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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies Print Monday, 06 February 2012 15:48 Organic solar cells based on the polymerfullerene bulk...

2

Quadrennial Technology Review's Alternative Generation Workshop...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Review's Alternative Generation Workshop Slides Preliminary Slides for Alternative Generation Workshop including Carbon Capture and Sequestration, Nuclear Power,...

3

Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Photovoltaic Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies Print Monday, 06 February 2012 15:48 Organic solar cells based on the polymer/fullerene bulk heterojunction (BHJ) model represent one of the most promising technologies for next-generation solar energy conversion due to their low cost and scalability. Traditional organic photovoltaics (OPVs) are thought to have interpenetrating networks of pure polymer and fullerene layers with discrete interfaces. Researchers at Argonne National Laboratory, working with collaborators from the University of Chicago, LBNL, and NIST, used ALS Beamline 11.0.1.2 to perform resonant soft x-ray scattering (RSoXS) on PTB7/fullerene BHJ solar cells to probe performance-related structures at different length scales. These solar cells set a historic record of conversion efficiency (7.4%). The RSoXS demonstrated that the superior performance of PTB7/fullerene solar cells is attributed to surprising hierarchical nanomorphologies ranging from several nanometers of crystallites to tens of nanometers of nanocrystallite aggregates in intermixed PTB7-rich and fullerene-rich domains, themselves hundreds of nanometers in size. This work will lead the research community to rethink ideal OPV morphologies, reconsider which structures should be targeted in OPVs, and enable the rational design of even higher-performance organic solar cells.

4

Other Distributed Generation Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Other Distributed Generation Technologies Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgw...

5

Predictive analysis of concealed social network activities based on communication technology choices: early-warning detection of attack signals from terrorist organizations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

activities based on communication technology choices: early-of what their communications technology choices may revealall avail- able communications technology use records over

Drozdova, Katya; Samoilov, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Geothermal Technologies Office: Electricity Generation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Geothermal Technologies Office Search Search Help Geothermal Technologies Office HOME ABOUT...

7

Program on Technology Innovation: Integrated Generation Technology Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a condensed, public-domain reference for current cost, performance, and technology status data for eight central-station power generation technologies. In this report, central station is defined as >100 MW with the exception of some renewable-resource-based technologies. In addition to fossil- and nuclear-based technologies, four renewable-resource-based technologies are included. This report addresses the principal technology options for utility-scale power generation.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

8

Program on Technology Innovation: Integrated Generation Technology Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Integrated Generation Technology Options is intended to provide a snapshot of current cost and performance and technology trends for central electricity generation stations (>50 MW). This document is designed to help with information on the current options in power generation infrastructure capital investments. This 2008 Integrated Generation Technology Options draws from the results of the 2007 TAG studies with relevant current updates. However, while the TAG addresses about 20 different Power ...

2008-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

Water Use in Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water use is increasingly viewed as an important sustainability metric for electricity generation technologies. Most of the attention on the link between electricity generation and water use focuses on the water used in cooling thermoelectric power plants during operations. This is warranted given the size of these withdrawals; however, all electricity generation technologies, including those that do not rely on thermoelectric generation, use water throughout their life cycles. Each life cycle stage cont...

2012-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

10

Program on Technology Innovation: Integrated Generation Technology Options 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a condensed, public-domain reference for 2012 cost, performance, and technology status data for 10 central-station power-generation technologies, including fossil-, nuclear-, and renewable resource–based technologies. In this report, central station is defined as > 100 MW with the exception of some renewable resource–based technologies. This report addresses the principal technology options for utility-scale power ...

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

11

Reference value choice of the wind turbine active power with doubly-fed induction generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variable speed wind turbine with doubly-fed induction generator (DFIG) is today widely used concept. This paper presents a control system of the DFIG wind turbine with focus on the control strategies and on active power reference value choice. The ... Keywords: DFIG, dynamic simulation, reference value of active power, wind turbine

J. Smajo; M. Smajo; D. Vukadinovic

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

13

Solar Thermal Generation Technologies: 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

After years of relative inactivity, the solar thermal electric (STE) industry is experiencing renewed activity and investment. The shift is partly due to new interest in large-scale centralized electricity generation, for which STE is well suited and offers the lowest cost for solar-specific renewable portfolio standards. With policymaking and public interest driven by concerns such as global climate change, atmospheric emissions, and traditional fossil fuel price and supply volatility, STE is increasing...

2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

14

Entropy Generation Analysis of Desalination Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Increasing global demand for fresh water is driving the development and implementation of a wide variety of seawater desalination technologies. Entropy generation analysis, and specifically, Second Law efficiency, is an ...

Mistry, Karan Hemant

15

Using Information Technology to Reduce a Health Risk| Effect of a Mercury Calculator on Consumer Fish Choices and Test of a Model for Technology Acceptance by Fish Consumers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Research indicates consumers lack adequate information about the mercury content of fish to make informed choices about eating fish. Information technology can be used… (more)

Wallace, Sharon D.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Study of technology acquisition modes : the choice between 'making' and 'buying' technology.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??An enterprise can acquire technology either through 'making' (the pursuit of new technology development through internal R&D) or 'buying' (acquisition from external sources). This is… (more)

Simatupang, T

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Market share elasticities for fuel and technology choice in home heating and cooling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique for estimating own- and cross-elasticities of market share for fuel and technology choices in home heating and cooling is presented. We simulate changes in economic conditions and estimate elasticities by calculating predicted changes in fuel and technology market shares. Elasticities are found with respect to household income, equipment capital cost, and equipment capital cost, and equipment operating cost (including fuel price). The method is applied to a revised and extended version of a study by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI). Data for that study are drawn primarily from the 1975--1979 Annual Housing Surveys. Results are generally similar to previous studies, although our estimates of elasticities are somewhat lower. We feel the superior formulation of consumer choice and the currency of data in EPRI's work produce reliable estimates of market share elasticities. 18 refs., 1 fig., 6 tabs.

Wood, D.J.; Ruderman, H.; McMahon, J.E.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Category:Electricity Generating Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Electricity Generating Technologies Subcategories This category has the following 5 subcategories, out of 5 total. B...

19

Pages that link to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Pages that link to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies" Category:Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to:...

20

Changes related to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Changes related to "Category:Electricity Generating Technologies" Category:Electricity Generating Technologies Jump to:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

MHK Technologies/Platform generators | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generators generators < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Platform generators.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Aqua Magnetics Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Reciprocating Device Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description In the platform configuration the generators sit on a platform and buoy floats move the generator s coil up and down as waves and swell pass underneath Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 06:09.4 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Platform_generators&oldid=681636

22

FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stationary/Distributed Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects to someone by E-mail Share FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on Facebook Tweet about FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on Twitter Bookmark FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on Google Bookmark FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on Delicious Rank FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on Digg Find More places to share FCT Technology Validation: Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects on AddThis.com... Home Transportation Projects Stationary/Distributed Generation Projects DOE Projects Non-DOE Projects Integrated Projects Quick Links Hydrogen Production

23

Program on Technology Innovation: Nuclear Power Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States and other countries are currently planning to expand their nuclear power electrical generation base in order to provide energy security and price stability while reducing greenhouse gas emissions. Since the existing fleet of nuclear plants was built during or before the 1970s, new plants will incorporate more advanced designs. This report documents the current status and potential for advanced nuclear power technology development and/or commercialization over the next 5 to 15 years.

2007-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

24

Advanced gas turbines: The choice for low-cost, environmentally superior electric power generation  

SciTech Connect

In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated an ambitious 8-year program to advance state-of-the-art gas turbine technology for land-based electric power generation. The program, known as the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Program, is a joint government/industry program with the objective to demonstrate advanced industrial and utility gas turbine systems by the year 2000. The goals of the ATS Program are to develop gas turbine systems capable of providing low-cost electric power, while maintaining environmental superiority over competing power generation options. A progress report on the ATS Program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. The technical challenges, advanced critical technology requirements, and systems designs meeting the goals of the program will be described and discussed.

Zeh, C.M.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Berkeley Lab Study of Hydrogen Generating Technology's Lifecycle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Berkeley Lab Study of Hydrogen Generating Technology's Lifecycle Net Energy Balance Designated a 'Hot' Article by Journal Photoelectrochemical hydrogen technology LCA analysis July...

26

Distributed Generation Technologies DGT | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DGT DGT Jump to: navigation, search Name Distributed Generation Technologies (DGT) Place Ithaca, New York Zip 14850 Product Commercializing a technology to convert organic waste into pure and compressed methane gas via anaerobic digestion. Coordinates 39.93746°, -84.553194° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.93746,"lon":-84.553194,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

27

MHK Technologies/Tidal Hydraulic Generators THG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generators THG Generators THG < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Tidal Hydraulic Generators THG.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Tidal Hydraulic Generators Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Ramsey Sound Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The concept of generating energy in this way is made unique by our novel design feature. The generator, devised in 1998, is a hydraulic accumulator system, involving relatively small revolving blades which gather power to a central collector, where electricity is generated. The generator, which is situated under water, is 80 metres square, stands at 15 metres high, and is designed to run for a minimum of ten years without service.

28

MHK Technologies/Sabella River Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sabella River Generator Sabella River Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Sabella River Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Sabella Energy Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/SR 01 Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description A unidirectional river bed turbine Technology Dimensions Technology Nameplate Capacity (MW) 2 Device Testing Date Submitted 7/11/2012 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Sabella_River_Generator&oldid=680598

29

ZERO EMISSION POWER GENERATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Clean Energy Systems (CES) was previously funded by DOE's ''Vision 21'' program. This program provided a proof-of-concept demonstration that CES' novel gas generator (combustor) enabled production of electrical power from fossil fuels without pollution. CES has used current DOE funding for additional design study exercises which established the utility of the CES-cycle for retrofitting existing power plants for zero-emission operations and for incorporation in zero-emission, ''green field'' power plant concepts. DOE funding also helped define the suitability of existing steam turbine designs for use in the CES-cycle and explored the use of aero-derivative turbines for advanced power plant designs. This work is of interest to the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. California's air quality districts have significant non-attainment areas in which CES technology can help. CEC is currently funding a CES-cycle technology demonstration near Bakersfield, CA. The Norwegian government is supporting conceptual studies for a proposed 40 MW zero-emission power plant in Stavager, Norway which would use the CES-cycle. The latter project is called Zero-Emission Norwegian Gas (ZENG). In summary, current engineering studies: (1) supported engineering design of plant subsystems applicable for use with CES-cycle zero-emission power plants, and (2) documented the suitability and availability of steam turbines for use in CES-cycle power plants, with particular relevance to the Norwegian ZENG Project.

Ronald Bischoff; Stephen Doyle

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

30

MHK Technologies/Floating wave Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generator Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Floating wave Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Energy Corp Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Floating Wave Powered Generator is an attenuator that uses three pontoons that pivot on rigid arms as the wave passes driving gears that turn a generator Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 45:12.2 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Floating_wave_Generator&oldid=681577"

31

MHK Technologies/The Linear Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Linear Generator Linear Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage The Linear Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Trident Energy Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/TE4 Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The simplicity of the Trident Energy solution is based around the fact that the system has only one moving part - float / linear generator translator, which is powered by the motion of floats placed in the sea. As waves pass through the wavefarm, so the floats rise and fall. This causes relative motion between the two components of the linear generator (the translator and stator) and electricity is immediately generated. There is absolutely no contact between the two parts of the generator as the energy conversion is entirely electromagnetic.

32

Matrix converter technology in doubly-fed induction generators for wind generators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wind generator technologies have been widely researched and documented. Modern wind generator systems are now being implemented with an output power of up to 5… (more)

Harris, Benjamin J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Information Technology Standards Choices and Industry Structure Outcomes: The Case of the U.S. Home Mortgage Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical IS standards prescribe data structures and definitions, document formats, and business processes for particular industries, in contrast to generic information technology (IT) standards, which concern IT characteristics applicable to many industries. ... Keywords: Adoption, Effects Of Standards, Implementation, Industry Structure, Industry-Level Effects, Is Standards, It Choices, Vertical Standards

Rolf T. Wigand; Charles W. Steinfield

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

ZERO EMISSION POWER GENERATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect

Clean Energy Systems (CES) was previously funded by DOE's ''Vision 21'' program. This program provided a proof-of-concept demonstration that CES' novel gas generator (combustor) enabled production of electrical power from fossil fuels without pollution. CES has used current DOE funding for additional design study exercises which established the utility of the CES-cycle for retrofitting existing power plants for zero-emission operations and for incorporation in zero-emission, ''green field'' power plant concepts. DOE funding also helped define the suitability of existing steam turbine designs for use in the CES-cycle and explored the use of aero-derivative turbines for advanced power plant designs. This work is of interest to the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. California's air quality districts have significant non-attainment areas in which CES technology can help. CEC is currently funding a CES-cycle technology demonstration near Bakersfield, CA. The Norwegian government is supporting conceptual studies for a proposed 40 MW zero-emission power plant in Stavager, Norway which would use the CES-cycle. The latter project is called Zero-Emission Norwegian Gas (ZENG). In summary, current engineering studies: (1) supported engineering design of plant subsystems applicable for use with CES-cycle zero-emission power plants, and (2) documented the suitability and availability of steam turbines for use in CES-cycle power plants, with particular relevance to the Norwegian ZENG Project.

Ronald Bischoff; Stephen Doyle

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

35

MHK Technologies/Current Electric Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generator Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Current Electric Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Current Electric Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Current Electric Generator will create electricity in three different processes simultaniously by harnessing the motion of water current to rotate the generator Two forms of magnetic induction and solar cells on the outer housing will produce electricity very efficiently The generators will be wired up together in large fields on open waterways sumerged from harm The electricity will be sent back to mainland via an underwater wire for consumption The Current Electric Generator is designed with the environment in mind and will primarilly be constructed from recycled materials cutting emmisions cost

36

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Own-Elasticities for Space Conditioning Equipment Equipmentthe choice of a space heat/air conditioning combination. Theutility from air conditioning and space heating alternative

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of space heating to air conditioning choice; 3) explicitthe presence of central air conditioning, it seems unwise tonot to have central air conditioning. Statistical evidence

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Building Integration of Micro-Generation Technologies ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Micro-generation can be defined as residential or small-commercial applications of the on-site generation of power with heating and/or cooling ...

2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

39

MHK Technologies/Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Cyclocean LLC Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 7 8 Open Water System Testing Demonstration and Operation Technology Description Self regulated sub surface current generators that operate independently that tether freely anchored offshore in deep waters in the Gulf Stream Current producing continuos clean energy for the eastern seaboard Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 20:10.1 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Sub_Surface_Counter_Rotation_Current_Generator&oldid=681657

40

MHK Technologies/Direct Drive Power Generation Buoy | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Generation Buoy Power Generation Buoy < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Direct Drive Power Generation Buoy.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Columbia Power Technologies Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description Direct drive point absorber In 2005 Oregon State University entered into an exclusive license agreement with Columbia Power Technologies to jointly develop a direct drive wave energy conversion device Designed to be anchored 2 5 miles off the Oregon coast in 130 feet of water it uses the rise and fall of ocean waves to generate electricity Mooring Configuration Anchored

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

ARPA-E Announces $30 Million for Distributed Generation Technologies...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reliable Electricity Based on ELectrochemical Systems (REBELS) program will develop fuel cell technology for distributed power generation to improve grid stability, increase...

42

Validation Testing of Hydrogen Generation Technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the results of testing performed by ORNL for Photech Energies, Inc. The objective of the testing was to evaluate the efficacy of Photech's hydrogen generation reactor technology, which produces gaseous hydrogen through electrolysis. Photech provided several prototypes of their proprietary reactor for testing and the ancillary equipment, such as power supplies and electrolyte solutions, required for proper operation of the reactors. ORNL measured the production of hydrogen gas (volumetric flow of hydrogen at atmospheric pressure) as a function of input power and analyzed the composition of the output stream to determine the purity of the hydrogen content. ORNL attempted measurements on two basic versions of the prototype reactors-one version had a clear plastic outer cylinder, while another version had a stainless steel outer cylinder-but was only able to complete measurements on reactors in the plastic version. The problem observed in the stainless steel reactors was that in these reactors most of the hydrogen was produced near the anodes along with oxygen and the mixed gases made it impossible to determine the amount of hydrogen produced. In the plastic reactors the production of hydrogen gas increased monotonically with input power, and the flow rates increased faster at low input powers than they did at higher input powers. The maximum flow rate from the cathode port measured during the tests was 0.85 LPM at an input power of about 1100 W, an electrolyte concentration of 20%. The composition of the flow from the cathode port was primarily hydrogen and water vapor, with some oxygen and trace amounts of carbon dioxide. An operational mode that occurs briefly during certain operating conditions, and is characterized by flashes of light and violent bubbling near the cathode, might be attributable to the combustion of hydrogen and oxygen in the electrolyte solution.

Smith, Barton [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Assessment of Micro-Generation Technologies for Distributed Generation Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small micro-turbine engines targeted for stationary power markets have been advancing rapidly the past few years. This report provides intelligence on vendor programs, markets and economic assessments for this emerging technology.

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

44

Technology for automatic generation of application programs: a pragmatic view  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article pragmatically reviews and appraises significant technology and efforts directed toward enhancing application program development and productivity and the challenging automatic generation of application programs. The topics covered are: decision ... Keywords: COBOL generators, automated information system development, automatic program generation, automatic programming, customizers, database generation, problem statement languages, software automation, special purpose languages

Alfonso F. Cardenas

1977-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

MHK Technologies/Gyroscopic wave power generation system | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gyroscopic wave power generation system Gyroscopic wave power generation system < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization Gyrodynamics Corporation Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description This gyroscopic wave power generation system is a pure rotational mechanical system that does not use conventional air turbines and is housed on a unique floating platform float In particular its outstanding feature is that it utilizes the gyroscopic spinning effect A motor is used to turn a 1 meter diameter steel disc flywheel inside the apparatus and when the rolling action of waves against the float tilts it at an angle the gyroscopic effect causes the disc to rotate longitudinally This energy turns a generator producing electricity

46

Available Technologies: High Energy Gamma Generator  

Biofuels; Biotechnology & Medicine. ... In addition, it can simultaneously use two or more target materials to generate photons with discrete energies.

47

Summary of New Generation Technologies and Resources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This compendium includes a PG&E R&D program perspective on the Advanced Energy Systems Technology Information Module (TIM) project, a glossary, a summary of each TIM, updated information on the status and trends of each technology, and a bibliography. The objectives of the TIMs are to enhance and document the PG&E R&D Program's understanding of the technology status, resource potential, deployment hurdles, commercial timing, PG&E applications and impacts, and R&D issues of advanced technologies for electric utility applications in Northern California. [DJE-2005

None

1993-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

48

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

level, the choice alternatives are cooling and no cooling.to zero in central cooling alternative Income ($1000) in airalternatives are conventional air conditioning and heat pump, given the cooling

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Choice in Home Heating and Cooling D.J. Wood, H. Ruderman,IN HOME HEATING AND COOLING* David J. Wood, Henry RudermanIN HOME HEATING AND COOLING David J. Wood, Henry Ruderman,

Wood, D.J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Fuel Cycle Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, as well as for coal and natural gas grid-generation technologies, are provided as baseline cases Cycle Power Plants 14.9 33.1 Natural Gas Turbine, Combined Cycle Power Plants 18.3 46.0 Coal comparable to the total energy use associated with the natural gas and coal grid-generation technologies

Argonne National Laboratory

51

MHK Technologies/Brandl Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generator Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Brandl Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Brandl Motor Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Floating Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Brandl Generator consists of a floating disc that is 10 meters in diameter and one meter thick that rises and falls with the waves A pendulum mass hanging beneath a spring moves up and down anticyclically This mass drives the direct connected magnets that induce an electrical current when they move through the induction coils This drawing shows the basic idea Legend 1 magnets 2 inductance coil 3 floating disc 4 spring 5 pendulum mass

52

MHK Technologies/Under Bottom Wave Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Under Bottom Wave Generator Under Bottom Wave Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Under Bottom Wave Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Glen Edward Cook Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description Water will flow up into the pipe from the down stroke and out of the pipe back into the ocean on the up stroke Waves rolling by will push water into the pipe This will mock the ocean swell A propellar is mounted inside the lower portion of the pipe the upward and downward flow of water will spin the propellar in both direcitons The propellar is connected to a generator

53

ARPA-E Announces $30 Million for Distributed Generation Technologies |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

30 Million for Distributed Generation 30 Million for Distributed Generation Technologies ARPA-E Announces $30 Million for Distributed Generation Technologies November 25, 2013 - 1:00pm Addthis NEWS MEDIA CONTACT (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Today, the Department of Energy announced up to $30 million in Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy (ARPA-E) funding for a new program focused on the development of transformational electrochemical technologies to enable low-cost distributed power generation. ARPA-E's Reliable Electricity Based on ELectrochemical Systems (REBELS) program will develop fuel cell technology for distributed power generation to improve grid stability, increase energy security, and balance intermittent renewable technologies while reducing CO2 emissions associated with current

54

Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology February 6, 2013 - 11:20am Addthis Professor Jack Brouwer, Associate Director and Chief Technology Officer of the National Fuel Cell Research Center, points out the tri-generation facility that uses biogas from Orange County Sanitation District’s wastewater treatment plant to produce hydrogen, heat and power. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Professor Jack Brouwer, Associate Director and Chief Technology Officer of the National Fuel Cell Research Center, points out the tri-generation facility that uses biogas from Orange County Sanitation District's wastewater treatment plant to produce hydrogen, heat and power. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department.

55

Energy Storage and Distributed Generation Technology Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy storage continues to hold a great deal of interest to utilities and other stakeholders in the electric power enterprise. Storage can be used to shift load or energy from one time to another, to provide ancillary services and grid support, and is an enabling technology for smart grid technologies. This report investigates the current state of the art of advanced lead-acid batteries and zinc-air batteries, specifically where pertinent to stationary applications. It focuses on those developments and ...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

56

III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hectares (Mha) of land would be required to meet the EU target for biofuels (5.75 per cent of transport29 III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27 The previous chapters focused on first generation biofuels. In this chapter we focus on second generation biofuels, specifically

57

Program on Technology Innovation: A Conceptual Framework for Modeling the Impact of CO2 Policy on Generator Cash Flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate policy represents a fundamental uncertainty for electricity generating companies. Although many analyses are available, the timing and stringency of domestic climate policies are unknown and will likely be dependent upon the actions of other countries. The outcomes of these deliberations can dramatically change the return on generation investments. Today, many electric companies are actively considering substantial investments in new capacity. The technology choices these companies make and the f...

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

58

Heat Transfer Enhancement: Second Generation Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews current activity in the field of enhanced heat transfer, with the aim of illustrating the technology and typical applications. Guidelines for application of enhanced surfaces are given, and practical concerns and economics are discussed. Special attention is directed toward use of enhanced surfaces in industrial process heat exchangers and heat recovery equipment.

Bergles, A. E.; Webb, R. L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology Supporting Innovative Research to Help Reduce Energy Use and Advance Manufacturing Supporting Innovative Research to Help Reduce Energy Use and Advance Manufacturing The Emerging Technologies team partners with national laboratories, industry, and universities to advance research, development, and commercialization of energy efficient and cost effective building technologies. These partnerships help foster American ingenuity to develop cutting-edge technologies that have less than 5 years to market readiness, and contribute to the goal to reduce energy consumption by at least 50%. Research and Development Improve the energy efficiency of appliances, including

60

MHK Technologies/Yu Oscillating Generator YOG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oscillating Generator YOG Oscillating Generator YOG < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Yu Oscillating Generator YOG.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Yu Energy Corp Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Wave Surge Converter Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description By harnessing force located on top of the device s mast Known as a form of actuator You would get a levered mechanical gain converted to torque for a period of time oscillating the lower half side to side The lower half will then drive a turbine producing power As it slows due to resistance the actuator will harness force again to drive the device Making up for any loss motion do to resistance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

MHK Technologies/Submergible Power Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Submergible Power Generator Submergible Power Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Submergible Power Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Current to Current Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The design of the SPG leverages water flows in varying scenarios to generate electricity While the focus of the C2C deployments is ocean currents the SPG works in a bi directional manner Therefore the SPG can be deployed to generate electricity from tidal differential tidal streams In areas where currents and tidal differential streams converge the SPG with remote control and telemetry systems will track the water velocity In this manner the SPG can be maneuver in three dimensions to optimize water flow Each tube of the catamaran is approximately 150 feet in length The inner tube contains the electronic components and the outer tube is the rotating impeller system comprising a generator with a four blade turbine which measures approximately 100 feet in diameter The total area covered by each SPG is about the size of a football field

62

Fuel cycle comparison of distributed power generation technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the application of fuel cells to distributed power generation were evaluated and compared with the combustion technologies of microturbines and internal combustion engines, as well as the various technologies associated with grid-electricity generation in the United States and California. The results were primarily impacted by the net electrical efficiency of the power generation technologies and the type of employed fuels. The energy use and GHG emissions associated with the electric power generation represented the majority of the total energy use of the fuel cycle and emissions for all generation pathways. Fuel cell technologies exhibited lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and other combustion technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than those for combustion generators. The dependence of all natural-gas-based technologies on petroleum oil was lower than that of internal combustion engines using petroleum fuels. Most fuel cell technologies approaching or exceeding the DOE target efficiency of 40% offered significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions.

Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

63

MHK Technologies/Electric Generating Wave Pipe | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generating Wave Pipe Generating Wave Pipe < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Electric Generating Wave Pipe.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Able Technologies Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The EGWAP incorporates a specially designed environmentally sound hollow noncorroding pipe also known as a tube or container whose total height is from the ocean floor to above the highest wave peak The pipe is anchored securely beneath the ocean floor When the water level in the pipe rises due to wave action a float rises and a counterweight descends This action will empower a main drive gear and other gearings to turn a generator to produce electricity The mechanism also insures that either up or down movement of the float will turn the generator drive gear in the same direction Electrical output of the generator is fed into a transmission cable

64

Distributed Generation: Which technologies? How fast will they emerge?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Distributed Generation: Which technologies? How fast will they emerge? Distributed Generation: Which technologies? How fast will they emerge? Speaker(s): Tony DeVuono Date: March 16, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Julie Osborn Utility deregulation, environmental issues, increases in electricity demand, natural gas/electricity rate changes, new technologies, and several other key drivers are stimulating distributed generation globally. The technologies that have pushed ahead of the pack are micro turbines and fuel cells. Since Modine is a world leader in the manufacturing of heat transfer equipment, we are eager to play in this new, emerging market. Are the market drivers real? Will these technologies survive or even thrive? What are the pitfalls? If you had the responsibility in your company to spend millions and direct dozens of people down the DG path,

65

Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative State/Provincial Govt Utility Savings Category Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Indiana Program Type Corporate Tax Incentive Industry Recruitment/Support Performance-Based Incentive Rebate Program Grant Program Provider Indiana Utility Regulatory Commission This statute establishes the state's support and incentives for the development of new energy production and generating facilities implementing advanced clean coal technology, such as coal gasification. The statute also supports the development of projects using renewable energy sources as well

66

Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration December 31, 2013 - 12:14pm Addthis GIF Policy Group Meeting in Brussels, Belgium, November 2013 GIF Policy Group Meeting in Brussels, Belgium, November 2013 Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary Kelly Deputy Assistant Secretary for Nuclear Reactor Technologies The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) held its 36th Policy Group (PG) meeting on November 21-22 in Brussels, Belgium. The PG reviewed progress on a number of on-going actions and received progress reports from the GIF Experts Group (EG) and the GIF Senior Industry Advisory Panel (SIAP).

67

Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report The development of advanced nuclear energy systems in the U.S. will depend greatly on the continued success of currently operating light water nuclear power plants and the ordering of new installations in the short term. DOE needs to give those immediate objectives the highest priority and any additional support they require to assure their success. DOE is pursuing two initiatives to encourage a greater use of nuclear energy systems. The initiatives have been reviewed by NERAC Subcommittee on Generation IV Technology Planning (GRNS) and they are: * A Near Term Development (NTD) Roadmap which is in the process of being

68

Energy Generation by State, by Technology (2009) Provides annual...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technology (2009) Provides annual energy generation for all states by fuel source (e.g. coal, gas, solar, wind) in 2009, reported in MWh. Also includes facility-level data...

69

Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

Joskow, Paul L.

70

Program on Technology Innovation: The Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Update documents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, which will demonstrate the design, licensing, construction, and operation of a new nuclear energy source using high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) technology. This new non-emitting energy source is applicable to a broad range of uses, from generating electricity to providing high-temperature industrial process heat to producing hydrogen. The NGNP project is sponsored as part of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and envi...

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

A next generation smart energy technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper has focused on the integration of renewable energy, specifically the solar energy resources into conventional electric grid and deployment of smart architecture of hybrid energy system in the user-centric pervasive computing concept in the ... Keywords: Kyoto protocol, NASA surface meteorology and solar energy data on solar energy resources, SAP-SOA energy optimization model, acceptance index, energy service companies, enterprise SAP-SOA net weaver architecture, enterprise resource planning, green house gas, market potential mappings, next generation smart-grid through pervasive computing, service-oriented-architecture, systems applications products in data processing

Aurobi Das; V. Balakrishnan

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

MHK Technologies/KESC Tidal Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

KESC Tidal Generator KESC Tidal Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage KESC Tidal Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Kinetic Energy Systems Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Newfound Harbor Project Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description The Tidal Generator is based on free flow hydrodynamics for regions that have flood and ebb tides. Strategically attached to bridges, pilings, river, channel, or sea bottoms, this multi-directional generator contains two sets of turbine blades. As the tide flows inward the inward turbine blades opens to maximum rotor diameter while the outward turbine closes into the outward cone-shaped hub to create a hydro dynamically clean surface for water to flow without drag. The center diameter is 75% of the diameter of the turbine blades at full rotor extension for stability.

73

MHK Technologies/Syphon Wave Generator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Syphon Wave Generator Syphon Wave Generator < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Syphon Wave Generator.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Energy Corp Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Oscillating Water Column Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The Syphon Wave Generator is composed of a horizontal pipe containing a propeller driven generator mounted above the highest normal wave at high tide and two or more vertical pipes at least one at each end of the horizontal pipe Each vertical pipe must extend below the water surface at all times and have openings below the surface All the air must be removed from the pipe thus filling the unit completely with water When the crest of a wave reaches the first vertical pipe the water level will be higher at that pipe than at the second vertical pipe This causes water to flow up the first pipe and through the horizontal pipe thus turning the propeller and generator to produce electricity and then down the second vertical pipe due to the siphon effect When the crest of the wave moves to the second vertical pipe the water level is higher there than at the first pipe This will cause the water to flow up the second pipe and through the system in the opposite direction again prod

74

Modeling and Model Validation for Variable Generation Technologies: Focus on Wind Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The influx of variable-generation technologies, particularly wind generation, into the bulk transmission grid has been tremendous over the past decade. This trend will likely continue, in light of national and state renewable portfolio standards. Thus, there is a need for generic, standard, and publicly available models for variable-generation technologies for power system planning studies. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), in collaboration with the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (...

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

75

Energy Performance Impacts from Competing Low-slope Roofing Choices and Photovoltaic Technologies.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??With such a vast quantity of space, commercial low-slope roofs offer significant potential for sustainable roofing technology deployment. Specifically, building energy performance can be improved… (more)

Nagengast, Amy L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

List of Other Distributed Generation Technologies Incentives | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incentives Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 123 Other Distributed Generation Technologies Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 123) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Wind energy Yes Alternative Energy Portfolio Standard (Pennsylvania) Renewables Portfolio Standard Pennsylvania Investor-Owned Utility Retail Supplier Building Insulation Ceiling Fan

77

Arnold Schwarzenegger COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX G Aggregation Guide is the interim report for the Community Choice Aggregation Pilot Program project (Contract Community Choice Aggregation Guide. California Energy Commission, PIER Renewable Energy Technologies

78

Energy Generation by State, by Technology (2009) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation by State, by Technology (2009) Generation by State, by Technology (2009) Dataset Summary Description Provides annual energy generation for all states by fuel source (e.g. coal, gas, solar, wind) in 2009, reported in MWh. Also includes facility-level data (directly from EIA Form 923). Source NREL Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal EIA Energy Generation gas geothermal oil solar States wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Energy Generation by Fuel Source and State, 2009 (xls, 5.9 MiB) application/msword icon Data dictionary for EIA 923 database (used to develop the NREL summary dataset) (doc, 239.6 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period 2009 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

79

Technology Assessment for Next Generation PMU Mark A. Buckner  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment for Next Assessment for Next Generation PMU Mark A. Buckner Oak Ridge National Laboratory bucknerma@ornl.gov 27/28 June 2013 Washington, DC DOE/OE Transmission Reliability Program 2 Project objective  Identify PMU technology migration paths  Develop an understanding of possible next- generation phasor-measurement devices  Develop a plan for designing and building a prototype next-generation PMU 3 Major Technical Accomplishments  Requirements Assessment Phase - Review current PMU functionality during normal and off-normal system operating conditions. - Identify limitations and deficiencies of current technologies. - Identify requirements for next generation PMUs ("If we could make things better, what would we improve?"). - Brainstorm options for next generation PMU. Identify top three

80

Generation technologies for a carbon-constrained world  

SciTech Connect

Planning future generation investments can be difficult in the context of today's high fuel costs and regulatory uncertainties. Of particular concern are sharp changes in the price of natural gas and the possibility of future mandatory limits on the atmospheric release of CO{sub 2}. Research on advanced coal, nuclear, natural gas and renewable energy technologies promises to substantially increase the deployment of low and non-carbon-emitting generation options over the next two decades. The article looks in turn at developments in these technologies. Prudent power provides are likely to invest in a number of these advanced technologies, weighing the advantages and risks of each option to build a strategically balanced generation portfolio. 12 figs.

Douglas, J.

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies September 22, 2010 - 6:40pm Addthis Former Under Secretary Koonin Former Under Secretary Koonin Director - NYU's Center for Urban Science & Progress and Former Under Secretary for Science When aerospace engineers design a new aircraft, they don't start with a prototype, they start with a computer. Computer simulations have revolutionized that industry, allowing engineers to make complex calculations and fine tune designs well before the first physical model is ever produced. All of this amounts to a production process that costs less and produces a commercial product much faster. It's an approach that has changed the way the aerospace industry operates, and it's one that we

82

NREL: Energy Analysis - Distributed Generation Energy Technology Capital  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capital Costs Capital Costs Transparent Cost Database Button The following charts indicate recent capital cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies. The estimates are shown in dollars per installed kilowatt of generating capacity or thermal energy capacity for thermal technologies. The charts provide a compilation of available national-level cost data from a variety of sources. Costs in your specific location will vary. The red horizontal lines represent the first standard deviation of the mean. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored the distributed generation data used within these charts. If you are seeking utility-scale technology capital cost estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information

83

Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies Simulating the Next Generation of Energy Technologies September 22, 2010 - 6:40pm Addthis Former Under Secretary Koonin Former Under Secretary Koonin Director - NYU's Center for Urban Science & Progress and Former Under Secretary for Science When aerospace engineers design a new aircraft, they don't start with a prototype, they start with a computer. Computer simulations have revolutionized that industry, allowing engineers to make complex calculations and fine tune designs well before the first physical model is ever produced. All of this amounts to a production process that costs less and produces a commercial product much faster. It's an approach that has changed the way the aerospace industry operates, and it's one that we

84

Review of Electricity Generation Technology Lifecycle GHG Emissions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents and discusses results from a selection of published cross-technology assessments and two recent meta-analyses evaluating life-cycle greenhouse gas emissions from different electricity generation technologies. Differences in life-cycle GHG estimates reflect differing assessment methodologies, plant and equipment construction practices, power plant conversion efficiencies, power plant size and operating characteristics, practices in fuel preparation and transport, and system boundary as...

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

85

Program on Technology Innovation: Power Generation and Water Sustainability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This brochure summarizes the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Report 1015371, Program on Technology Innovation: An Energy/Water Sustainability Program for the Electric Power Industry. It presents a research planbased on business, economic, and technical considerationsthat would create and test new technology and science to overcome present and future constraints on thermoelectric and hydroelectric generation resulting from limited fresh water availability. The 10 year plan has an overall budget o...

2007-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

86

The Future of Combustion Turbine Technology for Industrial and Utility Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Low capital cost and ample low-cost natural gas supplies will make natural gas-fired combustion turbine systems the power generation technology of choice over the next decade. Against the background of earlier use by electric utilities, this paper examines the status, economic outlook, and future directions of combustion turbine technology for industrial and utility power generation. The discussion takes into account the ongoing deregulation and increasing competition that are shaping the electric power generation business. Included is a comparison between heavy-duty industrial combustion turbines and their rapidly evolving competition, aeroderivative machines, with emphasis on the appropriate application of each. The prospects for future improvements in the cost and performance of combustion turbines are reviewed, and the likely impact of advanced combustion turbine power generation concepts is considered. Also summarized is the outlook for power generation fuels, including the longer term reemergence of coal and the potential for widespread use of coal gasification-based combustion turbine systems. The paper draws heavily from a technical, economic, and business analysis, Combustion Turbine Power Systems, recently completed by SFA Pacific. The analysis was sponsored by an international group of energy companies that includes utilities, independent power producers (IPPs), and power industry equipment vendors.

Karp, A. D.; Simbeck, D. R.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Costs for Distributed Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation (DG) is a broad term that encompasses both mature and emerging onsite power generation technologies with power output as small as 1 kW and as large as 20 MW. While the equipment or purchase cost of a DG system is very important, installation, operation, and maintenance (IOM) costs also are significant and often overlooked. This report reviews IOM costs for both mature and emerging DG technologies. Some equipment cost data is included for reference, but is not the focus of this repo...

2003-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

88

Learning by teaching with virtual peers and the effects of technological design choices on learning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advancements in technology have brought about new forms of learning and online instruction that allow communication through virtual representations without physically meeting in person. This study builds on previous work involving recursive feedback ... Keywords: Computer-mediated communication, Cooperative/collaborative learning, Interactive learning environments, Teaching/learning strategies, Virtual reality

Sandra Y. Okita; Selen Turkay; Mihwa Kim; Yumiko Murai

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

MHK Technologies/Water Current Generator Motor | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generator Motor Generator Motor < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Technology Profile Primary Organization Global Energies Inc Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description Simple Vertical Axis fully submerged open design flow through unit operating an onboard Pump unit that drives an on shore power generation system Slow turning swim through for Marine life Anchoring depends on topography and composition of resource bed Removable Scalable Please note that the Website is very old and needs updating In 2007 we hired Independent Engineering firm in Seattle to conduct extensive fluid dynamic testing or our design concepts and overall system Tests were completed much more extensively than we envisioned and were very positive for our needs and build out of a full size model We have been stuck and broke as it s all out of pocket in this position ever since as those Engineering costs were much more than anticipated

90

New Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Generating Technology to Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION 30 TH BIRTHDAY CONFERENCE April 7, 2008 Linda G. Stuntz Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 2 The Target * Energy related emissions of CO2 will increase by about 16% in AEO 2008 Reference Case between 2006 and 2030 (5,890 MM metric tons to 6,859 MM metric tons). (#s from Caruso Senate Energy testimony of 3/4/08). * Last year, emissions from electricity generation were 40% of total energy-related GHG emissions. * Based on projected annual electricity demand growth of 1.1%. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 3 The Target Cont'd * 16.4 GW of new nuclear + 2.7 GW Uprates of existing plants less 4.5 GW of retirements. * Coal responsible for 54% of generation in 2030.

91

Technical Assessment Guide (TAG) - Power Generation and Storage Technology Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Technical Assessment Guide (TAG)Power Generation and Storage Technology Options helps energy company decision makers optimize capital investments in power generation and energy storage infrastructure. The 2009 TAG has been significantly enhanced. The following topics are among those that are new or enhanced: several options on CO2 capture controls and costs for existing retrofits and for new Pulverized Coal and Combustion Turbine Combined Cycle plants; several options on hybrid and dry cooling f...

2009-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

92

Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Second Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Second Generation Advanced Reburning Second Generation Advanced Reburning General Electric - Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (GE-EER) is carrying out a two Phase research program to develop novel Advanced Reburning (AR) concepts for high efficiency and low cost NOx control from coal-fired utility boilers. AR technologies are based on combination of basic reburning and N-agent/promoter injections. Phase I of the project was successfully completed and EER was selected to continue to develop AR technology during Phase II. Phase I demonstrated that AR technologies are able to provide effective NOx control for coal-fired combustors. Three technologies were originally envisioned for development: AR-Lean, AR-Rich, and Multiple Injection AR (MIAR). Along with these, three additional technologies were identified during the project: reburning plus promoted SNCR; AR-Lean plus promoted SNCR; and AR-Rich plus promoted SNCR. The promoters are sodium salts, in particular sodium carbonate. These AR technologies have different optimum reburn heat input levels and furnace temperature requirements. For full scale application, an optimum technology can be selected on a boiler-specific basis depending on furnace temperature profile and regions of injector access.

93

Technological development under global warning : roadmap of the coal generation technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the measures for the Japanese electric power utilities to meet the Kyoto Target, and the technological development of the coal thermal power generation to meet the further abatement of the carbon dioxide ...

Furuyama, Yasushi, 1963-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Disposition of Nuclear Waste Using Subcritical Accelerator-Driven Systems: Technology Choices and Implementation Scenarios  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory has led the development of accelerator-driven transmutation of waste (ATW) to provide an alternative technological solution to the disposition of nuclear waste. While ATW will not eliminate the need for a high-level waste repository, it offers a new technology option for altering the nature of nuclear waste and enhancing the capability of a repository. The basic concept of ATW focuses on reducing the time horizon for the radiological risk from hundreds of thousands of years to a few hundred years and on reducing the thermal loading. As such, ATW will greatly reduce the amount of transuranic elements that will be disposed of in a high-level waste repository. The goal of the ATW nuclear subsystem is to produce three orders of magnitude reduction in the long-term radiotoxicity of the waste sent to a repository, including losses through processing. If the goal is met, the radiotoxicity of ATW-treated waste after 300 yr would be less than that of untreated waste after 100 000 yr.These objectives can be achieved through the use of high neutron fluxes produced in accelerator-driven subcritical systems. While critical fission reactors can produce high neutron fluxes to destroy actinides and select fission products, the effectiveness of the destruction is limited by the criticality requirement. Furthermore, a substantial amount of excess reactivity would have to be supplied initially and compensated for by control poisons. To overcome these intrinsic limitations, we searched for solutions in subcritical systems freed from the criticality requirement by taking advantage of the recent breakthroughs in accelerator technology and the release of liquid lead/bismuth nuclear coolant technology from Russia. The effort led to the selection of an accelerator-driven subcritical system that results in the destruction of the actinides and fission products of concern as well as permitting easy operational control through the external control of the neutron source.

Venneri, Francesco; Williamson, Mark A.; Li Ning; Houts, Michael G.; Morley, Richard A.; Beller, Denis E.; Sailor, William; Lawrence, George [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)

2000-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Generating Potable Water from Fuel Cell Technology Juan E. Tibaquir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generating Potable Water from Fuel Cell Technology Juan E. Tibaquirá Associate Professor Electricity Heat Water #12;Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability April 10th /09 6 PEM Fuel Cells for research 2. Fuel-cell fundamentals 3. Implications of using water from fuel cells in a society

Keller, Arturo A.

96

Program on Technology Innovation: Identification of Embedded Applications for New and Emerging Distributed Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Novel distributed generation (DG) technologies hold the potential of serving the needs of a variety of end-use applications, both existing as well as emerging. This report describes some of the emerging end-use applications and evaluates their potential for integration with distributed generation applications. The analysis addresses their value in terms of modularity, environmental friendliness, and favorable production economics.

2006-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

97

NREL: Energy Analysis - Distributed Generation Energy Technology Operations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations and Maintenance Costs Operations and Maintenance Costs Transparent Cost Database Button The following charts indicate recent operations and maintenance (O&M) cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies. The charts provide a compilation of available national-level cost data from a variety of sources. Costs in your specific location will vary. The red horizontal lines represent the first standard deviation of the mean. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) sponsored the distributed generation data used within these charts. If you are seeking utility-scale technology operations and maintenance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation.

98

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Power Quality and Harmonic Impacts of Distributed Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PQ TechWatch report series builds on EPRI's broad expertise and power quality testing and evaluation work to provide a vital flow of data, including important information on emerging trends powering ebusinesses and developments in next-generation power quality mitigation and energy storage technologies.This PQ TechWatch aims to present an overview of power quality impacts resulting from operation of DG technologies on the grid. An emphasis on harmonic effects is included here. Concerns in this area a...

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

100

Power Quality Impacts of Distributed Generation: Survey of Distributed Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the advent of deregulation, distributed generation (DG) will play an increasing role in electric distribution systems. Various new types of DG technologies, such as microturbines and fuel cells, now are being developed in addition to the more traditional solar and wind power. A common belief among developers is that DG will improve the local power quality. This potential for better quality is cited as one of the attributes that add value to the installation of distributed generators. In some cases, ...

2000-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: Jordan Macknick

102

Distributed Electrical Power Generation: Summary of Alternative Available Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000ABSTRACT: The Federal government is the greatest consumer of electricity in the nation. Federal procurement and installation of higher efficiency energy sources promises many benefits, in terms of economy, employment, export, and environment. While distributed generation (DG) technologies offer many of the benefits of alternative, efficient energy sources, few DG systems can currently be commercially purchased “off the shelf, ” and complicated codes and standards deter potential users. Federal use of distributed generation demonstrates the technology, can help drive down costs, and an help lead the general public to accept a changing energy scheme. This work reviews and describes various distributed generation technologies, including fuel cells, microturbines, wind turbines, photovoltaic arrays, and Stirling engines. Issues such as fuel availability, construction considerations, protection controls are addressed. Sources of further information are provided. DISCLAIMER: The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising, publication, or promotional purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products. All product names and trademarks cited are the property of their respective owners. The findings of this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents.

Sarah J. Scott; Franklin H. Holcomb; Nicholas M. Josefik; Sarah J. Scott; Franklin H. Holcomb; Nicholas M. Josefik

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Program on Technology Innovation: Ion Transport Membrane Oxygen Technology for Advanced Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Technology Innovation (TI) project that provides background information and increased understanding to EPRI members of the potential benefits of integrating ion transport membrane (ITM) technology for oxygen production with integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and oxyfuel combustion pulverized coal power plants. This TI project also generated new learning by conducting literature reviews of existing and new air separation technolo...

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

104

Next Generation CANDU Technology: Competitive Design for the Nuclear Renaissance  

SciTech Connect

AECL has developed the design for a next generation of CANDU{sup R} plants by marrying a set of enabling technologies to well-established successful CANDU features. The basis for the design is to replicate or adapt existing CANDU components for a new core design. By adopting slightly enriched uranium fuel, a core design with light water coolant, heavy water moderator and reflector has been defined, based on the existing CANDU fuel channel module. This paper summarizes the main features and characteristics of the reference next-generation CANDU design. The progress of the next generation of CANDU design program in meeting challenging cost, schedule and performance targets is described. AECL's cost reduction methodology is summarized as an integral part of the design optimization process. Examples are given of cost reduction features together with enhancement of design margins. (authors)

Hopwood, J.M.; Hedges, K.R.; Pakan, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Ontario (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

NEXT GENERATION SURFACTANTS FOR IMPROVED CHEMICAL FLOODING TECHNOLOGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NEXT GENERATION SURFACTANTS NEXT GENERATION SURFACTANTS FOR IMPROVED CHEMICAL FLOODING TECHNOLOGY FINAL REPORT June 1, 2010 - May 31, 2012 Laura L Wesson, Prapas Lohateeraparp, Jeffrey H. Harwell, and Bor-Jier Shiau October 2012 DE-FE0003537 University of Oklahoma Norman, OK 73019-0430 ii DISCLAIMER This report is prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name,

106

MHK Technologies/Turbo Ocean Power Generator MadaTech 17 | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Power Generator MadaTech 17 < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Turbo Ocean Power Generator MadaTech 17.jpg Technology...

107

Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies in the United States: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes highlights of exploratory research into next-generation photovoltaic (PV) technologies funded by the United States Department of Energy (DOE) through its National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) for the purpose of finding disruptive or ''leap frog'' technologies that may leap ahead of conventional PV in energy markets. The most recent set of 14 next-generation PV projects, termed Beyond the Horizon PV, will complete their third year of research this year. The projects tend to take two notably different approaches: high-efficiency solar cells that are presently too expensive, or organic solar cells having potential for low cost although efficiencies are currently too low. We will describe accomplishments for several of these projects. As prime examples of what these last projects have accomplished, researchers at Princeton University recently reported an organic solar cell with 5% efficiency (not yet NREL-verified). And Ohio State University scientists recently demonstrated an 18% (NREL-verified) single-junction GaAs solar cell grown on a low-cost silicon substrate. We also completed an evaluation of proposals for the newest set of exploratory research projects, but we are unable to describe them in detail until funding becomes available to complete the award process.

McConnell, R.; Matson, R.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

GE power generation technology challenges for advanced gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

The GE Utility ATS is a large gas turbine, derived from proven GEPG designs and integrated GEAE technology, that utilizes a new turbine cooling system and incorporates advanced materials. This system has the potential to achieve ATS objectives for a utility sized machine. Combined with use of advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC`s), the new cooling system will allow higher firing temperatures and improved cycle efficiency that represents a significant improvement over currently available machines. Developing advances in gas turbine efficiency and emissions is an ongoing process at GEPG. The third generation, ``F`` class, of utility gas turbines offers net combined cycle efficiencies in the 55% range, with NO{sub x} programs in place to reduce emissions to less than 10 ppM. The gas turbines have firing temperatures of 2350{degree}F, and pressure ratios of 15 to 1. The turbine components are cooled by air extracted from the cycle at various stages of the compressor. The heat recovery cycle is a three pressure steam system, with reheat. Throttle conditions are nominally 1400 psi and 1000{degree}F reheat. As part of GEPG`s ongoing advanced power generation system development program, it is expected that a gas fired advanced turbine system providing 300 MW power output greater than 58% net efficiency and < 10 ppM NO{sub x} will be defined. The new turbine cooling system developed with technology support from the ATS program will achieve system net efficiency levels in excess of 60%.

Cook, C.S.; Nourse, J.G.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

The role of clean coal technologies in post-2000 power generation  

SciTech Connect

A substantial global market for advanced power systems is expected to develop early in the next century for both repowering and new capacity additions, Although natural gas-fueled systems, such as gas turbines, are expected to dominate in the 1990`s, coal-fueled systems are expected to emerge in the 2000`s as systems of choice for base-load capacity because of coal`s lower expected cost. Stringent environmental regulations dictate that all advanced power systems must be clean, economical, and efficient in order to meet both the environmental and economic performance criteria of the future. Recognizing these needs, the DOE strategy is to carry out an effective RD&D program, in partnership with the private sector, to demonstrate these technologies for commercial applications in the next century. These technologies are expected to capture a large portion of the future power generation market. The DOE: expects that, domestically, advanced power systems products will be selected on the basis of varying regional needs and the needs of individual utilities. A large international demand is also expected for the new products, especially in developing nations.

Salvador, L.A.; Bajura, R.A.; Mahajan, K.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Tax barriers to solar central receiver generation technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tax loads and required revenues are estimated for current and future solar central receiver and gas-fired plants competing in the same market. An economic measure of tax equity is used to evaluate the equity of the tax loads under past and present tax codes. The same measure is used to devise a tax strategy which produces the following two types of equitable taxation: (1) the two plants carry nearly equal tax loads, and (2) local, state and federal governments receive the same distribution of revenues from the solar plant as from the gas-fired plant `Me results show that central receivers (and likely other capital-intensive technologies) carry higher tax loads compared to competing gasfired generation, that tax loads are highly correlated with competitiveness, and that equitable taxation is feasible within the boundaries of the study.

Jenkins, A.F. [California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA (United States); Reilly, H.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Waste generation process modeling and analysis for fuel reprocessing technologies  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of electric power generation requirements for the next century, even when taking the most conservative tack, indicate that the United States will have to increase its production capacity significantly. If the country determines that nuclear power will not be a significant component of this production capacity, the nuclear industry will have to die, as maintaining a small nuclear component will not be justifiable. However, if nuclear power is to be a significant component, it will probably require some form of reprocessing technology. The once-through fuel cycle is only feasible for a relatively small number of nuclear power plants. If we are maintaining several hundred reactors, the once-through fuel cycle is more expensive and ethically questionable.

Kornreich, D. E. (Drew E.); Koehler, A. C. (Andrew C.); Farman, Richard F.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Super Boiler 2nd Generation Technology for Watertube Boilers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes Phase I of a proposed two phase project to develop and demonstrate an advanced industrial watertube boiler system with the capability of reaching 94% (HHV) fuel-to-steam efficiency and emissions below 2 ppmv NOx, 2 ppmv CO, and 1 ppmv VOC on natural gas fuel. The boiler design would have the capability to produce >1500 F, >1500 psig superheated steam, burn multiple fuels, and will be 50% smaller/lighter than currently available watertube boilers of similar capacity. This project is built upon the successful Super Boiler project at GTI. In that project that employed a unique two-staged intercooled combustion system and an innovative heat recovery system to reduce NOx to below 5 ppmv and demonstrated fuel-to-steam efficiency of 94% (HHV). This project was carried out under the leadership of GTI with project partners Cleaver-Brooks, Inc., Nebraska Boiler, a Division of Cleaver-Brooks, and Media and Process Technology Inc., and project advisors Georgia Institute of Technology, Alstom Power Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Phase I of efforts focused on developing 2nd generation boiler concepts and performance modeling; incorporating multi-fuel (natural gas and oil) capabilities; assessing heat recovery, heat transfer and steam superheating approaches; and developing the overall conceptual engineering boiler design. Based on our analysis, the 2nd generation Industrial Watertube Boiler when developed and commercialized, could potentially save 265 trillion Btu and $1.6 billion in fuel costs across U.S. industry through increased efficiency. Its ultra-clean combustion could eliminate 57,000 tons of NOx, 460,000 tons of CO, and 8.8 million tons of CO2 annually from the atmosphere. Reduction in boiler size will bring cost-effective package boilers into a size range previously dominated by more expensive field-erected boilers, benefiting manufacturers and end users through lower capital costs.

Mr. David Cygan; Dr. Joseph Rabovitser

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

114

Advanced NOx Emissions Control: Control Technology - Second Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

In Situ Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements in Full-Scale SCR Systems In Situ Device for Real-Time Catalyst Deactivation Measurements in Full-Scale SCR Systems To support trends in the electric generating industry of moving from seasonal to year-round operation of Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) for control of NOx and mercury, as well as extending the time between generating unit outages, Fossil Energy Research Corporation (FERCo) is developing technology to determine SCR catalyst activity and remaining life without requiring an outage to obtain and analyze catalyst samples. FERCo intends to use SCR catalyst performance results measured with their in situ device at Alabama Power’s Plant Gorgas during the 2005 and 2006 ozone seasons, along with EPRI’s CatReactTM catalyst management software, to demonstrate the value of real-time activity measurements with respect to the optimization of catalyst replacement strategy. Southern Company and the Electric Power Research Institute are co-funding the project.

115

Technologies  

Technologies Energy. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor; Modular Electromechanical ...

116

Technologies  

Technologies Energy, Utilities, & Power Systems. Advanced Carbon Aerogels for Energy Applications; Distributed Automated Demand Response; Electrostatic Generator/Motor

117

Colorado's clean energy choices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The daily choices made as consumers affect the environment and the economy. Based on the state of today's technology and economics, Colorado consumers can include energy efficiency and renewable energy into many aspects of their lives. These choices include where they obtain electricity, how they use energy at home, and how they transport themselves from one place to another. In addition to outlining how they can use clean energy, Colorado's Clean Energy Choices gives consumers contacts and links to Web sites for where to get more information.

Strawn, N.; Jones, J.

2000-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

MHK Technologies/Sea wave Slot cone Generator SSG | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sea wave Slot cone Generator SSG Sea wave Slot cone Generator SSG < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Sea wave Slot cone Generator SSG.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Energy AS Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Wave Energy AS Project 1 Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Overtopping Device Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5/6: System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The Sea Wave Slot-Cone Generator (SSG) is based on the overtopping principle. It utilizes a total of three reservoirs stacked on top of one other (referred to as a 'multi-stage water turbine') in which the potential energy of the incoming wave will be stored. The water captured in the reservoirs will then run through the multi-stage turbine for highly efficient electricity production.

119

Solar Power Generation-A Sustainable Alternative Energy Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Abstract. Meeting, Materials Science & Technology 2011. Symposium, Perspectives for Emerging Materials Professionals: Early Strategies for Career ...

120

Program on Technology Innovation: Next Generation Monitoring, Assessment, and Control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power system operation technologies such as computerized one-line diagram visualization, state estimation, contingency analysis, and distance relay were developed upwards of 50 years ago, However, technological advances in communication, computing, and algorithms have made it possible to reexamine methods for performing real-time monitoring, assessment, and control. This report describes the vision, infrastructure, and technology roadmap for future smart control centers.

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The principle objective of this project was to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focused on reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian-aged (Penn) sands. In order to meet this objective the characteristic curvatures (Cc) of twenty-eight anionic surfactants selected for evaluation for use in chemical flooding formulations were determined. The Cc values ranged from -6.90 to 2.55 with the majority having negative values. Crude oil samples from nine Penn sand reservoirs were analyzed for several properties pertinent to surfactant formulation for EOR application. These properties included equivalent alkane carbon numbers, total acid numbers, and viscosity. The brine samples from these same reservoirs were analyzed for several cations and for total dissolved solids. Surfactant formulations were successfully developed for eight reservoirs by the end of the project period. These formulations were comprised of a tertiary mixture of anionic surfactants. The identities of these surfactants are considered proprietary, but suffice to say the surfactants in each mixture were comprised of varying chemical structures. In addition to the successful development of surfactant formulations for EOR, there were also two successful single-well field tests conducted. There are many aspects that must be considered in the development and implementation of effective surfactant formulations. Taking into account these other aspects, there were four additional studies conducted during this project. These studies focused on the effect of the stability of surfactant formulations in the presence of polymers with an associated examination of polymer rheology, the effect of the presence of iron complexes in the brine on surfactant stability, the potential use of sacrificial agents in order to minimize the loss of surfactant to adsorption, and the effect of electrolytes on surfactant adsorption. In these last four studies the effects of such things as temperature, electrolyte concentration and the effect of different types of electrolytes were taken into consideration.

Laura Wesson; Prapas Lohateeraparp; Jeffrey Harwell; Bor-Jier Shiau

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

122

Assessment and Evaluation of Next Generation HVDC Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As an established technology for bulk power transmission, high-voltage direct current (HVDC) power transmission is being used worldwide, and more than 100 schemes are operating at present. Most existing HVDC systems use conventional self-commutated converter technology using thyristors. However, advances in voltage sourced converter (VSC) technologies and power electronic devices such as gate turn offs (GTOs), insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs), and integrated gate commutated thyristors (IGCTs) w...

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

123

Fuel Cell Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than...

124

Distributed Generation: Which technologies? How fast will they...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Osborn Utility deregulation, environmental issues, increases in electricity demand, natural gaselectricity rate changes, new technologies, and several other key drivers are...

125

Building Technologies Office: Next Generation Rooftop Unit Research...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings News Building Technologies Office Announces 3 Million to Advance Building Automation Software Solutions in Small to Medium-Sized Commercial Buildings March 29,...

126

Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Fuel Cell Research Center, points out the tri-generation facility that uses biogas from Orange County Sanitation Districts wastewater treatment plant to produce...

127

Market Power and Technological Bias: The Case of Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collective output isQg, and intermittent generators (which we will assume here is wind generation) whose output is assumed to have a fixed and stochastic component Qw,0+ ?w. We assume that E[?w] = 0 and V ar[?w] = ?2w. The intermittent output is produced by a... conventional generation assets. In equilibrium demand matches supply: DT = Qg +Qw,0 + ?w, (2) and using (1) gives: p = D0 ? b(Qg +Qw,0 + ?w). (3) We assume that a conventional generator has a quadratic cost function: Cg(Qg) = ?Qg + ? 2Q 2 g, (4) and thus...

Twomey, Paul; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

128

The New Generation of Vertical Shaft Calciner Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... shaft calciner, the waste heat from which can be recuperated to generate electricity of 28 million kWh. The major invention is calciner structure optimization by ...

129

Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity markets in the United States are undergoing unprecedented structural changes as a result of the confluence of regulatory, competitive, and technological forces. This paper will introduce the role of distributed generation technologies in evolving electric markets and will review both current and emerging distributed generation technologies aimed at retail industrial, commercial and residential markets. This paper will draw upon several Electric Power Research Institute’s (EPRI) and member utility case studies involving the assessment of distributed generation in premium power service, standby power and industrial cogeneration applications. In addition, EPRI products and services which can help evaluate energy service options involving distributed generation will also be briefly reviewed.

Rastler, D. M.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and technologies like the tri-gen facility are going to play a vital role in our nation's future energy and transportation economies. And because FCEVs can boast rapid fueling,...

131

Multidimensional Assessment of Emerging Technologies: Case of Next Generation Internet and Online Gaming Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Internet has changed the world in many ways. Online communications, financial and business-to-business transactions, electronic shopping, banking, and entertainment have become the norm in the digital age. The combined package of technologies that ... Keywords: Evaluating Technologies, Multidimensional Assessment, Next Generation Internet, Online Gaming, Technology Assessment

Ramin Neshati; Tugrul U. Daim

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Technology Assessment of Residential Power Systems for Distributed Generation Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Significant research and development (R&D) investments in fuel cell technology have led to functioning prototypes of residential fuel power systems operating on natural gas. Efforts by at least four leading companies are expected to lead to early field trials of residential power systems in 2000 and early 2001, followed by pre-commercial prototypes during 2001-2002, and commercial introduction in the 2002-2005 time frame. Other technology companies are expected to follow suit.

2000-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

133

Technical Assessment Guide (TAG) - Power Generation and Storage Technology Options: 2013 Topics (DRAFT)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Technical Assessment Guide™ (TAG®)—Power Generation and Storage Technology Options report provides cost and performance data and analysis for energy company decision makers to optimize capital investments in the power generation and energy storage infrastructure. The topics chosen by the TAG® members in 2013 reflect the transition of the industry in the last few years from a heavily coal and nuclear technologies-based generation to natural ...

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

134

Comments on US LMFBR steam generator base technology  

SciTech Connect

The development of steam generators for the LMFBR was recognized from the onset by the AEC, now DOE, as a difficult, challenging, and high-priority task. The highly reactive nature of sodium with water/steam requires that the sodium-water/steam boundaries of LMFBR steam generators possess a degree of leak-tightness reliability not normally attempted on a commercial scale. In addition, the LMFBR steam generator is subjected to high fluid temperatures and severe thermal transients. These requirements place great demand on materials, fabrication processes, and inspection methods; and even greater demands on the designer to provide steam generators that can meet these demanding requirements, be fabricated without unreasonable shop requirements, and tolerate off-normal effects.

Simmons, W.R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Program on Technology Innovation: Alternative Approaches to Generation Adequacy Assurance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reliability of electricity supply"keeping the lights on"has been the principal motivation for many technical and economic constraints imposed on market designs. While short-term operational reliability is provided by means of protection devices, operating standards, and procedures that include security-constrained dispatch and procurement of ancillary services, long-term generation adequacy requires investment in upgrading and expansion of generation capacity. In restructured electricity markets, such ex...

2007-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

136

A Manifesto for Agent Technology: Towards Next Generation Computing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The European Commission's eEurope initiative aims to bring every citizen, home, school, business and administration online to create a digitally literate Europe. The value lies not in the objective itself, but in its ability to facilitate the advance ... Keywords: agent technology, challenges, roadmap, survey, trends

Michael Luck; Peter McBurney; Chris Preist

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

PFBC and IGCC power generation technologies: status and opportunities  

SciTech Connect

View graphs are presented for pressurized fluidized bed combustion and combined-cycle power plants/coal gasification technologies. Photographs, graphs and flowsheets are included covering the following topics: product line; product goals; product development strategy; this year`s success; barrier issues; key plans for next year; technical status; and market opportunities.

Brdar, R.D.; Reuther, R.B.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

The suitability of large area drift chambers as the technology choice for the Cosmic Ray Inspection and Passive Tomography (CRIPT) project  

SciTech Connect

The CRIPT project brings together several Canadian institutions, concerned with the detection of Special Nuclear Materials (SNM), addressing a requirement at ports-of-entry for detection of SNM in the many thousands of containers that flow into and out of Canada every day, while at the same time providing a way of monitoring the contents of nuclear waste storage containers, for waste management and non-proliferation reasons. The scale of these applications is large - typically tens of cubic metres, requiring detectors that can cover a large area at a minimum cost. The CRIPT project considered drift chambers adapted from high energy physics experience, as one of its technology choices. We report here on the performance of a full scale prototype, which covers an area of 2.4 m x 1.2 m with only 6 readout channels, and provides a 2D data point with accuracies (in x and z) of around 2 mm. (authors)

Anghel, V. [Atomic Energy Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 (Canada); Armitage, J. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Botte, J.; Boudjemline, K. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Bryman, D.; Bueno, J. [Advanced Applied Physics Solutions, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Charles, E. [Canadian Border Services Agency, Ottawa, ON K1A 0L8 (Canada); Cousins, T. [International Safety Research, Ottawa, ON K2E 7J6 (Canada); Erlandson, A. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Gallant, G. [Canadian Border Services Agency, Ottawa, ON K1A 0L8 (Canada); Jewett, C.; Jonkmans, G. [Atomic Energy Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 (Canada); Liu, Z. [Advanced Applied Physics Solutions, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Noel, S. [International Safety Research, Ottawa, ON K2E 7J6 (Canada); Oakham, F. G. [Carleton Univ., Ottawa, ON (Canada); Stocki, T. J. [Health Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0K9 (Canada); Thompson, M. [Atomic Energy Canada Ltd., Chalk River, ON K0J 1J0 (Canada); Waller, D. [Defence Research Development Canada, Ottawa, ON K1A 0Z4 (Canada)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Assessing the Long-Term System Value of Intermittent Electric Generation Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This research investigates the economic penetration and system-wide effects of large-scale intermittent technologies in an electric generation system. The research extends the standard screening curve analysis to optimize the penetration and system structure with intermittent technologies. The analysis is based on hour-by-hour electric demands and intermittent generation. A theoretical framework is developed to find an expression for the marginal value of an intermittent technology as a function of the average system marginal cost, the capacity factor of the generator, and the covariance between the generator's hourly production and the hourly system marginal cost. A series of model runs are made examining the penetration of wind and photovoltaic in a simple electric generation system. These illustrate the conclusions in the theoretical analysis and illustrate the effects that large-scale intermittent penetration has on the structure of the generation system. In the long-term, adding intermittent generation to a system allows us to restructure the dispatchable generation capacity to a mix with lower capital cost. It is found that large scale intermittent generation tends to reduce the optimal capacity and production of baseload generators and increase the capacity and production of intermediate generators, although the extent to which this occurs depends strongly on the pattern of production from the intermediate generators. It is also shown that the marginal value of intermittent generation declines as it penetrates. The analysis investigates the specific mechanism through which this occurs.

Lamont, A D

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

140

Assessing the Long-Term System Value of Intermittent Electric Generation Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research investigates the economic penetration and system-wide effects of large-scale intermittent technologies in an electric generation system. The research extends the standard screening curve analysis to optimize the penetration and system structure with intermittent technologies. The analysis is based on hour-by-hour electric demands and intermittent generation. A theoretical framework is developed to find an expression for the marginal value of an intermittent technology as a function of the average system marginal cost, the capacity factor of the generator, and the covariance between the generator's hourly production and the hourly system marginal cost. A series of model runs are made examining the penetration of wind and photovoltaic in a simple electric generation system. These illustrate the conclusions in the theoretical analysis and illustrate the effects that large-scale intermittent penetration has on the structure of the generation system. In the long-term, adding intermittent generation to a system allows us to restructure the dispatchable generation capacity to a mix with lower capital cost. It is found that large scale intermittent generation tends to reduce the optimal capacity and production of baseload generators and increase the capacity and production of intermediate generators, although the extent to which this occurs depends strongly on the pattern of production from the intermediate generators. It is also shown that the marginal value of intermittent generation declines as it penetrates. The analysis investigates the specific mechanism through which this occurs.

Lamont, A D

2005-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Next generation sequencing (NGS)technologies and applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NGS technology overview: (1) NGS library preparation - Nucleic acids extraction, Sample quality control, RNA conversion to cDNA, Addition of sequencing adapters, Quality control of library; (2) Sequencing - Clonal amplification of library fragments, (except PacBio), Sequencing by synthesis, Data output (reads and quality); and (3) Data analysis - Read mapping, Genome assembly, Gene expression, Operon structure, sRNA discovery, and Epigenetic analyses.

Vuyisich, Momchilo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

142

Advances in steam turbine technology for power generation  

SciTech Connect

This book contains articles presented at the 1990 International Joint Power Generation Conference. It is organized under the following headings: Solid particle erosion in steam turbines, Steam turbine failure analysis, Steam turbine upgrades, steam turbine blading development, Boiler feed pumps and auxiliary steam turbine drives.

Bellanca, C.P. (Dayton Power and Light Company (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Major Environmental Aspects of Gasification-Based Power Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems DECEMBER 2002 U.S. DOE/NETL 2-1 2. DETAILED EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GASIFICATION-BASED POWER SYTEMS 2.1 Introduction and Summary of Information Presented The single most compelling reason for utilities to consider coal gasification for electric power generation is superior environmental performance. 1 As shown in Figure 2-1, gasification has fundamental environmental advantages over direct coal combustion. Commercial-scale plants for both integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation and chemicals applications have already successfully demonstrated these advantages. The superior environmental capabilities of coal gasification apply to all three areas of concern: air emissions,

144

Assessment of turbine generator technology for district heating applications  

SciTech Connect

Steam turbines for cogeneration plants may carry a combination of industrial, space heating, cooling and domestic hot water loads. These loads are hourly, weekly, and seasonally irregular and require turbines of special design to meet the load duration curve, while generating electric power. Design features and performance characteristics of large cogeneration turbine units for combined electric generation and district heat supply are presented. Different modes of operation of the cogeneration turbine under variable load conditions are discussed in conjunction with a heat load duration curve for urban heat supply. The performance of the 250 MW district heating turbine as applied to meet the heat load duration curve for Minneapolis--St. Paul area is analyzed, and associated fuel savings are estimated.

Oliker, I.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Major Environmental Aspects of Gasification-Based Power Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Detailed Detailed Evaluation of the Environmental Performance of Gasification-Based Power Systems DECEMBER 2002 U.S. DOE/NETL 2-1 2. DETAILED EVALUATION OF THE ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE OF GASIFICATION-BASED POWER SYTEMS 2.1 Introduction and Summary of Information Presented The single most compelling reason for utilities to consider coal gasification for electric power generation is superior environmental performance. 1 As shown in Figure 2-1, gasification has fundamental environmental advantages over direct coal combustion. Commercial-scale plants for both integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generation and chemicals applications have already successfully demonstrated these advantages. The superior environmental capabilities of coal gasification apply to all three areas of concern: air emissions, water discharges, and solid

146

Low cost high performance generator technology program. Addendum report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a system weight, efficiency, and size analysis which was performed on the 500 W(e) low cost high performance generator (LCHPG) are presented. The analysis was performed in an attempt to improve system efficiency and specific power over those presented in June 1975, System Design Study Report TES-SNSO-3-25. Heat source volume, configuration, and safety as related to the 500 W(e) LCHPG are also discussed. (RCK)

Not Available

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Repair Welding Technologies For Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Tube failures that occur in heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) are often caused by thermal stress or thermal shock associated with cyclic plant operation or by flow-accelerated corrosion. Many premature failures occur along the length of finned tubes or at attachment locations where tubes are joined to the upper or lower header. Because of current tube repair practices and limited access for welding, reoccurring failures are common.

2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

148

Program on Technology Innovation: Water Resources for Thermoelectric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to severe drought conditions in the Southwest in recent years, EPRI and the U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory have sponsored three related assessments of water supplies in the San Juan Basin area of the four-corner intersection of Utah, Colorado, Arizona, and New Mexico. Two of the studies assess the use of saline waters in power plants. The third describes the adaptation of a deterministic watershed model to forecast the impact of climate change on river hydrology in t...

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

149

Examination of incentive mechanisms for innovative technologies applicable to utility and nonutility power generators  

SciTech Connect

Innovative technologies, built by either utility or nonutility power generators, have the potential to lower costs with less environmental emissions than conventional technologies. However, the public-good nature of information, along with uncertain costs, performance, and reliability, discourages rapid adoption of these technologies. The effect of regulation of electricity production may also have an adverse impact on motivation to innovate. Slower penetration of cleaner, more efficient technologies could result in greater levels of pollution, higher electricity prices, and a reduction in international competitiveness. Regulatory incentives could encourage adoption and deployment of innovative technologies of all kinds, inducting clean coal technologies. Such incentives must be designed to offset risks inherent in innovative technology and encourage cost-effective behavior. To evaluate innovative and conventional technologies equally, the incremental cost of risk (ICR) of adopting the innovative technology must be determined. Through the ICR, the magnitude of incentive required to make a utility (or nonutility) power generator equally motivated to use either conventional or innovative technologies can be derived. Two technology risks are examined: A construction risk, represented by a 15% cost overrun, and an operating risk, represented by a increased forced outage rate (decreased capacity factor). Different incentive mechanisms and measurement criteria are used to assess the effects of these risks on ratepayers and shareholders. In most cases, a regulatory incentive could offset the perceived risks while encouraging cost-effective behavior by both utility and nonutility power generators. Not only would the required incentive be recouped, but the revenue requirements would be less for the innovative technology; also, less environmental pollution would be generated. In the long term, ratepayers and society would benefit from innovative technologies.

McDermott, K.A. [Illinois Commerce Commission, Springfield, IL (United States); Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

LBNL's Low-NOx Combustion Technologies for Heat and Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Us Department Contacts Media Contacts LBNL's Low-NOx Combustion Technologies for Heat and Power Generation Speaker(s): Robert Cheng Date: February 2, 1999 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg....

151

Systematic Review and Harmonization of Life Cycle GHG Emission Estimates for Electricity Generation Technologies (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This powerpoint presentation to be presented at the World Renewable Energy Forum on May 14, 2012, in Denver, CO, discusses systematic review and harmonization of life cycle GHG emission estimates for electricity generation technologies.

Heath, G.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward  

SciTech Connect

This document presents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Systems, Subsystems, and Components, establishes a baseline for the current technology readiness status, and provides a path forward to achieve increasing levels of technical maturity.

John Collins

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Advanced Sensor Technologies for Next-Generation Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the development of automobile emissions sensors at Argonne National Laboratory. Three types of sensor technologies, i.e., ultrasound, microwave, and ion-mobility spectrometry (IMS), were evaluated for engine-out emissions monitoring. Two acoustic sensor technologies, i.e., surface acoustic wave and flexural plate wave, were evaluated for detection of hydrocarbons. The microwave technique involves a cavity design and measures the shifts in resonance frequency that are a result of the presence of trace organic compounds. The IMS technique was chosen for further development into a practical emissions sensor. An IMS sensor with a radioactive {sup 63}Ni ion source was initially developed and applied to measurement of hydrocarbons and NO{sub x} emissions. For practical applications, corona and spark discharge ion sources were later developed and applied to NO{sub x} emission measurement. The concentrations of NO{sub 2} in dry nitrogen and in a typical exhaust gas mixture are presented. The sensor response to moisture was evaluated, and a cooling method to control the moisture content in the gas stream was examined. Results show that the moisture effect can be reduced by using a thermoelectric cold plate. The design and performance of a laboratory prototype sensor are described.

Sheen, S H; Chien, H T; Gopalsami, N; Jendrzejczyk, A; Raptis, A C

2002-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

154

Technical Assessment Guide (TAG) -- Power Generation and Storage Technology Options: 2010 Topics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Technical Assessment Guide (TAG )151Power Generation and Storage Technology Options helps energy company decision makers optimize capital investments in the power generation and energy storage infrastructure. The 2010 TAG has been significantly enhanced to reflect current market conditions and technology trends, with cost and performance updates for pulverized coal (PC), large combustion turbine (CT) and combustion turbine combined-cycle (CTCC), nuclear, solar thermal (ST), photovoltaic (PV), b...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

155

Technical Assessment Guide (TAG) -- Power Generation and Storage Technology Options: 2011 Update  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Technical Assessment Guide (TAG) Power Generation and Storage Technology Options provides cost and performance data and analysis for energy company decision makers to optimize capital investments in the power generation and energy storage infrastructure. The 2011 TAG has been significantly enhanced to reflect current market conditions and technology trends, with cost and performance updates for pulverized coal (PC), large combustion turbine (CT), nuclear, solar thermal (ST), photovoltaic (PV), b...

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

MHK Technologies/OCGen turbine generator unit TGU | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OCGen turbine generator unit TGU OCGen turbine generator unit TGU < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage OCGen turbine generator unit TGU.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ocean Renewable Power Company Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Cook Inlet Tidal Energy *MHK Projects/East Foreland Tidal Energy *MHK Projects/Lubec Narrows Tidal *MHK Projects/Nenana Rivgen *MHK Projects/Treat Island Tidal *MHK Projects/Western Passage OCGen Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description he OCGen turbine-generator unit (TGU) is unidirectional regardless of current flow direction. Two cross flow turbines drive a permanent magnet generator on a single shaft. OCGen modules contain the ballast/buoyancy tanks and power electronics/control system allowing for easier installation. The OCGen TGU can be stacked either horizontally or vertically to form arrays.

157

Design Features and Technology Uncertainties for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the conclusions, observations, and recommendations of the Independent Technology Review Group (ITRG) regarding design features and important technology uncertainties associated with very-high-temperature nuclear system concepts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The ITRG performed its reviews during the period November 2003 through April 2004.

John M. Ryskamp; Phil Hildebrandt; Osamu Baba; Ron Ballinger; Robert Brodsky; Hans-Wolfgang Chi; Dennis Crutchfield; Herb Estrada; Jeane-Claude Garnier; Gerald Gordon; Richard Hobbins; Dan Keuter; Marilyn Kray; Philippe Martin; Steve Melancon; Christian Simon; Henry Stone; Robert Varrin; Werner von Lensa

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Carbon Nanomaterials: The Ideal Interconnect Technology for Next-Generation ICs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Editor's note:Carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoribbons are two promising next-generation interconnect technologies. Electrical modeling and performance analysis have demonstrated the superiority of these emerging technologies compared to conventional ... Keywords: design and test, carbon nanomaterials, carbon nanotube (CNT), graphene nanoribbon (GNR), electrical interconnects, optical interconnects, RF or wireless interconnects, on-chip vias, through-silicon vias (TSVs), delay, power

Hong Li; Chuan Xu; Kaustav Banerjee

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

www.cepe.ethz.ch A Real Options Evaluation Model for the Diffusion Prospects of New Renewable Power Generation Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.cepe.ethz.ch A real options evaluation model for the diffusion prospects of new renewable power generation technologies

Gürkan Kumbaroglu; Reinhard Madlener; Mustafa Demirel; Gürkan Kumbaroglu; Reinhard Madlener; Mustafa Demirel

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Executive Summary: Research in Nuclear Power—Workshop on the Needs of the Next Generation of Nuclear Power Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / NSF Workshop on the Research Needs of the Next Generation Nuclear Power Technology / Fission Reactor

A. David Rossin; Kunmo Chung; K. L. Peddicord

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The role of advanced technology in the future of the power generation industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation reviews the directions that technology has given the power generation industry in the past and how advanced technology will be the key for the future of the industry. The topics of the presentation include how the industry`s history has defined its culture, how today`s economic and regulatory climate has constrained its strategy, and how certain technology options might give some of the players an unfair advantage.

Bechtel, T.F.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Combustion technology developments in power generation in response to environmental challenges  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combustion technology developments in power generation in response to environmental challenges J Abstract Combustion system development in power generation is discussed ranging from the pre-environmental era in which the objectives were complete combustion with a minimum of excess air and the capability

Kammen, Daniel M.

163

Lessons from Deploying NLG Technology for Marine Weather Forecast Text Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lessons from Deploying NLG Technology for Marine Weather Forecast Text Generation Somayajulu G Language Generation (NLG) system that produces textual weather forecasts for offshore oilrigs from for producing 150 draft forecasts per day, which are then post-edited by forecasters before being released

Sripada, Yaji

164

New generation enrichment monitoring technology for gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

SciTech Connect

The continuous enrichment monitor, developed and fielded in the 1990s by the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided a go-no-go capability to distinguish between UF{sub 6} containing low enriched (approximately 4% {sup 235}U) and highly enriched (above 20% {sup 235}U) uranium. This instrument used the 22-keV line from a {sup 109}Cd source as a transmission source to achieve a high sensitivity to the UF{sub 6} gas absorption. The 1.27-yr half-life required that the source be periodically replaced and the instrument recalibrated. The instrument's functionality and accuracy were limited by the fact that measured gas density and gas pressure were treated as confidential facility information. The modern safeguarding of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant producing low-enriched UF{sub 6} product aims toward a more quantitative flow and enrichment monitoring concept that sets new standards for accuracy stability, and confidence. An instrument must be accurate enough to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of material, have virtually zero false alarms, and protect the operator's proprietary process information. We discuss a new concept for advanced gas enrichment assay measurement technology. This design concept eliminates the need for the periodic replacement of a radioactive source as well as the need for maintenance by experts. Some initial experimental results will be presented.

Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexandrov, Boian, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Thomas, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macarthur, Duncan, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marks, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moss, Calvin, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheppard, Gregory, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The O H E G plant is a revolutionary concept using tidal energy designed by FreeFlow 69 The plant uses tidal energy to create electricity 24 hours a day making this a unique project 24 hour power is produced by using both the kinetic energy in tidal flow and the potential energy created by tidal height changes The O H E G plant is completely independent of the wind farm however it does make an ideal foundation for offshore wind turbines combining both tidal energy and wind energy The O H E G plant is not detrimental to the surrounding environment or ecosystem and due to its offshore location it will not be visually offensive

166

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

167

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

SciTech Connect

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

168

New technology for purging the steam generators of nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technology for removal of undissolved impurities from a horizontal steam generator using purge water is developed on the basis of a theoretical analysis. A purge with a maximal flow rate is drawn off from the zone with the highest accumulation of sludge in the lower part of the steam generator after the main circulation pump of the corresponding loop is shut off and the temperatures of the heat transfer medium at the inlet and outlet of the steam generator have equilibrated. An improved purge configuration is used for this technology; it employs shutoff and regulator valves, periodic purge lines separated by a cutoff fixture, and a D{sub y} 100 drain union as a connector for the periodic purge. Field tests show that the efficiency of this technology for sludge removal by purge water is several times that for the standard method.

Budko, I. O.; Kutdjusov, Yu. F.; Gorburov, V. I. [Scientific-Research Center for Energy Technology 'NICE Centrenergo' (Russian Federation); Rjasnyj, S. I. [JSC 'The All-Rissia Nuklear Power Engineering Research and Development Institute' (VNIIAM) (Russian Federation)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

Next-generation online MC and A technologies for reprocessing plants  

SciTech Connect

As power-production nuclear fuel cycles propagate across the globe, a new generation of measurement technologies is needed to support safeguards monitoring of fuel reprocessing facilities. This paper describes the simulation and analysis of two potential technologies for meeting the challenges of 1) direct measurement of fissile isotopic content in irradiated fuel to detect partial defects, and 2) near-real-time monitoring of process chemistry to detect protracted diversion scenarios. Lead slowing-down spectroscopy is the core of the spent fuel assay technology and multi-isotope indicators via high-resolution gamma ray spectroscopy are the foundation of the process chemistry verification approach. The safeguards context and methods for each technology are described and the results of preliminary performance studies are presented. The quantitative results for both studies are promising but more comprehensive analysis and empirical validation is needed to adequately assess their potential value as next generation online materials control and accountability measures. (authors)

Smith, L.E.; Schwantes, J.M.; Ressler, J.J.; Douglas, M.; Anderson, K.A.; Fraga, C.G.; Durst, C. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, PO Box 999, Richland, WA, 99352 (United States); Orton, C.; Christensen, R. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Mechanical Engineering Department, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, 43210 (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Next-Generation Online MC&A Technologies for Reprocessing Plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As power-production nuclear fuel cycles propagate across the globe, a new generation of measurement technologies is needed to support safeguards monitoring of fuel reprocessing facilities. This paper describes the simulation and analysis of two potential technologies for meeting the challenges of 1) direct measurement of fissile isotopic content in irradiated fuel to detect partial defects, and 2) near-real-time monitoring of process chemistry to detect protracted diversion scenarios. Lead slowing-down spectroscopy is the core of the spent fuel assay technology and multi-isotope indicators via high-resolution gamma-ray spectroscopy is the foundation of the process chemistry verification approach. The safeguards context and methods for each technology are described and the results of preliminary performance studies are presented. The quantitative results for both studies are promising but more comprehensive analysis and empirical validation is needed to adequately assess their potential value as next-generation online materials control and accountability measures.

Smith, Leon E.; Schwantes, Jon M.; Ressler, Jennifer J.; Douglas, Matt; Anderson, Kevin K.; Fraga, Carlos G.; Durst, Casey; Orton, Chris; Christensen, Robert P.

2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

171

Technology status and project development risks of advanced coal power generation technologies in APEC developing economies  

SciTech Connect

The report reviews the current status of IGCC and supercritical/ultrasupercritical pulverized-coal power plants and summarizes risks associated with project development, construction and operation. The report includes an economic analysis using three case studies of Chinese projects; a supercritical PC, an ultrasupercritical PC, and an IGCC plant. The analysis discusses barriers to clean coal technologies and ways to encourage their adoption for new power plants. 25 figs., 25 tabs.

Lusica, N.; Xie, T.; Lu, T.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

172

Assessment of Emerging Low-Emissions Technologies for Combustion-Based Distributed Resource Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report analyzes the performance and cost of conventional and emerging emission control technologies for combustion-based distributed resource generators (combustion turbines, microturbines, and reciprocating engines). The performance is measured against the proposed California Air Resources Board (CARB) small generator certification standards for 2007. The costs are provided as capital cost and cost of electricity for emission control. The report also provides information on alternative fuel conside...

2005-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

173

Updated Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan, Revision 2  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Program will address the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. Such R&D will be guided by the technology roadmap developed for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) over two years with the participation of over 100 experts from the GIF countries. The roadmap evaluated over 100 future systems proposed by researchers around the world. The scope of the R&D described in the roadmap covers the six most promising Generation IV systems. The effort ended in December 2002 with the issue of the final Generation IV Technology Roadmap [1.1]. The six most promising systems identified for next generation nuclear energy are described within the roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor - SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor - GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor - LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor - SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides, and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. Accordingly, DOE has identified materials as one of the focus areas for Gen IV technology development.

Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Halsey, William [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hayner, George [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Comparison of Distributed Generation Technology Options, 250-400 kW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts own and operate biogas-fueled generating plants at a number of sites. Included in their portfolio are a 250 kW carbonate fuel cell, a 250 kW microturbine, a 400 kW internal combustion engine, and a cluster of ten (10) 30-kW microturbines. This afforded a unique opportunity to compare the power generation technologies. All of these systems use bio-gas that would otherwise be flared and generate power in parallel with the local utility to offset site electrical p...

2006-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

175

Competitiveness of Second Generation Biofuel Feedstocks: Role of Technology and Policy (2010 JGI User Meeting)  

SciTech Connect

Madhu Khanna from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute on "Competitiveness of Second Generation Biofuel Feedstocks: Role of Technology and Policy" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

Khanna, Madhu

2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

176

A Review of Research Status on LVRT Technology in Doubly-fed Wind Turbine Generator System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper gave a detailed introduction and analysis on the research status and industrialization situation of current LVRT Technology in doubly-fed wind turbine generator (WTG) system. Starting with the urgency of LVRT research in China, the paper introduced ... Keywords: LVRT, doubly-fed, research status, review

Yun Wang; Dong-li Zhao; Bin Zhao; Hong-hua Xu

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Reciprocating Engines for Stationary Power Generation: Technology, Products, Players, and Business Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reciprocating engines (REs) have long played an important role in the distributed resources market and should, in the future, continue to provide end-use customers and energy companies benefits in both onsite and grid-connected power generation service. This report presents a comprehensive worldwide overview of RE technology and the business climate for these products.

2000-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

178

ARE660 Wind Generator: Low Wind Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project is for the design of a wind turbine that can generate most or all of the net energy required for homes and small businesses in moderately windy areas. The purpose is to expand the current market for residential wind generators by providing cost effective power in a lower wind regime than current technology has made available, as well as reduce noise and improve reliability and safety. Robert W. Preus’ experience designing and/or maintaining residential wind generators of many configurations helped identify the need for an improved experience of safety for the consumer. Current small wind products have unreliable or no method of stopping the wind generator in fault or high wind conditions. Consumers and their neighbors do not want to hear their wind generators. In addition, with current technology, only sites with unusually high wind speeds provide payback times that are acceptable for the on-grid user. Abundant Renewable Energy’s (ARE) basic original concept for the ARE660 was a combination of a stall controlled variable speed small wind generator and automatic fail safe furling for shutdown. The stall control for a small wind generator is not novel, but has not been developed for a variable speed application with a permanent magnet alternator (PMA). The fail safe furling approach for shutdown has not been used to our knowledge.

Robert W. Preus; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

179

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The nation's power system is facing a diverse and broad set of challenges. These range from restructuring and increased competitiveness in power production to the need for additional production and distribution capacity to meet demand growth, and demands for increased quality and reliability of power and power supply. In addition, there are growing concerns about emissions from fossil fuel powered generation units and generators are seeking methods to reduce the CO{sub 2} emission intensity of power generation. Although these challenges may create uncertainty within the financial and electricity supply markets, they also offer the potential to explore new opportunities to support the accelerated deployment of cleaner and cost-effective technologies to meet such challenges. The federal government and various state governments, for example, support the development of a sustainable electricity infrastructure. As part of this policy, there are a variety of programs to support the development of ''cleaner'' technologies such as combined heat and power (CHP, or cogeneration) and renewable energy technologies. Energy from renewable energy sources, such as solar, wind, hydro, and biomass, are considered carbon-neutral energy technologies. The production of renewable energy creates no incremental increase in fossil fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. Electricity and thermal energy production from all renewable resources, except biomass, produces no incremental increase in air pollutants such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, particulate matter, and carbon monoxide. There are many more opportunities for the development of cleaner electricity and thermal energy technologies called ''recycled'' energy. A process using fossil fuels to produce an energy service may have residual energy waste streams that may be recycled into useful energy services. Recycled energy methods would capture energy from sources that would otherwise be unused and convert it to electricity or useful thermal energy. Recycled energy produces no or little increase in fossil fuel consumption and pollutant emissions. Examples of energy recycling methods include industrial gasification technologies to increase energy recovery, as well as less traditional CHP technologies, and the use of energy that is typically discarded from pressure release vents or from the burning and flaring of waste streams. These energy recovery technologies have the ability to reduce costs for power generation. This report is a preliminary study of the potential contribution of this ''new'' generation of clean recycled energy supply technologies to the power supply of the United States. For each of the technologies this report provides a short technical description, as well as an estimate of the potential for application in the U.S., estimated investment and operation costs, as well as impact on air pollutant emission reductions. The report summarizes the potential magnitude of the benefits of these new technologies. The report does not yet provide a robust cost-benefit analysis. It is stressed that the report provides a preliminary assessment to help focus future efforts by the federal government to further investigate the opportunities offered by new clean power generation technologies, as well as initiate policies to support further development and uptake of clean power generation technologies.

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

180

Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes how Learning-by-Doing (LBD) is implemented endogenously in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for generating plants. LBD is experiential learning that correlates to a generating technology's capacity growth. The annual amount of Learning-by-Doing affects the annual overnight cost reduction. Currently, there is no straightforward way to integrate and make sense of all the diffuse information related to the endogenous learning calculation in NEMS. This paper organizes the relevant information from the NEMS documentation, source code, input files, and output files, in order to make the model's logic more accessible. The end results are shown in three ways: in a simple spreadsheet containing all the parameters related to endogenous learning; by an algorithm that traces how the parameters lead to cost reductions; and by examples showing how AEO 2004 forecasts the reduction of overnight costs for generating technologies over time.

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

How do firms promote stability in an evolving technological system? : - The case of second generation biofuels in Norway.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis aims to increase the understanding of the formative phase of an evolving technological innovation system (TIS) related to second generation (2G) biofuels in… (more)

Blomberg, Line Elisabeth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Impact of Time Resolution on the Projected Rates of System Penetration by Intermittent Generation Technologies  

SciTech Connect

To hedge against the limited resources of fossil fuels and to reduce the emissions of green house gases, it is expected that our future electricity system will include more intermittent technologies, including wind and PV. To better understand how to develop energy systems that rely on intermittents, systems models are used to assess the cost at which intermittents become competitive, the degree of penetration as their costs are reduced, their impact on the optimal structure of the balance of the system, and their affect on total system costs. Modeling approaches designed for dispatchable technologies are not entirely appropriate for modeling intermittent technologies, since they, naturally, assume that generation can always be dispatched to meet demand. Intermittent generation cannot be dispatched--its output varies from hour to hour and from day to day on its own schedule, heedless to system needs. This research assesses the difference in results associated with the different approaches to modeling intermittency. The analyses compare cases using the hourly loads and intermittent generation patterns, cases in which the loads and generation were averaged over several hours, and cases in which the loads and/or the generation were represented by the annual averaging scheme used in the National Energy Modeling System developed by the Energy Information Administration. Three significant characteristics of an intermittent generator are the average power production (capacity factor), the coincidence of its power production and loads, and the variation in the magnitude of its power production. Economic models of the energy system represent these characteristics with differing degrees of accuracy. It is expected that different representations of the characteristics of an intermittent generator will give different answers to the sorts of questions posed above. This research assesses the magnitude and types of errors that are introduced by not representing the characteristics of the intermittents accurately. The most accurate representation of an intermittent generator uses its actual output from moment to moment. Here we use a one hour resolution over a full year of generation as the base case. This captures the variations from hour to hour and day-to-day. However, some energy modeling systems are based on a load duration curve approach for characterizing the variation in energy demand. This is quite suitable for dispatchable technologies since the generators can always be dispatched to meet the load whenever it occurs. When an intermittent generator is represented in this structure, it is represented as having a constant output equal to its capacity factor over long intervals (many hours). This approach captures the capacity factor of the intermittent and to some extent it can capture the coincidence of generation and demand, but does not capture the effect of the short term variations in output. In this paper, we evaluate the impacts of time resolution on the economic evaluation of wind and solar PV within a simple energy system. We assess the penetration of each intermittent generator as its cost is decreased. At the same time, the model optimally readjusts the capacities and dispatch of the conventional generators as the intermittent technology penetrates. This investigation compares the trajectories of intermittent penetration under a several different representations of intermittent generation and demand. In the following sections, we first discuss the approach to analysis, for both the load duration curve approach to representing intermittent generation and several averaging schemes. We then present results and conclusions.

Lamont, A; Wu, T

2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

183

Technologies for CO{sub 2}-capture from advanced power-generation systems  

SciTech Connect

The US power-generation industry generated about 1.5 billion metric tons of CO{sub 2} in 1990, with over 95% of that CO{sub 2} being generated by coal-fired utility boilers. Extensive use of coal for power generation is expected to continue for many years to come. Therefore, should capture and sequestration of CO{sub 2} be necessary, coal-fired power plants are likely to be primary targets for CO{sub 2} capture. This paper discusses opportunities and techniques for the capture of CO{sub 2} from the advanced power-generation systems that appear to be the leading candidates for widespread commercialization in the next two decades: integrated coal gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) and fuel cells. Retrofitting of conventional power plants for burning coal with O{sub 2} to facilitate CO{sub 2} capture was also investigated. A brief discussion of the impact of the CO{sub 2}-capture technology on the cost of power generation is also presented. Research and development needs of the CO{sub 2}-capture technologies are also identified. The results indicate that CO{sub 2} recovery from IGCC and fuel-cell plants is less complicated, less energy-intensive, and less costly than its recovery from conventional coal-fired power stations.

Wolsky, A.M.; Daniels, E.J.; Jody, B.J.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final technical report covers the period October 1, 1995 to February 29, 2008. This chapter begins with an overview of the history of Enhanced Oil Recovery techniques and specifically, CO2 flood. Subsequent chapters conform to the manner consistent with the Activities, Tasks, and Sub-tasks of the project as originally provided in Exhibit C1 in the Project Management Plan dated September 20, 1995. These chapters summarize the objectives, status and conclusions of the major project activities performed during the project period. The report concludes by describing technology transfer activities stemming from the project and providing a reference list of all publications of original research work generated by the project team or by others regarding this project. The overall objective of this project was a final research and development in the United States a technology that was developed at the Institute for Geology and Development of Fossil Fuels in Moscow, Russia. Before the technology can be convincingly adopted by United States oil and gas producers, the laboratory research was conducted at Mew Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experimental studies were conducted to measure the volume and the pressure of the CO{sub 2} gas generated according to the new Russian technology. Two experimental devices were designed, built and used at New Mexico Tech facilities for these purposes. The designed setup allowed initiating and controlling the reaction between the 'gas-yielding' (GY) and 'gas-forming' (GF) agents proposed by Russian technology. The temperature was controlled, and the generated gas pressure and volume were recorded during the reaction process. Additionally, the effect of surfactant addition on the effectiveness of the process was studied. An alternative GY reactant was tested in order to increase the efficiency of the CO2 gas generation process. The slim tube and the core flood experimental studies were conducted to define the sweep efficiency of the in-situ generated CO{sub 2} gas. A set of core flood experiments were conducted to define effect of surfactant on recovery efficiency. The results demonstrated obvious advantages of the foamy system over the brine solution in order to achieve higher sweep efficiency and recovery coefficient. It is shown that a slug injection is not an efficient method for mixing GY and GF solutions and it can't generate considerable gas inside the slim-tube.

Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

185

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. Download details: IP Address: 192.174.37.50 This content was downloaded on 04/11/2013 at 23:01 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more 2012 Environ. Res. Lett. 7 045802 (http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/7/4/045802) Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 045802 (10pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/045802 Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies:

186

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Electricity Generation Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies Volume 2 of 4 Volume 2 PDF Volume 3 PDF Volume 1 PDF Volume 4 PDF NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Renewable Electricity Futures Study Edited By Hand, M.M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Baldwin, S. U.S. Department of Energy DeMeo, E. Renewable Energy Consulting Services, Inc. Reilly, J.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Mai, T. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Arent, D. Joint Institute for Strategic Energy Analysis Porro, G. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Meshek, M. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Sandor, D. National Renewable

187

Technical Assessment Guide (TAG) -- Power Generation and Storage Technology Options: 2012 Topics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides cost and performance data and analysis for energy company decision makers to optimize capital investments in the power generation and energy storage infrastructure. The 2012 TAG has been significantly enhanced to reflect current topics of interest to members, which included market trends and integration and implementation of technologies from a planning perspective. In 2012, these topics included projected demand for large combustion turbine (CT) and combustion turbine ...

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

188

Assistive technologies for the disabled and for the new generation of senior citizens: the e-Tools architecture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present our exploratory ideas about the integration of agent technology with other technologies to build specific e-tools for the disabled and for the new generation of senior citizens. “e-Tools” stands for Embedded Tools, ... Keywords: Assistive technologies, agents, situated intelligence

Ulises Cortés; Roberta Annicchiarico; Javier Vázquez-Salceda; Cristina Urdiales; Lola Cañamero; Maite López; Miquel Sànchez-Marrè; Carlo Caltagirone

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Competitive Generation Market Study -- California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A growing number of states are unbundling utility services with the objective of creating a competitive open retail market for electric energy and other traditionally regulated utility services. Currently, each state or region has its own approach to unbundling and dealing with various issues such as stranded assets, market power, generation and fuel portfolio requirements, transmission system operation, and electricity pricing. Existing generating asset value and technology choice for new generation pro...

1998-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

190

Considerations Associated with Reactor Technology Selection for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the inception of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and during predecessor activities, alternative reactor technologies have been evaluated to determine the technology that best fulfills the functional and performance requirements of the targeted energy applications and market. Unlike the case of electric power generation where the reactor performance is primarily expressed in terms of economics, the targeted energy applications involve industrial applications that have specific needs in terms of acceptable heat transport fluids and the associated thermodynamic conditions. Hence, to be of interest to these industrial energy applications, the alternative reactor technologies are weighed in terms of the reactor coolant/heat transport fluid, achievable reactor outlet temperature, and practicality of operations to achieve the very high reliability demands associated with the petrochemical, petroleum, metals and related industries. These evaluations have concluded that the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) can uniquely provide the required ranges of energy needs for these target applications, do so with promising economics, and can be commercialized with reasonable development risk in the time frames of current industry interest – i.e., within the next 10-15 years.

L.E. Demick

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The effects of technological change, experience and environmental regulation on the construction of coal-burning generating units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper provides an empirical analysis of the technological, regulatory and organizational factors that have influenced the costs of building coal-burning steam-electric generating units over the past twenty year. We ...

Joskow, Paul L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supercritical coal-?red steam generators. Additionally, thecost of heat recovery steam generator(s) (HSRG) necessarythe primary generator is used to drive a secondary steam

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-57451 Clean Energy Technologies A Preliminary InventoryDepartment Environmental Energy Technologies Division Ernestand renewable energy technologies. Energy from renewable

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Program on Technology Innovation: An Assessment of the Future Potential for Biomass Electricity Generation in a Carbon-Constrained World  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report was developed as part of EPRI's Program on Technology Innovation. It evaluates the potential role of biomass electric power generation technologies in a carbon-constrained world. Also, it provides detailed background on U.S. and international biomass use, supply issues, and technologies that can be used to convert biomass into electric power and transportation fuels. A Geographic Information Systems (GIS) compatible database of U.S. biomass fuel supplies was also developed as part of this pro...

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

196

Ultracompact Accelerator Technology for a Next-Generation Gamma-Ray Source  

SciTech Connect

This presentation reported on the technology choices and progress manufacturing and testing the injector and accelerator of the 250 MeV ultra-compact Compton Scattering gamma-ray Source under development at LLNL for homeland security applications. This paper summarizes the status of various facets of current accelerator activities at LLNL. The major components for the X-band test station have been designed, fabricated, and await installation. The XL-4 klystron has been delivered, and will shortly be dressed and installed in the ScandiNova modulator. High power testing of the klystron into RF loads will follow, including adjustment of the modulator for the klystron load as necessary. Assembly of RF transport, test station supports, and accelerator components will follow. Commissioning will focus on processing the RF gun to full operating power, which corresponds to 200 MV/m peak electric field on the cathode surface. Single bunch benchmarking of the Mark 1 design will provide confidence that this first structure operates as designed, and will serve as a solid starting point for subsequent changes, such as a removable photocathode, and the use of various cathode materials for enhanced quantum efficiency. Charge scaling experiments will follow, partly to confirm predictions, as well as to identify important causes of emittance growth, and their scaling with charge. Multi-bunch operation will conclude testing of the Mark 1 RF gun, and allow verification of code predictions, direct measurement of bunch-to-bunch effects, and initial implementation compensation mechanisms. Modeling will continue and focus on supporting the commissioning and experimental program, as well as seeking to improve all facets of linac produced Compton gamma-rays.

Marsh, R A; Albert, F; Anderson, S G; Gibson, D J; Wu, S S; Hartemann, F V; Barty, C J

2012-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

197

DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

The impact of instrument choice on investment in abatement technologies: a case study of tax versus trade incentives for CCS and Biomass for electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

varying load factor, this may imply the use of small amounts of fossil fuel input and thus reduce the abatement that is possible vis-à-vis the reference plant. 18 )6.9,6.6(~ )2.3,2.2(~ 3 2 UQ UQ NT NT where the upper bound of abatement... with relatively low uncertainty over the technology involved. There are still large questions, however, over the supply chain for the fuel inputs and the load factor at which such plants could operate.14 We assume that the firm operates the technology...

Laing, T; Grubb, Michael

199

Externally-fired combined cycle: An effective coal fueled technology for repowering and new generation  

SciTech Connect

The Externally-Fired Combined Cycle (EFCC) is an attractive emerging technology for powering high efficiency combined gas and steam turbine cycles with coal or other ash bearing fuels. In the EFCC, the heat input to a gas turbine is supplied indirectly through a ceramic air heater. The air heater, along with an atmospheric coal combustor and ancillary equipment, replaces the conventional gas turbine combustor. A steam generator located downstream from the ceramic air heater and steam turbine cycle, along with an exhaust cleanup system, completes the combined cycle. A key element of the EFCC Development Program, the 25 MMBtu/h heat-input Kennebunk Test Facility (KTF), has recently begun operation. The KTF has been operating with natural gas and will begin operating with coal in early 1995. The US Department of Energy selected an EFCC repowering of the Pennsylvania Electric Company`s Warren Station for funding under the Clean Coal Technology Program Round V. The project focuses on repowering an existing 48 MW (gross) steam turbine with an EFCC power island incorporating a 30 MW gas turbine, for a gross power output of 78 MW and a net output of 72 MW. The net plant heat rate will be decreased by approximately 30% to below 9,700 Btu/kWh. Use of a dry scrubber and fabric filter will reduce sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and particulate emissions to levels under those required by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. Nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) emissions are controlled by the use of staged combustion. The demonstration project is currently in the engineering phase, with startup scheduled for 1997. This paper discusses the background of the EFCC, the KTF, the Warren Station EFCC Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Project, the commercial plant concept, and the market potential for the EFCC.

Stoddard, L.E.; Bary, M.R. [Black and Veatch, Kansas City, MO (United States); Gray, K.M. [Pennsylvania Electric Co., Johnstown, PA (United States); LaHaye, P.G. [Hague International, South Portland, ME (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2000. Distributed Power Generation, Marcel Dekker. pp.180-This greatly influences power generation costs and reducesand Ogden, 2000) total power generation is estimated at 5.3

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other than distributed generation. The cost reductionsWind Solar Thermal Photovoltaic Distributed Generation-Base Distributed Generation-Peak D Vintage PLANT TYPE C

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity from Steam Turbine-Generators: A System-level2. Backpressure Steam Turbine Generator Characteristics3. Backpressure Steam Turbine Generator Characteristics

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Shale oil: process choices  

SciTech Connect

The four broad categories of shale-oil processing are discussed. All of these processes share the basic function of retorting oil-shale rock at high temperature so that the kerogen material in the rocks is thermally decomposed to shale oil and gaseous products. The technologies and the organizations working on their development are: solids-to-solids heating, The Oil Shale Co. (TOSCO) and Lurgi-Rhur; gas-to-solids heating with internal gas combustion, U. S. Bureau of Mines, Development Engineering Inc. and Union Oil of California; gas-to-solid heating with external heat generation, Development Engineering, Union Oil, Petrobas, and Institute of Gas Technology; and in-situ retorting, Occidental Petroleum Corp. The TOSCO II process is considered proven and on the verge of commercialization. (BLM)

1974-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

204

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the condensate is returned to the steam generating plant.the condensate is often returned to the steam generating

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Next Generation Waste Tracking: Linking Legacy Systems with Modern Networking Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This report describes results from a preliminary analysis to satisfy the Department of Energy (DOE) objective to ensure the safe, secure, efficient packaging and transportation of materials both hazardous and non hazardous [1, 2]. The DOE Office of Environmental Management (OEM) through Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has embarked on a project to further this objective. OEM and ORNL have agreed to develop, demonstrate and make available modern day cost effective technologies for characterization, identification, tracking, monitoring and disposal of radioactive waste when transported by, or between, motor, air, rail, and water modes. During the past 8 years ORNL has investigated and deployed Web 2.0 compliant sensors into the transportation segment of the supply chain. ORNL has recently demonstrated operational experience with DOE Oak Ridge Operations Office (ORO) and others in national test beds and applications within this domain of the supply chain. Furthermore, in addition to DOE, these hazardous materials supply chain partners included Federal and State enforcement agencies, international ports, and commercial sector shipping operations in a hazardous/radioactive materials tracking and monitoring program called IntelligentFreight. IntelligentFreight is an ORNL initiative encompassing 5 years of research effort associated with the supply chain. The ongoing ORNL SmartFreight programs include RadSTraM [3], GRadSTraM , Trusted Corridors, SensorPedia [4], SensorNet, Southeastern Transportation Corridor Pilot (SETCP) and Trade Data Exchange [5]. The integration of multiple technologies aimed at safer more secure conveyance has been investigated with the core research question being focused on testing distinctly different distributed supply chain information sharing systems. ORNL with support from ORO have demonstrated capabilities when transporting Environmental Management (EM) waste materials for disposal over an onsite haul road. ORNL has unified the operations of existing legacy hazardous, radioactive and related informational databases and systems using emerging Web 2.0 technologies. These capabilities were used to interoperate ORNL s waste generating, packaging, transportation and disposal with other DOE ORO waste management contractors. Importantly, the DOE EM objectives were accomplished in a cost effective manner without altering existing information systems. A path forward is to demonstrate and share these technologies with DOE EM, contractors and stakeholders. This approach will not alter existing DOE assets, i.e. Automated Traffic Management Systems (ATMS), Transportation Tracking and Communications System (TRANSCOM), the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) demonstrated package tracking system, etc

Walker, Randy M [ORNL; Resseguie, David R [ORNL; Shankar, Mallikarjun [ORNL; Gorman, Bryan L [ORNL; Smith, Cyrus M [ORNL; Hill, David E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Commercialization possibilities of Stirling engine technology for microscale power generation in Sweden; MicroStirling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The presented master’s thesis has evaluated the possibility of commercializing a research project at the Royal Institute of Technologys (KTH) Department of Energy Technology… (more)

Backman, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward for 750–800°C Reactor Outlet Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the NGNP Critical PASSCs and defines their technical maturation path through Technology Development Roadmaps (TDRMs) and their associated Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). As the critical PASSCs advance through increasing levels of technical maturity, project risk is reduced and the likelihood of within-budget and on-schedule completion is enhanced. The current supplier-generated TRLs and TDRMs for a 750–800°C reactor outlet temperature (ROT) specific to each supplier are collected in Appendix A.

John Collins

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Technological Transfer from Research Nuclear Reactors to New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this paper is the analysis of the technological transfer role in the nuclear field, with particular emphasis on nuclear reactors domain. The presentation is sustained by historical arguments. In this frame, it is very important to start with the achievements of the first nuclear systems, for instant those with natural uranium as fuel and heavy water as moderator, following in time through the history until the New Generation Nuclear Power Reactors.Starting with 1940, the accelerated development of the industry has implied the increase of the global demand for energy. In this respect, the nuclear energy could play an important role, being essentially an unlimited source of energy. However, the nuclear option faces the challenges of increasingly demanding safety requirements, economic competitiveness and public acceptance. Worldwide, a significant amount of experience has been accumulated during development, licensing, construction, and operation of nuclear power reactors. The experience gained is a strong basis for further improvements. Actually, the nuclear programs of many countries are addressing the development of advanced reactors, which are intended to have better economics, higher reliability, improved safety, and proliferation-resistant characteristics in order to overcome the current concerns about nuclear power. Advanced reactors, now under development, may help to meet the demand for energy power of both developed and developing countries as well as for district heating, desalination and for process heat.The paper gives historical examples that illustrate the steps pursued from first research nuclear reactors to present advanced power reactors. Emphasis was laid upon the fact that the progress is due to the great discoveries of the nuclear scientists using the technological transfer.

Radulescu, Laura ['Horia Hulubei' National Institute of Nuclear Physics and Engineering, PO BOX MG-6, Bucharest 077125 (Romania); Pavelescu, Margarit [Academy of Romanian Scientists, Bucharest (Romania)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

209

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

technologies. The production of renewable energy creates noand thermal energy production from all renewable resources,

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 2002, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (Gen IV) Program has addressed the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. The six most promising systems identified for next-generation nuclear energy are described within this roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor-SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor-VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor-GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor-LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor-SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. At the inception of DOE's Gen IV program, it was decided to significantly pursue five of the six concepts identified in the Gen IV roadmap to determine which of them was most appropriate to meet the needs of future U.S. nuclear power generation. In particular, evaluation of the highly efficient thermal SCWR and VHTR reactors was initiated primarily for energy production, and evaluation of the three fast reactor concepts, SFR, LFR, and GFR, was begun to assess viability for both energy production and their potential contribution to closing the fuel cycle. Within the Gen IV Program itself, only the VHTR class of reactors was selected for continued development. Hence, this document will address the multiple activities under the Gen IV program that contribute to the development of the VHTR. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. The focus of this document will be the overall range of DOE's structural materials research activities being conducted to support VHTR development. By far, the largest portion of material's R&D supporting VHTR development is that being performed directly as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Supplementary VHTR materials R&D being performed in the DOE program, including university and international research programs and that being performed under direct contracts with the American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, will also be described. Specific areas of high-priority materials research that will be needed to deploy the NGNP and provide a basis for subsequent VHTRs are described, including the following: (1) Graphite: (a) Extensive unirradiated materials characterization and assessment of irradiation effects on properties must be performed to qualify new grades of graphite for nuclear service, including thermo-physical and mechanical properties and their changes, statistical variations from billot-to-billot and lot-to-lot, creep, and especially, irradiation creep. (b) Predictive models, as well as codification of the requirements and design methods for graphite core supports, must be developed to provide a basis for licensing. (2) Ceramics: Both fibrous and load-bearing ceramics must be qualified for environmental and radiation service as insulating materials. (3) Ceramic Composites: Carbon-carbon and SiC-SiC composites must be qualified for specialized usage in selected high-temperature components, such as core stabilizers, control rods, and insulating covers and ducting. This will require development of component-specific designs and fabrication processes, materials characterization, assessment of environmental and irradiation effects, and establishment of codes and standards for materials testing and design requirements. (4) Pressure Vessel Steels: (a) Qualification of short-term, high-temperature properties of light water rea

Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM PLASMATRON REFORMERS: A PROMISING TECHNOLOGY FOR NOX ADSORBER REGENERATION AND OTHER AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasmatron reformers are being developed at MIT and ArvinMeritor [1]. In these reformers a special low power electrical discharge is used to promote partial oxidation conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into hydrogen and CO. The partial oxidation reaction of this very fuel rich mixture is difficult to initiate. The plasmatron provides continuous enhanced volume initiation. To minimize electrode erosion and electrical power requirements, a low current, high voltage discharge with wide area electrodes is used. The reformers operate at or slightly above atmospheric pressure. Plasmatron reformers provide the advantages of rapid startup and transient response; efficient conversion of the fuel to hydrogen rich gas; compact size; relaxation or elimination of reformer catalyst requirements; and capability to process difficult to reform fuels, such as diesel and bio-oils. These advantages facilitate use of onboard hydrogen-generation technology for diesel exhaust after-treatment. Plasma-enhanced reformer technology can provide substantial conversion even without the use of a catalyst. Recent progress includes a substantial decrease in electrical power consumption (to about 200 W), increased flow rate (above 1 g/s of diesel fuel corresponding to approximately 40 kW of chemical energy), soot suppression and improvements in other operational features.. Plasmatron reformer technology has been evaluated for regeneration of NOx adsorber after-treatment systems. At ArvinMeritor tests were performed on a dual-leg NOx adsorber system using a Cummins 8.3L diesel engine both in a test cell and on a vehicle. A NOx adsorber system was tested using the plasmatron reformer as a regenerator and without the reformer i.e., with straight diesel fuel based regeneration as the baseline case. The plasmatron reformer was shown to improve NOx regeneration significantly compared to the baseline diesel case. The net result of these initial tests was a significant decrease in fuel penalty, roughly 50% at moderate adsorber temperatures. This fuel penalty improvement is accompanied by a dramatic drop in slipped hydrocarbon emissions, which decreased by 90% or more. Significant advantages are demonstrated across a wide range of engine conditions and temperatures. The study also indicated the potential to regenerate NOx adsorbers at low temperatures where diesel fuel based regeneration is not effective, such as those typical of idle conditions. Two vehicles, a bus and a light duty truck, have been equipped for plasmatron reformer NOx adsorber regeneration tests.

Bromberg, L.; Crane, S; Rabinovich, A.; Kong, Y; Cohn, D; Heywood, J; Alexeev, N.; Samokhin, A.

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

212

Research and Development Technology Development Roadmaps for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for process heat, hydrogen and electricity production. The reactor will be graphite moderated with helium as the primary coolant and may be either prismatic or pebble-bed. Although, final design features have not yet been determined. Research and Development (R&D) activities are proceeding on those known plant systems to mature the technology, codify the materials for specific applications, and demonstrate the component and system viability in NGNP relevant and integrated environments. Collectively these R&D activities serve to reduce the project risk and enhance the probability of on-budget, on-schedule completion and NRC licensing. As the design progresses, in more detail, toward final design and approval for construction, selected components, which have not been used in a similar application, in a relevant environment nor integrated with other components and systems, must be tested to demonstrate viability at reduced scales and simulations prior to full scale operation. This report and its R&D TDRMs present the path forward and its significance in assuring technical readiness to perform the desired function by: Choreographing the integration between design and R&D activities; and proving selected design components in relevant applications.

Ian McKirdy

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generate electricity and thermal energy to serve heating andenergy source for thermal energy loads and the generation of2 emissions. Electricity and thermal energy production from

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Free Electricity from Steam Turbine-Generators: A System-scale back-pressure steam turbine. Several manufactures2. Backpressure Steam Turbine Generator Characteristics

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Arc Steelmaking - Phase II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current trend in the steel industry is a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces, and an increasing number of alternative processes using metallic scrap iron, pig iron and metallized iron ore products. Currently, iron ores from Minnesota and Michigan are pelletized and shipped to the lower Great Lakes ports as blast furnace feed. The existing transportation system and infrastructure is geared to handling these bulk materials. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the needs of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling. A recent commercial installation employing Kobe Steel’s ITmk3 process, was installed in Northeastern Minnesota. The basic process uses a moving hearth furnace to directly reduce iron oxides to metallic iron from a mixture of iron ore, coals and additives. The resulting products can be shipped using the existing infrastructure for use in various steelmaking processes. The technology reportedly saves energy by 30% over the current integrated steelmaking process and reduces emissions by more than 40%. A similar large-scale pilot plant campaign is also currently in progress using JFE Steel’s Hi-QIP process in Japan. The objective of this proposal is to build upon and improve the technology demonstrated by Kobe Steel and JFE, by further reducing cost, improving quality and creating added incentive for commercial development. This project expands previous research conducted at the University of Minnesota Duluth’s Natural Resources Research Institute and that reported by Kobe and JFE Steel. Three major issues have been identified and are addressed in this project for producing high-quality nodular reduced iron (NRI) at low cost: (1) reduce the processing temperature, (2) control the furnace gas atmosphere over the NRI, and (3) effectively use sub-bituminous coal as a reductant. From over 4000 laboratory tube and box furnace tests, it was established that the correct combination of additives, fluxes, and reductant while controlling the concentration of CO and CO2 in the furnace atmosphere (a) lowers the operating temperature, (b) decreases the use of reductant coal (c) generates less micro nodules of iron, and (d) promotes desulphurization. The laboratory scale work was subsequently verified on 12.2 m (40 ft) long pilot scale furnace. High quality NRI could be produced on a routine basis using the pilot furnace facility with energy provided from oxy-gas or oxy-coal burner technologies. Specific strategies were developed to allow the use of sub-bituminous coals both as a hearth material and as part of the reaction mixture. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to study the overall carbothermic reduction and smelting process. The movement of the furnace gas on a pilot hearth furnace and larger simulated furnaces and various means of controlling the gas atmosphere were evaluated. Various atmosphere control methods were identified and tested during the course of the investigation. Based on the results, the appropriate modifications to the furnace were made and tested at the pilot scale. A series of reduction and smelting tests were conducted to verify the utility of the processing conditions. During this phase, the overall energy use characteristics, raw materials, alternative fuels, and the overall economics predicted for full scale implementation were analyzed. The results indicate that it should be possible to lower reaction temperatures while simultaneously producing low sulfur, high carbon NRI if the right mix chemistry and atmosphere are employed. Recommendations for moving the technology to the next stage of commercialization are presented.

Donald R. Fosnacht; Iwao Iwasaki; Richard F. Kiesel; David J. Englund; David W. Hendrickson; Rodney L. Bleifuss

2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

216

TransForum v7n1 - Diversity of Choices: Key to Improving Transportatio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diversity of Choices: Key to Improving Transportation Energy Efficiency Argonne's Mobile Automotive Technology Testbed Argonne's Mobile Automotive Technology Testbed can be...

217

How Happiness Affects Choice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consumers want to be happy, and marketers are increasingly trying to appeal to consumers’ pursuit of happiness. However, the results of six studies reveal that what happiness means varies, and consumers’ choices reflect ...

Mogilner, Cassie

218

ENDF/B-VII.0: Next Generation Evaluated Nuclear Data Library for Nuclear Science and Technology  

SciTech Connect

We describe the next generation general purpose Evaluated Nuclear Data File, ENDF/B-VII.0, of recommended nuclear data for advanced nuclear science and technology applications. The library, released by the U.S. Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) in December 2006, contains data primarily for reactions with incident neutrons, protons, and photons on almost 400 isotopes. The new evaluations are based on both experimental data and nuclear reaction theory predictions. The principal advances over the previous ENDF/B-VI library are the following: (1) New cross sections for U, Pu, Th, Np and Am actinide isotopes, with improved performance in integral validation criticality and neutron transmission benchmark tests; (2) More precise standard cross sections for neutron reactions on H, {sup 6}Li, {sup 10}B, Au and for {sup 235,238}U fission, developed by a collaboration with the IAEA and the OECD/NEA Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC); (3) Improved thermal neutron scattering; (4) An extensive set of neutron cross sections on fission products developed through a WPEC collaboration; (5) A large suite of photonuclear reactions; (6) Extension of many neutron- and proton-induced reactions up to an energy of 150 MeV; (7) Many new light nucleus neutron and proton reactions; (8) Post-fission beta-delayed photon decay spectra; (9) New radioactive decay data; and (10) New methods developed to provide uncertainties and covariances, together with covariance evaluations for some sample cases. The paper provides an overview of this library, consisting of 14 sublibraries in the same, ENDF-6 format, as the earlier ENDF/B-VI library. We describe each of the 14 sublibraries, focusing on neutron reactions. Extensive validation, using radiation transport codes to simulate measured critical assemblies, show major improvements: (a) The long-standing underprediction of low enriched U thermal assemblies is removed; (b) The {sup 238}U, {sup 208}Pb, and {sup 9}Be reflector biases in fast systems are largely removed; (c) ENDF/B-VI.8 good agreement for simulations of highly enriched uranium assemblies is preserved; (d) The underprediction of fast criticality of {sup 233,235}U and {sup 239}Pu assemblies is removed; and (e) The intermediate spectrum critical assemblies are predicted more accurately. We anticipate that the new library will play an important role in nuclear technology applications, including transport simulations supporting national security, nonproliferation, advanced reactor and fuel cycle concepts, criticality safety, medicine, space applications, nuclear astrophysics, and nuclear physics facility design. The ENDF/B-VII.0 library is archived at the National Nuclear Data Center, BNL. The complete library, or any part of it, may be retrieved from www.nndc.bnl.gov.

Chadwick, M B; Oblozinsky, P; Herman, M; Greene, N M; McKnight, R D; Smith, D L; Young, P G; MacFarlane, R E; Hale, G M; Haight, R C; Frankle, S; Kahler, A C; Kawano, T; Little, R C; Madland, D G; Moller, P; Mosteller, R; Page, P; Talou, P; Trellue, H; White, M; Wilson, W B; Arcilla, R; Dunford, C L; Mughabghab, S F; Pritychenko, B; Rochman, D; Sonzogni, A A; Lubitz, C; Trumbull, T H; Weinman, J; Brown, D; Cullen, D E; Heinrichs, D; McNabb, D; Derrien, H; Dunn, M; Larson, N M; Leal, L C; Carlson, A D; Block, R C; Briggs, B; Cheng, E; Huria, H; Kozier, K; Courcelle, A; Pronyaev, V; der Marck, S

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

219

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX B: Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor Project Reports on California Public Utilities Commission Decisions on Community Choice Aggregation Prepared For Participants FROM: John Dalessi, NCI SUBJECT: CPUC COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PHASE 1 DECISION On December 16

220

Arnold Schwarzenegger COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT PIERFINALPROJECTREPORT Rosenfeld. Please cite this report as follows: Stoner, G. Patrick. 2008. Community Choice Aggregation Pilot Aggregation Pilot Project Final Report is the final report for the Community Choice Aggregation Pilot Project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Characterization of alternative electric generation technologies for the SPS comparative assessment: volume 2, central-station technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The SPS Concept Development and Evaluation Program includes a comparative assessment. An early first step in the assessment process is the selection and characterization of alternative technologies. This document describes the cost and performance (i.e., technical and environmental) characteristics of six central station energy alternatives: (1) conventional coal-fired powerplant; (2) conventional light water reactor (LWR); (3) combined cycle powerplant with low-Btu gasifiers; (4) liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR); (5) photovoltaic system without storage; and (6) fusion reactor.

Not Available

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

processes. Industrial steam distribution pressures areto medium pressure steam for distribution. Although thelosses in steam generation or distribution. The potential

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Small Gas Turbines for Distributed Generation Markets: Technology, Products, and Business Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small gas turbines (300 kW to 5 MW) offer an attractive way for utilities and energy service companies to generate electric power within distribution grids and for consumers to generate their own power. Distributed generation also benefits utilities by deferring or avoiding costly expansion of the power transmission and distribution system, which could allow them to offer customers lower cost power. Gas turbines process more power-generation cycle air per unit size and weight of machine than do reciproca...

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

224

Natural Gas Residential Choice Programs  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

www.ai.orgiurcgasnipsco.html http:www.nipsco.comOur-ServicesNIPSCO-ChoiceChoice-Suppliers.aspx Lists activeparticipating marketers Kentucky 3 3 http:...

225

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX H: Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor Berkeley have been investigating and analyzing a program for the implementation of Community Choice Aggregation

226

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of biomass integrated-gasifier/gas turbine combined cyclefarms to large integrated gasifiers at petroleum refineries.BLGCC). The black liquor gasifier technology will produce a

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Outline of 145 MW Combined Cycle Power Plant for KawasakiGas Firing Gas Turbine Combined Cycle Plant,” Journal ofgasifier/gas turbine combined cycle technology and its

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Technologies A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for$/kWh References EPA. 2002. Inventory of U.S. Greenhouse Gas

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MCFC) and solid oxide (SOFC). Proton exchange membrane (PEM)technology. Hence, MCFC and SOFC offer the most potentialfuel cell system, MCFC and SOFC offer the most potential.

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Technology evaluation of the Stirling engine for stationary power generation in the 500 to 2000 horsepower range  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented of a study undertaken to assess the potential and development status of the Stirling engine and recommendations are made for a possible program to develop 500 to 2000 hp stationary Stirling engines for commercial introduction by the late 1980's. Information is included on the operation, performance, historical development, and design of Stirling engines; requirements and characteristics of associated combustion systems; economics; technology advances needed; and the technological risks involved in developing Stirling engines for stationary power generation. (LCL)

Hogland, L.C.; Percival, W.H.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Community Choice Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) enables California cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Community Choice Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) enables California cities and counties, and are looking at Community Choice Aggregation as a mechanism for doing so. When California deregulated the same utilities that provided it before deregulation. Community Choice Aggregation offers an opportunity

232

Energy 101: Lighting Choices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Choices Energy 101: Lighting Choices Addthis Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Lighting Choices video: The video opens with "Energy 101: Lighting Choices."...

233

LBNLs Low-NOx Combustion Technologies for Heat and Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Swirl Injectors for Swirl Injectors for High Hydrogen Fuel Gas Turbines Robert K. Cheng Environmental Energy Technologies Division Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Berkeley, CA 94720 Research supported by NETL - Fossil Energy, US Dept. of Energy Presentation at UTSR Workshop - Oct. 20, 2010 Participants and Collaborators  LBNL - Environmental Energy Technology Div.  Robert Cheng, David Littlejohn, Peter Therkelsen, Ken Smith & Sy Ali  United Tech. Research Center - Pratt & Whitney Power Systems  Dustin Davis, Catalin Fotache & Richard Tuthill  Florida Turbine Technologies  Russell Jones & Joe Brostmeyer  LBNL - Computational Research Div.  John Bell & Marc Day  Siemens Energy Inc.  Scott Martin & Enrique Portillo Bilbao  University of Iowa

234

Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of addition of renewable resources- solar and wind in the distribution system as deployed in the SGIG projects.

Singh, Ruchi; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

235

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX A: Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor Community in this report. #12;1 COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX A Community Choice Aggregation in the Community Choice Aggregation Demonstration project and assesses the costs and availability of renewable

236

Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the combined cycle gas turbine - an experience curveTechnologies Combustion gas turbine, gas combined- cycle,Integrated Gas CC Gas/Oil Steam Turbine Existing CT Conv CT

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost of natural gas and the enactment of the Power Plant &Power Plant & Industrial Fuel Use Act and the natural gaspower plant emissions, created a premium for “clean-burning” technologies. With natural gas

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Assessment and Evaluation of Next Generation High-Voltage DC Technologies—Phase 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As an established technology for bulk power transmission, high-voltage direct current (HVDC) power transmission is being used worldwide, and more than 100 schemes are operating at present. Advances in voltage sourced converter (VSC) technologies and power electronic devices with use of insulated-gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) will provide improved system performance and reliability. Also, the present highest operating voltage is +/- 800 kV as China and India are building +/- 800-kV lines. Anticipating ...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

239

Access and the Choice of Transit Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rail/Feeder Bus System on a Rectangular Grid. Transportation ResearchRail. European Journal of Transport and Infrastructure Research,rail systems around TODs seem to be limited. 5.2 Research

Sivakumaran, Karthikgeyan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Executive Summary  

SciTech Connect

To meet future energy needs, ten countries--Argentina, Brazil, Canada, France, Japan, the Republic of Korea, the Republic of South Africa, Switzerland, the United Kingdom, and the United States--have agreed on a framework for international cooperation in research for an advanced generation of nuclear energy systems, known as Generation IV. These ten countries have joined together to form the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) to develop future-generation nuclear energy systems that can be licensed, constructed, and operated in a manner that will provide competitively priced and reliable energy products while satisfactorily addressing nuclear safety, waste, proliferation, and public perception concerns. The objective for Generation IV nuclear energy systems is to be available for international deployment before the year 2030, when many of the world's currently operating nuclear power plants will be at or near the end of their operating licenses.

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a “solar hydrogen economy” has been projected. Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a “solar hydrogen economy” has been projected. Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Technologies  

Technologies Materials. Aggregate Spray for Air Particulate; Actuators Made From Nanoporous Materials; Ceramic Filters; Energy Absorbing Material; Diode Arrays for ...

244

Technologies  

Science & Technology. Weapons & Complex Integration. News Center. News Center. Around the Lab. Contacts. For Reporters. Livermore Lab Report. ...

245

Technologies  

Technologies Research Tools. Cell-Free Assembly of NanoLipoprotein Particles; Chemical Prism; Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA) ...

246

Low Cost High Performance Generator Technology Program. Volume 5. Heat Pipe Topical  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress towards the development of a heat pipe for use in the Low Cost High Performance Thermoelectric Generator Program is reported for the period May 15, 1975 through June 1975. (TFD)

Not Available

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and T. O’Brien. 2003. Free Electricity from Steam Turbine-plants and sites that need electricity and heat (i.e. steam)of the Potential for Electricity Generation Owen Bailey and

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation-peak, biomass, and advanced combustion turbineCombustion gas turbine, gas combined- cycle, conventional coal Biomass,Biomass plants change from Revolutionary to Evolutionary vintage, while the Advanced Combustion

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

250

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

suited for combined cycle, baseload applications. This sug-for the provision of baseload power in a combined cycle set-generators: provision of baseload power using a combined

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Illuminating Solar Decathlon Homes: Exploring Next Generation Lighting Technology - Light Emitting Diodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report was prepared by PNNL for the US Department of Energy Building Technologies Program, Solid-State Lighting Program. The report will be provided to teams of university students who are building houses for the 2009 Solar Decathlon, a home design competition sponsored in part by DOE, to encourage teams to build totally solar powered homes. One aspect of the competition is lighting. This report provides the teams with information about LED lighting that can help them determine how they incorporate LED lighting into their homes. The report provides an overview of LED technology, a status of where LED technology is today, questions and answers about lighting quality, efficiency, lifetime etc.; numerous examples of LED products; and several weblinks for further research.

Gordon, Kelly L.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

252

EDITORS’CHOICE  

combustion for energy generation. ... double membrane punctured by nuclear pores. ... surface. Without plants, the climate would

253

Burger King: Better Choices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Burger King: Better Choices: BK Veggie Burger w/o mayo 310 Calories, 7g fat, 1g sat* fat BK Chicken Whopper w/o mayo 420 Calories, 9g fat, 3 g sat fat Chicken Caesar w/o dressing & croutons 160 Calories, 6g: Extra Crispy, 1 Breast 470 Calories, 28g fat, 8g sat fat Popcorn Chicken, 1 Large Order 620 Calories, 40

de la Torre, José R.

254

Energy and global warming impacts of next generation refrigeration and air conditioning technologies  

SciTech Connect

Significant developments have occurred in hydrofluorocarbon (HFC) and the application of ammonia and hydrocarbons as refrigerant working fluids since the original TEWI (Total Equivalent Warming Impact) report in 1991. System operating and performance data on alternative refrigerants and refrigeration technologies justify and updated evaluation of these new alternative refrigerants and competing technologies in well-characterized applications. Analytical and experimental results are used to show quantitative comparisons between HFCS, HFC blends, hydrocarbons, and ammonia, used as refrigerants. An objective evaluation is presented for commercial and near commercial non-CFC refrigerants/blowing agents and alternative refrigeration technologies. This information is needed for objective and quantitative decisions on policies addressing greenhouse gas emissions from refrigeration and air conditioning equipment. The evaluation assesses the energy use and global warming impacts of refrigeration and air conditioning technologies that could be commercialized during the phase out of HCFCS. Quantitative comparison TEWI for two application areas are presented. Opportunities for significant reductions in TEWI are seen with currently known refrigerants through improved maintenance and servicing practices and improved product designs.

Sand, J.R.; Fischer, S.K.; Baxter, V.D.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Next Generation of Monitoring and Control Systems Using Synchronized Sampling Technology and Multifunctional IEDs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solution enables full use of field recorded IED data by various utility groups such as protection engineers deployment of the solution. 1. Introduction Digital substation technology has been first introduced Intelligent Electronic Device (IEDs) designs to implementation of integrated Substation Automation Systems

Kezunovic, Mladen

256

COMBINING STATED AND REVEALED CHOICE RESEARCH TO INFORM ENERGY SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from a vehicle attribute database. RP dynamics were assessed by comparing models estimated from regions....................................................................................................33 2.2.2 Vehicle Database technologies, including choices among appliances (Nanduri, Tiedemann, & Bilodeau, 2002), energy suppliers

257

Reliability technology to improve and/or maintain emergency diesel generator performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reviews a report that demonstrates that an emergency diesel generator reliability program can be developed using risk- and reliability-based techniques that can be integrated within current plant operational activities to (a) analyze problems that have affected emergency diesel generator (EDG) performances, (b) forecast the onset of potential problems, and (c) suggest actions that could eliminate or reduce their occurrence. With only a few exceptions, commercial NPPs in the United States use EDG units as backup sources. These EDG units consist of a diesel engine connected directly to an ac generator. They are safety grade and are normally arranged so that separate EDGs supply each of the two, three, or four redundant electrical divisions of the NPP. The EDGs are typically designed to start automatically, to be at rated speed and voltage in 10 s, and to accept full load within 1 min.

Karimian, S.; Taylor, J.H.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Technologies  

High Performance Computing (HPC) Technologies; Industrial Partnerships Office P.O. Box 808, L-795 Livermore, CA 94551 Phone: (925) 422-6416 Fax: (925) ...

259

US EPA Converting Limbo Lands to Energy-Generating Stations: Renewable Energy Technologies on Underused, Formerly Contaminated Sites October 2007  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R-08/023 R-08/023 October 2007 Converting Limbo Lands to Energy-Generating Stations: Renewable Energy Technologies on Underused, Formerly Contaminated Sites By: Gail Mosey, Donna Heimiller, Douglas Dahle, Laura Vimmerstedt, and Liz Brady-Sabeff National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Blvd. Golden, CO 80401 Under Contract No. DE-AC36-99-GO10337 Through EPA IAG NO. DW89930254010 NREL/TP-640-41522 For: George Huffman, EPA Project Manager Sustainable Technology Division National Risk Management Research Laboratory U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Cincinnati, Ohio 45268 National Risk Management Research Laboratory Office of Research and Development U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Cincinnati, Ohio 45268 Notice The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency through its Office of Research and Development

260

Integration of Ion Transport Membrane Technology with Oxy-Combustion Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) in conjunction with Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., (AP) has reviewed oxy-combustion, a methodology to burn coal using oxygen rather than air to aid in removing carbon by producing a more concentrated stream of carbon dioxide (CO2) for remediation, which reduces the cost and energy required to do so. This report discusses the ion transport membrane (ITM), a technology developed by AP under a Cooperative Agreement with the United States ...

2013-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Technological analysis of options for generating electricity with solid waste fuel in the Bangkok metropolitan area  

SciTech Connect

A discussion of relatively current techniques for converting mixed municipal waste into electricity is presented. A brief review of the comparative capabilities of the relevant energy recovery systems is documented in this section. The discussion is focused on the principal system and technological strategies that would be best suited for the municipal solid waste recovery project in Thailand. Emphasis in the review was placed on mixed waste processing in a mass burning waterwalled system.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Assessment of DC Backup Power Technology Options for Nuclear Power Generation Stations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The March 2011 Fukushima nuclear power plant accident in Japan created a renewed industry interest in examining potential improvements for backup power options to support plant accident scenarios in both near-term and long-term implementation time periods. This report assesses technology options that can be considered in improving DC backup power. Options with near-term applicability were considered and reviewed. Certain energy storage systems and hydrogen power fuel cells were identified that could ...

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

263

Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Assessment of Other Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. In combination with the aggressive 2010 target of the California, this will likely lead to a continued rapid rate generation since adoption of the Fifth Plan. The most feasible near-term uses of biofuels for electric power and animal manure energy recovery and chemical recovery boiler upgrades. Other possible sources of biofuels

264

A Novel MPPT Control Technology Based on Cloud Model for Photovoltaic Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cloud model is a mathematical representation to fuzziness and randomness in linguistic concepts, and integrates the fuzziness and randomness of a linguistic concept in a unified way. This model is a new method for transformation between qualitative ... Keywords: photovoltaic power generation, MPPT, duty factor, cloud model

Lei An; Wei Fan

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

generation of renewable energy tech-nologies, now coupled with market  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Geller, Energy Revolution: Policies for a Sustainable Future (Island, Washington, DC, 2003). 3. PA generation of renewable energy tech- nologies, now coupled with market mechanisms that make them with the deregulation of energy markets, as well as the California energy crisis, the Enron energy deba- cle

Kammen, Daniel M.

266

Biennial Assessment of the Fifth Power Plan Assessment of Other Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and animal manure energy recovery and chemical recovery boiler upgrades. Other possible sources of biofuels generation since adoption of the Fifth Plan. The most feasible near-term uses of biofuels for electric power. The wood is more valuable as a fiber crop. The most significant development regarding biofuels since

267

Bulk Electricity Generating Technologies This appendix describes the technical characteristics and cost and performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

foundations complete Start of boiler steel erection to commercial operation Time to complete (single unit factor of 1.10. May 2005 I-10 #12;petrochemical industry for processing of coal and petroleum residues the North American power generation industry. This is attributable to the availability of low- cost natural

268

Alternative fuels and vehicles choice model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the theory and implementation of a model of alternative fuel and vehicle choice (AFVC), designed for use with the US Department of Energy`s Alternative Fuels Trade Model (AFTM). The AFTM is a static equilibrium model of the world supply and demand for liquid fuels, encompassing resource production, conversion processes, transportation, and consumption. The AFTM also includes fuel-switching behavior by incorporating multinomial logit-type equations for choice of alternative fuel vehicles and alternative fuels. This allows the model to solve for market shares of vehicles and fuels, as well as for fuel prices and quantities. The AFVC model includes fuel-flexible, bi-fuel, and dedicated fuel vehicles. For multi-fuel vehicles, the choice of fuel is subsumed within the vehicle choice framework, resulting in a nested multinomial logit design. The nesting is shown to be required by the different price elasticities of fuel and vehicle choice. A unique feature of the AFVC is that its parameters are derived directly from the characteristics of alternative fuels and vehicle technologies, together with a few key assumptions about consumer behavior. This not only establishes a direct link between assumptions and model predictions, but facilitates sensitivity testing, as well. The implementation of the AFVC model as a spreadsheet is also described.

Greene, D.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Center for Transportation Analysis

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Development and Improvement of Devices for Hydrogen Generation and Oxidation in Water Detritiation Facility Based on CECE Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Tritium Science and Technology - Tritium Science and Technology - Detritiation, Purification, and Isotope Separation

M. Rozenkevich et al.

270

Maintaining a Technology-Neutral Approach to Hydrogen Production Process Development through Conceptual Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), tasking the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with demonstrating High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology. The demonstration is to include the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of HTGR technology for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), a component of the DOE Hydrogen Program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy, is also investigating multiple approaches to cost effective hydrogen production from nuclear energy. The objective of NHI is development of the technology and information basis for a future decision on commercial viability. The initiatives are clearly intertwined. While the objectives of NGNP and NHI are generally consistent, NGNP has progressed to the project definition phase and the project plan has matured. Multiple process applications for the NGNP require process heat, electricity and hydrogen in varied combinations and sizes. Coupling these processes to the reactor in multiple configurations adds complexity to the design, licensing and demonstration of both the reactor and the hydrogen production process. Commercial viability of hydrogen production may depend on the specific application and heat transport configuration. A component test facility (CTF) is planned by the NGNP to support testing and demonstration of NGNP systems, including those for hydrogen production, in multiple configurations. Engineering-scale demonstrations in the CTF are expected to start in 2012 to support scheduled design and licensing activities leading to subsequent construction and operation. Engineering-scale demonstrations planned by NHI are expected to start at least two years later. Reconciliation of these schedules is recommended to successfully complete both initiatives. Hence, closer and earlier integration of hydrogen process development and heat transport systems is sensible. For integration purposes, an analysis comparing the design, cost and schedule impact of maintaining a technology neutral approach through conceptual design or making an early hydrogen process technology selection was performed. Early selection does not specifically eliminate a technology, but rather selects the first hydrogen technology for demonstration. A systems-engineering approach was taken to define decision-making criteria for selecting a hydrogen technology. The relative technical, cost and schedule risks of each approach were analyzed and risk mitigation strategies were recommended, including provisions to maintain close collaboration with the NHI. The results of these analyses are presented here.

Michael W. Patterson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT APPENDIX E: Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor Community in this report. #12;«CCA_Name» - DRAFT - COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION IMPLEMENTATION PLAN «Date Choice Aggregation Implementation Plan Template Prepared For: California Energy Commission Prepared By

272

Study for Snake Robot Technology for Inspection of Headers and Tubes in Heat Recovery Steam Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tubing is especially difficult to inspect using conventional nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques because: The tubing is tightly bundled, with interior bundle tubing typically inaccessible by conventional equipment without cutting and later repairing the exterior tubes. The tubing is finned and, since ultrasonic techniques require solid contact with the tube, cannot be accessed unless the tubing is cut away. Access to the inside of the tubes is difficult, requi...

2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

273

Low Cost High Performance Generator Technology Program. Volume 2. Design study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The systems studies directed towards up-rating the performance of an RTG using selenide thermoelectrics and a heat source with improved safety are reported. The resulting generator design, designated LCHPG, exhibits conversion efficiency of greater than 10 percent, a specific power of 3 W/lb., and a cost of $6,000/W(e). In the course of system analyses, the significant development activities required to achieve this performance by the 1980 time period are identified.

Not Available

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Testing requirements for variable-speed generating technology for wind turbine applications. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Guidelines for evaluating the impacts of integrating variable-speed, constant-frequency (VSCF) wind turbines into electric utility systems have been proposed based upon prior test experiences with the NASA VSCF system and the expected performance of the Westinghouse and OMNION VSCF systems. The NASA and Westinghouse VSCF generating systems use a wound rotor induction generator and a cycloconverter, while the OMNION system uses a wound rotor induction generator and a dc-current link converter. The design of VSCF/utility system interface requirements and test plans is based on utility system electrical issues such as utility system control and operation, protection, voltage/reactive power management, power quality, and reliability. A framework for testing VSCF concepts is proposed which includes a three stage process: modeling of the system to analyze design alternatives and simulate disturbances that could be harmful to the actual system; laboratory testing which involves the use of the system under controlled conditions; and field testing to collect data under actual conditions to validate models and analyze the wind turbine behavior.

Herrera, J.I.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Technologies  

Current Weather. Protocol Office. Where to stay. Tri-Valley Visitors Bureau. ... Drum Ring Tools: Removal/Installation Set; Portable Hydrogen Peroxide Vapor Generator;

276

Technolog  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Research in Research in Science and Technolog y Sandia pushes frontiers of knowledge to meet the nation's needs, today and tomorrow Sandia National Laboratories' fundamental science and technology research leads to greater understanding of how and why things work and is intrinsic to technological advances. Basic research that challenges scientific assumptions enables the nation to push scientific boundaries. Innovations and breakthroughs produced at Sandia allow it to tackle critical issues, from maintaining the safety, security and effectiveness of the nation's nuclear weapons and preventing domestic and interna- tional terrorism to finding innovative clean energy solutions, develop- ing cutting-edge nanotechnology and moving the latest advances to the marketplace. Sandia's expertise includes:

277

Rethinking the scale of coal-fired electric generation: technological and institutional considerations  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines the economic and social implications of an electric-utility system based on medium-scale (50 to 200 MWe) coal-fired plants dispersed near load centers. The historical trend in US electric generation has been a sustained effort to capture the economies of large scale. Technical and institutional conditions within the industry, as well as the historical perception of universal electrification as a desirable social goal, have brought about this trend. Large fossil and nuclear plants, often representing joint ventures of several utilities, dominate the plans of utilities over the next 20 years. Despite these trends, this review was unable to conclude that clear advantages must inherently accrue to either small- or large-scale electrical generation. Transportation and construction do offer demonstrable economies of scale, but the other terms in the cost equation (such as reliability and transmission) are sufficiently uncertain or site-specific to prevent firm conclusions concerning the effect of scale. Biases believed to exist in the regulatory process would dilute the utilities' perception of any advantages accruing to small generators; rate-of-return regulation favors overcapitalization as embodied in the construction of large plants and extensive transmission networks. It is not clear that the current regulatory structure is capable of weighing the institutional values of accountability and local control against dollar savings generally supposed to accrue to large plants. The Midwest and East North Central states may be singularly fit for a decentralized, medium-scale system for historical, geographical, and institutional reasons, as well as for their location near the coal fields.

Gilmer, R.W.; Meunier, R.E.; Whittle, C.E.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

Not Available

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Computers and the internet play an increasingly larger role in the lives of students. In this activity, students must use various web sites to locate specific pieces of...

280

The Midwest Power PCFB demonstration projects: AHLSTROM PYROFLOW[reg sign] first and second generation pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) technology  

SciTech Connect

Midwest Power, Dairyland Power Cooperative, Pyropower Corporation (a subsidiary of Ahlstrom Pyropower Inc.), and Black Veatch, have embarked on the demonstration of Clean Coal Technology (CCT) at Midwest Power's Des Moines Energy Center (DMEC), in Pleasant Hill, Iowa. The DMEC-1 PCFB Demonstration Project was selected by the US Department of Energy for the demonstration of the First Generation Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) Technology. During Round 5 of the CCT Program, Midwest Power submitted a proposal for a second unit, to be known as DMEC-2. If selected by the DOE, the DMEC-2 unit will demonstrate Ahlstrom Pyropower's Second Generation (Advanced) PCFB technology which will incorporate a topping combustor fired on coal derived gas generated in a PCFB carbonizer, to raise the firing temperature of the gas turbine and the total net plant efficiency. The First Generation PCFB technology has the capability to achieve 40--42% efficiency, the Second Generation technology can obtain an efficiency in the range of 44--47% net. This paper will provide a comparison of the commercial versions of the First and Second Generation PCFB systems, and the plans for demonstrating these systems for repowering and new plant installations during the late 1990's and into the next century. A discussion of the DMEC-1 and DMEC-2 projects and their key technical features will be provided together with a projection of the future markets for these advanced clean coal technologies.

Ambrose, S.; Green, C.L.; Dryden, R.; Provol, S.J.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Midwest Power PCFB demonstration projects: AHLSTROM PYROFLOW{reg_sign} first and second generation pressurized circulating fluidized bed (PCFB) technology  

SciTech Connect

Midwest Power, Dairyland Power Cooperative, Pyropower Corporation (a subsidiary of Ahlstrom Pyropower Inc.), and Black & Veatch, have embarked on the demonstration of Clean Coal Technology (CCT) at Midwest Power`s Des Moines Energy Center (DMEC), in Pleasant Hill, Iowa. The DMEC-1 PCFB Demonstration Project was selected by the US Department of Energy for the demonstration of the First Generation Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed (PCFB) Technology. During Round 5 of the CCT Program, Midwest Power submitted a proposal for a second unit, to be known as DMEC-2. If selected by the DOE, the DMEC-2 unit will demonstrate Ahlstrom Pyropower`s Second Generation (Advanced) PCFB technology which will incorporate a topping combustor fired on coal derived gas generated in a PCFB carbonizer, to raise the firing temperature of the gas turbine and the total net plant efficiency. The First Generation PCFB technology has the capability to achieve 40--42% efficiency, the Second Generation technology can obtain an efficiency in the range of 44--47% net. This paper will provide a comparison of the commercial versions of the First and Second Generation PCFB systems, and the plans for demonstrating these systems for repowering and new plant installations during the late 1990`s and into the next century. A discussion of the DMEC-1 and DMEC-2 projects and their key technical features will be provided together with a projection of the future markets for these advanced clean coal technologies.

Ambrose, S.; Green, C.L.; Dryden, R.; Provol, S.J.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Information for Media on Lighting Choices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Media on Lighting Choices Media on Lighting Choices Information for Media on Lighting Choices July 30, 2012 - 8:25am Addthis Information for Media on Lighting Choices These videos, presentation, and images are available for use by media organizations. The materials are copyright-free, and you are welcome to cite the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy as the source. Public Service Announcements These PSAs educate consumers about saving money on their electric bill with new lighting choices and looking for "lumens," a new way to shop for light bulbs. Two :30 and two :60 audio PSAs are available for your download below. Download Windows Media Player or iTunes. PSA Format Length File Size A New Generation .MP3 0:30 483 KB A New Generation .MP3 1:00

283

Solar Choice Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Choice Solutions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Solar Choice Solutions Inc. Place Calabasas, California Zip 91302 Sector Solar Product Solar Choice Solutions Inc. is an...

284

Renewable Choice Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Choice Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Renewable Choice Energy Place Boulder, Colorado Zip 80301 Sector Carbon, Renewable Energy Product Renewable Choice Energy is a...

285

Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to 19.4% of vehicle fuel consumption in India is devoted to air conditioning (A/C). Indian A/C fuel consumption is almost four times the fuel penalty in the United States and close to six times that in the European Union because India's temperature and humidity are higher and because road congestion forces vehicles to operate inefficiently. Car A/C efficiency in India is an issue worthy of national attention considering the rate of increase of A/C penetration into the new car market, India's hot climatic conditions and high fuel costs. Car A/C systems originally posed an ozone layer depletion concern. Now that industrialized and many developing countries have moved away from ozone-depleting substances per Montreal Protocol obligations, car A/C impact on climate has captured the attention of policy makers and corporate leaders. Car A/C systems have a climate impact from potent global warming potential gas emissions and from fuel used to power the car A/Cs. This paper focuses on car A/C fuel consumption in the context of the rapidly expanding Indian car market and how new technological improvements can result in significant fuel savings and consequently, emission reductions. A 19.4% fuel penalty is associated with A/C use in the typical Indian passenger car. Car A/C fuel use and associated tailpipe emissions are strong functions of vehicle design, vehicle use, and climate conditions. Several techniques: reducing thermal load, improving vehicle design, improving occupants thermal comfort design, improving equipment, educating consumers on impacts of driver behaviour on MAC fuel use, and others - can lead to reduced A/C fuel consumption.

Chaney, L.; Thundiyil, K.; Andersen, S.; Chidambaram, S.; Abbi, Y. P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Low Cost High Performance Generator Technology Program. Volume 4. Mission application study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of initial efforts to investigate application of selenide thermoelectric RTG's to specific missions as well as an indication of development requirements to enable satisfaction of emerging RTG performance criteria are presented. Potential mission applications in DoD such as SURVSATCOM, Advance Defense Support Program, Laser Communication Satellite, Satellite Data System, Global Positioning Satellite, Deep Space Surveillance Satellite, and Unmanned Free Swimming Submersible illustrate power requirements in the range of 500 to 1000 W. In contrast, the NASA applications require lower power ranging from 50 W for outer planetary atmospheric probes to about 200 W for spacecraft flights to Jupiter and other outer planets. The launch dates for most of these prospective missions is circa 1980, a requirement roughly compatible with selenide thermoelectric and heat source technology development. A discussion of safety criteria is included to give emphasis to the requirements for heat source design. In addition, the observation is made that the potential accident environments of all launch vehicles are similar so that a reasonable composite set of design specifications may be derived to satisfy almost all applications. Details of the LCHPG application potential is afforded by three designs: an 80 W RTG using improved selenide thermoelectric material, a 55 to 65 W LCHPG using current and improved selenide materials, and the final 500 W LCHPG as reported in Volume 2. The final results of the LCHPG design study have shown that in general, all missions can expect an LCHPG design which yields 10 percent efficiency at 3 W/lb with the current standard selenide thermoelectric materials, with growth potential to 14 percent at greater than 4 W/lb in the mid 1980's time frame.

Not Available

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

The role of the US electric utility industry in the commercialization of renewable energy technologies for power generation  

SciTech Connect

A key element in the federal government's plan to commercialize R/As was to guarantee a market for the generated electric power at an attractive price. This was provided by the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978, better known as PURPA. Under PURPA, utilities were required to buy all that was produced by Qualifying Facilities or QFs{sup 2} and were required to pay for QF power based on the utilities; avoided costs. Utilities were also required to interconnect with such producers and provide supplemental and backup power to them at fair and reasonable rates. This article reviews the reason behind the rapid rise, and the subsequent oversupply, of R. As over the past decade in the context of the way PURPA was implemented. The article focuses on the critical role of the electric power industry in the commercialization of R/A technologies and the implications.

Nola, S.J.; Sioshansi, F.P. (Southern California Edison Co., Rosemead, CA (US))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Investment Timing and Capacity Choice for Small-Scale Wind Power Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scott Distributed power generation (New York, Marcel Dekker,the renewable share of power generation. The American Windin small-scale wind power generation, as well as the choice

Fleten, Stein-Erik; Maribu, Karl Magnus

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Natural Gas Residential Choice Programs  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Status of Natural Gas Residential Choice Programs by State as of December 2008 (Click on a State or its abbreviation for more information about that ...

290

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation. Final report, September 1989--March 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has successfully advanced the technology for MSOFCs for coal-based power generation. Major advances include: tape-calendering processing technology, leading to 3X improved performance at 1000 C; stack materials formulations and designs with sufficiently close thermal expansion match for no stack damage after repeated thermal cycling in air; electrically conducting bonding with excellent structural robustness; and sealants that form good mechanical seals for forming manifold structures. A stack testing facility was built for high-spower MSOFC stacks. Comprehensive models were developed for fuel cell performance and for analyzing structural stresses in multicell stacks and electrical resistance of various stack configurations. Mechanical and chemical compatibility properties of fuel cell components were measured; they show that the baseline Ca-, Co-doped interconnect expands and weakens in hydrogen fuel. This and the failure to develop adequate sealants were the reason for performance shortfalls in large stacks. Small (1-in. footprint) two-cell stacks were fabricated which achieved good performance (average area-specific-resistance 1.0 ohm-cm{sup 2} per cell); however, larger stacks had stress-induced structural defects causing poor performance.

Not Available

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ion Sources and Beam Technologies Ion Sources and Beam Technologies GENERATORS AND DETECTORS Compact, Safe and Energy Efficient Neutron Generator Fast Pulsed Neutron Generator High Energy Gamma Generator Lithium-Drifted Silicon Detector with Segmented Contacts Low Power, High Energy Gamma Ray Detector Calibration Device Nested Type Coaxial Neutron Generator Neutron and Proton Generators: Cylindrical Neutron Generator with Nested Option, IB-1764 Neutron-based System for Nondestructive Imaging, IB-1794 Mini Neutron Tube, IB-1793a Ultra-short Ion and Neutron Pulse Production, IB-1707 Mini Neutron Generator, IB-1793b Compact Spherical Neutron Generator, IB-1675 Plasma-Driven Neutron/Gamma Generators Portable, Low-cost Gamma Source for Active Interrogation ION SOURCES WITH ANTENNAS External Antenna for Ion Sources

292

Why SOFC Technology? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Why SOFC Technology? Why SOFC Technology? Why SOFC Technology? Why SOFC Technology? Like most fuel cell technologies, SOFCs are modular, scalable, and efficient. They are not subject to Carnot cycle limitations because they are not heat engines. Also, they benefit the public by minimizing emissions, such as oxides of nitrogen (NOx) <0.5 PPM compared to earlier combustion-based electrical power generation technologies due to lower operating temperatures. There are more reasons why SOFCs are the fuel cell technology of choice in USDOE/FE. First, relative to other fuel cell types, SOFCs are fuel-flexible - they can reform methane internally, use carbon monoxide as a fuel, and tolerate some degree of common fossil fuel impurities, such as ammonia and chlorides. Sulfur-bearing contaminants, such as hydrogen sulfide, are

293

An Examination of Multiple MicroGeneration Technologies Used within an Experimental Home: A Tire-bale Home Leverages Green Technologies for Energy Independence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of micro generation [1] can be extended into homes which use a variety of techniques to generate energy using green concepts. This paper examines one such experimental house that uses active and passive systems to generate energy for the ... Keywords: home systems, passive solar, tire bales, thermal mass, solar, net metering, net zero energy, NZEB

Jon Hagar, Laura Hagar

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Household savings and portfolio choice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis consists of three essays that examine household savings and portfolio choice behavior. Chapter One analyses the effects of employer matching contributions and tax incentives on participation and contribution ...

Klein, Sean Patrick

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Deploying Systems Interoperability and Customer Choice within...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deploying Systems Interoperability and Customer Choice within Smart Grid Title Deploying Systems Interoperability and Customer Choice within Smart Grid Publication Type Conference...

296

Apps for Energy Popular Choice Winners | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Popular Choice Winners Popular Choice Winners Home > Groups > Green Button Applications NickL's picture Submitted by NickL(46) Member 7 June, 2012 - 09:22 Congratulations to all of the winners of the "Apps for Energy" Challenge. Public voting has closed and the full list of winners is now available at http://energy.gov/articles/popular-choice-winners-announced-apps-energy-competition. Winners of the challenge can be found on OpenEI's featured apps list, and all apps from the challenge are available when filtering the list by "Challenge Generated". Groups: Green Button Applications Login to post comments Latest discussions NickL Apps for Energy Popular Choice Winners Posted: 7 Jun 2012 - 09:22 by NickL NickL Apps for Energy Challenge Posted: 23 May 2012 - 13:54 by NickL

297

Program on Technology Innovation: Projecting Future Fossil- and Biomass-Fueled Power Generation System Configurations: Year 2030  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generation mix in the year 2030 will likely look somewhat different from the present, as growth in generating capacity and regulatory initiatives to reduce emissions lead to changes in the U.S. power generation fleet. Chemical pollutants emitted from this future generation mix are likely to differ from those at present, including changes to the characteristics and amounts of chemicals released to air, wastewater, and solid waste streams. This report presents interim results of a project to predict he...

2009-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

298

Input Price Risk and Optimal Timing of Energy Investment: Choice between Fossil- and Biofuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ve consider energy investment, when a choice has to be made between fossil fuel and biomass fired production technologies. A dynamic model is presented to illustrate the effect of the different degrees of input price uncer- tainty on the choice of technolog2 and the timing of the investment. It is shown that when the choice of technology is irreversible, it may be optimal to postpone the investment even if it would otherwise be optimal to invest in one or both of the plant types. Ve provide a numerical example based on cost estimates of two different power plant types.

Pauli Murto; Gjermund Nese

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

SIG technology and converter-hardware schedule status as applicable to Galileo flight program. [Selenide Isotope Generator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed description of the status of the design, fabrication, and testing of the Selenide Isotope Generator for the Galileo program is presented. (WHK)

Hinderman, J.D.

1978-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

300

Public-Private Technology R&D Partnerships: Lessons from US Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

locate/tranpol Public-private technology R&D partnerships:reserved. 1. Introduction Public-private partnerships areThis paper addresses public-private R&D partnerships

Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Public-private technology R&D partnerships: lessons from US partnership for a new generation of vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

locate/tranpol Public-private technology R&D partnerships:reserved. 1. Introduction Public-private partnerships areThis paper addresses public-private R&D partnerships

Sperling, Dan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Public-Private Technology R&D Partnerships: Lessons from US Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the case of process and product R&D. Review of Economics andPublic-private technology R&D partnerships: lessons from USAbstract Government-industry R&D partnerships can play an

Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Public-private technology R&D partnerships: lessons from US partnership for a new generation of vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the case of process and product R&D. Review of Economics andPublic-private technology R&D partnerships: lessons from USAbstract Government-industry R&D partnerships can play an

Sperling, Dan

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Natural Gas as a Boiler Fuel of Choice in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural gas is abundant, clean burning, and cost competitive with other fuels. In addition to superior economic fundamentals, the expanded use of natural gas will be enhanced by political and industry leaders. Natural gas therefore will continue to be the boiler fuel choice for Texas electric generating companies.

Kmetz, W. J.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

The Determinants of Hazardous Waste Disposal Choice:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we estimate conditional logit models of generator’s choice of waste management facilities (TSDFs) for shipments of halogenated solvent waste documented by the manifests filled out in California in 1995. We find that the probability that a facility is selected as the destination of an off-site shipment of halogenated solvent waste depends on the cost of shipping and disposal at that facility, on measures of existing contamination at the site, and on the track record of the receiving facility. Generators do seem to balance current disposal costs with the likelihood of future liability, should the TSDF become involved in either the state or federal Superfund program. In general, we find no evidence that generators prefer “wealthier ” TSDFs or “larger ” facilities, suggesting that there is a role for smaller, private companies in the management of halogenated solvent waste. When attention is limited to so-called “restricted ” wastes containing halogenated compounds, which cannot be landfilled, the best match between the waste and the treatment offered by the facility may be more important than saving on the cost of disposal, and price may even be interpreted as a signal for quality of the facility. 3

Anna Alberini; John Bartholomew; Anna Alberini; John Bartholomew

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Monitoring and control requirement definition study for dispersed storage and generation (DSG). Volume II. Final report, Appendix A: selected DSG technologies and their general control requirements  

SciTech Connect

A major aim of the US National Energy Policy, as well as that of the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, is to conserve energy and to shift from oil to more abundant domestic fuels and renewable energy sources. Dispersed Storage and Generation (DSG) is the term that characterizes the present and future dispersed, relatively small (<30 MW) energy systems, such as solar thermal electric, photovoltaic, wind, fuel cell, storage battery, hydro, and cogeneration, which can help achieve these national energy goals and can be dispersed throughout the distribution portion of an electric utility system. The purpose of this survey and identification of DSG technologies is to present an understanding of the special characteristics of each of these technologies in sufficient detail so that the physical principles of their operation and the internal control of each technology are evident. In this way, a better appreciation can be obtained of the monitoring and control requirements for these DSGs from a remote distribution dispatch center. A consistent approach is being sought for both hardware and software which will handle the monitoring and control necessary to integrate a number of different DSG technologies into a common distribution dispatch network. From this study it appears that the control of each of the DSG technologies is compatible with a supervisory control method of operation that lends itself to remote control from a distribution dispatch center.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT - AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (1) European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), (2) Norway (Klimatek) and (3) the U.S.A. (Department of Energy). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre -Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies are making substantial progress towards their goals. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion Decarbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing good progress and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options that may have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Many studies are nearing completion or have been completed. Their preliminary results are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

Dr. Helen Kerr

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Understanding the Effect of Baseline Modeling Implementation Choices on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding the Effect of Baseline Modeling Implementation Choices on Understanding the Effect of Baseline Modeling Implementation Choices on Analysis of Demand Response Performance Title Understanding the Effect of Baseline Modeling Implementation Choices on Analysis of Demand Response Performance Publication Type Conference Paper LBNL Report Number LBNL-5560E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Addy, Nathan, Johanna L. Mathieu, Sila Kiliccote, and Duncan S. Callaway Conference Name ASME 2013 International Mechanical Engineering Congress & Exposition Conference Location Houston, TX Keywords market sectors, technologies Abstract Accurate evaluation of the performance of buildings participating in Demand Response (DR) programs is critical to the adoption and improvement of these programs. Typically, we calculate load sheds during DR events by comparing observed electric demand against counterfactual predictions made using statistical baseline models. Many baseline models exist and these models can produce different shed calculations. Moreover, modelers implementing the same baseline model can make different modeling implementation choices, which may affect shed estimates. In this work, using real data, we analyze the effect of different modeling implementation choices on shed predictions. We focused on five issues: weather data source, resolution of data, methods for determining when buildings are occupied, methods for aligning building data with temperature data, and methods for power outage filtering. Results indicate sensitivity to the weather data source and data filtration methods as well as an immediate potential for automation of methods to choose building occupied modes.

309

A Branch-and-Price Approach to the Share-of-Choice Product Line Design Problem  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop a branch-and-price algorithm for constructing an optimal product line using partworth estimates from choice-based conjoint analysis. The algorithm determines the specific attribute levels for each multiattribute product in a set of products ... Keywords: branch and price, column generation, combinatorial optimization, conjoint analysis, integer programming, marketing, optimization, product line design, share of choice

Xinfang (Jocelyn) Wang; Jeffrey D. Camm; David J. Curry

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Improving feedback from multiple choice tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Providing individual feedback to large groups of students can be difficult. By asking students to record their confidence in multiple choice test answers the quality of feedback can be improved. In a "multiple choice question" (MCQ) test the student ...

William Fone

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Clean coal technologies: Research, development, and demonstration program plan  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, has structured an integrated program for research, development, and demonstration of clean coal technologies that will enable the nation to use its plentiful domestic coal resources while meeting environmental quality requirements. The program provides the basis for making coal a low-cost, environmentally sound energy choice for electric power generation and fuels production. These programs are briefly described.

Not Available

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Program on Technology Innovation: Programmatic Risk Assessment Future Fossil- and Biomass-Fueled Power Generation System Configurations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent and upcoming regulatory activities will have a major impact on power plant design over the next few decades. To address various environmental concerns, including climate change, emissions of specific air toxics and waste-to-energy goals, a number of different power plant configurations have been proposed involving differences in fuel type, boiler designs and emissions control technology. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) commissioned Gradient to evaluate risks associated with ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

313

11.11.2004 08:48:00 GMT China aims to employ nuclear fusion technology in power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-2% to 60-70%; and third step is the employment of nuclear fusion. However, a report by Zhongguo Dianli Wang thermonuclear experimental reactors (ITER) by International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), says, are meant to utilize the energy generated in the fusion of hydrogen, as in the explosion of a hydrogen bomb

314

Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment of Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation sector have stayed constant or increased slightly. Values predicted in recent DTI Updated Energy. As Figure 1 shows, if overall UK energy use were to match DTI UEP predictions for 2020, the UK would Pollution [2], and subsequently endorsed by the Energy White Paper [3], exceeding the target by about 30 Mt

Haszeldine, Stuart

315

Emission allowances and utility compliance choices: Market development and regulatory response  

SciTech Connect

This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state PUCs, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusion; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to date by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements. (VC)

South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McDermott, K.A. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Emission allowances and utility compliance choices: Market development and regulatory response  

SciTech Connect

This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state PUCs, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusion; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to date by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements. (VC)

South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); McDermott, K.A. (Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Idaho National Laboratory - Technology Transfer - Technologies ...  

Idaho National Laboratory Technologies Available for Licensing ... National Security Electric Generator Protection. Related Patents: 7,453,674

318

Manhattan Project: Difficult Choices, 1942  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

"Met Lab" alumni at the University of Chicago -- Fermi is on the far left of the front row; Zinn is on Fermi's left; Anderson is on the far right of the front row; and Szilard is over Anderson's right shoulder. DIFFICULT CHOICES "Met Lab" alumni at the University of Chicago -- Fermi is on the far left of the front row; Zinn is on Fermi's left; Anderson is on the far right of the front row; and Szilard is over Anderson's right shoulder. DIFFICULT CHOICES (1942) Events More Uranium Research, 1942 More Piles and Plutonium, 1942 Enter the Army, 1942 Groves and the MED, 1942 Picking Horses, November 1942 Final Approval to Build the Bomb, December 1942 By early 1942, as the United States suffered a series of military defeats in the Pacific, top officials in Washington tentatively had decided to proceed with the construction of an atomic bomb. Two paths seemed possible. A uranium bomb could be achieved if sufficient uranium-235 could be produced by one or more of the three isotope separation methods under consideration: gaseous diffusion, centrifuge, and electromagnetic. A plutonium bomb might provide a quicker route, but it required demonstration that plutonium could be produced in a uranium pile and then be separated in usable quantities. To this end, Arthur Compton consolidated most plutonium research at the new Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) at the University of Chicago.

319

Magnetic Processing – A Pervasive Energy Efficient Technology for Next Generation Materials for Aerospace and Specialty Steel Markets  

SciTech Connect

Thermomagnetic Magnetic Processing is an exceptionally fertile, pervasive and cross-cutting technology that is just now being recognized by several major industry leaders for its significant potential to increase energy efficiency and materials performance for a myriad of energy intensive industries in a variety of areas and applications. ORNL has pioneered the use and development of large magnetic fields in thermomagnetically processing (T-MP) materials for altering materials phase equilibria and transformation kinetics. ORNL has discovered that using magnetic fields, we can produce unique materials responses. T-MP can produce unique phase stabilities & microstructures with improved materials performance for structural and functional applications not achieved with traditional processing techniques. These results suggest that there are unprecedented opportunities to produce significantly enhanced materials properties via atomistic level (nano-) microstructural control and manipulation. ORNL (in addition to others) have shown that grain boundary chemistry and precipitation kinetics are also affected by large magnetic fields. This CRADA has taken advantage of ORNL’s unique, custom-designed thermo-magnetic, 9 Tesla superconducting magnet facility that enables rapid heating and cooling of metallic components within the magnet bore; as well as ORNL’s expertise in high magnetic field (HMF) research. Carpenter Technologies, Corp., is a a US-based industrial company, that provides enhanced performance alloys for the Aerospace and Specialty Steel products. In this CRADA, Carpenter Technologies, Corp., is focusing on applying ORNL’s Thermomagnetic Magnetic Processing (TMP) technology to improve their current and future proprietary materials’ product performance and open up new markets for their Aerospace and Specialty Steel products. Unprecedented mechanical property performance improvements have been demonstrated for a high strength bainitic alloy industrial/commercial alloy that is envisioned to provide the potential for new markets for this alloy. These thermomechanical processing results provide these alloys with a major breakthrough demonstrating that simultaneous improvements in yield strength and ductility are achieved: 12 %, 10%, 13%, and 22% increases in yield strength, elongation, reduction-in-area, and impact energy respectively. In addition, TMP appears to overcome detrimental chemical homogeneity impacts on uniform microstructure evolution.

Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Ludtka, G.M.; Ray, P. (Carpenter Technologies, Inc.); Magee, J. (Carpenter Technologies, Inc.)

2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

320

TAFV Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Choice Model Documentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A model for predicting choice of alternative fuel and among alternative vehicle technologies for light-duty motor vehicles is derived. The nested multinomial logit (NML) mathematical framework is used. Calibration of the model is based on information in the existing literature and deduction based on assuming a small number of key parameters, such as the value of time and discount rates. A spreadsheet model has been developed for calibration and preliminary testing of the model.

Greene, D.L.

2001-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Market-Based Valuation of New Coal-Fired Generation: Case Studies of Investment Risk and Profitability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas turbine technology has dominated new generation capacity additions in the United States, yet several years of unexpectedly high natural gas prices are driving interest in alternatives. This report uses case studies of new coal-fired generation to address the question of whether coal can be a good choice for the private investor. The studies give great detail on possible coal plants in Texas and some guidance on possible projects in Virginia, Ohio, and Indiana. The studies provide a comprehens...

2003-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

322

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation. Annual report, October 1991--September 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program is being conducted by a team consisting of AlliedSignal Aerospace Systems & Equipment (ASE) (formerly AiResearch Los Angeles Division) and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

Not Available

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Task 3.14 - demonstration of technologies for remote power generation in Alaska. Semi-annual report, July 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect

This paper very briefly summarizes progress in the demonstration of a small (up to 6 MWe), environmentally acceptable electric generating system fueled by indigenous fuels and waste materials to serve power distribution systems typical of Alaskan Native communities. Two detailed appendices supplement the report. The project is focused on two primary technologies: (1) atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC), and (2) coalbed methane and coal-fired diesel technologies. Two sites have been selected as possible locations for an AFBC demonstration, and bid proposals are under review. The transfer of a coal-fired diesel clean coal demonstration project from Maryland to Fairbanks, Alaska was approved, and the environmental assessment has been initiated. Federal support for a fuel cell using coalbed methane is also being pursued. The appendices included in the report provide: (1) the status of the conceptual design study for a 600-kWe coal-fired cogeneration plant in McGrath, Alaska; and (2) a global market assessment of coalbed methane, fluidized-bed combustion, and coal-fired diesel technologies in remote applications.

Jones, M.L.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (Japanese translation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations.

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (Japanese translation)  

SciTech Connect

The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations.

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

326

Proceedings of the 2. MIT international conference on the next generation of nuclear power technology. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the conference was to try to attract a variety of points of view from well-informed people to debate issues concerning nuclear power. Hopefully from that process a better understanding of what one should be doing will emerge. In organizing the conference lessons learned from the previous one were applied. A continuous effort was made to see to it that the arguments for the alternatives to nuclear power were given abundant time for presentation. This is ultimately because nuclear power is going to have to compete with all of the energy technologies. Thus, in discussing energy strategy all of the alternatives must be considered in a reasonable fashion. The structure the conference used has seven sessions. The first six led up to the final session which was concerned with what the future nuclear power strategy should be. Each session focused upon a question concerning the future. None of these questions has a unique correct answer. Rather, topics are addressed where reasonable people can disagree. In order to state some of the important arguments for each session`s question, the combination of a keynote paper followed by a respondent was used. The respondent`s paper is not necessarily included to be a rebuttal to the keynote; but rather, it was recognized that two people will look at a complex question with different shadings. Through those two papers the intention was to get out the most important arguments affecting the question for the session. The purpose of the papers was to set the stage for about an hour of discussion. The real product of this conference was that discussion.

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

327

Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Car Buyers and Fuel Economy? ” Energy Policy, vol. 35, 2007.Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice? BY TOMyou think about fuel economy? ” Rather, we listened closely

Turrentine, Tom; Kurani, Kenneth S; Heffner, Reid R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Car Buyers and Fuel Economy? ” Energy Policy, vol. 35, 2007.Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice? BY TOMyou think about fuel economy? ” Rather, we listened closely

Turrentine, Tom; Kurani, Kenneth; Heffner, Rusty

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Underwriter choice and earnings management: evidence from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Feb 21, 2007 ... examines the association between the choice of financial ..... using the data obtained directly from the cash flow and income statements.

330

Discrete Choice Analysis: Hydrogen FCV Demand Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Choice Analysis: H 2 FCV Demand Potential Cory Welch H 2 Scenario Analysis Workshop Washington, D.C. , January 31, 2007 2 Overview * Motivation for work * Methodology * Relative...

331

On the Transportation Problem with Market Choice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 3, 2013 ... Abstract: We study a variant of the classical transportation problem in which suppliers with limited capacities have a choice of which demands ...

332

CONSUMER CHOICE AND TECHNOLOGY ICOHTEC 2011 conference in Glasgow, UK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from historical point of view Nazrin Movsum-zade, Institute of Cybernetics of Azerbaijan, Azerbaijan

Guo, Zaoyang

333

Future Implications of China's Energy-Technology Choices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. to develop and optimize a sparkignited CNG Powered Refuse Truck Photo Credit: Cummings Westport, Inc. 11.9 liter CNG engine suitable for refuse and other vocational Class 8 applications. The engine conventional CNG engine to a more efficient and higher performance engine, and integrate it into a refuse

334

Materials challenges in advanced coal conversion technologies  

SciTech Connect

Coal is a critical component in the international energy portfolio, used extensively for electricity generation. Coal is also readily converted to liquid fuels and/or hydrogen for the transportation industry. However, energy extracted from coal comes at a large environmental price: coal combustion can produce large quantities of ash and CO{sub 2}, as well as other pollutants. Advanced technologies can increase the efficiencies and decrease the emissions associated with burning coal and provide an opportunity for CO{sub 2} capture and sequestration. However, these advanced technologies increase the severity of plant operating conditions and thus require improved materials that can stand up to the harsh operating environments. The materials challenges offered by advanced coal conversion technologies must be solved in order to make burning coal an economically and environmentally sound choice for producing energy.

Powem, C.A.; Morreale, B.D. [National Energy Technology Laboratory, Albany, OR (United States)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

335

The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)  

SciTech Connect

The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations. This study begins with an examination of existing DER research. Building energy loads were then generated through simulation (DOE-2) and scaled to match available load data in the literature. Energy tariffs in Japan and the U.S. were then compared: electricity prices did not differ significantly, while commercial gas prices in Japan are much higher than in the U.S. For smaller DER systems, the installation costs in Japan are more than twice those in the U.S., but this difference becomes smaller with larger systems. In Japan, DER systems are eligible for a 1/3 rebate of installation costs, while subsidies in the U.S. vary significantly by region and application. For 10,000 m{sup 2} buildings, significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the economically optimal results. This was most noticeable in the sports facility, followed the hospital and hotel. This research demonstrates that office buildings can benefit from CHP, in contrast to popular opinion. For hospitals and sports facilities, the use of waste heat is particularly effective for water and space heating. For the other building types, waste heat is most effectivel

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

336

The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations. This study begins with an examination of existing DER research. Building energy loads were then generated through simulation (DOE-2) and scaled to match available load data in the literature. Energy tariffs in Japan and the U.S. were then compared: electricity prices did not differ significantly, while commercial gas prices in Japan are much higher than in the U.S. For smaller DER systems, the installation costs in Japan are more than twice those in the U.S., but this difference becomes smaller with larger systems. In Japan, DER systems are eligible for a 1/3 rebate of installation costs, while subsidies in the U.S. vary significantly by region and application. For 10,000 m{sup 2} buildings, significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the economically optimal results. This was most noticeable in the sports facility, followed the hospital and hotel. This research demonstrates that office buildings can benefit from CHP, in contrast to popular opinion. For hospitals and sports facilities, the use of waste heat is particularly effective for water and space heating. For the other building types, waste heat is most effectively use

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

337

SOLERAS - Solar Cooling Engineering Field Tests Project: United Technologies Research Center. Design guidelines for solar heating/cooling/power generation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the methodology, design guidelines and analytical tools for the preliminary technical/economic evaluation of solar heating/cooling/power generation systems. In particular, it provides the theoretical framework, data bases and software tools for: determining the preliminary economic feasibility of solar-powered configurations compared with grid-supplied electric power and/or competing fossil fuels; selecting the optimum system configuration with respect to solar collector area and ''solar-side'' thermal storage capacity. Implementation of the methodology described in this report can be facilitated by the use of the accompanying IBM PC-compatible computer program ''SOLERAS''. This report represents the final task of the multi-year SOLERAS Program -- jointly sponsored by the US Department of Energy and the King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology -- which involved the development and field-testing of a solar-powered cooling system in Phoenix, AZ. 11 refs., 37 figs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 6, 2009... specifications for future energy generation technologies, including the Ultra- Supercritical Steam Boiler and Turbine Project,” said Williamson.

339

The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential for Distributed Generation in Japanese PrototypePotential for Distributed Generation in Japanese PrototypePotential for Distributed Generation in Japanese Prototype

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of investment New Power Generation/Distribution EnterprisesDG Distributed Generation Disco distribution company DOEof fuel) Electricity generation, transmission, distribution

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

TAFV Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Choice Model Documentation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

34 34 ORNL/TM-2001/134 TAFV Alternative Fuels and TAFV Alternative Fuels and Vehicles Choice Model Vehicles Choice Model Documentation Documentation July 2001 David L. Greene David L. Greene Corporate Fellow Corporate Fellow DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD: 703-487-4639 Fax: 703-605-6900 E-mail: info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site: http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange

342

Energy 101: Lighting Choices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

101: Lighting Choices 101: Lighting Choices Energy 101: Lighting Choices August 13, 2013 - 2:38pm Addthis Learn about energy-efficient light bulbs that can light your home for less money. For many years, researchers have been working on new lighting options that produce the same light with less energy. Many of those designs are now on the market. This edition of Energy 101 features newer energy-saving light bulbs that provide the choices in colors and light levels you've come to expect, but with higher efficiencies-so they save you money. Upgrading 15 of the inefficient incandescent light bulbs in your home to energy-saving incandescent, compact fluorescent lamp (CFL), or light emitting diode (LED) bulbs could save you about $50 per year. For more information on lighting choices from the Office of Energy

343

Energy 101: Lighting Choices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Lighting Choices Lighting Choices Energy 101: Lighting Choices Addthis Below is the text version for the Energy 101: Lighting Choices video: The video opens with "Energy 101: Lighting Choices." This is followed by shots of a variety of lamps being turned on. We're all used to lighting up dark spaces with the flip of a switch. In fact, people have been doing so since Thomas Edison invented the incandescent light bulb about 130 years ago...and we've used that same old bulb ever since. The video shows a store aisle with a diverse light bulb selection, then moves to close-ups of the packaging labels on various bulbs. Today you'll see more light bulb options in stores. These bulbs will give you the light you want while saving you energy...and money. A hand screws in a light bulb and flips the switch. The bulb is shown in

344

Energy 101: Lighting Choices | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy 101: Lighting Choices Energy 101: Lighting Choices Energy 101: Lighting Choices August 13, 2013 - 2:38pm Addthis Learn about energy-efficient light bulbs that can light your home for less money. For many years, researchers have been working on new lighting options that produce the same light with less energy. Many of those designs are now on the market. This edition of Energy 101 features newer energy-saving light bulbs that provide the choices in colors and light levels you've come to expect, but with higher efficiencies-so they save you money. Upgrading 15 of the inefficient incandescent light bulbs in your home to energy-saving incandescent, compact fluorescent lamp (CFL), or light emitting diode (LED) bulbs could save you about $50 per year. For more information on lighting choices from the Office of Energy

345

The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology costdata in the literature. Energy tariffs in Japan and the U.S.DER technologies, Japanese energy tariffs, and prototypical

Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Next Generation Test Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3 machine rooms (safety, security, power, & A/C). Supports COOP ... ii. Developing methods and technologies for next generation biometric testing. ...

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

347

Hybrid power technology for remote military facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Defense (DoD) operates hundreds of test, evaluation, and training facilities across the US and abroad. Due to the nature of their missions, these facilities are often remote and isolated from the utility grid. The preferred choice for power at these facilities has historically been manned diesel generators. The DoD Photovoltaic Review Committee, estimates that on the order of 350 million gallons of diesel fuel is burned each year to generate the 2000 GWh of electricity required to operate these remote military facilities. Other federal agencies, including the National Park Service and the USDA Forest Service use diesel generators for remote power needs as well. The generation of power diesel generators is both expensive and detrimental to the environment. The augmentation of power from diesel generators with power processing and battery energy storage enhances the efficiency and utilization of the generator resulting in lower fuel consumption and lower generator run- time in proportion to the amount of renewables added. The hybrid technology can both reduce the cost of power and reduce environmental degradation at remote DoD facilities. This paper describes the expected performance and economics of photovoltaic/diesel hybrid systems. Capabilities and status of systems now being installed at DoD facilities are presented along with financing mechanisms available within DoD.

Chapman, R.N.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Renewble Choice Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewble Choice Energy Renewble Choice Energy Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Renewble Choice Energy Name Renewble Choice Energy Address 2500 55th Street, Suite 210 Place Boulder, Colorado Zip 80301 Sector Carbon Product Provides RECs, VERs and green power to LEED certified projects Website http://www.renewablechoice.com Coordinates 40.0251°, -105.223585° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.0251,"lon":-105.223585,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

349

First Choice Power | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

First Choice Power Place Texas Utility Id 6325 Utility Location Yes Ownership R NERC Location TRE NERC ERCOT Yes Activity Retail Marketing Yes References EIA Form EIA-861 Final...

350

Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology Creating the Next Generation of Energy Efficient Technology The Emerging Technologies team partners with national laboratories, industry, and universities to advance research, development, and commercialization of energy efficient and cost effective building technologies. These partnerships help foster American ingenuity to develop cutting-edge technologies that have less than 5 years to market readiness, and contribute to the goal to reduce energy consumption by at least 50%. Sandia Cooler's innovative, compact design combines a fan and a finned metal heat sink into a single element, efficiently transferring heat in microelectronics and reducing energy use. Supporting Innovative Research to Help Reduce Energy Use and Advance Manufacturing Learn More

351

Rise in gas-fired power generation tracks gains in turbine efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas-fueled gas turbines--in both simple and combined-cycle configurations--will account for most power generation capacity additions through 2000. It is widely agreed that gas turbines will remain the dominant form of technology for power generation for the next decade or two, making them the power generation technology of choice for today and the future. The pre-eminent stature of gas turbines can be attributed to their low capital costs, high efficiency, low emissions, short permitting and construction lead times, and proven reliability. The versatility of gas turbines also makes them unique among power generation technologies, as they can economically serve a wide spectrum of applications and sizes--from distributed generation to industrial cogeneration and central station generation. Three primary factors contribute to the growing interest in gas turbine-based power generation and the role gas turbines will play in the future power generation market: An optimistic outlook for the supply and price of natural gas; technology advances that have produced substantial improvements in efficiency and emissions; and emissions regulations that may favor the use of gas turbines over traditional fossil-fueled steam turbines. These three factors are discussed.

Bautista, P. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1996-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

NREL: Technology Transfer - Wind Technology Center Installing ...  

Wind Technology Center Installing a Dynamic Duo August 25, 2009. Generating 20 percent of the nation's electricity from clean wind resources will ...

353

Hydrogain Technologies Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technologies Inc Place Florida Zip FL 33069 Sector Hydro, Hydrogen Product Developers of hydrogen fuel generation and storage technology for generators, reactors, power plants,...

354

Energy Efficient IT IT for Energy Efficiency Clean Energy Generation Emissions Accounting Policy Considerations At Microsoft, we see information technology (IT) as a key tool to help address the daunting en-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficient IT IT for Energy Efficiency Clean Energy Generation Emissions Accounting Policy in energy conservation and integration of more renewable and zero-carbon energy sources into our economy. Microsoft envisions a clean energy ecosystem where information technology: · Empowers people

Narasayya, Vivek

355

Virtually simulating the next generation of clean energy technologies: NETL's AVESTAR Center is dedicated to the safe, reliable and efficient operation of advanced energy plants with carbon capture  

SciTech Connect

Imagine using a real-time virtual simulator to learn to fly a space shuttle or rebuild your car's transmission without touching a piece of equipment or getting your hands dirty. Now, apply this concept to learning how to operate and control a state-of-the-art, electricity-producing power plant capable of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture. That's what the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR) Center (www.netl.doe.gov/avestar) is designed to do. Established as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative to advance new clean energy technology for power generation, the AVESTAR Center focuses primarily on providing simulation-based training for process engineers and energy plant operators, starting with the deployment of a first-of-a-kind operator training simulator for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Based on Invensys Operations Management's SimSci-Esscor DYNSIM software, the high-fidelity dynamic simulator provides realistic training on IGCC plant operations, including normal and faulted operations, as well as plant start-up, shutdown and power demand load changes. The highly flexible simulator also allows for testing of different types of fuel sources, such as petcoke and biomass, as well as co-firing fuel mixtures. The IGCC dynamic simulator is available at AVESTAR's two locations, NETL (Figure 1) and West Virginia University's National Research Center for Coal and Energy (www.nrcce.wvu.edu), both in Morgantown, W.Va. By offering a comprehensive IGCC training program, AVESTAR aims to develop a workforce well prepared to operate, control and manage commercial-scale gasification-based power plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The facility and simulator at West Virginia University promotes NETL's outreach mission by offering hands-on simulator training and education to researchers and university students.

Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Lighting Choices to Save You Money Banner | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Field Sites Power Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home Lighting Choices to Save You Money Banner Lighting Choices to Save You Money Banner All of...

357

Solar Decathlon: Appalachian State Wins People's Choice Award...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Decathlon: Appalachian State Wins People's Choice Award Solar Decathlon: Appalachian State Wins People's Choice Award October 3, 2011 - 10:38am Addthis On Friday, Sept. 30,...

358

A Plug-in Hybrid Consumer Choice Model with Detailed Market Segmentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes a consumer choice model for projecting U.S. demand for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in competition among 13 light-duty vehicle technologies over the period 2005-2050. New car buyers are disaggregated by region, residential area, attitude toward technology risk, vehicle usage intensity, home parking and work recharging. The nested multinomial logit (NMNL) model of vehicle choice incorporates daily vehicle usage distributions, refueling and recharging availability, technology learning by doing, and diversity of choice among makes and models. Illustrative results are presented for a Base Case, calibrated to the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2009 Reference Updated Case, and an optimistic technology scenario reflecting achievement of U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) FreedomCAR goals. PHEV market success is highly dependent on the degree of technological progress assumed. PHEV sales reach one million in 2037 in the Base Case but in 2020 in the FreedomCARGoals Case. In the FreedomCARGoals Case, PHEV cumulative sales reach 1.5 million by 2015. Together with efficiency improvements in other technologies, petroleum use in 2050 is reduced by about 45% from the 2005 level. After technological progress, PHEV s market success appears to be most sensitive to recharging availability, consumers attitudes toward novel echnologies, and vehicle usage intensity. Successful market penetration of PHEVs helps bring down battery costs for electric vehicles (EVs), resulting in a significant EV market share after 2040.

Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL; Greene, David L [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

MHK Technologies/Oregon State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct Drive Point Absorber < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Oregon State University Columbia Power Technologies Direct Drive Point Absorber.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Oregon State University OSU Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/OSU Direct Drive Power Generation Buoys Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1-3: Discovery / Concept Definition / Early Stage Development & Design & Engineering Technology Description When the coil experiences a changing magnetic field created by the heaving magnets voltage is generated Technology Dimensions

360

Green Power Network: Community Choice Aggregation (CCA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) Community Choice Aggregation (CCA) Community choice aggregation (CCA) is a state policy that enables local governments to aggregate electricity demand within their jurisdictions in order to procure alternative energy supplies while maintaining the existing electricity provider for transmission and distribution services. Many states passed CCA laws as part of electric restructuring legislation in the late 1990s and early 2000s. States that have passed CCA laws include California (2002), Illinois (2009), Massachusetts (1997), New Jersey (2003), Ohio (1999), and Rhode Island (1997). There are many reasons that a community may choose to develop a CCA, including the option to purchase more green power, reduce electricity cost, and provide power from more local sources.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Choice Electric Co | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Choice Electric Co Choice Electric Co Jump to: navigation, search Name Choice Electric Co Place Murwillumbah, New South Wales, Australia Zip 2484 Sector Solar Product Agency for Sharp solar (the largest solar panel producer in the world), Fronius, and Unitrac. Coordinates -28.32995°, 153.391693° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-28.32995,"lon":153.391693,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

362

Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy conducts research on conventional hydropower technologies to increase generation and improve existing means of generating hydroelectricity.

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Renewable Energy Technology Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First published in 2000 as the Renewable Energy Technical Assessment GuideTAG-RE, the Electric Power Research Institute's (EPRI's) annual Renewable Energy Technology Guide provides a consistent basis for evaluating the economic feasibility of renewable generation technologies. These technologies include wind, solar photovoltaic (PV), solar thermal, biomass, municipal solid waste, geothermal, and emerging ocean energy conversion technologies.

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

364

RESEARCH Open Access Choice in maternity care: associations with unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RESEARCH Open Access Choice in maternity care: associations with unit supply, geographic European countries, current trends in maternity unit closures create a context in which user choice may women's choice of maternity unit. We study here how pregnant women's choices interact with the distance

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

365

Effects of Chlorine and Other Flue Gas Parameters on Selective Catalytic Reduction Technology for Mercury Oxidation and Capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technologythe technology of choice for meeting stringent nitrogen oxides (NOx) emission limits for coal-fired electric generating plantshas potential for oxidizing mercury, which would provide enhanced removal in downstream systems. Catalyst behavior is relatively well understood for deNOx and SO2 oxidation, but less is known about mercury oxidation behavior. This test program was designed to determine general behavior of typical SCR catalysts on mercury oxidation and ...

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

366

Near-synonymy and lexical choice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop a new computational model for representing the fine-grained meanings of near-synonyms and the differences between them. We also develop a lexical-choice process that can decide which of several near-synonyms is most appropriate in a particular ...

Philip Edmonds; Graeme Hirst

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Factors affecting the choice of memory  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the fundamental choices in the design of a computer or data processing system is concerned with the medium for the storage of information. Once the system requirements impose the need for information storage that exceeds a certain level, typically ...

Claude F. King

1961-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Materials Biofuels Biofuels Biotechnology and Medecine Biotechnology & Medicine Chemistry Developing World Energy Efficient Technologies Energy Environmental Technologies...

369

Part II Energy Storage Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II. II. Energy Storage Technology Overview * Instructor - Haresh Kamath, EPRI PEAC * Short term - Flywheels, Cranking Batteries, Electrochemical Capacitors, SMES * Long term - Compressed Air, Pumped Hydro storage, Stationary, Flow Batteries 2 Overview * Technology Types - Batteries, flywheels, electrochemical capacitors, SMES, compressed air, and pumped hydro * Theory of Operation - Brief description of the technologies and the differences between them * State-of-the-art - Past demonstrations, existing hurdles and performance targets for commercialization * Cost and cost projections: - Prototype cost vs. fully commercialized targets Technology Choice for Discharge Time and Power Rating (From ESA) 4 Maturity Levels for Energy Storage Technologies * Mature Technologies - Conventional pumped hydro

370

Electrochemical Technologies Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

essential for storing energy generated by intermittent renewable sources like solar and wind on the electricity grid. The Environmental Energy Technologies Division's...

371

NETL: Combustion Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Summary for the Combustion Program The Combustion Technologies Product promotes the advancement of coal combustion power generation for use in industrial, commercial, and utility...

372

FCT Technology Validation: Contacts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Validation: Contacts on AddThis.com... Home Transportation Projects StationaryDistributed Generation Projects Integrated Projects Quick Links Hydrogen Production...

373

Combustion Technologies Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combustion Technologies Group Combustion research generates the fundamental physical and chemical knowledge on the interaction between flame and turbulence. Experimental and...

374

Materials Technology @ TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 9, 2011 ... This team will focus on developing and manufacturing materials technologies that can be pushed to these extremes in next generation energy ...

375

Wind Energy Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Wind energy technologies use the energy in wind for practical purposes such as generating electricity, charging batteries, pumping water, and grinding grain.

376

Brookhaven National Laboratory Technology Marketing ...  

Brookhaven National Laboratory Technology Marketing ... a critical reaction in a number of growing energy generation and utilization ... Energy Analys ...

377

Summary Results of Challenges and Opportunities for Technology Areas of the Grid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2012 5, 2012 Summary Results of Challenges & Opportunities for Technology Areas of the Grid From Breakout Group Sessions DOE Grid Tech Team Vision of a 21 st Century Distribution System A seamless, cost-effective electricity system, from generation to end-use, capable of meeting all clean energy demands and capacity requirements, while allowing consumer participation and electricity use as desired: * Significant scale-up of clean energy (renewables, natural gas, nuclear, fossil with CCUS) * Allows 100% consumer participation and choice (including distributed generation, demand-side management, electrification of transportation, and energy efficiency) * 100% holistically designed (including regional diversity, AC-DC transmission and distribution solutions, microgrids, and centralized-

378

Choices for A Brighter Future: Perspectives on Renewable Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The report discusses the perspectives on the evolving U.S. electricity future, the renewable electric technology portfolio, the regional outlook, and the opportunities to move forward. Renewables are at a critical juncture as the domestic electricity marketplace moves toward an era of increased choice and greater diversity. The cost and performance of these technologies have improved dramatically over the past decade, yet their market penetration has stalled as the power industry grapples with the implications of the emerging competitive marketplace. Renewable energy technologies already contribute to the global energy mix and are ready to make an even greater contribution in the future. However, the renewables industry faces critical market uncertainties, both domestically and internationally, as policy commitments to renewables at both the federal and state levels are being reshaped to match the emerging competitive marketplace. The energy decisions that we make, or fail to make, today will have long-lasting implications. We can act now to ensure that renewable energy will play a major role in meeting the challenges of the evolving energy future. We have the power to choose.

NREL

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

379

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Choice Environmental Services Chooses  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Choice Environmental Choice Environmental Services Chooses Natural Gas to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Choice Environmental Services Chooses Natural Gas on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Choice Environmental Services Chooses Natural Gas on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Choice Environmental Services Chooses Natural Gas on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Choice Environmental Services Chooses Natural Gas on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Choice Environmental Services Chooses Natural Gas on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Choice Environmental Services Chooses Natural Gas on AddThis.com... Oct. 11, 2011 Choice Environmental Services Chooses Natural Gas " In our bidding for residential collection contracts, we realized that the

380

A bright green perspective on sustainable choices  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a qualitative study of 35 United States households whose occupants have made significant accommodations to their homes and behaviors in order to be more environmentally responsible. Our goal is to inform the design of future sustainable technologies ... Keywords: domestic technology, environmental technology, green, qualitative studies, sustainable interaction design

Allison Woodruff; Jay Hasbrouck; Sally Augustin

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Laser Polarization Effects in Supercontinuum Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present experimental evidence of a fourth order process in electric field in supercontinuum generation. We also show laser induced polarization preference in the supercontinuum generating media. These results have become possible through the choice of isotropic and anisotropic samples interacting with ultrashort laser pulses of changing ellipticity. Laser polarization emerges as an important control parameter for the highly nonlinear phenomenon of supercontinuum generation.

Alok Srivastava; Debabrata Goswami

2004-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

382

Energy Choice Simulator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Choice Simulator Energy Choice Simulator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Choice Simulator Agency/Company /Organization: Great Plains Institute Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, People and Policy Phase: Create a Vision, Develop Goals, Prepare a Plan, Get Feedback, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Topics: Market analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Desktop Application Website: www.energychoicesimulator.com/ Country: United States Locality: Midwestern United States Cost: Free Northern America Coordinates: 37.09024°, -95.712891° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.09024,"lon":-95.712891,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

383

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation - A Primer on Low-Temperature, Small-Scale Applications Geothermal Technologies Legacy...

384

Modern Smart Grid Offers Consumers the Power of Choice | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Modern Smart Grid Offers Consumers the Power of Choice Modern Smart Grid Offers Consumers the Power of Choice Modern Smart Grid Offers Consumers the Power of Choice February 7, 2011 - 9:19am Addthis Erin R. Pierce Erin R. Pierce Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs Home energy assessments are a practical, straightforward way to improve the overall efficiency of your home. Learning how to better manage home energy use can lead to significant cost savings. You may have enlisted the help of a professional auditor to perform the evaluation or relied on an annual, do-it-yourself review-but what if you could monitor your home's energy use on a monthly, weekly, or even daily basis? That's exactly what Smart Grid technology offers-providing both consumers and utilities with the information to better manage electricity use, in

385

CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT-AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), Norway (Klimatek) and the U.S.A. (Department of Energy)). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion--technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel--where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with wet high concentrations of CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion--in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening--analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV)--providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies have completed their 2003 stagegate review and are reported here. Some will proceed to the next stagegate review in 2004. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. The workscopes planned for the next key stagegates are under review before work begins based on the current economic assessment of their performance. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options but even so some significant potential reductions in cost have been identified and will continue to be explored. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward and suggest that geologic sequestration can be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along old wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Wells are also easy to monitor and intervention is possible if needed. The project will continue to evaluate and bring in novel studies and ideas within the project scope as requested by the DOE. The results to date are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

Helen Kerr

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

CO2 Capture Project-An Integrated, Collaborative Technology Development Project for Next Generation CO2 Separation, Capture and Geologic Sequestration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) was a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, ENI, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union [DG RES & DG TREN], the Norwegian Research Council [Klimatek Program] and the U.S. Department of Energy [NETL]). The project objective was to develop new technologies that could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies were to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. Certain promising technology areas were increased in scope and the studies extended through 2004. The project budget was approximately $26.4 million over 4 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum cokes are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies showed excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. Post-combustion technologies emerged as higher cost options that may only have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies suggest that geologic sequestration will be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Economic modeling shows that options to reduce costs by 50% exist. A rigorous methodology for technology evaluation was developed. Public acceptance and awareness were enhanced through extensive communication of results to the stakeholder community (scientific, NGO, policy, and general public). Two volumes of results have been published and are available to all. Well over 150 technical papers were produced. All funded studies for this phase of the CCP are complete. The results are summarized in this report and all final reports are presented in the attached appendices.

Helen Kerr; Linda M. Curran

2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Mechatronics Technology, and Renewable Energy Technology. Career Opportunities Graduates of four origin, gender, age, marital status, sexual orientation, status as a Vietnam-era veteran, or disability

388

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you ...

389

Technology reviews: Lighting systems  

SciTech Connect

We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize lighting system in the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends. Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Technology reviews: Shading systems  

SciTech Connect

We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends. Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Technology reviews: Glazing systems  

SciTech Connect

We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology; determine the performance range of available technologies; identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances; examine market forces and market trends; and develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fag into that class.

Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Lighting Choices to Save You Money Banner | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

lightingcenterpiece.jpg Description Low-resolution version of the Lighting Choices to Save You Money banner....

393

Next Generation Radioisotope Generators | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

» Next Generation Radioisotope Generators » Next Generation Radioisotope Generators Next Generation Radioisotope Generators Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) - The ASRG is currently being developed as a high-efficiency RPS technology to support future space missions on the Martian surface or in the vacuum of space. This system uses Stirling convertors, which have moving parts to mechanically convert heat to electricity. This power conversion system, if successfully deployed, will reduce the weight of each RPS and the amount of Pu-238 needed per mission. A HISTORY OF MISSION SUCCESSES For over fifty years, the Department of Energy has enabled space exploration on 27 missions by providing safe reliable radioistope power systems and radioisotope heater units for NASA, Navy and Air Force.

394

Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

New and New and Underutilized Power Generation Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Power Generation Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Power Generation Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Power Generation Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Power Generation Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Power Generation Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: New and Underutilized Power Generation Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Technology Deployment

395

Power Technologies Data Book  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared by NREL's Energy Analysis Office, includes up-to-date information on power technologies, including complete technology profiles. The data book also contains charts on electricity restructuring, power technology forecasts and comparisons, electricity supply, electricity capability, electricity generation, electricity demand, prices, economic indicators, environmental indicators, conversion factors, and selected congressional questions and answers.

Goldstein, L.

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

LASER Welding Survey for Power Generation Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has developed technology for laser weld repair of steam generator tubes in light water reactors. This technology has promise for other specialized welding and heat treatment applications in the power generation industry.

1998-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

398

A perspective of generative reuse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a perspective of generative reuse technologies as they have evolved over the last 15 years or so and a discussion of how generative reuse addresses some key reuse problems. Over that time period, a number of different ...

Ted J. Biggerstaff

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

A Kaleidoscope of Understanding: Comparing Real with Random Data, Using Binary-Choice Items, to Study Preservice Elementary Teachers’ Knowledge of Climate Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors used a 59-item survey to probe the understanding of climate change by 89 Ontario preservice teachers. The study investigated the usefulness of comparing real survey data from closed, binary choice items, with randomly generated data. ...

Douglas Hayhoe; Shawn Bullock; Katharine Hayhoe

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technologies Technologies Technologies November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Distributed energy (DE) technologies consist primarily of energy generation and storage systems placed at or near the point of use. DE provides consumers with greater reliability, adequate power quality, and the possibility to participate in competitive electric power markets. DE also has the potential to mitigate congestion in transmission lines, control price fluctuations, strengthen energy security, and provide greater stability to the electricity grid. The use of DE technologies can lead to lower emissions and, particularly in combined heat and power (CHP) applications, to improved efficiency. Example of a thermally activated energy conversion technology (TAT) -- a type of distributed energy technology. Distributed energy technologies consist primarily of energy generation and storage systems placed at or near the point of use. This gas engine-driven heat pump is operating on a rooftop.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Cost of New Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Coal Electricity Generation...................... 17  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Future demand for electricity can be met with a range of technologies, with fuels including coal, nuclear, natural gas, biomass and other renewables, as well as with energy efficiency and demand management approaches. Choices among options will depend on factors including capital cost, fuel cost, market and regulatory uncertainty, greenhouse gas emissions, and other environmental impacts. This paper estimates the costs of new electricity generation. The approach taken here is to provide a transparent and verifiable analysis based mainly on recent data provided

Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas; Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Frequently Asked Questions: Lighting Choices to Save You Money | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Frequently Asked Questions: Lighting Choices to Save You Money Frequently Asked Questions: Lighting Choices to Save You Money Frequently Asked Questions: Lighting Choices to Save You Money August 9, 2012 - 9:20am Addthis Frequently Asked Questions: Lighting Choices to Save You Money Below are some of the most frequently asked questions and answers about the new lighting efficiency standards. Learn more about your lighting choices and find out how to shop for lights by lumens, not watts. Download our Lighting Myths and Facts fact sheet to learn more about your lighting choices and the new lighting standards. Why are my lighting choices changing? What is the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007)? When will the new bulbs be phased in? What will the lighting standards mandated by EISA 2007 mean to consumers?

403

Frequently Asked Questions: Lighting Choices to Save You Money | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Frequently Asked Questions: Lighting Choices to Save You Money Frequently Asked Questions: Lighting Choices to Save You Money Frequently Asked Questions: Lighting Choices to Save You Money August 9, 2012 - 9:20am Addthis Frequently Asked Questions: Lighting Choices to Save You Money Below are some of the most frequently asked questions and answers about the new lighting efficiency standards. Learn more about your lighting choices and find out how to shop for lights by lumens, not watts. Download our Lighting Myths and Facts fact sheet to learn more about your lighting choices and the new lighting standards. Why are my lighting choices changing? What is the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007)? When will the new bulbs be phased in? What will the lighting standards mandated by EISA 2007 mean to consumers?

404

AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Characterization of Fatigue and Crash Performance of New Generation High Strength Steels for Automotive Applications  

SciTech Connect

A 2-year project (2001-2002) to generate fatigue and high strain data for a new generation of high strength steels (HSS) has been completed in December 2002. The project tested eleven steel grades, including Dual Phase (DP) steels, Transformation-Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels, Bake Hardenable (BH) steels, and conventional High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels. All of these steels are of great interest in automotive industry due to the potential benefit in weight reduction, improved fuel economy, enhanced crash energy management and total system cost savings. Fatigue behavior includes strain controlled fatigue data notch sensitivity for high strength steels. High strain rate behavior includes stress-strain data for strain rates from 0.001/s to 1000/s, which are considered the important strain rate ranges for crash event. The steels were tested in two phases, seven were tested in Phase 1 and the remaining steels were tested in Phase. In a addition to the fatigue data and high st rain rate data generated for the steels studied in the project, analyses of the testing results revealed that Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) exhibit significantly higher fatigue strength and crash energy absorption capability than conventional HSS. TRIP steels exhibit exceptionally better fatigue strength than steels of similar tensile strength but different microstructure, for conditions both with or without notches present

Brenda Yan; Dennis Urban

2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

405

EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Electric Technologies to demonstrate battery technology integration with wind generated electricity by deploying and evaluating utility-scale lithium battery technology to...

406

Clean Coal Technology and the Clean Coal Power Initiative | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Clean Coal Technology and the Clean Coal Power Initiative Clean Coal Technology and the Clean Coal Power Initiative "Clean coal technology" describes a new generation of energy...

407

Glitter™ Photovoltaic Technology - Energy Innovation Portal  

Technology Marketing Summary Revolutionary microsolar technology utilizes glitter-sized photovoltaic cells to change how we generate and use solar power.

408

Technology and international climate policy  

SciTech Connect

Both the nature of international climate policy architectures and the development and diffusion of new energy technologies could dramatically influence future costs of reducing global emissions of greenhouse gases. This paper explores the implications of interactions between technology availability and performance and international policy architectures for technology choice and the social cost of limiting atmospheric CO2 concentrations to 500 ppm by the year 2095. Key issues explored in the paper include the role of bioenergy production with CO2 capture and storage (CCS), overshoot concentration pathways, and the sensitivity of mitigation costs to policy and technology.

Clarke, Leon; Calvin, Kate; Edmonds, James A.; Kyle, Page; Wise, Marshall

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

technologies | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

technologies technologies Dataset Summary Description This dataset is from the report Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature (J. Macknick, R. Newmark, G. Heath and K.C. Hallett) and provides estimates of operational water withdrawal and water consumption factors for electricity generating technologies in the United States. Estimates of water factors were collected from published primary literature and were not modified except for unit conversions. Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released August 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords coal consumption csp factors geothermal PV renewable energy technologies Water wind withdrawal Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies (xlsx, 77.7 KiB)

410

Technology Search  

home \\ technologies \\ search. Technologies: Ready-to-Sign Licenses: Software: Patents: Technology Search. ... Operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, ...

411

Monolithic solid oxide fuel cell technology advancement for coal-based power generation. Quarterly technical status report, January--March 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The program is conducted by a team consisting of AiResearch Los Angeles Division of Allied-Signal Aerospace Company and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). The objective of the program is to advance materials and fabrication methodologies to develop a monolithic solid oxide fuel cell (MSOFC) system capable of meeting performance, life, and cost goals for coal-based power generation. The program focuses on materials research and development, fabrication process development, cell/stack performance testing and characterization, cost and system analysis, and quality development.

Not Available

1992-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

412

Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emerging Technologies Emerging Technologies Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Emerging Technologies on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Technology Research, Standards, & Codes Popular Links Success Stories Previous Next Lighten Energy Loads with System Design.

413

Vote for People's Choice Award! | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vote for People's Choice Award! Vote for People's Choice Award! Vote for People's Choice Award! June 6, 2013 - 5:49pm Addthis Vote for your favorite team to win the National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition's "People's Choice Award." Vote for your favorite team to win the National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition's "People's Choice Award." Jennifer Garson Tech to Market Analyst, Commercialization Program (EERE) Editor's note: This article was originally posted on the official blog for the National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition. As the final days count down to the 2013 DOE National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition, public voting for the "People's Choice" award has been launched on DOE's site! You can vote here. Voting closes on June 12 at 4

414

Task 3.14 -- Demonstration of technologies for remote power generation in Alaska. Semi-annual report, July 1--December 31, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall goal of this project is a site specific demonstration of a small, environmentally acceptable electric generating system fueled on indigenous fuels and waste materials to serve the microgrid or stand alone power distribution systems typical of remote, isolated Alaska Native communities. The objective of the project is to develop a commercialization plan that includes an analysis of the quantity, quality, and cost of the available fuels; a mapping of the electricity and district heating needs of a selected community, including electrical distribution layout and interconnecting steam piping; a step by step review of the environmental regulations and permit applications that need to be met; and a preliminary design and budget for the demonstration of a 0.5 to 6 MWe power system to be completed by the Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in a manner that provides technical and regulatory readiness to proceed with implementation of the demonstration.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Dynamic Capacity Investment with Two Competing Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the recent focus on sustainability, firms making adjustments to their production or distribution capacity levels often have the option of investing in newer technologies with lower carbon footprints and/or energy consumption. These more sustainable ... Keywords: dynamic capacity investment, sustainable operations, technology choice

Wenbin Wang, Mark E. Ferguson, Shanshan Hu, Gilvan C. Souza

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database is currently (2009) being updated to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.[Taken from http://www2.eere.energy.gov/windandhydro/hydrokinetic/

417

Hydrogen Gas Production from Nuclear Power Plant in Relation to Hydrogen Fuel Cell Technologies Nowadays  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, world has been confused by issues of energy resourcing, including fossil fuel use, global warming, and sustainable energy generation. Hydrogen may become the choice for future fuel of combustion engine. Hydrogen is an environmentally clean source of energy to end-users, particularly in transportation applications because without release of pollutants at the point of end use. Hydrogen may be produced from water using the process of electrolysis. One of the GEN-IV reactors nuclear projects (HTGRs, HTR, VHTR) is also can produce hydrogen from the process. In the present study, hydrogen gas production from nuclear power plant is reviewed in relation to commercialization of hydrogen fuel cell technologies nowadays.

Yusibani, Elin [Research Center for Hydrogen Industrial Use and Storage, AIST (Japan); Department of Physics, Universitas Syiah Kuala (Indonesia); Kamil, Insan; Suud, Zaki [Department of Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

418

Natural Gas Residential Choice Programs - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Status of Natural Gas Residential Choice Programs by State as of December 2006 (Click on a State or its abbreviation for more information about that State.

419

Best Practices in Material Choice for Design and Construction of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Best Practices in Material Choice for Design and Construction of ... Optimum Condition of Vanadium Recovery from Power Plant Fly-ash with ...

420

Popular Choice Winners Announced for "Apps for Energy" Competition...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

web applications that will help utility consumers save money by making the most of their "Green Button" electricity usage data. Popular Choice awards reflect the results of public...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Participation lags in most electricity retail choice States ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fifteen States and the District of Columbia have active retail choice programs for residential electricity ... State regulators set the rates for customers not ...

422

Electricity retail choice is mandated in Texas and growing in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Retail choice programs let electric power and natural gas customers ... These rates only slowly adjust to ... 15 States and the District of Columbia have active ...

423

State electric retail choice programs are popular with commercial ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

State electric retail choice programs are popular ... majority of industrial customers have signed up in 12 states. The highest participation rates are found in ...

424

6. State Regulators Promote Consumer Choice in Retail Gas Markets  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration Natural Gas 1996: Issues and Trends 113 6. State Regulators Promote Consumer Choice in Retail Gas Markets Restructur ...

425

Natural Gas Residential Choice Programs - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Status of Natural Gas Residential Choice Programs by State as of December 2009 (Click on a State or its abbreviation for more information about that State.

426

Natural Gas Residential Choice Programs - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Status of Natural Gas Residential Choice Programs by State as of December 2007 (Click on a State or its abbreviation for more information about that ...

427

Battery Choices for Different Plug-in HEV Configurations (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presents battery choices for different plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) configurations to reduce cost and to improve performance and life.

Pesaran, A.

2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

428

Beyond the ABC (Attitude, Behavior, Choice) of Climate Change...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Us Department Contacts Media Contacts Beyond the ABC (Attitude, Behavior, Choice) of Climate Change Policy: Conceptualising and Promoting Transitions in Social Practice...

429

Improved Plasma Spray Solution Precursors By Careful Choice of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Improved Plasma Spray Solution Precursors By Careful Choice of Precursor Chemistry/Properties and by Use of Suspensions. Author(s), Eric ...

430

Essays on ethanol-driven corn demand and crop choice.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Two essays are focused on crop choice and the growth of corn production in the Corn Belt and surrounding areas. The first essay develops a… (more)

[No author

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Choices and Requirements of Batteries for EVs, HEVs, PHEVs (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes the choices available and requirements for batteries for electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

Pesaran, A. A.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Natural Gas Residential Choice Programs - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Status of Natural Gas Residential Choice Programs by State as of December 2005 (Click on a state or its abbreviation for more information about that state.

433

Mathematics achievement : the impact of America's choice in Kentucky's schools.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ph. D. This study examined student achievement scores in Kentucky elementary schools to determine the relationship between implementing the America's Choice comprehensive school reform model… (more)

Upton, Sonia James

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Technology Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Homeland Security & Defense Homeland Security & Defense Information Technology & Communications Information Technology & Communications Sensors, Electronics &...

435

Technology@TMS: Online Article - Materials Technology@TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Newer concepts that provide higher efficiency and thus higher power levels are based on Stirling engine technology. Stirling Radioisotope Generators (SRGs) ...

436

A New Generation of Labels for a New Generation of Cars | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A New Generation of Labels for a New Generation of Cars A New Generation of Labels for a New Generation of Cars A New Generation of Labels for a New Generation of Cars May 25, 2011 - 5:42pm Addthis A New Generation of Labels for a New Generation of Cars John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? An improved car buying experience Clear cut cost comparisons of vehicles If you've ever gone through the process of shopping for a new car, you know just how difficult it can be to cut through the hype and find the best vehicle for you. For decades, consumers have been turning to fuel economy labels to get gas mileage estimates for city and highway driving, to narrow their choices and make an informed purchase. Today, there are more vehicle choices than ever and consumers want to know

437

A New Generation of Labels for a New Generation of Cars | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Generation of Labels for a New Generation of Cars New Generation of Labels for a New Generation of Cars A New Generation of Labels for a New Generation of Cars May 25, 2011 - 5:42pm Addthis A New Generation of Labels for a New Generation of Cars John Schueler John Schueler Former New Media Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? An improved car buying experience Clear cut cost comparisons of vehicles If you've ever gone through the process of shopping for a new car, you know just how difficult it can be to cut through the hype and find the best vehicle for you. For decades, consumers have been turning to fuel economy labels to get gas mileage estimates for city and highway driving, to narrow their choices and make an informed purchase. Today, there are more vehicle choices than ever and consumers want to know

438

Clean Coal Technology (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A public utility may not use clean coal technology at a new or existing electric generating facility without first applying for and obtaining from the Utility Regulatory Commission a certificate...

439

Geothermal Technologies Program: Utah  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Technologies Program Utah fact sheet describes the geothermal areas and use in Utah, focusing on power generation as well as direct use, including geothermally heated greenhouses, swimming pools, and therapeutic baths.

Not Available

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Energy Basics: Wind Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Photo of a hilly field, with six visible wind turbines spinning in the wind. Wind energy technologies use the energy in wind for practical purposes such as generating...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation technology choice" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

An Empirical Study of Alternative Fuel Vehicle Choice by Commercial Fleets: Lessons in Transportation Choices, and Public Agencies' Organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Error gov. Error model model CNG constant Methanol constantcompressed natural gas (CNG) vehicles with over 300 milestime or refueling cost of CNG vehicles? My fuel choice

Crane, Soheila Soltani

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

An Empirical Study of Alternative Fuel Vehicle Choice by Commercial Fleets: Lessons in Transportation Choices, and Public Agencies' Organization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the agriculture industry to electric vehicles. Organizationsindustry, however, strongly prefers gasoline vehicle to the electricelectric vehicles. Methanol appears to be the alternative fuel of choice by agriculture industry.

Crane, Soheila Soltani

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Bioconversion Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bioconversion Technologies Bioconversion Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name Bioconversion Technologies Place United Kingdom Sector Biofuels Product Second-generation biofuels technology developer References Bioconversion Technologies[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Bioconversion Technologies is a company located in United Kingdom . References ↑ "Bioconversion Technologies" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Bioconversion_Technologies&oldid=342770" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load)

444

Optimal Decision Stimuli for Risky Choice Experiments: An Adaptive Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collecting data to discriminate between models of risky choice requires careful selection of decision stimuli. Models of decision making aim to predict decisions across a wide range of possible stimuli, but practical limitations force experimenters to ... Keywords: active learning, choice under risk, experimental design, model discrimination

Daniel R. Cavagnaro; Richard Gonzalez; Jay I. Myung; Mark A. Pitt

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

An analysis of judgemental bias in housing choice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 vi CONTENTS 8.2 Arbitrary Coherence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 221 8.3 Conclusion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 232 IV 235 9 Conclusions and Future Research 236 9.1 Summary of Results... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 2.2 Decision weighting function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54 3.1 Asymmetric dominance in consumer choices . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 3.2 Compromise effect in consumer choices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 3.3 Extremeness aversion...

Scott, Peter J.

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

446

Social Choice in a Computer-Assisted Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pursuing a line of inquiry suggested by Crookall, Martin, Saunders, and Coote, the author applied, within the framework of design science, an optimal-design approach to incorporate into a computer-assisted simulation two innovative social choice processes: ... Keywords: GEO, affinity propagation, assessment of learning, business, bustling market, clustering algorithm, computer-assisted, continuous voting, periodic double auction, proposal voting, social choice

Precha Thavikulwat

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT)  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity. Retrofit technologies that address the challenges of slow-speed integral compression are: (1) optimum turndown using a combination of speed and clearance with single-acting operation as a last resort; (2) if single-acting is required, implement infinite length nozzles to address nozzle pulsation and tunable side branch absorbers for 1x lateral pulsations; and (3) advanced valves, either the semi-active plate valve or the passive rotary valve, to extend valve life to three years with half the pressure drop. This next generation of slow-speed compression should attain 95% efficiency, a three-year valve life, and expanded turndown. New equipment technologies that address the challenges of large-horsepower, high-speed compression are: (1) optimum turndown with unit speed; (2) tapered nozzles to effectively reduce nozzle pulsation with half the pressure drop and minimization of mechanical cylinder stretch induced vibrations; (3) tunable side branch absorber or higher-order filter bottle to address lateral piping pulsations over the entire extended speed range with minimal pressure drop; and (4) semi-active plate valves or passive rotary valves to extend valve life with half the pressure drop. This next generation of large-horsepower, high-speed compression should attain 90% efficiency, a two-year valve life, 50% turndown, and less than 0.75 IPS vibration. This program has generated proof-of-concept technologies with the potential to meet these ambitious goals. Full development of these identified technologies is underway. The GMRC has committed to pursue the most promising enabling technologies for their industry.

Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Generation -IV Reactor Concepts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Thomas H. Fanning Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA The Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) is a multi-national research and development (R&D) collaboration. The GIF pursues the development of advanced, next generation reactor technology with goals to improve: a) sustainability (effective fuel utilization and minimization of waste) b) economics (competitiveness with respect to other energy sources) c) safety and reliability (e.g., no need for offsite emergency response), and d) proliferation resistance and physical protection The GIF Technology Roadmap exercise selected six generic systems for further study: the Gas- cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR),

449

TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report originated in the authors ’ participation in a multi-country study of national innovation systems and their impact on new technology development, sponsored by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Our task was to look at the U.S. national innovation system’s impact on the commercial development of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cells for residential power applications. Early drivers of PEM fuel cell innovation were the aerospace and defense programs, in particular the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), which used fuel cells on its spacecraft. In the early 1990s, deregulation hit the electric utility industry, which made utilities and entrepreneurs see the potential in generating electricity from distributed power. Throughout the 1990s, the Department of Energy funded a significant portion of civilian fuel cell research, while the Department of Defense and NASA funded more esoteric military and space applications. In 1998, the Department of Commerce’s Advanced Technology Program (ATP) awarded the first of 25 fuel cell projects, as prospects for adoption and commercialization of fuel cell technologies improved.

John M. Nail; Gary Anderson; Gerald Ceasar; Christopher J. Hansen; John M. Nail; Gerald Ceasar; Christopher J. Hansen; Carlos M. Gutierrez; Hratch G. Samerjian; Acting Director; Marc G. Stanley; Director Abstract

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Technology disrupted  

SciTech Connect

Three years ago, the author presented a report on power generation technologies which in summary said 'no technology available today has the potential of becoming transformational or disruptive in the next five to ten years'. In 2006 the company completed another strategic view research report covering the electric power, oil, gas and unconventional energy industries and manufacturing industry. This article summarises the strategic view findings and then revisits some of the scenarios presented in 2003. The cost per megawatt-hour of the alternatives is given for plants ordered in 2005 and then in 2025. The issue of greenhouse gas regulation is dealt with through carbon sequestration and carbon allowances or an equivalent carbon tax. Results reveal substantial variability through nuclear power, hydro, wind, geothermal and biomass remain competitive through every scenario. Greenhouse gas scenario analysis shows coal still be viable, albeit less competitive against nuclear and renewable technologies. A carbon tax or allowance at $24 per metric ton has the same effect on IGCC cost as a sequestration mandate. However, the latter would hurt gas plants much more than a tax or allowance. Sequestering CO{sub 2} from a gas plant is almost as costly per megawatt-hour as for coal. 5 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

Papatheodorou, Y. [CH2M Hill (United States)

2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

451

Vendor / Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brake Assessment Tools Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor...

452

Vendor / Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Brake-Related Research Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor Safety Technology Showcase October 14, 2010 Commercial Motor Vehicle Roadside Technology Corridor...

453

Faience Technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by Joanne Hodges. Faience Technology, Nicholson, UEE 2009Egyptian materials and technology, ed. Paul T. Nicholson,Nicholson, 2009, Faience Technology. UEE. Full Citation:

Nicholson, Paul

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

There are no technology records available that match the search query. Find a Technology. Search our technologies by categories or by keywords.

455

Technology Transfer: Available Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

test test Please refer to the list of technologies below for licensing and research collaboration availability. If you can't find the technology you're interested in, please contact us at TTD@lbl.gov. Energy ENERGY EFFICIENT TECHNOLOGIES Aerosol Sealing Aerosol Remote Sealing System Clog-free Atomizing and Spray Drying Nozzle Air-stable Nanomaterials for Efficient OLEDs Solvent Processed Nanotube Composites OLEDS with Air-stable Structured Electrodes APIs for Online Energy Saving Tools: Home Energy Saver and EnergyIQ Carbon Dioxide Capture at a Reduced Cost Dynamic Solar Glare Blocking System Electrochromic Device Controlled by Sunlight Electrochromic Windows with Multiple-Cavity Optical Bandpass Filter Electrochromic Window Technology Portfolio Universal Electrochromic Smart Window Coating

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Energy Efficient Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Efficient Technologies Energy Efficient Technologies Energy efficient technologies are available now! Many of the vehicles currently on display in dealer showrooms boast new performance-enhancing, fuel-saving technologies that can save you money. Engine Technologies Transmission Technologies All Engine Technology Average Efficiency Increase Variable Valve Timing & Lift improve engine efficiency by optimizing the flow of fuel & air into the engine for various engine speeds. 5% Cylinder Deactivation saves fuel by deactivating cylinders when they are not needed. 7.5% Turbochargers & Superchargers increase engine power, allowing manufacturers to downsize engines without sacrificing performance or to increase performance without lowering fuel economy. 7.5% Integrated Starter/Generator (ISG) Systems automatically turn the engine on/off when the vehicle is stopped to reduce fuel consumed during idling. 8%

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Home Sweet Lab: Computerized House to Generate as Much ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... on September 12, 2012, the National Institute of ... appliances, as well as energy-generating technologies ... for Standards and Technology and NIST ...

2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

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NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Next Generation Surfactants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology Last Reviewed 12152012 DE-FE0003537 Goal...

459

Photovoltaic Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is an overview of photovoltaic power generation. The purpose of the report is to provide the reader with a general understanding of photovoltaic power generation and how PV technology can be practically applied. There is a brief discussion of early research and a description of how photovoltaic cells convert sunlight to electricity. The report covers concentrating collectors, flat-plate collectors, thin-film technology, and building-integrated systems. The discussion of photovoltaic cell types includes single-crystal, poly-crystalline, and thin-film materials. The report covers progress in improving cell efficiencies, reducing manufacturing cost, and finding economic applications of photovoltaic technology. Lists of major manufacturers and organizations are included, along with a discussion of market trends and projections. The conclusion is that photovoltaic power generation is still more costly than conventional systems in general. However, large variations in cost of conventional electrical power, and other factors, such as cost of distribution, create situations in which the use of PV power is economically sound. PV power is used in remote applications such as communications, homes and villages in developing countries, water pumping, camping, and boating. Gridconnected applications such as electric utility generating facilities and residential rooftop installations make up a smaller but more rapidly expanding segment of PV use. Furthermore, as technological advances narrow the cost gap, more applications are becoming economically feasible at an accelerating rate. iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES ...................................................................................v

Tom Penick; Gale Greenleaf Instructor; Thomas Penick; Bill Louk; Bill Louk

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

A REVIEW OF ASSUMPTIONS AND ANALYSIS IN EPRI EA-3409,"HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE CHOICE: REVISION OF REEPS BEHAVIORAL MODELS"  

SciTech Connect

This paper revises and extends EPRI report EA-3409, ''Household Appliance Choice: Revision of REEPS Behavioral Models.'' That paper reported the results of an econometric study of major appliance choice in new residential construction. Errors appeared in two tables of that report. We offer revised versions of those tables, and a brief analysis of the consequences and significance of the errors. The present paper also proposes several possible extensions and re-specifications of the models examined by EPRI. Some of these are judged to be highly successful; they both satisfy economic intuition more completely than the original specification and produce a better quality fit to the dependent variable. We feel that inclusion of these modifications produces a more useful set of coefficients for economic modeling than the original specification. This paper focuses on EPRI's models of residential space heating technology choice. That choice was modeled as a nested logit structure, with consumers choosing whether to have central air conditioning or not, and, given that choice, what kind of space heating system to have. The model included five space heating alternatives with central cooling (gas, oil, and electric forced-air; heat pumps; and electric baseboard) and eight alternatives without it (gas, oil, and electric forced-air; gas and oil boilers and non-central systems; and electric baseboard heat). The structure of the nested logit model is shown in Figure 1.

Wood, D.J.; Ruderman, H.; McMahon, J. E.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


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Technology Reviews | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Reviews Technology Reviews Technology Reviews November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Selecting a distributed energy (DE) technology for a specific application depends on many factors. Considerations include the amount of power needed, the duty cycle, space constraints, thermal needs, emission regulations, fuel availability, utility prices, and interconnection issues. The following technology reviews include descriptions of a variety of DE and combined heat and power (CHP) technologies, providing (when available) such parameters as efficiency, size, and projected cost to install and maintain. Behavior of Capstone and Honeywell Microturbine Generators During Load Changes, 38 pp, Feb. 2004 Catalogue of CHP Technologies, Dec. 2012 Cost Analysis of Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Control Alternatives for

462

Technology reviews: Daylighting optical systems  

SciTech Connect

We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends.Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

Staff Directory; BNL People Technology Commercialization & Partnerships. Home; For BNL Inventors; ... a nonprofit applied science and technology organization. ...

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Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

Non-Noble Metal Water Electrolysis Catalysts; Find a Technology. Search our technologies by categories or by keywords. Search ...

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Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

BSA 08-04: High Temperature Interfacial Superconductivity; Find a Technology. Search our technologies by categories or by keywords. Search ...

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Technology Search Results | Brookhaven Technology ...  

Receive Technology Updates. Get email notifications about new or improved technologies in your area of interest. Subscribe »

467

Jackson EMC - Right Choice for Builders Rebate Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Jackson EMC - Right Choice for Builders Rebate Program Jackson EMC - Right Choice for Builders Rebate Program Jackson EMC - Right Choice for Builders Rebate Program < Back Eligibility Installer/Contractor Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Program Info State Georgia Program Type Utility Rebate Program Rebate Amount Not specified Provider Jackson Electric Membership Corporation Jackson Electric Membership Corporation (EMC) is an electric cooperative that serves 194,000 in 10 northeast Georgia counties. To encourage the construction of homes that are energy efficient, Jackson EMC offers the Right Choice Savings Program. Builders who meet the certification standards of the program and build homes that meet certain energy efficiency

468

EIA-DOE Vehicle Choice and Markets Technical Workshop  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

DOE Vehicle Choice and Markets Technical Workshop 1 DOE Vehicle Choice and Markets Technical Workshop 1 January 2013 EIA-DOE Vehicle Choice and Markets Technical Workshop Meeting Summary The Department of Energy (DOE) and Energy Information Administration (EIA) held a workshop on January 25th, 2013 in Detroit, MI with marketing and automotive industry experts to discuss and better understand consumer acceptance of hybrid, plug-in hybrid, and battery electric vehicles. The workshop focused on recent survey analyses, market representation, state of the art modeling, and comparisons of projected model results. This event provided a rare and insightful opportunity to compare and contrast our understanding and representation of vehicle markets and vehicle choice modeling with our nation's automotive leaders to assure that EIA's future projections and policy

469

Power Choice/Pepco Energy Serv | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Choice/Pepco Energy Serv Choice/Pepco Energy Serv Jump to: navigation, search Name Power Choice/Pepco Energy Serv Place New Jersey Utility Id 14405 References EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File2_2010[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Utility Rate Schedules Grid-background.png No rate schedules available. Average Rates No Rates Available References ↑ "EIA Form EIA-861 Final Data File for 2010 - File2_2010" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Power_Choice/Pepco_Energy_Serv&oldid=412767" Categories: EIA Utility Companies and Aliases Utility Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version

470

Three Essays on R&D Choice with Compatibilty Externality.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation consists of the three essays on R&D project choice in the presence of compatibility externality.In the first essay we consider a R&D contest… (more)

Lee, Jaehee

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Indian Climate Policy: Choices and Challenges | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Policy: Choices and Challenges Climate Policy: Choices and Challenges Jump to: navigation, search Name Climate Change and India's Energy Policy Agency/Company /Organization Stimson Sector Energy, Climate Topics Policies/deployment programs, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Energy Security, Background analysis Website http://www.stimson.org/rv/pdf/ Country India UN Region South-Eastern Asia References Climate Change and India's Energy Policy[1] "Indian Climate Policy: Choices and Challenges illustrates the complex constraints on Indian policymakers and provides material for more fruitful, better-informed discussions in Washington, Delhi, and all points between" References ↑ "Climate Change and India's Energy Policy" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Indian_Climate_Policy:_Choices_and_Challenges&oldid=374308"

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