic pricing programs, and to the customer for minimizing energy costs.

  3. Demand Response Dispatch Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2012-08-31

    The Demand Response (DR) Dispatch Tool uses price profiles to dispatch demand response resources and create load modifying profiles. These annual profiles are used as inputs to production cost models and regional planning tools (e.g., PROMOD). The tool has been effectively implemented in transmission planning studies conducted by the Western Electricity Coordinating Council via its Transmission Expansion Planning and Policy Committee. The DR Dispatch Tool can properly model the dispatch of DR resources for bothmore » reliability and economic conditions.« less

  4. Model Catalysis of Ammonia Synthesis ad Iron-Water Interfaces - ASum Frequency Generation Vibrational Spectroscopic Study of Solid-GasInterfaces and Anion Photoelectron Spectroscopic Study of Selected Anionclusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, Michael James

    2005-12-15

    The ammonia synthesis reaction has been studied using single crystal model catalysis combined with sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy. The adsorption of gases N{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, O{sub 2} and NH{sub 3} that play a role in ammonia synthesis have been studied on the Fe(111) crystal surface by sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy using an integrated Ultra-High Vacuum (UHV)/high-pressure system. SFG spectra are presented for the dissociation intermediates, NH{sub 2} ({approx}3325 cm{sup -1}) and NH ({approx}3235 cm{sup -1}) under high pressure of ammonia or equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products on Fe(111) surfaces. Special attention was paid to understand how potassium promotion of the iron catalyst affects the intermediates of ammonia synthesis. An Fe(111) surface promoted with 0.2 monolayers of potassium red shifts the vibrational frequencies of the reactive surface intermediates, NH and NH{sub 2}, providing evidence for weakened the nitrogen-hydrogen bonds relative to clean Fe(111). Spectral features of these surface intermediates persisted to higher temperatures for promoted iron surfaces than for clean Fe(111) surfaces implying that nitrogen-iron bonds are stronger for the promoted surface. The ratio of the NH to NH{sub 2} signal changed for promoted surfaces in the presence of equilibrium concentrations of reactants and products. The order of adding oxygen and potassium to promoted surfaces does not alter the spectra indicating that ammonia induces surface reconstruction of the catalyst to produce the same surface morphology. When oxygen is co-adsorbed with nitrogen, hydrogen, ammonia or potassium on Fe(111), a relative phase shift of the spectra occurs as compared to the presence of adsorbates on clean iron surfaces. Water adsorption on iron was also probed using SFG vibrational spectroscopy. For both H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O, the only spectral feature was in the range of the free OH or free OD. From the absence of SFG spectra of ice-like structure we conclude that surface hydroxides are formed and no liquid water is present on the surface. Other than model catalysis, gas phase anion photoelectron spectroscopy of the Cl + H{sub 2} van der Waals well, silicon clusters, germanium clusters, aluminum oxide clusters and indium phosphide clusters were studied. The spectra help to map out the neutral potential energy surfaces of the clusters. For aluminum oxide, the structures of the anions and neutrals were explored and for silicon, germanium and indium phosphide the electronic structure of larger clusters was mapped out.

  5. Compact neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  6. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sandia Co-Hosts "Climate Risk Forum: Bridging Climate Science and Actuarial Practice" This Fall event was a follow-up to a Climate and Environment Program Area meeting with the California governor's office in July. There, the California Insurance Commissioner, Dave Jones, recognized the value of Sandia's climate-impact modeling and analysis work, led by Stephen Conrad (manager of Sandia's Resilience and Regulatory Effects Dept.), and wanted to connect that [...] By

  7. Synthetic guide star generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A.; Page, Ralph H.; Ebbers, Christopher A.; Beach, Raymond J.

    2004-03-09

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  8. Synthetic guide star generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Payne, Stephen A. [Castro Valley, CA; Page, Ralph H. [Castro Valley, CA; Ebbers, Christopher A. [Livermore, CA; Beach, Raymond J. [Livermore, CA

    2008-06-10

    A system for assisting in observing a celestial object and providing synthetic guide star generation. A lasing system provides radiation at a frequency at or near 938 nm and radiation at a frequency at or near 1583 nm. The lasing system includes a fiber laser operating between 880 nm and 960 nm and a fiber laser operating between 1524 nm and 1650 nm. A frequency-conversion system mixes the radiation and generates light at a frequency at or near 589 nm. A system directs the light at a frequency at or near 589 nm toward the celestial object and provides synthetic guide star generation.

  9. Magnetic field generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krienin, Frank (Shoreham, NY)

    1990-01-01

    A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

  10. Mann 3600 Pattern Generator

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mann 3600 Pattern Generator Description: The GCA Mann 3600 pattern generator is designed for patterning standard 5" x 5" mask plates for use in optical lithography. Pattern designs are created in AutoCAD. The AutoCAD file is then converted into binary format, which can be fractured into data read by the pattern generator. The illumination source for exposures is a high pressure Hg arc lamp. The light is filtered and projected onto a shutter, which controls the exposure dose. A set of

  11. Graph Generator Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lothian, Josh; Powers, Sarah S; Sullivan, Blair D; Baker, Matthew B; Schrock, Jonathan; Poole, Stephen W

    2013-12-01

    The benchmarking effort within the Extreme Scale Systems Center at Oak Ridge National Laboratory seeks to provide High Performance Computing benchmarks and test suites of interest to the DoD sponsor. The work described in this report is a part of the effort focusing on graph generation. A previously developed benchmark, SystemBurn, allowed the emulation of dierent application behavior profiles within a single framework. To complement this effort, similar capabilities are desired for graph-centric problems. This report examines existing synthetic graph generator implementations in preparation for further study on the properties of their generated synthetic graphs.

  12. PULSE SYNTHESIZING GENERATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kerns, Q.A.

    1963-08-01

    >An electronlc circuit for synthesizing electrical current pulses having very fast rise times includes several sinewave generators tuned to progressively higher harmonic frequencies with signal amplitudes and phases selectable according to the Fourier series of the waveform that is to be synthesized. Phase control is provided by periodically triggering the generators at precisely controlled times. The outputs of the generators are combined in a coaxial transmission line. Any frequency-dependent delays that occur in the transmission line can be readily compensated for so that the desired signal wave shape is obtained at the output of the line. (AEC)

  13. Generating electricity from viruses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2013-10-31

    Berkeley Lab's Seung-Wuk Lee discusses "Generating electricity from viruses" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas.

  14. Generating electricity from viruses

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lee, Seung-Wuk

    2014-06-23

    Berkeley Lab's Seung-Wuk Lee discusses "Generating electricity from viruses" in this Oct. 28, 2013 talk, which is part of a Science at the Theater event entitled Eight Big Ideas.

  15. Vector generator scan converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

    1988-02-05

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

  16. Vector generator scan converter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, James M.; Leighton, James F.

    1990-01-01

    High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

  17. Denison Dam Historical Generation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 250,000 300,000 350,000 400,000 450,000 500,000 (MWh) Denison Dam Historical Generation

  18. Scram signal generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johanson, Edward W. (New Lenox, IL); Simms, Richard (Westmont, IL)

    1981-01-01

    A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

  19. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  20. Oscillating fluid power generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morris, David C

    2014-02-25

    A system and method for harvesting the kinetic energy of a fluid flow for power generation with a vertically oriented, aerodynamic wing structure comprising one or more airfoil elements pivotably attached to a mast. When activated by the moving fluid stream, the wing structure oscillates back and forth, generating lift first in one direction then in the opposite direction. This oscillating movement is converted to unidirectional rotational movement in order to provide motive power to an electricity generator. Unlike other oscillating devices, this device is designed to harvest the maximum aerodynamic lift forces available for a given oscillation cycle. Because the system is not subjected to the same intense forces and stresses as turbine systems, it can be constructed less expensively, reducing the cost of electricity generation. The system can be grouped in more compact clusters, be less evident in the landscape, and present reduced risk to avian species.

  1. Revised evaluation of steam generator testing alternatives

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1981-01-01

    A scoping evaluation was made of various facility alternatives for test of LMFBR prototype steam generators and models. Recommendations are given for modifications to EBR-II and SCTI (Sodium Components Test Installation) for prototype SG testing, and for few-tube model testing. (DLC)

  2. RGG: Reactor geometry (and mesh) generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, R.; Tautges, T.

    2012-07-01

    The reactor geometry (and mesh) generator RGG takes advantage of information about repeated structures in both assembly and core lattices to simplify the creation of geometry and mesh. It is released as open source software as a part of the MeshKit mesh generation library. The methodology operates in three stages. First, assembly geometry models of various types are generated by a tool called AssyGen. Next, the assembly model or models are meshed by using MeshKit tools or the CUBIT mesh generation tool-kit, optionally based on a journal file output by AssyGen. After one or more assembly model meshes have been constructed, a tool called CoreGen uses a copy/move/merge process to arrange the model meshes into a core model. In this paper, we present the current state of tools and new features in RGG. We also discuss the parallel-enabled CoreGen, which in several cases achieves super-linear speedups since the problems fit in available RAM at higher processor counts. Several RGG applications - 1/6 VHTR model, 1/4 PWR reactor core, and a full-core model for Monju - are reported. (authors)

  3. Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    diffuse interface methods in ALE-AMR code with application in modeling NDCX-II experiments Wangyi Liu 1 , John Barnard 2 , Alex Friedman 2 , Nathan Masters 2 , Aaron Fisher 2 , Alice Koniges 2 , David Eder 2 1 LBNL, USA, 2 LLNL, USA This work was part of the Petascale Initiative in Computational Science at NERSC, supported by the Director, Office of Science, Advanced Scientific Computing Research, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. This work was performed

  4. Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loth, E.; Tryggvason, G.; Tsuji, Y.; Elghobashi, S. E.; Crowe, Clayton T.; Berlemont, A.; Reeks, M.; Simonin, O.; Frank, Th; Onishi, Yasuo; Van Wachem, B.

    2005-09-01

    Slurry flows occur in many circumstances, including chemical manufacturing processes, pipeline transfer of coal, sand, and minerals; mud flows; and disposal of dredged materials. In this section we discuss slurry flow applications related to radioactive waste management. The Hanford tank waste solids and interstitial liquids will be mixed to form a slurry so it can be pumped out for retrieval and treatment. The waste is very complex chemically and physically. The ARIEL code is used to model the chemical interactions and fluid dynamics of the waste.

  5. EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generating Capacity Release Date: January 3, 2013 | Next Release: August 2013 Year Existing Units by Energy Source Unit Additions Unit Retirements 2011 XLS XLS XLS 2010 XLS XLS XLS 2009 XLS XLS XLS 2008 XLS XLS XLS 2007 XLS XLS XLS 2006 XLS XLS XLS 2005 XLS XLS XLS 2004 XLS XLS XLS 2003 XLS XLS XLS Source: Form EIA-860, "Annual Electric Generator Report." Related links Electric Power Monthly Electric Power Annual Form EIA-860 Source Data

  6. Compact Mesh Generator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-02-02

    The CMG is a small, lightweight, structured mesh generation code. It features a simple text input parser that allows setup of various meshes via a small set of text commands. Mesh generation data can be output to text, the silo file format, or the API can be directly queried by applications. It can run serially or in parallel via MPI. The CMG includes the ability to specify varius initial conditions on a mesh via meshmore » tags.« less

  7. In vivo generator for radioimmunotherapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mausner, Leonard F.; Srivastava, Suresh G.; Straub, Rita F.

    1988-01-01

    The present invention involves labeling monoclonal antibodies with intermediate half-life radionuclides which decay to much shorter half-life daughters with desirable high energy beta emissions. Since the daughter will be in equilibrium with the parent, it can exert an in-situ tumoricidal effect over a prolonged period in a localized fashion, essentially as an "in-vivo generator". This approach circumvents the inverse relationship between half-life and beta decay energy. Compartmental modeling was used to determine the relative distribution of dose from both parent and daughter nuclei in target and non-target tissues. Actual antibody biodistribution data have been used to fit realistic rate constants for a model containing tumor, blood, and non-tumor compartments. These rate constants were then used in a variety of simulations for two generator systems, Ba-128/Cs-128 (t.sub.1/2 =2.4d/3.6m) and Pd-112/Ag-112 (t.sub.1/2 =0.9d/192m). The results show that higher tumor/background dose ratios may be achievable by virtue of the rapid excretion of a chemically different daughter during the uptake and clearance phases. This modeling also quantitatively demonstrates the favorable impact on activity distribution of a faster monoclonal antibody tumor uptake, especially when the antibody is labeled with a radionuclide with a comparable half-life.

  8. Fuel cell generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Makiel, Joseph M.

    1985-01-01

    A high temperature solid electrolyte fuel cell generator comprising a housing means defining a plurality of chambers including a generator chamber and a combustion products chamber, a porous barrier separating the generator and combustion product chambers, a plurality of elongated annular fuel cells each having a closed end and an open end with the open ends disposed within the combustion product chamber, the cells extending from the open end through the porous barrier and into the generator chamber, a conduit for each cell, each conduit extending into a portion of each cell disposed within the generator chamber, each conduit having means for discharging a first gaseous reactant within each fuel cell, exhaust means for exhausting the combustion product chamber, manifolding means for supplying the first gaseous reactant to the conduits with the manifolding means disposed within the combustion product chamber between the porous barrier and the exhaust means and the manifolding means further comprising support and bypass means for providing support of the manifolding means within the housing while allowing combustion products from the first and a second gaseous reactant to flow past the manifolding means to the exhaust means, and means for flowing the second gaseous reactant into the generator chamber.

  9. Massively parallel mesh generation for physics codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardin, D.D.

    1996-06-01

    Massively parallel processors (MPPs) will soon enable realistic 3-D physical modeling of complex objects and systems. Work is planned or presently underway to port many of LLNL`s physical modeling codes to MPPs. LLNL`s DSI3D electromagnetics code already can solve 40+ million zone problems on the 256 processor Meiko. However, the author lacks the software necessary to generate and manipulate the large meshes needed to model many complicated 3-D geometries. State-of-the-art commercial mesh generators run on workstations and have a practical limit of several hundred thousand elements. In the foreseeable future MPPs will solve problems with a billion mesh elements. The objective of the Parallel Mesh Generation (PMESH) Project is to develop a unique mesh generation system that can construct large 3-D meshes (up to a billion elements) on MPPs. Such a capability will remove a critical roadblock to unleashing the power of MPPs for physical analysis and will put LLNL at the forefront of mesh generation technology. PMESH will ``front-end`` a variety of LLNL 3-D physics codes, including those in the areas of electromagnetics, structural mechanics, thermal analysis, and hydrodynamics. The DSI3D and DYNA3D codes are already running on MPPs. The primary goal of the PMESH project is to provide the robust generation of large meshes for complicated 3-D geometries through the appropriate distribution of the generation task between the user`s workstation and the MPP. Secondary goals are to support the unique features of LLNL physics codes (e.g., unusual elements) and to minimize the user effort required to generate different meshes for the same geometry. PMESH`s capabilities are essential because mesh generation is presently a major limiting factor in simulating larger and more complex 3-D geometries. PMESH will significantly enhance LLNL`s capabilities in physical simulation by advancing the state-of-the-art in large mesh generation by 2 to 3 orders of magnitude.

  10. Generative inspection process planner for integrated production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, C.W. . Kansas City Div.); Gyorog, D.A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1990-04-01

    This work describes the design prototype development of a generative process planning system for dimensional inspection. The system, IPPEX (Inspection Process Planning EXpert), is a rule-based expert system for integrated production. Using as advanced product modeler, relational databases, and artificial intelligence techniques, IPPEX generates the process plan and part program for the dimensional inspection of products using CMMs. Through an application interface, the IPPEX system software accesses product definition from the product modeler. The modeler is a solid geometric modeler coupled with a dimension and tolerance modeler. Resource data regarding the machines, probes, and fixtures are queried from databases. IPPEX represents inspection process knowledge as production rules and incorporates an embedded inference engine to perform decision making. The IPPEX system, its functional architecture, system architecture, system approach, product modeling environment, inspection features, inspection knowledge, hierarchical planning strategy, user interface formats, and other fundamental issues related to inspection planning and part programming for CMMs are described. 27 refs., 16 figs., 4 tabs.

  11. Heat engine generator control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rajashekara, Kaushik (Carmel, IN); Gorti, Bhanuprasad Venkata (Towson, MD); McMullen, Steven Robert (Anderson, IN); Raibert, Robert Joseph (Fishers, IN)

    1998-01-01

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power.

  12. Heat engine generator control system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rajashekara, K.; Gorti, B.V.; McMullen, S.R.; Raibert, R.J.

    1998-05-12

    An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power. 8 figs.

  13. Second-harmonic generation of upper-hybrid radiation in a plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tewari, D.P.; Tripathi, V.K.

    1980-05-01

    Employing the fluid model for the nonlinear response of electrons, we have studied the phenomenon of second-harmonic generation of upper-hybrid electromagnetic radiation in an inhomogeneous plasma. In the case of laser-pallet fusion, the maximum contribution for harmonic generation comes from the vicinity of the upper-hybrid layer, and the harmonic conversion efficiency turns out to be approx.0.1% at the power densities approx.10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/ (CO/sub 2/ laser), the same order as observed experimentally. In the case of electron cyclotron heating experiments of tokamak, a strong second harmonic must be generated at the cyclotron resonance layer. The wave-number-matching condition could be satisfied in a tokamak, which adds to the conversion efficiency.

  14. MHD Generating system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Petrick, Michael; Pierson, Edward S.; Schreiner, Felix

    1980-01-01

    According to the present invention, coal combustion gas is the primary working fluid and copper or a copper alloy is the electrodynamic fluid in the MHD generator, thereby eliminating the heat exchangers between the combustor and the liquid-metal MHD working fluids, allowing the use of a conventional coalfired steam bottoming plant, and making the plant simpler, more efficient and cheaper. In operation, the gas and liquid are combined in a mixer and the resulting two-phase mixture enters the MHD generator. The MHD generator acts as a turbine and electric generator in one unit wherein the gas expands, drives the liquid across the magnetic field and thus generates electrical power. The gas and liquid are separated, and the available energy in the gas is recovered before the gas is exhausted to the atmosphere. Where the combustion gas contains sulfur, oxygen is bubbled through a side loop to remove sulfur therefrom as a concentrated stream of sulfur dioxide. The combustor is operated substoichiometrically to control the oxide level in the copper.

  15. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoelectricity is produced by applying a temperature differential to dissimilar electrically conducting or semiconducting materials, thereby producing a voltage that is proportional to the temperature difference. Thermoelectric generators use this effect to directly convert heat into electricity; however, presently-known generators have low efficiencies due to the production of high currents which in turn cause large resistive heating losses. Some thermoelectric generators operate at efficiencies between 4% and 7% in the 800{degrees} to 1200{degrees}C range. According to its major aspects and bradly stated, the present invention is an apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. In particular, the invention is a thermoelectric generator that juxtaposes a superconducting material and a semiconducting material - so that the superconducting and the semiconducting materials touch - to convert heat energy into electrical energy without resistive losses in the temperature range below the critical temperature of the superconducting material. Preferably, an array of superconducting material is encased in one of several possible configurations within a second material having a high thermal conductivity, preferably a semiconductor, to form a thermoelectric generator.

  16. Spherical neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2006-11-21

    A spherical neutron generator is formed with a small spherical target and a spherical shell RF-driven plasma ion source surrounding the target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) ion plasma is produced by RF excitation in the plasma ion source using an RF antenna. The plasma generation region is a spherical shell between an outer chamber and an inner extraction electrode. A spherical neutron generating target is at the center of the chamber and is biased negatively with respect to the extraction electrode which contains many holes. Ions passing through the holes in the extraction electrode are focused onto the target which produces neutrons by D-D or D-T reactions.

  17. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1984-11-16

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  18. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wheatley, John C.; Swift, Gregory W.; Migliori, Albert

    1986-01-01

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1,000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

  19. Fast generation of sparse random kernel graphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagberg, Aric; Lemons, Nathan; Du, Wen -Bo

    2015-09-10

    The development of kernel-based inhomogeneous random graphs has provided models that are flexible enough to capture many observed characteristics of real networks, and that are also mathematically tractable. We specify a class of inhomogeneous random graph models, called random kernel graphs, that produces sparse graphs with tunable graph properties, and we develop an efficient generation algorithm to sample random instances from this model. As real-world networks are usually large, it is essential that the run-time of generation algorithms scales better than quadratically in the number of vertices n. We show that for many practical kernels our algorithm runs in time at most ο(n(logn)²). As an example, we show how to generate samples of power-law degree distribution graphs with tunable assortativity.

  20. Fast generation of sparse random kernel graphs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hagberg, Aric; Lemons, Nathan; Du, Wen -Bo

    2015-09-10

    The development of kernel-based inhomogeneous random graphs has provided models that are flexible enough to capture many observed characteristics of real networks, and that are also mathematically tractable. We specify a class of inhomogeneous random graph models, called random kernel graphs, that produces sparse graphs with tunable graph properties, and we develop an efficient generation algorithm to sample random instances from this model. As real-world networks are usually large, it is essential that the run-time of generation algorithms scales better than quadratically in the number of vertices n. We show that for many practical kernels our algorithm runs in timemore » at most ο(n(logn)²). As an example, we show how to generate samples of power-law degree distribution graphs with tunable assortativity.« less

  1. Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Homeowners |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Homeowners Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Homeowners Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Homeowners Determine the amount of power you will need-How much power do you need to operate equipment and appliances connected to the generator? Portable generators made for household use can provide temporary power to a small number of selected appliances or lights. For example, light bulb wattage indicates the power needed

  2. Iridium 191-m generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Treves, S.; Cheng, C.C.

    1988-03-08

    Potassium osmate, of the formula K[sub 2]OsO[sub 2](OH)[sub 4], is used to make a column for the generation of Ir-191 m, which is used in first pass angiography to detect cardiac defects in patients. 2 figs.

  3. Iridium 191-M generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Treves, Salvador; Cheng, Chris C.

    1988-03-08

    Potassium osmate, of the formula K.sub.2 Os O.sub.2 (OH).sub.4), used to make a column for the generation of Ir-191 m, which is used in first pass angiography to detect cardiac defects in patients.

  4. Hydrogen Generation for Refineries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 DE-FG02-08ER85135 Hydrogen Generation for Refineries DOE Phase II SBIR Dr. Girish Srinivas P.I. gsrinivas@tda.com 303-940-2321 Dr. Steven Gebhard, P.E. Dr. Robert Copeland Mr. ...

  5. Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel sources may present additional safety and permitting issues. Choose the generator's ... Determine any utility requirements or building codes-Before you buy a generator, ask your ...

  6. Response Elements

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2007-07-11

    The Guide provides acceptable methods for meeting the requirement of DOE O 151.1C for response elements that respond or contribute to response as needed in an emergency. Supersedes DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 3-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-1, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-2, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-3, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-4, DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-5, and DOE G 151.1-1, Volume 4-6.

  7. Departmental Response:

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Departmental Response: Assessment of the Report of the SEAB Task Force on Nuclear Nonproliferation Introduction Despite many successful U.S. efforts in nuclear nonproliferation, daunting challenges remain. Some nations are pursuing nuclear weapons and others are expanding their nuclear arsenals; some stockpiles of nuclear weapons and nuclear-weapons-usable materials remain dangerously insecure; and rapidly changing technologies and greater availability of dual-use knowledge are increasing the

  8. Demand Response

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Demand Response Assessment for Eastern Interconnection Youngsun Baek, Stanton W. Hadley, Rocio Martinez, Gbadebo Oladosu, Alexander M. Smith, Fran Li, Paul Leiby and Russell Lee Prepared for FY12 DOE-CERTS Transmission Reliability R&D Internal Program Review September 20, 2012 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy DOE National Laboratory Studies Funded to Support FOA 63 * DOE set aside $20 million from transmission funding for national laboratory studies. * DOE

  9. GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

    2000-05-01

    A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

  10. Generates 2D Input for DYNA NIKE & TOPAZ

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1996-07-15

    MAZE is an interactive program that serves as an input and two-dimensional mesh generator for DYNA2D, NIKE2D, TOPAZ2D, and CHEMICAL TOPAZ2D. MAZE also generates a basic template for ISLAND input. MAZE has been applied to the generation of input data to study the response of two-dimensional solids and structures undergoing finite deformations under a wide variety of large deformation transient dynamic and static problems and heat transfer analyses.

  11. Next Generation Rooftop Unit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Flexible Research Platform - March 2014 DLL Hardware-based HPDMModelica model library to support RTU design, building control strategy development, fault diagnosis, etc.

  12. Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of this procedure is to provide guidance for developing an emergency response plan, as outlined in OSHA’s 29 CFR 1910.120(q), for facility response.  This model has been adopted and...

  13. IDC Re-Engineering Phase 2 Data Model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, James M.; Young, Christopher J.; Burns, John F.; Hamlet, Benjamin R.; Montoya, Mark Sinclair; Sandoval, Rudy Daniel; Vickers, James Wallace

    2016-01-01

    This document contains the Data Model generated from the model contained in Rational Software Architect.

  14. Exelôn. Generation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Exeln. Generation 4300 Winfield Road Warrenville, Illinois 60555 Writer's Direct Dial: ... On March 14, 2011, representatives of Exelon Generation Company, LLC and Exelon Nuclear ...

  15. Solaire Generation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Generation Place: New York, New York Zip: 10001 Sector: Solar Product: New York-based rooftop PV mounting systems and solar canopy maker. References: Solaire Generation1 This...

  16. Hydro Power (pbl/generation)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generation > Generation Hydro Power FCRPS Hydro Projects FCRPS Information Kiosk Current Hydrological Info Fish Funding Agreement FCRPS Definitions Wind Power Monthly GSP BPA White...

  17. SSE Generation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SSE Generation Jump to: navigation, search Name: SSE Generation Place: Perth, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip: PH1 3AQ Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Owns and operates around half...

  18. Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

    1986-07-08

    A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator is described comprising a magnet having a magnetic field, an elongate hollow housing containing an electrically conductive liquid and a thermoacoustic structure positioned in the liquid, heat exchange means thermally connected to the thermoacoustic structure for inducing the liquid to oscillate at an acoustic resonant frequency within the housing. The housing is positioned in the magnetic field and oriented such that the direction of the magnetic field and the direction of oscillatory motion of the liquid are substantially orthogonal to one another, first and second electrical conductor means connected to the liquid on opposite sides of the housing along an axis which is substantially orthogonal to both the direction of the magnetic field and the direction of oscillatory motion of the liquid, an alternating current output signal is generated in the conductor means at a frequency corresponding to the frequency of the oscillatory motion of the liquid.

  19. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, J.P.; Larson, R.A.; Goodrich, L.D.; Hall, H.J.; Stoddard, B.D.; Davis, S.G.; Kaser, T.G.; Conrad, F.J.

    1995-09-26

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet. 10 figs.

  20. Calibrated vapor generator source

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, John P.; Larson, Ronald A.; Goodrich, Lorenzo D.; Hall, Harold J.; Stoddard, Billy D.; Davis, Sean G.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Conrad, Frank J.

    1995-01-01

    A portable vapor generator is disclosed that can provide a controlled source of chemical vapors, such as, narcotic or explosive vapors. This source can be used to test and calibrate various types of vapor detection systems by providing a known amount of vapors to the system. The vapor generator is calibrated using a reference ion mobility spectrometer. A method of providing this vapor is described, as follows: explosive or narcotic is deposited on quartz wool, placed in a chamber that can be heated or cooled (depending on the vapor pressure of the material) to control the concentration of vapors in the reservoir. A controlled flow of air is pulsed over the quartz wool releasing a preset quantity of vapors at the outlet.

  1. Generation of energy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kalina, Alexander I.

    1984-01-01

    A method of generating energy which comprises utilizing relatively lower temperature available heat to effect partial distillation of at least portion of a multicomponent working fluid stream at an intermediate pressure to generate working fluid fractions of differing compositions. The fractions are used to produce at least one main rich solution which is relatively enriched with respect to the lower boiling component, and to produce at least one lean solution which is relatively improverished with respect to the lower boiling component. The pressure of the main rich solution is increased whereafter it is evaporated to produce a charged gaseous main working fluid. The main working fluid is expanded to a low pressure level to release energy. The spent low pressure level working fluid is condensed in a main absorption stage by dissolving with cooling in the lean solution to regenerate an initial working fluid for reuse.

  2. HIGH VOLTAGE GENERATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schwemin, A.J.

    1959-03-17

    A generator is presented for producing relatively large currents at high voltages. In general, the invention comprises a plurality of capacitors connected in series by a plurality of switches alternately disposed with the capacitors. The circuit is mounted for movement with respect to contact members and switch closure means so that a load device and power supply are connected across successive numbers of capacitors, while the other capacitors are successively charged with the same power supply.

  3. Electrical pulse generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norris, Neil J.

    1979-01-01

    A technique for generating high-voltage, wide dynamic range, shaped electrical pulses in the nanosecond range. Two transmission lines are coupled together by resistive elements distributed along the length of the lines. The conductance of each coupling resistive element as a function of its position along the line is selected to produce the desired pulse shape in the output line when an easily produced pulse, such as a step function pulse, is applied to the input line.

  4. High power microwave generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekdahl, Carl A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1986-01-01

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  5. High power microwave generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  6. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, I.G.; Galvin, J.

    1987-12-22

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam. 10 figs.

  7. Negative ion generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinnett, R.W.

    1984-05-08

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions. 8 figs.

  8. Monodisperse aerosol generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ortiz, Lawrence W.; Soderholm, Sidney C.

    1990-01-01

    An aerosol generator is described which is capable of producing a monodisperse aerosol within narrow limits utilizing an aqueous solution capable of providing a high population of seed nuclei and an organic solution having a low vapor pressure. The two solutions are cold nebulized, mixed, vaporized, and cooled. During cooling, particles of the organic vapor condense onto the excess seed nuclei, and grow to a uniform particle size.

  9. Negative ion generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stinnett, Regan W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1984-01-01

    A negative ion generator is formed from a magnetically insulated transmission line having a coating of graphite on the cathode for producing negative ions and a plurality of apertures on the opposed anode for the release of negative ions. Magnetic insulation keeps electrons from flowing from the cathode to the anode. A transverse magnetic field removes electrons which do escape through the apertures from the trajectory of the negative ions.

  10. Hydrogen Generation for Refineries

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE PEER REVIEW MEETING May 5-6, 2014 DE-FG02-08ER85135 Hydrogen Generation for Refineries DOE Phase II SBIR Dr. Girish Srinivas P.I. gsrinivas@tda.com 303-940-2321 Dr. Steven Gebhard, P.E. Dr. Robert Copeland Mr. Jeff Martin TDA Research Inc. 1 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Project Overview *

  11. Hydro-electric generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vauthier, P.

    1980-06-03

    The efficiency of a hydro-electric generator is improved by providing open-ended hollow tubes having influx ends proximate the axis and efflux ends proximate the periphery of a fan-bladed turbine. The jets of water developed by rotation of the fanbladed turbine are directed against turbine vanes at the periphery of the fan blades. The device is particularly suitable for mounting in a water current such as in an ocean current or river.

  12. Ion beam generating apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brown, Ian G.; Galvin, James

    1987-01-01

    An ion generating apparatus utilizing a vacuum chamber, a cathode and an anode in the chamber. A source of electrical power produces an arc or discharge between the cathode and anode. The arc is sufficient to vaporize a portion of the cathode to form a plasma. The plasma is directed to an extractor which separates the electrons from the plasma, and accelerates the ions to produce an ion beam.

  13. Optical harmonic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, Mark A.; Eimerl, David; Boyd, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A pair of uniaxial birefringent crystal elements are fixed together to form a serially arranged, integral assembly which, alternatively, provides either a linearly or elliptically polarized second-harmonic output wave or a linearly polarized third-harmonic output wave. The "extraordinary" or "e" directions of the crystal elements are oriented in the integral assembly to be in quadrature (90.degree.). For a second-harmonic generation in the Type-II-Type-II angle tuned case, the input fundamental wave has equal amplitude "o" and "e" components. For a third-harmonic generation, the input fundamental wave has "o" and "e" components whose amplitudes are in a ratio of 2:1 ("o":"e" reference first crystal). In the typical case of a linearly polarized input fundamental wave this can be accomplished by simply rotating the crystal assembly about the input beam direction by 10.degree.. For both second and third harmonic generation input precise phase-matching is achieved by tilting the crystal assembly about its two sensitive axes ("o").

  14. Optical harmonic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Summers, M.A.; Eimerl, D.; Boyd, R.D.

    1982-06-10

    A pair of uniaxial birefringent crystal elements are fixed together to form a serially arranged, integral assembly which, alternatively, provides either a linearly or elliptically polarized second-harmonic output wave or a linearly polarized third-harmonic output wave. The extraordinary or e directions of the crystal elements are oriented in the integral assembly to be in quadrature (90/sup 0/). For a second-harmonic generation in the Type-II-Type-II angle tuned case, the input fundamental wave has equal amplitude o and e components. For a third-harmonic generation, the input fundamental wave has o and e components whose amplitudes are in a ratio of 2:1 (o:e reference first crystal). In the typical case of a linearly polarized input fundamental wave this can be accomplished by simply rotating the crystal assembly about the input beam direction by 10/sup 0/. For both second and third harmonic generation input precise phase-matching is achieved by tilting the crystal assembly about its two sensitive axeses (o).

  15. Distributed generation implementation guidelines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzy, L.; O`Sullivan, J.B.; Jacobs, K.; Major, W.

    1999-11-01

    The overall economics of a distributed generation project is based on cost elements which include: Equipment and financing, fuel, displaced electricity cost, operation and maintenance. Of critical importance is how the facility is managed, including adequate provision for a comprehensive operator training program. Proper equipment maintenance and fuel procurement policy will also lead to greater system availability and optimal system economics. Various utility tariffs are available which may be economically attractive, with an added benefit to the utility of providing a peak shaving resource during peak periods. Changing modes of operation of the distributed generation system may affect staff readiness, require retraining and could affect maintenance costs. The degree of control and oversight that is provided during a project`s implementation and construction phases will impact subsequent maintenance and operating costs. The long term effect of siting impacts, such as building facades that restrict turbine inlet airflow will affect subsequent operations and require supplemental maintenance action. It is possible to site a variety of distributed generation technologies in settings which vary from urban to remote unattended locations with successful results from both an economic and operational perspective.

  16. Bicycle Generator Lightbar Indicator ----- Inventors William Evans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (Princeton University), Andrew Zwicker, and Shana Weber (Princeton University) | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab Bicycle Generator Lightbar Indicator ----- Inventors William Evans (Princeton University), Andrew Zwicker, and Shana Weber (Princeton University) This invention is a series of incandescent light bulbs that progressively brighten in response to a bicycler's physical effort. By monitoring the number of bulbs illuminated in a "light tower," the bicycler is able to judge the

  17. Commercial & Industrial Demand Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Events Skip navigation links Smart Grid Demand Response Agricultural Residential Demand Response Commercial & Industrial Demand Response Cross-sector Demand Response...

  18. Response from PJM Interconnection LLC and Pepco to Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Need for Potomac River Station Generation Response from PJM Interconnection LLC and Pepco to Department of Energy Request for Information Concerning the Potential Need for ...

  19. Downhole steam generator with improved preheating, combustion, and protection features

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, R.L.

    1981-01-07

    For tertiary oil recovery, a downhole steam generator is designed which provides for efficient counterflow cooling of the combustion chamber walls and preheating of the fuel and water. Pressure-responsive doors are provided for closing and opening the outlet in response to flameout, thereby preventing flooding of the combustion chamber. (DLC)

  20. Selecting tense, aspect, and connecting words in language generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaasterland, T.; Dorr, B.

    1995-12-31

    Generating language that reflects the temporal organization of represented knowledge requires a language generation model that integrates contemporary theories of tense and aspect, temporal representations, and methods to plan text. This paper presents a model that produces complex sentences that reflect temporal relations present in underlying temporal concepts. The main result of this work is the successful application of constrained linguistic theories of tense and aspect to a generator which produces meaningful event combinations and selects appropriate connecting words that relate them.

  1. Capturing the response of Clostridium acetobutylicum to chemical stressors using a regulated genome-scale metabolic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dash, Satyakam; Mueller, Thomas J.; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.; Maranas, Costas D.

    2014-10-14

    Clostridia are anaerobic Gram-positive Firmicutes containing broad and flexible systems for substrate utilization, which have been used successfully to produce a range of industrial compounds. Clostridium acetobutylicum has been used to produce butanol on an industrial scale through acetone-butanol-ethanol (ABE) fermentation. A genome-scale metabolic (GSM) model is a powerful tool for understanding the metabolic capacities of an organism and developing metabolic engineering strategies for strain development. The integration of stress related specific transcriptomics information with the GSM model provides opportunities for elucidating the focal points of regulation.

  2. Automotive Thermoelectric Generators and HVAC

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides overview of DOE-supported projects in automotive thermoelectric generators and heaters/air conditioners

  3. Fuel cell generator energy dissipator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veyo, Stephen Emery; Dederer, Jeffrey Todd; Gordon, John Thomas; Shockling, Larry Anthony

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for eliminating the chemical energy of fuel remaining in a fuel cell generator when the electrical power output of the fuel cell generator is terminated. During a generator shut down condition, electrically resistive elements are automatically connected across the fuel cell generator terminals in order to draw current, thereby depleting the fuel

  4. Energy Replacement Generation Tax Exemption

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Under the Energy Replacement Generation Tax Exemption, the following facilities are exempt from the replacement tax:

  5. High voltage pulse generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fasching, George E.

    1977-03-08

    An improved high-voltage pulse generator has been provided which is especially useful in ultrasonic testing of rock core samples. An N number of capacitors are charged in parallel to V volts and at the proper instance are coupled in series to produce a high-voltage pulse of N times V volts. Rapid switching of the capacitors from the paralleled charging configuration to the series discharging configuration is accomplished by using silicon-controlled rectifiers which are chain self-triggered following the initial triggering of a first one of the rectifiers connected between the first and second of the plurality of charging capacitors. A timing and triggering circuit is provided to properly synchronize triggering pulses to the first SCR at a time when the charging voltage is not being applied to the parallel-connected charging capacitors. Alternate circuits are provided for controlling the application of the charging voltage from a charging circuit to be applied to the parallel capacitors which provides a selection of at least two different intervals in which the charging voltage is turned "off" to allow the SCR's connecting the capacitors in series to turn "off" before recharging begins. The high-voltage pulse-generating circuit including the N capacitors and corresponding SCR's which connect the capacitors in series when triggered "on" further includes diodes and series-connected inductors between the parallel-connected charging capacitors which allow sufficiently fast charging of the capacitors for a high pulse repetition rate and yet allow considerable control of the decay time of the high-voltage pulses from the pulse-generating circuit.

  6. Response of LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) scintillators to 2.5 MeV fusion neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cazzaniga, C.; Nocente, M.; Gorini, G.; Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Associazione EURATOM-ENEA-CNR, Via Roberto Cozzi 53, Milano 20125 ; Tardocchi, M.; Croci, G.; Giacomelli, L.; Angelone, M.; Pillon, M.; Villari, S.; Weller, A.; Petrizzi, L.; Collaboration: ASDEX Upgrade Team; JET-EFDA Contributors

    2013-12-15

    Measurements of the response of LaBr{sub 3}(Ce) to 2.5 MeV neutrons have been carried out at the Frascati Neutron Generator and at tokamak facilities with deuterium plasmas. The observed spectrum has been interpreted by means of a Monte Carlo model. It is found that the main contributor to the measured response is neutron inelastic scattering on {sup 79}Br, {sup 81}Br, and {sup 139}La. An extrapolation of the count rate response to 14 MeV neutrons from deuterium-tritium plasmas is also presented. The results are of relevance for the design of ?-ray diagnostics of fusion burning plasmas.

  7. Computer generated holographic microtags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, W.C.

    1998-03-17

    A microlithographic tag comprising an array of individual computer generated holographic patches having feature sizes between 250 and 75 nanometers is disclosed. The tag is a composite hologram made up of the individual holographic patches and contains identifying information when read out with a laser of the proper wavelength and at the proper angles of probing and reading. The patches are fabricated in a steep angle Littrow readout geometry to maximize returns in the -1 diffracted order. The tags are useful as anti-counterfeiting markers because of the extreme difficulty in reproducing them. 5 figs.

  8. Hermetic turbine generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Meacher, John S.; Ruscitto, David E.

    1982-01-01

    A Rankine cycle turbine drives an electric generator and a feed pump, all on a single shaft, and all enclosed within a hermetically sealed case. The shaft is vertically oriented with the turbine exhaust directed downward and the shaft is supported on hydrodynamic fluid film bearings using the process fluid as lubricant and coolant. The selection of process fluid, type of turbine, operating speed, system power rating, and cycle state points are uniquely coordinated to achieve high turbine efficiency at the temperature levels imposed by the recovery of waste heat from the more prevalent industrial processes.

  9. Highly stable aerosol generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeFord, H.S.; Clark, M.L.

    1981-11-03

    An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly. 2 figs.

  10. Profile Interface Generator

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-11-09

    The Profile Interface Generator (PIG) is a tool for loosely coupling applications and performance tools. It enables applications to write code that looks like standard C and Fortran functions calls, without requiring that applications link to specific implementations of those function calls. Performance tools can register with PIG in order to listen to only the calls that give information they care about. This interface reduces the build and configuration burden on application developers and allowsmore » semantic instrumentation to live in production codes without interfering with production runs.« less

  11. Computer generated holographic microtags

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sweatt, William C.

    1998-01-01

    A microlithographic tag comprising an array of individual computer generated holographic patches having feature sizes between 250 and 75 nanometers. The tag is a composite hologram made up of the individual holographic patches and contains identifying information when read out with a laser of the proper wavelength and at the proper angles of probing and reading. The patches are fabricated in a steep angle Littrow readout geometry to maximize returns in the -1 diffracted order. The tags are useful as anti-counterfeiting markers because of the extreme difficulty in reproducing them.

  12. Highly stable aerosol generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    DeFord, Henry S.; Clark, Mark L.

    1981-01-01

    An improved compressed air nebulizer has been developed such that a uniform aerosol particle size and concentration may be produced over long time periods. This result is achieved by applying a vacuum pressure to the makeup assembly and by use of a vent tube between the atmosphere and the makeup solution. By applying appropriate vacuum pressures to the makeup solution container and by proper positioning of the vent tube, a constant level of aspirating solution may be maintained within the aspirating assembly with aspirating solution continuously replaced from the makeup solution supply. This device may also be adapted to have a plurality of aerosol generators and only one central makeup assembly.

  13. Alternative Approaches for Incentivizing the Frequency Responsive Reserve Ancillary Service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Tuohy, A.; Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.; Brooks, D.

    2012-05-01

    Frequency responsive reserve is the autonomous response of generators and demand response to deviations of system frequency, usually as a result of the instantaneous outage of a large supplier. This article discusses the issues that can occur without proper incentives and even disincentives, and proposes alternatives to introduce incentives for resources to provide frequency responsive reserve to ensure an efficient and reliable power system.

  14. PhotoVoltaic distributed generation for Lanai power grid real-time simulation and control integration scenario.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robinett, Rush D., III; Kukolich, Keith; Wilson, David Gerald; Schenkman, Benjamin L.

    2010-06-01

    This paper discusses the modeling, analysis, and testing in a real-time simulation environment of the Lanai power grid system for the integration and control of PhotoVoltaic (PV) distributed generation. The Lanai Island in Hawaii is part of the Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) to transition to 30% renewable green energy penetration by 2030. In Lanai the primary loads come from two Castle and Cook Resorts, in addition to residential needs. The total peak load profile is 12470 V, 5.5 MW. Currently there are several diesel generators that meet these loading requirements. As part of the HCEI, Lanai has initially installed 1.2 MW of PV generation. The goal of this study has been to evaluate the impact of the PV with respect to the conventional carbon-based diesel generation in real time simulation. For intermittent PV distributed generation, the overall stability and transient responses are investigated. A simple Lanai 'like' model has been developed in the Matlab/Simulink environment (see Fig. 1) and to accommodate real-time simulation of the hybrid power grid system the Opal-RT Technologies RT-Lab environment is used. The diesel generators have been modelled using the SimPowerSystems toolbox swing equations and a custom Simulink module has been developed for the High level PV generation. All of the loads have been characterized primarily as distribution lines with series resistive load banks with one VAR load bank. Three-phase faults are implemented for each bus. Both conventional and advanced control architectures will be used to evaluate the integration of the PV onto the current power grid system. The baseline numerical results include the stable performance of the power grid during varying cloud cover (PV generation ramping up/down) scenarios. The importance of assessing the real-time scenario is included.

  15. BUILDOUT AND UPGRADE OF CENTRAL EMERGENCY GENERATOR SYSTEM, GENERATOR 3 AND 4 ELECTRICAL INSTALLATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Seifert; G. Shawn West; Kurt S. Myers; Jim Moncur

    2006-07-01

    SECTION 01000—SUMMARY OF WORK PART 1—GENERAL 1.1 SUMMARY The work to be performed under this project consists of providing the labor, equipment, and materials to perform "Buildout and Upgrade of Central Emergency Generator System, Generator 3 and 4 Electrical Installation" for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration at the Dryden Flight Research Center (NASA/DFRC), Edwards, California 93523. All modifications to existing substations and electrical distribution systems are the responsibility of the contractor. It is the contractor’s responsibility to supply a complete and functionally operational system. The work shall be performed in accordance with these specifications and the related drawings. The work of this project is defined by the plans and specifications contained and referenced herein. This work specifically includes but is not limited to the following: Scope of Work - Installation 1. Install all electrical wiring and controls for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing electrical installation for generators 1 and 2 and in accordance with drawings. Contractor shall provide as-built details for electrical installation. 2. Install battery charger systems for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing battery charging equipment and installation for generators 1 and 2. This may require exchange of some battery charger parts already on-hand. Supply power to new battery chargers from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. 3. Install electrical wiring for fuel/lube systems for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing installation for generators 1 and 2. Supply power to lube oil heaters and fuel system (day tanks) from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. Add any conduits necessary to complete wiring to fuel systems. 4. Install power to new dampers/louvers from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Wiring shall be similar to installation to existing dampers/louvers. Utilize existing conduits already routed to louver areas to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. Add any conduits necessary to complete wiring to new dampers/louvers. 5. Install power to jacket water heaters for new generators 3 and 4 from panel and breakers as shown on drawings. Utilize existing conduits already routed to generators 3 and 4 to field route the new wiring in the most reasonable way possible. 6. Install new neutral grounding resistor and associated parts and wiring for new generators 3 and 4 to match existing installation for generators 1 and 2. Grounding resistors will be Government Furnished Equipment (GFE). 7. Install two new switchgear sections, one for generator #3 and one for generator #4, to match existing generator #1 cubicle design and installation and in accordance with drawings and existing parts lists. This switchgear will be provided as GFE. 8. Ground all new switchgear, generators 3 and 4, and any other new equipment to match existing grounding connections for generators 1 and 2, switchgear and other equipment. See drawings for additional details. Grounding grid is already existing. Ensure that all grounding meets National Electrical Code requirements. 9. Cummins DMC control for the generator and switchgear syste

  16. On a framework for generating PoD curves assisted by numerical simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subair, S. Mohamed Agrawal, Shweta Balasubramaniam, Krishnan Rajagopal, Prabhu; Kumar, Anish; Rao, Purnachandra B.; Tamanna, Jayakumar

    2015-03-31

    The Probability of Detection (PoD) curve method has emerged as an important tool for the assessment of the performance of NDE techniques, a topic of particular interest to the nuclear industry where inspection qualification is very important. The conventional experimental means of generating PoD curves though, can be expensive, requiring large data sets (covering defects and test conditions), and equipment and operator time. Several methods of achieving faster estimates for PoD curves using physics-based modelling have been developed to address this problem. Numerical modelling techniques are also attractive, especially given the ever-increasing computational power available to scientists today. Here we develop procedures for obtaining PoD curves, assisted by numerical simulation and based on Bayesian statistics. Numerical simulations are performed using Finite Element analysis for factors that are assumed to be independent, random and normally distributed. PoD curves so generated are compared with experiments on austenitic stainless steel (SS) plates with artificially created notches. We examine issues affecting the PoD curve generation process including codes, standards, distribution of defect parameters and the choice of the noise threshold. We also study the assumption of normal distribution for signal response parameters and consider strategies for dealing with data that may be more complex or sparse to justify this. These topics are addressed and illustrated through the example case of generation of PoD curves for pulse-echo ultrasonic inspection of vertical surface-breaking cracks in SS plates.

  17. Predictive Treatment Management: Incorporating a Predictive Tumor Response Model Into Robust Prospective Treatment Planning for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Pengpeng; Yorke, Ellen; Hu, Yu-Chi; Mageras, Gig; Rimner, Andreas; Deasy, Joseph O.

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: We hypothesized that a treatment planning technique that incorporates predicted lung tumor regression into optimization, predictive treatment planning (PTP), could allow dose escalation to the residual tumor while maintaining coverage of the initial target without increasing dose to surrounding organs at risk (OARs). Methods and Materials: We created a model to estimate the geometric presence of residual tumors after radiation therapy using planning computed tomography (CT) and weekly cone beam CT scans of 5 lung cancer patients. For planning purposes, we modeled the dynamic process of tumor shrinkage by morphing the original planning target volume (PTV{sub orig}) in 3 equispaced steps to the predicted residue (PTV{sub pred}). Patients were treated with a uniform prescription dose to PTV{sub orig}. By contrast, PTP optimization started with the same prescription dose to PTV{sub orig} but linearly increased the dose at each step, until reaching the highest dose achievable to PTV{sub pred} consistent with OAR limits. This method is compared with midcourse adaptive replanning. Results: Initial parenchymal gross tumor volume (GTV) ranged from 3.6 to 186.5 cm{sup 3}. On average, the primary GTV and PTV decreased by 39% and 27%, respectively, at the end of treatment. The PTP approach gave PTV{sub orig} at least the prescription dose, and it increased the mean dose of the true residual tumor by an average of 6.0 Gy above the adaptive approach. Conclusions: PTP, incorporating a tumor regression model from the start, represents a new approach to increase tumor dose without increasing toxicities, and reduce clinical workload compared with the adaptive approach, although model verification using per-patient midcourse imaging would be prudent.

  18. BPA-2014-01847-FOIA Response

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (and 2014 once it becomes available this fall). I am particularly interested in the Digital Elevation Models ofthe topographic surveys." Response: We conducted a search of the...

  19. Downhole hydraulic seismic generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gregory, Danny L.; Hardee, Harry C.; Smallwood, David O.

    1992-01-01

    A downhole hydraulic seismic generator system for transmitting energy wave vibrations into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system contains an elongated, unitary housing operably connected to a well head aboveground by support and electrical cabling, and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a hydraulic oscillator containing a double-actuating piston whose movement is controlled by an electro-servovalve regulating a high pressure hydraulic fluid flow into and out of upper and lower chambers surrounding the piston. The spent hydraulic fluid from the hydraulic oscillator is stored and pumped back into the system to provide high pressure fluid for conducting another run at the same, or a different location within the borehole.

  20. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1998-05-05

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat is disclosed. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device. 4 figs.

  1. ELECTRIC PULSE GENERATOR

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buntenbach, R.W.

    1959-06-01

    S>An electro-optical apparatus is described which produces electric pulses in programmed sequences at times and durations controlled with great accuracy. An oscilloscope CRT is supplied with signals to produce a luminous spot moving in a circle. An opaque mask with slots of variable width transmits light from the spot to a photoelectric transducer. For shorter pulse decay times a CRT screen which emits UV can be used with a UVtransmitting filter and a UV- sensitive photoelectric cell. Pulses are varied by changing masks or by using masks with variable slots. This device may be used in multiple arrangements to produce other pulse aT rangements, or it can be used to trigger an electronic pulse generator. (T.R.H.)

  2. Tailpulse signal generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, John; Archer, Daniel E.; Luke, Stanley John; Decman, Daniel J.; White, Gregory K.

    2009-06-23

    A tailpulse signal generating/simulating apparatus, system, and method designed to produce electronic pulses which simulate tailpulses produced by a gamma radiation detector, including the pileup effect caused by the characteristic exponential decay of the detector pulses, and the random Poisson distribution pulse timing for radioactive materials. A digital signal process (DSP) is programmed and configured to produce digital values corresponding to pseudo-randomly selected pulse amplitudes and pseudo-randomly selected Poisson timing intervals of the tailpulses. Pulse amplitude values are exponentially decayed while outputting the digital value to a digital to analog converter (DAC). And pulse amplitudes of new pulses are added to decaying pulses to simulate the pileup effect for enhanced realism in the simulation.

  3. Peak power ratio generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, R.D.

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  4. Peak power ratio generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moyer, Robert D.

    1985-01-01

    A peak power ratio generator is described for measuring, in combination with a conventional power meter, the peak power level of extremely narrow pulses in the gigahertz radio frequency bands. The present invention in a preferred embodiment utilizes a tunnel diode and a back diode combination in a detector circuit as the only high speed elements. The high speed tunnel diode provides a bistable signal and serves as a memory device of the input pulses for the remaining, slower components. A hybrid digital and analog loop maintains the peak power level of a reference channel at a known amount. Thus, by measuring the average power levels of the reference signal and the source signal, the peak power level of the source signal can be determined.

  5. Stratified vapor generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bharathan, Desikan; Hassani, Vahab

    2008-05-20

    A stratified vapor generator (110) comprises a first heating section (H.sub.1) and a second heating section (H.sub.2). The first and second heating sections (H.sub.1, H.sub.2) are arranged so that the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2) is operatively associated with the outlet of the first heating section (H.sub.1). A moisture separator (126) having a vapor outlet (164) and a liquid outlet (144) is operatively associated with the outlet (124) of the second heating section (H.sub.2). A cooling section (C.sub.1) is operatively associated with the liquid outlet (144) of the moisture separator (126) and includes an outlet that is operatively associated with the inlet of the second heating section (H.sub.2).

  6. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, J.D.; El-Genk, M.S.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  7. ION PULSE GENERATION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, R.F.; Moak, C.D.; Parker, V.E.

    1960-10-11

    A device for generating ions in an ion source, forming the ions into a stream, deflecting the stream rapidly away from and back to its normal path along the axis of a cylindrical housing, and continually focusing the stream by suitable means into a sharp, intermittent beam along the axis is described. The beam exists through an axial aperture into a lens which focuses it into an accelerator tube. The ions in each burst are there accelerated to very high energies and are directed against a target placed in the high-energy end of the tube. Radiations from the target can then be analyzed in the interval between incidence of the bursts of ions on the target.

  8. Magnetohydrodynamic generator electrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Marchant, David D.; Killpatrick, Don H.; Herman, Harold; Kuczen, Kenneth D.

    1979-01-01

    An improved electrode for use as a current collector in the channel of a magnetohydrodynamid (MHD) generator utilizes an elongated monolithic cap of dense refractory material compliantly mounted to the MHD channel frame for collecting the current. The cap has a central longitudinal channel which contains a first layer of porous refractory ceramic as a high-temperature current leadout from the cap and a second layer of resilient wire mesh in contact with the first layer as a low-temperature current leadout between the first layer and the frame. Also described is a monolithic ceramic insulator compliantly mounted to the frame parallel to the electrode by a plurality of flexible metal strips.

  9. Generation of electrical power

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hursen, Thomas F.; Kolenik, Steven A.; Purdy, David L.

    1976-01-01

    A heat-to-electricity converter is disclosed which includes a radioactive heat source and a thermoelectric element of relatively short overall length capable of delivering a low voltage of the order of a few tenths of a volt. Such a thermoelectric element operates at a higher efficiency than longer higher-voltage elements; for example, elements producing 6 volts. In the generation of required power, thermoelectric element drives a solid-state converter which is controlled by input current rather than input voltage and operates efficiently for a high signal-plus-noise to signal ratio of current. The solid-state converter has the voltage gain necessary to deliver the required voltage at the low input of the thermoelectric element.

  10. Superconducting thermoelectric generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Metzger, John D.; El-Genk, Mohamed S.

    1998-01-01

    An apparatus and method for producing electricity from heat. The present invention is a thermoelectric generator that uses materials with substantially no electrical resistance, often called superconductors, to efficiently convert heat into electrical energy without resistive losses. Preferably, an array of superconducting elements is encased within a second material with a high thermal conductivity. The second material is preferably a semiconductor. Alternatively, the superconducting material can be doped on a base semiconducting material, or the superconducting material and the semiconducting material can exist as alternating, interleaved layers of waferlike materials. A temperature gradient imposed across the boundary of the two materials establishes an electrical potential related to the magnitude of the temperature gradient. The superconducting material carries the resulting electrical current at zero resistivity, thereby eliminating resistive losses. The elimination of resistive losses significantly increases the conversion efficiency of the thermoelectric device.

  11. Next-Generation Wireless Instrumentation Integrated with Mathematical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Modeling for Aluminum Production | Department of Energy Next-Generation Wireless Instrumentation Integrated with Mathematical Modeling for Aluminum Production Next-Generation Wireless Instrumentation Integrated with Mathematical Modeling for Aluminum Production Monitoring Electrolytic Cell Anode Current Increases Current and Energy Efficiency In 2011, five-and-a-half-million tons of aluminum were produced in the United States. Over two-million tons were produced in smelters, large

  12. Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Business

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Owners | Department of Energy Business Owners Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Business Owners Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Business Owners Identify essential systems and equipment-What do you need to keep your business operating? These may include heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems; industrial equipment and major appliances, such as refrigerators and freezers; lights (interior and exterior), computers, and other

  13. Reducing gas generators and methods for generating a reducing gas

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Scotto, Mark Vincent; Perna, Mark Anthony

    2015-11-03

    One embodiment of the present invention is a unique reducing gas generator. Another embodiment is a unique method for generating a reducing gas. Other embodiments include apparatuses, systems, devices, hardware, methods, and combinations for generating reducing gas. Further embodiments, forms, features, aspects, benefits, and advantages of the present application will become apparent from the description and figures provided herewith.

  14. Protective, Modular Wave Power Generation System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vvedensky, Jane M.; Park, Robert Y.

    2012-11-27

    The concept of small wave energy conversion modules that can be built into large, scalable arrays, in the same vein as solar panels, has been developed. This innovation lends itself to an organic business and development model, and enables the use of large-run manufacturing technology to reduce system costs. The first prototype module has been built to full-scale, and tested in a laboratory wave channel. The device has been shown to generate electricity and dissipate wave energy. Improvements need to be made to the electrical generator and a demonstration of an array of modules should be made in natural conditions.

  15. Operation of Distributed Generation Under Stochastic Prices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-11-30

    We model the operating decisions of a commercial enterprisethatneeds to satisfy its periodic electricity demand with either on-sitedistributed generation (DG) or purchases from the wholesale market. Whilethe former option involves electricity generation at relatively high andpossibly stochastic costs from a set of capacity-constrained DGtechnologies, the latter implies unlimited open-market transactions atstochastic prices. A stochastic dynamic programme (SDP) is used to solvethe resulting optimisation problem. By solving the SDP with and withoutthe availability of DG units, the implied option values of the DG unitsare obtained.

  16. Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

    1995-09-01

    A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given project.

  17. Self-assembling software generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bouchard, Ann M.; Osbourn, Gordon C.

    2011-11-25

    A technique to generate an executable task includes inspecting a task specification data structure to determine what software entities are to be generated to create the executable task, inspecting the task specification data structure to determine how the software entities will be linked after generating the software entities, inspecting the task specification data structure to determine logic to be executed by the software entities, and generating the software entities to create the executable task.

  18. Electromechanical x-ray generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watson, Scott A; Platts, David; Sorensen, Eric B

    2016-05-03

    An electro-mechanical x-ray generator configured to obtain high-energy operation with favorable energy-weight scaling. The electro-mechanical x-ray generator may include a pair of capacitor plates. The capacitor plates may be charged to a predefined voltage and may be separated to generate higher voltages on the order of hundreds of kV in the AK gap. The high voltage may be generated in a vacuum tube.

  19. Electricity Generation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electricity Generation Electricity Generation The United States of America continues to generate the most geothermal electricity in the world: more than 3.5 gigawatts, predominantly from the western United States. That's enough to power about three and half million homes! Pictured above, the Raft River geothermal plant is located in Idaho. Source: Geothermal Resources Council The United States of America continues to generate the most geothermal electricity in the world: more than 3.5 gigawatts,

  20. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  1. Fluid bed gasification Plasma converter process generating energy from solid waste: Experimental assessment of sulphur species

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrin, Shane, E-mail: shane.morrin@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Advanced Plasma Power, Swindon, Wiltshire SN3 4DE (United Kingdom); Lettieri, Paola, E-mail: p.lettieri@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Chemical Engineering, University College London, London WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom); Chapman, Chris, E-mail: chris.chapman@app-uk.com [Advanced Plasma Power, Swindon, Wiltshire SN3 4DE (United Kingdom); Taylor, Richard, E-mail: richard.taylor@app-uk.com [Advanced Plasma Power, Swindon, Wiltshire SN3 4DE (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: We investigate gaseous sulphur species whilst gasifying sulphur-enriched wood pellets. Experiments performed using a two stage fluid bed gasifier plasma converter process. Notable SO{sub 2} and relatively low COS levels were identified. Oxygen-rich regions of the bed are believed to facilitate SO{sub 2}, with a delayed release. Gas phase reducing regions above the bed would facilitate more prompt COS generation. - Abstract: Often perceived as a Cinderella material, there is growing appreciation for solid waste as a renewable content thermal process feed. Nonetheless, research on solid waste gasification and sulphur mechanisms in particular is lacking. This paper presents results from two related experiments on a novel two stage gasification process, at demonstration scale, using a sulphur-enriched wood pellet feed. Notable SO{sub 2} and relatively low COS levels (before gas cleaning) were interesting features of the trials, and not normally expected under reducing gasification conditions. Analysis suggests that localised oxygen rich regions within the fluid bed played a role in SO{sub 2}s generation. The response of COS to sulphur in the feed was quite prompt, whereas SO{sub 2} was more delayed. It is proposed that the bed material sequestered sulphur from the feed, later aiding SO{sub 2} generation. The more reducing gas phase regions above the bed would have facilitated COS hence its faster response. These results provide a useful insight, with further analysis on a suite of performed experiments underway, along with thermodynamic modelling.

  2. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William H. Day

    2002-05-03

    The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

  3. Providing Reliability Services through Demand Response: A Prelimnary Evaluation of the Demand Response Capabilities of Alcoa Inc.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Starke, Michael R; Kirby, Brendan J; Kueck, John D; Todd, Duane; Caulfield, Michael; Helms, Brian

    2009-02-01

    Demand response is the largest underutilized reliability resource in North America. Historic demand response programs have focused on reducing overall electricity consumption (increasing efficiency) and shaving peaks but have not typically been used for immediate reliability response. Many of these programs have been successful but demand response remains a limited resource. The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) report, 'Assessment of Demand Response and Advanced Metering' (FERC 2006) found that only five percent of customers are on some form of demand response program. Collectively they represent an estimated 37,000 MW of response potential. These programs reduce overall energy consumption, lower green house gas emissions by allowing fossil fuel generators to operate at increased efficiency and reduce stress on the power system during periods of peak loading. As the country continues to restructure energy markets with sophisticated marginal cost models that attempt to minimize total energy costs, the ability of demand response to create meaningful shifts in the supply and demand equations is critical to creating a sustainable and balanced economic response to energy issues. Restructured energy market prices are set by the cost of the next incremental unit of energy, so that as additional generation is brought into the market, the cost for the entire market increases. The benefit of demand response is that it reduces overall demand and shifts the entire market to a lower pricing level. This can be very effective in mitigating price volatility or scarcity pricing as the power system responds to changing demand schedules, loss of large generators, or loss of transmission. As a global producer of alumina, primary aluminum, and fabricated aluminum products, Alcoa Inc., has the capability to provide demand response services through its manufacturing facilities and uniquely through its aluminum smelting facilities. For a typical aluminum smelter, electric power accounts for 30% to 40% of the factory cost of producing primary aluminum. In the continental United States, Alcoa Inc. currently owns and/or operates ten aluminum smelters and many associated fabricating facilities with a combined average load of over 2,600 MW. This presents Alcoa Inc. with a significant opportunity to respond in areas where economic opportunities exist to help mitigate rising energy costs by supplying demand response services into the energy system. This report is organized into seven chapters. The first chapter is the introduction and discusses the intention of this report. The second chapter contains the background. In this chapter, topics include: the motivation for Alcoa to provide demand response; ancillary service definitions; the basics behind aluminum smelting; and a discussion of suggested ancillary services that would be particularly useful for Alcoa to supply. Chapter 3 is concerned with the independent system operator, the Midwest ISO. Here the discussion examines the evolving Midwest ISO market structure including specific definitions, requirements, and necessary components to provide ancillary services. This section is followed by information concerning the Midwest ISO's classifications of demand response parties. Chapter 4 investigates the available opportunities at Alcoa's Warrick facility. Chapter 5 involves an in-depth discussion of the regulation service that Alcoa's Warrick facility can provide and the current interactions with Midwest ISO. Chapter 6 reviews future plans and expectations for Alcoa providing ancillary services into the market. Last, chapter 7, details the conclusion and recommendations of this paper.

  4. Sum-Frequency Generation from Chiral Media and Interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ji, Na

    2006-02-13

    Sum frequency generation (SFG), a second-order nonlinear optical process, is electric-dipole forbidden in systems with inversion symmetry. As a result, it has been used to study chiral media and interfaces, systems intrinsically lacking inversion symmetry. This thesis describes recent progresses in the applications of and new insights into SFG from chiral media and interfaces. SFG from solutions of chiral amino acids is investigated, and a theoretical model explaining the origin and the strength of the chiral signal in electronic-resonance SFG spectroscopy is discussed. An interference scheme that allows us to distinguish enantiomers by measuring both the magnitude and the phase of the chiral SFG response is described, as well as a chiral SFG microscope producing chirality-sensitive images with sub-micron resolution. Exploiting atomic and molecular parity nonconservation, the SFG process is also used to solve the Ozma problems. Sum frequency vibrational spectroscopy is used to obtain the adsorption behavior of leucine molecules at air-water interfaces. With poly(tetrafluoroethylene) as a model system, we extend the application of this surface-sensitive vibrational spectroscopy to fluorine-containing polymers.

  5. GROUNDWATER MONITORING REPORT GENERATION TOOLS - 12005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, N.

    2011-11-21

    Compliance with National and State environmental regulations (e.g. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) aka SuperFund) requires Savannah River Site (SRS) to extensively collect and report groundwater monitoring data, with potential fines for missed reporting deadlines. Several utilities have been developed at SRS to facilitate production of the regulatory reports which include maps, data tables, charts and statistics. Components of each report are generated in accordance with complex sets of regulatory requirements specific to each site monitored. SRS developed a relational database to incorporate the detailed reporting rules with the groundwater data, and created a set of automation tools to interface with the information and generate the report components. These process improvements enhanced quality and consistency by centralizing the information, and have reduced manpower and production time through automated efficiencies.

  6. Plasma generators, reactor systems and related methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kong, Peter C. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pink, Robert J. (Pocatello, ID); Lee, James E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2007-06-19

    A plasma generator, reactor and associated systems and methods are provided in accordance with the present invention. A plasma reactor may include multiple sections or modules which are removably coupled together to form a chamber. Associated with each section is an electrode set including three electrodes with each electrode being coupled to a single phase of a three-phase alternating current (AC) power supply. The electrodes are disposed about a longitudinal centerline of the chamber and are arranged to provide and extended arc and generate an extended body of plasma. The electrodes are displaceable relative to the longitudinal centerline of the chamber. A control system may be utilized so as to automatically displace the electrodes and define an electrode gap responsive to measure voltage or current levels of the associated power supply.

  7. Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-12-01

    DRQAT (Demand Response Quick Assessment Tool) is the tool for assessing demand response saving potentials for large commercial buildings. This tool is based on EnergyPlus simulations of prototypical buildings and HVAC equipment. The opportunities for demand reduction and cost savings with building demand responsive controls vary tremendously with building type and location. The assessment tools will predict the energy and demand savings, the economic savings, and the thermal comfor impact for various demand responsive strategies.more » Users of the tools will be asked to enter the basic building information such as types, square footage, building envelope, orientation, utility schedule, etc. The assessment tools will then use the prototypical simulation models to calculate the energy and demand reduction potential under certain demand responsive strategies, such as precooling, zonal temperature set up, and chilled water loop and air loop set points adjustment.« less

  8. Event generator tunes obtained from underlying event and multiparton

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    scattering measurements (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Event generator tunes obtained from underlying event and multiparton scattering measurements Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Event generator tunes obtained from underlying event and multiparton scattering measurements New sets of parameters ("tunes") for the underlying-event (UE) modelling of the pythia8, pythia6 and herwig++ Monte Carlo event generators are constructed using different parton distribution

  9. Customizing pays off in steam generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapathy, V. (ABCO Industries, Inc., Abilene, TX (United States))

    1995-01-01

    Packaged steam generators are the workhorses of chemical process plants, power plants and cogeneration systems. They are available as oil- or gas-fired models, and are used to generate either high-pressure superheated steam (400 to 1,200 psig, at 500 to 900 F) or saturated steam at low pressures (100 to 300 psig). In today's emission- and efficiency- conscious environment, steam generators have to be custom designed. Gone are the days when a boiler supplier--or for that matter an end user--could look up a model number from a list of standard sizes and select one for a particular need. Thus, before selecting a system, it is desirable to know the features of oil- and gas-fired steam generators, and the important variables that influence their selection, design and performance. It is imperative that all of these data are supplied to the boiler supplier so that the engineers may come up with the right design. Some of the parameters which are discussed in this paper are: duty, steam temperature, steam purity, emissions, and furnace design. Superheaters, economizers, and overall performance are also discussed.

  10. Impacts of Providing Inertial Response on Dynamic Loads of Wind Turbine Drivetrains: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Girsang, I. P.; Dhupia, J.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.; Muljadi, E.; Jonkman, J.

    2014-09-01

    There has been growing demand from the power industry for wind power plants to support power system operations. One such requirement is for wind turbines to provide ancillary services in the form of inertial response. When the grid frequency drops, it is essential for wind turbine generators (WTGs) to inject kinetic energy stored in their inertia into the grid to help arrest the frequency decline. However, the impacts of inertial response on the structural loads of the wind turbine have not been given much attention. To bridge this gap, this paper utilizes a holistic model for both fixed-speed and variable-speed WTGs by integrating the aeroelastic wind turbine model in FAST, developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, with the electromechanical drivetrain model in SimDriveline and SimPowerSystems.

  11. Neutronics activities for next generation devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Neutronic activities for the next generation devices are the subject of this paper. The main activities include TFCX and FPD blanket/shield studies, neutronic aspects of ETR/INTOR critical issues, and neutronics computational modules for the tokamak system code and tandem mirror reactor system code. Trade-off analyses, optimization studies, design problem investigations and computational models development for reactor parametric studies carried out for these activities are summarized.

  12. Cubit Mesh Generation Toolkit V11.1

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2009-03-25

    CUBIT prepares models to be used in computer-based simulation of real-world events. CUBIT is a full-featured software toolkit for robust generation of two- and three-dimensional finite element meshes (grids) and geometry preparation. Its main goal is to reduce the time to generate meshes, particularly large hex meshes of complicated, interlocking assemblies.

  13. Method and apparatus for anti-islanding protection of distributed generations

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ye, Zhihong; John, Vinod; Wang, Changyong; Garces, Luis Jose; Zhou, Rui; Li, Lei; Walling, Reigh Allen; Premerlani, William James; Sanza, Peter Claudius; Liu, Yan; Dame, Mark Edward

    2006-03-21

    An apparatus for anti-islanding protection of a distributed generation with respect to a feeder connected to an electrical grid is disclosed. The apparatus includes a sensor adapted to generate a voltage signal representative of an output voltage and/or a current signal representative of an output current at the distributed generation, and a controller responsive to the signals from the sensor. The controller is productive of a control signal directed to the distributed generation to drive an operating characteristic of the distributed generation out of a nominal range in response to the electrical grid being disconnected from the feeder.

  14. Isotope powered Stirling generator for terrestrial applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tingey, G.L.; Sorensen, G.C.; Ross, B.A.

    1995-01-01

    An electric power supply, small enough to be man-portable, is being developed for remote, terrestrial applications. This system is designed for an operating lifetime of five years without maintenance or refueling. A small Radioisotope Stirling Generator (RSG) has been developed. The energy source of the generator is a 60 watt plutonium-238 fuel clad used in the General Purpose Heat Sources (GPHS) developed for space applications. A free piston Stirling Engine drives a linear alternator to convert the heat to power. The system weighs about 7.5 kg and produces 11 watts AC power with a conversion efficiency of 18.5%. Two engine models have been designed, fabricated, and tested to date: (a) a developmental model instrumented to confirm and test parameters, and (b) an electrically heated model with an electrical heater equipped power input leads. Critical components have been tested for 10,000 to 20,000 hours. One complete generator has been operating for over 11,000 hours. Radioisotope heated prototypes are expected to be fabricated and tested in late 1995.

  15. The Next Generation Photoinjector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, Dennis Thomas; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept.

    2005-09-12

    This dissertation will elucidate the design, construction, theory, and operation of the Next Generation Photoinjector (NGP). This photoinjector is comprised of the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell symmetrized S-band photocathode radio frequency (rf) electron gun and a single emittance-compensation solenoidal magnet. This photoinjector is a prototype for the Linear Coherent Light Source X-ray Free Electron Laser operating in the 1.5 {angstrom} range. Simulations indicate that this photoinjector is capable of producing a 1nC electron bunch with transverse normalized emittance less than 1 {pi} mm mrad were the cathode is illuminated with a 10 psec longitudinal flat top pulse. Using a Gaussian longitudinal laser profile with a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 10 psec, simulation indicates that the NGP is capable of producing a normalized rms emittance of 2.50 {pi} mm mrad at 1 nC. Using the removable cathode plate we have studied the quantum efficiency (QE) of both copper and magnesium photo-cathodes. The Cu QE was found to be 4.5 x 10{sup -5} with a 25% variation in the QE across the emitting surface of the cathode, while supporting a field gradient of 125 MV/m. At low charge, the transverse normalized rms emittance, {epsilon}{sub n,rms}, produced by the NGP is {epsilon}{sub n,rms} = 1.2 {pi} mm mrad for Q{sub T} = 0.3 nC. The 95% electron beam bunch length was measured to 10.9 psec. The emittance due to the finite magnetic field at the cathode has been studied. The scaling of this magnetic emittance term as a function of cathode magnetic field was found to be 0.01 {pi} mm mrad per Gauss. The 1.6 cell rf gun has been designed to reduce the dipole field asymmetry of the longitudinal accelerating field. Low level rf measurements show that this has in fact been accomplished, with an order of magnitude decrease in the dipole field. High power beam studies also show that the dipole field has been decreased. An upper limit of the intrinsic non-reducible thermal emittance of a photocathode under high field gradient was found to be {epsilon}{sub n,rms} = 0.8 {pi} mm mrad. Agreement is found between the theoretical calculation of the thermal emittance, {epsilon}{sub 0} = 0.62 {pi} mm mrad, and the experimental results, after taking into account all of the emittance contribution terms. The 1 nC emittance was found to be {epsilon}{sub n,rms} = 4.75 {pi} mm mrad with a 95% electron beam bunch length of 14.7 psec. Systematic bunch length measurements showed electron beam bunch lengthening due the electron beam charge. They will show that the discrepancy between measurement and simulation is due to three effects. The major effect is due to the variation of the QE in the photo-emitting area of the Cu cathode. Also, space charge emittance blowup in the transport line will be shown to be a significant effect because the electron beam is still in the space charge dominated regime. The last effect, which has been observed experimentally, is the electron bunch lengthening as a function of total electron bunch charge.

  16. HIGH EFFICIENCY SYNGAS GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Copeland; Yevgenia Gershanovich; Brian Windecker

    2005-02-01

    This project investigated an efficient and low cost method of auto-thermally reforming natural gas to hydrogen and carbon monoxide. Reforming is the highest cost step in producing products such as methanol and Fisher Tropsch liquids (i.e., gas to liquids); and reducing the cost of reforming is the key to reducing the cost of these products. Steam reforming is expensive because of the high cost of the high nickel alloy reforming tubes (i.e., indirectly fired reforming tubes). Conventional auto-thermal or Partial Oxidation (POX) reforming minimizes the size and cost of the reformers and provides a near optimum mixture of CO and hydrogen. However POX requires pure oxygen, which consumes power and significantly increases the cost to reforming. Our high efficiency process extracts oxygen from low-pressure air with novel oxygen sorbent and transfers the oxygen to a nickel-catalyzed reformer. The syngas is generated at process pressure (typically 20 to 40 bar) without nitrogen dilution and has a 1CO to 2H{sub 2} ratio that is near optimum for the subsequent production of Fisher-Tropsch liquid to liquids and other chemicals (i.e., Gas to Liquids, GTL). Our high process efficiency comes from the way we transfer the oxygen into the reformer. All of the components of the process, except for the oxygen sorbent, are commonly used in commercial practice. A process based on a longlived, regenerable, oxygen transfer sorbent could substantially reduce the cost of natural gas reforming to syngas. Lower cost syngas (CO + 2H{sub 2}) that is the feedstock for GTL would reduce the cost of GTL and for other commercial applications (e.g., methanol, other organic chemicals). The vast gas resources of Alaska's North Slope (ANS) offer more than 22 Tcf of gas and GTL production in this application alone, and could account for as much as 300,000 to 700,000 bpd for 20 to 30+ years. We developed a new sorbent, which is an essential part of the High Efficiency Oxygen Process (HOP). We tested the sorbent and observed that it has both a good oxygen capacity and operates as a highly effective reforming catalyst. We conducted a long duration tests of the sorbent (1,500 hours of continuous operation in the HOP cycle). Although the sorbent lost some oxygen capacity with cycling, the sorbent oxygen capacity stabilized after 1,000 hours and remained constant to the end of the test, 1,500 hour. The activity of the catalyst to reform methane to a hydrogen and carbon monoxide mixture was unchanged through the oxidation/reduction cycling. Our cost and performance analyses indicated a significant reduction in the cost of GTL production when using the HOP process integrated into a GTL plant.

  17. Micro thrust and heat generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, E.J.

    1998-11-17

    A micro thrust and heat generator have a means for providing a combustion fuel source to an ignition chamber of the micro thrust and heat generator. The fuel is ignited by a ignition means within the micro thrust and heat generator`s ignition chamber where it burns and creates a pressure. A nozzle formed from the combustion chamber extends outward from the combustion chamber and tappers down to a narrow diameter and then opens into a wider diameter where the nozzle then terminates outside of said combustion chamber. The pressure created within the combustion chamber accelerates as it leaves the chamber through the nozzle resulting in pressure and heat escaping from the nozzle to the atmosphere outside the micro thrust and heat generator. The micro thrust and heat generator can be microfabricated from a variety of materials, e.g., of polysilicon, on one wafer using surface micromachining batch fabrication techniques or high aspect ratio micromachining techniques (LIGA). 30 figs.

  18. Macquarie Generation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Macquarie Generation Place: New South Wales, Australia Zip: 2299 Sector: Hydro, Solar, Wind energy Product: Australian state-owned on-grid...

  19. Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

  20. Wind Power (pbl/generation)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Generation Hydro Power Wind Power Monthly GSP BPA White Book Dry Year Tools Firstgov Wind Power (Updated June 16, 2014) Project Descriptions Foote Creek I Wind Project (Carbon...