National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for generator response models

  1. Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wang, Zhiguo; Prange, Micah P.; Wu, Dangxin

    2014-12-01

    This Final Report presents work carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators” (Project number: PL10-Scin-theor-PD2Jf) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project was divided into four tasks: 1) Electronic response functions (ab initio data model) 2) Electron-hole yield, variance, and spatial distribution 3) Ab initio calculations of information carrier properties 4) Transport of electron-hole pairs and scintillation efficiency Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the four tasks is provided in this Final Report. Furthermore, published peer-reviewed articles based on the work carried under this project are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  2. Imaging and modeling the ionospheric airglow response over Hawaii to the tsunami generated by the Tohoku earthquake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occhipinti, Giovanni "Ninto"

    Imaging and modeling the ionospheric airglow response over Hawaii to the tsunami generated July 2011. [1] Although only centimeters in amplitude over the open ocean, tsunamis can generate observation of the airglow tsunami signature, resulting from the 11 March 2011 Tohoku earthquake off

  3. Next Generation Calibration Models with Dimensional Modeling...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Decision Tree Based Control Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation Diesel Engines An Accelerated Aging Method for Diesel Exhaust Aftertreatment Systems...

  4. SPECTRA: A subroutine for response spectra generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, D.B.

    1991-11-01

    A simple Fortran subroutine for generation of response spectra has been written and implemented on a Sun Sparc2 workstation. The routine generates absolute acceleration spectra, relative velocity spectra and relative displacement spectra for a given input acceleration time history. The subroutine will automatically set the period (i.e. the abscissa values of the spectra) at which spectral quantities are determined, and the user can select one of three options for determining the period values: Periods correspond to the periods utilized by the California Department of Mines and Geology strong motion instrumentation program (CSMIP) in generating the spectra which they distribute; periods correspond to the periods suggested by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures and Commentary on Standard for Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures'' (ASCE 4-86) for in-structure spectra; periods correspond closely to the periods utilized by CSMIP, but a higher density of periods are utilized, resulting in a very high resolution spectra. To enable the use of the subroutine on any platform, simplicity has been maintained in the Fortran coding of the subroutine. The methodology utilized in generating the spectra, a discussion of the limitations of the spectra in the high frequency regime, and a listing of the subroutine are included in this report.

  5. SPECTRA: A subroutine for response spectra generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCallen, D.B.

    1991-11-01

    A simple Fortran subroutine for generation of response spectra has been written and implemented on a Sun Sparc2 workstation. The routine generates absolute acceleration spectra, relative velocity spectra and relative displacement spectra for a given input acceleration time history. The subroutine will automatically set the period (i.e. the abscissa values of the spectra) at which spectral quantities are determined, and the user can select one of three options for determining the period values: Periods correspond to the periods utilized by the California Department of Mines and Geology strong motion instrumentation program (CSMIP) in generating the spectra which they distribute; periods correspond to the periods suggested by the American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) ``Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures and Commentary on Standard for Seismic Analysis of Safety Related Nuclear Structures`` (ASCE 4-86) for in-structure spectra; periods correspond closely to the periods utilized by CSMIP, but a higher density of periods are utilized, resulting in a very high resolution spectra. To enable the use of the subroutine on any platform, simplicity has been maintained in the Fortran coding of the subroutine. The methodology utilized in generating the spectra, a discussion of the limitations of the spectra in the high frequency regime, and a listing of the subroutine are included in this report.

  6. Conventional regression models Auto-generated units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    Conventional regression models Auto-generated units Consequences of auto-generation Arguments pro-generated units #12;Conventional regression models Auto-generated units Consequences of auto-generation Arguments pro and con Outline 1 Conventional regression models Gaussian models Binary regression model

  7. Conventional regression models Auto-generated units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    Conventional regression models Auto-generated units Consequences of auto-generation Inference regression models Auto-generated units Consequences of auto-generation Inference and prediction Outline 1 Conventional regression models Gaussian models Binary regression model Properties of regression models Problems

  8. Current responsive devices for synchronous generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karlicek, R.F.

    1983-09-27

    A device for detecting current imbalance between phases of a polyphase alternating current generator. A detector responds to the maximum peak current in the generator, and detecting means generates an output for each phase proportional to the peak current of each phase. Comparing means generates an output when the maximum peak current exceeds the phase peak current. 11 figs.

  9. Current responsive devices for synchronous generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karlicek, Robert F. (Fullerton, CA)

    1983-01-01

    A device for detecting current imbalance between phases of a polyphase alternating current generator. A detector responds to the maximum peak current in the generator, and detecting means generates an output for each phase proportional to the peak current of each phase. Comparing means generates an output when the maximum peak current exceeds the phase peak current.

  10. Conventional regression models Auto-generated units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    Conventional regression models Auto-generated units Consequences of auto-generation Inference regression models Auto-generated units Consequences of auto-generation Inference and prediction Outline 1 Conventional regression models Gaussian models Binary regression model Attenuation of treatment effect Problems

  11. Failed Retrieval Attempts Foster Generation of Novel Responses 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angello, Genna Marie

    2014-07-31

    Novel, or uncommon, responses in idea generation, creative problem solving, and divergent thinking are difficult to generate because they experience reduced memory accessibility caused by blocking or fixation from common, ...

  12. Conventional regression models Auto-generated units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    Conventional regression models Auto-generated units Consequences of auto-generation Inference Royal Statistical Society Feb 6, 2008 Peter McCullagh Auto-generated units #12;Conventional regression Conventional regression models Gaussian models Binary regression model Properties of regression models Problems

  13. FlexibleSUSY -- A spectrum generator generator for supersymmetric models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Athron; Jae-hyeon Park; Dominik Stöckinger; Alexander Voigt

    2015-03-18

    We introduce FlexibleSUSY, a Mathematica and C++ package, which generates a fast, precise C++ spectrum generator for any SUSY model specified by the user. The generated code is designed with both speed and modularity in mind, making it easy to adapt and extend with new features. The model is specified by supplying the superpotential, gauge structure and particle content in a SARAH model file; specific boundary conditions e.g. at the GUT, weak or intermediate scales are defined in a separate FlexibleSUSY model file. From these model files, FlexibleSUSY generates C++ code for self-energies, tadpole corrections, renormalization group equations (RGEs) and electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) conditions and combines them with numerical routines for solving the RGEs and EWSB conditions simultaneously. The resulting spectrum generator is then able to solve for the spectrum of the model, including loop-corrected pole masses, consistent with user specified boundary conditions. The modular structure of the generated code allows for individual components to be replaced with an alternative if available. FlexibleSUSY has been carefully designed to grow as alternative solvers and calculators are added. Predefined models include the MSSM, NMSSM, E$_6$SSM, USSM, R-symmetric models and models with right-handed neutrinos.

  14. Grid Integration of Aggregated Demand Response, Part 2: Modeling Demand Response in a Production Cost Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Renewable integration studies have evaluated many challenges associated with deploying large amounts of variable wind and solar generation technologies. These studies can evaluate operational impacts associated with variable generation, benefits of improved wind and solar resource forecasting, and trade-offs between institutional changes, including increasing balancing area cooperation and technical changes such as installing new flexible generation. Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility and can aid in integrating variable generation; however, integration analyses have not yet incorporated these resources explicitly into grid simulation models as part of a standard toolkit for resource planners.

  15. Regression models Consequences of auto-generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    Regression models Consequences of auto-generation All creatures great and small Inference University of Chicago Statslab Cambridge Nov 14 2008 Peter McCullagh Auto-generated units #12;Regression Regression models Gaussian models Binary regression model Attenuation of treatment effect Problems

  16. MODEL DG535 Digital Delay / Pulse Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Hans-Gerd

    MODEL DG535 Digital Delay / Pulse Generator 1290-D Reamwood Avenue Sunnyvale, CA 94089 U.S.A. Phone/2000 #12;i DG535 DIGITAL DELAY / PULSE GENERATOR OPERATION AND SERVICE MANUAL Table of Contents CONDENSED Sequence Sheet #4 Rate Generators Sheet #5 Power Supply and Dropout Detection Sheet #6 System Connectors

  17. Modeling Photon Generation Problem Presenter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, David A.

    on Mathematical Problems in Industry June 13­17, 2011 New Jersey Institute of Technology #12;Section 1 generation in quantum experiments, involve one or more pump fields at relatively large amplitude interacting linear form of the CMEs in the undepleted-pump regime, where the CMEs can formally be solved to yield

  18. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Goldman, G. (2009) Retail demand response in Southwest PowerCoordination of retail demand response with Midwest ISO2010. 110 pages. Demand Response and Variable Generation

  19. Dynamic Long-Term Modelling of Generation Capacity Investment and Capacity Margins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eager, Dan; Hobbs, Benjamin; Bialek, Janusz

    2012-04-25

    is the mix and amount of generation investment over time in response to policies promoting high penetrations of variable output renewable power such as wind. Modelling the dynamics of merchant generation investment in market environments can inform the debate...

  20. Modeling a Helical-coil Steam Generator in RELAP5-3D for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan V. Hoffer; Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan A. Anderson

    2011-01-01

    Options for the primary heat transport loop heat exchangers for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant are currently being evaluated. A helical-coil steam generator is one heat exchanger design under consideration. Safety is an integral part of the helical-coil steam generator evaluation. Transient analysis plays a key role in evaluation of the steam generators safety. Using RELAP5-3D to model the helical-coil steam generator, a loss of pressure in the primary side of the steam generator is simulated. This report details the development of the steam generator model, the loss of pressure transient, and the response of the steam generator primary and secondary systems to the loss of primary pressure. Back ground on High Temperature Gas-cooled reactors, steam generators, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant is provided to increase the readers understanding of the material presented.

  1. Hardware model of a shipboard generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkins, Gregory L. (Gregory Lewis)

    2009-01-01

    A hardware model of the Gas Turbine Generator (GTG) in use on the US Navy's DDG-51 Class Destroyer is constructed for use as a lab apparatus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Laboratory for Electromagnetic and ...

  2. Motivation Model Results Summary A generative model for feedback networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    White, Douglas R.

    Motivation Model Results Summary A generative model for feedback networks D.R. White1 N. Kejzar2 C #12;Motivation Model Results Summary Outline 1 Motivation An example 2 Model 3 Results Network properties Simulations #12;Motivation Model Results Summary Cycle formation in growing network How to model

  3. System level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive applications System level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive applications Uses a model to predict and...

  4. Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste heat recovery applications Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste heat recovery applications Model...

  5. On modeling pollution-generating technologies July 22, 2010 On modeling pollution-generating technologies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    On modeling pollution-generating technologies July 22, 2010 On modeling pollution modeling pollution-generating technologies July 22, 2010 Abstract We distinguish between intended with respect to inputs and intended outputs that cause pollution. We derive implications from the phenomenon

  6. Finite generation and geography of models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaloghiros, Anne-Sophie; Lazi?, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    There are two main examples where a version of the Minimal Model Program can, at least conjecturally, be performed successfully: the first is the classical MMP associated to the canonical divisor, and the other is Mori Dream Spaces. In this paper we formulate a framework which generalises both of these examples. Starting from divisorial rings which are finitely generated, we determine precisely when we can run the MMP, and we show why finite generation alone is not sufficient to make the MMP work.

  7. Ancillary-service details: regulation, load following, and generator response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirst, E.; Kirby, B.

    1996-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to examine empirically these intrahour and interhour load changes and the responses of a utility`s generating resources to those load changes. We analyze data, primarily from one control area, to see how it maintains ACE close to zero in an effort to meet the A1 and A2 criteria. Overall, we estimate that load following costs US electric utilities over one billion dollars a year. We first test alternative ways to identify trends over multihour periods using both regression analysis and rolling averages. Then, we consider several metrics for intrahour load following. Next we examine characteristics of load following for different time-averaging periods and compare the dynamics of loads and load following generation across these time periods. Finally, we consider the contribution of each load to the total load following requirements of the control area.

  8. Alternative methods of modeling wind generation using production cost models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Pang, C.K. [P Plus Corp., Cupertino, CA (United States)] [P Plus Corp., Cupertino, CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This paper examines the methods of incorporating wind generation in two production costing models: one is a load duration curve (LDC) based model and the other is a chronological-based model. These two models were used to evaluate the impacts of wind generation on two utility systems using actual collected wind data at two locations with high potential for wind generation. The results are sensitive to the selected wind data and the level of benefits of wind generation is sensitive to the load forecast. The total production cost over a year obtained by the chronological approach does not differ significantly from that of the LDC approach, though the chronological commitment of units is more realistic and more accurate. Chronological models provide the capability of answering important questions about wind resources which are difficult or impossible to address with LDC models.

  9. Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for Fuel Efficient, Low Emissions Diesel Engines Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for Fuel...

  10. Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

    2014-04-14

    Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

  11. Probabilistic Constraint Programming for Parameters Optimisation of Generative Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zanin, Massimiliano; Sousa, Pedro A C; Cruz, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Complex networks theory has commonly been used for modelling and understanding the interactions taking place between the elements composing complex systems. More recently, the use of generative models has gained momentum, as they allow identifying which forces and mechanisms are responsible for the appearance of given structural properties. In spite of this interest, several problems remain open, one of the most important being the design of robust mechanisms for finding the optimal parameters of a generative model, given a set of real networks. In this contribution, we address this problem by means of Probabilistic Constraint Programming. By using as an example the reconstruction of networks representing brain dynamics, we show how this approach is superior to other solutions, in that it allows a better characterisation of the parameters space, while requiring a significantly lower computational cost.

  12. Building model generation project : generating a model of the MIT campus terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulikov, Vitaliy Y. (Vitaliy Yurievich), 1981-

    2004-01-01

    Possession of a complete, automatically generated and frequently updated model of the MIT campus leads the way to many valuable applications, ranging from three-dimensional navigation to virtual tours. In this thesis, we ...

  13. Aircraft AC Generators: Hybrid System Modeling and Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koutsoukos, Xenofon D.

    generator, phase-domain model, synchronous AC generator. I. INTRODUCTION The Integrated Drive Generator (IDG1 Aircraft AC Generators: Hybrid System Modeling and Simulation Ashraf Tantawy, Student Member--Integrated Drive Generators (IDGs) are the main source of electrical power for a number of critical systems

  14. Electric Water Heater Modeling and Control Strategies for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Samaan, Nader A.

    2012-07-22

    Abstract— Demand response (DR) has a great potential to provide balancing services at normal operating conditions and emergency support when a power system is subject to disturbances. Effective control strategies can significantly relieve the balancing burden of conventional generators and reduce investment on generation and transmission expansion. This paper is aimed at modeling electric water heaters (EWH) in households and tests their response to control strategies to implement DR. The open-loop response of EWH to a centralized signal is studied by adjusting temperature settings to provide regulation services; and two types of decentralized controllers are tested to provide frequency support following generator trips. EWH models are included in a simulation platform in DIgSILENT to perform electromechanical simulation, which contains 147 households in a distribution feeder. Simulation results show the dependence of EWH response on water heater usage . These results provide insight suggestions on the need of control strategies to achieve better performance for demand response implementation. Index Terms— Centralized control, decentralized control, demand response, electrical water heater, smart grid

  15. Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation Diesel Engines Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine...

  16. Modeling Distributed Electricity Generation in the NEMS Buildings Models

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents the modeling methodology, projected market penetration, and impact of distributed generation with respect to offsetting future electricity needs and carbon dioxide emissions in the residential and commercial buildings sector in the Annual Energy Outlook 2000 (AEO2000) reference case.

  17. Towards A Computational Model Of Poetry Generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manurung, Hisar; Ritchie, Graeme; Thompson, Henry

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we describe the difficulties of poetry generation, particularly in contrast to traditional informative natural language generation. We then point out deficiencies of previous attempts at poetry generation, ...

  18. Aeras: A next generation global atmosphere model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Spotz, William F.; Smith, Thomas M.; Demeshko, Irina P.; Fike, Jeffrey A.

    2015-06-01

    Sandia National Laboratories is developing a new global atmosphere model named Aeras that is performance portable and supports the quantification of uncertainties. These next-generation capabilities are enabled by building Aeras on top of Albany, a code base that supports the rapid development of scientific application codes while leveraging Sandia's foundational mathematics and computer science packages in Trilinos and Dakota. Embedded uncertainty quantification (UQ) is an original design capability of Albany, and performance portability is a recent upgrade. Other required features, such as shell-type elements, spectral elements, efficient explicit and semi-implicit time-stepping, transient sensitivity analysis, and concurrent ensembles, were not componentsmore »of Albany as the project began, and have been (or are being) added by the Aeras team. We present early UQ and performance portability results for the shallow water equations.« less

  19. EXTENSIONS OF GENERALIZED LINEAR MODELING APPROACH TO STOCHASTIC WEATHER GENERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    weather) -- Software R open source statistical programming language: Function glm "Family;(2) Generalized Linear Models Statistical Framework -- Multiple Regression Analysis (Linear model or LM) Response

  20. Modeling and simulation of consumer response to dynamic pricing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenzuela, J.; Thimmapuram, P.; Kim, J (Decision and Information Sciences); (Auburn Univ.)

    2012-08-01

    Assessing the impacts of dynamic-pricing under the smart grid concept is becoming extremely important for deciding its full deployment. In this paper, we develop a model that represents the response of consumers to dynamic pricing. In the model, consumers use forecasted day-ahead prices to shift daily energy consumption from hours when the price is expected to be high to hours when the price is expected to be low while maintaining the total energy consumption as unchanged. We integrate the consumer response model into the Electricity Market Complex Adaptive System (EMCAS). EMCAS is an agent-based model that simulates restructured electricity markets. We explore the impacts of dynamic-pricing on price spikes, peak demand, consumer energy bills, power supplier profits, and congestion costs. A simulation of an 11-node test network that includes eight generation companies and five aggregated consumers is performed for a period of 1 month. In addition, we simulate the Korean power system.

  1. Dynamic Simulation Studies of the Frequency Response of the Three U.S. Interconnections with Increased Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackin, Peter

    2011-01-01

    2009. “North America Dynamic Wind Generator Modeling Update,work performed by the WECC Wind Generator Modeling Group andIEEE Dynamic Performance of Wind Power Generation Working

  2. Modeling Hydraulic Responses to Meteorological Forcing: from Canopy to Aquifer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pan, Lehua; Jin, Jiming; Miller, Norman; Wu, Yu-Shu; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur

    2008-01-01

    equations  for  some  soil  hydraulic properties.  Water Modeling Hydraulic Responses to Meteorological Forcing: CA 94720  lpan@lbl.gov  Modeling Hydraulic Responses to 

  3. Aggregate Model for Heterogeneous Thermostatically Controlled Loads with Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Kalsi, Karanjit; Fuller, Jason C.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Chassin, David P.

    2012-07-22

    Due to the potentially large number of Distributed Energy Resources (DERs) – demand response, distributed generation, distributed storage - that are expected to be deployed, it is impractical to use detailed models of these resources when integrated with the transmission system. Being able to accurately estimate the fast transients caused by demand response is especially important to analyze the stability of the system under different demand response strategies. On the other hand, a less complex model is more amenable to design feedback control strategies for the population of devices to provide ancillary services. The main contribution of this paper is to develop aggregated models for a heterogeneous population of Thermostatic Controlled Loads (TCLs) to accurately capture their collective behavior under demand response and other time varying effects of the system. The aggregated model efficiently includes statistical information of the population and accounts for a second order effect necessary to accurately capture the collective dynamic behavior. The developed aggregated models are validated against simulations of thousands of detailed building models using GridLAB-D (an open source distribution simulation software) under both steady state and severe dynamic conditions caused due to temperature set point changes.

  4. Modeling generation and characterization of attosecond pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhardwaj, Siddharth

    2014-01-01

    Generation of high-order harmonics has emerged as a powerful technique for the generation of broadband coherent radiation in the EUV regime. This has lead to the development of table-top EUV sources that can produce ...

  5. Generator Response to Load Variation The below table summarizes the way that load variation is

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    1 Generator Response to Load Variation The below table summarizes the way that load variation is allocated to generators in a power system. In these notes, we derive the proximity effect, the inertial, constant impedance loads, and the network reduced to generator internal nodes. This expression was: { }00

  6. Value of Demand Response: Quantities from Production Cost Modeling (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.

    2014-04-01

    Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility particularly on future systems with high penetrations of variable wind and solar power generation. However, managed loads in grid models are limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the value of co-optimized DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model. There are significant variations in the availabilities of different types of DR resources, which affect both the operational savings as well as the revenue for each DR resource. The results presented include the system-wide avoided fuel and generator start-up costs as well as the composite revenue for each DR resource by energy and operating reserves. In addition, the revenue is characterized by the capacity, energy, and units of DR enabled.

  7. Variate Generation for the Accelerated Life and Proportional Hazards Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leemis, Larry

    Variate Generation for the Accelerated Life and Proportional Hazards Models Lawrence M. Leemis by a factor (z), variates are generated by t = H-1 0 (- log(u)) (z) . In the proportional hazards model The accelerated life and proportional hazards lifetime models are used to account for the effects of covariates

  8. Automatic Digital Surface Model (DSM) Generation from Linear Array Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Automatic Digital Surface Model (DSM) Generation from Linear Array Images A dissertation submitted-examiner Presented by Li Zhang Zurich 2005 #12;IGP Mitteilungen Nr. 88 Automatic Digital Surface Model (DSM-906467-55-4 #12;DISS. ETH NO. 16078 Automatic Digital Surface Model (DSM) Generation from Linear Array Images

  9. Modeling the mechanical response of PBX 9501

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ragaswamy, Partha; Lewis, Matthew W; Liu, Cheng; Thompson, Darla G

    2010-01-01

    An engineering overview of the mechanical response of Plastic-Bonded eXplosives (PBXs), specifically PBX 9501, will be provided with emphasis on observed mechanisms associated with different types of mechanical testing. Mechanical tests in the form of uniaxial tension, compression, cyclic loading, creep (compression and tension), and Hopkinson bar show strain rate and temperature dependence. A range of mechanical behavior is observed which includes small strain recoverable response in the form of viscoelasticity; change in stiffness and softening beyond peak strength due to damage in the form microcracks, debonding, void formation and the growth of existing voids; inelastic response in the form of irrecoverable strain as shown in cyclic tests, and viscoelastic creep combined with plastic response as demonstrated in creep and recovery tests. The main focus of this paper is to elucidate the challenges and issues involved in modeling the mechanical behavior of PBXs for simulating thermo-mechanical responses in engineering components. Examples of validation of a constitutive material model based on a few of the observed mechanisms will be demonstrated against three point bending, split Hopkinson pressure bar and Brazilian disk geometry.

  10. Modeling of concentrating solar thermoelectric generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng

    The conversion of solar power into electricity is dominated by non-concentrating photovoltaics and concentrating solar thermal systems. Recently, it has been shown that solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) are a viable ...

  11. Is the Higgs Mechanism of Fermion Mass Generation a Fact? A Yukawa-less First-Two-Generation Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diptimoy Ghosh; Rick Sandeepan Gupta; Gilad Perez

    2015-08-06

    It is now established that the major source of electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) is due to the observed Higgs particle. However, whether the Higgs mechanism is responsible for the generation of all the fermion masses, in particular, the fermions of the first two generations, is an open question. In this letter we present a construction where the light fermion masses are generated through a secondary, subdominant and sequestered source of EWSB. This fits well with the approximate U(2) global symmetry of the observed structure of the flavor sector. We first realize the above idea using a calculable two Higgs doublet model. We then show that the first two generation masses could come from technicolor dynamics, while the third generation fermions, as well as the electroweak gauge bosons get their masses dominantly from the Higgs mechanism. We also discuss how the small CKM mixing between the first two generations and the third generation, and soft mixing between the sequestered EWSB components arise in this setup. A typical prediction of this scenario is a significant reduction of the couplings of the observed Higgs boson to the first two generation of fermions.

  12. Modeling of a detonation driven, linear electric generator facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    Modeling of a detonation driven, linear electric generator facility E.M. Braun, E. Baydar, and F demonstrated that a PDE can be used for power generation and may be more efficient than a deflagration that involve coupling a PDE with different systems to drive a generator and produce electricity [2, 3]. One

  13. Stochastic precipitation generation based on a multivariate autoregression model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borchers, Brian

    Stochastic precipitation generation based on a multivariate autoregression model Oleg V. Makhnin of stochastic precipitation generation has long been of interest. A good generator should produce time series with statistical properties to match those of the real precipitation. Here, we present a multivariate

  14. A Friendly Approach to Increasing the Frequency Response of Piezoelectric Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . PROPOSED STRUCTURE In many piezoelectric harvesting applications, a conventional PZG includes one or more349 A Friendly Approach to Increasing the Frequency Response of Piezoelectric Generators Sam Ben -- A wide bandwidth piezoelectric generator (PZG) was constructed and tested experimentally. The PZG

  15. Comparison between third and second generation ocean wave models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bratos, Steven Martin

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the relative performance of a second generation (2G) model, WISWAVE (Hubertz 1992), and a third generation (3G) model, WAM (WAMDI 1988), in deep water. High-quality wind fields, with detailed spatial...

  16. SIMULATING CHILDREN'S NULL SUBJECTS: AN EARLY LANGUAGE GENERATION MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SIMULATING CHILDREN'S NULL SUBJECTS: AN EARLY LANGUAGE GENERATION MODEL Carole T. Boster Department, the model addresses the issue of why missing or phonetically "null" subjects appear as often as they do are that an output generator successfullyapproximates the null-subject output patterns found in English

  17. 2n-Dimensional Models with Topological Mass Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinichi Deguchi; Satoshi Hayakawa

    2008-02-06

    The 4-dimensional model with topological mass generation that has recently been presented by Dvali, Jackiw and Pi [G. Dvali, R. Jackiw, and S.-Y. Pi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 081602 (2006), hep-th/0610228] is generalized to any even number of dimensions. As in the 4-dimensional model, the 2n-dimensional model describes a mass-generation phenomenon due to the presence of the chiral anomaly. In addition to this model, new 2n-dimensional models with topological mass generation are proposed, in which a Stueckelberg-type mass term plays a crucial role in the mass generation. The mass generation of a pseudoscalar field such as the eta-prime meson is discussed within this framework.

  18. Numerical Modeling of Submarine Mass-Movement Generated Waves Using RANS Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yim, Solomon C.

    Numerical Modeling of Submarine Mass-Movement Generated Waves Using RANS Model D. YUK and S. YIM model for predicting waves generated by nearshore submarine mass-movements is described. The model to coastal scientists and engineers for many years. Coastal wave generation due to submarine mass movement

  19. Technical Manual for the SAM Biomass Power Generation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgenson, J.; Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

    2011-09-01

    This technical manual provides context for the implementation of the biomass electric power generation performance model in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). Additionally, the report details the engineering and scientific principles behind the underlying calculations in the model. The framework established in this manual is designed to give users a complete understanding of behind-the-scenes calculations and the results generated.

  20. Analytical Modeling of Wave Generation by the Borehole Orbital Vibrator Source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakagawa, Seiji; Daley, Thomas M.

    2004-01-01

    Analytical modeling of wave generation by the Boreholeand the mechanism of wave generation and the characteristicswave energy, and guided-wave generation. These models are

  1. Statistical Models for Next Generation Sequencing Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yiyi

    2013-04-01

    - parametric model to detect genes that are differentially expressed across treatments. A negative binomial sampling distribution is used for each gene’s read count such that each gene may have its own parameters. Despite the consequent large number...

  2. Generative modeling of dynamic visual scenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Dahua, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01

    Modeling visual scenes is one of the fundamental tasks of computer vision. Whereas tremendous efforts have been devoted to video analysis in past decades, most prior work focuses on specific tasks, leading to dedicated ...

  3. Two Market Models for Demand Response in Power Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wierman, Adam

    Two Market Models for Demand Response in Power Networks Lijun Chen, Na Li, Steven H. Low and John C-- In this paper, we consider two abstract market models for designing demand response to match power supply as oligopolistic markets, and propose distributed demand response algorithms to achieve the equilibria. The models

  4. Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LBNL-5096E Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated of California. #12;Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated.e. dynamic prices). Using a regression-based baseline model, we define several Demand Response (DR

  5. Generative Modeling by PRISM Taisuke Sato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sato, Taisuke

    ] PRISM is a probabilistic extension of Prolog2 . Syntactically a PRISM program DB = F R is a Prolog program such that F is a set of probabilistic atoms called msw atoms (see below) and R is a set. It is a high level language for probabilistic modeling capable of learning statistical parameters from observed

  6. Crowd modeling: generation of a fully articulated crowd of characters 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Karthik

    2006-04-12

    hyper-realistic characters to highly stylized characters, and from human characters to insects like spiders. The crowd character models generated by this method are fully articulated and are ready to be animated....

  7. Bond graph models of electromechanical systems. The AC generator case

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batlle, Carles

    Bond graph models of electromechanical systems. The AC generator case Carles Batlle Department. After reviewing electromechanical energy conversion and torque gener- ation, the core element present in any electromechanical system is introduced, and the corresponding electrical and mechanical ports

  8. MODELLING DISTRIBUTED KNOWLEDGE PROCESSES IN NEXT GENERATION MULTIDISCIPLINARY ALLIANCES *

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bowker, Geoffrey C.

    MODELLING DISTRIBUTED KNOWLEDGE PROCESSES IN NEXT GENERATION MULTIDISCIPLINARY ALLIANCES * Alaina G and industrial dollars are invested in establishing academic-industry alliances and building infrastructures and technology in distributed, multidisciplinary scientific teams in the National Computational Science Alliance

  9. Improved lumped parameter thermal modelling of synchronous generators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mejuto, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Within the existing available mix of numerical and analytical thermal analysis options, lumped parameter thermal modelling is selected as the operational backbone to develop an improved novel synchronous generator thermal ...

  10. Modeling distributed generation in the buildings sectors

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet) Wyoming Dry NaturalPrices1Markets See(STEO), 19992, 19999,33.0Modeling

  11. Combustion technology developments in power generation in response to environmental challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    and clean coal-fired systems. The most promising of these include pulverized coal combustionCombustion technology developments in power generation in response to environmental challenges J.M. Bee´r* Department of Chemical Engineering, Room 66-548, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  12. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain;Modeling Energy Taxes and Credits: The Genco's Choice · Each Genco has a portfolio of power plants · Each power plant can have different supply costs and transaction costs · Supply costs can reflect capital

  13. GENERATION OF TRANSITION CLASS MODELS FROM FORMAL QUEUEING NETWORK DESCRIPTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strelen, Christoph

    stochastic Petri nets (GSPN), UltraSAN [8] for stochastic activity networks, a class of stochastic Petri netsGENERATION OF TRANSITION CLASS MODELS FROM FORMAL QUEUEING NETWORK DESCRIPTIONS Johann Christoph-mail: strelen@cs.uni-bonn.de KEYWORDS Queueing Networks, Tools, Multi-Paradigm Models, Gener- ation, Markov

  14. Loss-of-feedwater, steam generator tube rupture, and steam line break experiments: Steam generator transient response test program: Interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendler, O.J.; Takeuchi, K.; Young, M.Y.

    1987-01-01

    The Westinghouse Model Boiler No. 2 (MB-2) steam generator test model at the Engineering Test Facility in Tampa, Florida, was reinstrumented and modified for performing a series of tests simulating steam generator accident transients. The transients simulated were: loss of feed flow, steam generator tube rupture, and steam line break events. This document presents a description of (1) the model boiler and the associated test facility, (2) the tests performed, and (3) the analyses of the test results. Two LOF tests were analyzed in detail. Both tests were initiated from 100% power condition by shutting off the main feedwater flow. In LOF Test No. 1, the remaining boundary conditions were kept constant while in LOF Test No. 2, the power was rapidly reduced to 3%. The results show that the primary to secondary heat transfer becomes degraded when the collapsed water liquid level in the bundle region falls below approximately 50 inches. The SGTR test analyzed in detail - SGTR Test No. 2 - simulated the post-reactor-trip portion of the SGTR transient (T/sub prim/ = 560/sup 0/F). The transient was initiated by starting the SGTR flow injection and simultaneously shutting off the auxiliary feedwater. The water level rose and flooded the dryer to its mid-elevation by the end of the test. The primary carry-over was shown to be less than 0.4% of the tracer mass injected into the secondary side by the SGTR flow. SGTR Test No. 3 investigated the response of the intact steam generator. Reverse heat transfer and low heat flow conditions were simulated. The results have demonstrated the occurrence of temperature stratification in the secondary water which lasted for about 800 seconds.

  15. An Operational Model for Optimal NonDispatchable Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    An Operational Model for Optimal NonDispatchable Demand Response for Continuous PowerintensiveFACTS, $ Demand Response Energy Storage HVDC Industrial Customer PEV Renewable Energy Source: U.S.-Canada Power: To balance supply and demand of a power system, one can manipulate both: supply and demand demand response

  16. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain-term solution (e.g.,are long-term solution (e.g., solar power and wind power (solar power and wind power Heavy user of fossil fuels:Heavy user of fossil fuels: Electric power industryElectric power industry

  17. Structure Learning for Generative Models of Protein Fold Families

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Structure Learning for Generative Models of Protein Fold Families Sivaraman Balakrishnan composition of the proteins within a fold family are widely used in science and engineering. Existing composition of the proteins within a fold family provide insights into the constraints that govern structure

  18. Hybrid Control Models of Next Generation Air Traffic Management ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, George J.

    Hybrid Control Models of Next Generation Air Traffic Management ? C. Tomlin, G. Pappas, J. Lygeros the overcrowding of large urban airports and the need to more efficiently handle larger numbers of aircraft malfunctions, ATC malfunctions (e.g. power failure), shifting winds (that cause changes in approach patterns

  19. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Mills, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Wiser, Ryan; Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-09-10

    This scoping study focuses on the policy issues inherent in the claims made by some Smart Grid proponents that the demand response potential of mass market customers which is enabled by widespread implementation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) through the Smart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integration issues. In terms of approach, we will: identify key issues associated with integrating large amounts of variable generation into the bulk power system; identify demand response opportunities made more readily available to mass market customers through widespread deployment of AMI systems and how they can affect the bulk power system; assess the extent to which these mass market Demand Response (DR) opportunities can mitigate Variable Generation (VG) integration issues in the near-term and what electricity market structures and regulatory practices could be changed to further expand the ability for DR to mitigate VG integration issues over the long term; and provide a qualitative comparison of DR and other approaches to mitigate VG integration issues.

  20. Modeling Framework and Validation of a Smart Grid and Demand Response System for Wind Power Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broeer, Torsten; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, David P.; Djilali, Ned

    2014-01-31

    Electricity generation from wind power and other renewable energy sources is increasing, and their variability introduces new challenges to the power system. The emergence of smart grid technologies in recent years has seen a paradigm shift in redefining the electrical system of the future, in which controlled response of the demand side is used to balance fluctuations and intermittencies from the generation side. This paper presents a modeling framework for an integrated electricity system where loads become an additional resource. The agent-based model represents a smart grid power system integrating generators, transmission, distribution, loads and market. The model incorporates generator and load controllers, allowing suppliers and demanders to bid into a Real-Time Pricing (RTP) electricity market. The modeling framework is applied to represent a physical demonstration project conducted on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA, and validation simulations are performed using actual dynamic data. Wind power is then introduced into the power generation mix illustrating the potential of demand response to mitigate the impact of wind power variability, primarily through thermostatically controlled loads. The results also indicate that effective implementation of Demand Response (DR) to assist integration of variable renewable energy resources requires a diversity of loads to ensure functionality of the overall system.

  1. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Busch, Andrea W.U.; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2015-04-01

    Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stressmore »signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms.« less

  2. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

    2010-11-01

    The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

  3. Variate Generation for Accelerated Life and Proportional Hazards Models with Time Dependent Covariates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leemis, Larry

    Variate Generation for Accelerated Life and Proportional Hazards Models with Time Dependent, Monte Carlo simulation, Proportional hazards model, Time dependent covariates, Variate generation. #12 Engineering 202 West Boyd, Room 124 Norman, OK 73019 September, 1989 SUMMARY Variate generation algorithms

  4. Estimating Student Proficiency Using an Item Response Theory Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    into two broad categories: expert-centric or data-centric [14]. The expert-centric approach, which includes. Examples of data-centric student models are structure-learned dynamic Bayesian networks [14], models learned using the Q-Matrix method [6], and Item Response Theory [16, 17] models. Data-centric models

  5. Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste heat recovery applications

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Model developed provides effective guidelines to designing thermoelectric generation systems for automotive waste heat recovery applications

  6. New generation of software? Modeling of energy demands for residential ventilation with HTML interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forowicz, T

    1997-01-01

    New generation of software? Modeling of energy demands for residential ventilation with HTML interface

  7. Comparison of integral equation and physical scale modelling of the electromagnetic response of models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farquharson, Colin G.

    Comparison of integral equation and physical scale modelling of the electromagnetic response history of EM numerical modelling in geophysics. · Another integral equation modelling program;Introduction: a brief history · Two main approaches to numerical modelling: integral equation; finite

  8. Development of a fourth generation predictive capability maturity model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hills, Richard Guy; Witkowski, Walter R.; Urbina, Angel; Rider, William J.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2013-09-01

    The Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) is an expert elicitation tool designed to characterize and communicate completeness of the approaches used for computational model definition, verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification associated for an intended application. The primary application of this tool at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been for physics-based computational simulations in support of nuclear weapons applications. The two main goals of a PCMM evaluation are 1) the communication of computational simulation capability, accurately and transparently, and 2) the development of input for effective planning. As a result of the increasing importance of computational simulation to SNL's mission, the PCMM has evolved through multiple generations with the goal to provide more clarity, rigor, and completeness in its application. This report describes the approach used to develop the fourth generation of the PCMM.

  9. Modeling of Electric Water Heaters for Demand Response: A Baseline PDE Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhijie; Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Lian, Jianming; Zhang, Yu

    2014-09-05

    Demand response (DR)control can effectively relieve balancing and frequency regulation burdens on conventional generators, facilitate integrating more renewable energy, and reduce generation and transmission investments needed to meet peak demands. Electric water heaters (EWHs) have a great potential in implementing DR control strategies because: (a) the EWH power consumption has a high correlation with daily load patterns; (b) they constitute a significant percentage of domestic electrical load; (c) the heating element is a resistor, without reactive power consumption; and (d) they can be used as energy storage devices when needed. Accurately modeling the dynamic behavior of EWHs is essential for designing DR controls. Various water heater models, simplified to different extents, were published in the literature; however, few of them were validated against field measurements, which may result in inaccuracy when implementing DR controls. In this paper, a partial differential equation physics-based model, developed to capture detailed temperature profiles at different tank locations, is validated against field test data for more than 10 days. The developed model shows very good performance in capturing water thermal dynamics for benchmark testing purposes

  10. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

    2009-11-16

    This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent expected conditions in an emplacement drift, but nevertheless illustrate the potential for acid-gas generation at moderate temperatures (<150 C).

  11. On the modelling of tsunami generation and tsunami inundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dias, Frédéric; O'Brien, Laura; Renzi, Emiliano; Stefanakis, Themistoklis

    2012-01-01

    While the propagation of tsunamis is well understood and well simulated by numerical models, there are still a number of unanswered questions related to the generation of tsunamis or the subsequent inundation. We review some of the basic generation mechanisms as well as their simulation. In particular, we present a simple and computationally inexpensive model that describes the seabed displacement during an underwater earthquake. This model is based on the finite fault solution for the slip distribution under some assumptions on the kinematics of the rupturing process. We also consider an unusual source for tsunami generation: the sinking of a cruise ship. Then we review some aspects of tsunami run-up. In particular, we explain why the first wave of a tsunami is sometimes less devastating than the subsequent waves. A resonance effect can boost the waves that come later. We also look at a particular feature of the 11 March 2011 tsunami in Japan - the formation of macro-scale vortices - and show that these macr...

  12. Diagnostic and Prognostic Models for Generator Step-Up Transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J. Lybeck; Binh T. Pham

    2014-09-01

    In 2014, the online monitoring (OLM) of active components project under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) focused on diagnostic and prognostic capabilities for generator step-up transformers. INL worked with subject matter experts from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to augment and revise the GSU fault signatures previously implemented in the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software. Two prognostic models were identified and implemented for GSUs in the FW-PHM Suite software. INL and EPRI demonstrated the use of prognostic capabilities for GSUs. The complete set of fault signatures developed for GSUs in the Asset Fault Signature Database of the FW-PHM Suite for GSUs is presented in this report. Two prognostic models are described for paper insulation: the Chendong model for degree of polymerization, and an IEEE model that uses a loading profile to calculates life consumption based on hot spot winding temperatures. Both models are life consumption models, which are examples of type II prognostic models. Use of the models in the FW-PHM Suite was successfully demonstrated at the 2014 August Utility Working Group Meeting, Idaho Falls, Idaho, to representatives from different utilities, EPRI, and the Halden Research Project.

  13. Integration of MHD load models with circuit representations the Z generator.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Jones, Brent Manley; McBride, Ryan D.; Bailey, James E.; Jones, Michael C.; Gomez, Matthew Robert.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Nakhleh, Charles; Stygar, William A.; Savage, Mark Edward; Wagoner, Timothy C.; Moore, James K.

    2013-03-01

    MHD models of imploding loads fielded on the Z accelerator are typically driven by reduced or simplified circuit representations of the generator. The performance of many of the imploding loads is critically dependent on the current and power delivered to them, so may be strongly influenced by the generators response to their implosion. Current losses diagnosed in the transmission lines approaching the load are further known to limit the energy delivery, while exhibiting some load dependence. Through comparing the convolute performance of a wide variety of short pulse Z loads we parameterize a convolute loss resistance applicable between different experiments. We incorporate this, and other current loss terms into a transmission line representation of the Z vacuum section. We then apply this model to study the current delivery to a wide variety of wire array and MagLif style liner loads.

  14. Towards next generation ocean models : novel discontinuous Galerkin schemes for 2D unsteady biogeochemical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ueckermann, Mattheus Percy

    2009-01-01

    A new generation of efficient parallel, multi-scale, and interdisciplinary ocean models is required for better understanding and accurate predictions. The purpose of this thesis is to quantitatively identify promising ...

  15. Gravitational wave generation in power-law inflationary models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulo M. Sá; Alfredo B. Henriques

    2008-06-06

    We investigate the generation of gravitational waves in power-law inflationary models. The energy spectrum of the gravitational waves is calculated using the method of continuous Bogoliubov coefficients. We show that, by looking at the interval of frequencies between 10^(-5) and 10^5 Hz and also at the GHz range, important information can be obtained, both about the inflationary period itself and about the thermalization regime between the end of inflation and the beginning of the radiation-dominated era. We thus deem the development of gravitational wave detectors, covering the MHz/GHz range of frequencies, to be an important task for the future.

  16. DISLOCATION GENERATION IN Si: A THERMO-MECHANICAL MODEL BASED ON MEASURABLE PARAMETERS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balzar, Davor

    DISLOCATION GENERATION IN Si: A THERMO-MECHANICAL MODEL BASED ON MEASURABLE PARAMETERS* Bhushan for predicting dislocation distribution generated by thermal stresses in Si is described. We use that can minimize dislocation generation for improved solar cell performance. INTRODUCTION Dislocations

  17. Modeling an Application's Theoretical Minimum and Average Transactional Response Times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paiz, Mary Rose

    2015-04-01

    The theoretical minimum transactional response time of an application serves as a ba- sis for the expected response time. The lower threshold for the minimum response time represents the minimum amount of time that the application should take to complete a transaction. Knowing the lower threshold is beneficial in detecting anomalies that are re- sults of unsuccessful transactions. On the converse, when an application's response time falls above an upper threshold, there is likely an anomaly in the application that is causing unusual performance issues in the transaction. This report explains how the non-stationary Generalized Extreme Value distribution is used to estimate the lower threshold of an ap- plication's daily minimum transactional response time. It also explains how the seasonal Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average time series model is used to estimate the upper threshold for an application's average transactional response time.

  18. Molecular modeling of responsive polymer films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tagliazucchi, Mario; Calvo, Ernesto J; Szleifer, Igal

    2010-06-29

    In this perspective, we have shown three different cases of responsive polymers at surfaces where the properties of the surface can be varied in response to cues from the bulk solution or in the presence of an external field. The most important conclusion in all three cases is that the chemical reaction equilibrium, physical interactions and molecular organization are strongly coupled, and it is imperative to consider the global and local changes that occur to the surface structure and properties due to this coupling. In particular acid-base and redox equilibrium are very different in polymer-modified surfaces than in the corresponding bulk solutions. Moreover, the definition of ‘‘apparent redox potentials’’ and ‘‘apparent pKa’’results from the averaging over highly inhomogeneous values,and, therefore, they do not necessarily represent the state of the layer and the local values and their variation are very important for the design of functional surfaces. The very large variation on chemical equilibrium results from the optimization of all the interactions. The picture that emerges is that trying to deduce what the final state of the system is by looking at the individual optimization of each contribution leads to qualitative incorrect assumptions and only the minimization of the complete free energy leads to the proper behavior in these complex systems.In the cases where domain formation is possible in grafted weak polyacid layers charge regulation may lead to regimes of coexistence between aggregates with relatively low fraction of charged polymer segments surrounded by highly stretched chains that have a relatively high fraction of charged groups.Therefore, one can control the state of charge, local electrostatic potential and local pH in all three dimensions with im-portant gradients on length scales of nanometers. For hydrophobic redox polymers we show how the application of an electrode potential can lead to changes in the structure and type of morphological aggregates that can form on the surface.Again, these structures result from the optimization of chemical redox equilibrium, conformational entropy, electrostatic and hydrophobic interactions. Furthermore, changes in domains structure can manifest themselves in the capacitance-potential curves and then provide a link between macroscopic measurements and the formation of nanoscopic domains. It is clear that chemical engineers are in a unique position to use these switchable surfaces in the molecular design of sensors, biosensors, separation devices, microfluidic devices with on-off environmental switches and drug delivery systems among many others. Finally, we want to stress that the application of molecular theories, where the coupling between chemical equilibrium, physical interactions and molecular organization are explicitly included provide with quantitative predictions of the layers properties, as compared with experimental observations, and enable the fundamental understanding of the observed behavior. Moreover, the theory provides with a detailed microscopic picture and should be used as an integral part in the design of functional and responsive surfaces. It is important to emphasize that the molecular approaches are not exact, and, therefore, there is a need to continue their development and the incorporation of improved approximations to further broaden their applicability.

  19. Neuroinflammation in Parkinson's Disease Animal Models: A Cell Stress Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sulzer, David

    in a wide range of toxin-based, inflammatory and genetic Parkinson's disease animal models. KeywordsNeuroinflammation in Parkinson's Disease Animal Models: A Cell Stress Response or a Step neuroin- flammatory processes are exacerbated in Parkinson's disease, including glial- mediated reactions

  20. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01

    hydro facility or demand response aggregator to provide theOperator Demand Response Mass-Market Customers Aggregator ofDemand Response Resources Mass Market Customers Aggregator

  1. A Model of U.S. Commercial Distributed Generation Adoption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Ryan Firestone; Zhou, Nan; Maribu,Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-10

    Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems over the next two decades. Forecasts of DG adoption published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) are made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. NEMS is also used for estimating the future benefits of Department of Energy research and development used in support of budget requests and management decisionmaking. The NEMS approach to modeling DG has some limitations, including constraints on the amount of DG allowed for retrofits to existing buildings and a small number of possible sizes for each DG technology. An alternative approach called Commercial Sector Model (ComSeM) is developed to improve the way in which DG adoption is modeled. The approach incorporates load shapes for specific end uses in specific building types in specific regions, e.g., cooling in hospitals in Atlanta or space heating in Chicago offices. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) uses these load profiles together with input cost and performance DG technology assumptions to model the potential DG adoption for four selected cities and two sizes of five building types in selected forecast years to 2022. The Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model (DER-MaDiM) is then used to then tailor the DER-CAM results to adoption projections for the entire U.S. commercial sector for all forecast years from 2007-2025. This process is conducted such that the structure of results are consistent with the structure of NEMS, and can be re-injected into NEMS that can then be used to integrate adoption results into a full forecast.

  2. A source function method for generation of waves on currents in Boussinesq models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    A source function method for generation of waves on currents in Boussinesq models A. Chawlaa,*, J for the generation of waves internal to Boussinesq model grid boundaries (Wei G, Kirby JT, Sinha A. Generation Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved. Keywords: Source function method; Wave generation; Boussinesq

  3. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling (TEG) designed for automotive waste heat recovery systems. This model is capable of computing telluride TEMs. Key words: Thermoelectric generators, waste heat recovery, automotive exhaust, skutterudites

  4. Modeling and Analysis of the Role of Fast-Response Energy Storage in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Han-I

    2011-01-01

    The large short time-scale variability of renewable energy resources presents significant challenges to the reliable operation of power systems. This variability can be mitigated by deploying fast-ramping generators. However, these generators are costly to operate and produce environmentally harmful emissions. Fast-response energy storage devices, such as batteries and flywheels, provide an environmentally friendly alternative, but are expensive and have limited capacity. To study the environmental benefits of storage, we introduce a slotted-time dynamic residual dc power flow model with the prediction error of the difference between the generation (including renewables) and the load as input and the fast-ramping generation and the storage (charging/discharging) operation as the control variables used to ensure that the demand is satisfied (as much as possible) in each time slot. We assume the input prediction error sequence to be i.i.d. zero-mean random variables. The optimal power flow problem is then formu...

  5. Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated Response to Dynamic Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-08-15

    Controlling electric loads to deliver power system services presents a number of interesting challenges. For example, changes in electricity consumption of Commercial and Industrial (C&I) facilities are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models, and model uncertainty makes it difficult to precisely quantify control responsiveness. Moreover, C&I facilities exhibit variability in their response. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and demand-side variability in responses to open-loop control signals (i.e. dynamic prices). Using a regression-based baseline model, we define several Demand Response (DR) parameters, which characterize changes in electricity use on DR days, and then present a method for computing the error associated with DR parameter estimates. In addition to analyzing the magnitude of DR parameter error, we develop a metric to determine how much observed DR parameter variability is attributable to real event-to-event variability versus simply baseline model error. Using data from 38 C&I facilities that participated in an automated DR program in California, we find that DR parameter errors are large. For most facilities, observed DR parameter variability is likely explained by baseline model error, not real DR parameter variability; however, a number of facilities exhibit real DR parameter variability. In some cases, the aggregate population of C&I facilities exhibits real DR parameter variability, resulting in implications for the system operator with respect to both resource planning and system stability.

  6. NDA SYSTEM RESPONSE MODELING AND ITS APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinson, D.

    2010-03-01

    The Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plant (PORTS) is a uranium enrichment facility that was historically used to enrich uranium to levels that range from 2% to greater than 97%. The feed material for PORTS was obtained from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) that produced uranium in the form of UF6 that was enriched to about 1 to 2%. The enrichment process involves a multistage process by which gaseous UF{sub 6} passed through a diffusion barrier in each stage. The porous diffusion barrier in each stage retards the rate of the diffusion of the heavier {sup 238}U atoms relative to the diffusion of the lighter {sup 235}U atoms. By this process the product stream is slightly enriched by each stage of the process. Each stage consists of a compressor, converter and a motor. There are more than 4000 stages that are linked together with piping of various diameters to form the PORTS cascade. The cascade spans three interconnected buildings and comprises miles of piping, thousands of seals, converters, valves, motors, and compressors. During operation, PORTS process equipment contained UF{sub 6} gas with uranium enrichment that increased in the process stream from the first to the last stage in a known manner. Gaseous UF{sub 6} moving through the PORTS process equipment had potential to form deposits within the process equipment by several mechanisms, including solidification due to incorrect temperature and pressure conditions during the process, inleakage of atmospheric moisture that chemically reacts with UF{sub 6} to form hydrated uranyl fluoride solids, reduction reactions of UF{sub 6} with cascade metals, and UF{sub 6} condensation on the internal equipment surfaces. As a result, the process equipment of the PORTS contains a variable and unknown quantity of uranium with variable enrichment that has been deposited within the equipment during plant operations. The exact chemical form of this uranium is variable, although it is expected that the bulk of the material is of the form of uranyl fluoride that will become hydrated on exposure to moisture in air when the systems are no longer buffered. The deposit geometry and thickness is uncertain and variable. However, a reasonable assessment of the level of material holdup in this equipment is necessary to support decommissioning efforts. The assessment of nuclear material holdup in process equipment is a complex process that requires integration of process knowledge, nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements, and computer modeling to maximize capabilities and minimize uncertainty. The current report is focused on the use of computer modeling and simulation of NDA measurements.

  7. Urban dispersion : challenges for fast response modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M. J. (Michael J.)

    2004-01-01

    There is renewed interest in urban dispersion modeling due to the need for tools that can be used for responding to, planning for, and assessing the consequences of an airborne release of toxic materials. Although not an everyday phenomenon, releases of hazardous gases and aerosols have occurred in populated urban environments and are potentially threatening to human life. These releases may stem from on-site accidents as in the case of industrial chemical releases, may result during transport of hazardous chemicals as in tanker truck or railroad spills, or may be premeditated as in a chemical, biological, or radiological (CBR) agent terrorist attack. Transport and dispersion in urban environments is extremely complicated. Buildings alter the flow fields and deflect the wind, causing updrafts and downdrafts, channeling between buildings, areas of calm winds adjacent to strong winds, and horizontally and vertically rotating-eddies between buildings, at street corners, and other places within the urban canopy (see review by Hosker, 1984). Trees, moving vehicles, and exhaust vents among other things further complicate matters. The distance over which chemical, biological, or radiological releases can be harmful varies from tens of meters to many kilometers depending on the amount released, the toxicity of the agent, and the atmospheric conditions. As we will show later, accounting for the impacts of buildings on the transport and dispersion is crucial in estimating the travel direction, the areal extent, and the toxicity levels of the contaminant plume, and ultimately for calculating exposures to the population.

  8. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    fueled power generation with wind energy reduces waterand water savings. Index Terms—power system modeling, wind

  9. 3D City Model Generator: The Application of Neuro-Fuzzy Systems in CAD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    163 3D City Model Generator: The Application of Neuro-Fuzzy Systems in CAD Yoshihiro Kobayashi that generates 3D city models from satellite images is formulated, implemented, and tested. Techniques from operations. Therefore, it is expected to develop a system that will generate 3D city models more easily

  10. USE OF A STOCHASTIC WEATHER GENERATOR IN A WATERSHED MODEL FOR STREAMFLOW SIMULATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USE OF A STOCHASTIC WEATHER GENERATOR IN A WATERSHED MODEL FOR STREAMFLOW SIMULATION by ADAM N OF A STOCHASTIC WEATHER GENERATOR IN A WATERSHED MODEL FOR STREAMFLOW SIMULATION written by Adam N. Hobson has and Architectural Engineering) Use of a Stochastic Weather Generator in a Watershed Model for Streamflow Simulation

  11. Study of Two-Loop Neutrino Mass Generation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Chao-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    We study the models with the Majorana neutrino masses generated radiatively by two-loop diagrams due to the Yukawa $\\rho \\bar \\ell_R^c \\ell_R$ and effective $\\rho^{\\pm\\pm} W^\\mp W^\\mp$ couplings along with a scalar triplet $\\Delta$, where $\\rho$ is a doubly charged singlet scalar, $\\ell_R$ the charged lepton and $W$ the charged gauge boson. A generic feature in these types of models is that the neutrino mass spectrum has to be a normal hierarchy. Furthermore, by using the neutrino oscillation data and comparing with the global fitting result in the literature, we find a unique neutrino mass matrix and predict the Dirac and two Majorana CP phases to be $1.40\\pi$, $1.11\\pi$ and $1.47\\pi$, respectively. We also discuss the model parameters constrained by the lepton flavor violating processes and electroweak oblique parameters. In addition, we show that the rate of the neutrinoless double beta decay $(0\

  12. Using modeling to generate alternatives (MGA) to expand our thinking on energy futures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barlaz, Morton A.

    Using modeling to generate alternatives (MGA) to expand our thinking on energy futures Joseph F. De modeling to generate alternatives (MGA) as a way to flex energy models and systematically explore: Mathematical methods (JEL: C02) Optimization Uncertainty Modeling Energy-economy optimization models ­ encoded

  13. Modeling the Thermal Response of Porcine Cartilage to Laser Irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    with experiments. The model simulations will provide insights to the relationship between the laser treatment advantage of using laser radiation to generate thermal energy in tissue is the precise control of the space animal and human studies have demonstrated clinical feasibility [2,3] the fundamental biophysical

  14. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Power System Operator Demand Response Mass-Market Customers Aggregator of RetailPower System Operator Demand Response Resources Mass Market Customers Aggregator of Retailmarket customers, retail entities offering demand response opportunities, and bulk power

  15. Modeling of solar thermal selective surfaces and thermoelectric generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEnaney, Kenneth

    2010-01-01

    A thermoelectric generator is a solid-state device that converts a heat flux into electrical power via the Seebeck effect. When a thermoelectric generator is inserted between a solar-absorbing surface and a heat sink, a ...

  16. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general rules-of-thumb'' for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  17. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general ``rules-of-thumb`` for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  18. Modeling of material response during fiber drawing of semicrystalline pet 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yadav, Seemant

    2007-09-17

    'Neal May 2006 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering iii ABSTRACT Modeling of Material Response during Fiber Drawing of Semicrystalline PET. (May 2006) Seemant Yadav, B.E., Shri Govindram Seksaria Institute of Technology and Science, Indore... Seksaria Institute of Technology and Science, Indore, India. Bachelor of Engineering, Mechanical Engineering ...

  19. Efficiency transfer for regression models with responses missing at random

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, Uschi

    Efficiency transfer for regression models with responses missing at random Ursula U. M that characteristics of the con- ditional distribution of Y given X can be estimated efficiently using complete case analysis. One can simply omit incomplete cases and work with an appro- priate efficient estimator without

  20. A Full Demand Response Model in Co-Optimized Energy and

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guodong; Tomsovic, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    It has been widely accepted that demand response will play an important role in reliable and economic operation of future power systems and electricity markets. Demand response can not only influence the prices in the energy market by demand shifting, but also participate in the reserve market. In this paper, we propose a full model of demand response in which demand flexibility is fully utilized by price responsive shiftable demand bids in energy market as well as spinning reserve bids in reserve market. A co-optimized day-ahead energy and spinning reserve market is proposed to minimize the expected net cost under all credible system states, i.e., expected total cost of operation minus total benefit of demand, and solved by mixed integer linear programming. Numerical simulation results on the IEEE Reliability Test System show effectiveness of this model. Compared to conventional demand shifting bids, the proposed full demand response model can further reduce committed capacity from generators, starting up and shutting down of units and the overall system operating costs.

  1. Triangle geometry processing for surface modeling and cartesian grid generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aftosmis, Michael J. (San Mateo, CA) [San Mateo, CA; Melton, John E. (Hollister, CA) [Hollister, CA; Berger, Marsha J. (New York, NY) [New York, NY

    2002-09-03

    Cartesian mesh generation is accomplished for component based geometries, by intersecting components subject to mesh generation to extract wetted surfaces with a geometry engine using adaptive precision arithmetic in a system which automatically breaks ties with respect to geometric degeneracies. During volume mesh generation, intersected surface triangulations are received to enable mesh generation with cell division of an initially coarse grid. The hexagonal cells are resolved, preserving the ability to directionally divide cells which are locally well aligned.

  2. Iterative Multivariate Regression Model for Correlated Responses Prediction S. Tom Au, Guangqin Ma, Rensheng Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenberg, Albert

    Iterative Multivariate Regression Model for Correlated Responses Prediction S. Tom Au, Guangqin Ma- tive procedure to model multiple responses prediction into correlated multivariate predicting scheme, which is always favorable for responses separations in our multivariate prediction. We also point out

  3. RELAP5 modeling of the Westinghouse model D4 steam generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, B.; Petelin, S.; Gortnar, O. (Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia))

    1993-02-01

    The steam generator is one of the most important components of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant. Thus, the ability to model and predict the steam generator steady-state and transient thermal-hydraulic behavior is a prerequisite for performing safety analyses of PWR systems. A RELAP5 model of the Westinghouse D4 steam generator with a 70/30 split feedwater system has been developed, and it is tested by simulating five secondary-side-initiated transients. This study of primary-to-secondary heat transfer and the secondary coolant vaporization process has enabled the primary coolant cooldown to be maximized, as required for performing a conservative steamline break analysis. These tests were realized using the RELAP5/MOD2.36.05 and RELAP5/MOD3.5M5 computer codes.

  4. Proposed model for Saturn's auroral response to the solar wind: Centrifugal instability model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, John

    Proposed model for Saturn's auroral response to the solar wind: Centrifugal instability model E. C in the intensity of Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR). Our model, referred to as the centrifugal instability model by centrifugally driven flux tube interchange motions, when the magnetosphere spins up, outward transport

  5. Modeling of passive microwave responses in convective situations using output from mesoscale models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardo-Carrión, Juan R.

    Modeling of passive microwave responses in convective situations using output from mesoscale models using output from nonhydrostatic mesoscale atmospheric model, Meso-NH, simulations. The radiative for a systematic evaluation of the mesoscale cloud models. An overall good agreement is obtained for both

  6. Full expandable model of parallel self-excited induction generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simões, Marcelo Godoy

    for wind and small hydro power plants [1, 2]. They have advantages over conventional synchronous generators, in a wind or small hydro power plant, is subjected to various transient conditions, such as initial self-speed generators in renewable energy systems. Small hydro and wind generating systems have constraints on the size

  7. Adiabatic electron response and solitary wave generation by trapped particle nonlinearity in a hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, Debraj; Sharma, Devendra [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-10-15

    The finite amplitude ion acoustic waves that trap electrons modify the structure of the evolving nonlinear soliton solutions. In the numerical simulations, self-consistently generated solitary waves are studied that emerge as a result of a current driven microinstability growing the ion acoustic mode in a collisionless Vlasov plasma. The growth saturates as a result of nonlinear effects governed by a combination of nonlinearities originating from the hydrodynamic model and kinetic particle trapping effects. The resulting solitary waves also coexist with a finite current and an electron plasma wave capable of perturbing the trapping potential. The results of multiscale simulation are analyzed and characterized following the kinetic prescription of undamped trapped particle mode in the form of phase space vortex solutions that are generalized form of Sagdeev's solitons and obey the solutions of a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation, accounting for a stronger nonlinearity originating from the electron trapping.

  8. A two-layer granular landslide model for tsunami wave generation: Theory and computation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    A two-layer granular landslide model for tsunami wave generation: Theory and computation Gangfeng for granular landslide motion and tsunami wave generation. The landslide, either submarine or subaerial experiments on impulsive wave generation by subaerial granular landslides. Model results illustrate a complex

  9. Overview of Key Roles and Responsibilities in Information Security Liaison Model Responsibilities Chief Information Security-Privacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    Overview of Key Roles and Responsibilities in Information Security Liaison Model Responsibilities Chief Information Security-Privacy Officers Divisional Information Security-Privacy Liaison Departmental Information Security-Privacy Liaison Planning Plan and conduct annual risk assessment Develop a prioritized

  10. Modeling thermal/chemical/mechanical response of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; Gross, R.J.

    1995-07-01

    An overview of modeling at Sandia National Laboratories is presented which describes coupled thermal, chemical and mechanical response of energetic materials. This modeling addresses cookoff scenarios for safety assessment studies in systems containing energetic materials. Foundation work is discussed which establishes a method for incorporating chemistry and mechanics into multidimensional analysis. Finite element analysis offers the capabilities to simultaneously resolve reactive heat transfer and structural mechanics in complex geometries. Nonlinear conduction heat transfer, with multiple step finite-rate chemistry, is resolved using a thermal finite element code. Rate equations are solved element-by-element using a modified matrix-free stiff solver This finite element software was developed for the simulation of systems requiring large numbers of finite elements. An iterative implicit scheme, based on the conjugate gradient method, is used and a hemi-cube algorithm is employed for the determination of view factors in surface-to-surface radiation transfer The critical link between the reactive heat transfer and mechanics is the introduction of an appropriate constitutive material model providing a stress-strain relationship for quasi-static mechanics analysis. This model is formally derived from bubble nucleation theory, and parameter variations of critical model parameters indicate that a small degree of decomposition leads to significant mechanical response. Coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical analysis is presented which simulates experiments designed to probe cookoff thermal-mechanical response of energetic materials.

  11. Ship response using a compact wave spectrum model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linn, Larry Donald

    1985-01-01

    SHIP RESPONSE USIM6 A COMPACT HAVE SPECTRUH HODEL A Thesis by LARRY DONALD LINN Submitted to the 6raduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject...: Ocean Engineering SHIP RESPONSE USIN6 A COMPACT 'NAVE SPECTRUN MODEL A Thesis by LARRY DONALD LINN Approved as to style and content by: John M. Niedzwec i (Chairman of Committee) Lee L. Lowery (Member) John M. Klinck (Member) Donald Mc...

  12. Finite element decomposition and grid generation for brain modeling and visualization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batte, David Allan

    1997-01-01

    Numerical grid generation is used to provide a framework for brain and neuron visualization. Smoothing spline surfaces are fit to contour data to generate 3D solid model reconstruction of brain tissues. Finite element methods are then used...

  13. THE EMERGENT STRUCTURE OF THE DROSOPHILA WING A Dynamic Model Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abate, Alessandro

    THE EMERGENT STRUCTURE OF THE DROSOPHILA WING A Dynamic Model Generator Alberto Silletti Department packing; 2. then, given a movie (a sequence of frames) of the fly wing, correlate the networks generated

  14. A stochastic multiscale model for electricity generation capacity ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-04-21

    or demand elasticity (a major objective of demand response programs). The contributions of this paper can be summarized as follows: 1. We formulate the ...

  15. pH-responsive scaffolds generate a pro-healing response Jin-Oh You a, 1, 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auguste, Debra T.

    transport Cell infiltration Tissue engineering a b s t r a c t A principal challenge in wound healing is a lack of cell recruitment, cell infiltration, and vascularization, which occurs in the absence and survival. In this study, we present a pH-responsive scaffold that increases oxygen transport, as confirmed

  16. Evaluation of detector placement strategies for first generation traffic responsive signal control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brehmer, Christopher Lynn

    1996-01-01

    Traffic responsive signal systems rely on system detector data to evaluate current traffic conditions and select a corresponding timing plan from a library of plans. One of the major decisions surrounding the use of traffic responsive signal systems...

  17. FireGrid: An e-infrastructure for next-generation emergency response support 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Liangxiu; Potter, Stephen; Beckett, George; Pringle, Gavin; Welch, Stephen; Koo, Sung-Han; Wickler, Gerhard; Usmani, Asif; Torero, Jose L; Tate, Austin

    2010-01-01

    The FireGrid project aims to harness the potential of advanced forms of computation to support the response to large-scale emergencies (with an initial focus on the response to fires in the built environment). Computational ...

  18. A model and architecture for pseudo-random generation with applications to /dev/random

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    A model and architecture for pseudo-random generation with applications to /dev/random Boaz Barak@alum.mit.edu September 1, 2005 Abstract We present a formal model and a simple architecture for robust pseudorandom's entropy source. Our model and architecture have the following properties: · Resilience. The generator

  19. A model and architecture for pseudorandom generation with applications to /dev/random

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    A model and architecture for pseudo­random generation with applications to /dev/random Boaz Barak@alum.mit.edu September 1, 2005 Abstract We present a formal model and a simple architecture for robust pseudorandom's entropy source. Our model and architecture have the following properties: . Resilience. The generator

  20. Generative model selection using a scalable and size-independent complex network classifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motallebi, Sadegh, E-mail: motallebi@ce.sharif.edu; Aliakbary, Sadegh, E-mail: aliakbary@ce.sharif.edu; Habibi, Jafar, E-mail: jhabibi@sharif.edu [Department of Computer Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Computer Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15

    Real networks exhibit nontrivial topological features, such as heavy-tailed degree distribution, high clustering, and small-worldness. Researchers have developed several generative models for synthesizing artificial networks that are structurally similar to real networks. An important research problem is to identify the generative model that best fits to a target network. In this paper, we investigate this problem and our goal is to select the model that is able to generate graphs similar to a given network instance. By the means of generating synthetic networks with seven outstanding generative models, we have utilized machine learning methods to develop a decision tree for model selection. Our proposed method, which is named “Generative Model Selection for Complex Networks,” outperforms existing methods with respect to accuracy, scalability, and size-independence.

  1. Data Center Demand Response: Avoiding the Coincident Peak via Workload Shifting and Local Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wierman, Adam

    Data Center Demand Response: Avoiding the Coincident Peak via Workload Shifting and Local facilities. In this extended abstract we briefly de- scribe recent work in [1] on two demand response schemes Keywords Demand response, coincident peak pricing, data center, work- load shifting, online algorithm 1

  2. Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugiyama, Gayle [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Nasstrom, John [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Pobanz, Brenda [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Foster, Kevin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Vogt, Phil [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Aluzzi, Fernando [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Homann, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2012-05-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This work encompassed: weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions, estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases, predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations, and source estimation and plume model refinement. An overview of NARAC response activities is provided, along with a more in-depth discussion of some of NARAC’s preliminary source reconstruction analyses. NARAC optimized the overall agreement of model predictions to dose rate measurements using statistical comparisons of data and model values paired in space and time. Estimated emission rates varied depending on the choice of release assumptions (e.g., time-varying vs. constant release rates), the radionuclide mix, meteorology, and/or the radiological data used in the analysis. Results were found to be consistent with other studies within expected uncertainties, despite the application of different source estimation methodologies and the use of significantly different radiological measurement data. A discussion of some of the operational and scientific challenges encountered during the response, along with recommendations for future work, is provided.

  3. Demonstrating Fuel Consumption and Emissions Reductions with Next Generation Model-Based Diesel Engine Control

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presents a next generation model-based engine controller that incorporates real-time fuel efficiency optimization and tested under fully transient engine and vehicle operating conditions.

  4. Modeling Variability and Uncertainty of Photovoltaic Generation: A Hidden State Spatial Statistical Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabone, Michaelangelo D; Callaway, Duncan S

    2015-01-01

    for grid-connected photovoltaic system based on advancedof many photovoltaic power generation systems dis- persed inSYSTEMS Modeling Variability and Uncertainty of Photovoltaic

  5. Modeling of thin-film solar thermoelectric generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinstein, Lee Adragon

    Recent advances in solar thermoelectric generator (STEG) performance have raised their prospect as a potential technology to convert solar energy into electricity. This paper presents an analysis of thin-film STEGs. ...

  6. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01

    T. (2005) Variability of wind power and other renewables:with large amounts of wind power. Final report, IEA WINDto increase acceptable wind power generation. Wind Energy.

  7. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Learned. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO.Study. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO.generated electricity. Renewable Energy. 35(8): 1765-1772.

  8. Control Oriented Modeling and System Identification of a Diesel Generator Set (Genset)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    Control Oriented Modeling and System Identification of a Diesel Generator Set (Genset) Kai Loon Cheong, Perry Y. Li and Jicheng Xia Abstract-- A diesel generator set (genset) refers to a diesel engine of a conventional PI regulator in the voltage closed control loop of a diesel driven generator is considered. In all

  9. Modeling the physics of FtsZ assembly and force generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erickson, Harold P.

    Modeling the physics of FtsZ assembly and force generation Harold P. Erickson1 Department of Cell) The tubulin homolog FtsZ is the major cytoskeletal protein in bacterial cytokinesis. It can generate proposed for how this force might be generated. These fall into 2 categories. The first is based

  10. Rayleigh WaveInternal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Rayleigh Wave­Internal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream B. R to the study of unstable jet flows and applications of this work for internal wave generation by dynamic remains poorly understood. Most investigations of shear­generation of inter­ nal waves in the atmosphere

  11. Rayleigh Wave-Internal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sutherland, Bruce

    Rayleigh Wave-Internal Wave Coupling and Internal Wave Generation Above a Model Jet Stream B. R to the study of unstable jet flows and applications of this work for internal wave generation by dynamic remains poorly understood. Most investigations of shear-generation of inter- nal waves in the atmosphere

  12. Numerical modeling of extreme rogue waves generated by directional energy focusing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Numerical modeling of extreme rogue waves generated by directional energy focusing Christophe that contributes to the generation of extreme waves, also known as rogue waves, in the ocean. To simulate and analyze this phenomenon, we generate extreme waves in a 3D numerical wave tank (NWT), by specifying

  13. Some Effects of Model Resolution on Simulated Gravity Waves Generated by Deep, Mesoscale Convection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knievel, Jason Clark

    Some Effects of Model Resolution on Simulated Gravity Waves Generated by Deep, Mesoscale Convection. Introduction Gravity waves generated by deep convective clouds play an important role in the momentum budget scales: short gravity waves generated by individual con- vective systems and cells on the meso- and meso

  14. An efficient model for three-dimensional surface wave simulations. Part II: Generation and absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clamond, Didier

    An efficient model for three-dimensional surface wave simulations. Part II: Generation wave generation procedures and efficient numerical beaches are crucial components of a fully non for efficient fully non-linear wave generation in three dimensions. Analytical integration of the (linear

  15. MAD: A Real World Application of Qualitative Model-Based Decision Tree Generation for Diagnosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamburg,.Universität

    equipment. Furthermore, cost of diagnosis system generation, modification and maintenance is reduced. We knowledge and computer-based product data for diagnosis system generation. This way, the cost of diagnosisMAD: A Real World Application of Qualitative Model-Based Decision Tree Generation for Diagnosis

  16. ANALYTIC MODEL OF HARMONIC GENERATION IN THE LOW-GAIN FEL REGIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    ANALYTIC MODEL OF HARMONIC GENERATION IN THE LOW-GAIN FEL REGIME G. Penn, M. Reinsch, J.S. Wurtele , LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract Harmonic generation using free electron lasers (FELs) requires with simulation results using the FEL code GENESIS, both for single stages of harmonic generation and for the LUX

  17. Linearization of Generator Current-State Space Model We developed a state-space current model for the synchronous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    1 Linearization of Generator Current-State Space Model We developed a state-space current model for the synchronous machine with the G-circuit represented (see notes on per- unitization), and it was found to be

  18. Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Model study of waves generated by convection with direct

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander, M. Joan

    Generated using version 3.0 of the official AMS LATEX template Model study of waves generated circulation, structure and stability on a global scale. Gravity waves can be generated by convection, the authors examine an event on January 12, 2003, when convective waves were clearly generated by a period

  19. A nonlinear dynamic model of a once-through, helical-coil steam generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdalla, M.A. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1993-07-01

    A dynamic model of a once-through, helical-coil steam generator is presented. The model simulates the advanced liquid metal reactor superheated cycle steam generator with a four-region, moving-boundary, drift-flux model. The model is described by a set of nonlinear differential equations derived from the fundamental equations of conversation of mass, energy, and momentum. Sample results of steady-state and transient calculations are presented.

  20. Incorporation of time-dependent thermodynamic models and radiation propagation models into JR 3-D synthetic image generation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    images representing what an airborne or satellite thermal infrared imaging sensor would record. The scene sensors to a point where the model can be usedas a research tool to evaluate the limitations in our infrared (TIR) imagery generated by midwave (3-5 Rm) and longwave (8-14 pm) sensors is being increasingly

  1. Modeling of passive microwave responses in convective situations using output from mesoscale models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre

    Modeling of passive microwave responses in convective situations using output from mesoscale models 2003; revised 27 January 2004; accepted 5 February 2004; published 30 March 2004. [1] Passive microwave, which essentially sense cloud tops. Therefore passive microwave observations are a very promising tool

  2. Aalborg Universitet ARIMA-Based Time Series Model of Stochastic Wind Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    the nonstationarity and physical limits of stochastic wind power generation. The model is constructed based on wind power measurement of one year from the Nysted offshore wind farm in Denmark. The proposed limitedAalborg Universitet ARIMA-Based Time Series Model of Stochastic Wind Power Generation Chen, Peiyuan

  3. Molecular Self-assembly-Based Language Generation Using the Hypernetwork Model: Design of DNA Computing Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molecular Self-assembly-Based Language Generation Using the Hypernetwork Model: Design of DNA Intelligence Magazine, vol.3, no.3, pp.49-63, 2008. [4] Zhang, B.-T. and Park, C.-H., Self-assembling.-H., Lee, E.-S. and Zhang, B.-T., A hypernetwork memory-Based model of sentence learning and generation

  4. Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States Kenneth://globalchange.mit.edu/ Printed on recycled paper #12;1 Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation of Withdrawal and Consumption for Thermo-electric Systems (WiCTS) is formalized. This empirically

  5. Modelling and Analysis of Variable Speed Wind Turbines with Induction Generator during Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    Modelling and Analysis of Variable Speed Wind Turbines with Induction Generator during Grid Fault Risø National Laboratory Vestas Wind Systems A/S #12;#12;I Modelling and Analysis of Variable Speed Wind Turbines with Induction Generator during Grid Fault by Sigrid M. Bolik Institute of Energy

  6. On the Communication Complexity of Secret Key Generation in the Multiterminal Source Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kashyap, Navin

    On the Communication Complexity of Secret Key Generation in the Multiterminal Source Model Manuj Mukherjee Navin Kashyap Abstract--Communication complexity refers to the minimum rate of public communication required for generating a maximal- rate secret key (SK) in the multiterminal source model of Csisz

  7. Tsunami Generation by Submarine Mass Failure. I: Modeling, Experimental Validation, and Sensitivity Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    Tsunami Generation by Submarine Mass Failure. I: Modeling, Experimental Validation, and Sensitivity with a two-dimensional 2D fully nonlinear potential flow FNPF model for tsunami generation by two idealized types of submarine mass failure SMF : underwater slides and slumps. These simulations feature rigid

  8. Automating UI Generation by Model Composition R. E. Kurt Stirewalt Spencer Rugaber

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stirewalt, Kurt

    spec­ ified [5]. Once specified, automated tools integrate the models and generate an efficient system Building user interfaces (UIs) is time consuming and costly. In systems with graphical UIs (GUIs), nearlyAutomating UI Generation by Model Composition R. E. Kurt Stirewalt Spencer Rugaber Computer Science

  9. Cognitive Effects of Physical Models in Engineering Idea Generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cherickal Viswanathan, Vimal 1983-

    2012-08-17

    models fixates designers. In light of these conflicts, the research discussed in this dissertation focuses on understanding the cognitive effects of physical models and developing guidelines for aiding designers in their implementation. A combination...

  10. Modeling of leachate generation in municipal solid waste landfills 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, James Bryan

    1994-01-01

    The use of computer modeling has become widespread in the engineering disciplines. Finite element models convert the properties of a specific volume to specific points in space called nodes. The conglomerated information ...

  11. Linear and Nonlinear Generative Probabilistic Class Models for Shape Contours 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeill, Graham; Vijayakumar, Sethu

    We introduce a robust probabilistic approach to modeling shape contours based on a low- dimensional, nonlinear latent variable model. In contrast to existing techniques that use objective functions in data space without ...

  12. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guoxiang

    2010-01-01

    solutions, Journal of nuclear technology 2008, 164:180– 35.Modeling and Analysis. Nuclear Technology 1993, 104: 418- 2.

  13. Probabilistic Generative Modelling Rasmus Larsen and Klaus Baggesen Hilger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Mathematical Modelling, Technical University of Denmark Richard Petersens Plads, Building 321, DK-2800 Kgs and interpretation of multivariate observations a standard method has been the application of principal component to texture modelling in active appearance models [6], and in [7] to multivariate images in extracting

  14. Generation of certifiably correct programs from formal models Alexei Iliasov

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southampton, University of

    design meets all the criteria of the respective specification - a formal rendering of a requirements a code generator to a safety-critical design one should expect software that is error-free1 . This mode of safety-critical systems, such as IEC 61508, require a justification for any tool used in a development

  15. Integration of Renewables Via Demand Management: Highly Dispatchable and Distributed Demand Response for the Integration of Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-02-11

    GENI Project: AutoGrid, in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Columbia University, will design and demonstrate automated control software that helps manage real-time demand for energy across the electric grid. Known as the Demand Response Optimization and Management System - Real-Time (DROMS-RT), the software will enable personalized price signal to be sent to millions of customers in extremely short timeframes—incentivizing them to alter their electricity use in response to grid conditions. This will help grid operators better manage unpredictable demand and supply fluctuations in short time-scales —making the power generation process more efficient and cost effective for both suppliers and consumers. DROMS-RT is expected to provide a 90% reduction in the cost of operating demand response and dynamic pricing Projects in the U.S.

  16. A physical model for seismic noise generation from sediment transport in rivers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Victor C.

    A physical model for seismic noise generation from sediment transport in rivers Victor C. Tsai,1 of seismic noise near rivers can help provide such measurements, but the lack of models linking observed model to describe the seismic noise induced by the transport of sediment in rivers. The model provides

  17. Diagnostics for Linear Models With Functional Responses Edmunds.com Inc.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Hongquan

    Diagnostics for Linear Models With Functional Responses Qing Shen Edmunds.com Inc. 2401 Colorado and predicting responses by a set of predictors. In a functional linear model, either the response are functions and the predictors are scalar vectors. Such linear models, including functional analysis

  18. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID 1 A Response Cost Model for Advanced Metering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, William H.

    Metering Infras- tructure (AMI). The cost model reflects the costs of response actions due to outages of the challenge is the requirement for a cost model that can accurately predict the costs of possible responseIEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SMART GRID 1 A Response Cost Model for Advanced Metering Infrastructures Ahmed

  19. A MODEL FOR THE FLEET SIZING OF DEMAND RESPONSIVE TRANSPORTATION SERVICES WITH TIME WINDOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dessouky, Maged

    A MODEL FOR THE FLEET SIZING OF DEMAND RESPONSIVE TRANSPORTATION SERVICES WITH TIME WINDOWS Marco a demand responsive transit service with a predetermined quality for the user in terms of waiting time models; Continuous approximation models; Paratransit services; Demand responsive transit systems. #12;3 1

  20. DOE Project Taps HPC for Next-Generation Climate Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOE Project Taps HPC for Next-Generation Climate

  1. Accurate resistive bridge fault modeling, simulation, and test generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sar-Dessai, Vijay Ramesh

    1999-01-01

    Resistive bridging faults in CMOS combinational circuits are studied in this work. Bridging faults are modeled using HSPICE circuit simulation of the various types of bridging faults that can occur in CMOS combinational ...

  2. Atmospheric Tides in the Latest Generation of Climate Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Covey, Curt

    For atmospheric tides driven by solar heating, the database of climate model output used in the most recent assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) confirms and extends the authors’ earlier ...

  3. Smart Finite State Devices: A Modeling Framework for Demand Response Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Konstantin; Ananyev, Maxim; Chertkov, Michael

    2011-01-01

    We introduce and analyze Markov Decision Process (MDP) machines to model individual devices which are expected to participate in future demand-response markets on distribution grids. We differentiate devices into the following four types: (a) optional loads that can be shed, e.g. light dimming; (b) deferrable loads that can be delayed, e.g. dishwashers; (c) controllable loads with inertia, e.g. thermostatically-controlled loads, whose task is to maintain an auxiliary characteristic (temperature) within pre-defined margins; and (d) storage devices that can alternate between charging and generating. Our analysis of the devices seeks to find their optimal price-taking control strategy under a given stochastic model of the distribution market.

  4. Numerical models of pressure pulse generation by imploding metal liners

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphries, S. Jr. [Acceleration Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States)] [Acceleration Associates, Albuquerque, NM (United States); [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Ekdahl, C.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1996-12-01

    The authors describe numerical calculations of pressure pulse generation using imploding liners. Liners are metal cylinders that are magnetically compressed by an intense axial current flow from a high-power pulse generator. The simulations cover the acceleration of the liner, collision with an internal diagnostic target, followed by compression and shock wave heating of the target. With the projected current waveform of the Atlas capacitor bank (in development at Los Alamos National Laboratory), initial results suggest that it may be possible to achieve pressures exceeding 3,000 Gpa (30 Mbar) in a 4 mm diameter sample over an interval of 100--200 ns. The simulations were carried out with Crunch, a new one-dimensional hydrodynamics package for advanced personal computers. The program uses finite-element techniques to solve the coupled problems of hydrodynamics and magnetic diffusion. Crunch fully supports loading and interpolating Sesame equation-of-state tables. The program exhibits excellent stability, even for collisions between material shells and shock convergence on axis. In contrast to previous work, the present studies follow the full process through solid target collision and compression. The work supports the High-Energy Density Physics Program of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), a component of the US Department of Energy Stockpile Stewardship Program. The purpose of this program is maintenance of the nuclear weapons stockpile through improved computational ability and above-ground experiments. Imploding liners driven by conventional capacitor banks constitute a portion of the program to study matter at high pressure.

  5. Monte-Carlo Simulator and Ancillary Response Generator of Suzaku XRT/XIS System for Spatially Extended Source Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Ishisaki; Y. Maeda; R. Fujimoto; M. Ozaki; K. Ebisawa; T. Takahashi; Y. Ueda; Y. Ogasaka; A. Ptak; K. Mukai; K. Hamaguchi; M. Hirayama; T. Kotani; H. Kubo; R. Shibata; M. Ebara; A. Furuzawa; R. Iizuka; H. Inoue; H. Mori; S. Okada; Y. Yokoyama; H. Matsumoto; H. Nakajima; H. Yamaguchi; N. Anabuki; N. Tawa; M. Nagai; S. Katsuda; K. Hayashida; A. Bamba; E. D. Miller; K. Sato; N. Y. Yamasaki

    2006-10-04

    We have developed a framework for the Monte-Carlo simulation of the X-Ray Telescopes (XRT) and the X-ray Imaging Spectrometers (XIS) onboard Suzaku, mainly for the scientific analysis of spatially and spectroscopically complex celestial sources. A photon-by-photon instrumental simulator is built on the ANL platform, which has been successfully used in ASCA data analysis. The simulator has a modular structure, in which the XRT simulation is based on a ray-tracing library, while the XIS simulation utilizes a spectral "Redistribution Matrix File" (RMF), generated separately by other tools. Instrumental characteristics and calibration results, e.g., XRT geometry, reflectivity, mutual alignments, thermal shield transmission, build-up of the contamination on the XIS optical blocking filters (OBF), are incorporated as completely as possible. Most of this information is available in the form of the FITS (Flexible Image Transport System) files in the standard calibration database (CALDB). This simulator can also be utilized to generate an "Ancillary Response File" (ARF), which describes the XRT response and the amount of OBF contamination. The ARF is dependent on the spatial distribution of the celestial target and the photon accumulation region on the detector, as well as observing conditions such as the observation date and satellite attitude. We describe principles of the simulator and the ARF generator, and demonstrate their performance in comparison with in-flight data.

  6. Waste generation process modeling and analysis for fuel reprocessing technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kornreich, D. E. (Drew E.); Koehler, A. C. (Andrew C.); Farman, Richard F.

    2002-01-01

    Estimates of electric power generation requirements for the next century, even when taking the most conservative tack, indicate that the United States will have to increase its production capacity significantly. If the country determines that nuclear power will not be a significant component of this production capacity, the nuclear industry will have to die, as maintaining a small nuclear component will not be justifiable. However, if nuclear power is to be a significant component, it will probably require some form of reprocessing technology. The once-through fuel cycle is only feasible for a relatively small number of nuclear power plants. If we are maintaining several hundred reactors, the once-through fuel cycle is more expensive and ethically questionable.

  7. Coincident steam generator tube rupture and stuck-open safety relief valve carryover tests: MB-2 steam generator transient response test program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garbett, K; Mendler, O J; Gardner, G C; Garnsey, R; Young, M Y

    1987-03-01

    In PWR steam generator tube rupture (SGTR) faults, a direct pathway for the release of radioactive fission products can exist if there is a coincident stuck-open safety relief valve (SORV) or if the safety relief valve is cycled. In addition to the release of fission products from the bulk steam generator water by moisture carryover, there exists the possibility that some primary coolant may be released without having first mixed with the bulk water - a process called primary coolant bypassing. The MB-2 Phase II test program was designed specifically to identify the processes for droplet carryover during SGTR faults and to provide data of sufficient accuracy for use in developing physical models and computer codes to describe activity release. The test program consisted of sixteen separate tests designed to cover a range of steady-state and transient fault conditions. These included a full SGTR/SORV transient simulation, two SGTR overfill tests, ten steady-state SGTR tests at water levels ranging from very low levels in the bundle up to those when the dryer was flooded, and three moisture carryover tests without SGTR. In these tests the influence of break location and the effect of bypassing the dryer were also studied. In a final test the behavior with respect to aerosol particles in a dry steam generator, appropriate to a severe accident fault, was investigated.

  8. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Undrill, John; Mackin, Peter; Daschmans, Ron; Williams, Ben; Haney, Brian; Hunt, Randall; Ellis, Jeff; Illian, Howard; Martinez, Carlos; O'Malley, Mark; Coughlin, Katie; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi

    2010-12-20

    An interconnected electric power system is a complex system that must be operated within a safe frequency range in order to reliably maintain the instantaneous balance between generation and load. This is accomplished by ensuring that adequate resources are available to respond to expected and unexpected imbalances and restoring frequency to its scheduled value in order to ensure uninterrupted electric service to customers. Electrical systems must be flexible enough to reliably operate under a variety of"change" scenarios. System planners and operators must understand how other parts of the system change in response to the initial change, and need tools to manage such changes to ensure reliable operation within the scheduled frequency range. This report presents a systematic approach to identifying metrics that are useful for operating and planning a reliable system with increased amounts of variable renewable generation which builds on existing industry practices for frequency control after unexpected loss of a large amount of generation. The report introduces a set of metrics or tools for measuring the adequacy of frequency response within an interconnection. Based on the concept of the frequency nadir, these metrics take advantage of new information gathering and processing capabilities that system operators are developing for wide-area situational awareness. Primary frequency response is the leading metric that will be used by this report to assess the adequacy of primary frequency control reserves necessary to ensure reliable operation. It measures what is needed to arrest frequency decline (i.e., to establish frequency nadir) at a frequency higher than the highest set point for under-frequency load shedding within an interconnection. These metrics can be used to guide the reliable operation of an interconnection under changing circumstances.

  9. A REDUCED GENERATOR MODEL WITH EXCITATION LIMITS Steven Ball Kevin Wedeward Ernest Barany Steve Schaffer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wedeward, Kevin

    in dynamic studies of electric power systems. The proposed model captures important characteristics be sufficient for analysis of power system dynamics. KEY WORDS Model reduction, simulation, electric power, generator models 1. Introduction The consequences of electric power outages dictate the importance

  10. Nested and multi-physics modeling of tsunami evolution from generation to inundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Nested and multi-physics modeling of tsunami evolution from generation to inundation Sangyoung Son water equations Boussinesq equations Coupling Coherent structures Turbulence Tsunami a b s t r a c used in tsunami modeling, as well as an approach to two-way couple these models together

  11. Revisiting the Steam-Boiler Case Study with LUTESS : Modeling for Automatic Test Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Revisiting the Steam-Boiler Case Study with LUTESS : Modeling for Automatic Test Generation. In this paper, we apply this modeling principle to a well known case study, the steam boiler problem which has model and to assess the difficulty of such a process in a realistic case study. The steam boiler case

  12. GENERALIZED LINEAR MODELING APPROACH TO STOCHASTIC WEATHER GENERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    ) Multisites (Spatial dependence of daily weather) -- Software R open source statistical programming language (Capable of "reproducing" any desired statistic) -- Disadvantages Synthetic weather looks too much like") Not amenable to uncertainty analysis #12;#12;#12;(2) Generalized Linear Models · Statistical Framework

  13. Response of the Los Azufres Geothermal Field to Four Years of 25 MW Wellhead Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, P.; Ortiz, J.; Miranda, G.; Gallardo, M.

    1987-01-20

    Production and chemical data have been compiled and analyzed on a six-month averaged basis for the first four years of electric energy generation with five 5-MW wellhead generators at the Los Azufres geothermal field. The data were evaluated with respect to the extent of observable thermal drawdown of the reservoir from 25 MW of generation in relation to the estimated capacity of the field of several hundred megawatts of power. The analysis updates the previous one compiled after the first two years of continuous production, at which time the results indicated that differences in reservoir temperature estimated from geochemical thermometers and wellhead production data were not statistically significant based on the number of data and the standard deviations. Analysis of the data after four years of operation were made for the larger number of data and smaller standard deviations. The results review the adequacy of the sampling frequency and the reliability of the measurements from statistical t-Test of the means of the first and second two-year periods. 3 figs., 5 tabs., 20 refs.

  14. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes Electric Power Supply Chain Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain in their power plants. This paper proposes significant extensions to the electric power supply chain network generators faced with a portfolio of power plant options and subject to pollution taxes. We then demonstrate

  15. A model of the ULF magnetic and electric field generated from a dust devil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    A model of the ULF magnetic and electric field generated from a dust devil W. M. Farrell,1 J. R emit ULF magnetic radiation. On Mars, dust devils may also generate such magnetic emissions, which in the vortex wind fields accounts for the magnetic emission. To test this hypothesis in general

  16. Coastal Dynamics 2013 MODELING OF THE TOHOKU-OKI 2011 TSUNAMI GENERATION, FAR-FIELD AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James T.

    Coastal Dynamics 2013 Paper No. MODELING OF THE TOHOKU-OKI 2011 TSUNAMI GENERATION, FAR Tsunami hazard assessment for future megathrust earthquakes requires that we understand the source mechanisms and tsunami generation processes for large historical events, such as the devastating Tohoku

  17. Anisotropic Mobility Model for Polymers under Shear and its Linear Response Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Uneyama; Kazushi Horio; Hiroshi Watanabe

    2011-04-19

    We propose a simple dynamic model of polymers under shear with an anisotropic mobility tensor. We calculate the shear viscosity, the rheo-dielectric response function, and the parallel relaxation modulus under shear flow deduced from our model. We utilize recently developed linear response theories for nonequilibrium systems to calculate linear response functions. Our results are qualitatively consistent with experimental results. We show that our anisotropic mobility model can reproduce essential dynamical nature of polymers under shear qualitatively. We compare our model with other models or theories such as the convective constraint release model or nonequilibrium linear response theories.

  18. Managing Model Data Introduced Uncertainties in Simulator Predictions for Generation IV Systems via Optimum Experimental Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turinsky, Paul J; Abdel-Khalik, Hany S; Stover, Tracy E

    2011-03-31

    An optimization technique has been developed to select optimized experimental design specifications to produce data specifically designed to be assimilated to optimize a given reactor concept. Data from the optimized experiment is assimilated to generate posteriori uncertainties on the reactor concept’s core attributes from which the design responses are computed. The reactor concept is then optimized with the new data to realize cost savings by reducing margin. The optimization problem iterates until an optimal experiment is found to maximize the savings. A new generation of innovative nuclear reactor designs, in particular fast neutron spectrum recycle reactors, are being considered for the application of closing the nuclear fuel cycle in the future. Safe and economical design of these reactors will require uncertainty reduction in basic nuclear data which are input to the reactor design. These data uncertainty propagate to design responses which in turn require the reactor designer to incorporate additional safety margin into the design, which often increases the cost of the reactor. Therefore basic nuclear data needs to be improved and this is accomplished through experimentation. Considering the high cost of nuclear experiments, it is desired to have an optimized experiment which will provide the data needed for uncertainty reduction such that a reactor design concept can meet its target accuracies or to allow savings to be realized by reducing the margin required due to uncertainty propagated from basic nuclear data. However, this optimization is coupled to the reactor design itself because with improved data the reactor concept can be re-optimized itself. It is thus desired to find the experiment that gives the best optimized reactor design. Methods are first established to model both the reactor concept and the experiment and to efficiently propagate the basic nuclear data uncertainty through these models to outputs. The representativity of the experiment to the design concept is quantitatively determined. A technique is then established to assimilate this data and produce posteriori uncertainties on key attributes and responses of the design concept. Several experiment perturbations based on engineering judgment are used to demonstrate these methods and also serve as an initial generation of the optimization problem. Finally, an optimization technique is developed which will simultaneously arrive at an optimized experiment to produce an optimized reactor design. Solution of this problem is made possible by the use of the simulated annealing algorithm for solution of optimization problems. The optimization examined in this work is based on maximizing the reactor cost savings associated with the modified design made possible by using the design margin gained through reduced basic nuclear data uncertainties. Cost values for experiment design specifications and reactor design specifications are established and used to compute a total savings by comparing the posteriori reactor cost to the a priori cost plus the cost of the experiment. The optimized solution arrives at a maximized cost savings.

  19. A dynamic model system of household car ownership, trip generation, and modal split: model development and simulation experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kitamura, Ryuichi

    2009-01-01

    1987) Why do people buy cars? Paper presented at the 5thRegression Model of Private Car Use. Report AE 4/87, FacultyEffects of Income and Car Ownership on Trip Generation: A

  20. Discrete Preisach Model for the Superelastic Response of Shape Memory Alloys 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doraiswamy, Srikrishna

    2012-02-14

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 V RESULTS AND DISCUSSION : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 32 vi CHAPTER Page A. Simulating Superelastic Response with Internal Loops of Nitinol Wire at 373 K . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 B. Prediction of Change in Response... to identify the parameters. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 29 9 The model prediction of response at 373 K of Nitinol wire. Note that the plot shows an overlay of the data given as input, the pre- dicted response...

  1. Modelling Heat Transport Across Nano-scale Material Interfaces for Next-generation Electronic Devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milgram, Paul

    ) thermal boundary resistance between two dissimilar semiconductor materials using a combinationModelling Heat Transport Across Nano-scale Material Interfaces for Next-generation Electronic) with customized thermal transport properties. The scattering of thermal energy carriers at fabricated interfaces

  2. A decision-support model for managing the fuel inventory of a Panamanian generating company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Franco, Roberto, 1976-

    2004-01-01

    Bahia Las Minas Corp (BLM) is a fuelpowered generating company in the Panamanian power system. The purpose of this thesis is to design and evaluate a decision-support model for managing the fuel inventory of this company. ...

  3. Learning user modelling strategies for adaptive referring expression generation in spoken dialogue systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janarthanam, Srinivasan Chandrasekaran

    2011-06-30

    We address the problem of dynamic user modelling for referring expression generation in spoken dialogue systems, i.e how a spoken dialogue system should choose referring expressions to refer to domain entities to users ...

  4. High-throughput generation, optimization and analysis of genome-scale metabolic models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henry, C. S.; DeJongh, M.; Best, A. A.; Frybarger, P. M.; Linsay, B.; Stevens, R. L.

    2010-09-01

    Genome-scale metabolic models have proven to be valuable for predicting organism phenotypes from genotypes. Yet efforts to develop new models are failing to keep pace with genome sequencing. To address this problem, we introduce the Model SEED, a web-based resource for high-throughput generation, optimization and analysis of genome-scale metabolic models. The Model SEED integrates existing methods and introduces techniques to automate nearly every step of this process, taking {approx}48 h to reconstruct a metabolic model from an assembled genome sequence. We apply this resource to generate 130 genome-scale metabolic models representing a taxonomically diverse set of bacteria. Twenty-two of the models were validated against available gene essentiality and Biolog data, with the average model accuracy determined to be 66% before optimization and 87% after optimization.

  5. Data Integration for the Generation of High Resolution Reservoir Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Reynolds; Dean Oliver; Gaoming Li; Yong Zhao; Chaohui Che; Kai Zhang; Yannong Dong; Chinedu Abgalaka; Mei Han

    2009-01-07

    The goal of this three-year project was to develop a theoretical basis and practical technology for the integration of geologic, production and time-lapse seismic data in a way that makes best use of the information for reservoir description and reservoir performance predictions. The methodology and practical tools for data integration that were developed in this research project have been incorporated into computational algorithms that are feasible for large scale reservoir simulation models. As the integration of production and seismic data require calibrating geological/geostatistical models to these data sets, the main computational tool is an automatic history matching algorithm. The following specific goals were accomplished during this research. (1) We developed algorithms for calibrating the location of the boundaries of geologic facies and the distribution of rock properties so that production and time-lapse seismic data are honored. (2) We developed and implemented specific procedures for conditioning reservoir models to time-lapse seismic data. (3) We developed and implemented algorithms for the characterization of measurement errors which are needed to determine the relative weights of data when conditioning reservoir models to production and time-lapse seismic data by automatic history matching. (4) We developed and implemented algorithms for the adjustment of relative permeability curves during the history matching process. (5) We developed algorithms for production optimization which accounts for geological uncertainty within the context of closed-loop reservoir management. (6) To ensure the research results will lead to practical public tools for independent oil companies, as part of the project we built a graphical user interface for the reservoir simulator and history matching software using Visual Basic.

  6. On reduced models for gravity waves generated by moving bodies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trinh, Philippe H

    2015-01-01

    In 1982, Marshall P. Tulin published a report proposing a framework for reducing the equations for gravity waves generated by moving bodies into a single nonlinear differential equation solvable in closed form [Proc. 14th Symp. on Naval Hydrodynamics, 1982, pp.19-51]. Several new and puzzling issues were highlighted by Tulin, notably the existence of weak and strong wave-making regimes, and the paradoxical fact that the theory seemed to be applicable to flows at low speeds, "but not too low speeds". These important issues were left unanswered, and despite the novelty of the ideas, Tulin's report fell into relative obscurity. Now thirty years later, we will revive Tulin's observations, and explain how an asymptotically consistent framework allows us to address these concerns. Most notably, we will explain, using the asymptotic method of steepest descents, how the production of free-surface waves can be related to the arrangement of integration contours connected to the shape of the moving body. This approach p...

  7. Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature The wind speed response to mesoscale SST variability is investigated over the Agulhas Return Current region-Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) atmospheric models. The SST-induced wind response is assessed from

  8. Modelling the long-term response of stream water chemistry to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modelling the long-term response of stream water chemistry to atmospheric pollution and forestry-term response of stream water chemistry to atmospheric pollution and forestry practices in Galloway, SW Scotland.forestry.gov.uk/fr/acidification #12;4 #12;Modelling the long-term response of stream water chemistry to atmospheric pollution

  9. A Hierarchical Task Model for Dispatching in Computer-Assisted Demand-Responsive Paratransit Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dessouky, Maged

    A Hierarchical Task Model for Dispatching in Computer- Assisted Demand-Responsive Paratransit Model for Dispatching in Computer-Assisted Demand-Responsive Paratransit Operation ABSTRACT, Dispatch Training #12;1 INTRODUCTION Demand-responsive paratransit service is on the rise. For example

  10. Simulation of Drosophila Circadian Oscillations, Mutations, and Light Responses by a Model with VRI, PDP-1, and CLK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul Smolen; Paul E. Hardin; Brian S. Lo; Douglas A. Baxter; John H. Byrne

    2004-01-23

    A model of Drosophila circadian rhythm generation was developed to represent feedback loops based on transcriptional regulation of per, Clk (dclock), Pdp-1, and vri (vrille). The model postulates that histone acetylation kinetics make transcriptional activation a nonlinear function of [CLK]. Such a nonlinearity is essential to simulate robust circadian oscillations of transcription in our model and in previous models. Simulations suggest two positive feedback loops involving Clk are not essential for oscillations, because oscillations of [PER] were preserved when Clk, vri, or Pdp-1 expression was fixed. Eliminating the negative feedback loop in which PER represses per expression abolished oscillations. Simulations of per or Clk null mutations and of vri, Clk, or Pdp-1 heterozygous null mutations altered model behavior in ways similar to experimental data. The model simulated a photic phase-response curve resembling experimental curves, and oscillations entrained to simulated light-dark cycles. The model makes experimental predictions, some of which could be tested in transgenic Drosophila.

  11. Neural Network Based Modeling of a Large Steam Turbine-Generator Rotor Body Parameters from On-Line Disturbance Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neural Network Based Modeling of a Large Steam Turbine-Generator Rotor Body Parameters from On technique to estimate and model rotor- body parameters of a large steam turbine-generator from real time

  12. Consistent generation of magnetic fields in axion inflation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomohiro Fujita; Ryo Namba; Yuichiro Tada; Naoyuki Takeda; Hiroyuki Tashiro

    2015-04-15

    There has been a growing evidence for the existence of magnetic fields in the extra-galactic regions, while the attempt to associate their origin with the inflationary epoch alone has been found extremely challenging. We therefore take into account the consistent post-inflationary evolution of the magnetic fields that are originated from vacuum fluctuations during inflation. In the model of our interest, the electromagnetic (EM) field is coupled to a pseudo-scalar inflaton $\\phi$ through the characteristic term $\\phi F\\tilde F$, breaking the conformal invariance. This interaction dynamically breaks the parity and enables a continuous production of only one of the polarization states of the EM field through tachyonic instability. The produced magnetic fields are thus helical. We find that the dominant contribution to the observed magnetic fields in this model comes from the modes that leave the horizon near the end of inflation, further enhanced by the tachyonic instability right after the end of inflation. The EM field is subsequently amplified by parametric resonance during the period of inflaton oscillation. Once the thermal plasma is formed (reheating), the produced helical magnetic fields undergo a turbulent process called inverse cascade, which shifts their peak correlation scales from smaller to larger scales. We consistently take all these effects into account within the regime where the perturbation of $\\phi$ is negligible and obtain $B_{\\rm eff} \\sim 10^{-19}$G, indicating the necessity of additional mechanisms to accommodate the observations.

  13. Automatic Generation of a JET 3D Neutronics Model from CAD Geometry Data for Monte Carlo Calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Automatic Generation of a JET 3D Neutronics Model from CAD Geometry Data for Monte Carlo Calculations

  14. Responsibility Modelling for Risk Analysis Russell Lock, Tim Storer & Ian Sommerville

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommerville, Ian

    Responsibility Modelling for Risk Analysis Russell Lock, Tim Storer & Ian Sommerville School INTRODUCTION Existing risk analysis techniques commonly focus on the interaction of technical aspects election process. We believe Responsibilities are a natural form of expression for risk analysis within

  15. Theoretical model for plasma expansion generated by hypervelocity impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingming Zhang, Dongjiang; Long, Renrong; Chen, Li; Huang, Fenglei; Gong, Zizheng

    2014-09-15

    The hypervelocity impact experiments of spherical LY12 aluminum projectile diameter of 6.4?mm on LY12 aluminum target thickness of 23?mm have been conducted using a two-stage light gas gun. The impact velocity of the projectile is 5.2, 5.7, and 6.3?km/s, respectively. The experimental results show that the plasma phase transition appears under the current experiment conditions, and the plasma expansion consists of accumulation, equilibrium, and attenuation. The plasma characteristic parameters decrease as the plasma expands outward and are proportional with the third power of the impact velocity, i.e., (T{sub e}, n{sub e})???v{sub p}{sup 3}. Based on the experimental results, a theoretical model on the plasma expansion is developed and the theoretical results are consistent with the experimental data.

  16. SU-F-BRE-03: Consideration of a Track-Interaction Model for Radiochromic Film Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosen, B; DeWerd, L

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Conventional methods for characterizing the energy response of radiochromic film (RCF) typically involve assessing changes in response when exposed to various beam qualities and use Monte Carlo to determine absorbed dose. These methods represent RCF as a dose integrator of a homogeneous energy deposition volume. Apparent film saturation, nonlinearity, and intrinsic energy dependence are unpredicted with conventional methods. Recent work has shown significant RCF intrinsic energy dependence, which limits its use in absolute dosimetry. This work introduces a track-interaction model (TIM) for RCF and assesses its ability to predict total energy response. Methods: A TIM based on Katz single-hit theory was developed to accumulate energy flux along particle tracks within active crystals, represented as (1×1×20)um{sup 3} prisms about the Gafchromic™ EBT3 active volume using MCNP5 and Matlab. Energy flux contributed to film response only if near the threshold energy for polymerization in polydiacetylenes (2.5eV/monomer). Energy deposition in excess of maximum efficiency represented crystal saturation and did not contribute to film response. The TIM was applied to RCF exposed in air to various monoenergetic photon beams and Co-60. Geometric distribution of energy flux was found for each beam quality in a (1×1)mm{sup 2} RCF area. RCF response relative to Co-60 absorbed dose-to-water (S-TIM) was determined and compared to published values (S-PUB). Results: TIM successfully predicted that lower energy radiation is less effective at inducing polymerization, though the magnitude of the phenomenon was overpredicted. S-TIM was ?29% and +20% for 20 and 40 keV, respectively. This agreed qualitatively with S-PUB of ?27% and +16%. TIM-generated sensitometric curves contained the non-linearity and saturation apparent in RCF. Conclusion: This work indicates the possibility for TIMs to predict changes in RCF response to various energies. Future work will refine TIM by considering size distributions of active elements, other RCF formulations, and response in complex treatment fields. Acknowledgements: The authors wish to thank Dr. Christopher Soares at NIST (Gaithersburg, MD) for performing film measurements and Dr. David Lewis of Ashland, Inc. (Wayne, NJ) for making the EBT3 film available to us.

  17. Efficiency and accuracy of the perturbation response coefficient generation method for whole core comet calculations in BWR and CANDU configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, D.; Rahnema, F.

    2013-07-01

    The coarse mesh transport method (COMET) is a highly accurate and efficient computational tool which predicts whole-core neutronics behaviors for heterogeneous reactor cores via a pre-computed eigenvalue-dependent response coefficient (function) library. Recently, a high order perturbation method was developed to significantly improve the efficiency of the library generation method. In that work, the method's accuracy and efficiency was tested in a small PWR benchmark problem. This paper extends the application of the perturbation method to include problems typical of the other water reactor cores such as BWR and CANDU bundles. It is found that the response coefficients predicted by the perturbation method for typical BWR bundles agree very well with those directly computed by the Monte Carlo method. The average and maximum relative errors in the surface-to-surface response coefficients are 0.02%-0.05% and 0.06%-0.25%, respectively. For CANDU bundles, the corresponding quantities are 0.01%-0.05% and 0.04% -0.15%. It is concluded that the perturbation method is highly accurate and efficient with a wide range of applicability. (authors)

  18. Modeling the Impacts of Solar Distributed Generation on U.S. Water Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amanda, Smith; Omitaomu, Olufemi A; Jaron, Peck

    2015-01-01

    Distributed electric power generation technologies typically use little or no water per unit of electrical energy produced; in particular, renewable energy sources such as solar PV systems do not require cooling systems and present an opportunity to reduce water usage for power generation. Within the US, the fuel mix used for power generation varies regionally, and certain areas use more water for power generation than others. The need to reduce water usage for power generation is even more urgent in view of climate change uncertainties. In this paper, we present an example case within the state of Tennessee, one of the top four states in water consumption for power generation and one of the states with little or no potential for developing centralized renewable energy generations. The potential for developing PV generation within Knox County, Tennessee, is studied, along with the potential for reducing water withdrawal and consumption within the Tennessee Valley stream region. Electric power generation plants in the region are quantified for their electricity production and expected water withdrawal and consumption over one year, where electrical generation data is provided over one year and water usage is modeled based on the cooling system(s) in use. Potential solar PV electrical production is modeled based on LiDAR data and weather data for the same year. Our proposed methodology can be summarized as follows: First, the potential solar generation is compared against the local grid demand. Next, electrical generation reductions are specified that would result in a given reduction in water withdrawal and a given reduction in water consumption, and compared with the current water withdrawal and consumption rates for the existing fuel mix. The increase in solar PV development that would produce an equivalent amount of power, is determined. In this way, we consider how targeted local actions may affect the larger stream region through thoughtful energy development. This model can be applied to other regions, other types of distributed generation, and used as a framework for modeling alternative growth scenarios in power production capacity in addition to modeling adjustments to existing capacity.

  19. Resistive Bridge Fault Modeling,Simulationand Test Generation Vijay R. Sar-Dessai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walker, Duncan M. "Hank"

    Resistive Bridge Fault Modeling,Simulationand Test Generation Vijay R. Sar-Dessai Intel Corporation.sar-dessai@intel.com Abstract In this work' we develop models of resistive bridging faults and study thefault coverage on ISCAS85 circuits of different test sets using resistive and zero-ohm bridges at different supply voltages

  20. A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations Characterizing and optimizing overall performance of wind plants composed of large numbers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are coupling physical models of the atmosphere and wind

  1. Modeling and Generating Daily Changes in Market Variables Using A Multivariate Mixture of Normal Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jin

    Modeling and Generating Daily Changes in Market Variables Using A Multivariate Mixture of Normal of the normal distribution for modeling of daily changes in market variables with fatter-than-normal tails is to transform (linearly) a multivariate normalwith an input covariance matrix into the desired multivariate

  2. Automatic generation of CSP || B skeletons from xUML models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    Automatic generation of CSP || B skeletons from xUML models Edward Turner, Helen Treharne, Steve. CSP B is a formal approach to specification that combines CSP and B. In this paper we present our tool that automatically trans- lates a subset of executable UML (xUML) models into CSP B, for the purpose of verification

  3. Dynamic Simulation Studies of the Frequency Response of the Three U.S. Interconnections with Increased Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackin, Peter

    2011-01-01

    IEEE Dynamic Performance of Wind Power Generation Workingof the impacts of wind generation on power system frequencywith Increased Wind Generation 9. Siemens Power Technologies

  4. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-01-01

    and energy storage. Use of Frequency Response Metrics toand energy storage. xxix Use of Frequency Response Metricsfrequency control such as demand response and energy storage.

  5. Computational models to quantify uncertain emergency search techniques -- A comparison of measured and synthetic gamma-ray detector response functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, M.M.; Goldsby, M.E.; Wilcox, W.B. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Hensley, W.K. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hansen, R.G. [Bechtel Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States). Remote Sensing Lab.

    1997-11-01

    As recent world events show, criminal and terrorist access to nuclear materials is a growing national concern. The national laboratories have developed quantitative models to simulate the response of detection equipment when looking for lost or stolen nuclear material. SYNTH, a code written to synthesize typical gamma-ray spectroscopy experiments, and QUEST, a model to Quantify Uncertain Emergency Search Techniques, calculate the response functions of gamma-ray detectors for arbitrary source types and shielding configurations. In addition, QUEST provides an interactive, three-dimensional user interface supporting the virtual quest for nuclear materials, making possible quantitative comparisons of various sensor technologies and inspection methodologies. The probability of detecting a radioactive source during an inspection is a function of many different variables, including source type, structure geometry (including shielding), inspection dynamics (path and speed), detector (type, size, and resolution), and analysis algorithms. The authors present the results of their study comparing the synthetic Sodium Iodide (NaI) and Germanium (Ge) detector responses generated by both SYNTH and QUEST with those generated by real detectors deployed in the field. Quantitative models, such as the ones presented here, are important since they, (1) allow inspection teams to maximize the probability of finding materials of interest, (2) aid in the development of new instruments and detection techniques, and (3) support other diverse applications including environmental monitoring, nuclear facilities inspections, and radiation safety responder training.

  6. A model for estimation of potential generation of waste electrical and electronic equipment in Brazil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Araujo, Marcelo Guimaraes; Magrini, Alessandra; Mahler, Claudio Fernando; Bilitewski, Bernd

    2012-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Literature of WEEE generation in developing countries is reviewed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We analyse existing estimates of WEEE generation for Brazil. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We present a model for WEEE generation estimate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer WEEE generation of 3.77 kg/capita year for 2008 is estimated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Use of constant lifetime should be avoided for non-mature market products. - Abstract: Sales of electrical and electronic equipment are increasing dramatically in developing countries. Usually, there are no reliable data about quantities of the waste generated. A new law for solid waste management was enacted in Brazil in 2010, and the infrastructure to treat this waste must be planned, considering the volumes of the different types of electrical and electronic equipment generated. This paper reviews the literature regarding estimation of waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), focusing on developing countries, particularly in Latin America. It briefly describes the current WEEE system in Brazil and presents an updated estimate of generation of WEEE. Considering the limited available data in Brazil, a model for WEEE generation estimation is proposed in which different methods are used for mature and non-mature market products. The results showed that the most important variable is the equipment lifetime, which requires a thorough understanding of consumer behavior to estimate. Since Brazil is a rapidly expanding market, the 'boom' in waste generation is still to come. In the near future, better data will provide more reliable estimation of waste generation and a clearer interpretation of the lifetime variable throughout the years.

  7. Comparison of integral equation and physical scale modeling of the electromagnetic responses of models with large conductivity contrasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oldenburg, Douglas W.

    Comparison of integral equation and physical scale modeling of the electromagnetic responses geophysical electromagnetic responses: a numerical approach based upon the electric-field integral equa- tion and the physical scale modeling approach. The particular implementation of the integral-equation solution

  8. A Historical Perspective and Business Model for Load Response Aggregation Based on Priority Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    A Historical Perspective and Business Model for Load Response Aggregation Based on Priority Service technologies and experiments in the 1980's for implementing demand response. We argue that while new smart grid technologies are cheaper and provide more functionality the barrier to demand response implementation

  9. Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response Wei Zhang, Jianming Lian, Chin-Yao Chang, Karanjit Kalsi and Yannan Sun Abstract-- Demand Response is playing population of appliances under demand response is especially important to evaluate the effec- tiveness

  10. Aggregated Modeling and Control of Air Conditioning Loads for Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    1 Aggregated Modeling and Control of Air Conditioning Loads for Demand Response Wei Zhang, Member, IEEE Abstract--Demand response is playing an increasingly impor- tant role in the efficient loads is especially important to evaluate the effec- tiveness of various demand response strategies

  11. Three-Dimensional Model on Thermal Response of Skin Subject to Laser Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jun

    thermal response. The time-dependent equation is discretized using the #12;nite di#11;erence methodThree-Dimensional Model on Thermal Response of Skin Subject to Laser Heating #3; Wensheng Shen y to investigate the transient thermal response of human skin subject to laser heating. The temperature

  12. ResPoNSe: modeling the wide variability of residential energy consumption.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peffer, Therese; Burke, William; Auslander, David

    2010-01-01

    the Design of Residential Demand Responsive Technology withHiroshi Asano. 2006. A Residential End-Use Demand Model forModelling of Energy Demand in the Residential Sector: 1.

  13. Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry L. Swinney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry wave generation in a laboratory model of oscillating tidal flow on a continental margin. Waves waves in the oceans are generated by oscillatory tides flowing over ocean to- pography

  14. Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature Perturbations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Modeling the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Wind Response to Mesoscale Sea Surface Temperature received 25 October 2013, in final form 24 July 2014) ABSTRACT The wind speed response to mesoscale SST Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model and the U.S. Navy Coupled Ocean­Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System

  15. Computational models of cardiovascular response to orthostatic stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heldt, Thomas, 1972-

    2004-01-01

    The cardiovascular response to changes in posture has been the focus of numerous investigations in the past. Yet despite considerable, targeted experimental effort, the mechanisms underlying orthostatic intolerance (OI) ...

  16. Response

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Response SEAB Recommendations Related to the Evaluation of New Funding Constructs for Energy R&D in the Department of Energy Introduction Over the past seven years, the Department...

  17. Canonical formalism for a 2n-dimensional model with topological mass generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deguchi, Shinichi [Institute of Quantum Science, College of Science and Technology, Nihon University, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8308 (Japan)

    2008-12-15

    The four-dimensional model with topological mass generation that was found by Dvali, Jackiw, and Pi has recently been generalized to any even number of dimensions (2n dimensions) in a nontrivial manner in which a Stueckelberg-type mass term is introduced [S. Deguchi and S. Hayakawa, Phys. Rev. D 77, 045003 (2008)]. The present paper deals with a self-contained model, called here a modified hybrid model, proposed in this 2n-dimensional generalization and considers the canonical formalism for this model. For the sake of convenience, the canonical formalism itself is studied for a model equivalent to the modified hybrid model by following the recipe for treating constrained Hamiltonian systems. This formalism is applied to the canonical quantization of the equivalent model in order to clarify observable and unobservable particles in the model. The equivalent model (with a gauge-fixing term) is converted to the modified hybrid model (with a corresponding gauge-fixing term) in a Becchi-Rouet-Stora-Tyutin-invariant manner. Thereby it is shown that the Chern-Pontryagin density behaves as an observable massive particle (or field). The topological mass generation is thus verified at the quantum-theoretical level.

  18. ReEDS Modeling of the President's 2020 U.S. Renewable Electricity Generation Goal (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinaman, O.; Mai, T.; Lantz, E.; Gelman, R.; Porro, G.

    2014-05-01

    President Obama announced in 2012 an Administration Goal for the United States to double aggregate renewable electricity generation from wind, solar, and geothermal sources by 2020. This analysis, using the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, explores a full range of future renewable deployment scenarios out to 2020 to assess progress and outlook toward this goal. Under all modeled conditions, consisting of 21 scenarios, the Administration Goal is met before 2020, and as early as 2015.

  19. Seismic modeling with radial basis function-generated finite differences (RBF-FD) (Seismic modeling with RBF-FD)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fornberg, Bengt

    ) Email: Amik.St-Cyr@shell.com #12;2 ABSTRACT Seismic exploration is the primary tool for finding1 Seismic modeling with radial basis function-generated finite differences (RBF-FD) (Seismic of Colorado-Boulder) Email: Fornberg@colorado.edu Amik St-Cyr (Shell International Exploration and Production

  20. Model generation of viral channel forming 2B protein bundles from polio and coxsackie viruses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Anthony

    GEORGE PATARGIAS1 , THOMAS BARKE1 , ANTHONY WATTS1 , & WOLFGANG B. FISCHER1,2 1 Biomembrane Structure and assesses stability by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations a putative tetrameric bundle model of 2B is generated. The bundles show a pore lining motif of three lysines followed by a serine. The bundle

  1. A Generative Approach for Image-Based Modeling of Tumor Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golland, Polina

    A Generative Approach for Image-Based Modeling of Tumor Growth Bjoern H. Menze1,2 , Koen Van Golland1 1 Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology University, Finland 5 Helsinki Institute for Information Technology HIIT, University of Helsinki, Finland 6

  2. Mathematical Modeling of Flow-Generated Forces in an In Vitro System of Cardiac Valve Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, John W.

    Mathematical Modeling of Flow-Generated Forces in an In Vitro System of Cardiac Valve Development) Abstract--Heart valve defects are the most common cardiac defects. Therefore, defining the mechanisms of cardiac valve development is critical to our understanding and treatment of these disorders. At early

  3. Two Molecular Models of Initial Left-Right Asymmetry Generation Michael Levin1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levin, Michael

    Two Molecular Models of Initial Left-Right Asymmetry Generation Michael Levin1 , Ph.D. and Nanette activity of Cx43 gap junctions within key cells sets up electric potentials in multi-cellular fields, thus is the most fundamental process in embryogenesis because it lays a foundation and provides a context for all

  4. Novel properties generated by interacting computational systems: A minimal model Fabio Boschetti1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boschetti, Fabio

    Novel properties generated by interacting computational systems: A minimal model Fabio questions: First, what is the smallest number of components a computational system needs in order such as selforganisation and emergence have been discussed in computational terms within Complex System Science

  5. THE CALIFORNIAN MODEL AS THE PARADIGM FOR SECOND GENERATION REFORMS IN LATINAMERIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    THE CALIFORNIAN MODEL AS THE PARADIGM FOR SECOND GENERATION REFORMS IN LATINAMERIC Hugh Rudnick, Pontificia Universidad Cat61ica de Chile, Santiago, Chile The electric energy industry in Latin America has countries in 1997. Brazil also joined the group and Venezuela, Mexico and Ecuador have initiated actions

  6. Extracting Entities and Relations from Web Tables Using a Non-parametric Generative Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, Kevin Patrick

    1 Real Y R4 {"City"} T2 T4 Y Observed tables Side informaTon TypeExtracting Entities and Relations from Web Tables Using a Non-parametric Generative Model Jon to extract such information from tables found on the web (Cafarella et al. 2008). Player Team Pos

  7. Modeling the effect of glacier recession on streamflow response using a coupled glacio-hydrological model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naz, Bibi S [ORNL] [ORNL; Frans, Chris [University of Washington, Seattle] [University of Washington, Seattle; Clarke, Garry [University of British Columbia, Vancouver] [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Burns, [Watershed Sciences Inc. (WSI), Portland] [Watershed Sciences Inc. (WSI), Portland; Lettenmaier, Dennis [University of Washington, Seattle] [University of Washington, Seattle

    2014-01-01

    We describe an integrated spatially distributed hydrologic and glacier dynamic model, and use it to investigate the effect of glacier recession on streamflow variations for the Upper Bow River basin, a tributary of the South Saskatchewan River. Several recent studies have suggested that observed decreases in summer flows in the South Saskatchewan River are partly due to the retreat of glaciers in the river's headwaters. Modeling the effect of glacier changes on streamflow response in river basins such as the South Saskatchewan is complicated due to the inability of most existing physically-based distributed hydrologic models to represent glacier dynamics. We compare predicted variations in glacier extent, snow water equivalent and streamflow discharge made with the integrated model with satellite estimates of glacier area and terminus position, observed streamflow and snow water equivalent measurements over the period of 1980 2007. Simulations with the coupled hydrology-glacier model reduce the uncertainty in streamflow predictions. Our results suggested that on average, the glacier melt contribution to the Bow River flow upstream of Lake Louise is about 30% in summer. For warm and dry years, however, the glacier melt contribution can be as large as 50% in August, whereas for cold years, it can be as small as 20% and the timing of glacier melt signature can be delayed by a month.

  8. NARAC Modeling During the Response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Emergency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J S; Probanz, B; Foster, K T; Simpson, M; Vogt, P; Aluzzi, F; Dillon, M; Homann, S

    2012-02-14

    This paper summarizes the activities of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) during the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant crisis. NARAC provided a wide range of products and analyses as part of its support including: (1) Daily Japanese weather forecasts and hypothetical release (generic source term) dispersion predictions to provide situational awareness and inform planning for U.S. measurement data collection and field operations; (2) Estimates of potential dose in Japan for hypothetical scenarios developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to inform federal government considerations of possible actions that might be needed to protect U.S. citizens in Japan; (3) Estimates of possible plume arrival times and dose for U.S. locations; and (4) Plume model refinement and source estimation based on meteorological analyses and available field data. The Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) deployed personnel to Japan and stood up 'home team' assets across the DOE complex to aid in assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The DOE Nuclear Incident Team (NIT) coordinated response activities, while DOE personnel provided predictive modeling, air and ground monitoring, sample collection, laboratory analysis, and data assessment and interpretation. DOE deployed the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) personnel, and the Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) to Japan. DOE/NNSA home team assets included the Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT); National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS); and Radiological Triage. NARAC was activated by the DOE/NNSA on March 11, shortly after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami occurred. The center remained on active operations through late May when DOE ended its deployment to Japan. Over 32 NARAC staff members, supplemented by other LLNL scientists, invested over 5000 person-hours of time and generated over 300 analyses and predictions.

  9. A Unit Commitment Model with Demand Response for the Integration of Renewable Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikeda, Yuichi; Kataoka, Kazuto; Ogimoto, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    The output of renewable energy fluctuates significantly depending on weather conditions. We develop a unit commitment model to analyze requirements of the forecast output and its error for renewable energies. Our model obtains the time series for the operational state of thermal power plants that would maximize the profits of an electric power utility by taking into account both the forecast of output its error for renewable energies and the demand response of consumers. We consider a power system consisting of thermal power plants, photovoltaic systems (PV), and wind farms and analyze the effect of the forecast error on the operation cost and reserves. We confirm that the operation cost was increases with the forecast error. The effect of a sudden decrease in wind power is also analyzed. More thermal power plants need to be operated to generate power to absorb this sudden decrease in wind power. The increase in the number of operating thermal power plants within a short period does not affect the total opera...

  10. Evaluation of an emergency response model for the Rocky Flats Plant: Charter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    This Charter provides a basis for a cooperative, interagency effort to evaluate the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code for emergency response and emergency planning for the Rocky Flats Plant. This document establishes the foundation for the project entitled, Evaluation of an Emergency Response Model for the Rocky Flats Plant'' (to be referred to as the Project). This document meets the following objectives: Identify the Project; establish the project management structure, organizational responsibilities, and organizational commitments for reaching the goals of the Project, and identify a process for model revision and revelation for acceptance. 2 figs.

  11. Failure probability of axially cracked steam generator tubes; A probabilistic fracture mechanics model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, B.; Cizelj, L. (Jozef Stefan Inst., Reactor Engineering Div., P.O. Box 100, 61111 Ljubljana, Slovenia (YU))

    1992-05-01

    In this paper a model for estimating the failure probability of axially cracked steam generator tubes is proposed. The model compares observed crack length distribution with critical crack length distribution by means of probabilistic fracture mechanics. The observed crack length is influenced by measured data, measurement reliability, sizing accuracy, and predicted crack growth rate. The critical crack length is defined by a deterministic mechanical model. All cracks are conservatively assumed to extend through the tube wall. The effect of the plugging limit is studied along with the number of cracked tubes to perform risk-based lifetime optimization of steam generators. A numerical example presented considers hypothetical accidental operating conditions during a feedwater line break.

  12. Climate Model Response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Caldeira, Ken; Boucher, Olivier; Robock, Alan; Rasch, Philip J.; Alterskjaer, Kari; Bou Karam, Diana; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Haywood, J.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Jones, A.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Lunt, Daniel; Moore, John; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Schulz, M.; Singh, Balwinder; Tilmes, S.; Watanabe, Shingo; Yang, Shuting; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2013-08-09

    Solar geoengineering—deliberate reduction in the amount of solar radiation retained by the Earth—has been proposed as a means of counteracting some of the climatic effects of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. We present results from Experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, in which 12 climate models have simulated the climate response to an abrupt quadrupling of CO2 from preindustrial concentrations brought into radiative balance via a globally uniform reduction in insolation. Models show this reduction largely offsets global mean surface temperature increases due to quadrupled CO2 concentrations and prevents 97% of the Arctic sea ice loss that would otherwise occur under high CO2 levels but, compared to the preindustrial climate, leaves the tropics cooler (-0.3 K) and the poles warmer (+0.8 K). Annual mean precipitation minus evaporation anomalies for G1 are less than 0.2mmday-1 in magnitude over 92% of the globe, but some tropical regions receive less precipitation, in part due to increased moist static stability and suppression of convection. Global average net primary productivity increases by 120% in G1 over simulated preindustrial levels, primarily from CO2 fertilization, but also in part due to reduced plant heat stress compared to a high CO2 world with no geoengineering. All models show that uniform solar geoengineering in G1 cannot simultaneously return regional and global temperature and hydrologic cycle intensity to preindustrial levels.

  13. Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Chang, Chin-Yao; Kalsi, Karanjit; Sun, Yannan

    2012-12-12

    Demand Response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid control strategies. Modeling the behavior of populations of appliances under demand response is especially important to evaluate the effectiveness of these demand response programs. In this paper, an aggregated model is proposed for a class of Thermostatically Controlled Loads (TCLs). The model efficiently includes statistical information of the population, systematically deals with heterogeneity, and accounts for a second-order effect necessary to accurately capture the transient dynamics in the collective response. However, an accurate characterization of the collective dynamics however requires the aggregate model to have a high state space dimension. Most of the existing model reduction techniques require the stability of the underlying system which does not hold for the proposed aggregated model. In this work, a novel model reduction approach is developed for the proposed aggregated model, which can significantly reduce its complexity with small performance loss. The original and the reducedorder aggregated models are validated against simulations of thousands of detailed building models using GridLAB-D, which is a realistic open source distribution simulation software. Index Terms – demand response, aggregated model, ancillary

  14. System for generating two-dimensional masks from a three-dimensional model using topological analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schiek, Richard (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-06-20

    A method of generating two-dimensional masks from a three-dimensional model comprises providing a three-dimensional model representing a micro-electro-mechanical structure for manufacture and a description of process mask requirements, reducing the three-dimensional model to a topological description of unique cross sections, and selecting candidate masks from the unique cross sections and the cross section topology. The method further can comprise reconciling the candidate masks based on the process mask requirements description to produce two-dimensional process masks.

  15. Parallel finite element modeling of earthquake ground response and liquefaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jinchi

    2006-01-01

    T. (1999). Computational Geomechanics with Special ReferenceDynamic Problems in Geomechanics," PhD Thesis, Universityon Numerical Models in Geomechanics, G. N. Pande, Van Impe,

  16. A Multi-State Model for the Reliability Assessment of a Distributed Generation System via Universal Generating Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    renewable technology (e.g. wind or solar, etc.) whose behavior is described by a binary state, working of the renewable generator (e.g. solar generator, wind turbine, and electrical vehicle aggregation) State value Multiplication operator of u-functions Wind speed Total number of discretized wind speed states Discretized wind

  17. Response

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-A Wholesale PowerNatural GasBreakoutResponse SEAB Recommendations

  18. Responsibility

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterestedReplacement-2-A Wholesale PowerNaturalEnergy Response

  19. Empirical study on the efficiency of search based test generation for EFSM models Ruilian Zhao, Mark Harman and Zheng Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Mark

    correlation between test generation cost and the number of numerical equal operators in conditions (NNEOC that there is very strong exponential relationship between test generation cost and NNEV or LPEV only when NNEOCEmpirical study on the efficiency of search based test generation for EFSM models Ruilian Zhao

  20. Modeled biogeochemical responses to mesoscale eddies in the South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiu, Peng

    Modeled biogeochemical responses to mesoscale eddies in the South China Sea Peng Xiu1 and Fei Chai1] Mesoscale eddies are observed each year in the South China Sea (SCS); however, their contributions physicalbiogeochemical model to evaluate the eddy impact. We first track the modeled mesoscale eddies in the SCS

  1. Food-Web Models Predict Species Abundances in Response to Habitat Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotelli, Nicholas J.

    sizes of food-web constituents than did simple keystone species models, models that included only-species demographic analyses [9] and assessments of extinction risk. Single-factor models also include keystone species effects, which emphasize responses of populations to changes in the abundance of a single keystone

  2. New modeling and control solutions for integrated microgrid system with respect to thermodynamics properties of generation and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Fang-Yu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01

    This thesis investigates microgrid control stability with respect to thermodynamics behaviors of generation and demand. First, a new integrated microgrid model is introduced. This model consists of a combined cycle power ...

  3. Path2Models: large-scale generation of computational models from biochemical pathway maps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    C: Petri net modelling of biological networks. Brief Bioinfonetworks [14-16] to discrete algebra [17] and dif- ferential equations [18], Petri

  4. DAMAGE DETECTION BASED ON STRUCTURAL RESPONSE TO TEMPERATURE CHANGES AND MODEL UPDATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DAMAGE DETECTION BASED ON STRUCTURAL RESPONSE TO TEMPERATURE CHANGES AND MODEL UPDATING Marian The paper proposes use of measured structural response to temperature loads for purposes of damage identification. As opposed to the most common approaches, which rely on suppressing temperature effects in damage

  5. Modelling the Somantic Electrical Response of Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borg-Graham, Lyle J.

    1989-09-01

    A modeling study of hippocampal pyramidal neurons is described. This study is based on simulations using HIPPO, a program which simulates the somatic electrical activity of these cells. HIPPO is based on a) descriptions ...

  6. Model-Based Query Systems for Emergency Response 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potter, Stephen; Wickler, Gerhard

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we describe the approach adopted and experiences gained during a project to develop a general architecture that aims to harness advanced sensor, modelling and Grid technologies to assist emergency responders ...

  7. Smart finite state devices: A modeling framework for demand response technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Konstantin

    We introduce and analyze Markov Decision Process (MDP) machines to model individual devices which are expected to participate in future demand-response markets on distribution grids. We differentiate devices into the ...

  8. Hydrologic modeling using triangulated irregular networks : terrain representation, flood forecasting and catchment response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vivoni, Enrique R. (Enrique Rafael), 1975-

    2003-01-01

    Numerical models are modern tools for capturing the spatial and temporal variability in the land-surface hydrologic response to rainfall and understanding the physical relations between internal watershed processes and ...

  9. Site-Specific Seismic Site Response Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Reidel, Steve P.

    2005-02-24

    This interim report documents the collection of site-specific geologic and geophysical data characterizing the Waste Treatment Plant site and the modeling of the site-specific structure response to earthquake ground motions.

  10. Use of field experimental studies to evaluate emergency response models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Lange, R.; Rodriguez, D.J.; Nasstrom, J.S.

    1985-07-16

    The three-dimensional diagnostic wind field model (MATHEW) and the particle-in-cell atmospheric transport and diffusion model (ADPIC) are used by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability to estimate the environmental consequences of accidental releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. These models have undergone extensive evaluations against field experiments conducted in a variety of environmental settings ranging from relatively flat to very complex terrain areas. Simulations of tracer experiments conducted in a complex mountain valley setting revealed that 35 to 50% of the comparisons between calculated and measured tracer concentrations were within a factor of 5. This may be compared with a factor of 2 for 50% of the comparisons for relatively flat terrain. This degradation of results in complex terrain is due to a variety of factors such as the limited representativeness of measurements in complex terrain, the limited spatial resolution afforded by the models, and the turbulence parameterization based on sigma/sub theta/ measurements to evaluate the eddy diffusivities. Measurements of sigma/sub theta/ in complex terrain exceed those measured over flat terrain by a factor of 2 to 3 leading to eddy diffusivities that are unrealistically high. The results of model evaluations are very sensitive to the quality and the representativeness of the meteorological data. This is particularly true for measurements near the source. The capability of the models to simulate the dispersion of an instantaneously produced cloud of particulates was illustrated to be generally within a factor of 2 over flat terrain. 19 refs., 16 figs.

  11. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A; Hand, Maureen; Blair, Nate; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Hern, Tracy; Miller, Bart; O'Connell, R.

    2008-06-09

    The Wind Energy Deployment System model was used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030. This generation capacity expansion model selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, nuclear plants, and wind technology to meet projected demand in future years. Technology cost and performance projections, as well as transmission operation and expansion costs, are assumed. This study demonstrates that producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology is technically feasible, not cost-prohibitive, and provides benefits in the forms of carbon emission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water savings.

  12. Modeling the viscoplastic micromechanical response of two-phase materials using fast Fourier transforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebensohn, Ricardo A; Lee, Sukbin; Rollett, Anthony D

    2009-01-01

    A viscoplastic approach using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) method for obtaining local mechanical response is utilized to study microstructure-property relationships in composite materials. Specifically, three-dimensional, two-phase digital materials containing isotropically coarsened particles surrounded by a matrix phase, generated through a Kinetic Monte Carlo Potts model for Ostwald ripening, are used as instantiations in order to calculate the stress and strain rate fields under uniaxial tension. The effects of the morphology of the matrix phase, the volume fraction and the contiguity of particles, and the polycrystallinity of matrix phase, on the stress and strain rate fields under uniaxial tension are examined. It is found that the first moments of the stress and strain rate fields have a different dependence on the particle volume fraction and the particle contiguity from their second moments. The average stresses and average strain rates of both phases and of the overall composite have rather simple relationships with the particle volume fraction whereas their standard deviations vary strongly, especially when the particle volume fraction is high, and the contiguity of particles has a noticeable effect on the mechanical response. It is also found that the shape of stress distribution in the BCC hard particle phase evolves as the volume fraction of particles in the composite varies, such that it agrees with the stress field in the BCC polycrystal as the volume of particles approaches unity. Finally, it is observed that the stress and strain rate fields in the microstructures with a polycrystalline matrix are less sensitive to changes in volume fraction and contiguity of particles.

  13. Generating Candidate Models Each variable li can identify a candidate model (a label).

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    , in our experiments. Fast Fusion Moves for Multi-Model Estimation Andrew Delong Olga Veksler Yuri Boykov. of the Royal Society A, 1998. V. Lempitsky, C. Rother, S. Roth, A. Blake. Fusion moves for markov random field Relaxation. CVPR 2007. H. N. Isack, Y. Boykov. Energy-based Geometric Multi-Model Fitting. IJCV 97

  14. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-01-01

    wind Time (Seconds) Figure 5-3. The Power Delivered by Primary Frequency Control Actions via Generator

  15. Dynamic Simulation Studies of the Frequency Response of the Three U.S. Interconnections with Increased Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackin, Peter

    2011-01-01

    the power factor. Type 2 Wind Turbine Generator (Wound Rotorwind Time (Seconds) Figure 2-5. The Power Delivered by Primary Frequency Control Actions Provided by GeneratorWind .. 20   Figure 3- 5. The Power Delivered (and Load Removed) by Primary Frequency Control Actions via Generator

  16. Modeling of reciprocating internal combustion engines for power generation and heat recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, Kyung Tae; Cho, Heejin; Luck, Rogelio; Mago, Pedro J.

    2013-02-01

    This paper presents a power generation and heat recovery model for reciprocating internal combustion engines (ICEs). The purpose of the proposed model is to provide realistic estimates of performance/efficiency maps for both electrical power output and useful thermal output for various capacities of engines for use in a preliminary CHP design/simulation process. The proposed model will serve as an alternative to constant engine efficiencies or empirical efficiency curves commonly used in the current literature for simulations of CHP systems. The engine performance/efficiency calculation algorithm has been coded to a publicly distributed FORTRAN Dynamic Link Library (DLL), and a user friendly tool has been developed using Visual Basic programming. Simulation results using the proposed model are validated against manufacturer’s technical data.

  17. Bayesian System Identification and Response Predictions Robust to Modeling Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, James L.

    .g. system ID, structural health monitoring, robust control, state &/or parameter estimation ) #12;33 Outline of seismic ground acceleration Finite element model with uncertain parameters Posterior analysis: During;55 System performance measure in the presence of uncertainty: Failure probability + - "Failure" t(t)iy i b i

  18. Generation IV benchmarking of TRISO fuel performance models under accident conditions. Modeling input data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01

    This document presents the benchmark plan for the calculation of particle fuel performance on safety testing experiments that are representative of operational accidental transients. The benchmark is dedicated to the modeling of fission product release under accident conditions by fuel performance codes from around the world, and the subsequent comparison to post-irradiation experiment (PIE) data from the modeled heating tests. The accident condition benchmark is divided into three parts: the modeling of a simplified benchmark problem to assess potential numerical calculation issues at low fission product release; the modeling of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis safety testing experiments; and, the comparison of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis modeling results with PIE data. The simplified benchmark case, thereafter named NCC (Numerical Calculation Case), is derived from ''Case 5'' of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on coated particle fuel technology [IAEA 2012]. It is included so participants can evaluate their codes at low fission product release. ''Case 5'' of the IAEA CRP-6 showed large code-to-code discrepancies in the release of fission products, which were attributed to ''effects of the numerical calculation method rather than the physical model''[IAEA 2012]. The NCC is therefore intended to check if these numerical effects subsist. The first two steps imply the involvement of the benchmark participants with a modeling effort following the guidelines and recommendations provided by this document. The third step involves the collection of the modeling results by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the comparison of these results with the available PIE data. The objective of this document is to provide all necessary input data to model the benchmark cases, and to give some methodology guidelines and recommendations in order to make all results suitable for comparison with each other. The participants should read this document thoroughly to make sure all the data needed for their calculations is provided in the document. Missing data will be added to a revision of the document if necessary.

  19. Aggregated Modeling and Control of Air Conditioning Loads for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Chang, Chin-Yao; Kalsi, Karanjit

    2013-06-21

    Demand response is playing an increasingly important role in the efficient and reliable operation of the electric grid. Modeling the dynamic behavior of a large population of responsive loads is especially important to evaluate the effectiveness of various demand response strategies. In this paper, a highly-accurate aggregated model is developed for a population of air conditioning loads. The model effectively includes statistical information of the population, systematically deals with load heterogeneity, and accounts for second-order dynamics necessary to accurately capture the transient dynamics in the collective response. Based on the model, a novel aggregated control strategy is designed for the load population under realistic conditions. The proposed controller is fully responsive and achieves the control objective without sacrificing end-use performance. The proposed aggregated modeling and control strategies are validated through realistic simulations using GridLAB-D. Extensive simulation results indicate that the proposed approach can effectively manage a large number of air conditioning systems to provide various demand response services, such as frequency regulation and peak load reduction.

  20. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    selected to achieve a cost-optimal generation mix over a 20-Conventional Generation Technology Cost and Performancethe future cost and performance of conventional generation

  1. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-01-01

    generating unit loading and commitment (e.g. , dispatchingas Conventional unit scheduling, commitment and dispatchconventional unit scheduling, commitment and dispatch will

  2. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-01-01

    load shedding is greater than the amount of generation that was lost, frequency will quickly rise and exceed the scheduled value.

  3. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-01-01

    Integration of Variable Renewable Generation The report isISO (CAISO). 2007. Integration of Renewable Resources.recommendations for integrating renewable resources on the

  4. Bulalo field, Philippines: Reservoir modeling for prediction of limits to sustainable generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strobel, Calvin J.

    1993-01-28

    The Bulalo geothermal field, located in Laguna province, Philippines, supplies 12% of the electricity on the island of Luzon. The first 110 MWe power plant was on line May 1979; current 330 MWe (gross) installed capacity was reached in 1984. Since then, the field has operated at an average plant factor of 76%. The National Power Corporation plans to add 40 MWe base load and 40 MWe standby in 1995. A numerical simulation model for the Bulalo field has been created that matches historic pressure changes, enthalpy and steam flash trends and cumulative steam production. Gravity modeling provided independent verification of mass balances and time rate of change of liquid desaturation in the rock matrix. Gravity modeling, in conjunction with reservoir simulation provides a means of predicting matrix dry out and the time to limiting conditions for sustainable levelized steam deliverability and power generation.

  5. effective evaluation of viscoelastic responses of arbitrarily stratified Earth models to surface loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    The Aim effective evaluation of viscoelastic responses of arbitrarily stratified Earth models to surface loading Physical Model Maxwell viscoelastic pre-stressed self-gravitating sphere, compressible et al., 1996] ¯ taking into account the block diagonal structure of È and É desirable (see next panel

  6. Modelling of Haptic Vibration Textures with Infinite-Impulse-Response Filters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, WonSook

    Modelling of Haptic Vibration Textures with Infinite-Impulse-Response Filters Vijaya L. Guruswamy, Canada ON K1N 6N5 Email: vguru054,jlang,wslee@site.uottwa.ca Abstract--Vibration feedback models--Haptic, Vibrotactile, Texture. I. INTRODUCTION We experience vibrations during contact with our physical environment

  7. Modeling the response of subglacial drainage at Paakitsoq, West Greenland, to 21st century climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayaud, Jerome R.; Banwell, Alison F.; Arnold, Neil S.; Willis, Ian C.

    2015-01-22

    , and into the future. Here, we apply a physically-based, subglacial hydrological model to the Paakitsoq region, west Greenland, and run it into the future to calculate patterns of daily subglacial water pressure fluctuations in response to climatic warming. The model...

  8. Predicting Response to Political Blog Posts with Topic Models Language Technologies Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, William W.

    Predicting Response to Political Blog Posts with Topic Models Tae Yano Language Technologies Language Technologies Institute Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA nasmith@cs.cmu.edu Abstract In this paper we model discussions in online po- litical weblogs (blogs). To do this, we extend La

  9. The Tropospheric Jet Response to Prescribed Zonal Forcing in an Idealized Atmospheric Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Gang

    The Tropospheric Jet Response to Prescribed Zonal Forcing in an Idealized Atmospheric Model GANG 2007, in final form 19 November 2007) ABSTRACT This paper explores the tropospheric jet shift to a prescribed zonal torque in an idealized dry atmospheric model with high stratospheric resolution. The jet

  10. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-01-01

    plants to frequency response during disturbances. Use ofkey event during a disturbance when the frequency stabilizesrestore frequency to normal following a disturbance and is

  11. Modeling the Structural Response from a Propagating High Explosive Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margraf, J

    2012-06-12

    This report primarily concerns the use of two massively parallel finite element codes originally written and maintained at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. ALE3D is an explicit hydrodynamics code commonly employed to simulate wave propagation from high energy scenarios and the resulting interaction with nearby structures. This coupled response ensures that a structure is accurately applied with a blast loading varying both in space and time. Figure 1 illustrates the radial outward propagation of a pressure wave due to a center detonated spherical explosive originating from the lower left. The radial symmetry seen in this scenario is lost when instead a cylindrocal charge is detonated. Figure 2 indicates that a stronger, faster traveling pressure wave occurs in the direction of the normal axis to the cylinder. The ALE3D name is derived because of the use of arbitrary-Lagrange-Eulerian elements in which the mesh is allowed to advect; a process through which the mesh is modified to alleviate tanlging and general mesh distortion often cuased by high energy scenarios. The counterpart to an advecting element is a Lagrange element, whose mesh moves with the material. Ideally all structural components are kept Lagrange as long as possible to preserve accuracy of material variables and minimize advection related errors. Advection leads to mixed zoning, so using structural Lagrange elements also improves the visualization when post processing the results. A simplified representation of the advection process is shown in Figure 3. First the mesh is distorted due to material motion during the Lagrange step. The mesh is then shifted to an idealized and less distorted state to prevent irregular zones caused by the Lagrange motion. Lastly, the state variables are remapped to the elements of the newly constructed mesh. Note that Figure 3 represents a purely Eulerian mesh relaxation because the mesh is relocated back to the pre-Lagrange position. This is the case when the material flows through a still mesh. This is not typically done in an ALE3D analysis, especially if Lagrange elements exist. Deforming Lagrange elements would certainly tangle with a Eulerian mesh eventually. The best method in this case is to have an advecting mesh positioned as some relaxed version of the pre and post Lagrange step; this gives the best opportunity of modeling a high energy event with a combination of Lagrange and ALE elements. Dyne3D is another explicit dynamic analysis code, ParaDyn being the parallel version. ParaDyn is used for predicting the transient response of three dimensional structures using Lagrangian solid mechanics. Large deformation and mesh tangling is often resolved through the use of an element deletion scheme. This is useful to accommodate component failure, but if it is done purely as a means to preserve a useful mesh it can lead to problems because it does not maintain continuity of the material bulk response. Whatever medium exists between structural components is typically not modeled in ParaDyn. Instead, a structure either has a known loading profile applied or given initial conditions. The many included contact algorithms can calculate the loading response of materials if and when they collide. A recent implementation of an SPH module in which failed or deleted material nodes are converted to independent particles is currently being utilized for a variety of spall related problems and high velocity impact scenarios. Figure 4 shows an example of a projectile, given an initial velocity, and how it fails the first plate which generates SPH particles which then interact with and damage the second plate.

  12. On the Inclusion of Energy-Shifting Demand Response in Production Cost Models: Methodology and a Case Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, Niamh; Hale, Elaine; Doebber, Ian; Jorgenson, Jennie

    2015-07-20

    In the context of future power system requirements for additional flexibility, demand response (DR) is an attractive potential resource. Its proponents widely laud its prospective benefits, which include enabling higher penetrations of variable renewable generation at lower cost than alternative storage technologies, and improving economic efficiency. In practice, DR from the commercial and residential sectors is largely an emerging, not a mature, resource, and its actual costs and benefits need to be studied to determine promising combinations of physical DR resource, enabling controls and communications, power system characteristics, regulatory environments, market structures, and business models. The work described in this report focuses on the enablement of such analysis from the production cost modeling perspective. In particular, we contribute a bottom-up methodology for modeling load-shifting DR in production cost models. The resulting model is sufficiently detailed to reflect the physical characteristics and constraints of the underlying flexible load, and includes the possibility of capturing diurnal and seasonal variations in the resource. Nonetheless, the model is of low complexity and thus suitable for inclusion in conventional unit commitment and market clearing algorithms. The ability to simulate DR as an operational resource on a power system over a year facilitates an assessment of its time-varying value to the power system.

  13. A simple cohesive zone model that generates a mode-mixity dependent toughness

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Reedy, Jr., E. D.; Emery, J. M.

    2014-07-24

    A simple, mode-mixity dependent toughness cohesive zone model (MDGc CZM) is described. This phenomenological cohesive zone model has two elements. Mode I energy dissipation is defined by a traction–separation relationship that depends only on normal separation. Mode II (III) dissipation is generated by shear yielding and slip in the cohesive surface elements that lie in front of the region where mode I separation (softening) occurs. The nature of predictions made by analyses that use the MDGc CZM is illustrated by considering the classic problem of an elastic layer loaded by rigid grips. This geometry, which models a thin adhesive bondmore »with a long interfacial edge crack, is similar to that which has been used to measure the dependence of interfacial toughness on crack-tip mode-mixity. The calculated effective toughness vs. applied mode-mixity relationships all display a strong dependence on applied mode-mixity with the effective toughness increasing rapidly with the magnitude of the mode-mixity. The calculated relationships also show a pronounced asymmetry with respect to the applied mode-mixity. As a result, this dependence is similar to that observed experimentally, and calculated results for a glass/epoxy interface are in good agreement with published data that was generated using a test specimen of the same type as analyzed here.« less

  14. Short-Term Energy Outlook Model Documentation: Electricity Generation and Fuel Consumption Models

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (Billion Cubic Feet)Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2Feet)Thousand7, 2013 MEMORANDUM Model

  15. Large deviation generating function for energy transport in the Pauli-Fierz model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wojciech De Roeck

    2007-11-14

    We consider a finite quantum system coupled to quasifree thermal reservoirs at different temperatures. Under the assumptions of small coupling and exponential decay of the reservoir correlation function, the large deviation generating function of energy transport into the reservoirs is shown to be analytic on a bounded set. Our method is different from the spectral deformation technique which was employed recently in the study of spin-boson-like models. As a corollary, we derive the Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation relation for the entropy production and a central limit theorem for energy transport.

  16. Quantum models with spectrum generated by the flows of polynomial zeros

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Moroz

    2014-10-27

    A class {\\cal R}_p of purely bosonic models is characterized having the following properties in the Bargmann Hilbert space of analytic functions: (i) wave function \\psi(\\epsilon,z)=\\sum_{n=0}^\\infty \\phi_n(\\epsilon) z^n is the {\\em generating function} for orthogonal polynomials \\phi_n(\\epsilon) of a discrete energy variable \\epsilon, (ii) any Hamiltonian \\hat{H}_b\\in {\\cal R}_p has nondegenerate purely point spectrum that corresponds to infinite discrete support of measure d\

  17. Analysis of supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle control strategies and dynamic response for Generation IV Reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-04-12

    The analysis of specific control strategies and dynamic behavior of the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been extended to the two reactor types selected for continued development under the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative; namely, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). Direct application of the standard S-CO{sub 2} recompression cycle to the VHTR was found to be challenging because of the mismatch in the temperature drop of the He gaseous reactor coolant through the He-to-CO{sub 2} reactor heat exchanger (RHX) versus the temperature rise of the CO{sub 2} through the RHX. The reference VHTR features a large temperature drop of 450 C between the assumed core outlet and inlet temperatures of 850 and 400 C, respectively. This large temperature difference is an essential feature of the VHTR enabling a lower He flow rate reducing the required core velocities and pressure drop. In contrast, the standard recompression S-CO{sub 2} cycle wants to operate with a temperature rise through the RHX of about 150 C reflecting the temperature drop as the CO{sub 2} expands from 20 MPa to 7.4 MPa in the turbine and the fact that the cycle is highly recuperated such that the CO{sub 2} entering the RHX is effectively preheated. Because of this mismatch, direct application of the standard recompression cycle results in a relatively poor cycle efficiency of 44.9%. However, two approaches have been identified by which the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be successfully adapted to the VHTR and the benefits of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle, especially a significant gain in cycle efficiency, can be realized. The first approach involves the use of three separate cascaded S-CO{sub 2} cycles. Each S-CO{sub 2} cycle is coupled to the VHTR through its own He-to-CO{sub 2} RHX in which the He temperature is reduced by 150 C. The three respective cycles have efficiencies of 54, 50, and 44%, respectively, resulting in a net cycle efficiency of 49.3 %. The other approach involves reducing the minimum cycle pressure significantly below the critical pressure such that the temperature drop in the turbine is increased while the minimum cycle temperature is maintained above the critical temperature to prevent the formation of a liquid phase. The latter approach also involves the addition of a precooler and a third compressor before the main compressor to retain the benefits of compression near the critical point with the main compressor. For a minimum cycle pressure of 1 MPa, a cycle efficiency of 49.5% is achieved. Either approach opens up the door to applying the SCO{sub 2} cycle to the VHTR. In contrast, the SFR system typically has a core outlet-inlet temperature difference of about 150 C such that the standard recompression cycle is ideally suited for direct application to the SFR. The ANL Plant Dynamics Code has been modified for application to the VHTR and SFR when the reactor side dynamic behavior is calculated with another system level computer code such as SAS4A/SYSSYS-1 in the SFR case. The key modification involves modeling heat exchange in the RHX, accepting time dependent tabular input from the reactor code, and generating time dependent tabular input to the reactor code such that both the reactor and S-CO{sub 2} cycle sides can be calculated in a convergent iterative scheme. This approach retains the modeling benefits provided by the detailed reactor system level code and can be applied to any reactor system type incorporating a S-CO{sub 2} cycle. This approach was applied to the particular calculation of a scram scenario for a SFR in which the main and intermediate sodium pumps are not tripped and the generator is not disconnected from the electrical grid in order to enhance heat removal from the reactor system thereby enhancing the cooldown rate of the Na-to-CO{sub 2} RHX. The reactor side is calculated with SAS4A/SASSYS-1 while the S-CO{sub 2} cycle is calculated with the Plant Dynamics Code with a number of iterations over a timescale of 500 seconds. It is found that the RHX u

  18. Exact Calculation of the Time Convolutionless Master Equation Generator: Application to the Nonequilibrium Resonant Level Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kidon, Lyran; Rabani, Eran

    2015-01-01

    The generalized quantum master equation provides a powerful tool to describe the dynamics in quantum impurity models driven away from equilibrium. Two complementary approaches, one based on Nakajima--Zwanzig--Mori time-convolution (TC) and the other on the Tokuyama--Mori time-convolutionless (TCL) formulations provide a starting point to describe the time-evolution of the reduced density matrix. A key in both approaches is to obtain the so called "memory kernel" or "generator", going beyond second or fourth order perturbation techniques. While numerically converged techniques are available for the TC memory kernel, the canonical approach to obtain the TCL generator is based on inverting a super-operator in the \\emph{full} Hilbert space, which is difficult to perform and thus, all applications of the TCL approach rely on a perturbative scheme of some sort. Here, the TCL generator is expressed using a reduced system propagator which can be obtained from system observables alone and requires the calculation of s...

  19. Development and Validation of Aggregated Models for Thermostatic Controlled Loads with Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Fuller, Jason C.; Lu, Shuai; Chassin, David P.

    2012-01-04

    Demand response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid research and technologies being examined in recently undertaken demonstration projects. The behavior of load as it is affected by various load control strategies is important to understanding the degree to which different classes of end-use load can contribute to demand response programs at various times. This paper focuses on developing aggregated control models for a population of thermostatically controlled loads. The effects of demand response on the load population dynamics are investigated.

  20. An On-Demand Optical Quantum Random Number Generator with In-Future Action and Ultra-Fast Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Stip?evi?; Rupert Ursin

    2015-06-09

    Random numbers are essential for our modern information based society e.g. in cryptography. Unlike frequently used pseudo-random generators, physical random number generators do not depend on complex algorithms but rather on a physical process to provide true randomness. Quantum random number generators (QRNG) do rely on a process, which can be described by a probabilistic theory only, even in principle. Here we present a conceptually simple implementation, which offers a 100% efficiency of producing a random bit upon a request and simultaneously exhibits an ultra low latency. A careful technical and statistical analysis demonstrates its robustness against imperfections of the actual implemented technology and enables to quickly estimate randomness of very long sequences. Generated random numbers pass standard statistical tests without any post-processing. The setup described, as well as the theory presented here, demonstrate the maturity and overall understanding of the technology.

  1. Final report for %22High performance computing for advanced national electric power grid modeling and integration of solar generation resources%22, LDRD Project No. 149016.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, Matthew J.; Riehm, Andrew Charles; Hoekstra, Robert John; Munoz-Ramirez, Karina; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Phillips, Laurence R.; Adams, Brian M.; Russo, Thomas V.; Oldfield, Ron A.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Hansen, Clifford W.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stein, Joshua S.; Schoenwald, David Alan; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.

    2011-02-01

    Design and operation of the electric power grid (EPG) relies heavily on computational models. High-fidelity, full-order models are used to study transient phenomena on only a small part of the network. Reduced-order dynamic and power flow models are used when analysis involving thousands of nodes are required due to the computational demands when simulating large numbers of nodes. The level of complexity of the future EPG will dramatically increase due to large-scale deployment of variable renewable generation, active load and distributed generation resources, adaptive protection and control systems, and price-responsive demand. High-fidelity modeling of this future grid will require significant advances in coupled, multi-scale tools and their use on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. This LDRD report demonstrates SNL's capability to apply HPC resources to these 3 tasks: (1) High-fidelity, large-scale modeling of power system dynamics; (2) Statistical assessment of grid security via Monte-Carlo simulations of cyber attacks; and (3) Development of models to predict variability of solar resources at locations where little or no ground-based measurements are available.

  2. Untangling the roles of parasites in food webs with generative network models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Abigail Z; Moore, Cristopher; Clauset, Aaron

    2015-01-01

    Food webs represent the set of consumer-resource interactions among a set of species that co-occur in a habitat, but most food web studies have omitted parasites and their interactions. Recent studies have provided conflicting evidence on whether including parasites changes food web structure, with some suggesting that parasitic interactions are structurally distinct from those among free-living species while others claim the opposite. Here, we describe a principled method for understanding food web structure that combines an efficient optimization algorithm from statistical physics called parallel tempering with a probabilistic generalization of the empirically well-supported food web niche model. This generative model approach allows us to rigorously estimate the degree to which interactions that involve parasites are statistically distinguishable from interactions among free-living species, whether parasite niches behave similarly to free-living niches, and the degree to which existing hypotheses about foo...

  3. Hybrid Powertrain Optimization for Plug-In Microgrid Power Generation Automated Modeling Laboratory Slide 1 of 28

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krstic, Miroslav

    stochastic behavior · Scaled for medium size office or apartment complex [1] California ISO: System Status Power Generation Automated Modeling Laboratory Slide 6 of 28 BATTERY COMPRESSOR H2 STORAGE TANK SUPPLY

  4. Biological Learning and Control: Shadmehr and Mussa-Ivaldi 1 9 Building generative models: structural learning, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shadmehr, Reza

    Biological Learning and Control: Shadmehr and Mussa-Ivaldi 1 9 Building generative models as a function of time (passive dynamics), and as a function of the input (active dynamics). What's more

  5. The Use of F0 Reliability Function for Prosodic Command Analysis on F0 Contour Generation Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakai, Mitsuru; Shimodaira, Hiroshi

    This paper describes a method of utilizing an ``F0 Reliability Field'' (FRF), which we have proposed in our previous work, for estimating prosodic commands on F0 contour generation model. This FRF is the time-frequency ...

  6. Self-consistent modeling of radio-frequency plasma generation in stellarators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moiseenko, V. E. Stadnik, Yu. S.; Lysoivan, A. I.; Korovin, V. B.

    2013-11-15

    A self-consistent model of radio-frequency (RF) plasma generation in stellarators in the ion cyclotron frequency range is described. The model includes equations for the particle and energy balance and boundary conditions for Maxwell’s equations. The equation of charged particle balance takes into account the influx of particles due to ionization and their loss via diffusion and convection. The equation of electron energy balance takes into account the RF heating power source, as well as energy losses due to the excitation and electron-impact ionization of gas atoms, energy exchange via Coulomb collisions, and plasma heat conduction. The deposited RF power is calculated by solving the boundary problem for Maxwell’s equations. When describing the dissipation of the energy of the RF field, collisional absorption and Landau damping are taken into account. At each time step, Maxwell’s equations are solved for the current profiles of the plasma density and plasma temperature. The calculations are performed for a cylindrical plasma. The plasma is assumed to be axisymmetric and homogeneous along the plasma column. The system of balance equations is solved using the Crank-Nicholson scheme. Maxwell’s equations are solved in a one-dimensional approximation by using the Fourier transformation along the azimuthal and longitudinal coordinates. Results of simulations of RF plasma generation in the Uragan-2M stellarator by using a frame antenna operating at frequencies lower than the ion cyclotron frequency are presented. The calculations show that the slow wave generated by the antenna is efficiently absorbed at the periphery of the plasma column, due to which only a small fraction of the input power reaches the confinement region. As a result, the temperature on the axis of the plasma column remains low, whereas at the periphery it is substantially higher. This leads to strong absorption of the RF field at the periphery via the Landau mechanism.

  7. Response Surface Energy Modeling of an Electric Vehicle over a Reduced Composite Drive Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jehlik, Forrest; LaClair, Tim J

    2014-01-01

    Response surface methodology (RSM) techniques were applied to develop a predictive model of electric vehicle (EV) energy consumption over the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) standardized drive cycles. The model is based on measurements from a synthetic composite drive cycle. The synthetic drive cycle is a minimized statistical composite of the standardized urban (UDDS), highway (HWFET), and US06 cycles. The composite synthetic drive cycle is 20 minutes in length thereby reducing testing time of the three standard EPA cycles by over 55%. Vehicle speed and acceleration were used as model inputs for a third order least squared regression model predicting vehicle battery power output as a function of the drive cycle. The approach reduced three cycles and 46 minutes of drive time to a single test of 20 minutes. Application of response surface modeling to the synthetic drive cycle is shown to predict energy consumption of the three EPA cycles within 2.6% of the actual measured values. Additionally, the response model may be used to predict energy consumption of any cycle within the speed/acceleration envelope of the synthetic cycle. This technique results in reducing test time, which additionally provides a model that may be used to expand the analysis and understanding of the vehicle under consideration.

  8. An analytic model for the response of a CZT detector in diagnostic energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LeClair, Robert J.; Wang Yinkun; Zhao Peiying; Boileau, Michel; Wang, Lilie; Fleurot, Fabrice [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada) and Biomolecular Sciences Program, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Laurentian University, 935 Ramsey Lake Road, Sudbury, Ontario P3E 2C6 (Canada)

    2006-05-15

    A CdZnTe detector (CZTD) can be very useful for measuring diagnostic x-ray spectra. The semiconductor detector does, however, exhibit poor hole transport properties and fluorescence generation upon atomic de-excitations. This article describes an analytic model to characterize these two phenomena that occur when a CZTD is exposed to diagnostic x rays. The analytical detector response functions compare well with those obtained via Monte Carlo calculations. The response functions were applied to 50, 80, and 110 kV x-ray spectra. Two 50 kV spectra were measured; one with no filtration and the other with 1.35 mm Al filtration. The unfiltered spectrum was numerically filtered with 1.35 mm of Al in order to see whether the recovered spectrum resembled the filtered spectrum actually measured. A deviation curve was obtained by subtracting one curve from the other on an energy bin by bin basis. The deviation pattern fluctuated around the zero line when corrections were applied to both spectra. Significant deviations from zero towards the lower energies were observed when the uncorrected spectra were used. Beside visual observations, the exposure obtained using the numerically attenuated unfiltered beam was compared to the exposure calculated with the actual filtered beam. The percent differences were 0.8% when corrections were applied and 25% for no corrections. The model can be used to correct diagnostic x-ray spectra measured with a CdZnTe detector.

  9. Modeling Variability and Uncertainty of Photovoltaic Generation: A Hidden State Spatial Statistical Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabone, Michaelangelo D; Callaway, Duncan S

    2015-01-01

    AND UNCERTAINTY OF PHOTOVOLTAIC GENERATION [9] M. Milligan,for grid-connected photovoltaic system based on advancedand uncertainty in solar photovoltaic generation at multiple

  10. Comparison of the response of two and four-stroke diesel-generator sets to transient loading 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willett, Kenneth Ray

    1979-01-01

    load1ng. The experimental apparatus necessary to conduct this research cons1sts of: ~ The diesel-generator sets. T hree diesel generator sets of comparable power outputs were chosen. . The instrumentat1on system. Instrumentat1on was developed...- ing the plates into the water by means ot a crank and pulley system. The deeper the plates were immersed the lower the resistance and the greater the load, as can be seen from examination of Kirchhoff's Law and the definition of 3-phase power...

  11. Results of an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model comparison using a state accepted statistical protocol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciolek, J.T. Jr.

    1993-10-01

    The Rocky Flats Plant, located approximately 26 km northwest of downtown Denver, Colorado, has developed an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model for complex terrain applications. Plant personnel would use the model, known as the Terrain-Responsive Atmospheric Code (TRAC) (Hodgin 1985) to project plume impacts and provide off-site protective action recommendations to the State of Colorado should a hazardous material release occur from the facility. The Colorado Department of Health (CDH) entered into an interagency agreement with the Rocky Flats Plant prime contractor, EG&G Rocky Flats, and the US Department of Energy to evaluate TRAC as an acceptable emergency response tool. After exhaustive research of similar evaluation processes from other emergency response and regulatory organizations, the interagency committee devised a formal acceptance process. The process contains an evaluation protocol (Hodgin and Smith 1992), descriptions of responsibilities, an identified experimental data set to use in the evaluation, and judgment criteria for model acceptance. The evaluation protocol is general enough to allow for different implementations. This paper explains one implementation, shows protocol results for a test case, and presents results of a comparison between versions of TRAC with different wind Field codes: a two dimensional mass consistent code called WINDS (Fosberg et al. 1976) that has been extended to three dimensions, and a fully 3 dimensional mass conserving code called NUATMOS (Ross and Smith 1987, Ross et al. 1988).

  12. Understanding the Effect of Baseline Modeling Implementation Choices on Analysis of Demand Response Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    University of California, Berkeley; Addy, Nathan; Kiliccote, Sila; Mathieu, Johanna; Callaway, Duncan S.

    2012-06-13

    Accurate evaluation of the performance of buildings participating in Demand Response (DR) programs is critical to the adoption and improvement of these programs. Typically, we calculate load sheds during DR events by comparing observed electric demand against counterfactual predictions made using statistical baseline models. Many baseline models exist and these models can produce different shed calculations. Moreover, modelers implementing the same baseline model can make different modeling implementation choices, which may affect shed estimates. In this work, using real data, we analyze the effect of different modeling implementation choices on shed predictions. We focused on five issues: weather data source, resolution of data, methods for determining when buildings are occupied, methods for aligning building data with temperature data, and methods for power outage filtering. Results indicate sensitivity to the weather data source and data filtration methods as well as an immediate potential for automation of methods to choose building occupied modes.

  13. Aggregated Modeling of Thermostatic Loads in Demand Response: A Systems and Control Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kalsi, Karanjit; Chassin, Forrest S.; Chassin, David P.

    2011-12-12

    Demand response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid research and technologies being examined in recently undertaken demonstration projects. The behavior of load as it is affected by various load control strategies is important to understanding the degree to which different classes of end-use load can contribute to demand response programs at various times. This paper focuses on developing aggregated models for a homogeneous population of thermostatically controlled loads. The different types of loads considered in this paper include, but are not limited to, water heaters and HVAC units. The effects of demand response and user over-ride on the load population dynamics are investigated. The controllability of the developed lumped models is validated which forms the basis for designing different control strategies.

  14. Tuning Gold Nanoparticle Self-Assembly for Optimum Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering and Second Harmonic Generation Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brolo, Alexandre G.

    , PO Box 3065, Victoria, BC, Canada, V8W 3V6, and Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering) techniques: Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG). The CARS. Maximum signal was observed for 11 NP layers and is attributed to the matching of the CARS signal

  15. A nonideal error-field response model for strongly shaped tokamak plasmas R. Fitzpatrick

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzpatrick, Richard

    A nonideal error-field response model for strongly shaped tokamak plasmas R. Fitzpatrick Citation of a rotating tokamak plasma to a resonant error-field Phys. Plasmas 21, 092513 (2014); 10.1063/1.4896244 Kinetic description of rotating Tokamak plasmas with anisotropic temperatures in the collisionless regime

  16. Terrestrial aridity and its response to greenhouse warming1 across CMIP5 climate models2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frierson, Dargan

    Terrestrial aridity and its response to greenhouse warming1 across CMIP5 climate models2 Jacob climatic aridity, it makes sense to consider P relative to potential37 evapotranspiration PET (e using v4.3.2 of the AMS LATEX template 1 #12;ABSTRACT 2 #12;The aridity of a terrestrial climate

  17. Price Responsiveness in the AEO2003 NEMS Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Models

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes the demand responses to changes in energy prices in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 versions of the Residential and Commercial Demand Modules of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It updates a similar paper completed for the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 version of the NEMS.

  18. Modeling of electrochemomechanical response of ionic polymer-metal composites with various solvents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    Modeling of electrochemomechanical response of ionic polymer-metal composites with various solvents and the amount of solvent uptake, the morphology of the electrodes, the composition of the backbone ionomer variations of the applied potential. Our most recent experimental results show that solvents can have

  19. MODELING ANISOTROPIC STRESS-STRAIN RESPONSE AND TEXTURE EVOLUTION OF -URANIUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mihaila, Bogdan

    MODELING ANISOTROPIC STRESS-STRAIN RESPONSE AND TEXTURE EVOLUTION OF -URANIUM Marko Knezevic Metz, France, laurent.capolungo@me.gatech.edu ABSTRACT The deformation behavior of wrought -uranium, and their role on strain hardening and texture evolution in -uranium. INTRODUCTION: At room temperature -uranium

  20. On the seismic response of deep-seated rock slope instabilities --Insights from numerical modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the seismic response of deep-seated rock slope instabilities -- Insights from numerical modeling 2015 Accepted 3 April 2015 Available online 15 April 2015 Keywords: Seismic landslide hazard Spectral component of seismic hazard in mountainous regions. While many seismic slope stability analysis methods

  1. Model predictive control system and method for integrated gasification combined cycle power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Kumar, Rajeeva; Dokucu, Mustafa

    2013-04-09

    Control system and method for controlling an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system may include a controller coupled to a dynamic model of the plant to process a prediction of plant performance and determine a control strategy for the IGCC plant over a time horizon subject to plant constraints. The control strategy may include control functionality to meet a tracking objective and control functionality to meet an optimization objective. The control strategy may be configured to prioritize the tracking objective over the optimization objective based on a coordinate transformation, such as an orthogonal or quasi-orthogonal projection. A plurality of plant control knobs may be set in accordance with the control strategy to generate a sequence of coordinated multivariable control inputs to meet the tracking objective and the optimization objective subject to the prioritization resulting from the coordinate transformation.

  2. Methane for Power Generation in Muaro Jambi: A Green Prosperity Model Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, K.; Elchinger, M.; Hill, G.; Katz, J.; Barnett, J.

    2014-07-01

    NREL conducted eight model projects for Millennium Challenge Corporation's (MCC) Compact with Indonesia. Green Prosperity, the largest project of the Compact, seeks to address critical constraints to economic growth while supporting the Government of Indonesia's commitment to a more sustainable, less carbon-intensive future. This study evaluates electricity generation from the organic content of wastewater at a palm oil mill in Muaro Jambi, Sumatra. Palm mills use vast amounts of water in the production process resulting in problematic waste water called palm oil mill effluent (POME). The POME releases methane to the atmosphere in open ponds which could be covered to capture the methane to produce renewable electricity for rural villages. The study uses average Indonesia data to determine the economic viability of methane capture at a palm oil mill and also evaluates technology as well as social and environmental impacts of the project.

  3. Response of a laminar premixed flame to flow oscillations: A kinematic model and thermoacoustic instability results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleifil, M.; Annaswamy, A.M.; Ghoneim, A.F.; Ghoneim, Z.A.

    1996-09-01

    Combustion instability is a resonance phenomenon that arises due to the coupling between the system acoustics and the unsteady heat release. The constructive feedback between the two processes, which is known to occur as a certain phase relationship between the pressure and the unsteady heat release rate is satisfied, depends on many parameters among which is the acoustic mode, the flame holder characteristics, and the dominant burning pattern. In this paper, the authors construct an analytical model to describe the dynamic response of a laminar premixed flame stabilized on the rim of a tube to velocity oscillation. They consider uniform and nonuniform velocity perturbations superimposed on a pipe flow velocity profile. The model results show that the magnitude of heat release perturbation and its phase with respect to the dynamic perturbation dependent primarily on the flame Strohal number, representing the ratio of the dominant frequency times the tube radius to the laminar burning velocity. In terms of this number, high-frequency perturbations pass through the flame while low frequencies lead to a strong response. The phase with respect to the velocity perturbation behaves in the opposite way. Results of this model are shown to agree with experimental observations and to be useful in determining how the combustion excited model is selected among all the acoustic unstable modes. The model is then used to obtain a time-domain differential equation describing the relationship between the velocity perturbation and the heat release response over the entire frequency range.

  4. Steam Generator Component Model in a Combined Cycle of Power Conversion Unit for Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oh, Chang H; Han, James; Barner, Robert; Sherman, Steven R

    2007-06-01

    The Department of Energy and the Idaho National Laboratory are developing a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to serve as a demonstration of state-of-the-art nuclear technology. The purpose of the demonstration is two fold 1) efficient low cost energy generation and 2) hydrogen production. Although a next generation plant could be developed as a single-purpose facility, early designs are expected to be dual-purpose. While hydrogen production and advanced energy cycles are still in its early stages of development, research towards coupling a high temperature reactor, electrical generation and hydrogen production is under way. A combined cycle is considered as one of the power conversion units to be coupled to the very high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). The combined cycle configuration consists of a Brayton top cycle coupled to a Rankine bottoming cycle by means of a steam generator. A detailed sizing and pressure drop model of a steam generator is not available in the HYSYS processes code. Therefore a four region model was developed for implementation into HYSYS. The focus of this study was the validation of a HYSYS steam generator model of two phase flow correlations. The correlations calculated the size and heat exchange of the steam generator. To assess the model, those calculations were input into a RELAP5 model and its results were compared with HYSYS results. The comparison showed many differences in parameters such as the heat transfer coefficients and revealed the different methods used by the codes. Despite differences in approach, the overall results of heat transfer were in good agreement.

  5. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appelt, Ane L., E-mail: ane.lindegaard.appelt@slb.regionsyddanmark.dk [Department of Oncology, Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark); University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark); Ploen, John [Department of Oncology, Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark)] [Department of Oncology, Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark); Vogelius, Ivan R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Bentzen, Soren M. [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)] [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Jakobsen, Anders [Department of Oncology, Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark) [Department of Oncology, Vejle Hospital, Vejle (Denmark); University of Southern Denmark, Odense (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is part of the standard treatment of locally advanced rectal cancers. Tumor regression at the time of operation is desirable, but not much is known about the relationship between radiation dose and tumor regression. In the present study we estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Response at the time of operation was evaluated from the histopathologic specimen and graded on a 5-point scale (TRG1-5). The probability of achieving complete, major, and partial response was analyzed by ordinal logistic regression, and the effect of including clinical parameters in the model was examined. The radiation dose-response relationship for a specific grade of histopathologic tumor regression was parameterized in terms of the dose required for 50% response, D{sub 50,i}, and the normalized dose-response gradient, {gamma}{sub 50,i}. Results: A highly significant dose-response relationship was found (P=.002). For complete response (TRG1), the dose-response parameters were D{sub 50,TRG1} = 92.0 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI] 79.3-144.9 Gy), {gamma}{sub 50,TRG1} = 0.982 (CI 0.533-1.429), and for major response (TRG1-2) D{sub 50,TRG1} and {sub 2} = 72.1 Gy (CI 65.3-94.0 Gy), {gamma}{sub 50,TRG1} and {sub 2} = 0.770 (CI 0.338-1.201). Tumor size and N category both had a significant effect on the dose-response relationships. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a significant dose-response relationship for tumor regression after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer for tumor dose levels in the range of 50.4-70 Gy, which is higher than the dose range usually considered.

  6. KAOS/LIB-V: A library of nuclear response functions generated by KAOS-V code from ENDF/B-V and other data files

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farawila, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Maynard, C.

    1989-04-01

    KAOS/LIB-V: A library of processed nuclear responses for neutronics analyses of nuclear systems has been generated. The library was prepared using the KAOS-V code and nuclear data from ENDF/B-V. The library includes kerma (kinetic energy released in materials) factors and other nuclear response functions for all materials presently of interest in fusion and fission applications for 43 nonfissionable and 15 fissionable isotopes and elements. The nuclear response functions include gas production and tritium-breeding functions, and all important reaction cross sections. KAOS/LIB-V employs the VITAMIN-E weighting function and energy group structure of 174 neutron groups. Auxiliary nuclear data bases, e.g., the Japanese evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-2 were used as a source of isotopic cross sections when these data are not provided in ENDF/B-V files for a natural element. These are needed mainly to estimate average quantities such as effective Q-values for the natural element. This analysis of local energy deposition was instrumental in detecting and understanding energy balance deficiencies and other problems in the ENDF/B-V data. Pertinent information about the library and a graphical display of the main nuclear response functions for all materials in the library are given. 35 refs.

  7. Modeling Cotton and Winter Wheat Growth and Yield Responses to Irrigation Management in the Texas High Plains and Rolling Plains 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Attia Mohamed, Ahmed

    2014-12-17

    were negatively correlated. A modeling study was performed using the cotton growth simulation model, Cotton2K, to investigate the lint yield, WUE, and economic return responses using 31 years weather records (1980 – 2010) from the Texas Rolling Plains...

  8. Generation of defects in model lubricant monolayers and their contribution to energy dissipation in friction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salmeron, Miquel

    2000-06-15

    The structural, mechanical (friction) and spectroscopic properties of model lubricant films made of self-assembled and Langmuir-Blodgett monolayers on quartz, mica and gold have been investigated with atomic force microscopy, surface forces apparatus and sum frequency generation. In these films, the molecules tend to form densely packed structures, with the alkane chains mostly vertical and parallel to each other. The SFG results suggest that under moderate pressures of a few tens of MPa, the methyl end group of the alkane chains is rotated to accommodate a terminal gauche distortion. The molecule,however, retains its upright close packed structure with a lattice periodicity when ordered, which can be resolved by AFM. At pressures above 0.1 GPa, changes in the form of collective molecular tilts take place that lower the height of the monolayer. Only certain angles of tilt are allowed that are explained by the interlocking of methylene units in neighboring chains. The discrete angular tilts are accompanied by increases in friction. A model based on the van derWaals attractive energy between chains is used to explain the stability of the films and to estimate the cohesive energy changes during tilt and, from that, the increases in friction force.

  9. Finding Bugs in Web Applications Using Dynamic Test Generation and Explicit State Model Checking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tip, Frank

    2009-03-26

    Web script crashes and malformed dynamically-generated web pages are common errors, and they seriously impact the usability of web applications. Current tools for web-page validation cannot handle the dynamically generated ...

  10. Modeling and Analysis of The Pressure Die Casting Using Response Surface Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kittur, Jayant K.; Herwadkar, T. V. [KLS Gogte Institute of Technology, Belgaum -590 008, Karnataka (India); Parappagoudar, M. B. [Chhatrapati Shivaji Institute of Technology, Durg (C.G)-491001 (India)

    2010-10-26

    Pressure die casting is successfully used in the manufacture of Aluminum alloys components for automobile and many other industries. Die casting is a process involving many process parameters having complex relationship with the quality of the cast product. Though various process parameters have influence on the quality of die cast component, major influence is seen by the die casting machine parameters and their proper settings. In the present work, non-linear regression models have been developed for making predictions and analyzing the effect of die casting machine parameters on the performance characteristics of die casting process. Design of Experiments (DOE) with Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been used to analyze the effect of effect of input parameters and their interaction on the response and further used to develop nonlinear input-output relationships. Die casting machine parameters, namely, fast shot velocity, slow shot to fast shot change over point, intensification pressure and holding time have been considered as the input variables. The quality characteristics of the cast product were determined by porosity, hardness and surface rough roughness (output/responses). Design of experiments has been used to plan the experiments and analyze the impact of variables on the quality of casting. On the other-hand Response Surface Methodology (Central Composite Design) is utilized to develop non-linear input-output relationships (regression models). The developed regression models have been tested for their statistical adequacy through ANOVA test. The practical usefulness of these models has been tested with some test cases. These models can be used to make the predictions about different quality characteristics, for the known set of die casting machine parameters, without conducting the experiments.

  11. Numerical simulation of waves generated by landslides using a multiple-fluid NavierStokes model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    ; Enet and Grilli, 2005, 2007) show that complex wave fields can be generated by underwater or subaerial

  12. MODEL-ASSISTED WEIGHTING FOR SURVEYS WITH MULTIPLE RESPONSE MODE Eric V. Slud, Census Bureau & Univ. of Maryland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Community Survey, demo- graphic weights, logistic regression, mean-squared error, misspecified modelMODEL-ASSISTED WEIGHTING FOR SURVEYS WITH MULTIPLE RESPONSE MODE Eric V. Slud, Census Bureau & Univ. Analysis of the survey results usually proceeds by weighting responses roughly by inverse unconditional

  13. A non-linear dimension reduction methodology for generating data-driven stochastic input models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganapathysubramanian, Baskar; Zabaras, Nicholas

    2008-06-20

    Stochastic analysis of random heterogeneous media (polycrystalline materials, porous media, functionally graded materials) provides information of significance only if realistic input models of the topology and property variations are used. This paper proposes a framework to construct such input stochastic models for the topology and thermal diffusivity variations in heterogeneous media using a data-driven strategy. Given a set of microstructure realizations (input samples) generated from given statistical information about the medium topology, the framework constructs a reduced-order stochastic representation of the thermal diffusivity. This problem of constructing a low-dimensional stochastic representation of property variations is analogous to the problem of manifold learning and parametric fitting of hyper-surfaces encountered in image processing and psychology. Denote by M the set of microstructures that satisfy the given experimental statistics. A non-linear dimension reduction strategy is utilized to map M to a low-dimensional region, A. We first show that M is a compact manifold embedded in a high-dimensional input space R{sup n}. An isometric mapping F from M to a low-dimensional, compact, connected set A is contained in R{sup d}(d<model of the material topology and thermal diffusivity variations is subsequently used as an input in the solution of stochastic partial differential equations that describe the evolution of dependant variables. A sparse grid collocation strategy (Smolyak algorithm) is utilized to solve these stochastic equations efficiently. We showcase the methodology by constructing low-dimensional input stochastic models to represent thermal diffusivity in two-phase microstructures. This model is used in analyzing the effect of topological variations of two-phase microstructures on the evolution of temperature in heat conduction processes.

  14. Coordination of Energy Efficiency and Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Charles

    2010-01-01

    response, distributed generation, and renewable energycontrol, distributed generation, renewable energy systems,

  15. Generation of mice deficient in RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) and characterization of its role in innate immune responses and cell growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuda, Atsushi [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan) [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Core Research for Evolution Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Ogawa, Masahiro [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yanai, Hideyuki [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan) [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Core Research for Evolution Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Naka, Daiji [ZOEGENE Corp., 1000 Kamoshida-cho, Aoba-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 227-0033 (Japan)] [ZOEGENE Corp., 1000 Kamoshida-cho, Aoba-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 227-0033 (Japan); Goto, Ayana; Ao, Tomoka [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)] [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Tanno, Yuji [Laboratory of Chromosome Dynamics, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Chromosome Dynamics, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Takeda, Kiyoshi [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshinori [Laboratory of Chromosome Dynamics, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Chromosome Dynamics, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Honda, Kenya [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Taniguchi, Tadatsugu, E-mail: tada@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan) [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Core Research for Evolution Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2011-07-22

    Highlights: {yields} We identified RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) as CpG-B DNA-binding protein. {yields} RBM3 translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and co-localized with CpG-B DNA. {yields} We newly generated Rbm3-deficient (Rbm3{sup -/-}) mice. {yields} DNA-mediated cytokine gene induction was normally occured in Rbm3{sup -/-} cells. {yields}Rbm3{sup -/-} MEFs showed poorer proliferation rate and increased number of G2-phase cells. -- Abstract: The activation of innate immune responses is critical to host defense against microbial infections, wherein nucleic acid-sensing pattern recognition receptors recognize DNA or RNA from viruses or bacteria and activate downstream signaling pathways. In a search for new DNA-sensing molecules that regulate innate immune responses, we identified RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3), whose role has been implicated in the regulation of cell growth. In this study, we generated Rbm3-deficient (Rbm3{sup -/-}) mice to study the role of RBM3 in immune responses and cell growth. Despite evidence for its interaction with immunogenic DNA in a cell, no overt phenotypic abnormalities were found in cells from Rbm3{sup -/-} mice for the DNA-mediated induction of cytokine genes. Interestingly, however, Rbm3{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) showed poorer proliferation rates as compared to control MEFs. Further cell cycle analysis revealed that Rbm3{sup -/-} MEFs have markedly increased number of G2-phase cells, suggesting a hitherto unknown role of RBM3 in the G2-phase control. Thus, these mutant mice and cells may provide new tools with which to study the mechanisms underlying the regulation of cell cycle and oncogenesis.

  16. Microstructure Based Modeling of ? Phase Influence on Mechanical Response of Cast AM Series Mg Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Erin I.; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Sun, Xin; Deda, Erin; Allison, John; Li, Mei; Forsmark, Joy; Zindel, Jacob; Godlewski, Larry

    2014-09-30

    Magnesium alloys have become popular alternatives to aluminums and steels for the purpose of vehicle light-weighting. However, Mg alloys are hindered from wider application due to limited ductility as well as poor creep and corrosion performance. Understanding the impact of microstructural features on bulk response is key to improving Mg alloys for more widespread use and for moving towards truly predicting modeling capabilities. This study focuses on modeling the intrinsic features, particularly volume fraction and morphology of beta phase present, of cast Mg alloy microstructure and quantifying their impact on bulk performance. Computational results are compared to experimental measurements of cast plates of Mg alloy with varying aluminum content.

  17. Equilibrium Response and Transient Dynamics Datasets from VEMAP: Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Users of the VEMAP Portal can access input files of numerical data that include monthly and daily files of geographic data, soil and site files, scenario files, etc. Model results from Phase I, the Equilibrium Response datasets, are available through the NCAR anonymous FTP site at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/vresults.html. Phase II, Transient Dynamics, include climate datasets, models results, and analysis tools. Many supplemental files are also available from the main data page at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html.

  18. Beyond-Quantum Modeling of Question Order Effects and Response Replicability in Psychological Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diederik Aerts; Massimiliano Sassoli de Bianchi

    2015-08-15

    A general tension-reduction (GTR) model was recently considered to derive quantum probabilities as (universal) averages over all possible forms of non-uniform fluctuations, and explain their considerable success in describing experimental situations also outside of the domain of physics, for instance in the ambit of quantum models of cognition and decision. Yet, this result also highlighted the possibility of observing violations of the predictions of the Born rule, in those situations where the averaging would not be large enough, or would be altered because of the combination of multiple measurements. In this article we show that this is indeed the case in typical psychological measurements exhibiting question order effects, by showing that their statistics of outcomes are inherently non-Hilbertian, and require the larger framework of the GTR-model to receive an exact mathematical description. We also consider another unsolved problem of quantum cognition: response replicability. It is has been observed that when question order effects and response replicability occur together, the situation cannot be handled anymore by quantum theory. However, we show that it can be easily and naturally described in the GTR-model. Based on these findings, we motivate the adoption in cognitive science of a hidden-measurements interpretation of the quantum formalism, and of its GTR-model generalization, as the natural interpretational framework explaining the data of psychological measurements on conceptual entities.

  19. Assessing the nonlinear response of fine particles to precursor emissions: Development and application of an extended response surface modeling technique v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, B.; Wang, S. X.; Xing, J.; Fu, K.; Fu, J. S.; Jang, C.; Zhu, Y.; Dong, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; Wu, W. J.; Wang, J. D.; Hao, J. M.

    2015-01-30

    An innovative extended response surface modeling technique (ERSM v1.0) is developed to characterize the nonlinear response of fine particles (PM???) to large and simultaneous changes of multiple precursor emissions from multiple regions and sectors. The ERSM technique is developed based on the conventional response surface modeling (RSM) technique; it first quantifies the relationship between PM??? concentrations and the emissions of gaseous precursors from each single region using the conventional RSM technique, and then assesses the effects of inter-regional transport of PM??? and its gaseous precursors on PM??? concentrations in the target region. We apply this novel technique with a widely used regional chemical transport model (CTM) over the Yangtze River delta (YRD) region of China, and evaluate the response of PM??? and its inorganic components to the emissions of 36 pollutant–region–sector combinations. The predicted PM??? concentrations agree well with independent CTM simulations; the correlation coefficients are larger than 0.98 and 0.99, and the mean normalized errors (MNEs) are less than 1 and 2% for January and August, respectively. It is also demonstrated that the ERSM technique could reproduce fairly well the response of PM??? to continuous changes of precursor emission levels between zero and 150%. Employing this new technique, we identify the major sources contributing to PM??? and its inorganic components in the YRD region. The nonlinearity in the response of PM??? to emission changes is characterized and the underlying chemical processes are illustrated.

  20. Assessing the nonlinear response of fine particles to precursor emissions: Development and application of an extended response surface modeling technique v1.0

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhao, B.; Wang, S. X.; State Environmental Protection Key Lab. of Sources and Control of Air Pollution Complex, Beijing; Xing, J.; Fu, K.; Fu, J. S.; Jang, C.; Zhu, Y.; Dong, X. Y.; Gao, Y.; et al

    2015-01-30

    An innovative extended response surface modeling technique (ERSM v1.0) is developed to characterize the nonlinear response of fine particles (PM???) to large and simultaneous changes of multiple precursor emissions from multiple regions and sectors. The ERSM technique is developed based on the conventional response surface modeling (RSM) technique; it first quantifies the relationship between PM??? concentrations and the emissions of gaseous precursors from each single region using the conventional RSM technique, and then assesses the effects of inter-regional transport of PM??? and its gaseous precursors on PM??? concentrations in the target region. We apply this novel technique with a widelymore »used regional chemical transport model (CTM) over the Yangtze River delta (YRD) region of China, and evaluate the response of PM??? and its inorganic components to the emissions of 36 pollutant–region–sector combinations. The predicted PM??? concentrations agree well with independent CTM simulations; the correlation coefficients are larger than 0.98 and 0.99, and the mean normalized errors (MNEs) are less than 1 and 2% for January and August, respectively. It is also demonstrated that the ERSM technique could reproduce fairly well the response of PM??? to continuous changes of precursor emission levels between zero and 150%. Employing this new technique, we identify the major sources contributing to PM??? and its inorganic components in the YRD region. The nonlinearity in the response of PM??? to emission changes is characterized and the underlying chemical processes are illustrated.« less

  1. Assessing the nonlinear response of fine particles to precursor emissions: Development and application of an extended response surface modeling technique v1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, B. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Wang, S. X. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); State Environmental Protection Key Lab. of Sources and Control of Air Pollution Complex, Beijing (China); Xing, J. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Fu, K. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Fu, J. S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Jang, C. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Zhu, Y. [South China Univ. of Technology (SCUT), Guangzhou (China); Dong, X. Y. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Gao, Y. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wu, W. J. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Wang, J. D. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); Hao, J. M. [Tsinghua Univ., Beijing (China); State Environmental Protection Key Lab. of Sources and Control of Air Pollution Complex, Beijing (China)

    2015-01-01

    An innovative extended response surface modeling technique (ERSM v1.0) is developed to characterize the nonlinear response of fine particles (PM???) to large and simultaneous changes of multiple precursor emissions from multiple regions and sectors. The ERSM technique is developed based on the conventional response surface modeling (RSM) technique; it first quantifies the relationship between PM??? concentrations and the emissions of gaseous precursors from each single region using the conventional RSM technique, and then assesses the effects of inter-regional transport of PM??? and its gaseous precursors on PM??? concentrations in the target region. We apply this novel technique with a widely used regional chemical transport model (CTM) over the Yangtze River delta (YRD) region of China, and evaluate the response of PM??? and its inorganic components to the emissions of 36 pollutant–region–sector combinations. The predicted PM??? concentrations agree well with independent CTM simulations; the correlation coefficients are larger than 0.98 and 0.99, and the mean normalized errors (MNEs) are less than 1 and 2% for January and August, respectively. It is also demonstrated that the ERSM technique could reproduce fairly well the response of PM??? to continuous changes of precursor emission levels between zero and 150%. Employing this new technique, we identify the major sources contributing to PM??? and its inorganic components in the YRD region. The nonlinearity in the response of PM??? to emission changes is characterized and the underlying chemical processes are illustrated.

  2. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    of wind and conventional energy technologies, transmission,wind versus the displaced conventional energy technologies,wind energy I. I NTRODUCTION Generating electricity from wind technology

  3. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply. National Renewable20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology byTERMS wind-generated electricity; wind energy; 20% wind

  4. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    fuel price forecast Coal prices follow AEO 2007 referencecoal- and natural gas-based electricity generation analyzed here include decreased natural gas prices,

  5. Air quality modeling for emergency response applications. [MATHEW; ADPIC; FEM3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Chan, S.T.; Knox, J.B.; Dickerson, M.H.; Lange, R.

    1985-12-01

    The three-dimensional diagnostic wind field model (MATHEW) and the particle-in-cell transport and diffusion model (ADPIC) are used by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) for real-time assessments of the consequences from accidental releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. For the dispersion of hazardous heavier-than-air gases, a time-dependent, three-dimensional finite element model (FEM3) is used. These models have been evaluated extensively against a wide spectrum of field experiments involving the release of chemically inert tracers or heavier-than-air gases. The results reveal that the MATHEW/ADPIC models are capable of simulating the spatial and temporal distributions of tracer concentration to within a factor of 2 for 50% of the measured tracer concentrations for near surface releases in relatively flat terrain and within a factor of 2 for 20% of the comparisons for elevated releases in complex terrain. The FEM3 model produces quite satisfactory simulations of the spatial and temporal distributions of heavier-than-air gases, typically within a kilometer of the release point. The ARAC consists of a centralized computerized emergency response system that is capable of supporting up to 100 sites and providing real-time predictions of the consequence of transportation accidents that may occur anywhere. It utilizes pertinent accident information, local and regional meteorology, and terrain as input to the MATHEW/ADPIC models for the consequence analysis. It has responded to over 150 incidents and exercises over the past decade.

  6. HEITSCH, R OMISCH --GENERATION OF MULTIVARIATE SCENARIO TREES TO MODEL STOCHASTICITY IN POWER MANAGEMENT 1 Generation of Multivariate Scenario Trees to Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    prices of fuel and electricity). Since the corresponding determinis- tic equivalents of multistage Heitsch and Werner R¨omisch Humboldt-University Berlin, Institute of Mathematics 10099 Berlin, Germany Abstract-- Modern electricity portfolio and risk management models represent multistage stochastic programs

  7. OASIS4: A Coupling Software for Next Generation Earth System Modelling Ren Redler (1), Sophie Valcke (2) and Hubert Ritzdorf (3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS4: A Coupling Software for Next Generation Earth System Modelling René Redler (1), Sophie system modelling, Geosci. Model. Dev., 3, 87 ­ 104 Link ­ https://oasistrac.cerfacs.fr Financial support ­ R. Redler, S. Valcke and H. Ritzdorf, 2010: OASIS4 ­ a coupling software for next generation earth

  8. Vibratory response modeling and verification of a high precision optical positioning system.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barraza, J.; Kuzay, T.; Royston, T. J.; Shu, D.

    1999-06-18

    A generic vibratory-response modeling program has been developed as a tool for designing high-precision optical positioning systems. Based on multibody dynamics theory, the system is modeled as rigid-body structures connected by linear elastic elements, such as complex actuators and bearings. The full dynamic properties of each element are determined experimentally or theoretically, then integrated into the program as inertial and stiffness matrices. Utilizing this program, the theoretical and experimental verification of the vibratory behavior of a double-multilayer monochromator support and positioning system is presented. Results of parametric design studies that investigate the influence of support floor dynamics and highlight important design issues are also presented. Overall, good matches between theory and experiment demonstrate the effectiveness of the program as a dynamic modeling tool.

  9. An analogue model for controllable Casimir radiation in a nonlinear cavity with amplitude-modulated pumping: Generation and quantum statistical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali Motazedifard; M. H. Naderi; R. Roknizadeh

    2015-05-07

    We present and investigate an analogue model for a controllable photon geberation via the dynamical Casimir effect (DCE) in a cavity containing a degenerate optical amplifier (OPA) which is pumed by an amplitude-modulated field. The time modulation of the pump field in the model OPA system is equivalent to a periodic modulation of the cavity length, which is responsible for the generation of the Casimir radiation. By taking into account the rapidly oscillating terms of the modulation frequency, the effects of the corresponding counter-rotating terms (CRTs) on the analogue Casimir radiation emerge clearly. We find that the mean number of generated photons and their quantum statistical properties exhibit oscillatory behaviors, which are controllable through the modulation frequency as an external control parameter.We also recognize a new phenomenon, the so-called "Anti-DCE," in which pair photons can be coherently annihilated due to the time-modulated pumping. We show that the Casimir radiation exhibits quadrature squeezing, photon bunching and super-Poissonian statistics which are controllable by modulation frequency. We also calculate the power spectrum of the intracavity light field. We find that the appearance of the side bands in the spectrum is due to the presence of the CRTs.

  10. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E; Starke, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

  11. Responsibility Modeling for the Sociotechnical Risk Analysis of Coalitions of Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwood, David

    2011-01-01

    Society is challenging systems engineers by demanding ever more complex and integrated systems. With the rise of cloud computing and systems-of-systems (including cyber-physical systems) we are entering an era where mission critical services and applications will be dependent upon 'coalitions-of-systems'. Coalitions-of-systems (CoS) are a class of system similar to systems-of-systems but they differ in that they interact to further overlapping self-interests rather than an overarching mission. Assessing the sociotechnical risks associated with CoS is an open research question of societal importance as existing risk analysis techniques typically focus on the technical aspects of systems and ignore risks associated with coalition partners reneging on responsibilities or leaving the coalition. We demonstrate that a responsibility modeling based risk analysis approach enables the identification of sociotechnical risks associated with CoS. The approach identifies hazards and associated risks that may arise when re...

  12. Verification of voltage/frequency requirement for emergency diesel generator in nuclear power plant using dynamic modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hur, Jin-Suk; Roh, Myung- Sub

    2014-02-12

    One major cause of the plant shutdown is the loss of electrical power. The study is to comprehend the coping action against station blackout including emergency diesel generator, sequential loading of safety system and to ensure that the emergency diesel generator should meet requirements, especially voltage and frequency criteria using modeling tool. This paper also considered the change of the sequencing time and load capacity only for finding electrical design margin. However, the revision of load list must be verified with safety analysis. From this study, it is discovered that new load calculation is a key factor in EDG localization and in-house capability increase.

  13. Effect of the scalar condensate on the linear gauge field response in the Abelian Higgs model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jakovác, A; Szép, Z; Szep, Zs.

    2001-01-01

    The effective equations of motion for low-frequency mean gauge fields in the Abelian Higgs model are investigated in the presence of a scalar condensate, near the high temperature equilibrium. We determine the current induced by an inhomogeneous background gauge field in the linear response approximation up to order $e^4$, assuming adiabatic variation of the scalar fields. The physical degrees of freedom are found and a physical gauge choice for the numerical study of the combined Higgs+gauge evolution is proposed.

  14. Electric and magnetic response to the continuum for A=7 isobars in a dicluster model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mason; R. Chatterjee; L. Fortunato; A. Vitturi

    2008-11-11

    Mirror isobars $^7$Li and $^7$Be are investigated in a dicluster model. The magnetic dipole moments and the magnetic dipole response to the continuum are calculated in this framework. The magnetic contribution is found to be small with respect to electric dipole and quadrupole excitations even at astrophysical energies, at a variance with the case of deuteron. Energy weighted molecular sum rules are evaluated and a formula for the molecular magnetic dipole sum rule is found which matches the numerical calculations. Cross-sections for photo-dissociation and radiative capture as well as the S-factor for reactions of astrophysical significance are calculated with good agreement with known experimental data.

  15. Imaginative procedural modeling : automated 3D generation and rendering of stylized building designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deshmane, Anisha V

    2011-01-01

    The entertainment industry relies fairly heavily on computer-generated imagery to depict built environments in current films, video games, and other forms of simulated reality. These often involve highly complex geometries ...

  16. Semileptonic B to scalar meson decays in the standard model with fourth generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jamil Aslam, M. [Physics Department, Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2011-02-01

    We study the effects of the fourth generation of quarks on the total branching ratio and the lepton polarizations in B{sub 0}{yields}K{sub 0}*(1430)l{sup +}l{sup -} (l={mu}, {tau}) decay. Taking the fourth generation quark mass m{sub t'} of about 400 to 600 GeV with the mixing angle |V{sub t}{sup '}{sub b}*V{sub t}{sup '}{sub s}| in the range (0.05-1.4)x10{sup -2} and using the phase to be 80 deg., it is found that the branching ratio and lepton polarizations are quite sensitive to these fourth generation parameters. In the future, the experimental study of this decay will give us an opportunity to study new physics effects, precisely, to search for the fourth generation of quarks (t{sup '},b{sup '}) in an indirect way.

  17. Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strzepek, Kenneth M.

    2012-06-15

    Water withdrawals for thermoelectric cooling account for a significant portion of total water use in the United States. Any change in electrical energy generation policy and technologies has the potential to have a major ...

  18. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants,natural gas plants, and combined cycle natural gas plants.generated largely from combined-cycle Capacity (GW) yd r as

  19. Copula Based Stochastic Weather Generator as an Application for Crop Growth Models and Crop Insurance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juarez Torres, Miriam 77-

    2012-08-31

    Stochastic Weather Generators (SWG) try to reproduce the stochastic patterns of climatological variables characterized by high dimensionality, non-normal probability density functions and non-linear dependence relationships. However, conventional...

  20. Dynamic modelling of generation capacity investment in electricity markets with high wind penetration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eager, Daniel

    2012-06-25

    The ability of liberalised electricity markets to trigger investment in the generation capacity required to maintain an acceptable level of security of supply risk has been - and will continue to be - a topic of much ...

  1. A process for evaluation and state approval of an emergency response atmospheric dispersion model for Rocky Flats, Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hodgin, C.R.

    1991-11-06

    This document contains copies of the vugraphs used by C. R. Hodgin for the November 6, 1991 presentation summarizing the process to be used for evaluation of the Emergency Response Dispersion Model. (MHB)

  2. A Risk-based Optimization Modeling Framework for Mitigating Fire Events for Water and Fire Response Infrastructures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanta, Lufthansa Rahman

    2011-02-22

    ) minimizing the cost of mitigation. Third, a stochastic modeling approach is developed to assess urban fire risk for the coupled water distribution and fire response systems that includes probabilistic expressions for building ignition, WDS failure, and wind...

  3. Inferring team task plans from human meetings: A generative modeling approach with logic-based prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Been

    We aim to reduce the burden of programming and deploying autonomous systems to work in concert with people in time-critical domains such as military field operations and disaster response. Deployment plans for these ...

  4. Modeling the Non-linear Viscoelastic Response of High Temperature Polyimides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karra, Satish

    2010-01-01

    A constitutive model is developed to predict the viscoelastic response of polyimide resins that are used in high temperature applications. This model is based on a thermodynamic framework that uses the notion that the `natural configuration' of a body evolves as the body undergoes a process and the evolution is determined by maximizing the rate of entropy production in general and the rate of dissipation within purely mechanical considerations. We constitutively prescribe forms for the specific Helmholtz potential and the rate of dissipation (which is the product of density, temperature and the rate of entropy production), and the model is derived by maximizing the rate of dissipation with the constraint of incompressibility, and the reduced energy dissipation equation is also regarded as a constraint in that it is required to be met in every process that the body undergoes. The efficacy of the model is ascertained by comparing the predictions of the model with the experimental data for PMR-15 and HFPE-II-52 ...

  5. Modeling the Non-linear Viscoelastic Response of High Temperature Polyimides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satish Karra; K. R. Rajagopal

    2010-08-20

    A constitutive model is developed to predict the viscoelastic response of polyimide resins that are used in high temperature applications. This model is based on a thermodynamic framework that uses the notion that the `natural configuration' of a body evolves as the body undergoes a process and the evolution is determined by maximizing the rate of entropy production in general and the rate of dissipation within purely mechanical considerations. We constitutively prescribe forms for the specific Helmholtz potential and the rate of dissipation (which is the product of density, temperature and the rate of entropy production), and the model is derived by maximizing the rate of dissipation with the constraint of incompressibility, and the reduced energy dissipation equation is also regarded as a constraint in that it is required to be met in every process that the body undergoes. The efficacy of the model is ascertained by comparing the predictions of the model with the experimental data for PMR-15 and HFPE-II-52 polyimide resins.

  6. Validating Modal Aspects of OntoUML Conceptual Models Using Automatically Generated Visual World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foundation Ontology (UFO). UFO is a foundational ontology designed specially for conceptual modeling

  7. Validating Modal Aspects of OntoUML Conceptual Models Using Automatically Generated Visual World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foundation Ontology (UFO). UFO is a foundational ontology designed specially for conceptual modeling l

  8. Curine inhibits eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness in a mouse model of allergic asthma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ribeiro-Filho, Jaime; Calheiros, Andrea Surrage; Vieira-de-Abreu, Adriana; Moraes de Carvalho, Katharinne Ingrid; Silva Mendes, Diego da; Melo, Christianne Bandeira; Martins, Marco Aurélio; Silva Dias, Celidarque da; Piuvezam, Márcia Regina; and others

    2013-11-15

    Allergic asthma is a chronic inflammatory airway disease with increasing prevalence around the world. Current asthma therapy includes drugs that usually cause significant side effects, justifying the search for new anti-asthmatic drugs. Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that modulates calcium influx in many cell types; however, its anti-allergic and putative toxic effects remain to be elucidated. Our aim was to investigate the effects of curine on eosinophil activation and airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and to characterize its potential toxic effects. We used a mouse model of allergic asthma induced by sensitization and challenge with ovalbumin (OVA) to evaluate the anti-allergic effects of oral treatment with curine. The oral administration of curine significantly inhibited eosinophilic inflammation, eosinophil lipid body formation and AHR in animals challenged with OVA compared with animals in the untreated group. The curine treatment also reduced eotaxin and IL-13 production triggered by OVA. Verapamil, a calcium channel antagonist, had similar anti-allergic properties, and curine pre-treatment inhibited the calcium-induced tracheal contractile response ex-vivo, suggesting that the mechanism by which curine exerts its effects is through the inhibition of a calcium-dependent response. A toxicological evaluation showed that orally administered curine did not significantly alter the biochemical, hematological, behavioral and physical parameters measured in the experimental animals compared with saline-treated animals. In conclusion, curine showed anti-allergic activity through mechanisms that involve inhibition of IL-13 and eotaxin and of Ca{sup ++} influx, without inducing evident toxicity and as such, has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs. - Highlights: • Curine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid from Chondrodendron platyphyllum. • Curine inhibits eosinophil influx and activation and airway hyper-responsiveness. • Curine mechanisms involve inhibition of Ca{sup 2+} influx, and IL-13 and eotaxin secretion. • No significant toxicity was observed in mice orally treated with curine for 7 days. • Curine has the potential for the development of anti-asthmatic drugs.

  9. Preliminary studies of tunnel interface response modeling using test data from underground storage facilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Bartel, Lewis Clark

    2010-11-01

    In attempting to detect and map out underground facilities, whether they be large-scale hardened deeply-buried targets (HDBT's) or small-scale tunnels for clandestine border or perimeter crossing, seismic imaging using reflections from the tunnel interface has been seen as one of the better ways to both detect and delineate tunnels from the surface. The large seismic impedance contrast at the tunnel/rock boundary should provide a strong, distinguishable seismic response, but in practice, such strong indicators are often lacking. One explanation for the lack of a good seismic reflection at such a strong contrast boundary is that the damage caused by the tunneling itself creates a zone of altered seismic properties that significantly changes the nature of this boundary. This report examines existing geomechanical data that define the extent of an excavation damage zone around underground tunnels, and the potential impact on rock properties such as P-wave and S-wave velocities. The data presented from this report are associated with sites used for the development of underground repositories for the disposal of radioactive waste; these sites have been excavated in volcanic tuff (Yucca Mountain) and granite (HRL in Sweden, URL in Canada). Using the data from Yucca Mountain, a numerical simulation effort was undertaken to evaluate the effects of the damage zone on seismic responses. Calculations were performed using the parallelized version of the time-domain finitedifference seismic wave propagation code developed in the Geophysics Department at Sandia National Laboratories. From these numerical simulations, the damage zone does not have a significant effect upon the tunnel response, either for a purely elastic case or an anelastic case. However, what was discovered is that the largest responses are not true reflections, but rather reradiated Stoneley waves generated as the air/earth interface of the tunnel. Because of this, data processed in the usual way may not correctly image the tunnel. This report represents a preliminary step in the development of a methodology to convert numerical predictions of rock properties to an estimation of the extent of rock damage around an underground facility and its corresponding seismic velocity, and the corresponding application to design a testing methodology for tunnel detection.

  10. Abstract--A bi-objective optimization model of power and power changes generated by a wind turbine is discussed in this

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    1 Abstract--A bi-objective optimization model of power and power changes generated by a wind the industrial data collected at a wind farm. The models and constraints derived from the data were integrated prediction, power ramp rate, data mining, wind turbine operation strategy, generator torque, blade pitch

  11. Evaluation of the Suitability of Polarimetric Scattering and Emissivity Models with Scene Generation Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gartley, Michael G.

    Evaluation of the Suitability of Polarimetric Scattering and Emissivity Models with Scene models and hardware based infrared scene projectors commonly utilize analytical forms of polarized bi, polarimetric imaging sensors and payloads can benefit greatly from polarization capable synthetic image

  12. Realistic fault modeling and quality test generation of combined delay faults 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thadhlani, Ajaykumar A

    2001-01-01

    With increasing operating speed and shrinking technology, timing defects in integrated circuits are becoming increasingly important. The well established stuck-at-fault model is not sufficient because it is a static fault model and does not account...

  13. Modeling Variability and Uncertainty of Photovoltaic Generation: A Hidden State Spatial Statistical Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabone, Michaelangelo D; Callaway, Duncan S

    2015-01-01

    require- ments in unit commitment optimal dispatch modelsLaboratory (NREL) uses a unit commitment optimal dispatch

  14. Modeling and Control of Co-generation Power Plants: A Hybrid System Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

    of turning on/off the gas and steam turbine, the operat- ing constraints (minimum up and down times and produces electric power through the expansion of the gas in the gas turbine; the steam cycle is supplied with the output ex- haust gas from the gas turbine and generates both electricity and steam for the industrial

  15. Modeling and Control of Co-generation Power Plants: A Hybrid System Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

    : they are more efficient and flexible than more conventional configurations based on boilers and steam turbines of hot gasses in a (gas!) turbine. The steam cycle is supplied with the still hot exhaust gases of the gas turbine and generates both electricity and steam for the industrial processes. Clearly

  16. MODELLING AND CONTROL OF CO-GENERATION POWER PLANTS UNDER CONSIDERATION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

    , and logic rules. The possibility of turning on/off the gas and steam turbines, the operating constraints) turbine; the steam cycle is supplied with the exhaust gases from the gas turbine and generates both elec (minimum up and down times) and the different types of start up of the turbines characterize the hybrid

  17. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Dynamic Heat Generation Modeling of High Performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Thomas

    -electric aircraft is a high priority goal in the avionics community. Both increased reliability and efficiency and quadrature axis current dt = time step or time differential e = electrical frequency of motor in radians per second p = flux linkage M = motor generated torque L = load torque J = rotor inertia = coefficient

  18. Event Recognition using Qualitative Reasoning on Automatically Generated SpatioTemporal Models from Visual Input

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leeds, University of

    from Visual Input J Fernyhough, A G Cohn and D C Hogg School of Computer Studies, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT, UK. agc@scs.leeds.ac.uk Abstract In this paper we describe an implemented tech­ nique input. Using an exist­ ing tracking program which generates labelled contours for objects in every frame

  19. The Importance of Mesoscale Circulations Generated by SubgridScale Landscape Heterogeneities in General Circulations Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridlind, Ann

    jcl92c.tex The Importance of Mesoscale Circulations Generated by Subgrid­Scale Landscape Oceanography, Cook Campus, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA. #12; Abstract A mesoscale. These results emphasize the need to parameterize mesoscale processes induced by landscape discontinuities

  20. A sustainable model for training teachers to use pivotal response training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suhrheinrich, Jessica Brooke

    2010-01-01

    J. R. , (1995). Pyramidal staff training in the extension ofvia pivotal response training and the individualization ofof pivotal response training. Journal of Speech, Language

  1. Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate complexity2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate system model of intermediate complexity. The parameterization is based on21 previously published global. Abstract19 We introduce a parameterization of ocean mixing by tropical cyclones (TCs) into20 an Earth

  2. The Effects of Low Dose Irradiation on Inflammatory Response Proteins in a 3D Reconstituted Human Skin Tissue Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Springer, David L.; Chaffee, Mary E.; Lien, Katie A.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Sacksteder, Colette A.

    2012-12-01

    Skin responses to moderate and high doses of ionizing radiation include the induction of DNA repair, apoptosis, and stress response pathways. Additionally, numerous studies indicate that radiation exposure leads to inflammatory responses in skin cells and tissue. However, the inflammatory response of skin tissue to low dose radiation (<10 cGy) is poorly understood. In order to address this, we have utilized a reconstituted human skin tissue model (MatTek EpiDerm FT) and assessed changes in 23 cytokines twenty-four and forty eight hours following treatment of skin with either 3 or 10 cGy low-dose of radiation. Three cytokines, IFN-?, IL-2, MIP-1?, were significantly altered in response to low dose radiation. In contrast, seven cytokines were significantly altered in response to a high radiation dose of 200 cGy (IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IFN-?, MIP-1?, TNF ?, and VEGF) or the tumor promoter 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate (G-CSF, GM-CSF, IL-1?, IL-8, MIP-1?, MIP-1?, RANTES). Additionally, radiation induced inflammation appears to have a distinct cytokine response relative to the non-radiation induced stressor, TPA. Overall, these results indicate that there are subtle changes in the inflammatory protein levels following exposure to low dose radiation and this response is a sub-set of what is seen following a high dose in a human skin tissue model.

  3. A CFD-based wind solver for a fast response transport and dispersion model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gowardhan, Akshay A; Brown, Michael J; Pardyjak, Eric R; Senocak, Inanc

    2010-01-01

    In many cities, ambient air quality is deteriorating leading to concerns about the health of city inhabitants. In urban areas with narrow streets surrounded by clusters of tall buildings, called street canyons, air pollution from traffic emissions and other sources is difficult to disperse and may accumulate resulting in high pollutant concentrations. For various situations, including the evacuation of populated areas in the event of an accidental or deliberate release of chemical, biological and radiological agents, it is important that models should be developed that produce urban flow fields quickly. For these reasons it has become important to predict the flow field in urban street canyons. Various computational techniques have been used to calculate these flow fields, but these techniques are often computationally intensive. Most fast response models currently in use are at a disadvantage in these cases as they are unable to correlate highly heterogeneous urban structures with the diagnostic parameterizations on which they are based. In this paper, a fast and reasonably accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for complex urban areas has been developed called QUIC-CFD (Q-CFD). This technique represents an intermediate balance between fast (on the order of minutes for a several block problem) and reasonably accurate solutions. The paper details the solution procedure and validates this model for various simple and complex urban geometries.

  4. Moment-Based Probability Modeling and Extreme Response Estimation, The FITS Routine Version 1.2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MANUEL,LANCE; KASHEF,TINA; WINTERSTEIN,STEVEN R.

    1999-11-01

    This report documents the use of the FITS routine, which provides automated fits of various analytical, commonly used probability models from input data. It is intended to complement the previously distributed FITTING routine documented in RMS Report 14 (Winterstein et al., 1994), which implements relatively complex four-moment distribution models whose parameters are fit with numerical optimization routines. Although these four-moment fits can be quite useful and faithful to the observed data, their complexity can make them difficult to automate within standard fitting algorithms. In contrast, FITS provides more robust (lower moment) fits of simpler, more conventional distribution forms. For each database of interest, the routine estimates the distribution of annual maximum response based on the data values and the duration, T, over which they were recorded. To focus on the upper tails of interest, the user can also supply an arbitrary lower-bound threshold, {chi}{sub low}, above which a shifted distribution model--exponential or Weibull--is fit.

  5. Earthquake Response Modeling for a Parked and Operating Megawatt-Scale Wind Turbine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prowell, I.; Elgamal, A.; Romanowitz, H.; Duggan, J. E.; Jonkman, J.

    2010-10-01

    Demand parameters for turbines, such as tower moment demand, are primarily driven by wind excitation and dynamics associated with operation. For that purpose, computational simulation platforms have been developed, such as FAST, maintained by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). For seismically active regions, building codes also require the consideration of earthquake loading. Historically, it has been common to use simple building code approaches to estimate the structural demand from earthquake shaking, as an independent loading scenario. Currently, International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) design requirements include the consideration of earthquake shaking while the turbine is operating. Numerical and analytical tools used to consider earthquake loads for buildings and other static civil structures are not well suited for modeling simultaneous wind and earthquake excitation in conjunction with operational dynamics. Through the addition of seismic loading capabilities to FAST, it is possible to simulate earthquake shaking in the time domain, which allows consideration of non-linear effects such as structural nonlinearities, aerodynamic hysteresis, control system influence, and transients. This paper presents a FAST model of a modern 900-kW wind turbine, which is calibrated based on field vibration measurements. With this calibrated model, both coupled and uncoupled simulations are conducted looking at the structural demand for the turbine tower. Response is compared under the conditions of normal operation and potential emergency shutdown due the earthquake induced vibrations. The results highlight the availability of a numerical tool for conducting such studies, and provide insights into the combined wind-earthquake loading mechanism.

  6. The ArcSDE GIS Dynamic Population Model Tool for Savannah River Site Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MCLANE, TRACY; JONES, DWIGHT

    2005-10-03

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) is a 310-square-mile Department of Energy site located near Aiken, South Carolina. With a workforce of over 10,000 employees and subcontractors, SRS emergency personnel must be able to respond to an emergency event in a timely and effective manner, in order to ensure the safety and security of the Site. Geographic Information Systems (GIS) provides the technology needed to give managers and emergency personnel the information they need to make quick and effective decisions. In the event of a site evacuation, knowing the number of on-site personnel to evacuate from a given area is an essential piece of information for emergency staff. SRS has developed a GIS Dynamic Population Model Tool to quickly communicate real-time information that summarizes employee populations by facility area and building and then generates dynamic maps that illustrate output statistics.

  7. Field localization and mass generation in an alternative 5-dimensional brane model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preston Jones; Gerardo Munoz; Doug Singleton; Triyanta

    2015-06-11

    This proceedings is based on a talk given at the APS DPF 2013 on an alternative 5-dimensional brane world model which is related to but has some physically distinct features from the Randall-Sundrum brane world model. The spin dependent localization of 5D fields for the alternative model are different and in some ways superior to the original Randall- Sundrum Model. The alternative model also exhibits a cutoff in the lo-calization of massive scalar fields not seen in the Randall-Sundrum and includes a self consistent mass prediction of two possible scalar bosons. Setting the warping factor in the new model consistent with a 126 GeV localized scalar boson predicts the existence of a second scalar boson at 177 GeV. This second scalar boson could be localized or non localized depending on the type of warping factor.

  8. Large-scale, realistic laboratory modeling of M2 internal tide generation at the Luzon Strait

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mercier, Matthieu J; Helfrich, Karl; Sommeria, Joël; Viboud, Samuel; Didelle, Henri; Saidi, Sasan; Dauxois, Thierry; Peacock, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The complex double-ridge system in the Luzon Strait in the South China Sea (SCS) is one of the strongest sources of internal tides in the oceans, associated with which are some of the largest amplitude internal solitary waves on record. An issue of debate, however, has been the specific nature of their generation mechanism. To provide insight, we present the results of a large-scale laboratory experiment performed at the Coriolis platform. The experiment was carefully designed so that the relevant dimensionless parameters, which include the excursion parameter, criticality, Rossby, and Froude numbers, closely matched the ocean scenario. The results advocate that a broad and coherent weakly nonlinear, three-dimensional, M2 internal tide that is shaped by the overall geometry of the double-ridge system is radiated into the South China Sea and subsequently steepens, as opposed to being generated by a particular feature or localized region within the ridge system.

  9. Systems and methods that generate height map models for efficient three dimensional reconstruction from depth information

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Frahm, Jan-Michael; Pollefeys, Marc Andre Leon; Gallup, David Robert

    2015-12-08

    Methods of generating a three dimensional representation of an object in a reference plane from a depth map including distances from a reference point to pixels in an image of the object taken from a reference point. Weights are assigned to respective voxels in a three dimensional grid along rays extending from the reference point through the pixels in the image based on the distances in the depth map from the reference point to the respective pixels, and a height map including an array of height values in the reference plane is formed based on the assigned weights. An n-layer height map may be constructed by generating a probabilistic occupancy grid for the voxels and forming an n-dimensional height map comprising an array of layer height values in the reference plane based on the probabilistic occupancy grid.

  10. Generation of surface waves by an underwater moving bottom: Experiments and application to tsunami modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jamin, Timothée; Ruiz-Chavarría, Gerardo; Berhanu, Michael; Falcon, Eric

    2014-01-01

    We report laboratory experiments on surface waves generated in a uniform fluid layer whose bottom undergoes a sudden upward motion. Simultaneous measurements of the free-surface deformation and the fluid velocity field are focused on the role of the bottom kinematics in wave generation. We observe that the fluid layer transfers bottom motion to the free surface as a temporal high-pass filter coupled with a spatial low-pass filter. Both filter effects are usually neglected in tsunami warning systems. Our results display good agreement with a prevailing linear theory without fitting parameter. Based on our experimental data, we provide a new theoretical approach for the rapid kinematics limit that is applicable even for non-flat bottoms: a key step since most approaches assume a uniform depth. This approach can be easily appended to tsunami simulations under arbitrary topography.

  11. Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeil, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    driver for the energy demand forecast. The basic assumptionglobal bottom-up energy demand forecasts, and a frameworkin modelling energy demand is to forecast activity. Activity

  12. Hydrogen Gas Generation Model for Fuel Based Remote Handled TRU Waste Stored at INEEL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soli T. Khericha; Rajiv N. Bhatt; Kevin Liekhus

    2003-02-01

    The Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) initiated efforts to calculate the hydrogen gas generation in remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) containers in order to evaluate continued storage of unvented RH-TRU containers in vaults and to identify any potential problems during retrieval and aboveground storage. A computer code is developed to calculate the hydrogen concentration in the stored RH-TRU waste drums for known configuration, waste matrix, and radionuclide inventories as a function of time.

  13. Generating meshes for finite-difference analysis using a solid modeler

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laguna, G.W.; White, W.T.; Cabral, B.K.

    1987-09-01

    One tool used by the Engineering Research Division of LLNL to help analyze the behavior of electronic systems in hostile environments is 3D finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) computation. FDTD codes solve Maxwell's equations,the differential equations of electromagnetism, on a uniform lattice of points. It is this uniform lattice, or ''mesh,'' that distinguishes finite-difference codes from other codes. The simple mesh makes FDTD codes computationally more efficient than other codes, which enables them to run larger problems and to run faster (up to thirty times faster than finite-element codes, for example). Therefore, within the Engineering Department at LLNL, Electronics Engineering (EE) has initiated a project to develop a mesh generator that will provide meshes suitable for FDTD analysis. This report describes the results of the first year of EE's FDTD Mesh Generation Project. During this year a preliminary version of an automated mesh generator was built and used to create a mesh of an object of interest to the High-Power Microwave Program, namely an electrically detonatable land mine. The code was verified by meshing basic solids such as spheres and cylinders. Because of the design of the code, there is no software limitation to the size of meshes that can be accommodated. The algorithm with a mesh space of approximately 500,000 cells has been demonstrated. The mesh generator can detect certain objects with walls that are thinner than the width of a cell. The code has internal graphics for viewing objects as they appear prior to being converted to a finite-difference representation. Additionally, via data files, the code is coupled to two external graphics packages for visually checking the meshes, namely TAURUS on the Cray and a new code, IMAGE, on the Silicon Graphics IRIS workstation.

  14. Response of Atmospheric Biomarkers to NOx-induced Photochemistry Generated by Stellar Cosmic Rays for Earth-like Planets in the Habitable Zone of M-Dwarf Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grenfell, John Lee; von Paris, Philip; Patzer, Beate; Lammer, Helmut; Stracke, Barbara; Gebauer, Stefanie; Schreier, Franz; Rauer, Heike

    2015-01-01

    Understanding whether M-dwarf stars may host habitable planets with Earth-like atmospheres and biospheres is a major goal in exoplanet research. If such planets exist, the question remains as to whether they could be identified via spectral signatures of biomarkers. Such planets may be exposed to extreme intensities of cosmic rays that could perturb their atmospheric photochemistry. Here, we consider stellar activity of M-dwarfs ranging from quiet up to strong flaring conditions and investigate one particular effect upon biomarkers, namely, the ability of secondary electrons caused by stellar cosmic rays to break up atmospheric molecular nitrogen (N2), which leads to production of nitrogen oxides in the planetary atmosphere, hence affecting biomarkers such as ozone. We apply a stationary model, that is, without a time-dependence, hence we are calculating the limiting case where the atmospheric chemistry response time of the biomarkers is assumed to be slow and remains constant compared with rapid forcing by t...

  15. SOFTWARE QUALITY ASSURANCE FOR EMERGENCY RESPONSE CONSEQUENCE ASSESSMENT MODELS AT DOE'S SAVANNAH RIVER SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunter, C

    2007-12-17

    The Savannah River National Laboratory's (SRNL) Atmospheric Technologies Group develops, maintains, and operates computer-based software applications for use in emergency response consequence assessment at DOE's Savannah River Site. These applications range from straightforward, stand-alone Gaussian dispersion models run with simple meteorological input to complex computational software systems with supporting scripts that simulate highly dynamic atmospheric processes. A software quality assurance program has been developed to ensure appropriate lifecycle management of these software applications. This program was designed to meet fully the overall structure and intent of SRNL's institutional software QA programs, yet remain sufficiently practical to achieve the necessary level of control in a cost-effective manner. A general overview of this program is described.

  16. Modeling and Optimal Control of Immune Response of Renal Transplant Recipients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    opportunistic infections and oncogenesis. Hence, there is a delicate balance needed so that the immune response

  17. A Generic Biogeochemical Module for Earth System Models: Next Generation BioGeoChemical Module (NGBGC), Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yilin; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-11-13

    Physical and biogeochemical processes regulate soil carbon dynamics and CO2 flux to and from atmosphere, influencing global climate changes. Integration of these processes into earth system models (e.g., community land models (CLM)), however, currently faces three major challenges: 1) extensive efforts are required to modify modeling structures and to rewrite computer programs to incorporate new or updated processes as new knowledge is being generated, 2) computational cost is prohibitively expensive to simulate biogeochemical processes in land models due to large variations in the rates of biogeochemical processes, and 3) various mathematical representations of biogeochemical processes exist to incorporate different aspects of fundamental mechanisms, but systematic evaluation of the different mathematical representations is difficult, if not possible. To address these challenges, we propose a new computational framework to easily incorporate physical and biogeochemical processes into land models. The new framework consists of a new biogeochemical module with a generic algorithm and reaction database so that new and updated processes can be incorporated into land models without the need to manually set up the ordinary differential equations to be solved numerically. The reaction database consists of processes of nutrient flow through the terrestrial ecosystems in plants, litter and soil. This framework facilitates effective comparison studies of biogeochemical cycles in an ecosystem using different conceptual models under the same land modeling framework. The approach was first implemented in CLM and benchmarked against simulations from the original CLM-CN code. A case study was then provided to demonstrate the advantages of using the new approach to incorporate a phosphorus cycle into the CLM model. To our knowledge, the phosphorus-incorporated CLM is a new model that can be used to simulate phosphorus limitation on the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems.

  18. SU-E-J-73: Generation of Volumetric Images with a Respiratory Motion Model Based On An External Surrogate Signal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hurwitz, M; Williams, C; Mishra, P; Dhou, S; Lewis, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Respiratory motion during radiotherapy treatment can differ significantly from motion observed during imaging for treatment planning. Our goal is to use an initial 4DCT scan and the trace of an external surrogate marker to generate 3D images of patient anatomy during treatment. Methods: Deformable image registration is performed on images from an initial 4DCT scan. The deformation vectors are used to develop a patient-specific linear relationship between the motion of each voxel and the trajectory of an external surrogate signal. Correlations in motion are taken into account with principal component analysis, reducing the number of free parameters. This model is tested with digital phantoms reproducing the breathing patterns of ten measured patient tumor trajectories, using five seconds of data to develop the model and the subsequent thirty seconds to test its predictions. The model is also tested with a breathing physical anthropomorphic phantom programmed to reproduce a patient breathing pattern. Results: The error (mean absolute, 95th percentile) over 30 seconds in the predicted tumor centroid position ranged from (0.8, 1.3) mm to (2.2, 4.3) mm for the ten patient breathing patterns. The model reproduced changes in both phase and amplitude of the breathing pattern. Agreement between prediction and truth over the entire image was confirmed by assessing the global voxel intensity RMS error. In the physical phantom, the error in the tumor centroid position was less than 1 mm for all images. Conclusion: We are able to reconstruct 3D images of patient anatomy with a model correlating internal respiratory motion with motion of an external surrogate marker, reproducing the expected tumor centroid position with an average accuracy of 1.4 mm. The images generated by this model could be used to improve dose calculations for treatment planning and delivered dose estimates. This work was partially funded by a research grant from Varian Medical Systems.

  19. Implications of the stability and triviality bounds on the standard model with three and four chiral generations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wingerter, Akin [Laboratoire de Physique Subatomique et de Cosmologie UJF Grenoble 1, CNRS/IN2P3, INPG, 53 Avenue des Martyrs, F-38026 Grenoble (France)

    2011-11-01

    We revisit the stability and triviality bounds on the Higgs boson mass in the context of the standard model with three and four generations (SM3 and SM4, respectively). In light of the recent results from LHC, the triviality bound in the SM3 has now become obsolete, and the stability bound implies for a Higgs mass of e.g. m{sub H}=115 GeV the onset of new physics before {Lambda}=650 TeV, whereas there are no limits for m{sub H}{>=}133 GeV. For the SM4, the stability and triviality curves intersect and bound a finite region. As a consequence, the fourth generation fermions place stringent theoretical limits on the Higgs mass, and there is a maximal scale beyond which the theory cannot be perturbatively valid. We find that the Higgs mass cannot exceed 700 GeV for any values of the fourth generation fermion masses. Turning the argument around, the absence of a Higgs signal for m{sub H}{<=}600 GeV excludes a fourth generation with quark masses below 300 GeV and lepton masses below 350 GeV. In particular, the quark bounds also hold for the small mixing scenarios for which the direct limits from Tevatron and LHC are not applicable, and the lepton bounds we obtain are stronger than the collider limits. If a Higgs boson lighter than 700 GeV is not observed, a fourth generation of chiral fermions with perturbative Yukawa couplings will be conclusively excluded for the full range of parameters.

  20. Power System Modeling of 20% Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; Blair, N.; Bolinger, M.; Wiser, R.; O'Connell, R.; Hern, T.; Miller, B.

    2008-06-01

    This paper shows the results of the Wind Energy Deployment System model used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030.

  1. Building robust chemical reaction mechanisms : next generation of automatic model construction software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Jing, 1972-

    2004-01-01

    Building proper reaction mechanisms is crucial to model the system dynamic properties for many industrial processes with complex chemical reaction phenomena. Because of the complexity of a reaction mechanism, computer-aided ...

  2. Activities Information Diffusion in Chinese Largest Recommendation Social Network: Patterns and Generative Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojmenovic, Ivan

    Reality Technology and Systems, Beihang University, Beijing 100191, China Guangdong Petrochemical Equipment Fault Diagnosis Key Laboratory Guangdong University of Petrochemical Technology, Guangdong 525000 models to study the diffusion process. The authors in [7] analyzed the behavior diffusion using an event

  3. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    Assumptions Land-Based Wind Technology Cost $1730/kW in 2005Shallow Offshore Wind Technology Cost Wind Technologyare modeled by WinDS, the costs of building transmission

  4. Physical modeling of wind turbine generators in a small scale analog system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xuntuo

    2014-01-01

    This project represents the physical modeling and experimental test of a Doubly-fed Induction Machine (DFIM), in order to substantially analyze the characteristic behaviors of wind turbines and its use in the micro-grid ...

  5. A Conformal Mapping Grid Generation Method for Modeling High-Fidelity Aeroelastic Simulations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worley, Gregory

    2010-07-14

    This work presents a method for building a three-dimensional mesh from two- dimensional topologically identical layers, for use in aeroelastic simulations. The method allows modeling of large deformations of the wing in both the span direction...

  6. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01

    2003. U.S. Department of Energy (2008). 20% Wind Energy by2030: Increasing Wind Energy’s Contribution to U.S.shows the results of the Wind Energy Deployment System model

  7. Modeling Variability and Uncertainty of Photovoltaic Generation: A Hidden State Spatial Statistical Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabone, Michaelangelo D; Callaway, Duncan S

    2015-01-01

    Solar Data for Power System Modeling From Static Spatial Variability Anal- ysis, National Renewable Energydata for isolated sites: Using artificial neural network and a library of Markov transition matrices approach,” Solar Energy

  8. Design of a next-generation regional weather research and forecast model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michalakes, J.

    1999-01-13

    The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is a new model development effort undertaken jointly by the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and a number of collaborating institutions and university scientists. The model is intended for use by operational NWP and university research communities, providing a common framework for idealized dynamical studies, fill physics numerical weather prediction, air-quality simulation, and regional climate. It will eventually supersede large, well-established but aging regional models now maintained by the participating institutions. The WRF effort includes re-engineering the underlying software architecture to produce a modular, flexible code designed from the outset to provide portable performance across diverse computing architectures. This paper outlines key elements of the WRF software design.

  9. Joint generative model for fMRI/DWI and its application to population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venkataraman, Archana

    We propose a novel probabilistic framework to merge information from DWI tractography and resting-state fMRI correlations. In particular, we model the interaction of latent anatomical and functional connectivity templates ...

  10. Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reuter, Martin

    and ecosystem impacts, and analysis of mitigation strategies, need to be based on realistic evaluation Geological Survey (USGS) inventories and a recent NREL report. To illustrate the model capabilities, we the Renewable Energy Futures (REF) calculations performed by

  11. Nodalization study of the Westinghouse Model E steam generator secondary side 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, Robert Orval

    1987-01-01

    Parameters 13 15 CHAPTER III. BASE MODEL DEVELOPMENT 18 Pur'pose Scope 18 18 Data Base Development Base Model Nodalization 19 20 Liquid Level Template Recommendations 25 CHAPTER IV. TRANSIENT DESCRIPTIONS AND BASE CASE RESULTS 29 Introduction... 29 Transient Overview 29 Transient Descriptions Page 30 Conclusions CHAPTER V. DESCRIPTION OF NODALIZATIONS STUDIED Introduction Case Descriptions Conclusions 59 CHAPTER VI. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS OF THE NODALIZATION STUDY Introduction...

  12. Generator Dynamic Model Validation and Parameter Calibration Using Phasor Measurements at the Point of Connection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Du, Pengwei; Kosterev, Dmitry; Yang, Steve

    2013-05-01

    Disturbance data recorded by phasor measurement units (PMU) offers opportunities to improve the integrity of dynamic models. However, manually tuning parameters through play-back events demands significant efforts and engineering experiences. In this paper, a calibration method using the extended Kalman filter (EKF) technique is proposed. The formulation of EKF with parameter calibration is discussed. Case studies are presented to demonstrate its validity. The proposed calibration method is cost-effective, complementary to traditional equipment testing for improving dynamic model quality.

  13. A Numerical Model Without Truncation Error for a Steady-State Analysis of a Once-Through Steam Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sim, Yoon Sub; Kim, Eui Kwang; Eoh, Jae Hyuk [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of)

    2005-06-15

    To overcome the drawbacks of conventional schemes for a numerical analysis of a steam generator (SG), an efficient numerical model has been developed to analyze the steady state of a once-through-type SG where the feedwater is heated to superheated steam. In the developed model, the temperature and enthalpy are defined at the boundary of a calculation cell, and the exact solutions for the temperature distribution in a calculation cell are utilized. This feature of the developed model frees calculation from the undesirable effects of numerical diffusion, and only a small number of nodes are required. Also, the developed model removes the ambiguity from the parameter values at the inlet and exit of a calculation.The BoSupSG-SS computer code was developed by using the analysis model, and it performed well with only three calculation nodes to analyze a superheated SG. The developed model can be effectively used for the cases where a fast one-dimensional calculation is required such as an SG or system design analysis.

  14. Long-memory effects in linear-response models of Earth's temperature and implications for future global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rypdal, Martin

    2013-01-01

    A linearized energy-balance model for global temperature is formulated, featuring a scale-free long-range memory (LRM) response and stochastic forcing representing the influence on the ocean heat reservoir from atmospheric weather systems. The model is parametrized by an effective response strength, the stochastic forcing strength, and the memory exponent. The instrumental global surface temperature record and the deterministic component of the forcing are used to estimate these parameters by means of the maximum-likelihood method. The residual obtained by subtracting the deterministic solution from the observed record is analyzed as a noise process and shown to be consistent with a long-memory time-series model and inconsistent with a short-memory model. By decomposing the forcing record in contributions from solar, volcanic, and anthropogenic activity one can estimate the contribution of each to 20'th century global warming. The LRM model is applied with a reconstruction of the forcing for the last millenni...

  15. Spatiotemporal variability of hydrologic response : an entropy-based approach using a distributed hydrologic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Aldrich Edra

    2014-01-01

    Basin hydrologic response pertains to the partitioning of precipitation into stream-flow, evapotranspiration, and change in storage. The ability to explain or predict the response has many applications e.g. flood forecasting, ...

  16. From Physics Model to Results: An Optimizing Framework for Cross-Architecture Code Generation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blazewicz, Marek; Hinder, Ian; Koppelman, David M.; Brandt, Steven R.; Ciznicki, Milosz; Kierzynka, Michal; Löffler, Frank; Schnetter, Erik; Tao, Jian

    2013-01-01

    Starting from a high-level problem description in terms of partial differential equations using abstract tensor notation, theChemoraframework discretizes, optimizes, and generates complete high performance codes for a wide range of compute architectures. Chemora extends the capabilities of Cactus, facilitating the usage of large-scale CPU/GPU systems in an efficient manner for complex applications, without low-level code tuning. Chemora achieves parallelism through MPI and multi-threading, combining OpenMP and CUDA. Optimizations include high-level code transformations, efficient loop traversal strategies, dynamically selected data and instruction cache usage strategies, and JIT compilation of GPU code tailored to the problem characteristics. The discretization is based onmore »higher-order finite differences on multi-block domains. Chemora's capabilities are demonstrated by simulations of black hole collisions. This problem provides an acid test of the framework, as the Einstein equations contain hundreds of variables and thousands of terms.« less

  17. From Physics Model to Results: An Optimizing Framework for Cross-Architecture Code Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marek Blazewicz; Ian Hinder; David M. Koppelman; Steven R. Brandt; Milosz Ciznicki; Michal Kierzynka; Frank Löffler; Erik Schnetter; Jian Tao

    2013-07-24

    Starting from a high-level problem description in terms of partial differential equations using abstract tensor notation, the Chemora framework discretizes, optimizes, and generates complete high performance codes for a wide range of compute architectures. Chemora extends the capabilities of Cactus, facilitating the usage of large-scale CPU/GPU systems in an efficient manner for complex applications, without low-level code tuning. Chemora achieves parallelism through MPI and multi-threading, combining OpenMP and CUDA. Optimizations include high-level code transformations, efficient loop traversal strategies, dynamically selected data and instruction cache usage strategies, and JIT compilation of GPU code tailored to the problem characteristics. The discretization is based on higher-order finite differences on multi-block domains. Chemora's capabilities are demonstrated by simulations of black hole collisions. This problem provides an acid test of the framework, as the Einstein equations contain hundreds of variables and thousands of terms.

  18. Group-theoretic restrictions on generation of CP-violation in multi-Higgs-doublet models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branco, G C

    2015-01-01

    It has been known since decades that imposing a symmetry group G on the scalar sector of multi-Higgs-doublet models has consequences for CP-violation. In all examples of two- and three-Higgs-doublet models equipped with symmetries, one observes the following intriguing property: if G prevents explicit CP-violation (CPV), at least in the neutral Higgs sector, then it also prevents spontaneous CPV, and if G allows explicit CPV, then it allows for spontaneous CPV. One is led to conjecture that this is a general phenomenon. In this paper, we prove this conjecture for any rephasing symmetry group G and any number of doublets.

  19. Next Generation Models for Storage and Representation of Microbial Biological Annotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quest, Daniel J; Land, Miriam L; Brettin, Thomas S; Cottingham, Robert W

    2010-01-01

    Background Traditional genome annotation systems were developed in a very different computing era, one where the World Wide Web was just emerging. Consequently, these systems are built as centralized black boxes focused on generating high quality annotation submissions to GenBank/EMBL supported by expert manual curation. The exponential growth of sequence data drives a growing need for increasingly higher quality and automatically generated annotation. Typical annotation pipelines utilize traditional database technologies, clustered computing resources, Perl, C, and UNIX file systems to process raw sequence data, identify genes, and predict and categorize gene function. These technologies tightly couple the annotation software system to hardware and third party software (e.g. relational database systems and schemas). This makes annotation systems hard to reproduce, inflexible to modification over time, difficult to assess, difficult to partition across multiple geographic sites, and difficult to understand for those who are not domain experts. These systems are not readily open to scrutiny and therefore not scientifically tractable. The advent of Semantic Web standards such as Resource Description Framework (RDF) and OWL Web Ontology Language (OWL) enables us to construct systems that address these challenges in a new comprehensive way. Results Here, we develop a framework for linking traditional data to OWL-based ontologies in genome annotation. We show how data standards can decouple hardware and third party software tools from annotation pipelines, thereby making annotation pipelines easier to reproduce and assess. An illustrative example shows how TURTLE (Terse RDF Triple Language) can be used as a human readable, but also semantically-aware, equivalent to GenBank/EMBL files. Conclusions The power of this approach lies in its ability to assemble annotation data from multiple databases across multiple locations into a representation that is understandable to researchers. In this way, all researchers, experimental and computational, will more easily understand the informatics processes constructing genome annotation and ultimately be able to help improve the systems that produce them.

  20. Acceleration of Energetic Particles Through Self-Generated Waves in a Decelerating Coronal Shock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanahuja, Blai

    Acceleration of Energetic Particles Through Self-Generated Waves in a Decelerating Coronal Shock M the Alfvén waves responsible for the diffusive acceleration of particles are generated by the accelerated coupled SEP acceleration and Alfvén wave self- generation model [5], the particles are simulated

  1. Comparison of Langevin and Markov channel noise models for neuronal signal generation B. Sengupta,* S. B. Laughlin, and J. E. Niven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comparison of Langevin and Markov channel noise models for neuronal signal generation B. Sengupta reproduces the channel noise produced by the Markov model remains unclear. Here we present a comparison between Langevin and Markov models of channel noise in neurons using single compartment Hodgkin

  2. Modeling and Optimization of Next Generation Feedstock Development for Chemical Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    1929, 2011 #12;Motivation Energy Consumption by Manufacturing Industry 20061Industry, 20061 Primary for CPI · Utilize sun-light energy as carbon- based molecules · Renewable · Reduced CO2 emissions, USA PanAmerican Advanced Studies Institute Process Modeling and Optimization for Energy

  3. An Arnoldi Approach for Generation of ReducedOrder Models for Turbomachinery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peraire, Jaime

    blading, aeroe­ lasticity has become a critical consideration in the design of compressors. Understanding boundaries, and thus has a large impact on the design process. Appro­ priate blade design, together model that has two degrees of freedom for each blade. The technique is applicable to viscous and three

  4. Modeling and Generation of Space-Time Correlated Signals for Sensor Network Fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossi, Michele

    and recovery in Wireless Sensor Networks (WSNs) have utilized the spatio-temporal statistics of real world signals in order to achieve good performance in terms of energy savings and improved signal reconstruction model is accurate in reproducing the signal statistics of interest. I. INTRODUCTION AND RELATED WORK

  5. Generating Trace-Sets for Model-based Testing Birgitta Lindstrom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Offutt, Jeff

    into a powerful technique for automatic formal ver- ification of transition systems. Researchers have devel- oped University Fairfax, VA 22030, USA E-mail: offutt@gmu.edu Abstract Model-checkers are powerful tools that can to a number of problems. Instead of individual traces, software testing needs sets of traces that satisfy

  6. A circuit model of the temporal pattern generator of Caenorhabditis egg-laying behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schafer, William R.

    , the model was implemented in the statis- tical language R (R Development Core Team (2008). R: A language and en- vironment for statistical computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria Supplemental Material Mi Zhang William R. Schafer Rainer Breitling December 3, 2009 1 Equations The following

  7. Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McMahon, James E.

    2009-05-29

    This paper presents efforts to date and prospective goals towards development of a modelling and analysis framework which is comprehensive enough to address the global climate crisis, and detailed enough to provide policymakers with concrete targets and achievable outcomes. In terms of energy efficiency policy, this requires coverage of the entire world, with emphasis on countries and regions with large and/or rapidly growing energy-related emissions, and analysis at the 'technology' level-building end use, transport mode or industrial process. These elements have not been fully addressed by existing modelling efforts, which usually take either a top-down approach, or concentrate on a few fully industrialized countries where energy demand is well-understood. Inclusion of details such as appliance ownership rates, use patterns and efficiency levels throughout the world allows for a deeper understanding of the demand for energy today and, more importantly, over the coming decades. This is a necessary next step for energy analysts and policy makers in assessment of mitigation potentials. The modelling system developed at LBNL over the past 3 years takes advantage of experience in end use demand and in forecasting markets for energy-consuming equipment, in combination with known technology-based efficiency opportunities and policy types. A particular emphasis has been placed on modelling energy growth in developing countries. Experiences to date include analyses covering individual countries (China and India), end uses (refrigerators and air conditioners) and policy types (standards and labelling). Each of these studies required a particular effort in data collection and model refinement--they share, however, a consistent approach and framework which allows comparison, and forms the foundation of a comprehensive analysis system leading to a roadmap to address the greenhouse gas mitigation targetslikely to be set in the coming years.

  8. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and implement a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of demand response resources and to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to assess economic value of the realizable potential of demand response for ancillary services.

  9. Side-payment profitability and interacting eyeball ISPs under convex demand-response modeling congestion-sensitive applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kesidis, George

    2011-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the issue of side payments between content providers (CPs) and Internet service (access bandwidth) providers (ISPs) in an Internet that is potentially not neutral. We herein generalize past results modeling the ISP and CP interaction as a noncooperative game in two directions. We consider different demand response models (price sensitivities) for different provider types in order to explore when side payments are profitable to the ISP. Also, we consider convex (non-linear) demand response to model demand triggered by traffic which is sensitive to access bandwidth congestion, particularly delay-sensitive interactive real-time applications. Finally, we consider a model with two competing "eyeball" ISPs with transit pricing of net traffic at their peering point to study the effects of caching remote content.

  10. A kinetic model of tumor growth and its radiation response with an application to Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watanabe, Yoichi; Leder, Kevin Z; Hui, Susanta K

    2015-01-01

    We developed a mathematical model to simulate the growth of tumor volume and its response to a single fraction of high dose irradiation. We made several key assumptions of the model. Tumor volume is composed of proliferating (or dividing) cancer cells and non-dividing (or dead) cells. Tumor growth rate (or tumor volume doubling time, Td) is proportional to the ratio of the volumes of tumor vasculature and the tumor. The vascular volume grows slower than the tumor by introducing the vascular growth retardation factor, theta. Upon irradiation the proliferating cells gradually die over a fixed time period after irradiation. Dead cells are cleared away with cell clearance time, Tcl. The model was applied to simulate pre-treatment growth and post-treatment radiation response of rat rhabdomyosarcoma tumor and metastatic brain tumors of five patients who were treated by Gamma Knife stereotactic radiosurgery (GKSRS). By selecting appropriate model parameters, we showed the temporal variation of the tumors for both th...

  11. Inference-based Geometric Modeling for the Generation of Complex Cluttered Virtual Environments 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggers, Keith Edward

    2012-07-16

    . : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 2 2 Surface splatting applied to a point cloud dataset. : : : : : : : : : : : 3 3 Moving Least Squares and contouring applied to a point cloud dataset. 4 4 Our solid modeling algorithm applied to a point cloud dataset. : : : 5 5 Overview... scanner-based point cloud of a cluttered environment. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 19 11 An example of a photo-based point cloud of a cluttered environment. 19 12 Point cloud samples and tted surface splats...

  12. Combining Weather Data for a Dataset Sufficient for Generating High-Resolution Weather Prediction Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fox, Jared B.; Ghan, Steven J.

    2004-03-01

    Assessments of the effects of climate change typically require information at scales of 10 km or less. In regions with complex terrain, much of the spatial variability in climate (temperature, precipitation, and snow water) occurs on scales below 10 km. Since the typical global climate model simulations grid size is more than 200 km, it is necessary to develop models with much higher resolution. Unfortunately, no datasets currently produced are both highly accurate and provide data at a sufficiently high resolution. As a result, current global climate models are forced to ignore the important climate variations that occur below the 200 km scale. This predicament prompted the creation of a global hybrid dataset with information for precipitation, temperature, and relative humidity. The resulting dataset illustrated the importance of having high-resolution datasets and gives clear proof that regions with complex terrain require a fine resolution grid to give an accurate represent at ion of their climatology. For example, the Andes Mountains in Chile cause a temperature shift of more than 25C within the same area as a single 2.5 grid cell from the NCEP dataset. Fortunately the CRU, U.D., GPCP, and NCEP datasets, when hybridized, are able to provide both precision and satisfactory resolution with global coverage. This composite will enable the development of both high-resolution models and quality empirical downscaling methods--both of which are necessary for scientists to more accurately predict the effects of global climate change. Without accurate long-term forecasts, climatologists and policy makers will not have the tools they need to effectively reduce the negative effects human activity have on the earth.

  13. Model-Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIX F Wetlandsof Energy Model RepairCladdings: A Statusof

  14. Model-Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICESpecialAPPENDIX F Wetlandsof Energy Model RepairCladdings: A Statusofof

  15. Water demands for electricity generation in the U.S.: Modeling different scenarios for the water–energy nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Lu; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Patel, Pralit L.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Zhou, Yuyu; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.

    2015-05-01

    Water withdrawal for electricity generation in the United States accounts for approximately half the total freshwater withdrawal. With steadily growing electricity demands, a changing climate, and limited water supplies in many water-scarce states, meeting future energy and water demands poses a significant socio-economic challenge. Employing an integrated modeling approach that can capture the energy-water interactions at regional and national scales is essential to improve our understanding of the key drivers that govern those interactions and the role of national policies. In this study, the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a technologically-detailed integrated model of the economy, energy, agriculture and land use, water, and climate systems, was extended to model the electricity and water systems at the state level in the U.S. (GCAM-USA). GCAM-USA was employed to estimate future state-level electricity generation and consumption, and their associated water withdrawals and consumption under a set of six scenarios with extensive details on the generation fuel portfolio, cooling technology mix, and their associated water use intensities. Six scenarios of future water demands of the U.S. electric-sector were explored to investigate the implications of socioeconomics development and growing electricity demands, climate mitigation policy, the transition of cooling systems, electricity trade, and water saving technologies. Our findings include: 1) decreasing water withdrawals and substantially increasing water consumption from both climate mitigation and the conversion from open-loop to closed-loop cooling systems; 2) open trading of electricity benefiting energy scarce yet demand intensive states; 3) within state variability under different driving forces while across state homogeneity under certain driving force ; 4) a clear trade-off between water consumption and withdrawal for the electricity sector in the U.S. The paper discusses this withdrawal-consumption trade-off in the context of current national policies and regulations that favor decreasing withdrawals (increasing consumptive use), and the role of water saving technologies. The highly-resolved nature of this study both geographically and technologically provides a useful platform to address scientific and policy relevant and emerging issues at the heart of the water-energy nexus in the U.S.

  16. The Effects of Realistic Geological Heterogeneity on Seismic Modeling: Applications in Shear Wave Generation and Near-Surface Tunnel Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, Christopher Scott

    2014-01-01

    5.1.1 Shear Wave Generation . . . . . 5.1.2 Near SurfaceApplications in Shear Wave Generation and Near-SurfaceApplications in Shear Wave Generation and Near-Surface

  17. Ocean Response to Wind Variations, Warm Water Volume, and Simple Models of ENSO in the Low-Frequency Approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Response to Wind Variations, Warm Water Volume, and Simple Models of ENSO in the Low the smallness of the ratio «k 5 Tk/T to expand solutions of the ocean shallow-water equations into power series- izontal redistribution of warm surface water along the equator: during an El Nin~o, weakened zonal winds

  18. The Response of Westerly Jets to Thermal Driving in a Primitive Equation Model SEOK-WOO SON AND SUKYOUNG LEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Son, Seok-Woo

    The Response of Westerly Jets to Thermal Driving in a Primitive Equation Model SEOK-WOO SON (Manuscript received 7 September 2004, in final form 7 April 2005) ABSTRACT The structure of westerly jets of the subtropical jet, while the high-latitude cooling modulates the meridional width of the extratropical

  19. Response of the Midlatitude Jets, and of Their Variability, to Increased Greenhouse Gases in the CMIP5 Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barnes, Elizabeth A.

    Response of the Midlatitude Jets, and of Their Variability, to Increased Greenhouse Gases This work documents how the midlatitude, eddy-driven jets respond to climate change using model output from Atlantic, the North Pacific, and the Southern Hemisphere jets. The analysis is not limited to annual- mean

  20. Investigation of techniques to build generation system models for reliability evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubbala, Nagalakshmi V.

    1994-01-01

    of the Proposed Method 1. Two State Unit 2. Three State Unit . 3. n State Unit B. Results and Discussion 1. Case Studies Using IEEE-RTS 2. Case Studies Using EPRI Synthetic System 3. The System Described in Reference [8] 4. CPU Times for Different Models... Transform 1. Count of Operations 3 7 10 11 12 13 16 16 17 20 24 25 27 30 33 39 39 40 43 44 46 48 50 VJn CHAPTER Page 2. Derivation D. Mathematical Comparison E. System Studies 1. IEEE-RTS 2. EPRI Synthetic 3. Results 4...

  1. Renewable Power Options for Electrical Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, K.; Keller, J.; Kroposki, B.; Lilienthal, P.; Slaughter, R.; Glassmire, J.

    2011-11-01

    The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is working with a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy in Hawaii. This part of the HCEI project focuses on working with Kaua'i Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) to understand how to integrate higher levels of renewable energy into the electric power system of the island of Kaua'i. NREL partnered with KIUC to perform an economic and technical analysis and discussed how to model PV inverters in the electrical grid.

  2. Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

    2013-06-01

    This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

  3. Predicting long-term carbon sequestration in response to CO2 enrichment: How and why do current ecosystem models differ?

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Walker, Anthony P.; Zaehle, Sönke; Medlyn, Belinda E.; De Kauwe, Martin G.; Asao, Shinichi; Hickler, Thomas; Parton, William; Ricciuto, Daniel M.; Wang, Ying -Ping; Wårlind, David; et al

    2015-04-27

    Large uncertainty exists in model projections of the land carbon (C) sink response to increasing atmospheric CO2. Free-Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE) experiments lasting a decade or more have investigated ecosystem responses to a step change in atmospheric CO2 concentration. To interpret FACE results in the context of gradual increases in atmospheric CO2 over decades to centuries, we used a suite of seven models to simulate the Duke and Oak Ridge FACE experiments extended for 300 years of CO2 enrichment. We also determine key modeling assumptions that drive divergent projections of terrestrial C uptake and evaluate whether these assumptions can bemore »constrained by experimental evidence. All models simulated increased terrestrial C pools resulting from CO2 enrichment, though there was substantial variability in quasi-equilibrium C sequestration and rates of change. In two of two models that assume that plant nitrogen (N) uptake is solely a function of soil N supply, the net primary production response to elevated CO2 became progressively N limited. In four of five models that assume that N uptake is a function of both soil N supply and plant N demand, elevated CO2 led to reduced ecosystem N losses and thus progressively relaxed nitrogen limitation. Many allocation assumptions resulted in increased wood allocation relative to leaves and roots which reduced the vegetation turnover rate and increased C sequestration. Additionally, self-thinning assumptions had a substantial impact on C sequestration in two models. As a result, accurate representation of N process dynamics (in particular N uptake), allocation, and forest self-thinning is key to minimizing uncertainty in projections of future C sequestration in response to elevated atmospheric CO2.« less

  4. Evaluation of Nonlinear Site Response of Soft Clay Using Centrifuge Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afacan, Kamil Bekir

    2014-01-01

    spreading ground during centrifuge tests." J. Geotech.densesand in laminated centrifuge container." J. Geotech. &response in laminated centrifuge container." Proc. 1st

  5. Precipitation response to land subsurface hydrologic processes in atmospheric general circulation model simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lo, Min-Hui; Famiglietti, James S

    2011-01-01

    LO AND FAMIGLIETTI: PRECIPITATION RESPONSE TO LAND PROCESSES2006), Regional tropical precipitation change mechanisms inrobustness of tropical precipitation asymmetry, J. Clim. ,

  6. Application for managing model-based material properties for simulation-based engineering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Edward L. (Alameda, CA)

    2009-03-03

    An application for generating a property set associated with a constitutive model of a material includes a first program module adapted to receive test data associated with the material and to extract loading conditions from the test data. A material model driver is adapted to receive the loading conditions and a property set and operable in response to the loading conditions and the property set to generate a model response for the material. A numerical optimization module is adapted to receive the test data and the model response and operable in response to the test data and the model response to generate the property set.

  7. Extraction of the second-order nonlinear response from model test data in random seas and comparison of the Gaussian and non-Gaussian models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Nungsoo

    2006-04-12

    , employing the quadratic Volterra model. The effects of sea severity and data length on the estimation of response are also investigated at the same time. The data sets used in this study are surge forces on a fixed barge, a surge motion of a compliant mini...

  8. Generation of non-local evolution loops and exchange operations for quantum control in three dimensional anisotropic Ising model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco Delgado

    2014-10-28

    Control of quantum entanglement has been considered as elemental physical resource for quantum applications in Quantum Information and Quantum Computation. Control of entangled states on a couple of atoms, ions or quantum dots are milestones in almost all quantum applications towards a scalable spin-based quantum computers or quantum devices. For magnetic systems, Ising model is an interaction which generates and modi?es entanglement properties of quantum systems based on matter. In addition, when this interaction includes driven magnetic ?elds, it can be controlled to sustain, characterize or modify entanglement and other quantum properties. In this work, recent results about evolution in a general anisotropic three dimensional Ising model including an inhomogeneous magnetic ?eld is considered to obtain some general quantum control e?ects for their sustainability, programmed evolution or transformation: Evolution loops and Exchange operations. This control is achievable through a set of physical parameters, whose prescriptions are reported. The use of a non local basis in the model to express time evolution lets take advantage to describe and control the system, in particular with those issues associated with entanglement and operations mentioned before. Finally, some analysis about equivalent gates based on our development is made including an example with teleportation, using one of the gates constructed.

  9. Modeling the thermoelastic-viscoplastic response of polycrystals using a continuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    plasticity use an aggregate of sin- gle crystals and this choice of the aggregate affects the response. Keywords: Crystal plasticity; Orientation distribution function; Lagrangian anal- ysis; Finite elements, a constitutive framework for thermoelastic-viscoplastic response of metals based on polycrystal plasticity

  10. Emergence of Holling type III zooplankton functional response: Bringing together field evidence and mathematical modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    as well as active food searching behaviour of zooplankton can modify the type of functional response. In particular, the rate of food intake by the whole zooplankton population in the column, as a function of total a different angle. The zooplankton functional response is usually defined as the specific food intake rate (i

  11. ESTIMATION OF EXTREME FLOODS IN THE RIVER RHINE BASIN BY COMBINING PRECIPITATION-RUNOFF MODELLING AND A RAINFALL GENERATOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beersma, Jules

    AND A RAINFALL GENERATOR Mailin Eberle 1 , Hendrik Buiteveld 2 , Jules Beersma 3 , Peter Krahe 1 , Klaus Wilke 1 of discharge generation. A stochastic rainfall generator based on nearest neighbour resampling has been. The largest simulated flood event based on generated precipitation is 20% larger than the 1993 flood event

  12. One- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation using experimentally generated reversing flow turbuulence models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, L.F.

    1990-08-01

    The activities described in this report do not constitute a continuum but rather a series of linked smaller investigations in the general area of one- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation. The initial impetus for these investigations was the development and construction of the Mechanical Engineering Test Rig (METR) under a grant awarded by NASA to Dr. Terry Simon at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota. The purpose of the METR is to provide experimental data on oscillating turbulent flows in Stirling machine working fluid flow path components (heater, cooler, regenerator, etc.) with particular emphasis on laminar/turbulent flow transitions. Hence, the initial goals for the grant awarded by NASA were, broadly, to provide computer simulation backup for the design of the METR and to analyze the results produced. This was envisaged in two phases: First, to apply an existing one-dimensional Stirling machine simulation code to the METR and second, to adapt a two-dimensional fluid mechanics code which had been developed for simulating high Rayleigh number buoyant cavity flows to the METR. The key aspect of this latter component was the development of an appropriate turbulence model suitable for generalized application to Stirling simulation. A final-step was then to apply the two-dimensional code to an existing Stirling machine for which adequate experimental data exist. The work described herein was carried out over a period of three years on a part-time basis. Forty percent of the first year`s funding was provided as a match to the NASA funds by the Underground Space Center, University of Minnesota, which also made its computing facilities available to the project at no charge.

  13. Current generation by helicons and lower hybrid waves in modern tokamaks and reactors ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vdovin, V. L., E-mail: vdov@nfi.kiae.ru [National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute,' (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-15

    The innovative concept and 3D full-wave code modeling the off-axis current drive by radio-frequency (RF) waves in large-scale tokamaks, ITER and DEMO, for steady-state operation with high efficiency is proposed. The scheme uses the helicon radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20-40) ion cyclotron frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500-700 MHz propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by helicons, in conjunction with the bootstrap current, ensure the maintenance of a given value of the total current in the stability margin q(0) {>=} 2 and q(a) {>=} 4, and will help to have regimes with a negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure {beta}{sub N} > 3 (the so-called advanced scenarios) of interest for the commercial reactor. Modeling with full-wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER and DEMO, using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal wave slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in the DIII-D, T-15MD, and JT-60AS tokamaks. Commercially available continuous-wave klystrons of the MW/tube range are promising for commercial stationary fusion reactors. The compact antennae of the waveguide type are proposed, and an example of a possible RF system for today's tokamaks is given. The advantages of the scheme (partially tested at lower frequencies in tokamaks) are a significant decline in the role of parametric instabilities in the plasma periphery, the use of electrically strong resonator-waveguide type antennae, and substantially greater antenna-plasma coupling.

  14. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. II. Inclusion of Radiative Transfer with RADYN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Petrosian, Vahe'; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Solar flares involve complex processes that are coupled together and span a wide range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. Modeling such processes self-consistently has been a challenge in the past. Here we present such a model to simulate the coupling of high-energy particle kinetics with hydrodynamics of the atmospheric plasma. We combine the Stanford unified Fokker-Planck code that models particle acceleration, transport, and bremsstrahlung radiation with the RADYN hydrodynamic code that models the atmospheric response to collisional heating by non-thermal electrons through detailed radiative transfer calculations. We perform simulations using different injection electron spectra, including an {\\it ad hoc} power law and more realistic spectra predicted by the stochastic acceleration model due to turbulence or plasma waves. Surprisingly, stochastically accelerated electrons, even with energy flux $\\ll 10^{10}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$, cause "explosive" chromospheric evaporation and drive stronger up- an...

  15. Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandadapu, Kranthi K; Berry, Richard M; Oster, George

    2015-01-01

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well-established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy needed for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, while steric forces comprise the actual 'power stroke'. Specifically, we predict that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline 'hinge' residue in an $\\alpha$-helix of the stator are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions f...

  16. Modeling of electrodes and implantable pulse generator cases for the analysis of implant tip heating under MR imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acikel, Volkan Atalar, Ergin; Uslubas, Ali

    2015-07-15

    Purpose: The authors’ purpose is to model the case of an implantable pulse generator (IPG) and the electrode of an active implantable medical device using lumped circuit elements in order to analyze their effect on radio frequency induced tissue heating problem during a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Methods: In this study, IPG case and electrode are modeled with a voltage source and impedance. Values of these parameters are found using the modified transmission line method (MoTLiM) and the method of moments (MoM) simulations. Once the parameter values of an electrode/IPG case model are determined, they can be connected to any lead, and tip heating can be analyzed. To validate these models, both MoM simulations and MR experiments were used. The induced currents on the leads with the IPG case or electrode connections were solved using the proposed models and the MoTLiM. These results were compared with the MoM simulations. In addition, an electrode was connected to a lead via an inductor. The dissipated power on the electrode was calculated using the MoTLiM by changing the inductance and the results were compared with the specific absorption rate results that were obtained using MoM. Then, MRI experiments were conducted to test the IPG case and the electrode models. To test the IPG case, a bare lead was connected to the case and placed inside a uniform phantom. During a MRI scan, the temperature rise at the lead was measured by changing the lead length. The power at the lead tip for the same scenario was also calculated using the IPG case model and MoTLiM. Then, an electrode was connected to a lead via an inductor and placed inside a uniform phantom. During a MRI scan, the temperature rise at the electrode was measured by changing the inductance and compared with the dissipated power on the electrode resistance. Results: The induced currents on leads with the IPG case or electrode connection were solved for using the combination of the MoTLiM and the proposed lumped circuit models. These results were compared with those from the MoM simulations. The mean square error was less than 9%. During the MRI experiments, when the IPG case was introduced, the resonance lengths were calculated to have an error less than 13%. Also the change in tip temperature rise at resonance lengths was predicted with less than 4% error. For the electrode experiments, the value of the matching impedance was predicted with an error less than 1%. Conclusions: Electrical models for the IPG case and electrode are suggested, and the method is proposed to determine the parameter values. The concept of matching of the electrode to the lead is clarified using the defined electrode impedance and the lead Thevenin impedance. The effect of the IPG case and electrode on tip heating can be predicted using the proposed theory. With these models, understanding the tissue heating due to the implants becomes easier. Also, these models are beneficial for implant safety testers and designers. Using these models, worst case conditions can be determined and the corresponding implant test experiments can be planned.

  17. SACCADE GENERATOR AND SACCADE RESET 7.1. Saccade Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossberg, Stephen

    CHAPTER 7 SACCADE GENERATOR AND SACCADE RESET 7.1. Saccade Generator In Section 2.5, we described learning requirements that suggest the need for a saccade generator (SG). An SG must be capable of shutting, moreover, change as a systematic function of SG input, not only to generate sa.:cades in response

  18. Modeling the elastic and plastic response of single crystals and polycrystalline aggregates 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patwardhan, Parag Vilas

    2005-02-17

    Understanding the elastic-plastic response of polycrystalline materials is an extremely difficult task. A polycrystalline material consists of a large number of crystals having different orientations. On its own, each ...

  19. The Statistical Reservoir Model: calibrating faults and fractures, and predicting reservoir response to water flood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    geomechanics to have a significant influence on hydrocarbon production rates through changes in the effective 2004). Geomechanics not only predicts a reservoir response in the near field, but also at long range i

  20. Dose-Response Modeling for Life Cycle Impact Assessment: Findings of the Portland Review Workshop

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKone, Thomas E.; Kyle, Amy D.; Jolliet, Olivier; Olsen, Stig Irving; Hauschild, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Key References Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a frameworkmeasure of impact in life- cycle assessment? When combiningHealth Response in Life Cycle Assessment Using ED10s and

  1. Calibration of an EnergyPlus Building Energy Model to Assess the Impact of Demand Response Measures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavigne, K.; Sansregret, S.; Daoud, A.; Leclair, L. A.

    2013-01-01

    Simon Sansregret Ahmed DaoudLouis-Alexandre Leclaire CALIBRATION OF AN ENERGYPLUS BUILDING ENERGY MODEL TO ASSESS THE IMPACT OF DEMAND RESPONSE MEASURES ICEBO 2013, Montr?al Groupe ? Technologie2 ICEBO-2013 Contextualization > Hydro..., Static fan pressure, Plug load intensity, etc. > Establish an optimization plan (? ? simulated and measured profiles) ? Parameter selection and their limits ? Calibration period (annual or specific period) ? Objective function and type of algorithm...

  2. Modeling and Control System Design for an Integrated Solar Generation and Energy Storage System with a Ride-Through Capability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.; Yue, M.; Muljadi, E.

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a generic approach for PV panel modeling. Data for this modeling can be easily obtained from manufacturer datasheet, which provides a convenient way for the researchers and engineers to investigate the PV integration issues. A two-stage power conversion system (PCS) is adopted in this paper for the PV generation system and a Battery Energy Storage System (BESS) can be connected to the dc-link through a bi-directional dc/dc converter. In this way, the BESS can provide some ancillary services which may be required in the high penetration PV generation scenario. In this paper, the fault ride-through (FRT) capability is specifically focused. The integrated BESS and PV generation system together with the associated control systems is modeled in PSCAD and Matlab platforms and the effectiveness of the controller is validated by the simulation results.

  3. Diophantine Generation,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shlapentokh, Alexandra

    Diophantine Generation, Horizontal and Vertical Problems, and the Weak Vertical Method Alexandra Shlapentokh Diophantine Sets, Definitions and Generation Diophantine Sets Diophantine Generation Properties of Diophantine Generation Diophantine Family of Z Diophantine Family of a Polynomial Ring Going Down Horizontal

  4. Modeling the thermal and structural response of engineered systems to abnormal environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skocypec, R.D.; Thomas, R.K.; Moya, J.L.

    1993-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is engaged actively in research to improve the ability to accurately predict the response of engineered systems to thermal and structural abnormal environments. Abnormal environments that will be addressed in this paper include: fire, impact, and puncture by probes and fragments, as well as a combination of all of the above. Historically, SNL has demonstrated the survivability of engineered systems to abnormal environments using a balanced approach between numerical simulation and testing. It is necessary to determine the response of engineered systems in two cases: (1) to satisfy regulatory specifications, and (2) to enable quantification of a probabilistic risk assessment (PRA). In a regulatory case, numerical simulation of system response is generally used to guide the system design such that the system will respond satisfactorily to the specified regulatory abnormal environment. Testing is conducted at the regulatory abnormal environment to ensure compliance.

  5. Linking Work Design and Corporate Social Responsibility Through an Exploratory Model for the Interdependency of Work Characteristics and Corporate Social Responsibility Orientation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurup, Priya Darshini

    2012-02-14

    characteristics that can result in desired organizational outcomes. Specifically, in current times, organizations are looking to develop socially responsible outcomes, otherwise referred as corporate social responsibility (CSR). A possible link between work design...

  6. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. V. modeling the dynamics of M87 with the made-to-measure method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Ling; Long, R. J.; Mao, Shude [National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, A20 Datun Rd, Chaoyang District, Beijing 100012 (China); Peng, Eric W.; Li, Biao [Department of Astronomy, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Liu, Chengze [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 800 Dongchuan Road, Shanghai 200240 (China); Caldwell, Nelson [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Blakeslee, John P.; Côté, Patrick; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, Stephen [National Research Council of Canada, Victoria, BC V9E 2E7 (Canada); Cuillandre, Jean-Charles [Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope Corporation, Kamuela, HI 96743 (United States); Durrell, Patrick [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, OH 44555 (United States); Emsellem, Eric [Université de Lyon 1, CRAL, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 av. Charles André, F-69230 Saint-Genis Laval, CNRS, UMR 5574, ENS de Lyon (France); Jordán, Andrés; Muñoz, Roberto; Puzia, Thomas [Instituto de Astrofísica, Facultad de Física, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile, Av. Vicuña Mackenna 4860, 7820436 Macul, Santiago (Chile); Lançon, Ariane [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l'Universite, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Mei, Simona, E-mail: lzhu@mpia-hd.mpg.de [GEPI, Observatoire de Paris, 77 av. Denfert Rochereau, F-75014 Paris (France)

    2014-09-01

    We study the dynamics of the giant elliptical galaxy M87 from the central to the outermost regions with the made-to-measure (M2M) method. We use a new catalog of 922 globular cluster line-of-sight velocities extending to a projected radius of 180 kpc (equivalent to 25 M87 effective radii), and SAURON integral field unit data within the central 2.4 kpc. There are 263 globular clusters, mainly located beyond 40 kpc, newly observed by the Next Generation Virgo Survey. For the M2M modeling, the gravitational potential is taken as a combination of a luminous matter potential with a constant stellar mass-to-light ratio and a dark matter potential modeled as a logarithmic potential. Our best-fit dynamical model returns a stellar mass-to-light ratio in the I band of M/L{sub I} = 6.0 ± 0.3 M{sub ?} L{sub ?}{sup ?1} with a dark matter potential scale velocity of 591 ± 50 km s{sup –1} and scale radius of 42 ± 10 kpc. We determine the total mass of M87 within 180 kpc to be (1.5 ± 0.2) × 10{sup 13} M {sub ?}. The mass within 40 kpc is smaller than previous estimates determined using globular cluster kinematics that did not extend beyond ?45 kpc. With our new globular cluster velocities at much larger radii, we see that globular clusters around 40 kpc show an anomalously large velocity dispersion which affected previous results. The mass we derive is in good agreement with that inferred from ROSAT X-ray observation out to 180 kpc. Within 30 kpc our mass is also consistent with that inferred from Chandra and XMM-Newton X-ray observations, while within 120 kpc it is about 20% smaller. The model velocity dispersion anisotropy ? parameter for the globular clusters in M87 is small, varying from –0.2 at the center to 0.2 at ?40 kpc, and gradually decreasing to zero at ?120 kpc.

  7. ALE3D Model Predictions and Materials Characterization for the Cookoff Response of PBXN-109

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Nichols, A L; Wardell, J F; Atwood, A I; Curran, P O

    2002-03-19

    ALE3D simulations are presented for the thermal explosion of PBXN-109 (RDX, AI, HTPB, DOA) in support of an effort by the U. S. Navy and Department of Energy (DOE) to validate computational models. The U.S. Navy is performing benchmark tests for the slow cookoff of PBXN-109 in a sealed tube. Candidate models are being tested using the ALE3D code, which can simulate the coupled thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior during heating, ignition, and explosion. The strength behavior of the solid constituents is represented by a Steinberg-Guinan model while polynomial and gamma-law expressions are used for the Equation Of State (EOS) for the solid and gas species, respectively. A void model is employed to represent the air in gaps. ALE3D model 'parameters are specified using measurements of thermal and mechanical properties including thermal expansion, heat capacity, shear modulus, and bulk modulus. A standard three-step chemical kinetics model is used during the thermal ramp, and a pressure-dependent burn front model is employed during the rapid expansion. Parameters for the three-step kinetics model are specified using measurements of the One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX), while measurements for burn rate of pristine and thermally damaged material are employed to determine parameters in the burn front model. Results are given for calculations in which heating, ignition, and explosion are modeled in a single simulation. We compare model results to measurements for the cookoff temperature and tube wall strain.

  8. Fine-grain modeling of species' response to climate change: holdouts,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moritz, Max A.

    of magnitude. We de- scribe the recent advances in this revolution and provide terminology to help frame, including air and surface temper- ature, precipitation, radiation, and wind speed, interact with organismal in response to cold-air pooling [7]. Differences in microhabitat affinity can influence the strength of spe

  9. Impediments to Predicting Site Response: Seismic Property Estimation and Modeling Simplifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzina, Bojan

    energy to heat through friction, viscosity, permanent deformations, and thermal relaxation. On the other site response. Seismic waves are attenuated by scattering (Sc Q-1 ) and from anelastic processes by heterogeneities within the medium. i Q-1 includes multiple physical processes, such as the conver- sion of seismic

  10. Analytical modeling of saturated zone head response to evapotranspiration and river-stage fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barrash, Warren

    : Evapotranspiration Unconfined aquifer Phreatophyte Hydraulic conductivity s u m m a r y We investigate the response. These solutions are fitted to observed groundwater head fluctuations recorded in observation wells at the Boise of the ET flux, aquifer hydraulic conductivity, specific storage and specific yield are obtained

  11. Generating a Generator Department of Computer and Information Sciences

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey G.

    Generating a Generator Jeff Gray Department of Computer and Information Sciences University. A key to this future work will be the generation of a generator from an XML DTD or schema. 1 for crosscutting modeling concerns, a combination of an aspect-oriented [6] and generative programming [2] approach

  12. ResPoNSe: modeling the wide variability of residential energy consumption.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peffer, Therese; Burke, William; Auslander, David

    2010-01-01

    affect appliance energy consumption. For example, differentStates, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: HousingModeling of End-Use Energy Consumption in the Residential

  13. ResPoNSe: modeling the wide variability of residential energy consumption.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peffer, Therese; Burke, William; Auslander, David

    2010-01-01

    variation imposed by occupant behavior and appliance loads.a stochastic model of occupant behavior to develop annualhousehold occupant make-up and behavior. Physical factors,

  14. Models and analysis of yeast mating response : tools for model building, from documentation to time-dependent stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomson, Ty M. (Ty Matthew)

    2008-01-01

    Molecular signaling systems allow cells to sense and respond to environmental stimuli. Quantitative modeling can be a valuable tool for evaluating and extending our understanding of signaling systems. In particular, studies ...

  15. Modeling the response of HCP polycrystals deforming by slip and twinning using a finite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    developments in the field of crystal plasticity modeling and evolution of microstructure. For defor- mation that eliminates the need for increasing the number of discrete crystal orientations to account for new for modeling deformation processes. PACS: 61.72.Mm;61.72.-y;81.40.Ef Keywords: Polycrystal plasticity; Texture

  16. Bob Sutherst Title: Synoptic modelling of biological responses to climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Queensland, University of

    users to assemble population models from a library of functions. In so doing it brings modelling change. Grants: Honorary with collaboration with various partners Key publications: 1. Sutherst, Bob.sutherst@iprimus.com.au (ii) list of publications, research grants and conference presentations/other invited talks (over

  17. PREDICTING HABITAT RESPONSE TO FLOW USING GENERALIZED HABITAT MODELS FOR TROUT IN ROCKY MOUNTAIN STREAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bledsoe, Brian

    The Nature Conservancy, Fort Collins, Colorado USA ABSTRACT Dams and water diversions can dramatically alter the hydraulic habitats of stream ecosystems. Predicting how water depth and velocity respond to flow alteration is possible using hydraulic models, such as Physical Habitat Simulation (PHABSIM); however, such models

  18. CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response): A Generic Transportation Network Model for the Calculation of Evacuation Time Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, M. P.; Urbanik, II, T.; Desrosiers, A. E.

    1982-03-01

    This paper describes the methodology and application of the computer model CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response) which estimates the time required for a specific population density and distribution to evacuate an area using a specific transportation network. The CLEAR model simulates vehicle departure and movement on a transportation network according to the conditions and consequences of traffic flow. These include handling vehicles at intersecting road segments, calculating the velocity of travel on a road segment as a function of its vehicle density, and accounting for the delay of vehicles in traffic queues. The program also models the distribution of times required by individuals to prepare for an evacuation. In order to test its accuracy, the CLEAR model was used to estimate evacuatlon tlmes for the emergency planning zone surrounding the Beaver Valley Nuclear Power Plant. The Beaver Valley site was selected because evacuation time estimates had previously been prepared by the licensee, Duquesne Light, as well as by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency. A lack of documentation prevented a detailed comparison of the estimates based on the CLEAR model and those obtained by Duquesne Light. However, the CLEAR model results compared favorably with the estimates prepared by the other two agencies.

  19. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  20. An Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on the environmental impacts associated with electricity consumption, and that interstate trading tends to makeAn Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios Joe Marriott Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements

  1. Improvements in fast-response flood modeling: desktop parallel computing and domain tracking

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judi, David R; Mcpherson, Timothy N; Burian, Steven J

    2009-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly important to have the ability to accurately forecast flooding, as flooding accounts for the most losses due to natural disasters in the world and the United States. Flood inundation modeling has been dominated by one-dimensional approaches. These models are computationally efficient and are considered by many engineers to produce reasonably accurate water surface profiles. However, because the profiles estimated in these models must be superimposed on digital elevation data to create a two-dimensional map, the result may be sensitive to the ability of the elevation data to capture relevant features (e.g. dikes/levees, roads, walls, etc...). Moreover, one-dimensional models do not explicitly represent the complex flow processes present in floodplains and urban environments and because two-dimensional models based on the shallow water equations have significantly greater ability to determine flow velocity and direction, the National Research Council (NRC) has recommended that two-dimensional models be used over one-dimensional models for flood inundation studies. This paper has shown that two-dimensional flood modeling computational time can be greatly reduced through the use of Java multithreading on multi-core computers which effectively provides a means for parallel computing on a desktop computer. In addition, this paper has shown that when desktop parallel computing is coupled with a domain tracking algorithm, significant computation time can be eliminated when computations are completed only on inundated cells. The drastic reduction in computational time shown here enhances the ability of two-dimensional flood inundation models to be used as a near-real time flood forecasting tool, engineering, design tool, or planning tool. Perhaps even of greater significance, the reduction in computation time makes the incorporation of risk and uncertainty/ensemble forecasting more feasible for flood inundation modeling (NRC 2000; Sayers et al. 2000).

  2. Wroclaw neutrino event generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jaroslaw A. Nowak

    2006-07-07

    A neutrino event generator developed by the Wroclaw Neutrino Group is described. The physical models included in the generator are discussed and illustrated with the results of simulations. The considered processes are quasi-elastic scattering and pion production modelled by combining the $\\Delta$ resonance excitation and deep inelastic scattering.

  3. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  4. 944 IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 7, NO. 6, NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2001 Modeling the Thermal Response of Porcine Cartilage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aguilar, Guillermo

    ­environ- ment heat and mass transfer; 4) and the occurrence of low-energy phase transformations responsible944 IEEE JOURNAL ON SELECTED TOPICS IN QUANTUM ELECTRONICS, VOL. 7, NO. 6, NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2001 Modeling the Thermal Response of Porcine Cartilage to Laser Irradiation Sergio H. Díaz, Guillermo Aguilar

  5. Models and Solution Approaches for Emergency Response Network Design Integrating Supply and Demand Sides 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalal, Jyotirmoy

    2014-12-02

    . Our model captures the trade-offs between system cost and critical time to start relief distribution, and can aid an emergency manager in strategic decision making under various uncertainties. Our third study combines the stochastic and robust...

  6. NEUROMOTOR RESPONSE TO WHOLE BODY VIBRATION TRANSMISSIBILITY IN THE HORIZONTAL DIRECTION AND ITS MATHEMATICAL MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanumanthareddygari, Vinay

    2010-09-02

    and head. However, no model to our knowledge has examined the transmission of mechanical vibration to muscle shortening/lengthening, the neuromotor system and reflex muscle activation. In addition, only a few studies have examined biodynamic vibration...

  7. Model Calibration and Optics Correction Using Orbit Response Matrix in the Fermilab Booster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lebedev, V.A.; Prebys, E.; /Fermilab; Petrenko, A.V.; /Novosibirsk, IYF; Kopp, S.E.; McAteer, M.J.; /Texas U.

    2012-05-01

    We have calibrated the lattice model and measured the beta and dispersion functions in Fermilab's fast-ramping Booster synchrotron using the Linear Optics from Closed Orbit (LOCO) method. We used the calibrated model to implement ramped coupling, dispersion, and beta-beating corrections throughout the acceleration cycle, reducing horizontal beta beating from its initial magnitude of {approx}30% to {approx}10%, and essentially eliminating vertical beta-beating and transverse coupling.

  8. Modeling the High Plains Aquifer's Response to Land Use and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dermyer, Reuben

    2011-06-14

    -Monteith evapotranspiration model that changes depending on reference crop and time step. Cn – Constant in the Penman-Monteith evapotranspiration model that changes depending on reference crop and time step. ea – Actual vapor pressure. Units: kPa es – Saturation vapor... automated weather stations. The Saturation vapor pressure, es, was calculated based on daily minimum and maximum 26 temperatures. Actual vapor pressure, ea, for the Penman-Monteith method was calculated using the daily minimum and maximum relative...

  9. Distributed Generation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electricity, US Data. 6. Distributed Generation: Standby Generation and Cogeneration Ozz Energy Solutions, Inc. February 28 th , 2005. For more information about...

  10. Responses of East Asian Summer Monsoon to Natural and Anthropogenic Forcings in the 17 Latest CMIP5 Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Fengfei; Zhou, Tianjun; Qian, Yun

    2014-01-31

    In this study, we examined the responses of East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) to natural (solar variability and volcanic aerosols) and anthropogenic (greenhouse gasses and aerosols) forcings simulated in the 17 latest Coupled Model Intercomparison Program phase 5 (CMIP5) models with 105 realizations. The observed weakening trend of low-level EASM circulation during 1958-2001 is partly reproduced under all-forcing runs. A comparison of separate forcing experiments reveals that the aerosol-forcing plays a primary role in driving the weakened low-level monsoon circulation. The preferential cooling over continental East Asia caused by aerosol affects the monsoon circulation through reducing the land-sea thermal contrast and results in higher sea level pressure over northern China. In the upper-level, both natural-forcing and aerosol-forcing contribute to the observed southward shift of East Asian subtropical jet through changing the meridional temperature gradient.

  11. Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi; Bakule, Pavel; Yokoyama, Koji; Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko

    2011-09-15

    We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

  12. Centralized and Decentralized Control for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Kirkham, Harold

    2011-04-29

    Demand response has been recognized as an essential element of the smart grid. Frequency response, regulation and contingency reserve functions performed traditionally by generation resources are now starting to involve demand side resources. Additional benefits from demand response include peak reduction and load shifting, which will defer new infrastructure investment and improve generator operation efficiency. Technical approaches designed to realize these functionalities can be categorized into centralized control and decentralized control, depending on where the response decision is made. This paper discusses these two control philosophies and compares their relative advantages and disadvantages in terms of delay time, predictability, complexity, and reliability. A distribution system model with detailed household loads and controls is built to demonstrate the characteristics of the two approaches. The conclusion is that the promptness and reliability of decentralized control should be combined with the predictability and simplicity of centralized control to achieve the best performance of the smart grid.

  13. Modeling the Inhomogeneous Response and Formation of Shear Bands in Steady and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of these models, the `flow curve' of stress and apparent shear rate resulting from an assumption of homogeneous de of Machanical Engineering, MIT 1 #12;1 Introduction A central assumption behind rheometry is that the velocity shampoos and body gels; in the petroleum industry they are used in fracturing operations and enhanced oil

  14. Fourth Generation Majorana Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Lenz; Heinrich Päs; Dario Schalla

    2012-05-02

    We investigate the possibility of a fourth sequential generation in the lepton sector. Assuming neutrinos to be Majorana particles and starting from a recent - albeit weak - evidence for a non-zero admixture of a fourth generation neutrino from fits to weak lepton and meson decays we discuss constraints from neutrinoless double beta decay, radiative lepton decay and like-sign dilepton production at hadron colliders. Also an idea for fourth generation neutrino mass model building is briefly outlined. Here we soften the large hierarchy of the neutrino masses within an extradimensional model that locates each generation on different lepton number violating branes without large hierarchies.

  15. Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudley, Junqiao Han; Black, Doug; Apte, Mike; Piette, Mary Ann; Berkeley, Pam

    2010-05-14

    We have studied a low energy building on a campus of the University of California. It has efficient heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, consisting of a dual-fan/dual-duct variable air volume (VAV) system. As a major building on the campus, it was included in two demand response (DR) events in the summers of 2008 and 2009. With chilled water supplied by thermal energy storage in the central plant, cooling fans played a critical role during DR events. In this paper, an EnergyPlus model of the building was developed and calibrated. We compared both whole-building and HVAC fan energy consumption with model predictions to understand why demand savings in 2009 were much lower than in 2008. We also used model simulations of the study building to assess pre-cooling, a strategy that has been shown to improve demand saving and thermal comfort in many types of building. This study indicates a properly calibrated EnergyPlus model can reasonably predict demand savings from DR events and can be useful for designing or optimizing DR strategies.

  16. Progress in model development to quantify High Explosive Violent Response (HEVR) to mechancial insult

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reaugh, J E

    2008-07-29

    The rapid release of chemical energy has found application for industrial and military purposes since the invention of gunpowder. Black powder, smokeless powder of various compositions, and pyrotechnics all exhibit the rapid release of energy without detonation when they are being used as designed. The rapidity of energy release for these materials is controlled by adjustments to the particle surface area (propellant grain configuration or powder particle size) in conjunction with the measured pressure-dependent burning rate, which is very subsonic. In this way a manufacturing process can be used to engineer the desired violence of the explosion. Detonations in molecular explosives, in contrast, propagate with a supersonic velocity that depends on the loading density, but is independent of the surface area. In ideal detonations, the reaction is complete within a small distance of the propagating shock front. Non-ideal detonations in molecular and composite explosives proceed with a slower velocity, and the reaction may continue well behind the shock front. We are developing models to describe the circumstances when molecular and composite explosives undergo a rapid release of energy without detonating. The models also apply to the behavior of rocket propellants subject to mechanical insult, whether for accidents (Hazards) or the suite of standardized tests used to assess whether the system can be designated an Insensitive Munition (IM). In the application described here, we are studying an HMX (1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetraazacyclooctane) explosive developed in the UK, which is 91% by weight HMX and 9% binder-plasticizer. Most explosives and propellants, when subjected to a mechanical insult, drop or impact that is well below the threshold for detonation have been observed to react violently. This behavior is known as High Explosive Violent Reaction (HEVR). The basis of our model is the observation that the mechanical insult produces damage in a volume of the explosive near the trajectory of the impactor. The damage is manifest as surface area through the creation of cracks and fragments, and also as porosity through the separation of crack faces and isolation of the fragments. Open porosity permits a flame to spread easily and so ignite the surface area that was created. The surface area itself leads to in increase in the mass-burning rate. As the kinetic energy and power of the insult increases, the degree of damage and the volume of damage both increase. Upon a localized ignition, the flame spreads to envelop the damaged volume, and the pressure rises at an accelerated rate until neither mechanical strength nor inertial confinement can successfully contain the pressure. The confining structure begins to expand. This reduces the pressure and may even extinguish the flame. Both the mass of explosive involved and the rate at which the gas is produced contribute to each of several different measures of violence. Such measures include damage to the confinement, the velocity and fragment size distributions from what was the confinement, and air blast. Figure 1 illustrates the interaction of the various phenomena described above. Our model comprises several interacting elements. The production of damage, the ignition criterion, the mass rate of burning (reaction rate), the equations of state and constitutive models of the solid explosive reactant (unburned) and gas products, flame propagation in damaged reactant, and the progressive failure of the confinement are all elements of the model. The model is intended for implementation in a general-purpose simulation program (hydrocode) that solves the partial differential equations for the conservation of mass, momentum, and energy in conjunction with equations of state and strength.

  17. A simulation model of the response of molting Pacific black brant to helicopter disturbance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Mark Wayne

    1991-01-01

    on molting Pacific black brant near Teshekpuk Lake, Alaska. Locations of 18, 118 brant were digitized into the model based on 10 years of aerial survey data. Bell 206 and Bell 412 helicopters were simulated flying across the molting grounds along various... Bell 412 around the northezn edge, 1-mile inland parallel to the coast 50 times/day, could cause heavy weight loss to 25% of the molting population. iv ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I thank Dr. Milton W. Weller for the opportunity to study under his...

  18. Simulating the growth response of aspen to elevated ozone: a mechanistic approach to scaling a leaf-level model of ozone effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulating the growth response of aspen to elevated ozone: a mechanistic approach to scaling a leaf-level model of ozone effects on photosynthesis to a complex canopy architecture§ M.J. Martina, *, G.E. Hosta; accepted 17 July 2001 ``Capsule'': A process model is described that predicts the relative effects of ozone

  19. Abstract. This paper applies Kim and Warde's (2004) stratified Warner's randomized response model to Mangat and Singh's (1990) two-stage ran-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jong-Min

    2004-01-01

    to Mangat and Singh's (1990) two-stage ran- domized response model. The proposed stratified randomized on the proposed method is more efficient than Kim and Warde's (2004) and Mangat and Singh's (1990) estimators in the case of less than completely truthful reporting. Mangat and Singh (1990) proposed a two-stage RR model

  20. 218 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ROBOTICS AND AUTOMATION, VOL. 17, NO. 2, APRIL 2001 Fig. 7. Simulated steering response for bicycle and nonholonomic models for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobrow, James E.

    steering response for bicycle and nonholonomic models for plant with no rate or saturation limits and K = 10 and for two speeds v = 1; 5 m/s. to a nonholonomic constraint. The bicycle and exact models were of a bicycle. However, at low speed, such as required when turning tight corners, the difference is significant