Sample records for generator response models

  1. Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Gao, Fei; Xie, YuLong; Campbell, Luke W.; Van Ginhoven, Renee M.; Wang, Zhiguo; Prange, Micah P.; Wu, Dangxin

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Final Report presents work carried out at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the project entitled “Validated Models for Radiation Response and Signal Generation in Scintillators” (Project number: PL10-Scin-theor-PD2Jf) and led by Drs. Fei Gao and Sebastien N. Kerisit. This project was divided into four tasks: 1) Electronic response functions (ab initio data model) 2) Electron-hole yield, variance, and spatial distribution 3) Ab initio calculations of information carrier properties 4) Transport of electron-hole pairs and scintillation efficiency Detailed information on the results obtained in each of the four tasks is provided in this Final Report. Furthermore, published peer-reviewed articles based on the work carried under this project are included in Appendix. This work was supported by the National Nuclear Security Administration, Office of Nuclear Nonproliferation Research and Development (DNN R&D/NA-22), of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE).

  2. Comparative study on fault responses of synchronous generators and wind turbine generators using transient stability index based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pota, Himanshu Roy

    Comparative study on fault responses of synchronous generators and wind turbine generators using voltage sag and the slip on fault responses with the TSI between synchronous generators and wind turbine with the second order classical model of the generator and constant impedance load model. Under the structure

  3. Current responsive devices for synchronous generators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karlicek, R.F.

    1983-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for detecting current imbalance between phases of a polyphase alternating current generator. A detector responds to the maximum peak current in the generator, and detecting means generates an output for each phase proportional to the peak current of each phase. Comparing means generates an output when the maximum peak current exceeds the phase peak current. 11 figs.

  4. Improving Dynamic Load and Generator Response PerformanceTools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lesieutre, Bernard C.

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a scoping study to examine research opportunities to improve the accuracy of the system dynamic load and generator models, data and performance assessment tools used by CAISO operations engineers and planning engineers, as well as those used by their counterparts at the California utilities, to establish safe operating margins. Model-based simulations are commonly used to assess the impact of credible contingencies in order to determine system operating limits (path ratings, etc.) to ensure compliance with NERC and WECC reliability requirements. Improved models and a better understanding of the impact of uncertainties in these models will increase the reliability of grid operations by allowing operators to more accurately study system voltage problems and the dynamic stability response of the system to disturbances.

  5. Driver tension responses generated by various levels of intersection illumination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franklin, Weldon Clifford

    1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DRIVER TENSION RESPONSES GENERATED BY VARIOUS LEVELS OF INTERSECTION ILLUMINATION A Thesis By WELDON CLIFFORD FRANKLIN Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1962 Major Subj ect: Civil Engineering DRIVER TENSION RESPONSES GENERATED BY VARIOUS LEVELS OF INTERSECTION ILLUMINATION A Thesis By WELDON CLIFFORD FRANKLIN Approved as to style and content by...

  6. FlexibleSUSY -- A spectrum generator generator for supersymmetric models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Athron; Jae-hyeon Park; Dominik Stöckinger; Alexander Voigt

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce FlexibleSUSY, a Mathematica and C++ package, which generates a fast, precise C++ spectrum generator for any SUSY model specified by the user. The generated code is designed with both speed and modularity in mind, making it easy to adapt and extend with new features. The model is specified by supplying the superpotential, gauge structure and particle content in a SARAH model file; specific boundary conditions e.g. at the GUT, weak or intermediate scales are defined in a separate FlexibleSUSY model file. From these model files, FlexibleSUSY generates C++ code for self-energies, tadpole corrections, renormalization group equations (RGEs) and electroweak symmetry breaking (EWSB) conditions and combines them with numerical routines for solving the RGEs and EWSB conditions simultaneously. The resulting spectrum generator is then able to solve for the spectrum of the model, including loop-corrected pole masses, consistent with user specified boundary conditions. The modular structure of the generated code allows for individual components to be replaced with an alternative if available. FlexibleSUSY has been carefully designed to grow as alternative solvers and calculators are added. Predefined models include the MSSM, NMSSM, E$_6$SSM, USSM, R-symmetric models and models with right-handed neutrinos.

  7. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Goldman, G. (2009) Retail demand response in Southwest PowerL. (2009) Renewable Demand Response (RDR): Financial &Northwest GridWise™ Demand Response and Variable Generation

  8. Co-Clustering with Generative Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golland, Polina

    2009-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we present a generative model for co-clustering and develop algorithms based on the mean field approximation for the corresponding modeling problem. These algorithms can be viewed as generalizations of the ...

  9. Modeling a Helical-coil Steam Generator in RELAP5-3D for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nathan V. Hoffer; Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan A. Anderson

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Options for the primary heat transport loop heat exchangers for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant are currently being evaluated. A helical-coil steam generator is one heat exchanger design under consideration. Safety is an integral part of the helical-coil steam generator evaluation. Transient analysis plays a key role in evaluation of the steam generators safety. Using RELAP5-3D to model the helical-coil steam generator, a loss of pressure in the primary side of the steam generator is simulated. This report details the development of the steam generator model, the loss of pressure transient, and the response of the steam generator primary and secondary systems to the loss of primary pressure. Back ground on High Temperature Gas-cooled reactors, steam generators, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant is provided to increase the readers understanding of the material presented.

  10. Hardware model of a shipboard generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkins, Gregory L. (Gregory Lewis)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hardware model of the Gas Turbine Generator (GTG) in use on the US Navy's DDG-51 Class Destroyer is constructed for use as a lab apparatus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Laboratory for Electromagnetic and ...

  11. Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste heat recovery applications Multi-physics modeling of thermoelectric generators for waste heat recovery applications Model...

  12. System level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive applications System level modeling of thermoelectric generators for automotive applications Uses a model to predict and...

  13. On modeling pollution-generating technologies July 22, 2010 On modeling pollution-generating technologies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    On modeling pollution-generating technologies July 22, 2010 On modeling pollution modeling pollution-generating technologies July 22, 2010 Abstract We distinguish between intended with respect to inputs and intended outputs that cause pollution. We derive implications from the phenomenon

  14. Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation Diesel Engines Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel...

  15. Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for Fuel Efficient, Low Emissions Diesel Engines Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for...

  16. Regression models Consequences of auto-generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCullagh, Peter

    with conventional models 2 Consequences of auto-generation Sampling bias Volunteer samples Joint distributions of Y into two components x1(u) = (variety(u), treatment(u), . . .) affecting the mean x2(u) = (block; ) = Nn(X1, 2 0In + 2 1K[x2])(A) A Rn, K[x] = {K(xi, xj)} block-factor models: K(i, j) = 1 if block

  17. Detailed Modeling and Response of Demand Response Enabled Appliances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vyakaranam, Bharat; Fuller, Jason C.

    2014-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Proper modeling of end use loads is very important in order to predict their behavior, and how they interact with the power system, including voltage and temperature dependencies, power system and load control functions, and the complex interactions that occur between devices in such an interconnected system. This paper develops multi-state time variant residential appliance models with demand response enabled capabilities in the GridLAB-DTM simulation environment. These models represent not only the baseline instantaneous power demand and energy consumption, but the control systems developed by GE Appliances to enable response to demand response signals and the change in behavior of the appliance in response to the signal. These DR enabled appliances are simulated to estimate their capability to reduce peak demand and energy consumption.

  18. STELLOPT Modeling of the 3D Diagnostic Response in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazerson, Samuel A

    2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The ITER three dimensional diagnostic response to an n=3 resonant magnetic perturbation is modeled using the STELLOPT code. The in-vessel coils apply a resonant magnetic perturbation (RMP) fi eld which generates a 4 cm edge displacement from axisymmetry as modeled by the VMEC 3D equilibrium code. Forward modeling of flux loop and magnetic probe response with the DIAGNO code indicates up to 20 % changes in measured plasma signals. Simulated LIDAR measurements of electron temperature indicate 2 cm shifts on the low field side of the plasma. This suggests that the ITER diagnostic will be able to diagnose the 3D structure of the equilibria.

  19. Market Response ModelsMarket Response Models Demand CreationDemand Creation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brock, David

    Market Response ModelsMarket Response Models andand Demand CreationDemand Creation Dominique MImportance of Marketing Investments Need for a Market Response focusNeed for a Market Response focus Digital data enriched acquisition and retention costsasymmetry between acquisition and retention costs In both cases, longIn both

  20. Electric Water Heater Modeling and Control Strategies for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Samaan, Nader A.

    2012-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract— Demand response (DR) has a great potential to provide balancing services at normal operating conditions and emergency support when a power system is subject to disturbances. Effective control strategies can significantly relieve the balancing burden of conventional generators and reduce investment on generation and transmission expansion. This paper is aimed at modeling electric water heaters (EWH) in households and tests their response to control strategies to implement DR. The open-loop response of EWH to a centralized signal is studied by adjusting temperature settings to provide regulation services; and two types of decentralized controllers are tested to provide frequency support following generator trips. EWH models are included in a simulation platform in DIgSILENT to perform electromechanical simulation, which contains 147 households in a distribution feeder. Simulation results show the dependence of EWH response on water heater usage . These results provide insight suggestions on the need of control strategies to achieve better performance for demand response implementation. Index Terms— Centralized control, decentralized control, demand response, electrical water heater, smart grid

  1. Dynamic Simulation Studies of the Frequency Response of the Three U.S. Interconnections with Increased Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackin, Peter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    North America Dynamic Wind Generator Modeling Update, Basedperformed by the WECC Wind Generator Modeling Group and theTo model the interactions between wind generators and the

  2. Gas production response to price signals: Implications for electric power generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferrell, M.L.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas production response to price signals is outlined. The following topics are discussed: Structural changes in the U.S. gas exploration and production industry, industry outlook, industry response to price signals, and implications for electric power generators.

  3. LLNL-CONF-554011 Modeling Responses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    54011 Modeling Responses of Naturally Fractured Geothermal Reservoir to Low-Pressure Stimulation P. Fu, C. R. Carrigan May 1, 2012 36th Annual Meeting of the Geothermal Resources...

  4. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    North America Dynamic Wind Generator Modeling Update, Basedperformed by the WECC Wind Generator Modeling Group and theand in particular, wind generators are the primary resources

  5. Dynamic Simulation Studies of the Frequency Response of the Three U.S. Interconnections with Increased Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackin, Peter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2009. “North America Dynamic Wind Generator Modeling Update,work performed by the WECC Wind Generator Modeling Group andIEEE Dynamic Performance of Wind Power Generation Working

  6. Generating expansion model incorporating compact DC power flow equations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nderitu, D.G.; Sparrow, F.T.; Yu, Z. [Purdue Inst. for Interdisciplinary Engineering Studies, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a compact method of incorporating the spatial dimension into the generation expansion problem. Compact DC power flow equations are used to provide real-power flow coordination equations. Using these equations the marginal contribution of a generator to th total system loss is formulated as a function of that generator`s output. Incorporating these flow equations directly into the MIP formulation of the generator expansion problem results in a model that captures a generator`s true net marginal cost, one that includes both the cost of generation and the cost of transport. This method contrasts with other methods that iterate between a generator expansion model and an optimal power flow model. The proposed model is very compact and has very good convergence performance. A case study with data from Kenya is used to provide a practical application to the model.

  7. EXTENSIONS OF GENERALIZED LINEAR MODELING APPROACH TO STOCHASTIC WEATHER GENERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    weather) -- Software R open source statistical programming language: Function glm "Family;(2) Generalized Linear Models Statistical Framework -- Multiple Regression Analysis (Linear model or LM) Response

  8. Modeling and simulation of consumer response to dynamic pricing.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valenzuela, J.; Thimmapuram, P.; Kim, J (Decision and Information Sciences); (Auburn Univ.)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessing the impacts of dynamic-pricing under the smart grid concept is becoming extremely important for deciding its full deployment. In this paper, we develop a model that represents the response of consumers to dynamic pricing. In the model, consumers use forecasted day-ahead prices to shift daily energy consumption from hours when the price is expected to be high to hours when the price is expected to be low while maintaining the total energy consumption as unchanged. We integrate the consumer response model into the Electricity Market Complex Adaptive System (EMCAS). EMCAS is an agent-based model that simulates restructured electricity markets. We explore the impacts of dynamic-pricing on price spikes, peak demand, consumer energy bills, power supplier profits, and congestion costs. A simulation of an 11-node test network that includes eight generation companies and five aggregated consumers is performed for a period of 1 month. In addition, we simulate the Korean power system.

  9. Network Models for Power Grids: A Generative Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deka, Deepjyoti

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The inherent structure of the electrical network has a significant impact on its functioning and health. As power grids move towards becoming `smarter' with increased demand response and decentralized control, the topological aspects of the grid have become even more important. Understanding the topology can thus lead to better strategies to control the smart grid as well as enable rapid identification and prevention of risks such as blackouts. This paper focuses on modeling and analyzing basic similarities in network structure of large power grids across America and Europe. It studies the topological characteristics of power grids and develops a generative model for them. Based on the typical small world characteristics, large scale test power systems can be developed to better study the working of new algorithms for smart grids

  10. Value of Demand Response: Quantities from Production Cost Modeling (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hummon, M.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response (DR) resources present a potentially important source of grid flexibility particularly on future systems with high penetrations of variable wind and solar power generation. However, managed loads in grid models are limited by data availability and modeling complexity. This presentation focuses on the value of co-optimized DR resources to provide energy and ancillary services in a production cost model. There are significant variations in the availabilities of different types of DR resources, which affect both the operational savings as well as the revenue for each DR resource. The results presented include the system-wide avoided fuel and generator start-up costs as well as the composite revenue for each DR resource by energy and operating reserves. In addition, the revenue is characterized by the capacity, energy, and units of DR enabled.

  11. Simulated movement of musculature in a computer generated model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ten Wolde, Kristian Bernard

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Designing a computer generated character involves many steps, including the structure that is responsible for moving the character in a organic manner. There are several ways to develop a character to control the motion exhibited by the skin...

  12. Supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibres: Modelling and dispersion engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibres: Modelling and dispersion engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2.4 The split-step Fourier method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 #12;iv CONTENTS 2

  13. Optimization Online - PSMG-A Parallel Structured Model Generator ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng Qiang

    2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 10, 2014 ... As far as we are aware, PSMG is the first processor for an algebraic modelling language that is capable of generating the problem in parallel.

  14. Modeling of concentrating solar thermoelectric generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ren, Zhifeng

    The conversion of solar power into electricity is dominated by non-concentrating photovoltaics and concentrating solar thermal systems. Recently, it has been shown that solar thermoelectric generators (STEGs) are a viable ...

  15. Modeling Operational Constraints imposed by Renewable Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniels, Thomas E.

    4 #12;Operational effects into NETPLAN G LX L T R 5 #12;Effect of Wind on Load Following 10 min, that include: Regulation, Intra-hour and inter-hour load following, Contingency reserves, Generation cycling

  16. Model Annex for Preparedness and Response to Radiological Transportati...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Response to Radiological Transportation Incidents.docx More Documents & Publications TEPP Model Needs Assessment Document First Responder Initial Response Procedure Hazardous...

  17. Model Recovery Procedure for Response to a Radiological Transportation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Incident.docx More Documents & Publications Hazardous Materials Incident Response Procedure First Responder Initial Response Procedure TEPP Model Needs Assessment Document...

  18. Distributed generation capabilities of the national energy modeling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Edwards, Jennifer L.; Marnay, Chris

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes Berkeley Lab's exploration of how the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) models distributed generation (DG) and presents possible approaches for improving how DG is modeled. The on-site electric generation capability has been available since the AEO2000 version of NEMS. Berkeley Lab has previously completed research on distributed energy resources (DER) adoption at individual sites and has developed a DER Customer Adoption Model called DER-CAM. Given interest in this area, Berkeley Lab set out to understand how NEMS models small-scale on-site generation to assess how adequately DG is treated in NEMS, and to propose improvements or alternatives. The goal is to determine how well NEMS models the factors influencing DG adoption and to consider alternatives to the current approach. Most small-scale DG adoption takes place in the residential and commercial modules of NEMS. Investment in DG ultimately offsets purchases of electricity, which also eliminates the losses associated with transmission and distribution (T&D). If the DG technology that is chosen is photovoltaics (PV), NEMS assumes renewable energy consumption replaces the energy input to electric generators. If the DG technology is fuel consuming, consumption of fuel in the electric utility sector is replaced by residential or commercial fuel consumption. The waste heat generated from thermal technologies can be used to offset the water heating and space heating energy uses, but there is no thermally activated cooling capability. This study consists of a review of model documentation and a paper by EIA staff, a series of sensitivity runs performed by Berkeley Lab that exercise selected DG parameters in the AEO2002 version of NEMS, and a scoping effort of possible enhancements and alternatives to NEMS current DG capabilities. In general, the treatment of DG in NEMS is rudimentary. The penetration of DG is determined by an economic cash-flow analysis that determines adoption based on the n umber of years to a positive cash flow. Some important technologies, e.g. thermally activated cooling, are absent, and ceilings on DG adoption are determined by some what arbitrary caps on the number of buildings that can adopt DG. These caps are particularly severe for existing buildings, where the maximum penetration for any one technology is 0.25 percent. On the other hand, competition among technologies is not fully considered, and this may result in double-counting for certain applications. A series of sensitivity runs show greater penetration with net metering enhancements and aggressive tax credits and a more limited response to lowered DG technology costs. Discussion of alternatives to the current code is presented in Section 4. Alternatives or improvements to how DG is modeled in NEMS cover three basic areas: expanding on the existing total market for DG both by changing existing parameters in NEMS and by adding new capabilities, such as for missing technologies; enhancing the cash flow analysis but incorporating aspects of DG economics that are not currently represented, e.g. complex tariffs; and using an external geographic information system (GIS) driven analysis that can better and more intuitively identify niche markets.

  19. Towards the Next Generation of Model-Driven Cloud Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muñoz, Francesc

    Towards the Next Generation of Model-Driven Cloud Platforms Javier Esparza-Peidro, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco of Model-Driven Cloud Platforms Javier Esparza-Peidro, Francesc D. Mu~noz-Esco´i Institut Universitari Mixt

  20. AUTOMATIC GENERATION OF OPTIMAL CONTROLLERS THROUGH MODEL CHECKING TECHNIQUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tronci, Enrico

    AUTOMATIC GENERATION OF OPTIMAL CONTROLLERS THROUGH MODEL CHECKING TECHNIQUES Giuseppe Della Penna Keywords: Controller Synthesis, Controller Optimization, Model Checking, Nonlinear Systems Abstract: We INTRODUCTION Control systems (or, shortly, controllers) are small hardware/software components that control

  1. A Developmental Model for Generative Media Jon McCormack

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCormack, Jon

    for the dynamic simulation of organic forms and processes. By decoupling the generative process from the generated@csse.monash.edu.au Abstract. Developmental models simulate the spatio-temporal develop- ment of a complex system. The system synthesis are provided. 1 Introduction We are interested in generalized models that simulate the continuous

  2. Electrical faults modeling of the photovoltaic generator Wail Rezgui1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    energy by the photovoltaic phenomena. So, the degradation of these two factors means the presenceElectrical faults modeling of the photovoltaic generator Wail Rezgui1 , Leïla-Hayet Mouss1 , Kinza presented a new methodology for the mathematical modeling of the photovoltaic generator's characteristics

  3. Generational Garbage Collection and the Radioactive Decay Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clinger, William D.

    Generational Garbage Collection and the Radioactive Decay Model William D Clinger and Lars T Hansen a rational basis for deciding how many objects to promote, when to collect garbage, and which generations to collect. Analysis of the model leads to a new kind of gen- erational garbage collector whose effectiveness

  4. Comparison between third and second generation ocean wave models 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bratos, Steven Martin

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this study is to assess the relative performance of a second generation (2G) model, WISWAVE (Hubertz 1992), and a third generation (3G) model, WAM (WAMDI 1988), in deep water. High-quality wind fields, with detailed spatial...

  5. 2n-Dimensional Models with Topological Mass Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinichi Deguchi; Satoshi Hayakawa

    2008-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The 4-dimensional model with topological mass generation that has recently been presented by Dvali, Jackiw and Pi [G. Dvali, R. Jackiw, and S.-Y. Pi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 081602 (2006), hep-th/0610228] is generalized to any even number of dimensions. As in the 4-dimensional model, the 2n-dimensional model describes a mass-generation phenomenon due to the presence of the chiral anomaly. In addition to this model, new 2n-dimensional models with topological mass generation are proposed, in which a Stueckelberg-type mass term plays a crucial role in the mass generation. The mass generation of a pseudoscalar field such as the eta-prime meson is discussed within this framework.

  6. MODELING VENTILATION SYSTEM RESPONSE TO FIRE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coutts, D

    2007-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Fires in facilities containing nuclear material have the potential to transport radioactive contamination throughout buildings and may lead to widespread downwind dispersal threatening both worker and public safety. Development and implementation of control strategies capable of providing adequate protection from fire requires realistic characterization of ventilation system response which, in turn, depends on an understanding of fire development timing and suppression system response. This paper discusses work in which published HEPA filter data was combined with CFAST fire modeling predictions to evaluate protective control strategies for a hypothetical DOE non-reactor nuclear facility. The purpose of this effort was to evaluate when safety significant active ventilation coupled with safety class passive ventilation might be a viable control strategy.

  7. Artificial Intelligence Techniques for Steam Generator Modelling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Sarah

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the use of different Artificial Intelligence methods to predict the values of several continuous variables from a Steam Generator. The objective was to determine how the different artificial intelligence methods performed in making predictions on the given dataset. The artificial intelligence methods evaluated were Neural Networks, Support Vector Machines, and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference Systems. The types of neural networks investigated were Multi-Layer Perceptions, and Radial Basis Function. Bayesian and committee techniques were applied to these neural networks. Each of the AI methods considered was simulated in Matlab. The results of the simulations showed that all the AI methods were capable of predicting the Steam Generator data reasonably accurately. However, the Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference system out performed the other methods in terms of accuracy and ease of implementation, while still achieving a fast execution time as well as a reasonable training time.

  8. Technical Manual for the SAM Biomass Power Generation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jorgenson, J.; Gilman, P.; Dobos, A.

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technical manual provides context for the implementation of the biomass electric power generation performance model in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL's) System Advisor Model (SAM). Additionally, the report details the engineering and scientific principles behind the underlying calculations in the model. The framework established in this manual is designed to give users a complete understanding of behind-the-scenes calculations and the results generated.

  9. Generative modeling of dynamic visual scenes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Dahua, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling visual scenes is one of the fundamental tasks of computer vision. Whereas tremendous efforts have been devoted to video analysis in past decades, most prior work focuses on specific tasks, leading to dedicated ...

  10. Statistical Models for Next Generation Sequencing Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yiyi

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    prior indexed by distances from Gene Ontology (GO). The use of the external biological information yields improvements in statistical power over the original Bayesian discovery procedure. The third model addresses the problem of identifying protein...

  11. Two Market Models for Demand Response in Power Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    Two Market Models for Demand Response in Power Networks Lijun Chen, Na Li, Steven H. Low and John C-- In this paper, we consider two abstract market models for designing demand response to match power supply as oligopolistic markets, and propose distributed demand response algorithms to achieve the equilibria. The models

  12. Expectation-Propagation for the Generative Aspect Model Thomas Minka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minka,Tom

    - ple variational methods of Blei et al. (2001) can lead to inaccurate inferences and biased learning model introduced by Blei et al. (2001) is a promising model for discrete data, and provides overfitting (Hof- mann, 1999). Blei et al. (2001) introduced a modified model with a proper generative

  13. Toward optimized code generation through model-based optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Toward optimized code generation through model- based optimization Asma Charfi, Chokri Mraidha.gerard, francois.terrier}@cea.fr Pierre Boulet LIFL, CNRS/INRIA, Université de Lille 1, Parc de la Haute Borne, Bât tools like synthesis of system's application by automatic code generation. Real-Time and Embedded

  14. SECOND GENERATION REFORMS IN CHILE, POWER EXCHANGE MODEL. THE SOLUTION?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    their electric power systems, encouraging competition in generation and allowing private investments organizations, the Power Exchange (PX) and the Independent System Operator (ISO). Based on the electricitySECOND GENERATION REFORMS IN CHILE, POWER EXCHANGE MODEL. THE SOLUTION? David Watts Paulo Atienza

  15. Modelling a Respiratory Central Pattern Generator Neuron in Lymnaea stagnalis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Sue Ann

    Modelling a Respiratory Central Pattern Generator Neuron in Lymnaea stagnalis Sharene D. Bungay, is characterized in part by its ability to take in oxygen both cutaneously and aerially (via its rudi- mentary lung by a 3-neuron central pattern generator (CPG) as depicted in Figure 1. Syed et al. [1, 2] were able

  16. Generative Modeling by PRISM Taisuke Sato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sato, Taisuke

    ] PRISM is a probabilistic extension of Prolog2 . Syntactically a PRISM program DB = F R is a Prolog program such that F is a set of probabilistic atoms called msw atoms (see below) and R is a set. It is a high level language for probabilistic modeling capable of learning statistical parameters from observed

  17. On the Universal Generation of Mobility Models Alberto Medina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the Universal Generation of Mobility Models Alberto Medina Raytheon BBN Technologies amedina@bbn.com Gonca Gursun Computer Science Dept. Boston University goncag@cs.bu.edu Prithwish Basu Raytheon BBN

  18. Dynamics of an Economics Model for Generation Coupled to the OPA Power Transmission Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Ian

    Dynamics of an Economics Model for Generation Coupled to the OPA Power Transmission Model B. A a dynamic model of the power transmission system (OPA) and a simple economic model of power generation development. Despite the simplicity of this economic model, complex dynamics both in the economics (prices

  19. Combustion technology developments in power generation in response to environmental challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    and clean coal-fired systems. The most promising of these include pulverized coal combustionCombustion technology developments in power generation in response to environmental challenges J.M. Bee´r* Department of Chemical Engineering, Room 66-548, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  20. Modeling distributed generation in the buildings sectors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHighandSWPA / SPRA /Ml'. William Hirst HirstModelingAssessing the

  1. Simple model for decay of laser generated shock waves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trainor, R.J.

    1980-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple model is derived to calculate the hydrodynamic decay of laser-generated shock waves. Comparison with detailed hydrocode simulations shows good agreement between calculated time evolution of shock pressure, position, and instantaneous pressure profile. Reliability of the model decreases in regions of the target where superthermal-electron preheat effects become comparable to shock effects.

  2. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain;Modeling Energy Taxes and Credits: The Genco's Choice · Each Genco has a portfolio of power plants · Each power plant can have different supply costs and transaction costs · Supply costs can reflect capital

  3. Efficient Estimation in a Regression Model with Missing Responses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crawford, Scott

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This article examines methods to efficiently estimate the mean response in a linear model with an unknown error distribution under the assumption that the responses are missing at random. We show how the asymptotic variance is affected...

  4. The generation of shared cryptographic keys through channel impulse response estimation at 60 GHz.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Derek P.; Forman, Michael A.; Dowdle, Donald Ryan

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods to generate private keys based on wireless channel characteristics have been proposed as an alternative to standard key-management schemes. In this work, we discuss past work in the field and offer a generalized scheme for the generation of private keys using uncorrelated channels in multiple domains. Proposed cognitive enhancements measure channel characteristics, to dynamically change transmission and reception parameters as well as estimate private key randomness and expiration times. Finally, results are presented on the implementation of a system for the generation of private keys for cryptographic communications using channel impulse-response estimation at 60 GHz. The testbed is composed of commercial millimeter-wave VubIQ transceivers, laboratory equipment, and software implemented in MATLAB. Novel cognitive enhancements are demonstrated, using channel estimation to dynamically change system parameters and estimate cryptographic key strength. We show for a complex channel that secret key generation can be accomplished on the order of 100 kb/s.

  5. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cappers, Peter; Mills, Andrew; Goldman, Charles; Wiser, Ryan; Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This scoping study focuses on the policy issues inherent in the claims made by some Smart Grid proponents that the demand response potential of mass market customers which is enabled by widespread implementation of Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) through the Smart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integration issues. In terms of approach, we will: identify key issues associated with integrating large amounts of variable generation into the bulk power system; identify demand response opportunities made more readily available to mass market customers through widespread deployment of AMI systems and how they can affect the bulk power system; assess the extent to which these mass market Demand Response (DR) opportunities can mitigate Variable Generation (VG) integration issues in the near-term and what electricity market structures and regulatory practices could be changed to further expand the ability for DR to mitigate VG integration issues over the long term; and provide a qualitative comparison of DR and other approaches to mitigate VG integration issues.

  6. Interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism, the generation of oxidative stress and the mitigative oxidative stress response

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Busch, Andrea W.U.; Montgomery, Beronda L.

    2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tetrapyrroles are involved in light harvesting and light perception, electron-transfer reactions, and as co-factors for key enzymes and sensory proteins. Under conditions in which cells exhibit stress-induced imbalances of photosynthetic reactions, or light absorption exceeds the ability of the cell to use photoexcitation energy in synthesis reactions, redox imbalance can occur in photosynthetic cells. Such conditions can lead to the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) associated with alterations in tetrapyrrole homeostasis. ROS accumulation can result in cellular damage and detrimental effects on organismal fitness, or ROS molecules can serve as signals to induce a protective or damage-mitigating oxidative stressmore »signaling response in cells. Induced oxidative stress responses include tetrapyrrole-dependent and -independent mechanisms for mitigating ROS generation and/or accumulation. Thus, tetrapyrroles can be contributors to oxidative stress, but are also essential in the oxidative stress response to protect cells by contributing to detoxification of ROS. In this review, we highlight the interconnection and interdependence of tetrapyrrole metabolism with the occurrence of oxidative stress and protective oxidative stress signaling responses in photosynthetic organisms.« less

  7. ERCOT's Dynamic Model of Wind Turbine Generators: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C. P.; Conto, J.; Donoho, K.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By the end of 2003, the total installed wind farm capacity in the Electric Reliability Council of Texas (ERCOT) system was approximately 1 gigawatt (GW) and the total in the United States was about 5 GW. As the number of wind turbines installed throughout the United States increases, there is a greater need for dynamic wind turbine generator models that can properly model entire power systems for different types of analysis. This paper describes the ERCOT dynamic models and simulations of a simple network with different types of wind turbine models currently available.

  8. Modeling Framework and Validation of a Smart Grid and Demand Response System for Wind Power Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broeer, Torsten; Fuller, Jason C.; Tuffner, Francis K.; Chassin, David P.; Djilali, Ned

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity generation from wind power and other renewable energy sources is increasing, and their variability introduces new challenges to the power system. The emergence of smart grid technologies in recent years has seen a paradigm shift in redefining the electrical system of the future, in which controlled response of the demand side is used to balance fluctuations and intermittencies from the generation side. This paper presents a modeling framework for an integrated electricity system where loads become an additional resource. The agent-based model represents a smart grid power system integrating generators, transmission, distribution, loads and market. The model incorporates generator and load controllers, allowing suppliers and demanders to bid into a Real-Time Pricing (RTP) electricity market. The modeling framework is applied to represent a physical demonstration project conducted on the Olympic Peninsula, Washington, USA, and validation simulations are performed using actual dynamic data. Wind power is then introduced into the power generation mix illustrating the potential of demand response to mitigate the impact of wind power variability, primarily through thermostatically controlled loads. The results also indicate that effective implementation of Demand Response (DR) to assist integration of variable renewable energy resources requires a diversity of loads to ensure functionality of the overall system.

  9. Thermal building simulation and computer generation of nodal models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Thermal building simulation and computer generation of nodal models H. BOYER, J.P. CHABRIAT, B in the development of several packages simulating the dynamic behaviour of buildings. This paper shows the adaptation. This article shows the chosen method in the case of our thermal simulation program for buildings, CODYRUN. #12

  10. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain-term solution (e.g.,are long-term solution (e.g., solar power and wind power (solar power and wind power Heavy user of fossil fuels:Heavy user of fossil fuels: Electric power industryElectric power industry

  11. ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation from model organic wastewater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation from model organic wastewater in a cassette-008-1516-0 T. Shimoyama :S. Komukai :K. Watanabe Laboratory of Applied Microbiology, Marine Biotechnology, Tobitakyu, Chofu, Tokyo 182-0036, Japan B. E. Logan Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering

  12. Hybrid Control Models of Next Generation Air Traffic Management ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, George J.

    Hybrid Control Models of Next Generation Air Traffic Management ? C. Tomlin, G. Pappas, J. Lygeros of California at Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720 Abstract. The study of hierarchical, hybrid control systems by today's Air Traffic Control (ATC), a ground­based system which routes aircraft along predefined jet ways

  13. Tsunami Landslide Generation: Modelling and Experiments Francois Enet 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grilli, Stéphan T.

    -linear potential flow model of landslide tsunami generation. LABORATORY EXPERIMENTS Overview Experiments depth and 1 Formerly at URI. Now at Alkyon, Hydraulic Consultancy & Research, PO Box 248 8300 AE for tsunami landslide experiments and computations. mechanical system (gates with electric wire) at three

  14. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

  15. Using Built-In Domain-Specific Modeling Support to Guide Model-Based Test Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanstrén, Teemu; 10.4204/EPTCS.80.5

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model-based testing approach to support automated test generation with domain-specific concepts. This includes a language expert who is an expert at building test models and domain experts who are experts in the domain of the system under test. First, we provide a framework to support the language expert in building test models using a full (Java) programming language with the help of simple but powerful modeling elements of the framework. Second, based on the model built with this framework, the toolset automatically forms a domain-specific modeling language that can be used to further constrain and guide test generation from these models by a domain expert. This makes it possible to generate a large set of test cases covering the full model, chosen (constrained) parts of the model, or manually define specific test cases on top of the model while using concepts familiar to the domain experts.

  16. Response of Soviet-designed VVER-440 steam generator vessel to pressurization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, J.M.; Sienicki, J.J.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Soviet-designed VVER (Water-Cooled, Water-Moderated Energy Reactors) pressurized water reactors use horizontal steam generators to transfer energy from the primary to secondary coolant systems (DOE/NE-0084 Revision 2, 1989). Primary coolant flowing from the reactor vessel enters the steam generator through a vertical, circular, manifold header that also serves as the tubesheet distributing coolant to the horizontal tube bundle. Primary coolant exits the tube bundle and steam generator through a second similar vertical manifold header. The header design includes the provision for access by a person to inspect the mainfolds through bolted down closure heads atop each manifold. The internal diameter of each header exceeds that of the connected primary coolant system piping. The postulated failure of a manifold closure head or the manifold itself provides a pathway for primary coolant to enter the secondary system. Steam formation due to flashing of primary coolant inside the steam generator secondary side region can result in pressurization of the steam generator shell to values above the nominal secondary side operating pressure. The present work involves the investigation of the consequences of manifold failure for the case of the VVER-440 reactor system. An analysis has been performed of the loadings upon and the mechanical response of the steam generator shell for the case of a postulated large break in the manifold wall. The objectives were to calculate the maximum pressure attained inside the shell and to predict the shell failure pressure as well as the failure mechanism. 6 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Modeling of Electric Water Heaters for Demand Response: A Baseline PDE Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Zhijie; Diao, Ruisheng; Lu, Shuai; Lian, Jianming; Zhang, Yu

    2014-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response (DR)control can effectively relieve balancing and frequency regulation burdens on conventional generators, facilitate integrating more renewable energy, and reduce generation and transmission investments needed to meet peak demands. Electric water heaters (EWHs) have a great potential in implementing DR control strategies because: (a) the EWH power consumption has a high correlation with daily load patterns; (b) they constitute a significant percentage of domestic electrical load; (c) the heating element is a resistor, without reactive power consumption; and (d) they can be used as energy storage devices when needed. Accurately modeling the dynamic behavior of EWHs is essential for designing DR controls. Various water heater models, simplified to different extents, were published in the literature; however, few of them were validated against field measurements, which may result in inaccuracy when implementing DR controls. In this paper, a partial differential equation physics-based model, developed to capture detailed temperature profiles at different tank locations, is validated against field test data for more than 10 days. The developed model shows very good performance in capturing water thermal dynamics for benchmark testing purposes

  18. Model for predicting the acrosswind response of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    force fluctuations are formulated, based on wind tunnel measurements. A statistical integration scheme the preliminary design of tall buildings. Keywords: buildings, wind Ioadings, acrosswind response It is important to recognize the unsteady nature of wind loads in the design of buildings to ensure structural safety

  19. Development of a fourth generation predictive capability maturity model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hills, Richard Guy; Witkowski, Walter R.; Urbina, Angel; Rider, William J.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) is an expert elicitation tool designed to characterize and communicate completeness of the approaches used for computational model definition, verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification associated for an intended application. The primary application of this tool at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been for physics-based computational simulations in support of nuclear weapons applications. The two main goals of a PCMM evaluation are 1) the communication of computational simulation capability, accurately and transparently, and 2) the development of input for effective planning. As a result of the increasing importance of computational simulation to SNL's mission, the PCMM has evolved through multiple generations with the goal to provide more clarity, rigor, and completeness in its application. This report describes the approach used to develop the fourth generation of the PCMM.

  20. Entanglement generation in the ultra-strongly coupled Rabi model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matteo Bina; Stefano Maffezzoli Felis; Stefano Olivares

    2014-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the dynamics of the quantum Rabi model for two qubits interacting through a common bosonic field mode (resonator), focusing on the generation and detection of maximally entangled Bell states. We obtain analytical results for the unitary dynamics of this system in the slow-qubit (or degenerate) regime, considering ultra-strong coupling between qubits and resonator mode, for which the rotating wave approximation is no longer applicable. We also numerically investigate the dynamics beyond the slow-qubit condition in order to study the validity of the model in the presence of less strict conditions.

  1. Addition of First Generation Leptons to the External Flux Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aaron J. Roy

    2009-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In an extra dimensional EW model in M_4 X S_1 there is no distinction mathematically with the standard model analog as far as the degrees of freedom of the two models along with the masses and more importantly the mass ratio relation in the zero mode limit. In this paper we present a theoretical construct of the same geometry but with the addition of an external magnetic flux permeating the extra coordinate. This will give all of the charged fields in the model an additional phase with nontrivial periodicity. This rather important addition leads to very interesting and mathematically rich physics. Here we will present the generalized theory for the addition of first generation leptons to this theory.

  2. Integration of MHD load models with circuit representations the Z generator.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jennings, Christopher A.; Ampleford, David J.; Jones, Brent Manley; McBride, Ryan D.; Bailey, James E.; Jones, Michael C.; Gomez, Matthew Robert.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Nakhleh, Charles; Stygar, William A.; Savage, Mark Edward; Wagoner, Timothy C.; Moore, James K.

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MHD models of imploding loads fielded on the Z accelerator are typically driven by reduced or simplified circuit representations of the generator. The performance of many of the imploding loads is critically dependent on the current and power delivered to them, so may be strongly influenced by the generators response to their implosion. Current losses diagnosed in the transmission lines approaching the load are further known to limit the energy delivery, while exhibiting some load dependence. Through comparing the convolute performance of a wide variety of short pulse Z loads we parameterize a convolute loss resistance applicable between different experiments. We incorporate this, and other current loss terms into a transmission line representation of the Z vacuum section. We then apply this model to study the current delivery to a wide variety of wire array and MagLif style liner loads.

  3. Diagnostic and Prognostic Models for Generator Step-Up Transformers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivek Agarwal; Nancy J. Lybeck; Binh T. Pham

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2014, the online monitoring (OLM) of active components project under the Light Water Reactor Sustainability program at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) focused on diagnostic and prognostic capabilities for generator step-up transformers. INL worked with subject matter experts from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to augment and revise the GSU fault signatures previously implemented in the Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI’s) Fleet-Wide Prognostic and Health Management (FW-PHM) Suite software. Two prognostic models were identified and implemented for GSUs in the FW-PHM Suite software. INL and EPRI demonstrated the use of prognostic capabilities for GSUs. The complete set of fault signatures developed for GSUs in the Asset Fault Signature Database of the FW-PHM Suite for GSUs is presented in this report. Two prognostic models are described for paper insulation: the Chendong model for degree of polymerization, and an IEEE model that uses a loading profile to calculates life consumption based on hot spot winding temperatures. Both models are life consumption models, which are examples of type II prognostic models. Use of the models in the FW-PHM Suite was successfully demonstrated at the 2014 August Utility Working Group Meeting, Idaho Falls, Idaho, to representatives from different utilities, EPRI, and the Halden Research Project.

  4. MODELING THE GENERATION AND DISSOCIATION OF THE BORON-OXYGEN COMPLEX IN B-DOPED CZ-SI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MODELING THE GENERATION AND DISSOCIATION OF THE BORON-OXYGEN COMPLEX IN B-DOPED CZ-SI Bianca Lim Emmerthal, Germany ABSTRACT We demonstrate that the boron-oxygen (BsO2i) re- combination center responsible of this complex with the oxygen dimer O2i into XO2i, thereby reducing the concen- tration of unbound O2i

  5. Towards next generation ocean models : novel discontinuous Galerkin schemes for 2D unsteady biogeochemical models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ueckermann, Mattheus Percy

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new generation of efficient parallel, multi-scale, and interdisciplinary ocean models is required for better understanding and accurate predictions. The purpose of this thesis is to quantitatively identify promising ...

  6. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pricing on the Usage of Wind Generation. Power Systems, IEEE2008) Analysis of Wind Generation Impact on ERCOT Anclillaryto higher or lower wind generation than scheduled. To manage

  7. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. (2008). Coupling wind generators with deferrable loads.tariff. For example, a wind generator could partner with acharge for or prevent a wind generator from submitting hour-

  8. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    diverse set of flexible traditional generation resourcessufficient flexible demand or generation capacity exists tosufficient flexible demand or generation capacity exists to

  9. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    hydro facility or demand response aggregator to provide theOperator Demand Response Mass-Market Customers Aggregator ofDemand Response Resources Mass Market Customers Aggregator

  10. Gravitational wave generation in power-law inflationary models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paulo M. Sá; Alfredo B. Henriques

    2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the generation of gravitational waves in power-law inflationary models. The energy spectrum of the gravitational waves is calculated using the method of continuous Bogoliubov coefficients. We show that, by looking at the interval of frequencies between 10^(-5) and 10^5 Hz and also at the GHz range, important information can be obtained, both about the inflationary period itself and about the thermalization regime between the end of inflation and the beginning of the radiation-dominated era. We thus deem the development of gravitational wave detectors, covering the MHz/GHz range of frequencies, to be an important task for the future.

  11. Dynamic Simulation Studies of the Frequency Response of the Three U.S. Interconnections with Increased Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackin, Peter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on work performed by the WECC Wind Generator Modeling GroupModeling Approach in the WECC. ” IEEE Transactions on PowerNational Laboratory. 11. WECC. 2008. WECC Standard BAL-002-

  12. Modeling and Analysis of the Role of Fast-Response Energy Storage in the Smart Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Su, Han-I

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The large short time-scale variability of renewable energy resources presents significant challenges to the reliable operation of power systems. This variability can be mitigated by deploying fast-ramping generators. However, these generators are costly to operate and produce environmentally harmful emissions. Fast-response energy storage devices, such as batteries and flywheels, provide an environmentally friendly alternative, but are expensive and have limited capacity. To study the environmental benefits of storage, we introduce a slotted-time dynamic residual dc power flow model with the prediction error of the difference between the generation (including renewables) and the load as input and the fast-ramping generation and the storage (charging/discharging) operation as the control variables used to ensure that the demand is satisfied (as much as possible) in each time slot. We assume the input prediction error sequence to be i.i.d. zero-mean random variables. The optimal power flow problem is then formu...

  13. Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated Response to Dynamic Pricing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mathieu, Johanna L.; Callaway, Duncan S.; Kiliccote, Sila

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlling electric loads to deliver power system services presents a number of interesting challenges. For example, changes in electricity consumption of Commercial and Industrial (C&I) facilities are usually estimated using counterfactual baseline models, and model uncertainty makes it difficult to precisely quantify control responsiveness. Moreover, C&I facilities exhibit variability in their response. This paper seeks to understand baseline model error and demand-side variability in responses to open-loop control signals (i.e. dynamic prices). Using a regression-based baseline model, we define several Demand Response (DR) parameters, which characterize changes in electricity use on DR days, and then present a method for computing the error associated with DR parameter estimates. In addition to analyzing the magnitude of DR parameter error, we develop a metric to determine how much observed DR parameter variability is attributable to real event-to-event variability versus simply baseline model error. Using data from 38 C&I facilities that participated in an automated DR program in California, we find that DR parameter errors are large. For most facilities, observed DR parameter variability is likely explained by baseline model error, not real DR parameter variability; however, a number of facilities exhibit real DR parameter variability. In some cases, the aggregate population of C&I facilities exhibits real DR parameter variability, resulting in implications for the system operator with respect to both resource planning and system stability.

  14. A Model of U.S. Commercial Distributed Generation Adoption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi; Ryan Firestone; Zhou, Nan; Maribu,Karl; Marnay, Chris

    2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Small-scale (100 kW-5 MW) on-site distributed generation (DG) economically driven by combined heat and power (CHP) applications and, in some cases, reliability concerns will likely emerge as a common feature of commercial building energy systems over the next two decades. Forecasts of DG adoption published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) are made using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), which has a forecasting module that predicts the penetration of several possible commercial building DG technologies over the period 2005-2025. NEMS is also used for estimating the future benefits of Department of Energy research and development used in support of budget requests and management decisionmaking. The NEMS approach to modeling DG has some limitations, including constraints on the amount of DG allowed for retrofits to existing buildings and a small number of possible sizes for each DG technology. An alternative approach called Commercial Sector Model (ComSeM) is developed to improve the way in which DG adoption is modeled. The approach incorporates load shapes for specific end uses in specific building types in specific regions, e.g., cooling in hospitals in Atlanta or space heating in Chicago offices. The Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM) uses these load profiles together with input cost and performance DG technology assumptions to model the potential DG adoption for four selected cities and two sizes of five building types in selected forecast years to 2022. The Distributed Energy Resources Market Diffusion Model (DER-MaDiM) is then used to then tailor the DER-CAM results to adoption projections for the entire U.S. commercial sector for all forecast years from 2007-2025. This process is conducted such that the structure of results are consistent with the structure of NEMS, and can be re-injected into NEMS that can then be used to integrate adoption results into a full forecast.

  15. A simulation model for generation of aquifer characteristics and contaminant concentrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deena, Jayaram

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simulation model was developed to generate aquifer characteristics such as hydraulic conductivity, porosity and organic carbon content. The variability of aquifer characteristics is represented by the fields generated using the simulation model. Random...

  16. NDA SYSTEM RESPONSE MODELING AND ITS APPLICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vinson, D.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plant (PORTS) is a uranium enrichment facility that was historically used to enrich uranium to levels that range from 2% to greater than 97%. The feed material for PORTS was obtained from the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP) that produced uranium in the form of UF6 that was enriched to about 1 to 2%. The enrichment process involves a multistage process by which gaseous UF{sub 6} passed through a diffusion barrier in each stage. The porous diffusion barrier in each stage retards the rate of the diffusion of the heavier {sup 238}U atoms relative to the diffusion of the lighter {sup 235}U atoms. By this process the product stream is slightly enriched by each stage of the process. Each stage consists of a compressor, converter and a motor. There are more than 4000 stages that are linked together with piping of various diameters to form the PORTS cascade. The cascade spans three interconnected buildings and comprises miles of piping, thousands of seals, converters, valves, motors, and compressors. During operation, PORTS process equipment contained UF{sub 6} gas with uranium enrichment that increased in the process stream from the first to the last stage in a known manner. Gaseous UF{sub 6} moving through the PORTS process equipment had potential to form deposits within the process equipment by several mechanisms, including solidification due to incorrect temperature and pressure conditions during the process, inleakage of atmospheric moisture that chemically reacts with UF{sub 6} to form hydrated uranyl fluoride solids, reduction reactions of UF{sub 6} with cascade metals, and UF{sub 6} condensation on the internal equipment surfaces. As a result, the process equipment of the PORTS contains a variable and unknown quantity of uranium with variable enrichment that has been deposited within the equipment during plant operations. The exact chemical form of this uranium is variable, although it is expected that the bulk of the material is of the form of uranyl fluoride that will become hydrated on exposure to moisture in air when the systems are no longer buffered. The deposit geometry and thickness is uncertain and variable. However, a reasonable assessment of the level of material holdup in this equipment is necessary to support decommissioning efforts. The assessment of nuclear material holdup in process equipment is a complex process that requires integration of process knowledge, nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements, and computer modeling to maximize capabilities and minimize uncertainty. The current report is focused on the use of computer modeling and simulation of NDA measurements.

  17. Model Projection: Simplifying Models in Response to Restricting the Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Jeremy

    . For example, the `basic model' car air conditioning system may not offer the climate control functionality constructed by model checkers [8] and built by engineers in the telecommunications and embedded systems on state-based modelling [27], and are widely used for specifying discrete-event control devices

  18. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Smart Grid, and specifically AMI, can play in mitigating variable generation integrationSmart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integrationSmart Grid could be the “silver bullet” for mitigating variable generation integration

  19. Analytical thermal model validation for Cassini radioisotope thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, E.I. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Jet Propulsion Lab.

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Saturn-bound Cassini spacecraft is designed to rely, without precedent, on the waste heat from its three radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) to warm the propulsion module subsystem, and the RTG end dome temperature is a key determining factor of the amount of waste heat delivered. A previously validated SINDA thermal model of the RTG was the sole guide to understanding its complex thermal behavior, but displayed large discrepancies against some initial thermal development test data. A careful revalidation effort led to significant modifications and adjustments of the model, which result in a doubling of the radiative heat transfer from the heat source support assemblies to the end domes and bring up the end dome and flange temperature predictions to within 2 C of the pertinent test data. The increased inboard end dome temperature has a considerable impact on thermal control of the spacecraft central body. The validation process offers an example of physically-driven analytical model calibration with test data from not only an electrical simulator but also a nuclear-fueled flight unit, and has established the end dome temperatures of a flight RTG where no in-flight or ground-test data existed before.

  20. Study of Two-Loop Neutrino Mass Generation Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geng, Chao-Qiang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the models with the Majorana neutrino masses generated radiatively by two-loop diagrams due to the Yukawa $\\rho \\bar \\ell_R^c \\ell_R$ and effective $\\rho^{\\pm\\pm} W^\\mp W^\\mp$ couplings along with a scalar triplet $\\Delta$, where $\\rho$ is a doubly charged singlet scalar, $\\ell_R$ the charged lepton and $W$ the charged gauge boson. A generic feature in these types of models is that the neutrino mass spectrum has to be a normal hierarchy. Furthermore, by using the neutrino oscillation data and comparing with the global fitting result in the literature, we find a unique neutrino mass matrix and predict the Dirac and two Majorana CP phases to be $1.40\\pi$, $1.11\\pi$ and $1.47\\pi$, respectively. We also discuss the model parameters constrained by the lepton flavor violating processes and electroweak oblique parameters. In addition, we show that the rate of the neutrinoless double beta decay $(0\

  1. Angular Momentum Generation from Holographic Chern-Simons Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chaolun Wu

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study parity-violating effects, particularly the generation of angular momentum density and its relation to the parity-odd and dissipationless transport coefficient Hall viscosity, in strongly-coupled quantum fluid systems in 2+1 dimensions using holographic method. We employ a class of 3+1-dimensional holographic models of Einstein-Maxwell system with gauge and gravitational Chern-Simons terms coupled to a dynamical scalar field. The scalar can condensate and break the parity spontaneously. We find that when the scalar condensates, a non-vanishing angular momentum density and an associated edge current are generated, and they receive contributions from both gauge and gravitational Chern-Simons terms. The angular momentum density does not satisfy a membrane paradigm form because the vector mode fluctuations from which it is calculated are effectively massive. On the other hand, the emergence of Hall viscosity is a consequence of the gravitational Chern-Simons term alone and it has membrane paradigm form. We present both general analytic results and numeric results which take back-reactions into account. The ratio between Hall viscosity and angular momentum density resulting from the gravitational Chern-Simons term has in general a deviation from the universal 1/2 value obtained from field theory and condensed matter physics.

  2. Comparison of the response of two and four-stroke diesel-generator sets to transient loading

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Willett, Kenneth Ray

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    COMPARISON OF THE RESPONSE OF TWO AND FOUR-STROKE DIESEL-GENERATOR SETS TO TRANSIENT LOADING A Thesis by KENNETH RAY WILLETT Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas Ai!M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1979 Major Subject: Mechanical Engineering COMPARISON OF THE RESPONSE OF TWO AND FOUR-STROKE DIESEL-GENERATOR SETS TO TRANSIENT LOADING A Thesis by KENNETH RAV MILLETT Approved as to style and content by: ~~m J'V (Cha1...

  3. HEITSCH, R OMISCH --GENERATION OF MULTIVARIATE SCENARIO TREES TO MODEL STOCHASTICITY IN POWER MANAGEMENT 1 Generation of Multivariate Scenario Trees to Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    MANAGEMENT 1 Generation of Multivariate Scenario Trees to Model Stochasticity in Power Management Holger data of EDF Electricit´e de France. Index Terms-- Stochastic programming, power management, scenarioHEITSCH, R ¨OMISCH -- GENERATION OF MULTIVARIATE SCENARIO TREES TO MODEL STOCHASTICITY IN POWER

  4. A Full Demand Response Model in Co-Optimized Energy and

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guodong [ORNL; Tomsovic, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been widely accepted that demand response will play an important role in reliable and economic operation of future power systems and electricity markets. Demand response can not only influence the prices in the energy market by demand shifting, but also participate in the reserve market. In this paper, we propose a full model of demand response in which demand flexibility is fully utilized by price responsive shiftable demand bids in energy market as well as spinning reserve bids in reserve market. A co-optimized day-ahead energy and spinning reserve market is proposed to minimize the expected net cost under all credible system states, i.e., expected total cost of operation minus total benefit of demand, and solved by mixed integer linear programming. Numerical simulation results on the IEEE Reliability Test System show effectiveness of this model. Compared to conventional demand shifting bids, the proposed full demand response model can further reduce committed capacity from generators, starting up and shutting down of units and the overall system operating costs.

  5. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general ``rules-of-thumb`` for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  6. Characteristics of identifying linear dynamic models from impulse response data using Prony analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the characteristics of fitting linear dynamic models to the impulse response of oscillatory dynamic systems using Prony analysis. Many dynamic systems exhibit oscillatory responses with multiple modes of oscillations. Although the underlying dynamics of such systems are often nonlinear, it is frequently possible and very useful to represent the system operating about some set point with a linear model. Derivation of such linear models can be done using two basic approaches: model the system using theoretical derivations and some linearization method such as a Taylor series expansion; or use a curve-fitting technique to optimally fit a linear model to specified system response data. Prony analysis belongs to the second class of system modeling because it is a method of fitting a linear model to the impulse response of a dynamic system. Its parallel formulation inherently makes it well suited for fitting models to oscillatory system data. Such oscillatory dynamic effects occur in large synchronous-generator-based power systems in the form of electromechanical oscillations. To study and characterize these oscillatory dynamics, BPA has developed computer codes to analyze system data using Prony analysis. The objective of this study was to develop a highly detailed understanding of the properties of using Prony analysis to fit models to systems with characteristics often encountered in power systems. This understanding was then extended to develop general rules-of-thumb'' for using Prony analysis. The general characteristics were investigated by performing fits to data from known linear models under controlled conditions. The conditions studied include various mathematical solution techniques; different parent system configurations; and a large variety of underlying noise characteristics.

  7. Adiabatic electron response and solitary wave generation by trapped particle nonlinearity in a hydrogen plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mandal, Debraj; Sharma, Devendra [Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382428 (India)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The finite amplitude ion acoustic waves that trap electrons modify the structure of the evolving nonlinear soliton solutions. In the numerical simulations, self-consistently generated solitary waves are studied that emerge as a result of a current driven microinstability growing the ion acoustic mode in a collisionless Vlasov plasma. The growth saturates as a result of nonlinear effects governed by a combination of nonlinearities originating from the hydrodynamic model and kinetic particle trapping effects. The resulting solitary waves also coexist with a finite current and an electron plasma wave capable of perturbing the trapping potential. The results of multiscale simulation are analyzed and characterized following the kinetic prescription of undamped trapped particle mode in the form of phase space vortex solutions that are generalized form of Sagdeev's solitons and obey the solutions of a modified Korteweg-de Vries equation, accounting for a stronger nonlinearity originating from the electron trapping.

  8. Modeling of solar thermal selective surfaces and thermoelectric generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEnaney, Kenneth

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermoelectric generator is a solid-state device that converts a heat flux into electrical power via the Seebeck effect. When a thermoelectric generator is inserted between a solar-absorbing surface and a heat sink, a ...

  9. Modeling of leachate generation in municipal solid waste landfills

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, James Bryan

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and the inclusion of compaction effects and leachate generation and movement effects by Mehevec (1994) should provide the user with a tool for estimating leachate generation values and landfill capacity figures for a variety of initial design and operational...

  10. Overview of Key Roles and Responsibilities in Information Security Liaison Model Responsibilities Chief Information Security-Privacy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cantlon, Jessica F.

    Overview of Key Roles and Responsibilities in Information Security Liaison Model Responsibilities Chief Information Security-Privacy Officers Divisional Information Security-Privacy Liaison Departmental Information Security-Privacy Liaison Planning Plan and conduct annual risk assessment Develop a prioritized

  11. Modeling of passive microwave responses in convective situations using output from mesoscale models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pardo-Carrión, Juan R.

    Modeling of passive microwave responses in convective situations using output from mesoscale models using output from nonhydrostatic mesoscale atmospheric model, Meso-NH, simulations. The radiative for a systematic evaluation of the mesoscale cloud models. An overall good agreement is obtained for both

  12. Triangle geometry processing for surface modeling and cartesian grid generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Aftosmis, Michael J. (San Mateo, CA) [San Mateo, CA; Melton, John E. (Hollister, CA) [Hollister, CA; Berger, Marsha J. (New York, NY) [New York, NY

    2002-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Cartesian mesh generation is accomplished for component based geometries, by intersecting components subject to mesh generation to extract wetted surfaces with a geometry engine using adaptive precision arithmetic in a system which automatically breaks ties with respect to geometric degeneracies. During volume mesh generation, intersected surface triangulations are received to enable mesh generation with cell division of an initially coarse grid. The hexagonal cells are resolved, preserving the ability to directionally divide cells which are locally well aligned.

  13. RELAP5 modeling of the Westinghouse model D4 steam generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, B.; Petelin, S.; Gortnar, O. (Univ. of Ljubljana (Slovenia))

    1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The steam generator is one of the most important components of a pressurized water reactor (PWR) nuclear power plant. Thus, the ability to model and predict the steam generator steady-state and transient thermal-hydraulic behavior is a prerequisite for performing safety analyses of PWR systems. A RELAP5 model of the Westinghouse D4 steam generator with a 70/30 split feedwater system has been developed, and it is tested by simulating five secondary-side-initiated transients. This study of primary-to-secondary heat transfer and the secondary coolant vaporization process has enabled the primary coolant cooldown to be maximized, as required for performing a conservative steamline break analysis. These tests were realized using the RELAP5/MOD2.36.05 and RELAP5/MOD3.5M5 computer codes.

  14. Commercial second-generation PFBC plant transient model: Task 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, J.S.; Getty, R.T.; Torpey, M.R.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustor (APFBC) power plant combines an efficient gas-fired combined cycle, a low-emission PFB combustor, and a coal pyrolysis unit (carbonizer) that converts coal, America`s most plentiful fuel, into the gas turbine fuel. From an operation standpoint, the APFBC plant is similar to an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant, except that the PFBC and fluid bed heat exchanger (FBHE) allow a considerable fraction of coal energy to be shunted around the gas turbine and sent directly to the steam turbine. By contrast, the fuel energy in IGCC plants and most other combined cycles is primarily delivered to the gas turbine and then to the steam turbine. Another characteristic of the APFBC plant is the interaction among three large thermal inertias--carbonizer, PFBC, and FBHE--that presents unique operational challenges for modeling and operation of this type of plant. This report describes the operating characteristics and dynamic responses of the APFBC plant and discusses the advantages and shortcomings of several alternative control strategies for the plant. In particular, interactions between PFBC, FBHE, and steam bottoming cycle are analyzed and the effect of their interactions on plant operation is discussed. The technical approach used in the study is described in Section 2. The dynamic model is introduced in Section 3 and described is detail in the appendices. Steady-state calibration and transient simulations are presented in Sections 4 and 5. The development of the operating philosophy is discussed in Section 6. Potential design changes to the dynamic model and trial control schemes are listed in Sections 7 and 8. Conclusions derived from the study are presented in Section 9.

  15. A stochastic multiscale model for electricity generation capacity ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    mand response requires a coupling of both the long and short term dynamics. ... Division, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Ave, Building ... or demand elasticity (a major objective of demand response programs).

  16. Modeling thermal/chemical/mechanical response of energetic materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baer, M.R.; Hobbs, M.L.; Gross, R.J. [and others

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of modeling at Sandia National Laboratories is presented which describes coupled thermal, chemical and mechanical response of energetic materials. This modeling addresses cookoff scenarios for safety assessment studies in systems containing energetic materials. Foundation work is discussed which establishes a method for incorporating chemistry and mechanics into multidimensional analysis. Finite element analysis offers the capabilities to simultaneously resolve reactive heat transfer and structural mechanics in complex geometries. Nonlinear conduction heat transfer, with multiple step finite-rate chemistry, is resolved using a thermal finite element code. Rate equations are solved element-by-element using a modified matrix-free stiff solver This finite element software was developed for the simulation of systems requiring large numbers of finite elements. An iterative implicit scheme, based on the conjugate gradient method, is used and a hemi-cube algorithm is employed for the determination of view factors in surface-to-surface radiation transfer The critical link between the reactive heat transfer and mechanics is the introduction of an appropriate constitutive material model providing a stress-strain relationship for quasi-static mechanics analysis. This model is formally derived from bubble nucleation theory, and parameter variations of critical model parameters indicate that a small degree of decomposition leads to significant mechanical response. Coupled thermal/chemical/mechanical analysis is presented which simulates experiments designed to probe cookoff thermal-mechanical response of energetic materials.

  17. Ship response using a compact wave spectrum model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linn, Larry Donald

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SHIP RESPONSE USIM6 A COMPACT HAVE SPECTRUH HODEL A Thesis by LARRY DONALD LINN Submitted to the 6raduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1985 Major Subject...: Ocean Engineering SHIP RESPONSE USIN6 A COMPACT 'NAVE SPECTRUN MODEL A Thesis by LARRY DONALD LINN Approved as to style and content by: John M. Niedzwec i (Chairman of Committee) Lee L. Lowery (Member) John M. Klinck (Member) Donald Mc...

  18. Finite element decomposition and grid generation for brain modeling and visualization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Batte, David Allan

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical grid generation is used to provide a framework for brain and neuron visualization. Smoothing spline surfaces are fit to contour data to generate 3D solid model reconstruction of brain tissues. Finite element methods are then used...

  19. Evaluation of detector placement strategies for first generation traffic responsive signal control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brehmer, Christopher Lynn

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traffic responsive signal systems rely on system detector data to evaluate current traffic conditions and select a corresponding timing plan from a library of plans. One of the major decisions surrounding the use of traffic responsive signal systems...

  20. PSMG–A Parallel Structured Model Generator for Mathematical ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    elling and generating large scale nested structured problems, including .... statements to describe repeated common structures that build up the full problem.

  1. Generative model selection using a scalable and size-independent complex network classifier

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Motallebi, Sadegh, E-mail: motallebi@ce.sharif.edu; Aliakbary, Sadegh, E-mail: aliakbary@ce.sharif.edu; Habibi, Jafar, E-mail: jhabibi@sharif.edu [Department of Computer Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)] [Department of Computer Engineering, Sharif University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Real networks exhibit nontrivial topological features, such as heavy-tailed degree distribution, high clustering, and small-worldness. Researchers have developed several generative models for synthesizing artificial networks that are structurally similar to real networks. An important research problem is to identify the generative model that best fits to a target network. In this paper, we investigate this problem and our goal is to select the model that is able to generate graphs similar to a given network instance. By the means of generating synthetic networks with seven outstanding generative models, we have utilized machine learning methods to develop a decision tree for model selection. Our proposed method, which is named “Generative Model Selection for Complex Networks,” outperforms existing methods with respect to accuracy, scalability, and size-independence.

  2. Modeling of a detonation driven, linear electric generator facility

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Arlington, University of

    the heat and the force produced from the detonation wave. In previous experimental work, a single that involve coupling a PDE with different systems to drive a generator and produce electricity [2, 3]. One. For instance, it may be possible to design a generator that uses the force created by the pressure rise from

  3. Atmospheric Dispersion Modeling: Challenges of the Fukushima Daiichi Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugiyama, Gayle [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Nasstrom, John [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Pobanz, Brenda [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Foster, Kevin [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Simpson, Matthew [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Vogt, Phil [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Aluzzi, Fernando [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Homann, Steve [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) provided a wide range of predictions and analyses as part of the response to the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant accident. This work encompassed: weather forecasts and atmospheric transport predictions, estimates of possible dose in Japan based on hypothetical U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission scenarios of potential radionuclide releases, predictions of possible plume arrival times and dose levels at U.S. locations, and source estimation and plume model refinement. An overview of NARAC response activities is provided, along with a more in-depth discussion of some of NARAC’s preliminary source reconstruction analyses. NARAC optimized the overall agreement of model predictions to dose rate measurements using statistical comparisons of data and model values paired in space and time. Estimated emission rates varied depending on the choice of release assumptions (e.g., time-varying vs. constant release rates), the radionuclide mix, meteorology, and/or the radiological data used in the analysis. Results were found to be consistent with other studies within expected uncertainties, despite the application of different source estimation methodologies and the use of significantly different radiological measurement data. A discussion of some of the operational and scientific challenges encountered during the response, along with recommendations for future work, is provided.

  4. Examining Uncertainty in Demand Response Baseline Models and Variability in Automated Response to Dynamic Pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand response and energy ef?ciency in commercial buildings,”building control strategies and techniques for demand response,”building electricity use with application to demand response

  5. Intrinsic Plasticity in a Generative Model of V1 Cornelius Weber & Jochen Triesch

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Cornelius

    Intrinsic Plasticity in a Generative Model of V1 Cornelius Weber & Jochen Triesch Frankfurt Institute for Advanced Studies, Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt. Email: c.weber

  6. Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappers, Peter

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reliability Corporation National Institute of Standards and Technology Open Access Transmission Tariff Open Automated Demand Response Protocol Public Utility Commission Photovoltaic

  7. A Multi-State Model for the Reliability Assessment of a Distributed Generation System via Universal Generating Function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , Milan, Italy, Dipartimento di Energia Enrico.zio@polimi.it Abstract The current and future developments renewable technology (e.g. wind or solar, etc.) whose behavior is described by a binary state, working assessment, multi-state modeling, universal generating function #12;2 Notations Solar irradiance Total number

  8. Transient Responses to Rapid Changes in Mean and Variance in Spiking Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khorsand, Peyman; Chance, Frances

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    features of IF model responses to steps in input signals:neuron firing rates in response to steps in mean and noise.variance (see Decaying Response to Step Function). In the

  9. Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    advanced metering and demand response in electricityGoldman, and D. Kathan. “Demand response in U.S. electricity29] DOE. Benefits of demand response in electricity markets

  10. Modeling of thin-film solar thermoelectric generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinstein, Lee Adragon

    Recent advances in solar thermoelectric generator (STEG) performance have raised their prospect as a potential technology to convert solar energy into electricity. This paper presents an analysis of thin-film STEGs. ...

  11. Control Oriented Modeling and System Identification of a Diesel Generator Set (Genset)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Perry Y.

    Control Oriented Modeling and System Identification of a Diesel Generator Set (Genset) Kai Loon Cheong, Perry Y. Li and Jicheng Xia Abstract-- A diesel generator set (genset) refers to a diesel engine of a conventional PI regulator in the voltage closed control loop of a diesel driven generator is considered. In all

  12. ANALYTIC MODEL OF HARMONIC GENERATION IN THE LOW-GAIN FEL REGIME

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    ANALYTIC MODEL OF HARMONIC GENERATION IN THE LOW-GAIN FEL REGIME G. Penn, M. Reinsch, J.S. Wurtele , LBNL, Berkeley, CA 94720, USA Abstract Harmonic generation using free electron lasers (FELs) requires with simulation results using the FEL code GENESIS, both for single stages of harmonic generation and for the LUX

  13. Combining Language Generation and Belief Modelling into a Flexible Hypertext System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bontcheva, Kalina

    Combining Language Generation and Belief Modelling into a Flexible Hypertext System Kalina the required flexibility. Since these problems also fall in the domain of natural language generation (nlg how we can combine these two systems into a flexible hypertext generation environment. 2 Hypertext

  14. Dynamic Simulation Studies of the Frequency Response of the Three U.S. Interconnections with Increased Wind Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackin, Peter; Daschmans, R.; Williams, B.; Haney, B.; Hung, R.; Ellis, J.

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Utility Systems Efficiencies, Inc. was tasked by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) to conduct dynamic simulation studies of the three U.S. interconnections (Eastern, Western, and Texas). The simulations were prepared in support of LBNL's project for the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission to study frequency-response-related issues that must be addressed to operate the power system reliably with large amounts of variable renewable generation. The objective of the simulation studies of each interconnection was to assess the effects of different amounts of wind generation on frequency behavior of each interconnection following a sudden loss of generation. The scenarios created to study these effects considered an operating circumstance in which system load is at or close to its minimum. The event studied was the sudden loss of the largest amount of generation recorded within each interconnection. The simulations calculated the impact of this event on interconnection frequency for three levels of wind generation. In addition to varying the amount of wind generation, the simulations varied the amount of operating reserves between a high level representative of current operating practices and a low level representative of the minimum required by present operating rules.

  15. Testing a Model of American Elite Generational Continuity with Cross National Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurtz II, Donn M.

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A cross national data set consisting of 122 national chief executives who were in office in 1990 is used to test the validity of a model of American elite generational continuity. The hypothesis is that the model will be ...

  16. Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    Thermoelectric Generators for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Systems Part I: Numerical Modeling (TEG) designed for automotive waste heat recovery systems. This model is capable of computing bismuth telluride are considered for thermoelectric modules (TEMs) for conversion of waste heat from

  17. Integration of Renewables Via Demand Management: Highly Dispatchable and Distributed Demand Response for the Integration of Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2012-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    GENI Project: AutoGrid, in conjunction with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Columbia University, will design and demonstrate automated control software that helps manage real-time demand for energy across the electric grid. Known as the Demand Response Optimization and Management System - Real-Time (DROMS-RT), the software will enable personalized price signal to be sent to millions of customers in extremely short timeframes—incentivizing them to alter their electricity use in response to grid conditions. This will help grid operators better manage unpredictable demand and supply fluctuations in short time-scales —making the power generation process more efficient and cost effective for both suppliers and consumers. DROMS-RT is expected to provide a 90% reduction in the cost of operating demand response and dynamic pricing Projects in the U.S.

  18. A nonlinear dynamic model of a once-through, helical-coil steam generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdalla, M.A. [Oak Ridge Inst. for Science and Education, TN (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A dynamic model of a once-through, helical-coil steam generator is presented. The model simulates the advanced liquid metal reactor superheated cycle steam generator with a four-region, moving-boundary, drift-flux model. The model is described by a set of nonlinear differential equations derived from the fundamental equations of conversation of mass, energy, and momentum. Sample results of steady-state and transient calculations are presented.

  19. Multi-fluid Modeling of Transient a Case Study in the Generation and Guiding of Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    Multi-fluid Modeling of Transient Plasmas: a Case Study in the Generation and Guiding of Light, B.H.P. Multi-fluid Modeling of Transient Plasmas: a Case Study in the Generation and Guid- ing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 2.3.1 The multi-fluid description in PLASIMO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 iii #12;iv

  20. http://rcc.its.psu.edu/hpc Advanced CFD Models for Next-Generation Combustion Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bjørnstad, Ottar Nordal

    http://rcc.its.psu.edu/hpc Advanced CFD Models for Next-Generation Combustion Systems S: Requirements for next-generation combustion systems include: Increased performance, Reduced fuel consumption, and for direct-injection diesel engines Models carried intact from simulations of laboratory flames give good

  1. Annular mode-like responses to external forcings in a simple atmospheric general circulation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ring, Michael J., 1979-

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I investigate the response of a simple atmospheric general circulation model to applied forcings to learn whether the annular mode patterns are a preferred model response to the forcings. The thesis is ...

  2. Incorporation of time-dependent thermodynamic models and radiation propagation models into JR 3-D synthetic image generation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    images representing what an airborne or satellite thermal infrared imaging sensor would record. The scene sensors to a point where the model can be usedas a research tool to evaluate the limitations in our infrared (TIR) imagery generated by midwave (3-5 Rm) and longwave (8-14 pm) sensors is being increasingly

  3. A Generative Model of Human Hair for Hair Sketching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong Chen; Song Chun Zhu

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Yu, ”A practical model for hair mutual interactions,” Proc.Interactive multi-resolution hair modeling and editing,”directions (?1, +1) of the hair ?ow on the two sides of the

  4. Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Guoxiang

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    solutions, Journal of nuclear technology 2008, 164:180– 35.Modeling and Analysis. Nuclear Technology 1993, 104: 418- 2.

  5. Full expandable model of parallel self-excited induction generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simões, Marcelo Godoy

    possibilities for incorporating advanced control to monitor and optimise a parallel installation of SEIGs and small induction motors. Typically, generators rated 15kVA are cost effective; but 100kVA [4] was found, the trend has changed from installing a few wind turbines to planning large wind farm installations

  6. ExpectationPropagation for the Generative Aspect Model Thomas Minka

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lafferty, John

    ­ ple variational methods of Blei et al. (2001) can lead to inaccurate inferences and biased learning model introduced by Blei et al. (2001) is a promising model for discrete data, and provides procedures to avoid overfitting (Hof­ mann, 1999). Blei et al. (2001) introduced a modified model

  7. Generator based Modeling CP Game for Gene Regulatory Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lescanne, Pierre

    introduces a framework based on game theory that models gene regulation activities. Strategic games which are the basic model in game theory was successfully applied to gene regulation networks and molecular networks be established. One of the main issue when a gene regulation system is analyzed through a model is to decompose

  8. A MODEL FOR THE FLEET SIZING OF DEMAND RESPONSIVE TRANSPORTATION SERVICES WITH TIME WINDOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dessouky, Maged

    A MODEL FOR THE FLEET SIZING OF DEMAND RESPONSIVE TRANSPORTATION SERVICES WITH TIME WINDOWS Marco a demand responsive transit service with a predetermined quality for the user in terms of waiting time models; Continuous approximation models; Paratransit services; Demand responsive transit systems. #12;3 1

  9. Generation of Component Based Architecture from Business Processes: Model Driven Engineering for SOA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Generation of Component Based Architecture from Business Processes: Model Driven Engineering-running business service composition models drive their supporting service implementation models. To progress organiza- tions must reflect evolutions in their existing business pro- cess models, the IT must also adapt

  10. Generating audio-responsive video images in real-time for a live symphony performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beane, Allison Brooke

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    instruments to cutting-edge video image productions for musical groups of all sizes. Throughout this evolution, a common goal has been to create real-time, audio-responsive visuals that accentuate the sound and enhance the performance. This paper explains...

  11. Smart Finite State Devices: A Modeling Framework for Demand Response Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Konstantin; Ananyev, Maxim; Chertkov, Michael

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce and analyze Markov Decision Process (MDP) machines to model individual devices which are expected to participate in future demand-response markets on distribution grids. We differentiate devices into the following four types: (a) optional loads that can be shed, e.g. light dimming; (b) deferrable loads that can be delayed, e.g. dishwashers; (c) controllable loads with inertia, e.g. thermostatically-controlled loads, whose task is to maintain an auxiliary characteristic (temperature) within pre-defined margins; and (d) storage devices that can alternate between charging and generating. Our analysis of the devices seeks to find their optimal price-taking control strategy under a given stochastic model of the distribution market.

  12. Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    El-Saadany. “A summary of demand response in electricityadvanced metering and demand response in electricityWolak. When it comes to demand response is FERC is own worst

  13. Vortex and gap generation in gauge models of graphene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O. Oliveira; C. E. Cordeiro; A. Delfino; W. de Paula; T. Frederico

    2011-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective quantum field theoretical continuum models for graphene are investigated. The models include a complex scalar field and a vector gauge field. Different gauge theories are considered and their gap patterns for the scalar, vector, and fermion excitations are investigated. Different gauge groups lead to different relations between the gaps, which can be used to experimentally distinguish the gauge theories. In this class of models the fermionic gap is a dynamic quantity. The finite-energy vortex solutions of the gauge models have the flux of the "magnetic field" quantized, making the Bohm-Aharonov effect active even when external electromagnetic fields are absent. The flux comes proportional to the scalar field angular momentum quantum number. The zero modes of the Dirac equation show that the gauge models considered here are compatible with fractionalization.

  14. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Undrill, John; Mackin, Peter; Daschmans, Ron; Williams, Ben; Haney, Brian; Hunt, Randall; Ellis, Jeff; Illian, Howard; Martinez, Carlos; O'Malley, Mark; Coughlin, Katie; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi

    2010-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An interconnected electric power system is a complex system that must be operated within a safe frequency range in order to reliably maintain the instantaneous balance between generation and load. This is accomplished by ensuring that adequate resources are available to respond to expected and unexpected imbalances and restoring frequency to its scheduled value in order to ensure uninterrupted electric service to customers. Electrical systems must be flexible enough to reliably operate under a variety of"change" scenarios. System planners and operators must understand how other parts of the system change in response to the initial change, and need tools to manage such changes to ensure reliable operation within the scheduled frequency range. This report presents a systematic approach to identifying metrics that are useful for operating and planning a reliable system with increased amounts of variable renewable generation which builds on existing industry practices for frequency control after unexpected loss of a large amount of generation. The report introduces a set of metrics or tools for measuring the adequacy of frequency response within an interconnection. Based on the concept of the frequency nadir, these metrics take advantage of new information gathering and processing capabilities that system operators are developing for wide-area situational awareness. Primary frequency response is the leading metric that will be used by this report to assess the adequacy of primary frequency control reserves necessary to ensure reliable operation. It measures what is needed to arrest frequency decline (i.e., to establish frequency nadir) at a frequency higher than the highest set point for under-frequency load shedding within an interconnection. These metrics can be used to guide the reliable operation of an interconnection under changing circumstances.

  15. Atmospheric Tides in the Latest Generation of Climate Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Covey, Curt

    For atmospheric tides driven by solar heating, the database of climate model output used in the most recent assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) confirms and extends the authors’ earlier ...

  16. Accurate resistive bridge fault modeling, simulation, and test generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sar-Dessai, Vijay Ramesh

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resistive bridging faults in CMOS combinational circuits are studied in this work. Bridging faults are modeled using HSPICE circuit simulation of the various types of bridging faults that can occur in CMOS combinational ...

  17. Accurate resistive bridge fault modeling, simulation, and test generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sar-Dessai, Vijay Ramesh

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Resistive bridging faults in CMOS combinational circuits are studied in this work. Bridging faults are modeled using HSPICE circuit simulation of the various types of bridging faults that can occur in CMOS combinational circuits. The results...

  18. Technical bases of the second generation SARIS core model (Task Number: 90-008-0)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory, M.V.

    1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology has been developed to rigorously derive the constants in the Savannah River Simulator (SARIS) core model from detailed, charge-design, diffusion theory solutions. This methodology is intended to replace the ill-defined, ad hoc iterative process used in the past to generate these constants. Along the development path, three shortcomings of the current core model were identified and corrected. The updated core model with revised constants is termed the second generation core model. In addition, changes in the decay heat and delayed neutron precursor models are also recommended, all in the interest of improving simulator neutronics fidelity.

  19. Radiative Generation of Quark Masses and Mixing Angles in the Two Higgs Doublet Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alejandro Ibarra; Ana Solaguren-Beascoa

    2014-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a framework to generate the quark mass hierarchies and mixing angles by extending the Standard Model with one extra Higgs doublet. The charm and strange quark masses are generated by small quantum effects, thus explaining the hierarchy between the second and third generation quark masses. All the mixing angles are also generated by small quantum effects: the Cabibbo angle is generated at zero-th order in perturbation theory, while the remaining off-diagonal entries of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix are generated at first order, hence explaining the observed hierarchy $|V_{ub}|,|V_{cb}|\\ll |V_{us}|$. The values of the radiatively generated parameters depend only logarithmically on the heavy Higgs mass, therefore this framework can be reconciled with the stringent limits on flavor violation by postulating a sufficiently large new physics scale.

  20. Development of the in-structure response spectra of the VVER-440 Model 230 Kozloduy Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kostov, M.K. [Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, Sofia (BG). Central Lab. for Seismic Mechanics and Earthquake Engineering; Ma, D.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Prato, C.A. [Univ. of Cordoba (AR); Stevenson, J.D. [Stevenson and Associates, Cleveland, OH (US)

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Kozloduy NPP is located in the North-West part of Bulgaria on the Danube river. The plant consists of four units of 440 MW and two units of 1,000 MW. In the last 15 years there have been three strong, intermediate depth earthquakes in the Vrancea seismic zone (1977, 1986, 1990) which have affected the NPP site. The Vrancea zone is located approximately 300 km northeast of the plant. It is known for the generation of strong, long-period seismic motions. In 1990 an intensive work program for qualification of the plant according to the international standards (IAEA 1991; IAEA 1992) was initiated. The work started by a project for site confirmation. As a result, new design seismic characteristics were obtained. A Review Level Earthquake is defined by a maximum acceleration of 0.2 g; a response spectrum is shown. The generation of the in-structure response spectra for units 1 and 2 VVER-440 Model 230 is presented in this paper. The coauthors belong to an IAEA Advisory Team assisting the seismic upgrading project of the Kozloduy plant.

  1. Anticipatory control of turbine generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messec, Freddie Laurel

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Turbine Generators. (Nay 1971) Freddie Laurel Nessec, B. S. E. E, , Texas Tech University; Directed by: Professor J. S . Denison An investigation is made of the use of predicted loads in controlling turbine generators. A perturbation model of a turbine... 3. Relational diagram of a turbine generator. Speed governor system. Static speed-load characteristic of a speed governor system. Block diagram of model. Frequency response to step load change. Block diagram of model with integral control...

  2. Fast, Automated, Scalable Generation of Textured 3D Models of Indoor Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zakhor, Avideh

    , Student Member, IEEE, Peter Cheng, and Avideh Zakhor, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--3D modeling of building- realistic models. We apply these techniques to several data sets of building interiors, including multi or missing, especially after several remodelings. Such scans can be used to generate building models

  3. A REDUCED GENERATOR MODEL WITH EXCITATION LIMITS Steven Ball Kevin Wedeward Ernest Barany Steve Schaffer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wedeward, Kevin

    in dynamic studies of electric power systems. The proposed model captures important characteristics be sufficient for analysis of power system dynamics. KEY WORDS Model reduction, simulation, electric power, generator models 1. Introduction The consequences of electric power outages dictate the importance

  4. Automated Environment Generation for Software Model Checking Oksana Tkachuk, Matthew B. Dwyer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasareanu, Corina

    Automated Environment Generation for Software Model Checking Oksana Tkachuk, Matthew B. Dwyer programs or about program components, an abstract model of the environment can be essential in enabling environment behavior with sound abstractions of environment implemen­ tations to form a model

  5. Revisiting the Steam-Boiler Case Study with LUTESS : Modeling for Automatic Test Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Revisiting the Steam-Boiler Case Study with LUTESS : Modeling for Automatic Test Generation. In this paper, we apply this modeling principle to a well known case study, the steam boiler problem which has model and to assess the difficulty of such a process in a realistic case study. The steam boiler case

  6. A 2D Pseudodynamic Rupture Model Generator for Earthquakes on Geometrically Complex Faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunham, Eric M.

    A 2D Pseudodynamic Rupture Model Generator for Earthquakes on Geometrically Complex Faults complexity in the rupture process and resulting ground motion. We present a 2D kinematic rupture generator that emulates the strong dependence of earthquake source parameters on local fault geometry observed in dynamic

  7. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes Electric Power Supply Chain Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    than a third arises from generating electricity. With the accumulating evidence of global warming, any affect the equilibrium electric power supply chain network production outputs, the transactions betweenModeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain

  8. Dynamic Phasor Modeling of the Doubly-Fed Induction Machine in Generator Operation Emmanuel Delaleau*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stankoviæ, Aleksandar

    Dynamic Phasor Modeling of the Doubly-Fed Induction Machine in Generator Operation Emmanuel at variable speed; second, the excitation power electronics converter feeding the rotor windings needs of the doubly- fed induction machine in generator operation using dynamic phasors. This concept is coming from

  9. Model Refinement Needs A model developed by Peters and Marmorek (2003) will be used to generate predictions for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    449 Model Refinement Needs A model developed by Peters and Marmorek (2003) will be used to generate primarily an energy sink or primarily a source of food? More information is needed as to interactions predictions for comparison with observed variations in kokanee production. As with most models

  10. A Hierarchical Task Model for Dispatching in Computer-Assisted Demand-Responsive Paratransit Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dessouky, Maged

    A Hierarchical Task Model for Dispatching in Computer- Assisted Demand-Responsive Paratransit Model for Dispatching in Computer-Assisted Demand-Responsive Paratransit Operation ABSTRACT, Dispatch Training #12;1 INTRODUCTION Demand-responsive paratransit service is on the rise. For example

  11. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 27, NO. 1, FEBRUARY 2012 465 Dynamics of Type-3 Wind Turbine Generator Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hiskens, Ian A.

    Turbine Generator Models Ian A. Hiskens, Fellow, IEEE Abstract--The influence of wind turbine generators, singular systems, small disturbance analysis, switching deadlock, wind turbine generator modeling. I. INTRODUCTION THE dynamic behavior of wind turbine generators (WTGs) is quite different to that of synchronous

  12. GENERALIZED LINEAR MODELING APPROACH TO STOCHASTIC WEATHER GENERATORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katz, Richard

    ) Multisites (Spatial dependence of daily weather) -- Software R open source statistical programming language (Capable of "reproducing" any desired statistic) -- Disadvantages Synthetic weather looks too much like") Not amenable to uncertainty analysis #12;#12;#12;(2) Generalized Linear Models · Statistical Framework

  13. A decision-support model for managing the fuel inventory of a Panamanian generating company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Franco, Roberto, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bahia Las Minas Corp (BLM) is a fuelpowered generating company in the Panamanian power system. The purpose of this thesis is to design and evaluate a decision-support model for managing the fuel inventory of this company. ...

  14. A Conformal Mapping Grid Generation Method for Modeling High-Fidelity Aeroelastic Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Worley, Gregory

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A CONFORMAL MAPPING GRID GENERATION METHOD FOR MODELING HIGH-FIDELITY AEROELASTIC SIMULATIONS A Thesis by GREGORY DORWAY WORLEY Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial ful llment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 2010 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering A CONFORMAL MAPPING GRID GENERATION METHOD FOR MODELING HIGH-FIDELITY AEROELASTIC SIMULATIONS A Thesis by GREGORY DORWAY WORLEY Submitted to the O ce of Graduate Studies of Texas A...

  15. Neural Network Based Modeling of a Large Steam Turbine-Generator Rotor Body Parameters from On-Line Disturbance Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neural Network Based Modeling of a Large Steam Turbine-Generator Rotor Body Parameters from On technique to estimate and model rotor- body parameters of a large steam turbine-generator from real time

  16. Consistent generation of magnetic fields in axion inflation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujita, Tomohiro; Tada, Yuichiro; Takeda, Naoyuki; Tashiro, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been a growing evidence for the existence of magnetic fields in the extra-galactic regions, while the attempt to associate their origin with the inflationary epoch alone has been found extremely challenging. We therefore take into account the consistent post-inflationary evolution of the magnetic fields that are originated from vacuum fluctuations during inflation. In the model of our interest, the electromagnetic (EM) field is coupled to a pseudo-scalar inflaton $\\phi$ through the characteristic term $\\phi F\\tilde F$, breaking the conformal invariance. This interaction dynamically breaks the parity and enables a continuous production of only one of the polarization states of the EM field through tachyonic instability. The produced magnetic fields are thus helical. We find that the dominant contribution to the observed magnetic fields in this model comes from the modes that leave the horizon near the end of inflation, further enhanced by the tachyonic instability right after the end of inflation. Th...

  17. Data Integration for the Generation of High Resolution Reservoir Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Reynolds; Dean Oliver; Gaoming Li; Yong Zhao; Chaohui Che; Kai Zhang; Yannong Dong; Chinedu Abgalaka; Mei Han

    2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this three-year project was to develop a theoretical basis and practical technology for the integration of geologic, production and time-lapse seismic data in a way that makes best use of the information for reservoir description and reservoir performance predictions. The methodology and practical tools for data integration that were developed in this research project have been incorporated into computational algorithms that are feasible for large scale reservoir simulation models. As the integration of production and seismic data require calibrating geological/geostatistical models to these data sets, the main computational tool is an automatic history matching algorithm. The following specific goals were accomplished during this research. (1) We developed algorithms for calibrating the location of the boundaries of geologic facies and the distribution of rock properties so that production and time-lapse seismic data are honored. (2) We developed and implemented specific procedures for conditioning reservoir models to time-lapse seismic data. (3) We developed and implemented algorithms for the characterization of measurement errors which are needed to determine the relative weights of data when conditioning reservoir models to production and time-lapse seismic data by automatic history matching. (4) We developed and implemented algorithms for the adjustment of relative permeability curves during the history matching process. (5) We developed algorithms for production optimization which accounts for geological uncertainty within the context of closed-loop reservoir management. (6) To ensure the research results will lead to practical public tools for independent oil companies, as part of the project we built a graphical user interface for the reservoir simulator and history matching software using Visual Basic.

  18. Efficiency and accuracy of the perturbation response coefficient generation method for whole core comet calculations in BWR and CANDU configurations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, D.; Rahnema, F. [Georgia Institute of Technology, 770 State Street NW, Atlanta, GA 30332-0745 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coarse mesh transport method (COMET) is a highly accurate and efficient computational tool which predicts whole-core neutronics behaviors for heterogeneous reactor cores via a pre-computed eigenvalue-dependent response coefficient (function) library. Recently, a high order perturbation method was developed to significantly improve the efficiency of the library generation method. In that work, the method's accuracy and efficiency was tested in a small PWR benchmark problem. This paper extends the application of the perturbation method to include problems typical of the other water reactor cores such as BWR and CANDU bundles. It is found that the response coefficients predicted by the perturbation method for typical BWR bundles agree very well with those directly computed by the Monte Carlo method. The average and maximum relative errors in the surface-to-surface response coefficients are 0.02%-0.05% and 0.06%-0.25%, respectively. For CANDU bundles, the corresponding quantities are 0.01%-0.05% and 0.04% -0.15%. It is concluded that the perturbation method is highly accurate and efficient with a wide range of applicability. (authors)

  19. FireGrid: An e-infrastructure for next-generation emergency response support 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Liangxiu; Potter, Stephen; Beckett, George; Pringle, Gavin; Welch, Stephen; Koo, Sung-Han; Wickler, Gerhard; Usmani, Asif; Torero, Jose L; Tate, Austin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    phenomena are developed, and then deployed and computed on High Performance Computing resources to infer incident conditions by assimilating live sensor data from an emergency in real time–or, in the case of predictive models, faster-than-real time...

  20. Model-Based Transient Calibration Optimization for Next Generation Diesel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,OfficialProducts | Department of| DepartmentModelEnergyEngines

  1. An Operational Model for Optimal NonDispatchable Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    FACTS, $ Demand Response Energy Storage HVDC Industrial Customer PEV Renewable Energy Source: U.S.-Canada Power

  2. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Impact of Wind Generation on System Frequency2008. Analysis of Wind Generation Impact on ERCOT Ancillarywith Increased Wind Generation. LBNL-XXXX. Berkeley:

  3. Dynamic Simulation Studies of the Frequency Response of the Three U.S. Interconnections with Increased Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackin, Peter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with Increased Wind Generation 9. Siemens Power Technologieswith Increased Wind Generation Acknowledgments The workall three levels of wind generation, all frequency nadirs

  4. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Variable Renewable Generation The report is accompaniedit Relates to Wind-Powered Generation. LBNL-XXXX. Berkeley:with Increased Wind Generation. LBNL-XXXX. Berkeley:

  5. Dynamic Simulation Studies of the Frequency Response of the Three U.S. Interconnections with Increased Wind Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mackin, Peter

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance of Wind Power Generation Working Group. ” IECwith Increased Wind Generation 9. Siemens Power Technologiesit Relates to Wind-Powered Generation. LBNL-XXXX. Berkeley:

  6. MDA-based ATL transformation to generate MVC 2 web models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahmouni, M'hamed

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development and maintenance of Web application is still a complex and error-prone process. We need integrated techniques and tool support for automated generation of Web systems and a ready prescription for easy maintenance. The MDA approach proposes an architecture taking into account the development and maintenance of large and complex software. In this paper, we apply MDA approach for generating PSM from UML design to MVC 2Web implementation. That is why we have developed two meta-models handling UML class diagrams and MVC 2 Web applications, then we have to set up transformation rules. These last are expressed in ATL language. To specify the transformation rules (especially CRUD methods) we used a UML profiles. To clearly illustrate the result generated by this transformation, we converted the XMI file generated in an EMF (Eclipse Modeling Framework) model.

  7. Theoretical model for plasma expansion generated by hypervelocity impact

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ju, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Qingming, E-mail: qmzhang@bit.edu.cn; Zhang, Dongjiang; Long, Renrong; Chen, Li; Huang, Fenglei [State Key Laboratory of Explosion Science and Technology, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Gong, Zizheng [National Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Reliability and Environment Engineering, Beijing Institute of Spacecraft Environment Engineering, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The hypervelocity impact experiments of spherical LY12 aluminum projectile diameter of 6.4?mm on LY12 aluminum target thickness of 23?mm have been conducted using a two-stage light gas gun. The impact velocity of the projectile is 5.2, 5.7, and 6.3?km/s, respectively. The experimental results show that the plasma phase transition appears under the current experiment conditions, and the plasma expansion consists of accumulation, equilibrium, and attenuation. The plasma characteristic parameters decrease as the plasma expands outward and are proportional with the third power of the impact velocity, i.e., (T{sub e}, n{sub e})???v{sub p}{sup 3}. Based on the experimental results, a theoretical model on the plasma expansion is developed and the theoretical results are consistent with the experimental data.

  8. Modelling and Analysis of Variable Speed Wind Turbines with Induction Generator during Grid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, René Rydhof

    Modelling and Analysis of Variable Speed Wind Turbines with Induction Generator during Grid Fault to the grid connection of wind turbines. The second chapter elucidates recent thinking in the area of grid Risø National Laboratory Vestas Wind Systems A/S #12;#12;I Modelling and Analysis of Variable Speed

  9. International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance 2008 1 Generation and Analysis of Digital Terrain Models with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1st International Conference on Machine Control & Guidance 2008 1 Generation and Analysis of Digital Terrain Models with Parallel Guidance Systems for Precision Agriculture Görres GRENZDÖRFFER models at no or little additional cost. In the paper the achievable data accuracy under different

  10. Nested and multi-physics modeling of tsunami evolution from generation to inundation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynett, Patrick

    Nested and multi-physics modeling of tsunami evolution from generation to inundation Sangyoung Son. The fundamental purpose of the coupling effort is to develop the capability to seamlessly model tsunami evolution water equations Boussinesq equations Coupling Coherent structures Turbulence Tsunami a b s t r a c

  11. Economic Modeling of Intermittency in Wind Power Generation Alan Yung Chen Cheng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the total cost from energy from wind more expensive. Because the model explicitly accounts for the impacts intermittent sources to the system in addition to the cost of generating wind energy This model the past decade wind energy has steadily emerged as a potential source for large-scale, low carbon energy

  12. Automatic generation of CSP || B skeletons from xUML models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    Automatic generation of CSP || B skeletons from xUML models Edward Turner, Helen Treharne, Steve. CSP B is a formal approach to specification that combines CSP and B. In this paper we present our tool that automatically trans- lates a subset of executable UML (xUML) models into CSP B, for the purpose of verification

  13. A forward microphysical model to predict the size-distribution parameters of laboratory generated (mimic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oxford, University of

    A forward microphysical model to predict the size- distribution parameters of laboratory generated Interactions ­ Condensational Growth and Coagulation, Submitted for Indian Aerosol Science and Technology Microphysical Model for the UTLS (FAMMUS) is applied to predict the size-distribution parameters of laboratory

  14. A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A next-generation modeling capability assesses wind turbine array fluid dynamics and aeroelastic simulations Characterizing and optimizing overall performance of wind plants composed of large numbers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) are coupling physical models of the atmosphere and wind

  15. Modeling of a second-generation solar-driven Rankine air conditioner. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denius, M.W.; Batton, W.D.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ten configurations of a second-generation (2G), solar-powered, Rankine-driven air conditioner were simulated and the data presented for use in companion studies. The results of the analysis show that the boiling-in-collector (BIC) configuration generates more power per collector area than the other configurations. The models used to simulate the configuration are presented in this report. The generated data are also presented. Experimental work was done under this study to both improve a novel refrigerant and oil lubrication system for the centrifugal compressor and investigate the aerodynamic unloading characteristics of the centrifugal compressor. The information generated was used to define possible turbo-gearbox configurations for use in the second generation computer simulation.

  16. Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response Wei Zhang, Jianming Lian, Chin-Yao Chang, Karanjit Kalsi and Yannan Sun Abstract-- Demand Response is playing population of appliances under demand response is especially important to evaluate the effec- tiveness

  17. Aggregated Modeling and Control of Air Conditioning Loads for Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Wei

    1 Aggregated Modeling and Control of Air Conditioning Loads for Demand Response Wei Zhang, Member, IEEE Abstract--Demand response is playing an increasingly impor- tant role in the efficient loads is especially important to evaluate the effec- tiveness of various demand response strategies

  18. A Historical Perspective and Business Model for Load Response Aggregation Based on Priority Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    A Historical Perspective and Business Model for Load Response Aggregation Based on Priority Service technologies and experiments in the 1980's for implementing demand response. We argue that while new smart grid technologies are cheaper and provide more functionality the barrier to demand response implementation

  19. A Simple Atmospheric Model of the Local and Teleconnection Responses to Tropical Heating Anomalies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    the local and remote stationary responses of the atmosphere to tropical heating anomalies is describedA Simple Atmospheric Model of the Local and Teleconnection Responses to Tropical Heating Anomalies and forced with a localized heating for illustration. In the tropics, the baroclinic responses are familiar

  20. Chemical reaction model for oil and gas generation from type 1 and type 2 kerogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braun, R.L.; Burnham, A.K.

    1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A global model for the generation of oil and gas from petroleum source rocks is presented. The model consists of 13 chemical species and 10 reactions, including an alternate-pathway mechanism for kerogen pyrolysis. Reaction rate parameters and stoichiometry coefficients determined from a variety of pyrolysis data are given for both type I and type II kerogen. Use of the chemical reaction model is illustrated for typical geologic conditions.

  1. Gap generation in Weyl semimetals in a model with local four-fermion interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. O. Sukhachov

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the gap generation in Weyl semimetals in a model with local four-fermion interaction. It is shown that there exists a critical value of coupling constant separating the symmetric and broken symmetry phases, and the corresponding phase diagram is described. The gap generation in a more general class of Weyl materials with small bare gap is studied, and the quasiparticle energy spectrum is determined. It is found that, in this case, the dynamically generated gap leads to additional splitting of the quasiparticle energy bands.

  2. Discrete Preisach Model for the Superelastic Response of Shape Memory Alloys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doraiswamy, Srikrishna

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this work is to present a model for the superelastic response of Shape Memory Alloys (SMAs) by developing a Preisach Model with thermodynamics basis. The special features of SMA superelastic response is useful in a variety of applications...

  3. Asymptotic normality of urn models for clinical trials with delayed response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Li-Xin

    normality of Yn in the GFU model. Typically, clinical trials do not result in immediate outcomes ­ that isAsymptotic normality of urn models for clinical trials with delayed response F E I FA N G H U 1, Zhejiang, Hangzhou 310028, P. R. China. E-mail: lxzhang@mail.hz.zj.cn For response-adaptive clinical trials

  4. Dendrodendritic Inhibition and Simulated Odor Responses in a Detailed Olfactory Bulb Network Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jianfeng

    Dendrodendritic Inhibition and Simulated Odor Responses in a Detailed Olfactory Bulb Network Model responses in a detailed olfac- tory bulb network model. J Neurophysiol 90: 1921­1935, 2003. First published May 7, 2003; 10.1152/jn.00623.2002. In the olfactory bulb, both the spatial distribution

  5. Final Report for Sea-level Rise Response Modeling for San Francisco Bay Estuary Tidal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fleskes, Joe

    i Final Report for Sea-level Rise Response Modeling for San Francisco Bay Estuary Tidal Marshes Refuge in northern San Francisco Bay, California. #12;iii Final Report for Sea-level Rise Response)................................................................... 7 Sea-level rise scenario model inputs

  6. A KINETIC MODEL OF SOLAR WIND GENERATION BY OBLIQUE ION-CYCLOTRON WAVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J. [Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans and Space and Department of Physics, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)

    2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The fast solar wind is generated by extended perpendicular ion heating in coronal holes, but the kinetic mechanism responsible for this heating has not been determined. One long-standing possibility is the resonant-cyclotron dissipation of ion-cyclotron waves, replenished from a turbulent cascade of interacting counter-propagating Alfven waves. We present results of a kinetic model for proton heating by the quasilinear resonant-cyclotron wave-particle interaction in a coronal hole. The resonant wave spectrum is taken as a power law in wavenumber, uniformly distributed in propagation direction between 0 deg. and 60 deg. with respect to the large-scale radial magnetic field. We obtain the steady-state solution of the kinetic guiding-center equation for the proton distribution in an expanding coronal hole, including the effects of large-scale forces of gravity, charge-separation electric field, Alfven wave ponderomotive force, and mirror force, along with the small-scale scattering from the wave dissipation. We find that plausible wave intensities can yield reasonable flow speeds and temperatures in the heliocentric radial range between 2 and 6 solar radii. We address the claim in earlier work that dissipation of parallel-propagating ion-cyclotron waves cannot provide enough acceleration and show that claim to be incorrect. We find that the combined action of the large-scale forces and the resonant-cyclotron scattering produces proton distribution functions with a characteristic structure: compressed in the sunward half of velocity space with a high-density shell separate from the origin, and relatively expanded in the anti-sunward half of velocity space. We suggest that qualitatively similar proton distributions would result from the kinetic evolution of any sufficiently effective perpendicular heating mechanism operating in an expanding coronal hole.

  7. Computational models of cardiovascular response to orthostatic stress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heldt, Thomas, 1972-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The cardiovascular response to changes in posture has been the focus of numerous investigations in the past. Yet despite considerable, targeted experimental effort, the mechanisms underlying orthostatic intolerance (OI) ...

  8. A Statistical Model for Generating a Population of Unclassified Objects and Radiation Signatures Spanning Nuclear Threats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, K; Sokkappa, P

    2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes an approach for generating a simulated population of plausible nuclear threat radiation signatures spanning a range of variability that could be encountered by radiation detection systems. In this approach, we develop a statistical model for generating random instances of smuggled nuclear material. The model is based on physics principles and bounding cases rather than on intelligence information or actual threat device designs. For this initial stage of work, we focus on random models using fissile material and do not address scenarios using non-fissile materials. The model has several uses. It may be used as a component in a radiation detection system performance simulation to generate threat samples for injection studies. It may also be used to generate a threat population to be used for training classification algorithms. In addition, we intend to use this model to generate an unclassified 'benchmark' threat population that can be openly shared with other organizations, including vendors, for use in radiation detection systems performance studies and algorithm development and evaluation activities. We assume that a quantity of fissile material is being smuggled into the country for final assembly and that shielding may have been placed around the fissile material. In terms of radiation signature, a nuclear weapon is basically a quantity of fissile material surrounded by various layers of shielding. Thus, our model of smuggled material is expected to span the space of potential nuclear weapon signatures as well. For computational efficiency, we use a generic 1-dimensional spherical model consisting of a fissile material core surrounded by various layers of shielding. The shielding layers and their configuration are defined such that the model can represent the potential range of attenuation and scattering that might occur. The materials in each layer and the associated parameters are selected from probability distributions that span the range of possibilities. Once an object is generated, its radiation signature is calculated using a 1-dimensional deterministic transport code. Objects that do not make sense based on physics principles or other constraints are rejected. Thus, the model can be used to generate a population of spectral signatures that spans a large space, including smuggled nuclear material and nuclear weapons.

  9. Ecosystem response to upwelling off the Oregon coast: Behavior of three nitrogen-based models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    Ecosystem response to upwelling off the Oregon coast: Behavior of three nitrogen-based models Y. H; published 6 March 2003. [1] The behavior of three ecosystem models is analyzed for upwelling off the Oregon coast as a function of the number of model components. The first ecosystem model includes dissolved

  10. Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes how Learning-by-Doing (LBD) is implemented endogenously in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for generating plants. LBD is experiential learning that correlates to a generating technology's capacity growth. The annual amount of Learning-by-Doing affects the annual overnight cost reduction. Currently, there is no straightforward way to integrate and make sense of all the diffuse information related to the endogenous learning calculation in NEMS. This paper organizes the relevant information from the NEMS documentation, source code, input files, and output files, in order to make the model's logic more accessible. The end results are shown in three ways: in a simple spreadsheet containing all the parameters related to endogenous learning; by an algorithm that traces how the parameters lead to cost reductions; and by examples showing how AEO 2004 forecasts the reduction of overnight costs for generating technologies over time.

  11. ReEDS Modeling of the President's 2020 U.S. Renewable Electricity Generation Goal (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinaman, O.; Mai, T.; Lantz, E.; Gelman, R.; Porro, G.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    President Obama announced in 2012 an Administration Goal for the United States to double aggregate renewable electricity generation from wind, solar, and geothermal sources by 2020. This analysis, using the Regional Energy Deployment System (ReEDS) model, explores a full range of future renewable deployment scenarios out to 2020 to assess progress and outlook toward this goal. Under all modeled conditions, consisting of 21 scenarios, the Administration Goal is met before 2020, and as early as 2015.

  12. NARAC Modeling During the Response to the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant Emergency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sugiyama, G; Nasstrom, J S; Probanz, B; Foster, K T; Simpson, M; Vogt, P; Aluzzi, F; Dillon, M; Homann, S

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the activities of the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) during the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant crisis. NARAC provided a wide range of products and analyses as part of its support including: (1) Daily Japanese weather forecasts and hypothetical release (generic source term) dispersion predictions to provide situational awareness and inform planning for U.S. measurement data collection and field operations; (2) Estimates of potential dose in Japan for hypothetical scenarios developed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to inform federal government considerations of possible actions that might be needed to protect U.S. citizens in Japan; (3) Estimates of possible plume arrival times and dose for U.S. locations; and (4) Plume model refinement and source estimation based on meteorological analyses and available field data. The Department of Energy/National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) deployed personnel to Japan and stood up 'home team' assets across the DOE complex to aid in assessing the consequences of the releases from the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant. The DOE Nuclear Incident Team (NIT) coordinated response activities, while DOE personnel provided predictive modeling, air and ground monitoring, sample collection, laboratory analysis, and data assessment and interpretation. DOE deployed the Aerial Measuring System (AMS), Radiological Assistance Program (RAP) personnel, and the Consequence Management Response Team (CMRT) to Japan. DOE/NNSA home team assets included the Consequence Management Home Team (CMHT); National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC); Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS); and Radiological Triage. NARAC was activated by the DOE/NNSA on March 11, shortly after the Tohoku earthquake and tsunami occurred. The center remained on active operations through late May when DOE ended its deployment to Japan. Over 32 NARAC staff members, supplemented by other LLNL scientists, invested over 5000 person-hours of time and generated over 300 analyses and predictions.

  13. A Unit Commitment Model with Demand Response for the Integration of Renewable Energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ikeda, Yuichi; Kataoka, Kazuto; Ogimoto, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The output of renewable energy fluctuates significantly depending on weather conditions. We develop a unit commitment model to analyze requirements of the forecast output and its error for renewable energies. Our model obtains the time series for the operational state of thermal power plants that would maximize the profits of an electric power utility by taking into account both the forecast of output its error for renewable energies and the demand response of consumers. We consider a power system consisting of thermal power plants, photovoltaic systems (PV), and wind farms and analyze the effect of the forecast error on the operation cost and reserves. We confirm that the operation cost was increases with the forecast error. The effect of a sudden decrease in wind power is also analyzed. More thermal power plants need to be operated to generate power to absorb this sudden decrease in wind power. The increase in the number of operating thermal power plants within a short period does not affect the total opera...

  14. Abduction in Model Generative Reasoning Roger T. Hartley and Michael J. Coombs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartley, Roger

    Abduction in Model Generative Reasoning Roger T. Hartley and Michael J. Coombs Computer Science, 1990 1 Introduction Most of the abductive mechanisms in the literature are based on formalizations (binary) operations on these graphs. The equivalence of the method to logical abduction is noted

  15. Cloud Formation in the Plumes of Solar Chimney Power Generation Facilities: A Modeling Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nenes, Athanasios

    for a proposed solar chimney facility in southwestern Australia. A range of temperatures and updraft velocities technology for converting solar energy into electricity that has shown promise in recent years is the so1 Cloud Formation in the Plumes of Solar Chimney Power Generation Facilities: A Modeling Study

  16. Building ventilation : a pressure airflow model computer generation and elements of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Building ventilation : a pressure airflow model computer generation and elements of validation H when heating a residential building, approximately 30% of the energy loss is due to air renewal[1. Thus in tropical climates, natural ventilation affects essentially the inside comfort by favouring

  17. Prediction of harmonic distortion generated by electro-dynamic loudspeakers using cascade of Hammerstein models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    loudspeakers, a motor converts the electrical signal in motion and makes a cone vibrate. The piston-like movement of the cone generates the sound field. The motor induces non-linearities because of non models. Gallman [12] and Hawksford [11] proposed a method using Gaussian noise at different amplitudes

  18. A benchmark suite with virtualized reality models for supporting tracking evaluation and data set generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    ) Benchmark resources Sharing of benchmarking results A : Datasets GenerateA benchmark suite with virtualized reality models for supporting tracking evaluation and data set laurence.nigay@imag.fr Takeshi Kurata AIST, Japan t.kurata@aist.go.jp Abstract We describe a benchmark

  19. Model generation of viral channel forming 2B protein bundles from polio and coxsackie viruses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, Anthony

    GEORGE PATARGIAS1 , THOMAS BARKE1 , ANTHONY WATTS1 , & WOLFGANG B. FISCHER1,2 1 Biomembrane Structure and assesses stability by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations a putative tetrameric bundle model of 2B is generated. The bundles show a pore lining motif of three lysines followed by a serine. The bundle

  20. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Price Reduction Offsetting demand for natural gas in the electricity sector by increasing wind energy’price reductions, and water savings. Index Terms—power system modeling, wind energywind energy to offset coal- and natural gas-based electricity generation analyzed here include decreased natural gas prices,

  1. THE CALIFORNIAN MODEL AS THE PARADIGM FOR SECOND GENERATION REFORMS IN LATINAMERIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    THE CALIFORNIAN MODEL AS THE PARADIGM FOR SECOND GENERATION REFORMS IN LATINAMERIC Hugh Rudnick, Pontificia Universidad Cat61ica de Chile, Santiago, Chile The electric energy industry in Latin America has countries in 1997. Brazil also joined the group and Venezuela, Mexico and Ecuador have initiated actions

  2. Modeling and Optimization of Next Generation Feedstock Development for Chemical Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Modeling and Optimization of Next Generation Feedstock Development for Chemical Process Industry -Glutamic acid Anaerobic digestion mass Cellulose Biogas Bio oil Gasoline Diesel Butanol Dimethyl ether,Oil Polyol Biodiesel Glycerin Naphtha and Diesel Liquefaction / d h l Thermo chemical Protein Protein

  3. Modeling the effect of glacier recession on streamflow response using a coupled glacio-hydrological model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Naz, Bibi S [ORNL] [ORNL; Frans, Chris [University of Washington, Seattle] [University of Washington, Seattle; Clarke, Garry [University of British Columbia, Vancouver] [University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Burns, [Watershed Sciences Inc. (WSI), Portland] [Watershed Sciences Inc. (WSI), Portland; Lettenmaier, Dennis [University of Washington, Seattle] [University of Washington, Seattle

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe an integrated spatially distributed hydrologic and glacier dynamic model, and use it to investigate the effect of glacier recession on streamflow variations for the Upper Bow River basin, a tributary of the South Saskatchewan River. Several recent studies have suggested that observed decreases in summer flows in the South Saskatchewan River are partly due to the retreat of glaciers in the river's headwaters. Modeling the effect of glacier changes on streamflow response in river basins such as the South Saskatchewan is complicated due to the inability of most existing physically-based distributed hydrologic models to represent glacier dynamics. We compare predicted variations in glacier extent, snow water equivalent and streamflow discharge made with the integrated model with satellite estimates of glacier area and terminus position, observed streamflow and snow water equivalent measurements over the period of 1980 2007. Simulations with the coupled hydrology-glacier model reduce the uncertainty in streamflow predictions. Our results suggested that on average, the glacier melt contribution to the Bow River flow upstream of Lake Louise is about 30% in summer. For warm and dry years, however, the glacier melt contribution can be as large as 50% in August, whereas for cold years, it can be as small as 20% and the timing of glacier melt signature can be delayed by a month.

  4. Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling and control of aggregated heterogeneous thermostatically controlled loads for ancillary services”. In: Proceedings of the Power SystemsModeling and control of thermostatically controlled loads”. In: Pro- ceedings of 17 th Power Systems

  5. Modeling, Analysis, and Control of Demand Response Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathieu, Johanna L.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling and control of aggregated heterogeneous thermostatically controlled loads for ancillary services”. In: Proceedings of the Power SystemsModeling and control of thermostatically controlled loads”. In: Pro- ceedings of 17 th Power Systems

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLE Modelling multi-species response to landscape dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleyer, Michael

    and to the spatio-temporal configuration of urban brownfield habitats in a multi-species approach (37 plant and 43- sion time of brownfield habitats required to support all and especially regionally rare species Dynamic landscape Á Species distribution model Á Habitat model Á Urban brownfields Á Model averaging Á

  7. Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dudley, Junqiao Han

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Automated Demand Response in a Large Office Building”, inBuilding Control Strategies and Techniques for Demand Response.Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building

  8. Reduced-Order Modeling of Aggregated Thermostatic Loads With Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Wei; Lian, Jianming; Chang, Chin-Yao; Kalsi, Karanjit; Sun, Yannan

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand Response is playing an increasingly important role in smart grid control strategies. Modeling the behavior of populations of appliances under demand response is especially important to evaluate the effectiveness of these demand response programs. In this paper, an aggregated model is proposed for a class of Thermostatically Controlled Loads (TCLs). The model efficiently includes statistical information of the population, systematically deals with heterogeneity, and accounts for a second-order effect necessary to accurately capture the transient dynamics in the collective response. However, an accurate characterization of the collective dynamics however requires the aggregate model to have a high state space dimension. Most of the existing model reduction techniques require the stability of the underlying system which does not hold for the proposed aggregated model. In this work, a novel model reduction approach is developed for the proposed aggregated model, which can significantly reduce its complexity with small performance loss. The original and the reducedorder aggregated models are validated against simulations of thousands of detailed building models using GridLAB-D, which is a realistic open source distribution simulation software. Index Terms – demand response, aggregated model, ancillary

  9. Modeling and Verification of Distributed Generation and Voltage Regulation Equipment for Unbalanced Distribution Power Systems; Annual Subcontract Report, June 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, M. W.; Broadwater, R.; Hambrick, J.

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the development of models for distributed generation and distribution circuit voltage regulation equipment for unbalanced power systems and their verification through actual field measurements.

  10. Failure probability of axially cracked steam generator tubes; A probabilistic fracture mechanics model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mavko, B.; Cizelj, L. (Jozef Stefan Inst., Reactor Engineering Div., P.O. Box 100, 61111 Ljubljana, Slovenia (YU))

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a model for estimating the failure probability of axially cracked steam generator tubes is proposed. The model compares observed crack length distribution with critical crack length distribution by means of probabilistic fracture mechanics. The observed crack length is influenced by measured data, measurement reliability, sizing accuracy, and predicted crack growth rate. The critical crack length is defined by a deterministic mechanical model. All cracks are conservatively assumed to extend through the tube wall. The effect of the plugging limit is studied along with the number of cracked tubes to perform risk-based lifetime optimization of steam generators. A numerical example presented considers hypothetical accidental operating conditions during a feedwater line break.

  11. Climate Model Response from the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project (GeoMIP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravitz, Benjamin S.; Caldeira, Ken; Boucher, Olivier; Robock, Alan; Rasch, Philip J.; Alterskjaer, Kari; Bou Karam, Diana; Cole, Jason N.; Curry, Charles L.; Haywood, J.; Irvine, Peter; Ji, Duoying; Jones, A.; Kristjansson, J. E.; Lunt, Daniel; Moore, John; Niemeier, Ulrike; Schmidt, Hauke; Schulz, M.; Singh, Balwinder; Tilmes, S.; Watanabe, Shingo; Yang, Shuting; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar geoengineering—deliberate reduction in the amount of solar radiation retained by the Earth—has been proposed as a means of counteracting some of the climatic effects of anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. We present results from Experiment G1 of the Geoengineering Model Intercomparison Project, in which 12 climate models have simulated the climate response to an abrupt quadrupling of CO2 from preindustrial concentrations brought into radiative balance via a globally uniform reduction in insolation. Models show this reduction largely offsets global mean surface temperature increases due to quadrupled CO2 concentrations and prevents 97% of the Arctic sea ice loss that would otherwise occur under high CO2 levels but, compared to the preindustrial climate, leaves the tropics cooler (-0.3 K) and the poles warmer (+0.8 K). Annual mean precipitation minus evaporation anomalies for G1 are less than 0.2mmday-1 in magnitude over 92% of the globe, but some tropical regions receive less precipitation, in part due to increased moist static stability and suppression of convection. Global average net primary productivity increases by 120% in G1 over simulated preindustrial levels, primarily from CO2 fertilization, but also in part due to reduced plant heat stress compared to a high CO2 world with no geoengineering. All models show that uniform solar geoengineering in G1 cannot simultaneously return regional and global temperature and hydrologic cycle intensity to preindustrial levels.

  12. System for generating two-dimensional masks from a three-dimensional model using topological analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schiek, Richard (Albuquerque, NM)

    2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of generating two-dimensional masks from a three-dimensional model comprises providing a three-dimensional model representing a micro-electro-mechanical structure for manufacture and a description of process mask requirements, reducing the three-dimensional model to a topological description of unique cross sections, and selecting candidate masks from the unique cross sections and the cross section topology. The method further can comprise reconciling the candidate masks based on the process mask requirements description to produce two-dimensional process masks.

  13. Parallel finite element modeling of earthquake ground response and liquefaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jinchi

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. (1999). Computational Geomechanics with Special ReferenceDynamic Problems in Geomechanics," PhD Thesis, Universityon Numerical Models in Geomechanics, G. N. Pande, Van Impe,

  14. Site response in NEHRP Provisions and NGA models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seyhan, Emel; Stewart, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    communication, 2011) (EPRI model). Page 16 The principal11 that are derived from EPRI curves. REFERENCES Abrahamson,using MRD curves from EPRI (1993), with otherwise identical

  15. Parallel finite element modeling of earthquake ground response and liquefaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Jinchi

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Failure of Sand Slope in Centrifuge Test." Proceedings ofStephen E. (2001b). "Centrifuge Modeling of Pile-Supportedof Site Liquefaction Using Centrifuge Tests." Proceedings of

  16. Response

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin ofEnergy at Waste-to-Energy usingof Enhanced Dr. JuliaPOINTRespond to theResponse SEAB

  17. An Impulse Response Model for the 60 Ghz Channel Based on Spectral Techniques of -stable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    procedures deals directly with the measured transfer functions this avoid loosing informations in data pretreatments. Finally, an estimation of the spectral measure permit to directly generate the impulse response to -stable distributions. Secondly we did not want to loose information in preprocessing the data, like

  18. Modeled biogeochemical responses to mesoscale eddies in the South China Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maine, University of

    Modeled biogeochemical responses to mesoscale eddies in the South China Sea Peng Xiu1 and Fei Chai1] Mesoscale eddies are observed each year in the South China Sea (SCS); however, their contributions physicalbiogeochemical model to evaluate the eddy impact. We first track the modeled mesoscale eddies in the SCS

  19. DAMAGE DETECTION BASED ON STRUCTURAL RESPONSE TO TEMPERATURE CHANGES AND MODEL UPDATING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    DAMAGE DETECTION BASED ON STRUCTURAL RESPONSE TO TEMPERATURE CHANGES AND MODEL UPDATING Marian The paper proposes use of measured structural response to temperature loads for purposes of damage identification. As opposed to the most common approaches, which rely on suppressing temperature effects in damage

  20. Modeling the climate response to a massive methane release from gas hydrates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renssen, Hans

    Modeling the climate response to a massive methane release from gas hydrates H. Renssen and C. J release from gas hydrates, Paleoceanography, 19, PA2010, doi:10.1029/2003PA000968. 1. Introduction [2] Catastrophic releases of methane gas from hydrates (clathrates) have been mentioned to be responsible for rapid

  1. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Responsive Reserve Report. WECC Frequency Responsive Reserve=&View={BB5A76DA-21C8-48FC-9468-F82B395DF8F9} WECC.2008. WECC Standard BAL-002-WECC-1 - Contingency Reserves.

  2. New modeling and control solutions for integrated microgrid system with respect to thermodynamics properties of generation and demand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Fang-Yu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates microgrid control stability with respect to thermodynamics behaviors of generation and demand. First, a new integrated microgrid model is introduced. This model consists of a combined cycle power ...

  3. Analysis of P-wave seismic response for fracture detection: modelling and case studies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yungui

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis addresses a few specific issues in the use of wide azimuth P-wave seismic data for fracture detection based on numerical modelling and real data. These issues include the seismic response of discrete fractures, ...

  4. Site-Specific Seismic Site Response Model for the Waste Treatment Plant, Hanford, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rohay, Alan C.; Reidel, Steve P.

    2005-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This interim report documents the collection of site-specific geologic and geophysical data characterizing the Waste Treatment Plant site and the modeling of the site-specific structure response to earthquake ground motions.

  5. Smart finite state devices: A modeling framework for demand response technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turitsyn, Konstantin

    We introduce and analyze Markov Decision Process (MDP) machines to model individual devices which are expected to participate in future demand-response markets on distribution grids. We differentiate devices into the ...

  6. Maternal adrenocorticotropin, cortisol and thyroid hormone responses to chronic binge alcohol exposure throughout gestation: ovine model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tress, Ursula

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study investigated the effect of chronic alcohol exposure on the responses of the maternal hypothalamus-pituitary adrenal axis (HPA-axis) and thyroid hormones throughout gestation using an ovine model. Maternal plasma concentrations of ACTH...

  7. Models and Solution Approaches for Emergency Response Network Design Integrating Supply and Demand Sides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dalal, Jyotirmoy

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present three models for emergency response network design. First, in a deterministic setting, we focus on two critical aspects of emergency logistics: evacuation and relief distribution. We consider a three-tier system comprising evacuation...

  8. Modelling the Somantic Electrical Response of Hippocampal Pyramidal Neurons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borg-Graham, Lyle J.

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A modeling study of hippocampal pyramidal neurons is described. This study is based on simulations using HIPPO, a program which simulates the somatic electrical activity of these cells. HIPPO is based on a) descriptions ...

  9. Use of field experimental studies to evaluate emergency response models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Lange, R.; Rodriguez, D.J.; Nasstrom, J.S.

    1985-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The three-dimensional diagnostic wind field model (MATHEW) and the particle-in-cell atmospheric transport and diffusion model (ADPIC) are used by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability to estimate the environmental consequences of accidental releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. These models have undergone extensive evaluations against field experiments conducted in a variety of environmental settings ranging from relatively flat to very complex terrain areas. Simulations of tracer experiments conducted in a complex mountain valley setting revealed that 35 to 50% of the comparisons between calculated and measured tracer concentrations were within a factor of 5. This may be compared with a factor of 2 for 50% of the comparisons for relatively flat terrain. This degradation of results in complex terrain is due to a variety of factors such as the limited representativeness of measurements in complex terrain, the limited spatial resolution afforded by the models, and the turbulence parameterization based on sigma/sub theta/ measurements to evaluate the eddy diffusivities. Measurements of sigma/sub theta/ in complex terrain exceed those measured over flat terrain by a factor of 2 to 3 leading to eddy diffusivities that are unrealistically high. The results of model evaluations are very sensitive to the quality and the representativeness of the meteorological data. This is particularly true for measurements near the source. The capability of the models to simulate the dispersion of an instantaneously produced cloud of particulates was illustrated to be generally within a factor of 2 over flat terrain. 19 refs., 16 figs.

  10. Modeling Hydrogen Generation Rates in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camaioni, Donald M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Hallen, Richard T.; Sherwood, David J.; Stock, Leon M.

    2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes a project in which Hanford Site and Environmental Management Science Program investigators addressed issues concerning hydrogen generation rates in the Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant. The hydrogen generation rates of radioactive wastes must be estimated to provide for safe operations. While an existing model satisfactorily predicts rates for quiescent wastes in Hanford underground storage tanks, pretreatment operations will alter the conditions and chemical composition of these wastes. Review of the treatment process flowsheet identified specific issues requiring study to ascertain whether the model would provide conservative values for waste streams in the plant. These include effects of adding hydroxide ion, alpha radiolysis, saturation with air (oxygen) from pulse-jet mixing, treatment with potassium permanganate, organic compounds from degraded ion exchange resins and addition of glass-former chemicals. The effects were systematically investigated through literature review, technical analyses and experimental work.

  11. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bolinger, Mark A; Hand, Maureen; Blair, Nate; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Hern, Tracy; Miller, Bart; O'Connell, R.

    2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind Energy Deployment System model was used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030. This generation capacity expansion model selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, nuclear plants, and wind technology to meet projected demand in future years. Technology cost and performance projections, as well as transmission operation and expansion costs, are assumed. This study demonstrates that producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology is technically feasible, not cost-prohibitive, and provides benefits in the forms of carbon emission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water savings.

  12. Supercomputer Assisted Generation of Machine Learning Agents for the Calibration of Building Energy Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, Jibonananda [ORNL] [ORNL; New, Joshua Ryan [ORNL] [ORNL; Edwards, Richard [ORNL] [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building Energy Modeling (BEM) is an approach to model the energy usage in buildings for design and retrot pur- poses. EnergyPlus is the agship Department of Energy software that performs BEM for dierent types of buildings. The input to EnergyPlus can often extend in the order of a few thousand parameters which have to be calibrated manu- ally by an expert for realistic energy modeling. This makes it challenging and expensive thereby making building en- ergy modeling unfeasible for smaller projects. In this paper, we describe the \\Autotune" research which employs machine learning algorithms to generate agents for the dierent kinds of standard reference buildings in the U.S. building stock. The parametric space and the variety of building locations and types make this a challenging computational problem necessitating the use of supercomputers. Millions of En- ergyPlus simulations are run on supercomputers which are subsequently used to train machine learning algorithms to generate agents. These agents, once created, can then run in a fraction of the time thereby allowing cost-eective cali- bration of building models.

  13. Modeling of reciprocating internal combustion engines for power generation and heat recovery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun, Kyung Tae; Cho, Heejin; Luck, Rogelio; Mago, Pedro J.

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a power generation and heat recovery model for reciprocating internal combustion engines (ICEs). The purpose of the proposed model is to provide realistic estimates of performance/efficiency maps for both electrical power output and useful thermal output for various capacities of engines for use in a preliminary CHP design/simulation process. The proposed model will serve as an alternative to constant engine efficiencies or empirical efficiency curves commonly used in the current literature for simulations of CHP systems. The engine performance/efficiency calculation algorithm has been coded to a publicly distributed FORTRAN Dynamic Link Library (DLL), and a user friendly tool has been developed using Visual Basic programming. Simulation results using the proposed model are validated against manufacturer’s technical data.

  14. Modeling HIV Immune Response and Validation with Clinical Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and parameters describing vi- ral production and clearance, cell infection and death rate, treatment efficacy, and stimulation by antigens other than HIV. A stability analysis illustrates the capability of this model in admitting multiple locally asymptotically stable (locally a.s.) off-treatment equilibria. The phenomenon

  15. Modeling the effect of glacier recession on streamflow1 response using a coupled glacio-hydrological model2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    1 Modeling the effect of glacier recession on streamflow1 response using a coupled glacio an integrated spatially distributed hydrologic and glacier dynamic model,14 and use it to investigate the effect of glacier recession on streamflow variations for the Upper15 Bow River basin, a tributary of the South

  16. Storm fronts over galaxy discs: Models of how waves generate extraplanar gas and its anomalous kinematics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curtis Struck; Daniel C. Smith

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The existence of partially ionized, diffuse gas and dust clouds at kiloparsec scale distances above the central planes of edge-on, galaxy discs was an unexpected discovery about 20 yrs ago. Subsequent observations showed that this EDIG (extended or extraplanar diffuse interstellar gas) has rotation velocities approximately 10-20% lower than those in the central plane, and have been hard to account for. Here we present results of hydrodynamic models, with radiative cooling and heating from star formation. We find that in models with star formation generated stochastically across the disc an extraplanar gas layer is generated as long as the star formation is sufficiently strong. However, this gas rotates at nearly the same speed as the mid-plane gas. We then studied a range of models with imposed spiral or bar waves in the disc. EDIG layers were also generated in these models, but primarily over the wave regions, not over the entire disc. Because of this partial coverage, the EDIG clouds move radially, as well as vertically, with the result that observed kinematic anomalies are reproduced. The implication is that the kinematic anomalies are the result of three-dimensional motions when the cylindrical symmetry of the disc is broken. Thus, the kinematic anomalies are the result of bars or strong waves, and more face-on galaxies with such waves should have an asymmetric EDIG component. The models also indicate that the EDIG can contain a significant fraction of cool gas, and that some star formation can be triggered at considerable heights above the disc midplane. We expect all of these effects to be more prominent in young, forming discs, to play a role in rapidly smoothing disc asymmetries, and in working to self-regulate disc structure.

  17. Use of Frequency Response Metrics to Assess the Planning and Operating Requirements for Reliable Integration of Variable Renewable Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    plants to frequency response during disturbances. Use ofkey event during a disturbance when the frequency stabilizesrestore frequency to normal following a disturbance and is

  18. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transmission to deliver wind generation to load centers. Toof integrating variable wind generation into the electricityfrom wind. Annual wind energy generation was specified in

  19. Modeling Variability and Uncertainty of Photovoltaic Generation: A Hidden State Spatial Statistical Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callaway, Duncan S; Tabone, Michaelangelo D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Operational im- pacts of wind generation on California poweralong with all solar and wind generation) is different thanincreases in wind and solar generation—see those cited

  20. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of about 80 GW of coal-based generation technologyand reduces coal-based electricity generation by 18%.to offset coal- and natural gas-based electricity generation

  1. Ship response using a compact wave spectrum model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linn, Larry Donald

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    statistical technique, known as principal component analysis, is used to compact large data bases of theoretical and real spectral information. Statistical properties of the various data bases are examined in their original and compacted forms. Sensitivity.... The available spectrum models fall into two basic categories. Formulas which use the first, or "classic, " approach use wind speed as the independent variable to define the spectrum. The Pierson-Noskowitz Spectrum is an example of this type...

  2. Program Plan for Renewable Energy generation of electricity. Response to Section 2111 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 5-Year Program Plan for providing cost-effective options for generating electricity from renewable energy sources is presented by the US Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. The document covers the Utility-Sector situation, scope of the program, specific generating technologies, and implementation of the program plan.

  3. Tuning the Passive Structural Response of an Oscillating-foil Propulsion Mechanism for Improved Thrust Generation and Efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victoria, University of

    Thrust Generation and Efficiency by Andrew James Richards B.A.Sc., The University of British Columbia of an Oscillating-foil Propulsion Mechanism for Improved Thrust Generation and Efficiency by Andrew James Richards B for the use of flexible oscillating foils which, under suitable conditions, have been demon- strated

  4. Generation IV benchmarking of TRISO fuel performance models under accident conditions. Modeling input data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the benchmark plan for the calculation of particle fuel performance on safety testing experiments that are representative of operational accidental transients. The benchmark is dedicated to the modeling of fission product release under accident conditions by fuel performance codes from around the world, and the subsequent comparison to post-irradiation experiment (PIE) data from the modeled heating tests. The accident condition benchmark is divided into three parts: the modeling of a simplified benchmark problem to assess potential numerical calculation issues at low fission product release; the modeling of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis safety testing experiments; and, the comparison of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis modeling results with PIE data. The simplified benchmark case, thereafter named NCC (Numerical Calculation Case), is derived from ''Case 5'' of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on coated particle fuel technology [IAEA 2012]. It is included so participants can evaluate their codes at low fission product release. ''Case 5'' of the IAEA CRP-6 showed large code-to-code discrepancies in the release of fission products, which were attributed to ''effects of the numerical calculation method rather than the physical model''[IAEA 2012]. The NCC is therefore intended to check if these numerical effects subsist. The first two steps imply the involvement of the benchmark participants with a modeling effort following the guidelines and recommendations provided by this document. The third step involves the collection of the modeling results by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the comparison of these results with the available PIE data. The objective of this document is to provide all necessary input data to model the benchmark cases, and to give some methodology guidelines and recommendations in order to make all results suitable for comparison with each other. The participants should read this document thoroughly to make sure all the data needed for their calculations is provided in the document. Missing data will be added to a revision of the document if necessary.

  5. Modeling the observed proton aurora and ionospheric convection responses to changes in the IMF clock angle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lockwood, Mike

    Modeling the observed proton aurora and ionospheric convection responses to changes in the IMF clock angle: 1. Persistence of cusp proton aurora K. Throp, M. Lockwood,1 B. S. Lanchester, and S. K employ a numerical model of cusp ion precipitation and proton aurora emission to fit variations

  6. Regarding Compass Response Functions For Modeling Path Integration: Comment on "Evolving a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    275 Regarding Compass Response Functions For Modeling Path Integration: Comment on "Evolving neural model of the animal behavior known as path integra- tion, a navigation process requiring a compass mention of the simi- larity of their compass sensors to the known properties of the polarization

  7. Quantifying and Generalizing Hydrologic Responses to Dam Regulation using a Statistical Modeling Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McManamay, Ryan A [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the ubiquitous existence of dams within riverscapes, much of our knowledge about dams and their environmental effects remains context-specific. Hydrology, more than any other environmental variable, has been studied in great detail with regard to dam regulation. While much progress has been made in generalizing the hydrologic effects of regulation by large dams, many aspects of hydrology show site-specific fidelity to dam operations, small dams (including diversions), and regional hydrologic regimes. A statistical modeling framework is presented to quantify and generalize hydrologic responses to varying degrees of dam regulation. Specifically, the objectives were to 1) compare the effects of local versus cumulative dam regulation, 2) determine the importance of different regional hydrologic regimes in influencing hydrologic responses to dams, and 3) evaluate how different regulation contexts lead to error in predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Overall, model performance was poor in quantifying the magnitude of hydrologic responses, but performance was sufficient in classifying hydrologic responses as negative or positive. Responses of some hydrologic indices to dam regulation were highly dependent upon hydrologic class membership and the purpose of the dam. The opposing coefficients between local and cumulative-dam predictors suggested that hydrologic responses to cumulative dam regulation are complex, and predicting the hydrology downstream of individual dams, as opposed to multiple dams, may be more easy accomplished using statistical approaches. Results also suggested that particular contexts, including multipurpose dams, high cumulative regulation by multiple dams, diversions, close proximity to dams, and certain hydrologic classes are all sources of increased error when predicting hydrologic responses to dams. Statistical models, such as the ones presented herein, show promise in their ability to model the effects of dam regulation effects at large spatial scales as to generalize the directionality of hydrologic responses.

  8. Modeling the Structural Response from a Propagating High Explosive Using Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Margraf, J

    2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This report primarily concerns the use of two massively parallel finite element codes originally written and maintained at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. ALE3D is an explicit hydrodynamics code commonly employed to simulate wave propagation from high energy scenarios and the resulting interaction with nearby structures. This coupled response ensures that a structure is accurately applied with a blast loading varying both in space and time. Figure 1 illustrates the radial outward propagation of a pressure wave due to a center detonated spherical explosive originating from the lower left. The radial symmetry seen in this scenario is lost when instead a cylindrocal charge is detonated. Figure 2 indicates that a stronger, faster traveling pressure wave occurs in the direction of the normal axis to the cylinder. The ALE3D name is derived because of the use of arbitrary-Lagrange-Eulerian elements in which the mesh is allowed to advect; a process through which the mesh is modified to alleviate tanlging and general mesh distortion often cuased by high energy scenarios. The counterpart to an advecting element is a Lagrange element, whose mesh moves with the material. Ideally all structural components are kept Lagrange as long as possible to preserve accuracy of material variables and minimize advection related errors. Advection leads to mixed zoning, so using structural Lagrange elements also improves the visualization when post processing the results. A simplified representation of the advection process is shown in Figure 3. First the mesh is distorted due to material motion during the Lagrange step. The mesh is then shifted to an idealized and less distorted state to prevent irregular zones caused by the Lagrange motion. Lastly, the state variables are remapped to the elements of the newly constructed mesh. Note that Figure 3 represents a purely Eulerian mesh relaxation because the mesh is relocated back to the pre-Lagrange position. This is the case when the material flows through a still mesh. This is not typically done in an ALE3D analysis, especially if Lagrange elements exist. Deforming Lagrange elements would certainly tangle with a Eulerian mesh eventually. The best method in this case is to have an advecting mesh positioned as some relaxed version of the pre and post Lagrange step; this gives the best opportunity of modeling a high energy event with a combination of Lagrange and ALE elements. Dyne3D is another explicit dynamic analysis code, ParaDyn being the parallel version. ParaDyn is used for predicting the transient response of three dimensional structures using Lagrangian solid mechanics. Large deformation and mesh tangling is often resolved through the use of an element deletion scheme. This is useful to accommodate component failure, but if it is done purely as a means to preserve a useful mesh it can lead to problems because it does not maintain continuity of the material bulk response. Whatever medium exists between structural components is typically not modeled in ParaDyn. Instead, a structure either has a known loading profile applied or given initial conditions. The many included contact algorithms can calculate the loading response of materials if and when they collide. A recent implementation of an SPH module in which failed or deleted material nodes are converted to independent particles is currently being utilized for a variety of spall related problems and high velocity impact scenarios. Figure 4 shows an example of a projectile, given an initial velocity, and how it fails the first plate which generates SPH particles which then interact with and damage the second plate.

  9. Analysis of supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle control strategies and dynamic response for Generation IV Reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of specific control strategies and dynamic behavior of the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been extended to the two reactor types selected for continued development under the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative; namely, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). Direct application of the standard S-CO{sub 2} recompression cycle to the VHTR was found to be challenging because of the mismatch in the temperature drop of the He gaseous reactor coolant through the He-to-CO{sub 2} reactor heat exchanger (RHX) versus the temperature rise of the CO{sub 2} through the RHX. The reference VHTR features a large temperature drop of 450 C between the assumed core outlet and inlet temperatures of 850 and 400 C, respectively. This large temperature difference is an essential feature of the VHTR enabling a lower He flow rate reducing the required core velocities and pressure drop. In contrast, the standard recompression S-CO{sub 2} cycle wants to operate with a temperature rise through the RHX of about 150 C reflecting the temperature drop as the CO{sub 2} expands from 20 MPa to 7.4 MPa in the turbine and the fact that the cycle is highly recuperated such that the CO{sub 2} entering the RHX is effectively preheated. Because of this mismatch, direct application of the standard recompression cycle results in a relatively poor cycle efficiency of 44.9%. However, two approaches have been identified by which the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be successfully adapted to the VHTR and the benefits of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle, especially a significant gain in cycle efficiency, can be realized. The first approach involves the use of three separate cascaded S-CO{sub 2} cycles. Each S-CO{sub 2} cycle is coupled to the VHTR through its own He-to-CO{sub 2} RHX in which the He temperature is reduced by 150 C. The three respective cycles have efficiencies of 54, 50, and 44%, respectively, resulting in a net cycle efficiency of 49.3 %. The other approach involves reducing the minimum cycle pressure significantly below the critical pressure such that the temperature drop in the turbine is increased while the minimum cycle temperature is maintained above the critical temperature to prevent the formation of a liquid phase. The latter approach also involves the addition of a precooler and a third compressor before the main compressor to retain the benefits of compression near the critical point with the main compressor. For a minimum cycle pressure of 1 MPa, a cycle efficiency of 49.5% is achieved. Either approach opens up the door to applying the SCO{sub 2} cycle to the VHTR. In contrast, the SFR system typically has a core outlet-inlet temperature difference of about 150 C such that the standard recompression cycle is ideally suited for direct application to the SFR. The ANL Plant Dynamics Code has been modified for application to the VHTR and SFR when the reactor side dynamic behavior is calculated with another system level computer code such as SAS4A/SYSSYS-1 in the SFR case. The key modification involves modeling heat exchange in the RHX, accepting time dependent tabular input from the reactor code, and generating time dependent tabular input to the reactor code such that both the reactor and S-CO{sub 2} cycle sides can be calculated in a convergent iterative scheme. This approach retains the modeling benefits provided by the detailed reactor system level code and can be applied to any reactor system type incorporating a S-CO{sub 2} cycle. This approach was applied to the particular calculation of a scram scenario for a SFR in which the main and intermediate sodium pumps are not tripped and the generator is not disconnected from the electrical grid in order to enhance heat removal from the reactor system thereby enhancing the cooldown rate of the Na-to-CO{sub 2} RHX. The reactor side is calculated with SAS4A/SASSYS-1 while the S-CO{sub 2} cycle is calculated with the Plant Dynamics Code with a number of iterations over a timescale of 500 seconds. It is found that the RHX u

  10. Quantum models with spectrum generated by the flows of polynomial zeros

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Moroz

    2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A class {\\cal R}_p of purely bosonic models is characterized having the following properties in the Bargmann Hilbert space of analytic functions: (i) wave function \\psi(\\epsilon,z)=\\sum_{n=0}^\\infty \\phi_n(\\epsilon) z^n is the {\\em generating function} for orthogonal polynomials \\phi_n(\\epsilon) of a discrete energy variable \\epsilon, (ii) any Hamiltonian \\hat{H}_b\\in {\\cal R}_p has nondegenerate purely point spectrum that corresponds to infinite discrete support of measure d\

  11. Innovative approach to modeling accident response of Gravel Gerties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, M.; McClure, P.; Sullivan, H.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent safety analyses at nuclear explosive facilities have renewed interest in the accident phenomenology associated with explosions in nuclear explosive cells, which are commonly referred to as {open_quotes}Gravel Gerties.{close_quotes} The cells are used for the assembly and disassembly of nuclear explosives and are located in the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at the Pantex facility. The cells are designed to mitigate the release of special nuclear material to the environment in the event of a detonation of high explosive within the Gravel Gertie. Although there are some subtle differences between the cells of DAF and Pantex, their general design, geometry, and configuration are similar. The cells consist of a round room approximately 10.4 m in diameter and 5.2 m high enclosed by 0.3-m-thick concrete. Each cell has a wire-rope cantenary roof overlain with gravel. The gravel is approximately 6.9 m deep at the center of the roof and decreases toward the outer edge of the cell. The cell is connected to a corridor and subsequent rooms through an interlocking blast door. In the event of a accidental explosion involving significant amounts of high explosive, the roof structure is lifted by the force of the explosion, the supporting cables break, the gravel is lifted by the blast (resulting in rapid venting of the cell), and the gravel roof collapses, filling the cell. The lifting and subsequent collapse of the gravel, which acts much like a piston, is very challenging to model.

  12. Final report for %22High performance computing for advanced national electric power grid modeling and integration of solar generation resources%22, LDRD Project No. 149016.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reno, Matthew J.; Riehm, Andrew Charles; Hoekstra, Robert John; Munoz-Ramirez, Karina; Stamp, Jason Edwin; Phillips, Laurence R.; Adams, Brian M.; Russo, Thomas V.; Oldfield, Ron A.; McLendon, William Clarence, III; Nelson, Jeffrey Scott; Hansen, Clifford W.; Richardson, Bryan T.; Stein, Joshua S.; Schoenwald, David Alan; Wolfenbarger, Paul R.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Design and operation of the electric power grid (EPG) relies heavily on computational models. High-fidelity, full-order models are used to study transient phenomena on only a small part of the network. Reduced-order dynamic and power flow models are used when analysis involving thousands of nodes are required due to the computational demands when simulating large numbers of nodes. The level of complexity of the future EPG will dramatically increase due to large-scale deployment of variable renewable generation, active load and distributed generation resources, adaptive protection and control systems, and price-responsive demand. High-fidelity modeling of this future grid will require significant advances in coupled, multi-scale tools and their use on high performance computing (HPC) platforms. This LDRD report demonstrates SNL's capability to apply HPC resources to these 3 tasks: (1) High-fidelity, large-scale modeling of power system dynamics; (2) Statistical assessment of grid security via Monte-Carlo simulations of cyber attacks; and (3) Development of models to predict variability of solar resources at locations where little or no ground-based measurements are available.

  13. A dual model-free control of non-minimum phase systems for generation of stable limit cycles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A dual model-free control of non-minimum phase systems for generation of stable limit cycles S parameters tuning. It is therefore easy to build a controller for an unknown system. Model-free control has of flow. In [14], model-free control methodology is applied to a power converter, where stable regulation

  14. TSC Modelling of Current Ramp Scenarios with ITB-Generated Bootstrap Currents in JT-60U Reversed Shear Discharges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Modelling of Internal & Edge Transport Barriers (ITB & ETB) relevant to bootstrap currents has been with the ITB & ETB-generated bootstrap currents. A fast and strong ITB build-up near plasma core may cause process of Current Hole formation. - 2 - #12;qmin ITB & ETB Modelling on TSC Numerical Model JT-60U m

  15. Soft-ratchet modeling of end-point memory in the nonlinear resonant response of sedimentary rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soft-ratchet modeling of end-point memory in the nonlinear resonant response of sedimentary rocks. The subsystem of ruptured bonds is shown to be of a soft-ratchet type, so that its response to an alternating

  16. Untangling the roles of parasites in food webs with generative network models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobs, Abigail Z; Moore, Cristopher; Clauset, Aaron

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Food webs represent the set of consumer-resource interactions among a set of species that co-occur in a habitat, but most food web studies have omitted parasites and their interactions. Recent studies have provided conflicting evidence on whether including parasites changes food web structure, with some suggesting that parasitic interactions are structurally distinct from those among free-living species while others claim the opposite. Here, we describe a principled method for understanding food web structure that combines an efficient optimization algorithm from statistical physics called parallel tempering with a probabilistic generalization of the empirically well-supported food web niche model. This generative model approach allows us to rigorously estimate the degree to which interactions that involve parasites are statistically distinguishable from interactions among free-living species, whether parasite niches behave similarly to free-living niches, and the degree to which existing hypotheses about foo...

  17. Protecting and Dynamically Generating Entanglement in a Two-Atom Two-Field-Mode Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Sinha; N. Cummings; B. L. Hu

    2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the time evolution of quantum entanglement in a model consisting of two two-level atoms interacting with a two-mode electromagnetic field for a variety of initial states. We study two different coupling schemes motivated by the forms that can arise due to atomic separation. We observe a variety of qualitative features such as entanglement sudden death, dynamical generation, protection, and transfer between subsystems. Our quantitative analysis shows that these cases with different couplings and initial states differ significantly in these qualitative features. The multifarious behaviors in these two-mode cases suggest the importance of considering atomic separation carefully for any model where two atoms interact with a common field.

  18. Self-consistent modeling of radio-frequency plasma generation in stellarators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moiseenko, V. E., E-mail: moiseenk@ipp.kharkov.ua; Stadnik, Yu. S., E-mail: stadnikys@kipt.kharkov.ua [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (Ukraine); Lysoivan, A. I., E-mail: a.lyssoivan@fz-juelich.de [Royal Military Academy, EURATOM-Belgian State Association, Laboratory for Plasma Physics (Belgium); Korovin, V. B. [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (Ukraine)] [National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, National Science Center Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (Ukraine)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A self-consistent model of radio-frequency (RF) plasma generation in stellarators in the ion cyclotron frequency range is described. The model includes equations for the particle and energy balance and boundary conditions for Maxwell’s equations. The equation of charged particle balance takes into account the influx of particles due to ionization and their loss via diffusion and convection. The equation of electron energy balance takes into account the RF heating power source, as well as energy losses due to the excitation and electron-impact ionization of gas atoms, energy exchange via Coulomb collisions, and plasma heat conduction. The deposited RF power is calculated by solving the boundary problem for Maxwell’s equations. When describing the dissipation of the energy of the RF field, collisional absorption and Landau damping are taken into account. At each time step, Maxwell’s equations are solved for the current profiles of the plasma density and plasma temperature. The calculations are performed for a cylindrical plasma. The plasma is assumed to be axisymmetric and homogeneous along the plasma column. The system of balance equations is solved using the Crank-Nicholson scheme. Maxwell’s equations are solved in a one-dimensional approximation by using the Fourier transformation along the azimuthal and longitudinal coordinates. Results of simulations of RF plasma generation in the Uragan-2M stellarator by using a frame antenna operating at frequencies lower than the ion cyclotron frequency are presented. The calculations show that the slow wave generated by the antenna is efficiently absorbed at the periphery of the plasma column, due to which only a small fraction of the input power reaches the confinement region. As a result, the temperature on the axis of the plasma column remains low, whereas at the periphery it is substantially higher. This leads to strong absorption of the RF field at the periphery via the Landau mechanism.

  19. Atmospheric Circulation Response to an Instantaneous Doubling of Carbon Dioxide. Part I: Model Experiments and Transient Thermal Response in the Troposphere*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atmospheric Circulation Response to an Instantaneous Doubling of Carbon Dioxide. Part I: Model Experiments and Transient Thermal Response in the Troposphere* YUTIAN WU Department of Applied Physics (CO2) by looking into the transient step-by-step adjustment of the circulation. The transient

  20. Response Surface Energy Modeling of an Electric Vehicle over a Reduced Composite Drive Cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jehlik, Forrest [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)] [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); LaClair, Tim J [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Response surface methodology (RSM) techniques were applied to develop a predictive model of electric vehicle (EV) energy consumption over the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) standardized drive cycles. The model is based on measurements from a synthetic composite drive cycle. The synthetic drive cycle is a minimized statistical composite of the standardized urban (UDDS), highway (HWFET), and US06 cycles. The composite synthetic drive cycle is 20 minutes in length thereby reducing testing time of the three standard EPA cycles by over 55%. Vehicle speed and acceleration were used as model inputs for a third order least squared regression model predicting vehicle battery power output as a function of the drive cycle. The approach reduced three cycles and 46 minutes of drive time to a single test of 20 minutes. Application of response surface modeling to the synthetic drive cycle is shown to predict energy consumption of the three EPA cycles within 2.6% of the actual measured values. Additionally, the response model may be used to predict energy consumption of any cycle within the speed/acceleration envelope of the synthetic cycle. This technique results in reducing test time, which additionally provides a model that may be used to expand the analysis and understanding of the vehicle under consideration.

  1. Collective response to perturbations in a data-driven fish school model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calovi, Daniel S; Schuhmacher, Paul; Chaté, Hugues; Sire, Clément; Theraulaz, Guy

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fish schools are able to display a rich variety of collective states and behavioural responses when they are confronted to threats. However a school's response to perturbations may be different depending on its collective state. Here we use a previously developed data-driven fish school model to investigate how a single or a small number of perturbing individuals affect the long-term behaviour of a school depending on its collective state. These perturbing fish are characterised by a set of attraction and alignment parameters different from those of the main population. We find that the responsiveness of the school to the perturbation is maximum near the transition region between milling and schooling states where the school exhibits multistability and regularly shifts between these two states. We also find that a significant school's response to a perturbation only happens below a certain threshold of the noise to social interactions ratio.

  2. Modeling Variability and Uncertainty of Photovoltaic Generation: A Hidden State Spatial Statistical Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Callaway, Duncan S; Tabone, Michaelangelo D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    AND UNCERTAINTY OF PHOTOVOLTAIC GENERATION [9] M. Milligan,for grid-connected photovoltaic system based on advancedand uncertainty in solar photovoltaic generation at multiple

  3. Assessing Invariance of Factor Structures and Polytomous Item Response Model Parameter Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes, Jennifer McGee

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    .e., identical items, different people) for the homogenous graded response model (Samejima, 1969) and the partial credit model (Masters, 1982)? To evaluate measurement invariance using IRT methods, the item discrimination and item difficulty parameters... obtained from the GRM need to be equivalent across datasets. The YFCY02 and YFCY03 GRM item discrimination parameters (slope) correlation was 0.828. The YFCY02 and YFCY03 GRM item difficulty parameters (location) correlation was 0...

  4. Predicting effective magnetoelectric response in magnetic-ferroelectric composites via phase-field modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Long-Qing

    Predicting effective magnetoelectric response in magnetic-ferroelectric composites via phase Articles you may be interested in Stress magnetization model for magnetostriction in multiferroic composite circular fibrous multiferroic composites J. Appl. Phys. 109, 104901 (2011); 10.1063/1.3583580 Effect

  5. Price Responsiveness in the AEO2003 NEMS Residential and Commercial Buildings Sector Models

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the demand responses to changes in energy prices in the Annual Energy Outlook 2003 versions of the Residential and Commercial Demand Modules of the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). It updates a similar paper completed for the Annual Energy Outlook 1999 version of the NEMS.

  6. Soft-ratchet modeling of slow dynamics in the nonlinear resonant response of sedimentary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soft-ratchet modeling of slow dynamics in the nonlinear resonant response of sedimentary rocks of Physics 0-7354-0330-9/06/$23.00 CREDIT LINE (BELOW) TO BE INSERTED ONLY ON THE FIRST PAGE OF THE #12;SOFT-RATCHET

  7. Modeling impacts of geomagnetic field variations on middle atmospheric ozone responses to solar proton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    events (SPEs) the flux of high-energy protons from the Sun is markedly increased. In order to investigateModeling impacts of geomagnetic field variations on middle atmospheric ozone responses to solar charged particles of solar and cosmic origin. Therefore variations of the geomagnetic field occurring

  8. Mathematical model of a three-stage innate immune response to a pneumococcal lung infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Fred

    Mathematical model of a three-stage innate immune response to a pneumococcal lung infection Amber M in the lung: resident alveolar macrophages, neutrophils and monocyte-derived macrophages. The alveolar migrate to the lungs resulting in a more serious infection. Nevertheless, only a small fraction

  9. 3 Response to comment by Jozsef Szilagyi on 4 ``Using numerical modelling to evaluate the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonnell, Jeffrey J.

    REPLY 3 Response to comment by Jozsef Szilagyi on 4 ``Using numerical modelling to evaluate the 5 by Szilagyi is a welcome addition to the de- 15 bate surrounding the link between the hypothesis of 16 a possible explanation for high proportions of 40pre-event water. 41Szilagyi (submitted) has identified

  10. STABLE FREQUENCY RESPONSE TO VARYING STIMULUS INTENSITY IN A MODEL OF THE RAT OLFACTORY BULB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STABLE FREQUENCY RESPONSE TO VARYING STIMULUS INTENSITY IN A MODEL OF THE RAT OLFACTORY BULB Thomas Neurosciences et Systèmes sensoriels, CNRS UMR 5020, Lyon, France ABSTRACT In the rat olfactory bulb (OB), fast. Introduction The rat olfactory bulb (OB) is a rich and complex sensory processing system that shows stimulus

  11. KAOS/LIB-V: A library of nuclear response functions generated by KAOS-V code from ENDF/B-V and other data files

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farawila, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Maynard, C.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    KAOS/LIB-V: A library of processed nuclear responses for neutronics analyses of nuclear systems has been generated. The library was prepared using the KAOS-V code and nuclear data from ENDF/B-V. The library includes kerma (kinetic energy released in materials) factors and other nuclear response functions for all materials presently of interest in fusion and fission applications for 43 nonfissionable and 15 fissionable isotopes and elements. The nuclear response functions include gas production and tritium-breeding functions, and all important reaction cross sections. KAOS/LIB-V employs the VITAMIN-E weighting function and energy group structure of 174 neutron groups. Auxiliary nuclear data bases, e.g., the Japanese evaluated nuclear data library JENDL-2 were used as a source of isotopic cross sections when these data are not provided in ENDF/B-V files for a natural element. These are needed mainly to estimate average quantities such as effective Q-values for the natural element. This analysis of local energy deposition was instrumental in detecting and understanding energy balance deficiencies and other problems in the ENDF/B-V data. Pertinent information about the library and a graphical display of the main nuclear response functions for all materials in the library are given. 35 refs.

  12. Global environmental effects of impact-generated aerosols: Results from a general circulation model: Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Covey, C.; Ghan, S.J.; Walton, J.J.; Weissman, P.R.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interception of sunlight by the high altitude worldwide dust cloud generated by impact of a large asteroid or comet would lead to substantial land surface cooling, according to our three-dimensional atmospheric general circulation model (GCM). This result is qualitatively similar to conclusions drawn from an earlier study that employed a one-dimensional atmospheric model, but in the GCM simulation the heat capacity of the oceans substantially mitigates land surface cooling, an effect that one-dimensional models cannot quantify. On the other hand, the low heat capacity of the GCM's land surface allows temperatures to drop more rapidly in the initial stage of cooling than in the one-dimensional model study. These two differences between three-dimensional and one-dimensional model simulations were noted previously in studies of ''nuclear winter; '' GCM-simulated climatic changes in the Alvarez-inspired scenario of ''asteroid/comet winter,'' however, are more severe than in ''nuclear winter'' because the assumed aerosol amount is large enough to intercept all sunlight falling on earth. Impacts of smaller objects -- which would occur much more frequently than the Cretaceous/Tertiary event deduced by Alvarez and coworkers -- could also lead to dramatic, though less severe, climatic changes, according to our GCM. Our conclusion is that it is difficult to imagine an asteroid or comet impact leading to anything approaching complete global freezing, but quite reasonable to assume that impacts at the Alvarez level, or even smaller, dramatically alter the climate in at least a ''patchy'' sense. 30 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Predictions and measurements of isothermal airflow in a model once-through steam generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, H R; Promey, G J; Rush, G C

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Once-Through Steam Generators (OTSGs) are used in the Nuclear Steam Supply Systems marketed by The Babcock and Wilcox Company (B and W). To analytically predict the three-dimensional, steady-state thermohydraulic conditions in the OTSG, B and W has developed a proprietary code THEDA-1 and is working in cooperation with EPRI to develop an improved version, THEDA-2. Confident application of THEDA requires experimental verification to demonstrate that the code can accurately describe the thermohydraulic conditions in geometries characteristic of the OTSG. The first step in the THEDA verification process is the subject of this report. A full-scale, partial-section model of two OTSG spans was constructed and tested using isothermal air as the working fluid. Model local velocities and pressure profiles were measured and compared to THEDA prediction for five model configurations. Over 3000 velocity measurements were taken and the results were compared to THEDA predictions. Agreement between measured and predicted velocity data was generally better than +-12.5%.

  14. Unlocking the Standard Model. IV. N=2 generations of quarks : spectrum and mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machet, Bruno

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Glashow-Salam-Weinberg model for 2 generations of quarks is extended to 8 composite Higgs multiplets, with no adjunction of extra fermions. It is the minimal number of Higgs doublets required to suitably account, simultaneously, for the spectrum of pseudoscalar mesons that can be built with 4 quarks and for the mass of the W gauge bosons. These masses being used as input, together with elementary low energy considerations for the pions, we calculate all other parameters, masses and couplings. We focus in this work on the spectrum of the 8 Higgs bosons (which all potentially contribute to the W and quark masses), and on the mixing (Cabibbo) angle, leaving the study of couplings to a subsequent work. The Higgs bosons fall into one triplet, two doublets and one singlet. In the triplet stand three states with masses \\sqrt{2} x that of heaviest pseudoscalar meson D_s, which, for 2 generations, pushes them up to 2.80 GeV. The 2 components of the first doublet have masses close to 1.25 GeV. The singlet has a mas...

  15. A systems model and potential leverage points for base load electric generating options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brownson, D.A.; Hanson, D.J.; Price, L.G.; Sebo, D.E.

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission and structure of electric utilities may change significantly to meet the challenges on the next several decades. In addition, providing electrical energy in an environmentally responsible manner will continue to be a major challenge. The methods of supplying electrical power may change dramatically in the future as utilities search for ways to improve the availability and reliability of electrical power systems. The role of large, base load generating capacity to supply the bulk of a utility`s electrical power is evolving, but it will continue to be important for many years to come. The objective of this study is to examine the systems structure of five base load capacity options available to a utility and identify areas where technological improvements could produce significant changes in their systems. These improvements would enhance the likelihood that these options would be selected for providing future electrical capacity. Technology improvements are identified and discussed, but it was beyond the scope of this work to develop strategies for specific Idaho National Engineering Laboratory involvement.

  16. Model predictive control system and method for integrated gasification combined cycle power generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kumar, Aditya; Shi, Ruijie; Kumar, Rajeeva; Dokucu, Mustafa

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Control system and method for controlling an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) plant are provided. The system may include a controller coupled to a dynamic model of the plant to process a prediction of plant performance and determine a control strategy for the IGCC plant over a time horizon subject to plant constraints. The control strategy may include control functionality to meet a tracking objective and control functionality to meet an optimization objective. The control strategy may be configured to prioritize the tracking objective over the optimization objective based on a coordinate transformation, such as an orthogonal or quasi-orthogonal projection. A plurality of plant control knobs may be set in accordance with the control strategy to generate a sequence of coordinated multivariable control inputs to meet the tracking objective and the optimization objective subject to the prioritization resulting from the coordinate transformation.

  17. Linear-optical generation of eigenstates of the two-site XY model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanie Barz; Borivoje Dakic; Yannick Ole Lipp; Frank Verstraete; James D. Whitfield; Philip Walther

    2014-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Much of the anticipation accompanying the development of a quantum computer relates to its application to simulating dynamics of another quantum system of interest. Here we study the building blocks for simulating quantum spin systems with linear optics. We experimentally generate the eigenstates of the XY Hamiltonian under an external magnetic field. The implemented quantum circuit consists of two CNOT gates, which are realized experimentally by harnessing entanglement from a photon source and by applying a CPhase gate. We tune the ratio of coupling constants and magnetic field by changing local parameters. This implementation of the XY model using linear quantum optics might open the door to the future studies of quenching dynamics using linear optics.

  18. Methane for Power Generation in Muaro Jambi: A Green Prosperity Model Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moriarty, K.; Elchinger, M.; Hill, G.; Katz, J.; Barnett, J.

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL conducted eight model projects for Millennium Challenge Corporation's (MCC) Compact with Indonesia. Green Prosperity, the largest project of the Compact, seeks to address critical constraints to economic growth while supporting the Government of Indonesia's commitment to a more sustainable, less carbon-intensive future. This study evaluates electricity generation from the organic content of wastewater at a palm oil mill in Muaro Jambi, Sumatra. Palm mills use vast amounts of water in the production process resulting in problematic waste water called palm oil mill effluent (POME). The POME releases methane to the atmosphere in open ponds which could be covered to capture the methane to produce renewable electricity for rural villages. The study uses average Indonesia data to determine the economic viability of methane capture at a palm oil mill and also evaluates technology as well as social and environmental impacts of the project.

  19. Modeling and experiments on differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eck, H. J. N. van; Koppers, W. R.; Rooij, G. J. van; Goedheer, W. J.; Cardozo, N. J. Lopes; Kleyn, A. W. [FOM-Institute for Plasma Physics Rijnhuizen, Association EURATOM-FOM, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, P.O. Box 1207, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Engeln, R.; Schram, D. C. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method was used to investigate the efficiency of differential pumping in linear plasma generators operating at high gas flows. Skimmers are used to separate the neutrals from the plasma beam, which is guided from the source to the target by a strong axial magnetic field. In this way, the neutrals are prevented to reach the target region. The neutral flux to the target must be lower than the plasma flux to enable ITER relevant plasma-surface interaction (PSI) studies. It is therefore essential to control the neutral gas dynamics. The DSMC method was used to model the expansion of a hot gas in a low pressure vessel where a small discrepancy in shock position was found between the simulations and a well-established empirical formula. Two stage differential pumping was modeled and applied in the linear plasma devices Pilot-PSI and PLEXIS. In Pilot-PSI a factor of 4.5 pressure reduction for H{sub 2} has been demonstrated. Both simulations and experiments showed that the optimum skimmer position depends on the position of the shock and therefore shifts for different gas parameters. The shape of the skimmer has to be designed such that it has a minimum impact on the shock structure. A too large angle between the skimmer and the forward direction of the gas flow leads to an influence on the expansion structure. A pressure increase in front of the skimmer is formed and the flow of the plasma beam becomes obstructed. It has been shown that a skimmer with an angle around 53 deg. gives the best performance. The use of skimmers is implemented in the design of the large linear plasma generator Magnum-PSI. Here, a three stage differentially pumped vacuum system is used to reach low enough neutral pressures near the target, opening a door to PSI research in the ITER relevant regime.

  20. CAFFEINE: Template-Free Symbolic Model Generation of Analog Circuits via Canonical Form Functions and Genetic Programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    CAFFEINE: Template-Free Symbolic Model Generation of Analog Circuits via Canonical Form Functions symbolic performance models of analog circuits with no prior specification of an equation template. [1] is a survey. Its main weakness is that it is limited to linear and weakly nonlinear circuits

  1. Modeling the barotropic response of the global ocean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing -comparisons with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling the barotropic response of the global ocean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing] A global simulation of the ocean response to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing has been run during the barotropic response of the global ocean to atmospheric wind and pressure forcing - comparisons

  2. SEISMIC RESPONSE PREDICTION OF NUPEC'S FIELD MODEL TESTS OF NPP STRUCTURES WITH ADJACENT BUILDING EFFECT.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU,J.COSTANTINO,C.HOFMAYER,C.ALI,S.

    2004-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of a verification test program for seismic analysis computer codes for Nuclear Power Plant (NPP) structures, the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC) of Japan has conducted a series of field model tests to address the dynamic cross interaction (DCI) effect on the seismic response of NPP structures built in close proximity to each other. The program provided field data to study the methodologies commonly associated with seismic analyses considering the DCI effect. As part of a collaborative program between the United States and Japan on seismic issues related to NPP applications, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission sponsored a program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to perform independent seismic analyses which applied common analysis procedures to predict the building response to recorded earthquake events for the test models with DCI effect. In this study, two large-scale DCI test model configurations were analyzed: (1) twin reactor buildings in close proximity and (2) adjacent reactor and turbine buildings. This paper describes the NUPEC DCI test models, the BNL analysis using the SASSI 2000 program, and comparisons between the BNL analysis results and recorded field responses. To account for large variability in the soil properties, the conventional approach of computing seismic responses with the mean, mean plus and minus one-standard deviation soil profiles is adopted in the BNL analysis and the three sets of analysis results were used in the comparisons with the test data. A discussion is also provided in the paper to address (1) the capability of the analysis methods to capture the DCI effect, and (2) the conservatism of the practice for considering soil variability in seismic response analysis for adjacent NPP structures.

  3. c 1997 by Jay H. Lee, Jin Hoon Choi, and Kwang Soon Lee 2.3 TRUNCATED STEP RESPONSE MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Deog Ki

    c 1997 by Jay H. Lee, Jin Hoon Choi, and Kwang Soon Lee 2.3 TRUNCATED STEP RESPONSE MODEL Step Responses of Linear Systems yk = hkx0 + k,1X i=0 hk , i , 1ui Step Response Sequence fskg: fykg when x0 = 0 and ui = 1, i = 0;1;2; . Relationship between impulse and step responses: sk = kX i=1 hi m hk = sk , sk

  4. Kobayashi-Maskawa type of hard-CP-violation model with three-generation Majorana neutrinos

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, H.

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Within the framework of the Kobayashi-Maskawa (KM) type of hard CP-violation model with three-generation Majorana neutrinos, we point out that on-shell CP-violation phenomena (i.e., CP-violating effects taking place in on-shell processes), which are characteristic of Majorana neutrinos, can only occur in total-lepton-number-conserving reactions, and are unobservably small. Off-shell CP-nonconserving effects which arise from gauge bosons are undetectable, but those which are mediated by Higgs bosons could be seen in certain rare decays. It is emphasized that CP-odd effects intrinsic to Majorana behavior depend not only on the two CP-violating Majorana phases but also on the KM phase. We then demonstrate why the KM model, which has rich implications in the hadronic sector, leads to no observable CP-violating effects in leptonic processes (except in neutrino oscillations) directly related to the CP-odd KM phase.

  5. Modeling and Analysis of The Pressure Die Casting Using Response Surface Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kittur, Jayant K.; Herwadkar, T. V. [KLS Gogte Institute of Technology, Belgaum -590 008, Karnataka (India); Parappagoudar, M. B. [Chhatrapati Shivaji Institute of Technology, Durg (C.G)-491001 (India)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Pressure die casting is successfully used in the manufacture of Aluminum alloys components for automobile and many other industries. Die casting is a process involving many process parameters having complex relationship with the quality of the cast product. Though various process parameters have influence on the quality of die cast component, major influence is seen by the die casting machine parameters and their proper settings. In the present work, non-linear regression models have been developed for making predictions and analyzing the effect of die casting machine parameters on the performance characteristics of die casting process. Design of Experiments (DOE) with Response Surface Methodology (RSM) has been used to analyze the effect of effect of input parameters and their interaction on the response and further used to develop nonlinear input-output relationships. Die casting machine parameters, namely, fast shot velocity, slow shot to fast shot change over point, intensification pressure and holding time have been considered as the input variables. The quality characteristics of the cast product were determined by porosity, hardness and surface rough roughness (output/responses). Design of experiments has been used to plan the experiments and analyze the impact of variables on the quality of casting. On the other-hand Response Surface Methodology (Central Composite Design) is utilized to develop non-linear input-output relationships (regression models). The developed regression models have been tested for their statistical adequacy through ANOVA test. The practical usefulness of these models has been tested with some test cases. These models can be used to make the predictions about different quality characteristics, for the known set of die casting machine parameters, without conducting the experiments.

  6. Response of water vapor to interannual variations of SST: Results from NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, De-Zheng [National Center For Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper very briefly documents the response of water vapor to interannual changes in sea surface temperature (SST) in two of the most frequently used climate models: the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) community climate model (CCM2) and the GFDL spectral model (R30). The corresponding results from radiosonde data are also presented for reference. A simple linear regression model is used to quantify the response of water vapor to changes in SST in the two simulations. Except for the negative response of water vapor over Australia, CCM2 simulates the major characteristics in the horizontal structure of the water vapor response shown in the radiosonde data. The negative response of water over Australia is also not well simulated by GFDL R30. In addition, GFDL R30 significantly underestimates the positive response over the Indian Ocean. The horizontal contrasts between the negative response over the western Pacific and the positive response over the central and eastern Pacific in the model simulations are larger than in the radiosonde data. The negative response in the subtropical region in CCM2 is more pronounced than in R30. Averaged over the tropics, CCM2 has a larger water vapor response in both the boundary layer and the upper troposphere than R30. The correlations between variations of water vapor in the upper troposphere and those at the surface level are also stronger in CCM2 than in R30. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Generation of mice deficient in RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) and characterization of its role in innate immune responses and cell growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matsuda, Atsushi [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan) [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Core Research for Evolution Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Ogawa, Masahiro [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yanai, Hideyuki [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan) [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Core Research for Evolution Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan); Naka, Daiji [ZOEGENE Corp., 1000 Kamoshida-cho, Aoba-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 227-0033 (Japan)] [ZOEGENE Corp., 1000 Kamoshida-cho, Aoba-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 227-0033 (Japan); Goto, Ayana; Ao, Tomoka [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)] [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Tanno, Yuji [Laboratory of Chromosome Dynamics, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Chromosome Dynamics, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Takeda, Kiyoshi [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Watanabe, Yoshinori [Laboratory of Chromosome Dynamics, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Chromosome Dynamics, Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0032 (Japan); Honda, Kenya [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)] [Laboratory of Immune Regulation, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Taniguchi, Tadatsugu, E-mail: tada@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan) [Department of Immunology, Graduate School of Medicine and Faculty of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Core Research for Evolution Science and Technology, Japan Science and Technology Agency, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 102-0075 (Japan)

    2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: {yields} We identified RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3) as CpG-B DNA-binding protein. {yields} RBM3 translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and co-localized with CpG-B DNA. {yields} We newly generated Rbm3-deficient (Rbm3{sup -/-}) mice. {yields} DNA-mediated cytokine gene induction was normally occured in Rbm3{sup -/-} cells. {yields}Rbm3{sup -/-} MEFs showed poorer proliferation rate and increased number of G2-phase cells. -- Abstract: The activation of innate immune responses is critical to host defense against microbial infections, wherein nucleic acid-sensing pattern recognition receptors recognize DNA or RNA from viruses or bacteria and activate downstream signaling pathways. In a search for new DNA-sensing molecules that regulate innate immune responses, we identified RNA-binding motif protein 3 (RBM3), whose role has been implicated in the regulation of cell growth. In this study, we generated Rbm3-deficient (Rbm3{sup -/-}) mice to study the role of RBM3 in immune responses and cell growth. Despite evidence for its interaction with immunogenic DNA in a cell, no overt phenotypic abnormalities were found in cells from Rbm3{sup -/-} mice for the DNA-mediated induction of cytokine genes. Interestingly, however, Rbm3{sup -/-} mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) showed poorer proliferation rates as compared to control MEFs. Further cell cycle analysis revealed that Rbm3{sup -/-} MEFs have markedly increased number of G2-phase cells, suggesting a hitherto unknown role of RBM3 in the G2-phase control. Thus, these mutant mice and cells may provide new tools with which to study the mechanisms underlying the regulation of cell cycle and oncogenesis.

  8. Finding Bugs in Web Applications Using Dynamic Test Generation and Explicit State Model Checking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tip, Frank

    2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Web script crashes and malformed dynamically-generated web pages are common errors, and they seriously impact the usability of web applications. Current tools for web-page validation cannot handle the dynamically generated ...

  9. An InformationModel for Presentation Generation Katja Otto, Heidrun Schumann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schumann, Heidrun

    for presentation generation. On the base of this approach we implemented a flexible framework for multimedia a very flexible framework. Starting point of presentation generation in IMMPS is a question asked for flexible presentation generation. After a short survey on related work (chapter 2) a formal description

  10. Equilibrium Response and Transient Dynamics Datasets from VEMAP: Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Users of the VEMAP Portal can access input files of numerical data that include monthly and daily files of geographic data, soil and site files, scenario files, etc. Model results from Phase I, the Equilibrium Response datasets, are available through the NCAR anonymous FTP site at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/vresults.html. Phase II, Transient Dynamics, include climate datasets, models results, and analysis tools. Many supplemental files are also available from the main data page at http://www.cgd.ucar.edu/vemap/datasets.html.

  11. Microstructure Based Modeling of ? Phase Influence on Mechanical Response of Cast AM Series Mg Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barker, Erin I.; Choi, Kyoo Sil; Sun, Xin; Deda, Erin; Allison, John; Li, Mei; Forsmark, Joy; Zindel, Jacob; Godlewski, Larry

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnesium alloys have become popular alternatives to aluminums and steels for the purpose of vehicle light-weighting. However, Mg alloys are hindered from wider application due to limited ductility as well as poor creep and corrosion performance. Understanding the impact of microstructural features on bulk response is key to improving Mg alloys for more widespread use and for moving towards truly predicting modeling capabilities. This study focuses on modeling the intrinsic features, particularly volume fraction and morphology of beta phase present, of cast Mg alloy microstructure and quantifying their impact on bulk performance. Computational results are compared to experimental measurements of cast plates of Mg alloy with varying aluminum content.

  12. Demand Response for Ancillary Services

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many demand response resources are technically capable of providing ancillary services. In some cases, they can provide superior response to generators, as the curtailment of load is typically much faster than ramping thermal and hydropower plants. Analysis and quantification of demand response resources providing ancillary services is necessary to understand the resources economic value and impact on the power system. Methodologies used to study grid integration of variable generation can be adapted to the study of demand response. In the present work, we describe and illustrate a methodology to construct detailed temporal and spatial representations of the demand response resource and to examine how to incorporate those resources into power system models. In addition, the paper outlines ways to evaluate barriers to implementation. We demonstrate how the combination of these three analyses can be used to translate the technical potential for demand response providing ancillary services into a realizable potential.

  13. Unlocking the Standard Model. IV. N=1 AND 2 generations of quarks : spectrum and mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno Machet

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a one-to-one correspondence between its complex Higgs doublet and very specific quadruplets of bilinear quark operators, the Glashow-Salam-Weinberg model for 2 generations is extended, without adding any extra fermion, to 8 composite Higgs multiplets. 8 is the minimal number required to suitably account, simultaneously, for the pseudoscalar mesons that can be built with 4 quarks and for the mass of the W gauge bosons. Their masses being used as input, together with elementary low energy considerations for the pions, we calculate all other parameters, masses and couplings. We focus in this work on the spectrum of the 8 Higgs bosons, and on the two u-c and d-s mixing angles, showing that this is very fine-tuned physics. We show in particular that the u-c mixing angle cannot be safely tuned to 0. Symmetries are investigated in detail. We leave the study of couplings and of their content of non-standard physics to a forthcoming work.

  14. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generation by 18%. Natural gas combustion turbine capacitycombined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbinenuclear plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, and

  15. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    generation by 18%. Natural gas combustion turbine capacitycycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gasnuclear plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, and

  16. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply. National Renewable20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology byTERMS wind-generated electricity; wind energy; 20% wind

  17. CPUF - a chemical-structure-based polyurethane foam decomposition and foam response model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fletcher, Thomas H. (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Thompson, Kyle Richard; Erickson, Kenneth L.; Dowding, Kevin J.; Clayton, Daniel (Brigham Young University, Provo, UT); Chu, Tze Yao; Hobbs, Michael L.; Borek, Theodore Thaddeus III

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Chemical-structure-based PolyUrethane Foam (CPUF) decomposition model has been developed to predict the fire-induced response of rigid, closed-cell polyurethane foam-filled systems. The model, developed for the B-61 and W-80 fireset foam, is based on a cascade of bondbreaking reactions that produce CO2. Percolation theory is used to dynamically quantify polymer fragment populations of the thermally degrading foam. The partition between condensed-phase polymer fragments and gas-phase polymer fragments (i.e. vapor-liquid split) was determined using a vapor-liquid equilibrium model. The CPUF decomposition model was implemented into the finite element (FE) heat conduction codes COYOTE and CALORE, which support chemical kinetics and enclosure radiation. Elements were removed from the computational domain when the calculated solid mass fractions within the individual finite element decrease below a set criterion. Element removal, referred to as ?element death,? creates a radiation enclosure (assumed to be non-participating) as well as a decomposition front, which separates the condensed-phase encapsulant from the gas-filled enclosure. All of the chemistry parameters as well as thermophysical properties for the CPUF model were obtained from small-scale laboratory experiments. The CPUF model was evaluated by comparing predictions to measurements. The validation experiments included several thermogravimetric experiments at pressures ranging from ambient pressure to 30 bars. Larger, component-scale experiments were also used to validate the foam response model. The effects of heat flux, bulk density, orientation, embedded components, confinement and pressure were measured and compared to model predictions. Uncertainties in the model results were evaluated using a mean value approach. The measured mass loss in the TGA experiments and the measured location of the decomposition front were within the 95% prediction limit determined using the CPUF model for all of the experiments where the decomposition gases were vented sufficiently. The CPUF model results were not as good for the partially confined radiant heat experiments where the vent area was regulated to maintain pressure. Liquefaction and flow effects, which are not considered in the CPUF model, become important when the decomposition gases are confined.

  18. Air quality modeling for emergency response applications. [MATHEW; ADPIC; FEM3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gudiksen, P.H.; Chan, S.T.; Knox, J.B.; Dickerson, M.H.; Lange, R.

    1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The three-dimensional diagnostic wind field model (MATHEW) and the particle-in-cell transport and diffusion model (ADPIC) are used by the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) for real-time assessments of the consequences from accidental releases of radioactivity into the atmosphere. For the dispersion of hazardous heavier-than-air gases, a time-dependent, three-dimensional finite element model (FEM3) is used. These models have been evaluated extensively against a wide spectrum of field experiments involving the release of chemically inert tracers or heavier-than-air gases. The results reveal that the MATHEW/ADPIC models are capable of simulating the spatial and temporal distributions of tracer concentration to within a factor of 2 for 50% of the measured tracer concentrations for near surface releases in relatively flat terrain and within a factor of 2 for 20% of the comparisons for elevated releases in complex terrain. The FEM3 model produces quite satisfactory simulations of the spatial and temporal distributions of heavier-than-air gases, typically within a kilometer of the release point. The ARAC consists of a centralized computerized emergency response system that is capable of supporting up to 100 sites and providing real-time predictions of the consequence of transportation accidents that may occur anywhere. It utilizes pertinent accident information, local and regional meteorology, and terrain as input to the MATHEW/ADPIC models for the consequence analysis. It has responded to over 150 incidents and exercises over the past decade.

  19. Retrospective modeling of the merit-order effect on wholesale electricity prices from distributed photovoltaic generation in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandiford, Mike

    Retrospective modeling of the merit-order effect on wholesale electricity prices from distributed, the depression in wholesale prices has significant value. c 5 GW of solar generation would have saved $1.8 billion in the market over two years. c The depression of wholesale prices offsets the cost of support

  20. The Use of F0 Reliability Function for Prosodic Command Analysis on F0 Contour Generation Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nakai, Mitsuru; Shimodaira, Hiroshi

    This paper describes a method of utilizing an ``F0 Reliability Field'' (FRF), which we have proposed in our previous work, for estimating prosodic commands on F0 contour generation model. This FRF is the time-frequency representation of F0...

  1. Analytic model of bunched beams for harmonic generation in the low-gain free electron laser regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wurtele, Jonathan

    Analytic model of bunched beams for harmonic generation in the low-gain free electron laser regime employs free electron lasers (FELs) with two undulators: the first uses a seed laser to modulate Many proposed x-ray free electron lasers (FELs) are designed to produce radiation starting from

  2. OASIS4: A Coupling Software for Next Generation Earth System Modelling Ren Redler (1), Sophie Valcke (2) and Hubert Ritzdorf (3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OASIS4: A Coupling Software for Next Generation Earth System Modelling René Redler (1), Sophie system modelling, Geosci. Model. Dev., 3, 87 ­ 104 Link ­ https://oasistrac.cerfacs.fr Financial support ­ R. Redler, S. Valcke and H. Ritzdorf, 2010: OASIS4 ­ a coupling software for next generation earth

  3. Sandia National Laboratories: hydrodynamic modeling platform...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    modeling platform SNL-EFDC Upgrades to SNL-EFDC: A Tool to Balance Marine Hydrokinetic Energy Generation Efficiency with Environmental Response On June 26, 2014, in Computational...

  4. Fluctuating Currents in Stochastic Thermodynamics II. Energy Conversion and Nonequilibrium Response in Kinesin Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altaner, Bernhard; Vollmer, Jürgen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Unlike macroscopic engines, the molecular machinery of living cells is strongly affected by fluctuations. Stochastic Thermodynamics uses Markovian jump processes to model the random transitions between the chemical and configurational states of these biological macromolecules. A recently developed theoretical framework [Wachtel, Vollmer, Altaner: "Fluctuating Currents in Stochastic Thermodynamics I. Gauge Invariance of Asymptotic Statistics"] provides a simple algorithm for the determination of macroscopic currents and correlation integrals of arbitrary fluctuating currents. Here, we use it to discuss energy conversion and nonequilibrium response in different models for the molecular motor kinesin. Methodologically, our results demonstrate the effectiveness of the algorithm in dealing with parameter-dependent stochastic models. For the concrete biophysical problem our results reveal two interesting features in experimentally accessible parameter regions: The validity of a non-equilibrium Green--Kubo relation ...

  5. A New Item Response Theory Model for Open-Ended Online Homework with Multiple Allowed Attempts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gönülate?, Emre

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Item Response Theory (IRT) was originally developed in traditional exam settings, and it has been shown that the model does not readily transfer to formative assessment in the form of online homework. We investigate if this is mostly due to learner traits that do not become apparent in exam settings, namely random guessing due to lack of diligence or dedication, and copying work from other students or resources. Both of these traits mask the true ability of the learner, which is the only trait considered in most mainstream unidimensional IRT models. We find that indeed the introduction of these traits allows to better assess the true ability of the learners, as well as to better gauge the quality of assessment items. Correspondence of the model traits to self-reported behavior is investigated and confirmed. We find that of these two traits, copying answers has a larger influence on initial homework attempts than random guessing.

  6. An analogue model for controllable Casimir radiation in a nonlinear cavity with amplitude-modulated pumping: Generation and quantum statistical properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ali Motazedifard; M. H. Naderi; R. Roknizadeh

    2015-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present and investigate an analogue model for a controllable photon geberation via the dynamical Casimir effect (DCE) in a cavity containing a degenerate optical amplifier (OPA) which is pumed by an amplitude-modulated field. The time modulation of the pump field in the model OPA system is equivalent to a periodic modulation of the cavity length, which is responsible for the generation of the Casimir radiation. By taking into account the rapidly oscillating terms of the modulation frequency, the effects of the corresponding counter-rotating terms (CRTs) on the analogue Casimir radiation emerge clearly. We find that the mean number of generated photons and their quantum statistical properties exhibit oscillatory behaviors, which are controllable through the modulation frequency as an external control parameter.We also recognize a new phenomenon, the so-called "Anti-DCE," in which pair photons can be coherently annihilated due to the time-modulated pumping. We show that the Casimir radiation exhibits quadrature squeezing, photon bunching and super-Poissonian statistics which are controllable by modulation frequency. We also calculate the power spectrum of the intracavity light field. We find that the appearance of the side bands in the spectrum is due to the presence of the CRTs.

  7. A model for structural response to hydrogen combustion loads in severe accidents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breitung, W.; Redlinger, R. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). Institut fuer Neutronenphysik und Reaktortechnik

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The response of structures to different pressure histories from hydrogen combustion is analyzed using the model of a linear undamped oscillator. The effective static pressures from a slow deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) and a stable detonation are calculated as functions of oscillator frequency. The response of components with a low natural frequency, such as the outermost shell in a large dry containment, is governed by the long-term pressure after combustion. Detonation peak pressure and impulse are not important. For structures with low frequencies, fast flames have a damage potential very similar to detonations. For the investigated pressure loads, the normally reflected detonation provides the bounding effective static pressure for oscillators up to 500 Hz. Fully confined DDT events can exceed the detonation load near the transition location for structural frequencies about {approximately}40 Hz.

  8. Modeling added compressibility of porosity and the thermomechanical response of wet porous rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubin, M.B.; Elata, D.; Attia, A.V.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper concerned with modeling the response of a porous brittle solid whose pores may be dry or partially filled with fluid. A form for the Helmholtz free energy is proposed which incorporated known Mie-Grueneisen constitutive equations for the nonporous solid and for the fluid, and which uses an Eilnstein formulation with variable specific heat. In addition, a functional form for porosity is postulated which porous rock. Restrictions on constitutive assumptions for the composite of porous solid ad fluid are obtained which ensure thermodynamic consistency. Examples show that although the added compressibility of porosity is determined by fitting data for dry Mt. Helen Tuff, the predicted responses of saturated and partially saturated tuff agree well with experimental data.

  9. Is the $f_0(600)$ meson a dynamically generated resonance? -- a lesson learned from the O(N) model and beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhi-Hui Guo; L. Y. Xiao; H. Q. Zheng

    2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    O(N) linear $\\sigma$ model is solvable in the large $N$ limit and hence provides a useful theoretical laboratory to test various unitarization approximations. We find that the large $N_c$ limit and the $m_\\sigma\\to \\infty$ limit do not commute. In order to get the correct large $N_c$ spectrum one has to firstly take the large $N_c$ limit. We argue that the $f_0(600)$ meson may not be described as generated dynamically. On the contrary, it is most appropriately described at the same level as the pions, i.e, both appear explicitly in the effective lagrangian. Actually it is very likely the $\\sigma$ meson responsible for the spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking in a lagrangian with linearly realized chiral symmetry.

  10. Right-handed Majorana Neutrino Mass Matrices for Generating Bimaximal Mixings in Degenerate and Inverted Models of Neutrinos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahadev Patgiri; N. Nimai Singh

    2003-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    An attempt is made to generate the bimaximal mixings of the three species of neutrinos from the textures of the right-handed Majorana neutrino mass matrices. We extend our earlier work in this paper for the generation of the nearly degenerate as well as the inverted hierarchical models of the left-handed Majorana neutrino mass matrices using the non-diagonal textures of the right-handed Majorana neutrino mass matrices and the diagonal form of the Dirac neutrino mass matrices, within the frame work of the seesaw mechanism in a model independent way. Such Majorana neutrino mass models are important to explain the recently reported result on the neutrinoless double beat decay (0/nu/beta/beta) experiment,together with the earlier established data on LMA MSW solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillations.

  11. The strain path dependence of plastic deformation response of AA5754: Experiment and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pham, Minh-Son [Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA and NIST Center for Automotive Lightweighting, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8553 (United States); Hu, Lin [Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, USA and Now at IBM (United States); Iadicola, Mark; Creuziger, Adam [NIST Center for Automotive Lightweighting, National Institute of Standards and Technology, 100 Bureau Drive, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-8553 (United States); Rollett, Anthony D. [Materials Science and Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents modeling of experiments on a balanced biaxial (BB) pre-strained AA5754 alloy, subsequently reloaded uniaxially along the rolling direction and transverse direction. The material exhibits a complex plastic deformation response during the change in strain path due to 1) crystallographic texture, 2) aging (interactions between dislocations and Mg atoms) and 3) recovery (annihilation and re-arrangement of dislocations). With a BB prestrain of about 5 %, the aging process is dominant, and the yield strength for uniaxially deformed samples is observed to be higher than the flow stress during BB straining. The strain hardening rate after changing path is, however, lower than that for pre-straining. Higher degrees of pre-straining make the dynamic recovery more active. The dynamic recovery at higher strain levels compensates for the aging effect, and results in: 1) a reduction of the yield strength, and 2) an increase in the hardening rate of re-strained specimens along other directions. The yield strength of deformed samples is further reduced if these samples are left at room temperature to let static recovery occur. The synergistic influences of texture condition, aging and recovery processes on the material response make the modeling of strain path dependence of mechanical behavior of AA5754 challenging. In this study, the influence of crystallographic texture is taken into account by incorporating the latent hardening into a visco-plastic self-consistent model. Different strengths of dislocation glide interaction models in 24 slip systems are used to represent the latent hardening. Moreover, the aging and recovery effects are also included into the latent hardening model by considering strong interactions between dislocations and dissolved atom Mg and the microstructural evolution. These microstructural considerations provide a powerful capability to successfully describe the strain path dependence of plastic deformation behavior of AA5754.

  12. Verification of voltage/frequency requirement for emergency diesel generator in nuclear power plant using dynamic modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hur, Jin-Suk; Roh, Myung- Sub [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, 1456-1 Shinam-ri, Seosaeng-myeon, Ulju-gun, Ulsan, 689-882 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    One major cause of the plant shutdown is the loss of electrical power. The study is to comprehend the coping action against station blackout including emergency diesel generator, sequential loading of safety system and to ensure that the emergency diesel generator should meet requirements, especially voltage and frequency criteria using modeling tool. This paper also considered the change of the sequencing time and load capacity only for finding electrical design margin. However, the revision of load list must be verified with safety analysis. From this study, it is discovered that new load calculation is a key factor in EDG localization and in-house capability increase.

  13. Response to dynamical modulation of the optical lattice for fermions in the Hubbard model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu Zhaoxin; Yang Shuxiang; Sheehy, Daniel E.; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Chiesa, Simone [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Physics Department, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee 37996 (United States); Su Shiquan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Center for Computational Sciences, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States); Scalettar, Richard T. [Physics Department, University of California, Davis, California 95616 (United States)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermionic atoms in a periodic optical lattice provide a realization of the single-band Hubbard model. Using quantum Monte Carlo simulations along with the maximum-entropy method, we evaluate the effect of a time-dependent perturbative modulation of the optical lattice amplitude on atomic correlations, revealed in the fraction of doubly occupied sites. We find that the effect of modulation depends strongly on the filling--the response of the double occupation is significantly different in the half-filled Mott insulator from that in the doped Fermi liquid region.

  14. Ridge, Bulk, and Medium Response: How to Kill Models and Learn Something in the Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. L. Nagle

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In these proceedings, we highlight experimental data (published and preliminary) related to jet quenching and the response of the medium to this deposited energy. Signatures in two- and three- particle hadron correlations indicate interesting structures near the trigger particle in azimuth and over a broad range in pseudo-rapidity, often termed "the ridge", and conical-like structures separated in azimuth opposite to the trigger particle. We review numerous theoretical interpretations of the ridge in particular with a critical eye for the key properties that allow one to discriminate between, or rule out, certain physical pictures and models (and hopefully learn something in the process).

  15. Dynamic modelling of generation capacity investment in electricity markets with high wind penetration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eager, Daniel

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability of liberalised electricity markets to trigger investment in the generation capacity required to maintain an acceptable level of security of supply risk has been - and will continue to be - a topic of much ...

  16. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flat through Coal plant capital cost ($2120/kW in 2005)costs and performance for other generation technologies such as pulverized coal plants,Coal plant performance improves by about 5% between 2005 and 2030 Nuclear plant capital cost (

  17. DISLOCATION GENERATION IN Si: A THERMO-MECHANICAL MODEL BASED ON MEASURABLE PARAMETERS*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balzar, Davor

    cause severe degradation of the cell performance. Indeed, it is now known that dislocation clusters dislocations in Si can be generated in any high-temperature processing step, the dislocations in photovoltaic

  18. Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strzepek, Kenneth M.

    2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Water withdrawals for thermoelectric cooling account for a significant portion of total water use in the United States. Any change in electrical energy generation policy and technologies has the potential to have a major ...

  19. Calibration of an EnergyPlus Building Energy Model to Assess the Impact of Demand Response Measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lavigne, K.; Sansregret, S.; Daoud, A.; Leclair, L. A.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 Karine Lavigne Simon Sansregret Ahmed DaoudLouis-Alexandre Leclaire CALIBRATION OF AN ENERGYPLUS BUILDING ENERGY MODEL TO ASSESS THE IMPACT OF DEMAND RESPONSE MEASURES ICEBO 2013, Montr?al Groupe ? Technologie2 ICEBO-2013 Contextualization... ICEBO-2013 Groupe ? Technologie Calibrated Results 22 ICEBO-2013 12 Groupe ? Technologie Conclusion 23 ICEBO-2013 > Calibrating model for a demand response objective : Challenging and High Effort > Capturing building and human erratic behaviour...

  20. An Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and the different means of generating power. We build a flexible framework for creating new industry sectors, supply of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios Joe Marriott Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements in the input- output model of the U.S. economy, the power generation sector is an excellent candidate

  1. Modeling the Non-linear Viscoelastic Response of High Temperature Polyimides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karra, Satish

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A constitutive model is developed to predict the viscoelastic response of polyimide resins that are used in high temperature applications. This model is based on a thermodynamic framework that uses the notion that the `natural configuration' of a body evolves as the body undergoes a process and the evolution is determined by maximizing the rate of entropy production in general and the rate of dissipation within purely mechanical considerations. We constitutively prescribe forms for the specific Helmholtz potential and the rate of dissipation (which is the product of density, temperature and the rate of entropy production), and the model is derived by maximizing the rate of dissipation with the constraint of incompressibility, and the reduced energy dissipation equation is also regarded as a constraint in that it is required to be met in every process that the body undergoes. The efficacy of the model is ascertained by comparing the predictions of the model with the experimental data for PMR-15 and HFPE-II-52 ...

  2. Modeling the Non-linear Viscoelastic Response of High Temperature Polyimides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satish Karra; K. R. Rajagopal

    2010-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A constitutive model is developed to predict the viscoelastic response of polyimide resins that are used in high temperature applications. This model is based on a thermodynamic framework that uses the notion that the `natural configuration' of a body evolves as the body undergoes a process and the evolution is determined by maximizing the rate of entropy production in general and the rate of dissipation within purely mechanical considerations. We constitutively prescribe forms for the specific Helmholtz potential and the rate of dissipation (which is the product of density, temperature and the rate of entropy production), and the model is derived by maximizing the rate of dissipation with the constraint of incompressibility, and the reduced energy dissipation equation is also regarded as a constraint in that it is required to be met in every process that the body undergoes. The efficacy of the model is ascertained by comparing the predictions of the model with the experimental data for PMR-15 and HFPE-II-52 polyimide resins.

  3. Thermomechanical repository and shaft response analyses using the CAVS (Cracking And Void Strain) jointed rock model: Draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dial, B.W.; Maxwell, D.E.

    1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical studies of the far-field repository and near-field shaft response for a nuclear waste repository in bedded salt have been performed with the STEALTH computer code using the CAVS model for jointed rock. CAVS is a constitutive model that can simulate the slip and dilatancy of fracture planes in a jointed rock mass. The initiation and/or propagation of fractures can also be modeled when stress intensity criteria are met. The CAVS models are based on the joint models proposed with appropriate modifications for numerical simulations. The STEALTH/CAVS model has been previously used to model (1) explosive fracturing of a wellbore, (2) earthquake effects on tunnels in a generic nuclear waste repository, (3) horizontal emplacement for a nuclear waste repository in jointed granite, and (4) tunnel response in jointed rock. The use of CAVS to model far-field repository and near-field shaft response was different from previous approaches because it represented a spatially oriented approach to rock response and failure, rather than the traditional stress invariant formulation for yielding. In addition, CAVS tracked the response of the joint apertures to the time-dependent stress changes in the far-field repository and near-field shaft regions. 28 refs., 21 figs., 11 tabs.

  4. Fractional Dynamical Model for the Generation of ECG like Signals from Filtered Coupled Van-der Pol Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saptarshi Das; Koushik Maharatna

    2014-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, an incommensurate fractional order (FO) model has been proposed to generate ECG like waveforms. Earlier investigation of ECG like waveform generation is based on two identical Van-der Pol (VdP) family of oscillators which are coupled by time delays and gains. In this paper, we suitably modify the three state equations corresponding to the nonlinear cross-product of states, time delay coupling of the two oscillators and low-pass filtering, using the concept of fractional derivatives. Our results show that a wide variety of ECG like waveforms can be simulated from the proposed generalized models, characterizing heart conditions under different physiological conditions. Such generalization of the modelling of ECG waveforms may be useful to understand the physiological process behind ECG signal generation in normal and abnormal heart conditions. Along with the proposed FO models, an optimization based approach is also presented to estimate the VdP oscillator parameters for representing a realistic ECG like signal.

  5. Extraction of the second-order nonlinear response from model test data in random seas and comparison of the Gaussian and non-Gaussian models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Nungsoo

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This study presents the results of an extraction of the 2nd-order nonlinear responses from model test data. Emphasis is given on the effects of assumptions made for the Gaussian and non-Gaussian input on the estimation of the 2nd-order response...

  6. Preliminary studies of tunnel interface response modeling using test data from underground storage facilities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Bartel, Lewis Clark

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In attempting to detect and map out underground facilities, whether they be large-scale hardened deeply-buried targets (HDBT's) or small-scale tunnels for clandestine border or perimeter crossing, seismic imaging using reflections from the tunnel interface has been seen as one of the better ways to both detect and delineate tunnels from the surface. The large seismic impedance contrast at the tunnel/rock boundary should provide a strong, distinguishable seismic response, but in practice, such strong indicators are often lacking. One explanation for the lack of a good seismic reflection at such a strong contrast boundary is that the damage caused by the tunneling itself creates a zone of altered seismic properties that significantly changes the nature of this boundary. This report examines existing geomechanical data that define the extent of an excavation damage zone around underground tunnels, and the potential impact on rock properties such as P-wave and S-wave velocities. The data presented from this report are associated with sites used for the development of underground repositories for the disposal of radioactive waste; these sites have been excavated in volcanic tuff (Yucca Mountain) and granite (HRL in Sweden, URL in Canada). Using the data from Yucca Mountain, a numerical simulation effort was undertaken to evaluate the effects of the damage zone on seismic responses. Calculations were performed using the parallelized version of the time-domain finitedifference seismic wave propagation code developed in the Geophysics Department at Sandia National Laboratories. From these numerical simulations, the damage zone does not have a significant effect upon the tunnel response, either for a purely elastic case or an anelastic case. However, what was discovered is that the largest responses are not true reflections, but rather reradiated Stoneley waves generated as the air/earth interface of the tunnel. Because of this, data processed in the usual way may not correctly image the tunnel. This report represents a preliminary step in the development of a methodology to convert numerical predictions of rock properties to an estimation of the extent of rock damage around an underground facility and its corresponding seismic velocity, and the corresponding application to design a testing methodology for tunnel detection.

  7. A sustainable model for training teachers to use pivotal response training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suhrheinrich, Jessica Brooke

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    J. R. , (1995). Pyramidal staff training in the extension ofvia pivotal response training and the individualization ofof pivotal response training. Journal of Speech, Language

  8. Evaluation of the Suitability of Polarimetric Scattering and Emissivity Models with Scene Generation Software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gartley, Michael G.

    Evaluation of the Suitability of Polarimetric Scattering and Emissivity Models with Scene models and hardware based infrared scene projectors commonly utilize analytical forms of polarized bi, polarimetric imaging sensors and payloads can benefit greatly from polarization capable synthetic image

  9. Realistic fault modeling and quality test generation of combined delay faults

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thadhlani, Ajaykumar A

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coupled lines. To cope up with these realistic testing problems, it is necessary to model the circuit defects by considering the capacitively coupling between lines. This needs a better fault model which can incorporate the local defects (such...

  10. MODELLING AND CONTROL OF CO-GENERATION POWER PLANTS UNDER CONSIDERATION OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

    , and logic rules. The possibility of turning on/off the gas and steam turbines, the operating constraints) turbine; the steam cycle is supplied with the exhaust gases from the gas turbine and generates both elec (minimum up and down times) and the different types of start up of the turbines characterize the hybrid

  11. Modeling and Control of Co-generation Power Plants: A Hybrid System Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

    : they are more efficient and flexible than more conventional configurations based on boilers and steam turbines of hot gasses in a (gas!) turbine. The steam cycle is supplied with the still hot exhaust gases of the gas turbine and generates both electricity and steam for the industrial processes. Clearly

  12. The Importance of Mesoscale Circulations Generated by SubgridScale Landscape Heterogeneities in General Circulations Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridlind, Ann

    jcl92c.tex The Importance of Mesoscale Circulations Generated by Subgrid­Scale Landscape Oceanography, Cook Campus, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA. #12; Abstract A mesoscale. These results emphasize the need to parameterize mesoscale processes induced by landscape discontinuities

  13. Modeling and Control of Co-generation Power Plants: A Hybrid System Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

    of turning on/off the gas and steam turbine, the operat- ing constraints (minimum up and down times and produces electric power through the expansion of the gas in the gas turbine; the steam cycle is supplied with the output ex- haust gas from the gas turbine and generates both electricity and steam for the industrial

  14. Accurate Online Power Estimation and Automatic Battery Behavior Based Power Model Generation for Smartphones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomkins, Andrew

    of Systems]: Modeling techniques General Terms Measurement, Design Keywords Power modeling, mobile phones systems. Combined, PowerBooter and PowerTutor have the goal of opening power modeling and analysis of determining the impact of software design decisions on system energy consumption, but that barrier can

  15. Conclusions The results show that the models are able to predict the response of the FETi motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    Conclusions The results show that the models are able to predict the response of the FETi motor just one animal might over-fit the noise of that particular animal. However, a model designed strand transmit the movement to the sensory neurons in the FeCO, which excite the motor neurons. Design

  16. Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate complexity2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate response to tropical cyclone-induced ocean mixing in an1 Earth system model of intermediate system model of intermediate complexity. The parameterization is based on21 previously published global. Abstract19 We introduce a parameterization of ocean mixing by tropical cyclones (TCs) into20 an Earth

  17. A CFD-based wind solver for a fast response transport and dispersion model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gowardhan, Akshay A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Michael J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Pardyjak, Eric R [UNIV OF UTAH; Senocak, Inanc [BOISE STATE UNIV

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In many cities, ambient air quality is deteriorating leading to concerns about the health of city inhabitants. In urban areas with narrow streets surrounded by clusters of tall buildings, called street canyons, air pollution from traffic emissions and other sources is difficult to disperse and may accumulate resulting in high pollutant concentrations. For various situations, including the evacuation of populated areas in the event of an accidental or deliberate release of chemical, biological and radiological agents, it is important that models should be developed that produce urban flow fields quickly. For these reasons it has become important to predict the flow field in urban street canyons. Various computational techniques have been used to calculate these flow fields, but these techniques are often computationally intensive. Most fast response models currently in use are at a disadvantage in these cases as they are unable to correlate highly heterogeneous urban structures with the diagnostic parameterizations on which they are based. In this paper, a fast and reasonably accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique that solves the Navier-Stokes equations for complex urban areas has been developed called QUIC-CFD (Q-CFD). This technique represents an intermediate balance between fast (on the order of minutes for a several block problem) and reasonably accurate solutions. The paper details the solution procedure and validates this model for various simple and complex urban geometries.

  18. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO sub 2 and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth's surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society's ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

  19. Modeling the response of plants and ecosystems to elevated CO{sub 2} and climate change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, J.F.; Hilbert, D.W.; Chen, Jia-lin; Harley, P.C.; Kemp, P.R.; Leadley, P.W.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While the exact effects of elevated CO{sub 2} on global climate are unknown, there is a growing consensus among climate modelers that global temperature and precipitation will increase, but that these changes will be non-uniform over the Earth`s surface. In addition to these potential climatic changes, CO{sub 2} also directly affects plants via photosynthesis, respiration, and stomatal closure. Global climate change, in concert with these direct effects of CO{sub 2} on plants, could have a significant impact on both natural and agricultural ecosystems. Society`s ability to prepare for, and respond to, such changes depends largely on the ability of climate and ecosystem researchers to provide predictions of regional level ecosystem responses with sufficient confidence and adequate lead time.

  20. Model-Experimental Studies on Next-generation Li-ion Materials...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    D.C. es086srinivasan2010p.pdf More Documents & Publications Performance and Degradation Modeling of Batteries Improved Methods for Making Intermetallic Anodes Overview of...

  1. Instrumentation and procedures for validation of synthetic infrared image generation (SIG) models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvaggio, Carl

    temperature, relative humidity, wind speed, cloud cover, precipitation type and rate, total insolation models are becoming more complex with the incorporation of radiation propagation, thermodynamic by the model mimic many effects seen in actual imagery. The focus of this paper is the definition

  2. A Generic Biogeochemical Module for Earth System Models: Next Generation BioGeoChemical Module (NGBGC), Version 1.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, Yilin; Huang, Maoyi; Liu, Chongxuan; Li, Hongyi; Leung, Lai-Yung R.

    2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Physical and biogeochemical processes regulate soil carbon dynamics and CO2 flux to and from atmosphere, influencing global climate changes. Integration of these processes into earth system models (e.g., community land models (CLM)), however, currently faces three major challenges: 1) extensive efforts are required to modify modeling structures and to rewrite computer programs to incorporate new or updated processes as new knowledge is being generated, 2) computational cost is prohibitively expensive to simulate biogeochemical processes in land models due to large variations in the rates of biogeochemical processes, and 3) various mathematical representations of biogeochemical processes exist to incorporate different aspects of fundamental mechanisms, but systematic evaluation of the different mathematical representations is difficult, if not possible. To address these challenges, we propose a new computational framework to easily incorporate physical and biogeochemical processes into land models. The new framework consists of a new biogeochemical module with a generic algorithm and reaction database so that new and updated processes can be incorporated into land models without the need to manually set up the ordinary differential equations to be solved numerically. The reaction database consists of processes of nutrient flow through the terrestrial ecosystems in plants, litter and soil. This framework facilitates effective comparison studies of biogeochemical cycles in an ecosystem using different conceptual models under the same land modeling framework. The approach was first implemented in CLM and benchmarked against simulations from the original CLM-CN code. A case study was then provided to demonstrate the advantages of using the new approach to incorporate a phosphorus cycle into the CLM model. To our knowledge, the phosphorus-incorporated CLM is a new model that can be used to simulate phosphorus limitation on the productivity of terrestrial ecosystems.

  3. Demonstrating and Validating a Next Generation Model-Based Controller for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of No53197 This workDayton:|ElectricityGenerationFuel Efficient,

  4. Generating upward sweeps in population using the Turchin--Korotayev model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niemeyer, Richard E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The works of [Cha-DunAlvInoNieCarFieLaw,Cha-Dun] describe upward sweeps in populations of city-states and attempt to characterize such phenomenon. The model proposed in both [TurKor,Tur] describes how the population, state resources and internal conflict influence each other over time. We show that one can obtain an upward sweep in the population by altering particular parameters of the system of differential equations constituting the model given in [TurKor,Tur]. Moreover, we show that such a system has a unstable critical point and propose an approach for determining bifurcation points in the parameter space for the model.

  5. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assumptions Land-Based Wind Technology Cost $1730/kW in 2005Shallow Offshore Wind Technology Cost Wind Technologyare modeled by WinDS, the costs of building transmission

  6. Realistic fault modeling and quality test generation of combined delay faults 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thadhlani, Ajaykumar A

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With increasing operating speed and shrinking technology, timing defects in integrated circuits are becoming increasingly important. The well established stuck-at-fault model is not sufficient because it is a static fault ...

  7. Building robust chemical reaction mechanisms : next generation of automatic model construction software

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Jing, 1972-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building proper reaction mechanisms is crucial to model the system dynamic properties for many industrial processes with complex chemical reaction phenomena. Because of the complexity of a reaction mechanism, computer-aided ...

  8. A generative model for brain tumor segmentation in multi-modal images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sabuncu, Mert R.

    We propose a nonparametric, probabilistic model for the automatic segmentation of medical images, given a training set of images and corresponding label maps. The resulting inference algorithms rely on pairwise registrations ...

  9. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerosol generator model Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S N E E T A L . 2002 American Meteorological Society Summary: by no more than 10% of the cooling caused by aerosols. 1. Introduction Observations and models highlight......

  10. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    curve for wind energy: energy costs including connection toavailable to transport wind energy, the cost of feeder linesWind Energy Deployment System model used to estimate the costs

  11. Physical modeling of wind turbine generators in a small scale analog system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xuntuo

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project represents the physical modeling and experimental test of a Doubly-fed Induction Machine (DFIM), in order to substantially analyze the characteristic behaviors of wind turbines and its use in the micro-grid ...

  12. Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reuter, Martin

    and ecosystem impacts, and analysis of mitigation strategies, need to be based on realistic evaluation Geological Survey (USGS) inventories and a recent NREL report. To illustrate the model capabilities, we the Renewable Energy Futures (REF) calculations performed by

  13. Power System Modeling of 20% Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, M.; Blair, N.; Bolinger, M.; Wiser, R.; O'Connell, R.; Hern, T.; Miller, B.

    2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper shows the results of the Wind Energy Deployment System model used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030.

  14. Generator Dynamic Model Validation and Parameter Calibration Using Phasor Measurements at the Point of Connection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Zhenyu; Du, Pengwei; Kosterev, Dmitry; Yang, Steve

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Disturbance data recorded by phasor measurement units (PMU) offers opportunities to improve the integrity of dynamic models. However, manually tuning parameters through play-back events demands significant efforts and engineering experiences. In this paper, a calibration method using the extended Kalman filter (EKF) technique is proposed. The formulation of EKF with parameter calibration is discussed. Case studies are presented to demonstrate its validity. The proposed calibration method is cost-effective, complementary to traditional equipment testing for improving dynamic model quality.

  15. Nodalization study of the Westinghouse Model E steam generator secondary side 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montgomery, Robert Orval

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameters 13 15 CHAPTER III. BASE MODEL DEVELOPMENT 18 Pur'pose Scope 18 18 Data Base Development Base Model Nodalization 19 20 Liquid Level Template Recommendations 25 CHAPTER IV. TRANSIENT DESCRIPTIONS AND BASE CASE RESULTS 29 Introduction... 29 Transient Overview 29 Transient Descriptions Page 30 Conclusions CHAPTER V. DESCRIPTION OF NODALIZATIONS STUDIED Introduction Case Descriptions Conclusions 59 CHAPTER VI. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS OF THE NODALIZATION STUDY Introduction...

  16. Spatiotemporal variability of hydrologic response : an entropy-based approach using a distributed hydrologic model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castillo, Aldrich Edra

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Basin hydrologic response pertains to the partitioning of precipitation into stream-flow, evapotranspiration, and change in storage. The ability to explain or predict the response has many applications e.g. flood forecasting, ...

  17. Analysis of the Effect of Geometry Generated Turbulence on HCCI Combustion by Multi-Zone Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L; Martinez-Frias, J; Espinosa-Loza, F; Christensen, M; Johansson, B; Hessel, R P

    2004-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper illustrates the applicability of a sequential fluid mechanics, multi-zone chemical kinetics model to analyze HCCI experimental data for two combustion chamber geometries with different levels of turbulence: a low turbulence disc geometry (flat top piston), and a high turbulence square geometry (piston with a square bowl). The model uses a fluid mechanics code to determine temperature histories in the engine as a function of crank angle. These temperature histories are then fed into a chemical kinetic solver, which determines combustion characteristics for a relatively small number of zones (40). The model makes the assumption that there is no direct linking between turbulence and combustion. The results show that the multi-zone model yields good results for both the disc and the square geometries. The model makes good predictions of pressure traces and heat release rates. The experimental results indicate that the high turbulence square geometry has longer burn duration than the low turbulence disc geometry. This difference can be explained by the sequential multi-zone model, which indicates that the cylinder with the square bowl has a thicker boundary layer that results in a broader temperature distribution. This broader temperature distribution tends to lengthen the combustion, as cold mass within the cylinder takes longer to reach ignition temperature when compressed by the expansion of the first burned gases. The multi-zone model, which makes the basic assumption that HCCI combustion is controlled by chemical kinetics, is therefore capable of explaining the experimental results obtained for different levels of turbulence, without considering a direct interaction between turbulence and combustion. A direct connection between turbulence and HCCI combustion may still exists, but it seems to play a relatively minor role in determining burn duration at the conditions analyzed in this paper.

  18. System Modeling and Design Optimization for a Next-Generation Unattended Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, Benjamin S.; Myjak, Mitchell J.; Hensley, Walter K.; Smart, John E.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We are developing a next-generation unattendedsensor that can detect and identify radiation sources while operating on battery power for several weeks. The system achieves smaller size and weight over systems that use NaI:Tl and 3He detectors by using a relatively new scintillator, Cs2LiYCl6:Ce:Ce (CLYC). This material can detect both gamma rays and thermal neutrons, has energy resolution of ~4% full width at half maximum at 662 keV, and allows for particle discrimination by pulse amplitude as well as pulse shape. The overall design features an array of sixteen CLYC detectors, each read out by a photomultiplier tube and custom pulse processing electronics. A field-programmable gate array analyzes the energy spectra using computationally efficient algorithms for anomaly detection.

  19. The automatic generation of semantic annotations for didactic materials and the use of models in the material development to improve its reusability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The automatic generation of semantic annotations for didactic materials and the use of models.es, aedo@ia.inf.uc3m.es Abstract The didactic material reusability, understood as its capability to be used in the MD2 approach to automatically generate semantic annotations within the didactic material development

  20. Abstract--A bi-objective optimization model of power and power changes generated by a wind turbine is discussed in this

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    operating a variable-speed wind turbine with pitch control to maximize power while minimizing the loads prediction, power ramp rate, data mining, wind turbine operation strategy, generator torque, blade pitch1 Abstract--A bi-objective optimization model of power and power changes generated by a wind

  1. The effect of the number of condensed phases modeled on aerosol behavior during an induced steam generator tube rupture sequence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, N.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Schaperow, J.H. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VICTORIA is a mechanistic computer code designed to analyze fission product behavior within a nuclear reactor coolant system (RCS) during a severe accident. It provides detailed predictions of the release of radioactive and nonradioactive materials from the reactor core and transport and deposition of these materials within the RCS. A recently completed independent peer review of VICTORIA, while confirming the overall adequacy of the code, recommended a number of modeling improvements. One of these recommendations, to model three rather than a single condensed phase, is the focus of the work reported here. The recommendation has been implemented as an option so that either a single or three condensed phases can be treated. Both options have been employed in the study of fission product behavior during an induced steam generator tube rupture sequence. Differences in deposition patterns and mechanisms predicted using these two options are discussed.

  2. New physical effects on the decay $B_{s(d)} \\to ??$ in the sequential fourth Generation model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Chen; W. Huo

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the contributions to the branching ratios of $B_{s(d)}\\to \\gamma \\gamma$ decay in the sequential fourth generation model (SM4). We find that the theoretical values of the branching ratios, ${\\rm BR}(B_{s(d)}\\to\\gamma\\gamma)$, including the contributions of $m_{t'}$ and the new $4 \\times 4$ CKM (CKM4) matrix factors, $|V^{*}_{t's}V_{t'b}|$ and $|V^{*}_{t'd}V_{t'b}|$, are much different from the minimal standard model (SM) predictions. The new physics effects, especially contributed from the CKM4 matrix factors, can provide more than one order enhancement to the SM prediction. It is shown that the decay $B_{s(d)}\\to \\gamma \\gamma$ can test the new physics signals from SM4.

  3. Side-payment profitability and interacting eyeball ISPs under convex demand-response modeling congestion-sensitive applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kesidis, George

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is concerned with the issue of side payments between content providers (CPs) and Internet service (access bandwidth) providers (ISPs) in an Internet that is potentially not neutral. We herein generalize past results modeling the ISP and CP interaction as a noncooperative game in two directions. We consider different demand response models (price sensitivities) for different provider types in order to explore when side payments are profitable to the ISP. Also, we consider convex (non-linear) demand response to model demand triggered by traffic which is sensitive to access bandwidth congestion, particularly delay-sensitive interactive real-time applications. Finally, we consider a model with two competing "eyeball" ISPs with transit pricing of net traffic at their peering point to study the effects of caching remote content.

  4. Inference-based Geometric Modeling for the Generation of Complex Cluttered Virtual Environments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggers, Keith Edward

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    that support the automatic construction of complex cluttered environments. The rst method we present is a surface reconstruction-based approach that is capable of reconstructing solid models from a point cloud capture of a cluttered environment. Our... III INFERENCE-BASED POINT CLOUD RECONSTRUCTION : 35 A. Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 B. Algorithm Details . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 1. Phase I: Setup...

  5. arXiv:cond-mat/0508028v131Jul2005 A generative model for feedback networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    model for constructing net- works that grow via competition between cycle formation and the addition, they may seek a partner completely outside it, thereby adding a new node and expanding it. Another], there has been very little work on net- works of this type. The only exception that we are aware of involves

  6. Modeling and Generating Daily Changes in Market Variables Using A Multivariate Mixture of Normal Distributions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jin

    Distributions Jin Wang Department of Mathematics and Computer Science Valdosta State University Valdosta, GA 31698-0040 January 28, 2000 Abstract The mixture of normal distributions provides a useful extension of the normal distribution for modeling of daily changes in market variables with fatter-than-normal tails

  7. A circuit model of the temporal pattern generator of Caenorhabditis egg-laying behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schafer, William R.

    , the model was implemented in the statis- tical language R (R Development Core Team (2008). R: A language and en- vironment for statistical computing. R Foundation for Statistical Computing, Vienna, Austria Supplemental Material Mi Zhang William R. Schafer Rainer Breitling December 3, 2009 1 Equations The following

  8. Automatic generation of RF compact models from device simulation S. Luryi and A. Pacelli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luryi, Serge

    , parasitic elements, and complex physical effects such as self- heating and hot-carrier transport. Keywords: Compact models; device simulation; RF; inter- connects; self-heating 1 INTRODUCTION Conventional RF of Electrical and Computer Engineering State University of New York, Stony Brook, NY 11794-2350, (serge

  9. Using Stochastically Generated Subcolumns to Represent Cloud Structure in a Large-Scale Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert, Pincus

    condensate amount and cloud fraction, has about the same effect on radiative fluxes as does the ad hoc tuning for representing cloud structure in instantaneous calculations and long-term integrations. Shortwave radiation accounting for this effect in the operational radiation scheme. Long simulations with the new model

  10. Rapid generation of human B-cell lymphomas via combined expression of Myc and Bcl2 and their use as a preclinical model for biological therapies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweighofer, C D

    Although numerous mouse models of B-cell malignancy have been developed via the enforced expression of defined oncogenic lesions, the feasibility of generating lineage-defined human B-cell malignancies using mice reconstituted ...

  11. Enduse Global Emissions Mitigation Scenarios (EGEMS): A New Generation of Energy Efficiency Policy Planning Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McNeil, Michael A.; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McMahon, James E.

    2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents efforts to date and prospective goals towards development of a modelling and analysis framework which is comprehensive enough to address the global climate crisis, and detailed enough to provide policymakers with concrete targets and achievable outcomes. In terms of energy efficiency policy, this requires coverage of the entire world, with emphasis on countries and regions with large and/or rapidly growing energy-related emissions, and analysis at the 'technology' level-building end use, transport mode or industrial process. These elements have not been fully addressed by existing modelling efforts, which usually take either a top-down approach, or concentrate on a few fully industrialized countries where energy demand is well-understood. Inclusion of details such as appliance ownership rates, use patterns and efficiency levels throughout the world allows for a deeper understanding of the demand for energy today and, more importantly, over the coming decades. This is a necessary next step for energy analysts and policy makers in assessment of mitigation potentials. The modelling system developed at LBNL over the past 3 years takes advantage of experience in end use demand and in forecasting markets for energy-consuming equipment, in combination with known technology-based efficiency opportunities and policy types. A particular emphasis has been placed on modelling energy growth in developing countries. Experiences to date include analyses covering individual countries (China and India), end uses (refrigerators and air conditioners) and policy types (standards and labelling). Each of these studies required a particular effort in data collection and model refinement--they share, however, a consistent approach and framework which allows comparison, and forms the foundation of a comprehensive analysis system leading to a roadmap to address the greenhouse gas mitigation targetslikely to be set in the coming years.

  12. The response of glaciers to intrinsic climate variability: observations and models of late-Holocene variations in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roe, Gerard

    The response of glaciers to intrinsic climate variability: observations and models of late glacier variations due to natural climate variability and those due to true climate change is crucial for the interpretation and attribution of past glacier changes, and for the expectations of future changes. We explore

  13. Numerical modeling of effect of polyurea on response of steel plates to impulsive loads in direct pressure-pulse experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    Numerical modeling of effect of polyurea on response of steel plates to impulsive loads in direct is studied, focusing on the effects of the relative position of polyurea with respect to the loading plates subjected to uniform blast loads and compared their predictions with experimental results. Bahei

  14. Building ventilation: A pressure airflow model computer generation and elements of validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, H; Adelard, L; Mara, T A

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The calculation of airflows is of great importance for detailed building thermal simulation computer codes, these airflows most frequently constituting an important thermal coupling between the building and the outside on one hand, and the different thermal zones on the other. The driving effects of air movement, which are the wind and the thermal buoyancy, are briefly outlined and we look closely at their coupling in the case of buildings, by exploring the difficulties associated with large openings. Some numerical problems tied to the resolving of the non-linear system established are also covered. Part of a detailled simulation software (CODYRUN), the numerical implementation of this airflow model is explained, insisting on data organization and processing allowing the calculation of the airflows. Comparisons are then made between the model results and in one hand analytical expressions and in another and experimental measurements in case of a collective dwelling.

  15. Application for managing model-based material properties for simulation-based engineering

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Edward L. (Alameda, CA)

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    An application for generating a property set associated with a constitutive model of a material includes a first program module adapted to receive test data associated with the material and to extract loading conditions from the test data. A material model driver is adapted to receive the loading conditions and a property set and operable in response to the loading conditions and the property set to generate a model response for the material. A numerical optimization module is adapted to receive the test data and the model response and operable in response to the test data and the model response to generate the property set.

  16. Voltage-controllable generator of pure spin current: A three-terminal model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Zheng; Wu, Reng-Lai; Yu, Ya-Bin, E-mail: apybyu@hnu.edu.cn; Wang, Miao [School of Physics and Electronics, Hunan University, Changsha 410082 (China)

    2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-terminal devices have been frequently proposed to generate the pure spin current. However, the controllability and stability of pure spin current still needs to be improved. In this paper, a three-terminal device, composed of a ferromagnetic metallic lead and two nonmagnetic semiconductor leads coupled with a quantum dot, is employed to study the properties of electron spin transport. The results show that when the external voltage on one of nonmagnetic semiconductor leads is adjusted to a proper range, a pure spin current plateau or a fully spin-polarized current plateau appears in another nonmagnetic semiconductor lead. In a wide range of external voltage, the pure spin current or the spin-polarized current is kept unchanged. Since the change of temperature may considerably influence the spin-polarization of current and is inevitable actually, we studied the corresponding compensation to keep the pure spin current unchanged. Furthermore, the effect of device parameters on the pure spin current is also investigated.

  17. Final Technical Report for "Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.W.; Ghil, M.; Kravtsov, K.; Smyth, P.J.

    2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was a continuation of previous work under DOE CCPP funding in which we developed a twin approach of non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. We have developed a family of latent-variable NHMMs to simulate historical records of daily rainfall, and used them to downscale seasonal predictions. We have also developed empirical mode reduction (EMR) models for gaining insight into the underlying dynamics in observational data and general circulation model (GCM) simulations. Using coupled O-A ICMs, we have identified a new mechanism of interdecadal climate variability, involving the midlatitude oceans mesoscale eddy field and nonlinear, persistent atmospheric response to the oceanic anomalies. A related decadal mode is also identified, associated with the oceans thermohaline circulation. The goal of the continuation was to build on these ICM results and NHMM/EMR model developments and software to strengthen two key pillars of support for the development and application of climate models for climate change projections on time scales of decades to centuries, namely: (a) dynamical and theoretical understanding of decadal-to-interdecadal oscillations and their predictability; and (b) an interface from climate models to applications, in order to inform societal adaptation strategies to climate change at the regional scale, including model calibration, correction, downscaling and, most importantly, assessment and interpretation of spread and uncertainties in multi-model ensembles. Our main results from the grant consist of extensive further development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes. Each of these project components is elaborated on below, followed by a list of publications resulting from the grant.

  18. Final Technical Report for "Collaborative Research: Regional climate-change projections through next-generation empirical and dynamical models"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kravtsov, S.; Robertson, A. W.; Ghil, M.; Smyth, P. J.

    2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This project was a continuation of previous work under DOE CCPP funding in which we developed a twin approach of non-homogeneous hidden Markov models (NHMMs) and coupled ocean-atmosphere (O-A) intermediate-complexity models (ICMs) to identify the potentially predictable modes of climate variability, and to investigate their impacts on the regional-scale. We have developed a family of latent-variable NHMMs to simulate historical records of daily rainfall, and used them to downscale seasonal predictions. We have also developed empirical mode reduction (EMR) models for gaining insight into the underlying dynamics in observational data and general circulation model (GCM) simulations. Using coupled O-A ICMs, we have identified a new mechanism of interdecadal climate variability, involving the midlatitude oceansâ?? mesoscale eddy field and nonlinear, persistent atmospheric response to the oceanic anomalies. A related decadal mode is also identified, associated with the oceansâ?? thermohaline circulation. The goal of the continuation was to build on these ICM results and NHMM/EMR model developments and software to strengthen two key pillars of support for the development and application of climate models for climate change projections on time scales of decades to centuries, namely: (a) dynamical and theoretical understanding of decadal-to-interdecadal oscillations and their predictability; and (b) an interface from climate models to applications, in order to inform societal adaptation strategies to climate change at the regional scale, including model calibration, correction, downscaling and, most importantly, assessment and interpretation of spread and uncertainties in multi-model ensembles. Our main results from the grant consist of extensive further development of the hidden Markov models for rainfall simulation and downscaling specifically within the non-stationary climate change context together with the development of parallelized software; application of NHMMs to downscaling of rainfall projections over India; identification and analysis of decadal climate signals in data and models; and, studies of climate variability in terms of the dynamics of atmospheric flow regimes. Each of these project components is elaborated on below, followed by a list of publications resulting from the grant.

  19. Evaluation of Nonlinear Site Response of Soft Clay Using Centrifuge Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afacan, Kamil Bekir

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    spreading ground during centrifuge tests." J. Geotech.densesand in laminated centrifuge container." J. Geotech. &response in laminated centrifuge container." Proc. 1st

  20. Investigation of techniques to build generation system models for reliability evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubbala, Nagalakshmi V.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Proposed Method 1. Two State Unit 2. Three State Unit . 3. n State Unit B. Results and Discussion 1. Case Studies Using IEEE-RTS 2. Case Studies Using EPRI Synthetic System 3. The System Described in Reference [8] 4. CPU Times for Different Models... Transform 1. Count of Operations 3 7 10 11 12 13 16 16 17 20 24 25 27 30 33 39 39 40 43 44 46 48 50 VJn CHAPTER Page 2. Derivation D. Mathematical Comparison E. System Studies 1. IEEE-RTS 2. EPRI Synthetic 3. Results 4...

  1. Investigation of techniques to build generation system models for reliability evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gubbala, Nagalakshmi V.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Proposed Method 1. Two State Unit 2. Three State Unit . 3. n State Unit B. Results and Discussion 1. Case Studies Using IEEE-RTS 2. Case Studies Using EPRI Synthetic System 3. The System Described in Reference [8] 4. CPU Times for Different Models... Transform 1. Count of Operations 3 7 10 11 12 13 16 16 17 20 24 25 27 30 33 39 39 40 43 44 46 48 50 VJn CHAPTER Page 2. Derivation D. Mathematical Comparison E. System Studies 1. IEEE-RTS 2. EPRI Synthetic 3. Results 4...

  2. Renewable Power Options for Electrical Generation on Kaua'i: Economics and Performance Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burman, K.; Keller, J.; Kroposki, B.; Lilienthal, P.; Slaughter, R.; Glassmire, J.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hawaii Clean Energy Initiative (HCEI) is working with a team led by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assess the economic and technical feasibility of increasing the contribution of renewable energy in Hawaii. This part of the HCEI project focuses on working with Kaua'i Island Utility Cooperative (KIUC) to understand how to integrate higher levels of renewable energy into the electric power system of the island of Kaua'i. NREL partnered with KIUC to perform an economic and technical analysis and discussed how to model PV inverters in the electrical grid.

  3. Fuel Cell Power Model Version 2: Startup Guide, System Designs, and Case Studies. Modeling Electricity, Heat, and Hydrogen Generation from Fuel Cell-Based Distributed Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steward, D.; Penev, M.; Saur, G.; Becker, W.; Zuboy, J.

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This guide helps users get started with the U.S. Department of Energy/National Renewable Energy Laboratory Fuel Cell Power (FCPower) Model Version 2, which is a Microsoft Excel workbook that analyzes the technical and economic aspects of high-temperature fuel cell-based distributed energy systems with the aim of providing consistent, transparent, comparable results. This type of energy system would provide onsite-generated heat and electricity to large end users such as hospitals and office complexes. The hydrogen produced could be used for fueling vehicles or stored for later conversion to electricity.

  4. Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mandadapu, Kranthi K; Berry, Richard M; Oster, George

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well-established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy needed for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, while steric forces comprise the actual 'power stroke'. Specifically, we predict that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline 'hinge' residue in an $\\alpha$-helix of the stator are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions f...

  5. Use of Slip Ring Induction Generator for Wind Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K Y Patil; D S Chavan

    Wind energy is now firmly established as a mature technology for electricity generation. There are different types of generators that can be used for wind energy generation, among which Slip ring Induction generator proves to be more advantageous. To analyse application of Slip ring Induction generator for wind power generation, an experimental model is developed and results are studied. As power generation from natural sources is the need today and variable speed wind energy is ample in amount in India, it is necessary to study more beneficial options for wind energy generating techniques. From this need a model is developed by using Slip ring Induction generator which is a type of Asynchronous generator.

  6. The Next Generation Virgo cluster Survey. V. modelling the dynamics of M87 with the Made-to-Measure method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Ling; Mao, Shude; Peng, Eric W; Liu, Chengze; Caldwell, Nelson; Li, Biao; Blakeslee, John P; Cote, Patrick; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Durrell, Patrick; Emsellem, Eric; Ferrarese, Laura; Gwyn, Stephen; Jordan, Andres; Lancon, Ariane; Mei, Simona; Munoz, Roberto; Puzi, Thomas

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the dynamics of the giant elliptical galaxy M87 from the central to the outermost regions with the made-to-measure (M2M) method. We use a new catalogue of 922 globular cluster line-of- sight velocities extending to a projected radius of 180 kpc (equivalent to 25 M87 effective radii), and SAURON integral field unit data within the central 2.4 kpc. 263 globular clusters, mainly located beyond 40 kpc, are newly observed by the Next Generation Virgo Survey (NGVS). For the M2M modelling, the gravitational potential is taken as a combination of a luminous matter potential with a constant stellar mass-to-light ratio and a dark matter potential modelled as a logarithmic potential. Our best dynamical model returns a stellar mass-to-light ratio in the I band of M/LI = 6.0(+ -0.3) M_sun/L_sun with a dark matter potential scale velocity of 591(+ -50) km/s and scale radius of 42(+ -10) kpc. We determine the total mass of M87 within 180 kpc to be (1.5 + - 0.2) 10^13 M_sun. The mass within 40 kpc is smaller than pr...

  7. Current generation by helicons and lower hybrid waves in modern tokamaks and reactors ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vdovin, V. L., E-mail: vdov@nfi.kiae.ru [National Research Centre 'Kurchatov Institute,' (Russian Federation)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The innovative concept and 3D full-wave code modeling the off-axis current drive by radio-frequency (RF) waves in large-scale tokamaks, ITER and DEMO, for steady-state operation with high efficiency is proposed. The scheme uses the helicon radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20-40) ion cyclotron frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500-700 MHz propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by helicons, in conjunction with the bootstrap current, ensure the maintenance of a given value of the total current in the stability margin q(0) {>=} 2 and q(a) {>=} 4, and will help to have regimes with a negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure {beta}{sub N} > 3 (the so-called advanced scenarios) of interest for the commercial reactor. Modeling with full-wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER and DEMO, using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal wave slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in the DIII-D, T-15MD, and JT-60AS tokamaks. Commercially available continuous-wave klystrons of the MW/tube range are promising for commercial stationary fusion reactors. The compact antennae of the waveguide type are proposed, and an example of a possible RF system for today's tokamaks is given. The advantages of the scheme (partially tested at lower frequencies in tokamaks) are a significant decline in the role of parametric instabilities in the plasma periphery, the use of electrically strong resonator-waveguide type antennae, and substantially greater antenna-plasma coupling.

  8. One- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation using experimentally generated reversing flow turbuulence models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldberg, L.F. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The activities described in this report do not constitute a continuum but rather a series of linked smaller investigations in the general area of one- and two-dimensional Stirling machine simulation. The initial impetus for these investigations was the development and construction of the Mechanical Engineering Test Rig (METR) under a grant awarded by NASA to Dr. Terry Simon at the Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Minnesota. The purpose of the METR is to provide experimental data on oscillating turbulent flows in Stirling machine working fluid flow path components (heater, cooler, regenerator, etc.) with particular emphasis on laminar/turbulent flow transitions. Hence, the initial goals for the grant awarded by NASA were, broadly, to provide computer simulation backup for the design of the METR and to analyze the results produced. This was envisaged in two phases: First, to apply an existing one-dimensional Stirling machine simulation code to the METR and second, to adapt a two-dimensional fluid mechanics code which had been developed for simulating high Rayleigh number buoyant cavity flows to the METR. The key aspect of this latter component was the development of an appropriate turbulence model suitable for generalized application to Stirling simulation. A final-step was then to apply the two-dimensional code to an existing Stirling machine for which adequate experimental data exist. The work described herein was carried out over a period of three years on a part-time basis. Forty percent of the first year`s funding was provided as a match to the NASA funds by the Underground Space Center, University of Minnesota, which also made its computing facilities available to the project at no charge.

  9. Combined Modeling of Acceleration, Transport, and Hydrodynamic Response in Solar Flares. II. Inclusion of Radiative Transfer with RADYN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    da Costa, Fatima Rubio; Petrosian, Vahe'; Carlsson, Mats

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar flares involve complex processes that are coupled together and span a wide range of temporal, spatial, and energy scales. Modeling such processes self-consistently has been a challenge in the past. Here we present such a model to simulate the coupling of high-energy particle kinetics with hydrodynamics of the atmospheric plasma. We combine the Stanford unified Fokker-Planck code that models particle acceleration, transport, and bremsstrahlung radiation with the RADYN hydrodynamic code that models the atmospheric response to collisional heating by non-thermal electrons through detailed radiative transfer calculations. We perform simulations using different injection electron spectra, including an {\\it ad hoc} power law and more realistic spectra predicted by the stochastic acceleration model due to turbulence or plasma waves. Surprisingly, stochastically accelerated electrons, even with energy flux $\\ll 10^{10}$ erg s$^{-1}$ cm$^{-2}$, cause "explosive" chromospheric evaporation and drive stronger up- an...

  10. Evaluation and Sensitivity Analysis of an Ocean Model Response to Hurricane Ivan G. R. HALLIWELL JR.,* L. K. SHAY, AND J. K. BREWSTER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    provides the thermal energy for intensification, errors and biases in the ocean compo- nent of coupled TCEvaluation and Sensitivity Analysis of an Ocean Model Response to Hurricane Ivan G. R. HALLIWELL JR December 2009) ABSTRACT An ocean model response to Hurricane Ivan (2004) over the northwest Caribbean Sea

  11. Aberrant Response Patterns as a Multidimensional Phenomenon: Using Factor-Analytic Model Comparison to Detect Cheating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark III, John Michael

    2010-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation proposes a new factor-analytic technique for detecting cheating on exams. Person-fit statistics have been developed to assess the extent to which examinees' response patterns are consistent with expectation, ...

  12. The Statistical Reservoir Model: calibrating faults and fractures, and predicting reservoir response to water flood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    geomechanics to have a significant influence on hydrocarbon production rates through changes in the effective 2004). Geomechanics not only predicts a reservoir response in the near field, but also at long range i

  13. Examining the Role of the Special Educator in a Response to Intervention Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mitchell, Belinda B.

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this observational study was to examine the role of the special educator within a response-to-intervention (RTI) framework and to examine what instructional behaviors special educators evidence most frequently ...

  14. Modeling a Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger with RELAP5-3D for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main purpose of this report is to design a printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant and carry out Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) simulation using RELAP5-3D. Helium was chosen as the coolant in the primary and secondary sides of the heat exchanger. The design of PCHE is critical for the LOCA simulations. For purposes of simplicity, a straight channel configuration was assumed. A parallel intermediate heat exchanger configuration was assumed for the RELAP5 model design. The RELAP5 modeling also required the semicircular channels in the heat exchanger to be mapped to rectangular channels. The initial RELAP5 run outputs steady state conditions which were then compared to the heat exchanger performance theory to ensure accurate design is being simulated. An exponential loss of pressure transient was simulated. This LOCA describes a loss of coolant pressure in the primary side over a 20 second time period. The results for the simulation indicate that heat is initially transferred from the primary loop to the secondary loop, but after the loss of pressure occurs, heat transfers from the secondary loop to the primary loop.

  15. Monte Carlo modelling of a-Si EPID response: The effect of spectral variations with field size and position

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parent, Laure; Seco, Joao; Evans, Phil M.; Fielding, Andrew; Dance, David R. [Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, SM2 5PT (United Kingdom); School of Physical and Chemical Sciences, Queensland University of Technology, Q337 Gardens Point Campus, Brisbane, Queensland 4001 (Australia); Joint Department of Physics, Institute of Cancer Research and Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Fulham Road, London, SW3 6JJ (United Kingdom)

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study focused on predicting the electronic portal imaging device (EPID) image of intensity modulated radiation treatment (IMRT) fields in the absence of attenuation material in the beam with Monte Carlo methods. As IMRT treatments consist of a series of segments of various sizes that are not always delivered on the central axis, large spectral variations may be observed between the segments. The effect of these spectral variations on the EPID response was studied with fields of various sizes and off-axis positions. A detailed description of the EPID was implemented in a Monte Carlo model. The EPID model was validated by comparing the EPID output factors for field sizes between 1x1 and 26x26 cm{sup 2} at the isocenter. The Monte Carlo simulations agreed with the measurements to within 1.5%. The Monte Carlo model succeeded in predicting the EPID response at the center of the fields of various sizes and offsets to within 1% of the measurements. Large variations (up to 29%) of the EPID response were observed between the various offsets. The EPID response increased with field size and with field offset for most cases. The Monte Carlo model was then used to predict the image of a simple test IMRT field delivered on the beam axis and with an offset. A variation of EPID response up to 28% was found between the on- and off-axis delivery. Finally, two clinical IMRT fields were simulated and compared to the measurements. For all IMRT fields, simulations and measurements agreed within 3%--0.2 cm for 98% of the pixels. The spectral variations were quantified by extracting from the spectra at the center of the fields the total photon yield (Y{sub total}), the photon yield below 1 MeV (Y{sub low}), and the percentage of photons below 1 MeV (P{sub low}). For the studied cases, a correlation was shown between the EPID response variation and Y{sub total}, Y{sub low}, and P{sub low}.

  16. Penetration Deep into Tissues of Reactive Oxygen Species Generated in Floating-Electrode Dielectric Barrier Discharge (FE-DBD): in Vitro Agarose Gel Model Mimicking an Open Wound

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobrynin, Danil; Friedman, Gary; Fridman, Alexander

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this manuscript we present an in vitro model based on agarose gel that can be used to simulate a dirty, oily, bloody, and morphologically complex surface of, for example, an open wound. We show this models effectiveness in simulating depth of penetration of reactive species generated in plasma deep into tissue of a rat and confirm the penetration depths with agarose gel model. We envision that in the future such a model could be used to study plasma discharges (and other modalities) and minimize the use of live animals: plasma can be optimized on the agarose gel wound model and then finally verified using an actual wound.

  17. Modeling and Control System Design for an Integrated Solar Generation and Energy Storage System with a Ride-Through Capability: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, X.; Yue, M.; Muljadi, E.

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a generic approach for PV panel modeling. Data for this modeling can be easily obtained from manufacturer datasheet, which provides a convenient way for the researchers and engineers to investigate the PV integration issues. A two-stage power conversion system (PCS) is adopted in this paper for the PV generation system and a Battery Energy Storage System (BESS) can be connected to the dc-link through a bi-directional dc/dc converter. In this way, the BESS can provide some ancillary services which may be required in the high penetration PV generation scenario. In this paper, the fault ride-through (FRT) capability is specifically focused. The integrated BESS and PV generation system together with the associated control systems is modeled in PSCAD and Matlab platforms and the effectiveness of the controller is validated by the simulation results.

  18. Skeletal Response to Simulated Microgravity Exposures and Exercise in the Adult Rat Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shirazi-Fard, Yasaman

    2013-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    mass, structure, and integrity and not an accurate predictor of fracture risk. Therefore, it is essential to measure the mechanical properties of bone tissue directly using animal models. The hindlimb unloaded (HU) rat model is a well-established ground...

  19. Dose Dependent Response to Cyclodextrin Infusion in a Rat Model of Verapamil Toxicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Allan R.; Bryant, Sean M; Aks, Steven E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Model of Verapamil Toxicity Allan R. Mottram, MD* Sean M.Address for Correspondence: Allan R. Mottram, MD, University

  20. Eastern Frequency Response Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, N.W.; Shao, M.; Pajic, S.; D'Aquila, R.

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was specifically designed to investigate the frequency response of the Eastern Interconnection that results from large loss-of-generation events of the type targeted by the North American Electric Reliability Corp. Standard BAL-003 Frequency Response and Frequency Bias Setting (NERC 2012a), under possible future system conditions with high levels of wind generation.

  1. Three-Dimensional Model on Thermal Response of Skin Subject to Laser Heating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jun

    in human skin [3]. The #12;rst medical lasers were continuous beam lasers such as CO 2 laser, argon laser and Jun Zhang z Laboratory for High Performance Scienti#12;c Computing and Computer Simulation, Department to investigate the transient thermal response of human skin subject to laser heating. The temperature

  2. FINITE ELEMENT STRUCTURAL RESPONSE SENSITIVITY AND RELIABILITY ANALYSES USING SMOOTH VERSUS NON-SMOOTH MATERIAL CONSTITUTIVE MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbato, Michele; Conte, Joel P

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and response sensitivity histories up to the current time stepthe integration time step. Response sensitivity results arestep, after convergence is achieved for the response

  3. Estimating Demand Response Load Impacts: Evaluation of Baseline Load Models for Non-Residential Buildings in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coughlin, Katie; Piette, Mary Ann; Goldman, Charles; Kiliccote, Sila

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    commercial buildings participating in a demand?response (buildings participating in an Automated Demand Response buildings  participating  in  an  event?driven  demand?response  (

  4. ALE3D Model Predictions and Materials Characterization for the Cookoff Response of PBXN-109

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClelland, M A; Maienschein, J L; Nichols, A L; Wardell, J F; Atwood, A I; Curran, P O

    2002-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ALE3D simulations are presented for the thermal explosion of PBXN-109 (RDX, AI, HTPB, DOA) in support of an effort by the U. S. Navy and Department of Energy (DOE) to validate computational models. The U.S. Navy is performing benchmark tests for the slow cookoff of PBXN-109 in a sealed tube. Candidate models are being tested using the ALE3D code, which can simulate the coupled thermal, mechanical, and chemical behavior during heating, ignition, and explosion. The strength behavior of the solid constituents is represented by a Steinberg-Guinan model while polynomial and gamma-law expressions are used for the Equation Of State (EOS) for the solid and gas species, respectively. A void model is employed to represent the air in gaps. ALE3D model 'parameters are specified using measurements of thermal and mechanical properties including thermal expansion, heat capacity, shear modulus, and bulk modulus. A standard three-step chemical kinetics model is used during the thermal ramp, and a pressure-dependent burn front model is employed during the rapid expansion. Parameters for the three-step kinetics model are specified using measurements of the One-Dimensional-Time-to-Explosion (ODTX), while measurements for burn rate of pristine and thermally damaged material are employed to determine parameters in the burn front model. Results are given for calculations in which heating, ignition, and explosion are modeled in a single simulation. We compare model results to measurements for the cookoff temperature and tube wall strain.

  5. Forward Modeling of the Induction Log Response of a Fractured Geologic Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bray, Steven Hunter

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    3.1 Layered Earth Model The environment used for the induction log simulations is a layered Earth model. The model consists of six layers that are assigned different thicknesses and conductivities based on the desired induction log... Tx-Rx pair has a fixed separation and is moved along a vertical profile through the subsurface taking measurements at predetermined logging points. 20 The second change to the original Seatem code involves the surrounding environment. The code...

  6. Forward Modeling of the Induction Log Response of a Fractured Geologic Formation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bray, Steven Hunter

    2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    3.1 Layered Earth Model The environment used for the induction log simulations is a layered Earth model. The model consists of six layers that are assigned different thicknesses and conductivities based on the desired induction log... Tx-Rx pair has a fixed separation and is moved along a vertical profile through the subsurface taking measurements at predetermined logging points. 20 The second change to the original Seatem code involves the surrounding environment. The code...

  7. Model error estimation in composite impact response prediction using hierarchical Bayes networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salas Mendez, Pablo Antonio

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in Progressive Failure Analysis . . . 4.0.2 ModelingPuck and H. Schurmann, “Failure analysis of frp laminates byComposite laminate failure analysis using multi- continuum

  8. ResPoNSe: modeling the wide variability of residential energy consumption.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peffer, Therese; Burke, William; Auslander, David

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    affect appliance energy consumption. For example, differentStates, 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: HousingModeling of End-Use Energy Consumption in the Residential

  9. Models and analysis of yeast mating response : tools for model building, from documentation to time-dependent stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomson, Ty M. (Ty Matthew)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Molecular signaling systems allow cells to sense and respond to environmental stimuli. Quantitative modeling can be a valuable tool for evaluating and extending our understanding of signaling systems. In particular, studies ...

  10. CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response): A Generic Transportation Network Model for the Calculation of Evacuation Time Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, M. P.; Urbanik, II, T.; Desrosiers, A. E.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the methodology and application of the computer model CLEAR (Calculates Logical Evacuation And Response) which estimates the time required for a specific population density and distribution to evacuate an area using a specific transportation network. The CLEAR model simulates vehicle departure and movement on a transportation network according to the conditions and consequences of traffic flow. These include handling vehicles at intersecting road segments, calculating the velocity of travel on a road segment as a function of its vehicle density, and accounting for the delay of vehicles in traffic queues. The program also models the distribution of times required by individuals to prepare for an evacuation. In order to test its accuracy, the CLEAR model was used to estimate evacuatlon tlmes for the emergency planning zone surrounding the Beaver Valley Nuclear Power Plant. The Beaver Valley site was selected because evacuation time estimates had previously been prepared by the licensee, Duquesne Light, as well as by the Federal Emergency Management Agency and the Pennsylvania Emergency Management Agency. A lack of documentation prevented a detailed comparison of the estimates based on the CLEAR model and those obtained by Duquesne Light. However, the CLEAR model results compared favorably with the estimates prepared by the other two agencies.

  11. Predicting Response to Political Blog Posts with Topic Models Language Technologies Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, William W.

    - tent Dirichlet Allocation, introduced by Blei et al. (2003), in various ways to capture different char a blog site. The model is an extension of Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) introduced by Blei et al for learning and/or prediction (Blei et al., 2003). Different models can be compared to explore

  12. NEUROMOTOR RESPONSE TO WHOLE BODY VIBRATION TRANSMISSIBILITY IN THE HORIZONTAL DIRECTION AND ITS MATHEMATICAL MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanumanthareddygari, Vinay

    2010-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................................................................................................................................... 1 1. Introduction ................................................................................................................................. 4 1.1 Lower Back Pain (LBP... into the model and develop a model for vertical vibration. 4 1. Introduction 1.1 Lower Back Pain (LBP): One of the most severe and costly problems in public health is the occurrence of lower back pain (LBP) [1-5]. LBP and low back...

  13. Numerical modeling of response of monolithic and bilayer plates to impulsive loads

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    -receiving side) amplifies the initial shock loading and thereby enhances the destructive effect of the blast modeling FEM analysis Metal-elastomer adhesion Numerical blast modeling a b s t r a c t In this paper, we in the latter case the pressure effects. Comparing the simulation and the experimental results, we focus

  14. Centralized and Decentralized Control for Demand Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shuai; Samaan, Nader A.; Diao, Ruisheng; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Jin, Chunlian; Mayhorn, Ebony T.; Zhang, Yu; Kirkham, Harold

    2011-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response has been recognized as an essential element of the smart grid. Frequency response, regulation and contingency reserve functions performed traditionally by generation resources are now starting to involve demand side resources. Additional benefits from demand response include peak reduction and load shifting, which will defer new infrastructure investment and improve generator operation efficiency. Technical approaches designed to realize these functionalities can be categorized into centralized control and decentralized control, depending on where the response decision is made. This paper discusses these two control philosophies and compares their relative advantages and disadvantages in terms of delay time, predictability, complexity, and reliability. A distribution system model with detailed household loads and controls is built to demonstrate the characteristics of the two approaches. The conclusion is that the promptness and reliability of decentralized control should be combined with the predictability and simplicity of centralized control to achieve the best performance of the smart grid.

  15. USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 325 Modeling Aspen Responses to Climatic Warming and Insect Defoliation in Western Canada Hogg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USDA Forest Service Proceedings RMRS-P-18. 2001. 325 Modeling Aspen Responses to Climatic Warming Aspen Responses to Climatic Warming and Insect Defoliation in Western Canada E. H. (Ted) Hogg1 Abstract change on boreal aspen forests may not become evident until after major insect outbreaks have occurred

  16. Assessment of Uncertainties in the Response of the African Monsoon Precipitation to Land Use change simulated by a regional model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xue, Yongkang; Boone, Aaron; de Sales, Fernando; Neupane, Naresh; Huang, Maoyi; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2014-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Land use and land cover over Africa have changed substantially over the last sixty years and this change has been proposed to affect monsoon circulation and precipitation. This study examines the uncertainties on the effect of these changes on the African Monsoon system and Sahel precipitation using an ensemble of regional model simulations with different combinations of land surface and cumulus parameterization schemes. Although the magnitude of the response covers a broad range of values, most of the simulations show a decline in Sahel precipitation due to the expansion of pasture and croplands at the expense of trees and shrubs and an increase in surface air temperature.

  17. Generating Structurally Complex Test Cases by Data Mutation: A Case Study of Testing an Automated Modelling Tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Hong

    - 1 - Generating Structurally Complex Test Cases by Data Mutation: A Case Study of Testing Brookes University, Oxford OX33 1HX, UK Email: hzhu@brookes.ac.uk ABSTRACT Generation of adequate test cases is difficult and expensive, especially for testing software systems whose input is structurally

  18. How important is diversity for capturing environmental-change responses in ecosystem models?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prowe, A. E. F.

    Marine ecosystem models used to investigate how global change affects ocean ecosystems and their functioning typically omit pelagic plankton diversity. Diversity, however, may affect functions such as primary production ...

  19. Responses of East Asian Summer Monsoon to Natural and Anthropogenic Forcings in the 17 Latest CMIP5 Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Fengfei; Zhou, Tianjun; Qian, Yun

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we examined the responses of East Asian Summer Monsoon (EASM) to natural (solar variability and volcanic aerosols) and anthropogenic (greenhouse gasses and aerosols) forcings simulated in the 17 latest Coupled Model Intercomparison Program phase 5 (CMIP5) models with 105 realizations. The observed weakening trend of low-level EASM circulation during 1958-2001 is partly reproduced under all-forcing runs. A comparison of separate forcing experiments reveals that the aerosol-forcing plays a primary role in driving the weakened low-level monsoon circulation. The preferential cooling over continental East Asia caused by aerosol affects the monsoon circulation through reducing the land-sea thermal contrast and results in higher sea level pressure over northern China. In the upper-level, both natural-forcing and aerosol-forcing contribute to the observed southward shift of East Asian subtropical jet through changing the meridional temperature gradient.

  20. Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bakule, Pavel [STFC, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Yokoyama, Koji [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

  1. CCCG 2014, Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 1113, 2014 An improved method for generating triangle-mesh models of images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adams, Michael D.

    CCCG 2014, Halifax, Nova Scotia, August 11­13, 2014 An improved method for generating triangle of Victoria, Victoria, BC, Canada, {xiaom,mdadams}@ece.uvic.ca triangulated were chosen. Since

  2. REVIEW AND IMPROVEMENT OF SIMPLE MECHANICAL MODELS FOR PREDICTING THE FORCE-DISPLACEMENT RESPONSE OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thévenaz, Jacques

    engineering demand parameters and mechanical models that link local and global deformation quantities. Although unreinforced masonry (URM) is one of the most used construction materials for residential quantities, e.g. curvature profiles and shear strain profiles, we show that this is due to the formation

  3. Modeling the Inhomogeneous Response and Formation of Shear Bands in Steady and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of these models, the `flow curve' of stress and apparent shear rate resulting from an assumption of homogeneous de of Machanical Engineering, MIT 1 #12;1 Introduction A central assumption behind rheometry is that the velocity shampoos and body gels; in the petroleum industry they are used in fracturing operations and enhanced oil

  4. Comparison of Demand Response Performance with an EnergyPlus Model in a Low Energy Campus Building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudley, Junqiao Han; Black, Doug; Apte, Mike; Piette, Mary Ann; Berkeley, Pam

    2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied a low energy building on a campus of the University of California. It has efficient heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems, consisting of a dual-fan/dual-duct variable air volume (VAV) system. As a major building on the campus, it was included in two demand response (DR) events in the summers of 2008 and 2009. With chilled water supplied by thermal energy storage in the central plant, cooling fans played a critical role during DR events. In this paper, an EnergyPlus model of the building was developed and calibrated. We compared both whole-building and HVAC fan energy consumption with model predictions to understand why demand savings in 2009 were much lower than in 2008. We also used model simulations of the study building to assess pre-cooling, a strategy that has been shown to improve demand saving and thermal comfort in many types of building. This study indicates a properly calibrated EnergyPlus model can reasonably predict demand savings from DR events and can be useful for designing or optimizing DR strategies.

  5. A polar stratospheric cloud parameterization for the global modeling initiative three-dimensional model and its response to stratospheric aircraft

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Considine, D. B. [Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center and Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland, College Park (United States)] [Earth System Science Interdisciplinary Center and Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland, College Park (United States); Douglass, A. R. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States)] [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland (United States); Connell, P. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Kinnison, D. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States); Rotman, D. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California (United States)

    2000-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new parameterization of polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) which was written for and incorporated into the three-dimensional (3-D) chemistry and transport model (CTM) developed for NASA's Atmospheric Effects of Aviation Project (AEAP) by the Global Modeling Initiative (GMI). The parameterization was designed to respond to changes in NO{sub y} and H{sub 2}O produced by high-speed civilian transport (HSCT) emissions. The parameterization predicts surface area densities (SADs) of both Type 1 and Type 2 PSCs for use in heterogeneous chemistry calculations. Type 1 PSCs are assumed to have a supercooled ternary sulfate (STS) composition, and Type 2 PSCs are treated as water ice with a coexisting nitric acid trihydrate (NAT) phase. Sedimentation is treated by assuming that the PSC particles obey lognormal size distributions, resulting in a realistic mass flux of condensed phase H{sub 2}O and HNO{sub 3}. We examine a simulation of the Southern Hemisphere high-latitude lower stratosphere winter and spring seasons driven by temperature and wind fields from a modified version of the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Middle Atmosphere Community Climate Model Version 2 (MACCM2). Predicted PSC SADs and median radii for both Type 1 and Type 2 PSCs are consistent with observations. Gas phase HNO{sub 3} and H{sub 2}O concentrations in the high-latitude lower stratosphere qualitatively agree with Cryogenic Limb Array Etalon Spectrometer (CLAES) HNO{sub 3} and Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) H{sub 2}O observations. The residual denitrification and dehydration of the model polar vortex after polar winter compares well with atmospheric trace molecule spectroscopy (ATMOS) observations taken during November 1994. When the NO{sub x} and H{sub 2}O emissions of a standard 500-aircraft HSCT fleet with a NO{sub x} emission index of 5 are added, NO{sub x} and H{sub 2}O concentrations in the Southern Hemisphere polar vortex before winter increase by up to 3%. This results in earlier onset of PSC formation, denitrification, and dehydration. Active Cl{sub y} increases and produces small ({approx}1%) decreases in lower stratospheric vortex O{sub 3} concentrations during the spring relative to the HSCT-free run. (c) 2000 American Geophysical Union.

  6. Effect of voltage dynamics on response properties in a model of sensory hair cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amro, Rami

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensory hair cells in auditory and vestibular organs rely on active mechanisms to achieve high sensitivity and frequency selectivity. Recent experimental studies have documented self-sustained oscillations in hair cells of lower vertebrates on two distinct levels. First, the hair bundle can undergo spontaneous mechanical oscillations. Second, somatic electric voltage oscillations across the baso-lateral membrane of the hair cell have been observed. We develop a biophysical model of the bullfrog's saccular hair cell consisting of two compartments, mechanical and electrical, to study how the mechanical and the voltage oscillations interact to produce coherent self-sustained oscillations and how this interaction contributes to the overall sensitivity and selectivity of the hair cell. The model incorporates nonlinear mechanical stochastic hair bundle system coupled bi-directionally to a Hodgkin-Huxley type system describing somatic ionic currents. We isolate regions of coherent spontaneous oscillations in the par...

  7. The response of strati?ed swirling ?ames to acoustic forcing: experiments and comparison to model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Zhiyi; Hochgreb, Simone

    2014-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    systems from a positive coupling between pressure perturbations and the heat release rate oscillation [1], and have posed significant challenges to the development of advanced gas turbine engines [1–3]. The drive towards lean operation leaves combustion... . Lieuwen, V. Yang, Combustion instabilities in gas turbine en- gines: operational experience, fundamental mechanisms and modeling, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, 2005. [2] Y. Huang, V. Yang, Progress in Energy and Combustion Science 35...

  8. Modeling surfaces in the context of pulsed-power : work functions, electron emission and dynamic response.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochrane, Kyle Robert (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Chantrenne, Sophie (SAIC, Albuquerque, NM); Mattsson, Thomas Kjell Rene; Faleev, Sergey V. (SNAMI Inc., AL)

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to quickly understand and deal with issues on ZR, or to virtually design a future ZX accelerator, requires a physics-based capability to simulate all key pulsed power components. Highly important for gas switches and transmission lines are surface phenomena: thermionic emission, photoemission, field emission, and ion-surface dynamics. These are complex processes even at normal conditions, when coupled to the dynamic environment in pulsed power components, the current state of the art of understanding is not at the level of science based predictive modeling. Modeling efforts at the macroscopic level (finite element based hydrodynamic simulations) require detailed information of these processes to yield more reliable results. This is the final report of an LDRD project in the science of extreme environments investment area; the project was focused on describing the physics of surfaces of materials of interest in pulsed-power components. We have calculated the temperature dependence of work functions for metals from first principles using density functional theory (DFT) as well as investigated the effect of initial oxidation and alloying. By using the GW method, we have gone beyond DFT to calculate work functions for Al. The GW work required base-lining the GW results for different systems, since GW lacks a description of total energy. Lastly, we investigated the more macroscopic physics of how a surface and bulk material responds to a very high current under a short time, representative for current loads in pulsed-power components, with emphasis on materials modeling. These simulations were made using two hydrodynamic codes, ALEGRA and MACH2, in order to focus on the materials models themselves.

  9. Effect of voltage dynamics on response properties in a model of sensory hair cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rami Amro; Alexander B. Neiman

    2012-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensory hair cells in auditory and vestibular organs rely on active mechanisms to achieve high sensitivity and frequency selectivity. Recent experimental studies have documented self-sustained oscillations in hair cells of lower vertebrates on two distinct levels. First, the hair bundle can undergo spontaneous mechanical oscillations. Second, somatic electric voltage oscillations across the baso-lateral membrane of the hair cell have been observed. We develop a biophysical model of the bullfrog's saccular hair cell consisting of two compartments, mechanical and electrical, to study how the mechanical and the voltage oscillations interact to produce coherent self-sustained oscillations and how this interaction contributes to the overall sensitivity and selectivity of the hair cell. The model incorporates nonlinear mechanical stochastic hair bundle system coupled bi-directionally to a Hodgkin-Huxley type system describing somatic ionic currents. We isolate regions of coherent spontaneous oscillations in the parameter space of the model and then study how coupling between compartments affect sensitivity of the hair cell to external mechanical perturbations. We show that spontaneous electrical oscillations may enhance significantly the sensitivity and selectivity of the hair cell.

  10. Simulating the growth response of aspen to elevated ozone: a mechanistic approach to scaling a leaf-level model of ozone effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simulating the growth response of aspen to elevated ozone: a mechanistic approach to scaling a leaf-level model of ozone effects on photosynthesis to a complex canopy architecture§ M.J. Martina, *, G.E. Hosta; accepted 17 July 2001 ``Capsule'': A process model is described that predicts the relative effects of ozone

  11. Transient Climate Response in a Two-Layer Energy-Balance Model. Part I: Analytical Solution and Parameter Calibration Using CMIP5 AOGCM Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    analyzing the global thermal properties of atmosphere­ocean coupled general circulation models (AOGCMs perturbation, some EBMs assume that the thermal energy balance of the climate system is only expressedTransient Climate Response in a Two-Layer Energy-Balance Model. Part I: Analytical Solution

  12. A simulation model of the response of molting Pacific black brant to helicopter disturbance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Mark Wayne

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , unpubl. data). Interpolation was used to fill gape in the data. The model has 3 classes of flock size (&26, 26-100, &100), 11 altitudes (150, 305, 460, 610, 760, 915, 1065, 1220, 1525, 1680, 1830 m), and 13 classes of lateral distance (0-0. 500, 0. 501...-then statements. For example, an overflight at an altitude of 305 m (1000 ft) directly over a flock of 75 brant would cause the birds to be 19 TABLE 2 Simulation of a either a Bell 206 or Bell 412 helicopter flying directly from Lonely to Kogru airfield...

  13. The response of a capacitively coupled discharge to the formation of dust particles: Experiments and modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denysenko, I.; Berndt, J.; Kovacevic, E.; Stefanovic, I.; Selenin, V.; Winter, J. [School of Physics and Technology, V. N. Karazin Kharkiv National University, Svobody sq. 4, 61077 Kharkiv (Ukraine); Institute of Experimental Physics II, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Institute of Experimental Physics II, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum, Germany and Institute of Physics, POB 57, 11001 Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro); Institute of Experimental Physics II, Ruhr-University Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The influence of dust particles on the properties of a capacitively coupled Ar-C{sub 2}H{sub 2} discharge is studied both experimentally and theoretically. The results of measurements of the intensity and spatial distribution of the emitted light, the line width of the fast component of H{sub {alpha}} line and of the electron density during the particle growth are presented. To analyze the experimental results a one-dimensional discharge model is developed. Using the model the effects of dust grains on the power absorption (taking into account stochastic and Ohmic heating in the plasma sheaths), the optical emission intensity profile, the sheath size, the rf electric field and on the energy of positive ions bombarding the electrodes are investigated. In particular, it is shown that the decrease of the power absorption in the sheaths of complex plasmas is due to the dependence of the stochastic and Ohmic heating in the plasma sheaths on the electron temperature and the current flowing across the discharge plates. The results of the calculations are compared with the available experimental data and found to be in good agreement.

  14. The Impact of Misspecifying A Higher Level Nesting Structure in Item Response Theory Models: A Monte Carlo Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Qiong

    2013-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Discussion .............................................................................................................. 42 CHAPTER IV STUDY TWO: A MULTILEVEL ITEM RESPONSE THEORY ANALYSIS OF PISA 2009 DATA...

  15. RELAP5-3D Modeling of Heat Transfer Components (Intermediate Heat Exchanger and Helical-Coil Steam Generator) for NGNP Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N. A. Anderson; P. Sabharwall

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant project is aimed at the research and development of a helium-cooled high-temperature gas reactor that could generate both electricity and process heat for the production of hydrogen. The heat from the high-temperature primary loop must be transferred via an intermediate heat exchanger to a secondary loop. Using RELAP5-3D, a model was developed for two of the heat exchanger options a printed-circuit heat exchanger and a helical-coil steam generator. The RELAP5-3D models were used to simulate an exponential decrease in pressure over a 20 second period. The results of this loss of coolant analysis indicate that heat is initially transferred from the primary loop to the secondary loop, but after the decrease in pressure in the primary loop the heat is transferred from the secondary loop to the primary loop. A high-temperature gas reactor model should be developed and connected to the heat transfer component to simulate other transients.

  16. An integrated model supporting histological and biometric responses as predictive biomarkers of fish health status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres Junior, Audalio Rebelo [Department of Oceanography and Limnology, Federal University of Maranhão (Brazil); Sousa, Débora Batista Pinheiro [Postgraduate Program of Aquatic Resources and Fishery (PPGRAP/UEMA), State University of Maranhão (Brazil); Neta, Raimunda Nonata Fortes Carvalho [Department of Chemistry and Biology, State University of Maranhão (Brazil)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, an experimental system of histological (branchial lesions) biomarkers and biometric data in catfish (Sciades herzbergii) was modeled. The fish were sampled along known pollution areas (S1) and from environmental protect areas (S2) in São Marcos' Bay, Brazil. Gills were fixed in 10% formalin and usual histological techniques were used in the first gill arch right. The lesions were observed by light microscopy. There were no histopathological changes in animals captured at reference site (S1). However, in the catfish collected in the potentially contaminated area (S2) was observed several branchial lesions, such as lifting of the lamellar epithelium, fusion of some secondary lamellae, hypertrophy of epithelial cells and lamellar aneurysm. The analysis using the biometric data showed significant differences, being highest in fish analyzed in the reference area. This approach revealed spatial differences related with biometric patterns and morphological modifications of catfish.

  17. Modeling of Oceanic Gas Hydrate Instability and Methane Release in Response to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, Matthew; Reagan, Matthew T.; Moridis, George J.

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Paleooceanographic evidence has been used to postulate that methane from oceanic hydrates may have had a significant role in regulating global climate, implicating global oceanic deposits of methane gas hydrate as the main culprit in instances of rapid climate change that have occurred in the past. However, the behavior of contemporary oceanic methane hydrate deposits subjected to rapid temperature changes, like those predicted under future climate change scenarios, is poorly understood. To determine the fate of the carbon stored in these hydrates, we performed simulations of oceanic gas hydrate accumulations subjected to temperature changes at the seafloor and assessed the potential for methane release into the ocean. Our modeling analysis considered the properties of benthic sediments, the saturation and distribution of the hydrates, the ocean depth, the initial seafloor temperature, and for the first time, estimated the effect of benthic biogeochemical activity. The results show that shallow deposits--such as those found in arctic regions or in the Gulf of Mexico--can undergo rapid dissociation and produce significant methane fluxes of 2 to 13 mol/yr/m{sup 2} over a period of decades, and release up to 1,100 mol of methane per m{sup 2} of seafloor in a century. These fluxes may exceed the ability of the seafloor environment (via anaerobic oxidation of methane) to consume the released methane or sequester the carbon. These results will provide a source term to regional or global climate models in order to assess the coupling of gas hydrate deposits to changes in the global climate.

  18. U.S. airport entry screening in response to pandemic influenza: Modeling and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, John D. [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS); Brigantic, Robert [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Muller, G. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Gadgil, Ashok [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); Delp, Woody [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL); McMahon, Benjamin H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lee, Russell [ORNL; Kulesz, Jim [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Mihelic, F. Matthew [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A stochastic discrete event simulation model was developed to assess the effectiveness of passenger screening for Pandemic Influenza (PI) at U.S. airport foreign entry. Methods: International passengers arriving at 18 U.S. airports from Asia, Europe, South America, and Canada were assigned to one of three states: not infected, infected with PI, infected with other respiratory illness. Passengers passed through layered screening then exited the model. 80% screening effectiveness was assumed for symptomatic passengers; 6% asymptomatic passengers. Results: In the first 100 days of a global pandemic, U.S. airport screening would evaluate over 17 M passengers with 800 K secondary screenings. 11,570 PI infected passengers (majority asymptomatic) would enter the U.S. undetected from all 18 airports. Foreign airport departure screening significantly decreased the false negative (infected/undetected) passengers. U.S. attack rates: no screening (26.9%-30.9%); screening (26.4%-30.6%); however airport screening results in 800 K-1.8 M less U.S. PI cases; 16 K-35 K less deaths (2% fatality rate). Antiviral medications for travel contact prophylaxis (10 contacts/PI passenger) were high - 8.8 M. False positives from all 18 airports: 100-200/day. Conclusions: Foreign shore exit screening greatly reduces numbers of PI infected passengers. U.S. airport screening identifies 50% infected individuals; efficacy is limited by the asymptomatic PI infected. Screening will not significantly delay arrival of PI via international air transport, but will reduce the rate of new US cases and subsequent deaths. (C) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Ecological Impacts of the Cerro Grande Fire: Predicting Elk Movement and Distribution Patterns in Response to Vegetative Recovery through Simulation Modeling October 2005

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S.P. Rupp

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In May 2000, the Cerro Grande Fire burned approximately 17,200 ha in north-central New Mexico as the result of an escaped prescribed burn initiated by Bandelier National Monument. The interaction of large-scale fires, vegetation, and elk is an important management issue, but few studies have addressed the ecological implications of vegetative succession and landscape heterogeneity on ungulate populations following large-scale disturbance events. Primary objectives of this research were to identify elk movement pathways on local and landscape scales, to determine environmental factors that influence elk movement, and to evaluate movement and distribution patterns in relation to spatial and temporal aspects of the Cerro Grande Fire. Data collection and assimilation reflect the collaborative efforts of National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, and Department of Energy (Los Alamos National Laboratory) personnel. Geographic positioning system (GPS) collars were used to track 54 elk over a period of 3+ years and locational data were incorporated into a multi-layered geographic information system (GIS) for analysis. Preliminary tests of GPS collar accuracy indicated a strong effect of 2D fixes on position acquisition rates (PARs) depending on time of day and season of year. Slope, aspect, elevation, and land cover type affected dilution of precision (DOP) values for both 2D and 3D fixes, although significant relationships varied from positive to negative making it difficult to delineate the mechanism behind significant responses. Two-dimensional fixes accounted for 34% of all successfully acquired locations and may affect results in which those data were used. Overall position acquisition rate was 93.3% and mean DOP values were consistently in the range of 4.0 to 6.0 leading to the conclusion collar accuracy was acceptable for modeling purposes. SAVANNA, a spatially explicit, process-oriented ecosystem model, was used to simulate successional dynamics. Inputs to the SAVANNA included a land cover map, long-term weather data, soil maps, and a digital elevation model. Parameterization and calibration were conducted using field plots. Model predictions of herbaceous biomass production and weather were consistent with available data and spatial interpolations of snow were considered reasonable for this study. Dynamic outputs generated by SAVANNA were integrated with static variables, movement rules, and parameters developed for the individual-based model through the application of a habitat suitability index. Model validation indicated reasonable model fit when compared to an independent test set. The finished model was applied to 2 realistic management scenarios for the Jemez Mountains and management implications were discussed. Ongoing validation of the individual-based model presented in this dissertation provides an adaptive management tool that integrates interdisciplinary experience and scientific information, which allows users to make predictions about the impact of alternative management policies.

  20. Resonant Generation of Internal Waves on a Model Continental Slope H. P. Zhang, B. King, and Harry L. Swinney

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    within a thin boundary layer above the bottom surface. The resonant wave is unstable because of strong for the intense boundary flows on continental slopes. DOI: 10.1103/PhysRevLett.100.244504 PACS numbers: 47.35.Bb waves in the oceans are generated by oscillatory tides flowing over ocean to- pography

  1. Utilizing the C2Maps Platform for Characterizing Drug-Protein Relations, Generating Mobile Games, and Constructing Integrated Pathway Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Yaoqi

    Utilizing the C2Maps Platform for Characterizing Drug-Protein Relations, Generating Mobile Games of Science. The C2Maps platform is a collection of genome-wide data that display the connections between disease specific proteins. Manual curation is important for the C2Maps platform in order to validate

  2. Utilizing Context in Generative Bayesian Models for Linked Corpus Saurabh Kataria and Prasenjit Mitra and Sumit Bhatia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, C. Lee

    (Blei, Ng, and Jordan 2003) and PLSA (Hofmann 1999) model the co- occurrence patterns present in text, the content based topic models (Blei, Ng, and Jordan 2003; Hofmann 1999; Blei and Lafferty 2006) completely. (Nallapati et al. 2008) and Cheng, et al. (Chang and Blei 2009) have shown that modeling the ci- tation

  3. Emergency Response Equipment and Related Training: Airborne Radiological Computer System (Model II)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David P. Colton

    2007-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The materials included in the Airborne Radiological Computer System, Model-II (ARCS-II) were assembled with several considerations in mind. First, the system was designed to measure and record the airborne gamma radiation levels and the corresponding latitude and longitude coordinates, and to provide a first overview look of the extent and severity of an accident's impact. Second, the portable system had to be light enough and durable enough that it could be mounted in an aircraft, ground vehicle, or watercraft. Third, the system must control the collection and storage of the data, as well as provide a real-time display of the data collection results to the operator. The notebook computer and color graphics printer components of the system would only be used for analyzing and plotting the data. In essence, the provided equipment is composed of an acquisition system and an analysis system. The data can be transferred from the acquisition system to the analysis system at the end of the data collection or at some other agreeable time.

  4. Transition-fault test generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cobb, Bradley Douglas

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    . One way to detect these timing defects is to apply test patterns to the integrated circuit that are generated using the transition-fault model. Unfortunately, industry's current transition-fault test generation schemes produce test sets that are too...

  5. Method of grid generation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Barnette, Daniel W. (Veguita, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a method of grid generation that uses the geometry of the problem space and the governing relations to generate a grid. The method can generate a grid with minimized discretization errors, and with minimal user interaction. The method of the present invention comprises assigning grid cell locations so that, when the governing relations are discretized using the grid, at least some of the discretization errors are substantially zero. Conventional grid generation is driven by the problem space geometry; grid generation according to the present invention is driven by problem space geometry and by governing relations. The present invention accordingly can provide two significant benefits: more efficient and accurate modeling since discretization errors are minimized, and reduced cost grid generation since less human interaction is required.

  6. Side slope design based on human tolerance to vehicle response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weaver, Graeme Douglas

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an investigation of simulated vehicle response to the traversal of roadside terrain features. A Texas Transportation Institute adaptation of the CALSVA model was utilized to quantify the relative lateral, longitudinal, and vertical acceleration levels generated... by traversal of roadside cross-sections commonly employed in highway design. STUDY -SOCEDURS The principal aim of this research was to investigate the vehicle dynamic response during traversal of various roadside terrain featuzes to provide a basis...

  7. INTEGRATION OF PV IN DEMAND RESPONSE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    . It may also be implemented by means of customer-sited emergency power generation (e.g., diesel generators the case that distributed PV generation deserves a substantial portion of the credit allotted to demand response programs. This is because PV generation acts as a catalyst to demand response, markedly enhancing

  8. Modeling and Field Test Planning Activities in Support of Disposal of Heat-Generating Waste in Salt

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Blanco Martin, Laura; Mukhopadhyay, Sumit; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2014-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The modeling efforts in support of the field test planning conducted at LBNL leverage on recent developments of tools for modeling coupled thermal-hydrological-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in salt and their effect on brine migration at high temperatures. This work includes development related to, and implementation of, essential capabilities, as well as testing the model against relevant information and published experimental data related to the fate and transport of water. These are modeling capabilities that will be suitable for assisting in the design of field experiment, especially related to multiphase flow processes coupled with mechanical deformations, at high temperature. In this report, we first examine previous generic repository modeling results, focusing on the first 20 years to investigate the expected evolution of the different processes that could be monitored in a full-scale heater experiment, and then present new results from ongoing modeling of the Thermal Simulation for Drift Emplacement (TSDE) experiment, a heater experiment on the in-drift emplacement concept at the Asse Mine, Germany, and provide an update on the ongoing model developments for modeling brine migration. LBNL also supported field test planning activities via contributions to and technical review of framework documents and test plans, as well as participation in workshops associated with field test planning.

  9. Power and Frequency Control as it Relates to Wind-Powered Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacommare, Kristina S H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Undrill. 1975. "Automatic Generation Control", IEEE Tutorialfraction of generation providing response grid. The adjustment of generation, minute-by- minute, in

  10. Steam generator tube failures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

  11. Mechanics of torque generation in the bacterial flagellar motor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kranthi K. Mandadapu; Jasmine A. Nirody; Richard M. Berry; George Oster

    2015-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The bacterial flagellar motor (BFM) is responsible for driving bacterial locomotion and chemotaxis, fundamental processes in pathogenesis and biofilm formation. In the BFM, torque is generated at the interface between transmembrane proteins (stators) and a rotor. It is well-established that the passage of ions down a transmembrane gradient through the stator complex provides the energy needed for torque generation. However, the physics involved in this energy conversion remain poorly understood. Here we propose a mechanically specific model for torque generation in the BFM. In particular, we identify two fundamental forces involved in torque generation: electrostatic and steric. We propose that electrostatic forces serve to position the stator, while steric forces comprise the actual 'power stroke'. Specifically, we predict that ion-induced conformational changes about a proline 'hinge' residue in an $\\alpha$-helix of the stator are directly responsible for generating the power stroke. Our model predictions fit well with recent experiments on a single-stator motor. Furthermore, we propose several experiments to elucidate the torque-speed relationship in motors where the number of stators may not be constant. The proposed model provides a mechanical explanation for several fundamental features of the flagellar motor, including: torque-speed and speed-ion motive force relationships, backstepping, variation in step sizes, and the puzzle of swarming experiments.

  12. RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yen, W.W.S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR. GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA Energy and Environment

  13. Comparison of Strong Gravitational Lens Model Software II. HydraLens: Computer-Assisted Strong Gravitational Lens Model Generation and Translation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefor, Alsn T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The behavior of strong gravitational lens model software in the analysis of lens models is not necessarily consistent among the various software available, suggesting that the use of several models may enhance the understanding of the system being studied. Among the publicly available codes, the model input files are heterogeneous, making the creation of multiple models tedious. An enhanced method of creating model files and a method to easily create multiple models, may increase the number of comparison studies. HydraLens simplifies the creation of model files for four strong gravitational lens model software packages, including Lenstool, Gravlens/Lensmodel, glafic and PixeLens, using a custom designed GUI for each of the four codes that simplifies the entry of the model for each of these codes, obviating the need for user manuals to set the values of the many flags and in each data field. HydraLens is designed in a modular fashion, which simplifies the addition of other strong gravitational lens codes in th...

  14. Modeling runoff response of pervious pavement systems at a catchment scale O. Epshtein1, L. Turnbull2, and S. Earl2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Modeling runoff response of pervious pavement systems at a catchment scale O. Epshtein1, L of Sustainability, Arizona State University 1. INTRODUCTION The application potential of pervious pavements urban Total Impervious Area (TIA) is not a feasible solution, pervious pavements operate as self

  15. Modeling Sea Ice-Ocean-Ecosystem Responses to Climate Changes in the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Seas with Data Assimilation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Marine Science and Technology, Haoguo Hu - CILER, University of Michigan Overview This project will useModeling Sea Ice-Ocean-Ecosystem Responses to Climate Changes in the Bering-Chukchi-Beaufort Seas-Investigators: Leo Oey - Princeton University, Tel Ezer - Old Dominion University, K. Mizobata - Tokyo University

  16. Investigation of Wave Energy Converter Effects on Near-shore Wave Fields: Model Generation Validation and Evaluation - Kaneohe Bay HI.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, Jesse D.; Chang, Grace; Jones, Craig

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The numerical model, SWAN (Simulating WAves Nearshore) , was used to simulate wave conditions in Kaneohe Bay, HI in order to determine the effects of wave energy converter ( WEC ) devices on the propagation of waves into shore. A nested SWAN model was validated then used to evaluate a range of initial wave conditions: significant wave heights (H s ) , peak periods (T p ) , and mean wave directions ( MWD) . Differences between wave height s in the presence and absence of WEC device s were assessed at locations in shore of the WEC array. The maximum decrease in wave height due to the WEC s was predicted to be approximately 6% at 5 m and 10 m water depths. Th is occurred for model initiation parameters of H s = 3 m (for 5 m water depth) or 4 m (10 m water depth) , T p = 10 s, and MWD = 330deg . Subsequently, bottom orbital velocities were found to decrease by about 6%.

  17. Modeling Long-term Creep Performance for Welded Nickel-base Superalloy Structures for Power Generation Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Chen

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report here a constitutive model for predicting long-term creep strain evolution in ?’ strengthened Ni-base superalloys. Dislocation climb-bypassing ?’, typical in intermediate ?’ volume fraction (~20%) alloys, is considered as the primary deformation mechanism. Dislocation shearing ?’ to anti-phase boundary (APB) faults and diffusional creep are also considered for high-stress and high-temperature low-stress conditions, respectively. Additional damage mechanism is taken into account for rapid increase in tertiary creep strain. The model has been applied to Alloy 282, and calibrated in a temperature range of 1375-1450?F, and stress range of 15-45ksi. The model parameters and a MATLAB code are provided. This report is prepared by Monica Soare and Chen Shen at GE Global Research. Technical discussions with Dr. Vito Cedro are greatly appreciated. This work was supported by DOE program DE-FE0005859

  18. Thermoelectric Generators 1. Thermoelectric generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ho Sung

    1 Thermoelectric Generators HoSung Lee 1. Thermoelectric generator 1.1 Basic Equations In 1821 effects are called the thermoelectric effects. The mechanisms of thermoelectricity were not understood. Cold Hot I - -- - - - - -- Figure 1 Electron concentration in a thermoelectric material. #12;2 A large

  19. Current generation by helicons and LH waves in modern tokamaks and reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO. Scenarios, modeling and antennae

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vdovin, V. [NRC Kurchatov Institute Tokamak Physics Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Innovative concept and 3D full wave code modeling Off-axis current drive by RF waves in large scale tokamaks, reactors FNSF-AT, ITER and DEMO for steady state operation with high efficiency was proposed [1] to overcome problems well known for LH method [2]. The scheme uses the helicons radiation (fast magnetosonic waves at high (20–40) IC frequency harmonics) at frequencies of 500–1000 MHz, propagating in the outer regions of the plasmas with a rotational transform. It is expected that the current generated by Helicons will help to have regimes with negative magnetic shear and internal transport barrier to ensure stability at high normalized plasma pressure ?{sub N} > 3 (the so-called Advanced scenarios) of interest for FNSF and the commercial reactor. Modeling with full wave three-dimensional codes PSTELION and STELEC2 showed flexible control of the current profile in the reactor plasmas of ITER, FNSF-AT and DEMO [2,3], using multiple frequencies, the positions of the antennae and toroidal waves slow down. Also presented are the results of simulations of current generation by helicons in tokamaks DIII-D, T-15MD and JT-60SA [3]. In DEMO and Power Plant antenna is strongly simplified, being some analoge of mirrors based ECRF launcher, as will be shown. For spherical tokamaks the Helicons excitation scheme does not provide efficient Off-axis CD profile flexibility due to strong coupling of helicons with O-mode, also through the boundary conditions in low aspect machines, and intrinsic large amount of trapped electrons, as is shown by STELION modeling for the NSTX tokamak. Brief history of Helicons experimental and modeling exploration in straight plasmas, tokamaks and tokamak based fusion Reactors projects is given, including planned joint DIII-D – Kurchatov Institute experiment on helicons CD [1].

  20. Development and Demonstration of a Modeling Framework for Assessing the Efficacy of Using Mine Water for Thermoelectric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermoelectric power plants use large volumes of water for condenser cooling and other plant operations. Traditionally, this water has been withdrawn from the cleanest water available in streams and rivers. However, as demand for electrical power increases it places increasing demands on freshwater resources resulting in conflicts with other off stream water users. In July 2002, NETL and the Governor of Pennsylvania called for the use of water from abandoned mines to replace our reliance on the diminishing and sometimes over allocated surface water resource. In previous studies the National Mine Land Reclamation Center (NMLRC) at West Virginia University has demonstrated that mine water has the potential to reduce the capital cost of acquiring cooling water while at the same time improving the efficiency of the cooling process due to the constant water temperatures associated with deep mine discharges. The objectives of this project were to develop and demonstrate a user-friendly computer based design aid for assessing the costs, technical and regulatory aspects and potential environmental benefits for using mine water for thermoelectric generation. The framework provides a systematic process for evaluating the hydrologic, chemical, engineering and environmental factors to be considered in using mine water as an alternative to traditional freshwater supply. A field investigation and case study was conducted for the proposed 300 MW Beech Hollow Power Plant located in Champion, Pennsylvania. The field study based on previous research conducted by NMLRC identified mine water sources sufficient to reliably supply the 2-3,000gpm water supply requirement of Beech Hollow. A water collection, transportation and treatment system was designed around this facility. Using this case study a computer based design aid applicable to large industrial water users was developed utilizing water collection and handling principals derived in the field investigation and during previous studies of mine water and power plant cooling. Visual basic software was used to create general information/evaluation modules for a range of power plant water needs that were tested/verified against the Beech Hollow project. The program allows for consideration of blending mine water as needed as well as considering potential thermal and environmental benefits that can be derived from using constant temperature mine water. Users input mine water flow, quality, distance to source, elevations to determine collection, transport and treatment system design criteria. The program also evaluates low flow volumes and sustainable yields for various sources. All modules have been integrated into a seamless user friendly computer design aid and user's manual for evaluating the capital and operating costs of mine water use. The framework will facilitate the use of mine water for thermoelectric generation, reduce demand on freshwater resources and result in environmental benefits from reduced emissions and abated mine discharges.

  1. North-South asymmetry in the modeled phytoplankton community response to climate change over the 21st century

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marinov, Irina; Doney, Scott C; Lima, Ivan D; Lindsay, K.; Moore, J. K; Mahowald, N.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of com- plex Earth System Models uses widely differentacross the IPCC AR5 earth system models, manuscript in

  2. Linking life history theory, environmental setting, and individual-based modeling to compare responses of different fish species to environmental change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Winkle, W.; Rose, K.A.; Winemiller, K.O.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Christensen, S.W. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Otto, R.G. (R.G. Otto Associates, Vienna, MD (United States)); Shuter, B.J. (Ontario Ministry of Natural Resurces, Onatario (Canada))

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We link life history theory, environmental setting, and individual-based modeling to compare the responses of two fish species to environmental change. Life history theory provides the framework for selecting representative species, and in combination with information on important environmental characteristics, it provides the framework for predicting the results of model simulations. Individual-based modeling offers a promising tool for integrating and extrapolating our mechanistic understanding of reproduction, growth, and mortality at the individual level to population-level responses such as size-frequency distributions and indices of year-class strength. Based on the trade-offs between life history characteristics of striped bass Morone saxatilis and smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu and differences in their respective environments, we predicted that young-of-year smallmouth bass are likely to demonstrate a greater compensatory change in growth and mortality than young-of-year striped bass in response to changes in density of early life stages and turnover rates of zooplankton prey. We tested this prediction with a simulation experiment. The pattern of model results was consistent with our expectations: by the end of the first growing season, compensatory changes in length and abundance of juveniles were more pronounced for smallmouth bass than for striped bass. The results also highlighted the dependence of model predictions on the interplay between density of larvae and juveniles and characteristics of their zooplankton prey.

  3. Dynamic response of conventional and hot isostatically pressed Ti6Al4V alloys: experiments and modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nemat-Nasser, Sia

    Dynamic response of conventional and hot isostatically pressed Ti±6Al±4V alloys: experiments of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Center of Excellence for Advanced Materials, University of California thermomechanical response of Ti± 6Al±4V alloys with three dierent microstructures. Two of the alloys are produced

  4. A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight detector response in current mode to inertial confinement fusion experiments (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, A. J.; Cooper, G. W. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Ruiz, C. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Fehl, D. L.; Hahn, K. D.; Leeper, R. J.; Smelser, R.; Torres, J. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1196 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight (nTOF) detector response in current mode for inertial confinement fusion experiments has been applied to the on-axis nTOF detectors located in the basement of the Z-Facility. It will be shown that this method can identify sources of neutron scattering, and is useful for predicting detector responses in future experimental configurations, and for identifying potential sources of neutron scattering when experimental set-ups change. This method can also provide insight on how much broadening neutron scattering contributes to the primary signals, which is then subtracted from them. Detector time responses are deconvolved from the signals, allowing a transformation from dN/dt to dN/dE, extracting neutron spectra at each detector location; these spectra are proportional to the absolute yield.

  5. Systems Biology Model of Interactions Between Tissue Growth Factors and DNA Damage Pathways: Low Dose Response and Cross-Talk in TGFbeta and ATM Signaling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neill, Peter [University of Oxford; Anderson, Jennifer [University of Oxford

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The etiology of radiation carcinogenesis has been described in terms of aberrant changes that span several levels of biological organization. Growth factors regulate many important cellular and tissue functions including apoptosis, differentiation and proliferation. A variety of genetic and epigenetic changes of growth factors have been shown to contribute to cancer initiation and progression. It is known that cellular and tissue damage to ionizing radiation is in part initiated by the production of reactive oxygen species, which can activate cytokine signaling, and the DNA damage response pathways, most notably the ATM signaling pathway. Recently the transforming growth factor ? (TGF?) pathway has been shown to regulate or directly interact with the ATM pathway in the response to radiation. The relevance of this interaction with the ATM pathway is not known although p53 becomes phosphorylated and DNA damage responses are involved. However, growth factor interactions with DNA damage responses have not been elucidated particularly at low doses and further characterization of their relationship to cancer processes is warranted. Our goal will be to use a systems biology approach to mathematically and experimentally describe the low dose responses and cross-talk between the ATM and TGF? pathways initiated by low and high LET radiation. We will characterize ATM and TGF? signaling in epithelial and fibroblast cells using 2D models and ultimately extending to 3D organotypic cell culture models to begin to elucidate possible differences that may occur for different cell types and/or inter-cellular communication. We will investigate the roles of the Smad and Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF2) proteins as the potential major contributors to cross- talk between the TGF? and ATM pathways, and links to cell cycle control and/or the DNA damage response, and potential differences in their responses at low and high doses. We have developed various experimental approaches to apply to these problems using confocal microscopy and flow cytometry to detail changes at low dose/dose-rate in order to understand individual cell responses, and will establish our mathematical models based on the experimental findings resulting from changes in DNA repair, apoptosis and proliferation.

  6. Analysis of permafrost thermal dynamics and response to climate change in the CMIP5 Earth System Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koven, C.D.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    coupled climate-carbon earth system models part i: PhysicalChange in the CMIP5 Earth System Models  Koven, C.D. , W.J.output from a set of Earth System Models (ESMs) (Table 1)

  7. Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressure Responses during Excavation of the TSX Tunnel in Granitic Rock at URL, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling of Damage, Permeability Changes and Pressureof excavation-induced damage, permeability changes, andrange of approaches to model damage and permeability changes

  8. Visuohaptic Borescope Inspection Simulation Training: Modeling Multi-Point Collision Detection/Response and Evaluating Skills Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    Paul, Anand Gramopadhye Industrial Engineering Clemson University Carl Washburn Aircraft Maintenance Program Greenville Technical College Figure 1: Visual comparison of intersection response of actual [Computer Applications]: Social and Behavioral Sciences--Psychology. 1 INTRODUCTION In aircraft maintenance

  9. Abstract--We formulate a three-period model for studying how the exercise of local market power by generation firms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by generation firms affects the equilibrium investment between the generation and the transmission sectors-efficient equilibrium of generation investments) with both those made by an integrated-resources planner (who jointly plans generation and transmission expansions) and those made by a "reactive" network planner (who plans

  10. Abstract--We formulate a three-period model for studying how the exercise of local market power by generation firms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oren, Shmuel S.

    by generation firms affects the equilibrium investment between the generation and the transmission sectors-efficient equilibrium of generation investments) with both those made by an integrated- resources planner (who jointly plans generation and transmission expansions) and those made by a "reactive" network planner (who plans

  11. MCNP LWR Core Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Noah A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactor core input generator allows for MCNP input files to be tailored to design specifications and generated in seconds. Full reactor models can now easily be created by specifying a small set of parameters and generating an MCNP input for a full reactor core. Axial zoning of the core will allow for density variation in the fuel and moderator, with pin-by-pin fidelity, so that BWR cores can more accurately be modeled. LWR core work in progress: (1) Reflectivity option for specifying 1/4, 1/2, or full core simulation; (2) Axial zoning for moderator densities that vary with height; (3) Generating multiple types of assemblies for different fuel enrichments; and (4) Parameters for specifying BWR box walls. Fuel pin work in progress: (1) Radial and azimuthal zoning for generating further unique materials in fuel rods; (2) Options for specifying different types of fuel for MOX or multiple burn assemblies; (3) Additional options for replacing fuel rods with burnable poison rods; and (4) Control rod/blade modeling.

  12. Waste Classification based on Waste Form Heat Generation in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles Using the Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denia Djokic; Steven J. Piet; Layne F. Pincock; Nick R. Soelberg

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study explores the impact of wastes generated from potential future fuel cycles and the issues presented by classifying these under current classification criteria, and discusses the possibility of a comprehensive and consistent characteristics-based classification framework based on new waste streams created from advanced fuel cycles. A static mass flow model, Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT), was used to calculate the composition of waste streams resulting from different nuclear fuel cycle choices. This analysis focuses on the impact of waste form heat load on waste classification practices, although classifying by metrics of radiotoxicity, mass, and volume is also possible. The value of separation of heat-generating fission products and actinides in different fuel cycles is discussed. It was shown that the benefits of reducing the short-term fission-product heat load of waste destined for geologic disposal are neglected under the current source-based radioactive waste classification system , and that it is useful to classify waste streams based on how favorable the impact of interim storage is in increasing repository capacity.

  13. Waste Classification based on Waste Form Heat Generation in Advanced Nuclear Fuel Cycles Using the Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT) Model - 13413

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Djokic, Denia [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California - Berkeley, 4149 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California - Berkeley, 4149 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1730 (United States); Piet, Steven J.; Pincock, Layne F.; Soelberg, Nick R. [Idaho National Laboratory - INL, 2525 North Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)] [Idaho National Laboratory - INL, 2525 North Fremont Avenue, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study explores the impact of wastes generated from potential future fuel cycles and the issues presented by classifying these under current classification criteria, and discusses the possibility of a comprehensive and consistent characteristics-based classification framework based on new waste streams created from advanced fuel cycles. A static mass flow model, Fuel-Cycle Integration and Tradeoffs (FIT), was used to calculate the composition of waste streams resulting from different nuclear fuel cycle choices. This analysis focuses on the impact of waste form heat load on waste classification practices, although classifying by metrics of radiotoxicity, mass, and volume is also possible. The value of separation of heat-generating fission products and actinides in different fuel cycles is discussed. It was shown that the benefits of reducing the short-term fission-product heat load of waste destined for geologic disposal are neglected under the current source-based radioactive waste classification system, and that it is useful to classify waste streams based on how favorable the impact of interim storage is in increasing repository capacity. (authors)

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: economically competitive next generation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    economically competitive next generation biofuels JBEI Updates Techno-Economic Modeling Tools for Biofuels On September 18, 2013, in Biofuels, Biomass, Computational Modeling &...

  15. Recovery and Resilience After a Nuclear Power Plant Disaster: A Medical Decision model for Managing an Effective, Timely, and Balanced Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coleman, C. Norman [National Cancer Institute, NIH; Blumenthal, Daniel J. [National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), Department of Energy

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on experiences in Tokyo responding to the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant crisis, a real-time, medical decision model is presented by which to make key health-related decisions given the central role of health and medical issues in such disasters. Focus is on response and recovery activities that are safe, timely, effective, and well-organized. This approach empowers on-site decision makers to make interim decisions without undue delay using readily available and high-level scientific, medical, communication, and policy expertise. Key features of this approach include ongoing assessment, consultation, information, and adaption to the changing conditions. This medical decision model presented is compatible with the existing US National Response Framework structure.

  16. Hyperbolic Graph Generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldecoa, Rodrigo; Krioukov, Dmitri

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Networks representing many complex systems in nature and society share some common structural properties like heterogeneous degree distributions and strong clustering. Recent research on network geometry has shown that those real networks can be adequately modeled as random geometric graphs in hyperbolic spaces. In this paper, we present a computer program to generate such graphs. Besides real-world-like networks, the program can generate random graphs from other well-known graph ensembles, such as the soft configuration model, random geometric graphs on a circle, or Erd\\H{o}s-R\\'enyi random graphs. The simulations show a good match between the expected values of different network structural properties and the corresponding empirical values measured in generated graphs, confirming the accurate behavior of the program.

  17. Thermomechanical response of WIPP repositories

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maxwell, D.E.; Wahi, K.K.; Dial, B.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coarsely zoned STEALTH 2D calculations were used to investigate two candidate WIPP repositories. The grid was designed for one hundred thousand years of response with modest computing costs. As a result, the early time mechanical response was compromised by non-real oscillations that could not be damped completely before a few thousand years. In spite of these oscillations, it was possible to see that the dominant effects of stress and strain peaked between one and two thousand years, at the time of maximum heat in the site. This time corresponded to the condition that the surface heat loss rate balanced the heat generation rate. Though the creep strains were quite small, a large volume of salt was involved and the effects were significant. The peak surface uplift of 75HLW was increased by about 25% due to creep. However, the deviatoric stress relaxation due to creep produced large changes in the stress fields. The Rustler layer survived reasonable failure criterion for the 75HLW case with creep, and failed both in tension and shear, according to these same criterion, when the calculation was repeated without creep. The deviatoric stress fields, with and without salt creep, concentrated near the repository as expected and also in the Rustler layer due to its relatively high Young's modulus compared to the neighboring layers. Since the time of interest is so much smaller than the 100,000 years this calculation was designed to examine, it is possible to model the WIPP stratigraphy in much more detail and still be able to calculate the response for the time of interest. A finer zoned calculation of the response of the WIPP stratigraphy to a repository similar to the 75 K watt/acre repository is modeled in this report. In this calculation the Rustler formation is modeled as a five layered formation using material properties derived from data taken at the Nome site.

  18. assessing inflammatory response: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Medicine Websites Summary: Gaussian to generate a spike density function. Response latency was assessed as the time when the spikeRELATIONSHIP OF RESPONSE LATENCY AND...

  19. Assessment of Industrial Load for Demand Response across Western Interconnect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alkadi, Nasr E [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Ma, Ookie [United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Demand response (DR) has the ability to both increase power grid reliability and potentially reduce operating system costs. Understanding the role of demand response in grid modeling has been difficult due to complex nature of the load characteristics compared to the modeled generation and the variation in load types. This is particularly true of industrial loads, where hundreds of different industries exist with varying availability for demand response. We present a framework considering industrial loads for the development of availability profiles that can provide more regional understanding and can be inserted into analysis software for further study. The developed framework utilizes a number of different informational resources, algorithms, and real-world measurements to perform a bottom-up approach in the development of a new database with representation of the potential demand response resource in the industrial sector across the U.S. This tool houses statistical values of energy and demand response (DR) potential by industrial plant and geospatially locates the information for aggregation for different territories without proprietary information. This report will discuss this framework and the analyzed quantities of demand response for Western Interconnect (WI) in support of evaluation of the cost production modeling with power grid modeling efforts of demand response.

  20. Logarithmic transformation of response Logarithmic transformation of response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Komarek, Arnost

    Logarithmic transformation of response Logarithmic transformation of response Often, support S of Y is S = (0, ). Logarithm is then one of transformations to consider when trying to obtain a correct (wrong. Model Building 1. Transformation of response #12;Logarithmic transformation of response When does