Sample records for generation technology choice

  1. Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies Print Monday, 06 February 2012 15:48 Organic solar cells based on the polymerfullerene bulk...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: ParaChoice: Parametric Vehicle Choice Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ParaChoice:...

  3. Future Implications of China's Energy-Technology Choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .......................................................................................................................... 16 3.3.3 Natural GasFuture Implications of China's Energy-Technology Choices Electricity Technology Selections 0 500 1 Technologies TWh Solar & Geothermal Wind Biomass Hydro Nuclear Hydrogen FC N Gas FC N. Gas cogen N. Gas Oil

  4. Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling D.J. Wood,AND TECHNOLOGY CHOICE IN HOME HEATING AND COOLING* David J.nology choices in home heating and cooling is presented. We

  5. The Industrialization of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Industrialization of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology The Industrialization of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology Presents module and system requirements for...

  6. Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    among different space heating technologies to household andhousehold's choice of heating technology is modeled jointlymodel five space heating technologies given central cooling

  7. Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive Waste Heat at GM Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive Waste Heat at GM...

  8. Innovative Energy Technologies: The Next Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Peter B.

    Innovative Energy Technologies: The Next Generation T E C H N O L O G Y G U I D E #12;Our lifestyle is sustained by energy. Technologies developed at Carnegie Mellon have the ability to enhance energy generation Generation Energy Technologies? 7 How Do We Realize the Benefits of Next Generation Energy Technologies? 9

  9. Agent Technology: Enabling Next Generation Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luck, Michael

    Agent Technology: Enabling Next Generation Computing A Roadmap for Agent Based Computing MichaelTechnology:ARoadmapLuck,McBurney&PreistAgentLink #12;i AgentLink Roadmap Agent Technology: Enabling Next Generation Computing A Roadmap for Agent, Peter McBurney and Chris Preist Agent Technology: Enabling Next Generation Computing A Roadmap for Agent

  10. Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy consumption. EPRI translates these projections into3 Technology Choices in EPRI's Model of Space Heating andPower Research Institute (EPRI) [1984]: "Household Appliance

  11. Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration December 31, 2013 - 12:14pm...

  12. Articles about Next-Generation Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stories about next-generation technologies featured by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program.

  13. Public transport technological choices -- A way through the maze

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morser, H.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Rapid growth in public transportation in the United States faces purchasers of the equipment with a bewildering variety of choices. Selections must be made of types of motors, types of semiconductor in variable-speed drives, supply network voltage, and so on. Consultants and operators of existing systems recommend differing solutions. This paper sets out some practical steps for narrowing down the choices, particularly at the start-up stage. The conflicting objectives are customer satisfaction, maximum reliability and efficiency, and a system offering flexibility of choice for later extensions and enhancements. This paper discusses ways to arrive at the correct amount of innovation; it emphasises the need for rigorously defined interfaces and the importance of inherently safe design and electromagnetic compatibility throughout the system at all levels. Most of the detail in the paper is concerned with methods of attaining zero interaction and high EMC.

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: ParaChoice: Parametric Vehicle Choice Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Sandia National Laboratories at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about parametric...

  15. Sandia National Laboratories: next generation energy technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    next generation energy technology SWiFT Commissioned to Study Wind Farm Optimization On July 29, 2013, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy,...

  16. Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes the state's support and incentives for the development of new energy production and generating facilities implementing advanced clean coal technology, such as coal...

  17. Learning-by-Doing and the Choice of Technology: The Role of Patience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, Larry S.

    technology and under the next best alternative, i.e. on the opportunity cost of adoption. The opportunity. An agent who is less 1 #12;familiar with the existing technology has a lower opportunity cost of adoptingLearning-by-Doing and the Choice of Technology: The Role of Patience Larry Karp and In Ho Lee

  18. Multiple choice of gauge generators and consistency of interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. L. Lyakhovich; A. A. Sharapov

    2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    It is usually assumed that any consistent interaction either deforms or retains the gauge symmetries of the corresponding free theory. We propose a simple model where an obvious irreducible gauge symmetry does not survive an interaction, while the interaction is consistent as it preserves the number of physical degrees of freedom. The model turns out admitting a less obvious reducible set of gauge generators which is compatible with the interaction and smooth in coupling constant. Possible application to gravity models is discussed.

  19. Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  20. Entropy Generation Analysis of Desalination Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mistry, Karan Hemant

    Increasing global demand for fresh water is driving the development and implementation of a wide variety of seawater desalination technologies. Entropy generation analysis, and specifically, Second Law efficiency, is an ...

  1. Overview of Progress in Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress in Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan Overview of Progress in Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan Presents progress in government- and...

  2. Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy Storage Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy Storage 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  3. Activity Stream - Energy Generation by State and Technology ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Generation by State and Technology (2009) 22 days ago harvest created the dataset Energy Generation by State and Technology (2009) 1 month ago harvest created the dataset...

  4. Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy Storage Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy Storage 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  5. On modeling pollution-generating technologies July 22, 2010 On modeling pollution-generating technologies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    On modeling pollution-generating technologies July 22, 2010 On modeling pollution modeling pollution-generating technologies July 22, 2010 Abstract We distinguish between intended with respect to inputs and intended outputs that cause pollution. We derive implications from the phenomenon

  6. The Future of Combustion Turbine Technology for Industrial and Utility Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, A. D.; Simbeck, D. R.

    Low capital cost and ample low-cost natural gas supplies will make natural gas-fired combustion turbine systems the power generation technology of choice over the next decade. Against the background of earlier use by electric utilities, this paper...

  7. Integrated, Automated Distributed Generation Technologies Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Kevin

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the NETL Project was to develop a diverse combination of distributed renewable generation technologies and controls and demonstrate how the renewable generation could help manage substation peak demand at the ATK Promontory plant site. The Promontory plant site is located in the northwestern Utah desert approximately 25 miles west of Brigham City, Utah. The plant encompasses 20,000 acres and has over 500 buildings. The ATK Promontory plant primarily manufactures solid propellant rocket motors for both commercial and government launch systems. The original project objectives focused on distributed generation; a 100 kW (kilowatt) wind turbine, a 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit, a 500 kW energy storage system, and an intelligent system-wide automation system to monitor and control the renewable energy devices then release the stored energy during the peak demand time. The original goal was to reduce peak demand from the electrical utility company, Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), by 3.4%. For a period of time we also sought to integrate our energy storage requirements with a flywheel storage system (500 kW) proposed for the Promontory/RMP Substation. Ultimately the flywheel storage system could not meet our project timetable, so the storage requirement was switched to a battery storage system (300 kW.) A secondary objective was to design/install a bi-directional customer/utility gateway application for real-time visibility and communications between RMP, and ATK. This objective was not achieved because of technical issues with RMP, ATK Information Technology Department’s stringent requirements based on being a rocket motor manufacturing facility, and budget constraints. Of the original objectives, the following were achieved: • Installation of a 100 kW wind turbine. • Installation of a 300 kW battery storage system. • Integrated control system installed to offset electrical demand by releasing stored energy from renewable sources during peak hours of the day. Control system also monitors the wind turbine and battery storage system health, power output, and issues critical alarms. Of the original objectives, the following were not achieved: • 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit. • Bi-directional customer/utility gateway for real time visibility and communications between RMP and ATK. • 3.4% reduction in peak demand. 1.7% reduction in peak demand was realized instead.

  8. Overview of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses thermoelectric power generation technologies as applied to waste heat recovery, renewable thermal energy sources, and energy harvesting

  9. SMALL TURBOGENERATOR TECHNOLOGY FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sy Ali; Bob Moritz

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is produced in under Contract DE-FC26-00NT40914, awarded in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy solicitation DE-PS26-00FT40759, ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Fossil Energy-Wide Coal, Natural Gas and Oil R&D Programs'', area of interest 7, ''Advanced Turbines and Engines.'' As a result of ten years of collaborative fuel cell systems studies with U.S. fuel cell manufacturers, initiated to evaluate the gas turbine opportunities likely to result from this technology, Rolls-Royce in Indianapolis has established a clear need for the creation of a turbogenerator to a specification that cannot be met by available units. Many of the required qualities are approached, but not fully met, by microturbines, which tend to be too small and low in pressure ratio. Market evaluation suggests a 1 MW fuel cell hybrid, incorporating a turbogenerator of about 250 kW, is a good market entry product (large enough to spread the costs of a relatively complex plant, but small enough to be acceptable to early adopters). The fuel cell stack occupies the position of a combustor in the turbogenerator, but delivers relatively low turbine entry temperature (1600 F [870 C]). If fitted with a conventional combustor and run stand-alone at full uncooled turbine temperature (1800 F [980 C]), the turbogenerator will develop more power. The power can be further enhanced if the turbogenerator is designed to have flow margin in its fuel cell role (by running faster). This margin can be realized by running at full speed and it is found that power can be increased to the 0.7 to 1.0 MW range, depending on initial fuel cell stack flow demand. The fuel cell hybrid applications require increased pressure ratio (at least 6 rather than the 3-4 of microturbines) and very long life for a small machine. The outcome is a turbogenerator that is very attractive for stand-alone operation and has been the subject of unsolicited enthusiasm from potential users who see an application in grid support. The machine is consistent with 21st century power generation objectives. It will be more efficient than a microturbine and also more cost effective because it does not require an expensive recuperator. It will produce ultra-low emissions because it has a low combustor delivery temperature. It will also avoid producing hazardous waste because it requires no lube system. These qualities are obtained by combining, and in some instances extending, the best of available technologies rather than breaking wholly new ground. Limited ''barrier technology'' rig tests of bearing systems and alternator configuration are proposed to support the extension of technology. Low combustion temperature also has merit in handling alternative fuels with minimum emissions and minimum materials degradation. Program continuation is proposed that will simultaneously provide technology support to a SECA fuel cell hybrid system and a distributed generation turbogenerator. This technology program will be led by a Rolls-Royce team based in Indianapolis with access to extensive small turbogenerator experience gathered in DOE (and other) programs by Allison Mobile Power Systems. It is intended that subsequent production will be in the U.S., but the products may have substantial export potential.

  10. Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    are conventional air conditioning and heat pump, given thein heat pump alternative Dummy for oil forced air choiceair choice Dummy for electric baseboard choice Dummy for heat pump

  11. ZERO EMISSION POWER GENERATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Bischoff; Stephen Doyle

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Energy Systems (CES) was previously funded by DOE's ''Vision 21'' program. This program provided a proof-of-concept demonstration that CES' novel gas generator (combustor) enabled production of electrical power from fossil fuels without pollution. CES has used current DOE funding for additional design study exercises which established the utility of the CES-cycle for retrofitting existing power plants for zero-emission operations and for incorporation in zero-emission, ''green field'' power plant concepts. DOE funding also helped define the suitability of existing steam turbine designs for use in the CES-cycle and explored the use of aero-derivative turbines for advanced power plant designs. This work is of interest to the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. California's air quality districts have significant non-attainment areas in which CES technology can help. CEC is currently funding a CES-cycle technology demonstration near Bakersfield, CA. The Norwegian government is supporting conceptual studies for a proposed 40 MW zero-emission power plant in Stavager, Norway which would use the CES-cycle. The latter project is called Zero-Emission Norwegian Gas (ZENG). In summary, current engineering studies: (1) supported engineering design of plant subsystems applicable for use with CES-cycle zero-emission power plants, and (2) documented the suitability and availability of steam turbines for use in CES-cycle power plants, with particular relevance to the Norwegian ZENG Project.

  12. Energy Generation by State and Technology (2009) - Energy Generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Generation by Fuel ... Download Energy Generation by Fuel Source and State, 2009 URL: http:en.openei.orgdatasetsdataset03f65dc9-ddc9-41ce-806f-edafad486a1fresource...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Next Generation Inverter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about next generation inverter.

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Next Generation Inverter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about next generation inverter.

  15. Overview of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Japan Discusses thermoelectric power generation technologies as applied to waste heat recovery, renewable thermal energy sources, and energy harvesting kajikawa.pdf...

  16. Next-Generation Wind Technology | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and reliability of next-generation wind technologies while lowering the cost of wind energy. The program's research efforts have helped to increase the average capacity...

  17. Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    models require accurate estimates of how the market shares of different fuel choices (electricity, gas, or oil)

  18. NREL: Technology Deployment - Distributed Generation Interconnection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative Become a Member DGIC members are included in quarterly informational meetings and discussions related to distributed PV...

  19. III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    29 III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27 The previous chapters focused on first generation biofuels. In this chapter we focus on second generation biofuels, specifically biofuels derived from cellulosic or lignocellulosic conversion. Advocates for the development of cellulosic

  20. Fuel cycle comparison of distributed power generation technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

    2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the application of fuel cells to distributed power generation were evaluated and compared with the combustion technologies of microturbines and internal combustion engines, as well as the various technologies associated with grid-electricity generation in the United States and California. The results were primarily impacted by the net electrical efficiency of the power generation technologies and the type of employed fuels. The energy use and GHG emissions associated with the electric power generation represented the majority of the total energy use of the fuel cycle and emissions for all generation pathways. Fuel cell technologies exhibited lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and other combustion technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than those for combustion generators. The dependence of all natural-gas-based technologies on petroleum oil was lower than that of internal combustion engines using petroleum fuels. Most fuel cell technologies approaching or exceeding the DOE target efficiency of 40% offered significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions.

  1. Michigan Technological University Generations of Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan Tech to acquire the resources needed to continue to grow as a premier research university, the University also has been able to establish the Pavlis Institute for Global Technological Leadership and bring Mineral Museum, and Sherman Field. Alumni play a key role in any capital campaign. We invite you and other

  2. Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

  3. Clean coal technologies in electric power generation: a brief overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janos Beer; Karen Obenshain [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), MA (United States)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper talks about the future clean coal technologies in electric power generation, including pulverized coal (e.g., advanced supercritical and ultra-supercritical cycles and fluidized-bed combustion), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), and CO{sub 2} capture technologies. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  4. Ontology Generation for Large Email Collections Language Technologies Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Ontology Generation for Large Email Collections Hui Yang Language Technologies Institute School Callan Language Technologies Institute School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213 callan@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT This paper presents a new approach

  5. Power Generation Technologies | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformation to ReducePoseidonPowderPowerPower Generation

  6. Technology choice and its performance: Towards a sociology of software package procurement 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, R.; Pollock, N

    2007-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Technology Acquisition is an important but neglected issue within the social science analysis of technology. The limited number of studies undertaken reproduce a schism between rationalist (e.g., economic) forms of ...

  7. Technological development under global warning : roadmap of the coal generation technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furuyama, Yasushi, 1963-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the measures for the Japanese electric power utilities to meet the Kyoto Target, and the technological development of the coal thermal power generation to meet the further abatement of the carbon dioxide ...

  8. Floating Offshore Wind Technology Generating Resources Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floating Offshore Wind Technology Jeff King Generating Resources Advisory Committee May 28, 2014 1 to site) Potential interconnection to future offshore PNWCA intertie 4 #12;5 Ave wind speed >= 10 m. (2010) Large-scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (2012

  9. Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    joint probability of a household choosing each particular heating/cooling technology combination is a function of the capital and operating

  10. Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ing the Market for Home Heating and Cooling Equipment," LBLestimating the market shares of space-heating technologiesestimating the market shares of space-heating technologies

  11. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

  12. History of Science, Technology, and Medicine Choose what you want to search from these choices.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ). The default finds all the words entered and does not allow Boolean searching. 3. Use quotation marks are entered. A search for Euclidean geometry will have more results than and include the results of a searchHistory of Science, Technology, and Medicine Results Choose what you want to search from

  13. The Impact of Near-term Climate Policy Choices on Technology and Emissions Transition Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eom, Jiyong; Edmonds, James A.; Krey, Volker; Johnson, Nils; Longden, Thomas; Luderer, Gunnar; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper explores the implications of delays associated with currently formulated climate policies (compared to optimal policies) for long-term transition pathways to limit climate forcing to 450ppm CO2e on the basis of the AMPERE Work Package 2 model comparison study. The paper highlights the critical importance of the 2030-2050 period for ambitious mitigation strategies. In this period, the most rapid shift to non-greenhouse gas emitting technology occurs. In the delayed response emissions mitigation scenarios, an even faster transition rate in this period is required to compensate for the additional emissions before 2030. Our physical deployment measures indicate that, without CCS, technology deployment rates in the 2030-2050 period would become considerably high. Yet the presence of CCS greatly alleviates the challenges to the transition particularly after the delayed climate policies. The results also highlight the critical role that bioenergy and CO2 capture and storage (BECCS) could play. If this technology is available, transition pathways exceed the emissions budget in the mid-term, removing the excess with BECCS in the long term. Excluding either BE or CCS from the technology portfolio implies that emission reductions need to take place much earlier.

  14. MHK Technologies/Syphon Wave Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter < MHK TechnologiesSyphon Wave Generator

  15. Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

  16. Sustainable solar thermal power generation (STPG) technologies in Indian context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R.S. [Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources, New Delhi (India). Solar Energy Centre

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    India is a fast developing country. Some of the factors like population growth, industrialization, liberalization in economic policies, green revolution and awareness toward the environment, are increasing the electricity demand rapidly. As per the 14th Power Survey Report, an energy deficit of (+) 9% and peak demand deficit of (+) 18% have been estimated. Keeping in view the liberalization in economic policies, this deficit may be higher by the year 2000 AD. An estimation indicates that India is blessed with solar energy to the tune of 5 x 10{sup 15} kWh/yr. Being clean and inexhaustible source of energy, it can be used for large-scale power generation in the country. Keeping in view the present state-of-art technologies for STPG in MW range, best possible efforts are required to be made by all the concerned, to develop sustainable STPG technology of the future, specially for tropical regions. Standardization of vital equipment is an important aspect. There are a few required criteria like simple and robust technology, its transfer and adaptation in tropical climate conditions; high plant load factor without fossil-fired backup; availability of plant during evening peak and night hours; least use of fragile components, and capacity optimization for MW plants as per solar irradiance and environmental factors. In this paper, efforts have been made to compare the different STPG technologies. On the basis, of literature surveyed and studies carried out by the author, it may be stated that Central Receiver System technologies using molten salt and volumetric air receiver, along with molten salt and ceramic thermal storage respectively seems to be suitable and comparable in Indian context. Performance of SOLAR-TWO and PHOEBUS plants may be decisive.

  17. Super Boiler 2nd Generation Technology for Watertube Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mr. David Cygan; Dr. Joseph Rabovitser

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes Phase I of a proposed two phase project to develop and demonstrate an advanced industrial watertube boiler system with the capability of reaching 94% (HHV) fuel-to-steam efficiency and emissions below 2 ppmv NOx, 2 ppmv CO, and 1 ppmv VOC on natural gas fuel. The boiler design would have the capability to produce >1500 F, >1500 psig superheated steam, burn multiple fuels, and will be 50% smaller/lighter than currently available watertube boilers of similar capacity. This project is built upon the successful Super Boiler project at GTI. In that project that employed a unique two-staged intercooled combustion system and an innovative heat recovery system to reduce NOx to below 5 ppmv and demonstrated fuel-to-steam efficiency of 94% (HHV). This project was carried out under the leadership of GTI with project partners Cleaver-Brooks, Inc., Nebraska Boiler, a Division of Cleaver-Brooks, and Media and Process Technology Inc., and project advisors Georgia Institute of Technology, Alstom Power Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Phase I of efforts focused on developing 2nd generation boiler concepts and performance modeling; incorporating multi-fuel (natural gas and oil) capabilities; assessing heat recovery, heat transfer and steam superheating approaches; and developing the overall conceptual engineering boiler design. Based on our analysis, the 2nd generation Industrial Watertube Boiler when developed and commercialized, could potentially save 265 trillion Btu and $1.6 billion in fuel costs across U.S. industry through increased efficiency. Its ultra-clean combustion could eliminate 57,000 tons of NOx, 460,000 tons of CO, and 8.8 million tons of CO2 annually from the atmosphere. Reduction in boiler size will bring cost-effective package boilers into a size range previously dominated by more expensive field-erected boilers, benefiting manufacturers and end users through lower capital costs.

  18. Low dimension structures and devices for new generation photonic technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, D. H.; Tang, D. Y.; Chen, T. P. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 679798 (Singapore); Mei, T. [Institute of Optoelectronic Materials and Technology, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Yuan, X. C. [Institute of Modern Optics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Low dimensional structures and devices are the key technological building blocks for new generation of electronic and photonic technology. Such structures and devices show novel properties and can be integrated into systems for wide applications in many areas, including medical, biological and military and advancement of science. In this invited talk, I will present the main results achieved in our competitive research program which aims to explore the application of the mesoscopic structures in light source, manipulation and imaging and integrate them into advanced systems. In the light source aspect, we have for the first time developed graphene mode-locked lasers which are in the process of commercialization. Nanocrystal Si embedded in dielectrics was formed by ion implantation and subsequent annealing. Si light emitting devices with external quantum efficiency of about 2.9×10{sup ?3}% for visible emission were demonstrated at room temperature and the color of emitted light can be tuned electrically from violet to white by varying the injected current. In light manipulation, loss compensation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using quantum well (QW) gain media was studied theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. The SPP propagation length was effectively elongated several times through electrical pumping. One and two microring resonators based on silicon on insulator and III-V semiconductors technologies have been successfully fabricated and they can be used as filter and switch in the photonic circuit. In imaging, both SPP and low dimension structures are investigated and resolution far beyond diffraction limit in visible range has been realized. The integration of the components in the three aspects into complicated systems is on the way.

  19. The Interprofessional Project Course at Illinois Institute of Technology One Distinctive Experience Three Choices of Learning Platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, Barbara

    ­ Three Choices of Learning Platforms The multidisciplinary IPRO team project course experience is offered via three platforms that provide students a variety of choices that tap their passion and disciplinary approaches to accommodate their interests. All three IPRO platforms are designed to achieve the same learning

  20. Assessing the environmental impact of energy generating clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie, A.C.D.; McMillen, M. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Pell, J. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is a partnership between government and industry designed for cleaner and more efficient use of coal, both for electric power generation and industrial applications. Approximately seven billion dollars have been committed to the CCT program (two and half-billion dollars from DOE and the rest by industry). The potential environmental effects of CCT projects are subject to review because a proposal by DOE to cost-share a CCT project constitutes a {open_quotes}major federal action{close_quotes} under section 102(2)(c) of NEPA. Consequently, by virtue of numerous NEPA impact evaluations of CCT projects, a great deal has been learned about environmental impact analyses for coal combustion sources. In the course of NEPA review of CCT projects, air quality is often a significant environmental issue. This paper focuses on CCT air quality issues from a NEPA perspective, including Prevention of Significant Deterioration, New Source Review, atmospheric visibility, global climate change, and acidic deposition. The analyses of the impacts of the proposed action, alternative actions, and cumulative effects will be examined. (It is a {open_quotes}given{close_quotes} that any action must comply with Federal and State requirements and the provision of the Clean Air Act and other regulatory statues.) NEPA is not a permitting process, but rather it is a process to provide decision makers with the information they require make an informed decision about the potential environmental consequences of undertaking an action. The NEPA review of environmental effects has been instrumental in effectuating beneficial changes in some past CCT projects-changes that have mitigated potentially adverse environmental impacts. Accordingly, NEPA has served as a constructive analytical tool, with similar implications for other actions related to the electric power generation industry that are subject to environmental review.

  1. Insuring Electric Power for Critical Services After Disasters with Building-Sited Electric Generating Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insuring Electric Power for Critical Services After Disasters with Building-Sited Electric Generating Technologies Jerry Jackson, Associate Professor, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Abstract Electric power failures... available with new building-sited combined heat and power (CHP) electric generation technologies. This paper evaluates the physical requirements and costs of preemptively installing these new building- sited electric generation technologies to insure...

  2. Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rastler, D. M.

    Wires Manage Wires defer capital Optimize Energy Services Not Utility Business Not Utility Business New Business Opportunities DISTRIBUTED GENERATION Distributed generation includes small gas turbines, micro-turbines, fuel cells, storage...UTILITYIINDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS INVOLVING DISTRIBUTED GENERATION TECHNOLOGIES IN EVOLVING ELECTRICITY MARKETS Daniel M. Rastler Manager, Fuel Cells and Distributed Generation Electric Power Research Institute Palo Alto, California ABSTRACT...

  3. Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laura Wesson; Prapas Lohateeraparp; Jeffrey Harwell; Bor-Jier Shiau

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The principle objective of this project was to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focused on reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian-aged (Penn) sands. In order to meet this objective the characteristic curvatures (Cc) of twenty-eight anionic surfactants selected for evaluation for use in chemical flooding formulations were determined. The Cc values ranged from -6.90 to 2.55 with the majority having negative values. Crude oil samples from nine Penn sand reservoirs were analyzed for several properties pertinent to surfactant formulation for EOR application. These properties included equivalent alkane carbon numbers, total acid numbers, and viscosity. The brine samples from these same reservoirs were analyzed for several cations and for total dissolved solids. Surfactant formulations were successfully developed for eight reservoirs by the end of the project period. These formulations were comprised of a tertiary mixture of anionic surfactants. The identities of these surfactants are considered proprietary, but suffice to say the surfactants in each mixture were comprised of varying chemical structures. In addition to the successful development of surfactant formulations for EOR, there were also two successful single-well field tests conducted. There are many aspects that must be considered in the development and implementation of effective surfactant formulations. Taking into account these other aspects, there were four additional studies conducted during this project. These studies focused on the effect of the stability of surfactant formulations in the presence of polymers with an associated examination of polymer rheology, the effect of the presence of iron complexes in the brine on surfactant stability, the potential use of sacrificial agents in order to minimize the loss of surfactant to adsorption, and the effect of electrolytes on surfactant adsorption. In these last four studies the effects of such things as temperature, electrolyte concentration and the effect of different types of electrolytes were taken into consideration.

  4. Heat generation from electronics increases with the advent of high-density integrated circuit technology. To

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    circuit technology. To come up with the heat generation, microscale cooling has been thought as a promising technology. Prediction of heat transfer rate is crucial in design of microscale cooling device1 Abstract Heat generation from electronics increases with the advent of high-density integrated

  5. Motion-to-Energy (M2Eâ?¢) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking. To learn more,

  6. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    INL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  7. Fuel Cell Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model Fuel Cell Development Status Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Technology for Greener Airplanes...

  8. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    INL

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  9. Motion-to-Energy (M2E™) Power Generation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking. To learn more,

  10. Comments on US LMFBR steam generator base technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, W.R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of steam generators for the LMFBR was recognized from the onset by the AEC, now DOE, as a difficult, challenging, and high-priority task. The highly reactive nature of sodium with water/steam requires that the sodium-water/steam boundaries of LMFBR steam generators possess a degree of leak-tightness reliability not normally attempted on a commercial scale. In addition, the LMFBR steam generator is subjected to high fluid temperatures and severe thermal transients. These requirements place great demand on materials, fabrication processes, and inspection methods; and even greater demands on the designer to provide steam generators that can meet these demanding requirements, be fabricated without unreasonable shop requirements, and tolerate off-normal effects.

  11. Learning About Wind Turbine Technology, Motors and Generators...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subscribe to all future posts Who Steven Wik What Energy Electrical Machines Generators Smart Grid Why Building Subscribe You Might Also Like MunichinteriorV 10 Years ON: From...

  12. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Consumer-Segmented Vehicle Choice Modeling: the MA3T Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about consumer...

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Alternative Fuel Market Development Program- Forwarding Wisconsin’s Fuel Choice

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Wisconsin Department of Administration at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about...

  14. Next Generation Lighting Technologies (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Siminovittch, Micheal

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past several years, Michael Siminovittch, a researcher in the Environmental Energy Technologies Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has worked to package efficient lighting in an easy-to-use and good-looking lamp. His immensely popular "Berkeley Lamp" has redefined how America lights its offices.

  15. Systematic Review and Harmonization of Life Cycle GHG Emission Estimates for Electricity Generation Technologies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This powerpoint presentation to be presented at the World Renewable Energy Forum on May 14, 2012, in Denver, CO, discusses systematic review and harmonization of life cycle GHG emission estimates for electricity generation technologies.

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Next-generation Ultra-Lean Burn Powertrain

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by MAHLE Powertrain LLC at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about next-generation ultra...

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Next-Generation Ultra Lean Burn Powertrain

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by MAHLE Powertrain, LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about next-generation ultra...

  18. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION CONTROL OPTIONS: ASSESSING TRANSPORTATION AND ELECTRICITY GENERATION TECHNOLOGIES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    power generation, energy policy, fuel economy ABSTRACT Prioritizing the numerous technology and policy Publications for book titled "Energy Consumption: Impacts of Human Activity, Current and Future Challenges, Environmental and Ecological Effects," August 2013. KEY WORDS: Greenhouse gases, transportation energy, electric

  19. The Future of Combustion Turbine Technology for Industrial and Utility Power Generation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, A. D.; Simbeck, D. R.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    examines the status, economic outlook, and future directions of combustion turbine technology for industrial and utility power generation. The discussion takes into account the ongoing deregulation and increasing competition that are shaping the electric...

  20. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Systems, Subsystems, and Components, establishes a baseline for the current technology readiness status, and provides a path forward to achieve increasing levels of technical maturity.

  1. Market Power and Technological Bias: The Case of Electricity Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twomey, Paul; Neuhoff, Karsten

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , the intermittent nature of output from wind turbines and solar panels is frequently discussed as a potential obstacle to larger scale application of these tech- nologies. Contributions of 10-20% of electrical energy from individual intermittent technologies create... fixed, exogenously set, strike price. The results are not sensitive to the strike price - but further research is required to assess the impact of multiple types of option contracts with different strike prices. The outline of this paper is as follows...

  2. Next generation sequencing (NGS)technologies and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vuyisich, Momchilo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    NGS technology overview: (1) NGS library preparation - Nucleic acids extraction, Sample quality control, RNA conversion to cDNA, Addition of sequencing adapters, Quality control of library; (2) Sequencing - Clonal amplification of library fragments, (except PacBio), Sequencing by synthesis, Data output (reads and quality); and (3) Data analysis - Read mapping, Genome assembly, Gene expression, Operon structure, sRNA discovery, and Epigenetic analyses.

  3. Combustion technology developments in power generation in response to environmental challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    and clean coal-fired systems. The most promising of these include pulverized coal combustionCombustion technology developments in power generation in response to environmental challenges J.M. Bee´r* Department of Chemical Engineering, Room 66-548, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  4. Design Features and Technology Uncertainties for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John M. Ryskamp; Phil Hildebrandt; Osamu Baba; Ron Ballinger; Robert Brodsky; Hans-Wolfgang Chi; Dennis Crutchfield; Herb Estrada; Jeane-Claude Garnier; Gerald Gordon; Richard Hobbins; Dan Keuter; Marilyn Kray; Philippe Martin; Steve Melancon; Christian Simon; Henry Stone; Robert Varrin; Werner von Lensa

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the conclusions, observations, and recommendations of the Independent Technology Review Group (ITRG) regarding design features and important technology uncertainties associated with very-high-temperature nuclear system concepts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The ITRG performed its reviews during the period November 2003 through April 2004.

  5. Teaching Sodium Fast Reactor Technology and Operation for the Present and Future Generations of SFR Users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Teaching Sodium Fast Reactor Technology and Operation for the Present and Future Generations of SFR or development of sodium fast reactors and related experimental facilities. The sum of courses provided by CEA on sodium fast reactor design, technology, safety and operation experience, decommissioning aspects

  6. The role of advanced technology in the future of the power generation industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel, T.F.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation reviews the directions that technology has given the power generation industry in the past and how advanced technology will be the key for the future of the industry. The topics of the presentation include how the industry`s history has defined its culture, how today`s economic and regulatory climate has constrained its strategy, and how certain technology options might give some of the players an unfair advantage.

  7. Novel Thermal Storage Technologies for Concentrating Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neti, Sudhakar; Oztekin, Alparslan; Chen, John; Tuzla, Kemal; Misiolek, Wojciech

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The technologies that are to be developed in this work will enable storage of thermal energy in 100 MWe solar energy plants for 6-24 hours at temperatures around 300oC and 850oC using encapsulated phase change materials (EPCM). Several encapsulated phase change materials have been identified, fabricated and proven with calorimetry. Two of these materials have been tested in an airflow experiment. A cost analysis for these thermal energy storage systems has also been conducted that met the targets established at the initiation of the project.

  8. Fuel Cell Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies Program (FCTP) (Fact Sheet) |Energy 12Kathy4

  9. Overview of Progress in Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartmentOutreach toTransmissionProgramTechnologiesCells

  10. MHK Technologies/Current Electric Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK Projects JumpPlane < MHKGenerator.jpg Technology

  11. MHK Technologies/Electric Generating Wave Pipe | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK Projects JumpPlaneElectric Buoy.jpg Technology

  12. MHK Technologies/Gyroscopic wave power generation system | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK ProjectsFlagship < MHK Technologies

  13. MHK Technologies/Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter < MHK Technologies Jump to:SihwaEnergy

  14. MHK Technologies/Submergible Power Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter < MHK Technologies Jump

  15. MHK Technologies/The Linear Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter < MHKDUCK < MHK Technologies

  16. MHK Technologies/Water Current Generator Motor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAG Buoy < MHK TechnologiesWEPTOSNZWAP

  17. MHK Technologies/Yu Oscillating Generator YOG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAG BuoyYOG < MHK Technologies Jump

  18. MHK Technologies/Floating wave Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK Projects JumpPlaneElectricBuoy.jpgGenerator < MHK

  19. MHK Technologies/KESC Tidal Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK ProjectsFlagship <HelixKESC Tidal Generator <

  20. Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice, Vehicle...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice, Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) (Fact Sheet) Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice, Vehicle...

  1. Recommendations for Modernization of Solid Waste Management Practices in Class -I Cities -Suggestions on Choice of Technology in Indian Context

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    , formed on 16.01.98 in response to a PIL (Public Interest Litigation WP(C) 888/96 ­ Almitra Patel, root growth and soil moisture retention. Beware of Expensive & Unproven Technology ­ Local bodies). This is very important for protecting proposed and even existing sites from demands for shift

  2. New generation enrichment monitoring technology for gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexandrov, Boian S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Thomas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macarthur, Duncan W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marks, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moss, Calvin E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheppard, Gregory A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The continuous enrichment monitor, developed and fielded in the 1990s by the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided a go-no-go capability to distinguish between UF{sub 6} containing low enriched (approximately 4% {sup 235}U) and highly enriched (above 20% {sup 235}U) uranium. This instrument used the 22-keV line from a {sup 109}Cd source as a transmission source to achieve a high sensitivity to the UF{sub 6} gas absorption. The 1.27-yr half-life required that the source be periodically replaced and the instrument recalibrated. The instrument's functionality and accuracy were limited by the fact that measured gas density and gas pressure were treated as confidential facility information. The modern safeguarding of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant producing low-enriched UF{sub 6} product aims toward a more quantitative flow and enrichment monitoring concept that sets new standards for accuracy stability, and confidence. An instrument must be accurate enough to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of material, have virtually zero false alarms, and protect the operator's proprietary process information. We discuss a new concept for advanced gas enrichment assay measurement technology. This design concept eliminates the need for the periodic replacement of a radioactive source as well as the need for maintenance by experts. Some initial experimental results will be presented.

  3. Coal-fired power generation: Proven technologies and pollution control systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balat, M. [University of Mah, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last two decades, significant advances have been made in the reduction of emissions from coal-fired power generating plants. New technologies include better understanding of the fundamentals of the formation and destruction of criteria pollutants in combustion processes (low nitrogen oxides burners) and improved methods for separating criteria pollutants from stack gases (FGD technology), as well as efficiency improvements in power plants (clean coal technologies). Future demand for more environmentally benign electric power, however, will lead to even more stringent controls of pollutants (sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) and greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide.

  4. HPI Future SOC Lab: Call for Projects Next generation technology, such as multicore CPUs as well as increasing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weske, Mathias

    - Memory Computing Technology (SAP HANA). The SAP Business ByDesign systemHPI Future SOC Lab: Call for Projects Next generation technology, such as multicore, developers of service-oriented computing systems have to understand

  5. Technology status and project development risks of advanced coal power generation technologies in APEC developing economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusica, N.; Xie, T.; Lu, T.

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report reviews the current status of IGCC and supercritical/ultrasupercritical pulverized-coal power plants and summarizes risks associated with project development, construction and operation. The report includes an economic analysis using three case studies of Chinese projects; a supercritical PC, an ultrasupercritical PC, and an IGCC plant. The analysis discusses barriers to clean coal technologies and ways to encourage their adoption for new power plants. 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  6. Updated Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Halsey, William [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hayner, George [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Program will address the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. Such R&D will be guided by the technology roadmap developed for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) over two years with the participation of over 100 experts from the GIF countries. The roadmap evaluated over 100 future systems proposed by researchers around the world. The scope of the R&D described in the roadmap covers the six most promising Generation IV systems. The effort ended in December 2002 with the issue of the final Generation IV Technology Roadmap [1.1]. The six most promising systems identified for next generation nuclear energy are described within the roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor - SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor - GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor - LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor - SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides, and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. Accordingly, DOE has identified materials as one of the focus areas for Gen IV technology development.

  7. Laboratory Glass Columns "Next Generation" technology for high-performance preparative chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    SNAP ® Laboratory Glass Columns "Next Generation" technology for high-performance preparative lesiones graves o la muerte! WARNING Glass SNAP® columns are intended for use in a liquid environment disassembly or cleaning for scratches, chips or defects, particularly on the glass surfaces. DO NOT use column

  8. Competitiveness of Second Generation Biofuel Feedstocks: Role of Technology and Policy (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, Madhu

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Madhu Khanna from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute on "Competitiveness of Second Generation Biofuel Feedstocks: Role of Technology and Policy" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  9. N-PERT BACK JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS: AN OPTION FOR THE NEXT INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY GENERATION?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are introducing a new solar cell design: the Passivated Emitter and Rear Cell (PERC), which features a full-PERT (Passivated Emitter, Rear Totally Diffused) solar cells with a processing sequence based on an industrialN-PERT BACK JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS: AN OPTION FOR THE NEXT INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY GENERATION? Bianca

  10. General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement: A structural sensitivity analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : C61 C68 D58 Q43 Keywords: Carbon policy Energy modeling Electric power sector Bottom-up Top of generation technologies and the overall electricity system. By construction, these models are partial equilib of an integrated representation of economic and electricity systems makes simplifying assumptions appealing

  11. Competitiveness of Second Generation Biofuel Feedstocks: Role of Technology and Policy (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Khanna, Madhu

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Madhu Khanna from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute on "Competitiveness of Second Generation Biofuel Feedstocks: Role of Technology and Policy" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  12. ARE660 Wind Generator: Low Wind Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Preus; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is for the design of a wind turbine that can generate most or all of the net energy required for homes and small businesses in moderately windy areas. The purpose is to expand the current market for residential wind generators by providing cost effective power in a lower wind regime than current technology has made available, as well as reduce noise and improve reliability and safety. Robert W. Preus’ experience designing and/or maintaining residential wind generators of many configurations helped identify the need for an improved experience of safety for the consumer. Current small wind products have unreliable or no method of stopping the wind generator in fault or high wind conditions. Consumers and their neighbors do not want to hear their wind generators. In addition, with current technology, only sites with unusually high wind speeds provide payback times that are acceptable for the on-grid user. Abundant Renewable Energy’s (ARE) basic original concept for the ARE660 was a combination of a stall controlled variable speed small wind generator and automatic fail safe furling for shutdown. The stall control for a small wind generator is not novel, but has not been developed for a variable speed application with a permanent magnet alternator (PMA). The fail safe furling approach for shutdown has not been used to our knowledge.

  13. This article describes recent activities in the area of RF integrated circuits First, transceiver architectures developed for cellular and cordless telephone standards are presented. Next, the choice of device technology is discussed, and the design of bu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razavi, Behzad

    , the choice of device technology is discussed, and the design of building blocks such as low-noise amplifiers (formerly AT&T Microelectron- ics) offers a single-chip solution that, along with a low-noise amplifier (LNA and mixers, oscillators, and power amplifiers is described. Last, some of the emerging applications of RF

  14. Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

    2005-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The nation's power system is facing a diverse and broad set of challenges. These range from restructuring and increased competitiveness in power production to the need for additional production and distribution capacity to meet demand growth, and demands for increased quality and reliability of power and power supply. In addition, there are growing concerns about emissions from fossil fuel powered generation units and generators are seeking methods to reduce the CO{sub 2} emission intensity of power generation. Although these challenges may create uncertainty within the financial and electricity supply markets, they also offer the potential to explore new opportunities to support the accelerated deployment of cleaner and cost-effective technologies to meet such challenges. The federal government and various state governments, for example, support the development of a sustainable electricity infrastructure. As part of this policy, there are a variety of programs to support the development of ''cleaner'' technologies such as combined heat and power (CHP, or cogeneration) and renewable energy technologies. Energy from renewable energy sources, such as solar, wind, hydro, and biomass, are considered carbon-neutral energy technologies. The production of renewable energy creates no incremental increase in fossil fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. Electricity and thermal energy production from all renewable resources, except biomass, produces no incremental increase in air pollutants such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, particulate matter, and carbon monoxide. There are many more opportunities for the development of cleaner electricity and thermal energy technologies called ''recycled'' energy. A process using fossil fuels to produce an energy service may have residual energy waste streams that may be recycled into useful energy services. Recycled energy methods would capture energy from sources that would otherwise be unused and convert it to electricity or useful thermal energy. Recycled energy produces no or little increase in fossil fuel consumption and pollutant emissions. Examples of energy recycling methods include industrial gasification technologies to increase energy recovery, as well as less traditional CHP technologies, and the use of energy that is typically discarded from pressure release vents or from the burning and flaring of waste streams. These energy recovery technologies have the ability to reduce costs for power generation. This report is a preliminary study of the potential contribution of this ''new'' generation of clean recycled energy supply technologies to the power supply of the United States. For each of the technologies this report provides a short technical description, as well as an estimate of the potential for application in the U.S., estimated investment and operation costs, as well as impact on air pollutant emission reductions. The report summarizes the potential magnitude of the benefits of these new technologies. The report does not yet provide a robust cost-benefit analysis. It is stressed that the report provides a preliminary assessment to help focus future efforts by the federal government to further investigate the opportunities offered by new clean power generation technologies, as well as initiate policies to support further development and uptake of clean power generation technologies.

  15. Influence of Climate Change Mitigation Technology on Global Demands of Water for Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Dooley, James J.; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.

    2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Globally, electricity generation accounts for a large and potentially growing water demand, and as such is an important component to assessments of global and regional water scarcity. However, the current suite—as well as potential future suites—of thermoelectric generation technologies has a very wide range of water demand intensities, spanning two orders of magnitude. As such, the evolution of the generation mix is important for the future water demands of the sector. This study uses GCAM, an integrated assessment model, to analyze the global electric sector’s water demands in three futures of climate change mitigation policy and two technology strategies. We find that despite five- to seven-fold expansion of the electric sector as a whole from 2005 to 2095, global electric sector water withdrawals remain relatively stable, due to the retirement of existing power plants with water-intensive once-through flow cooling systems. In the scenarios examined here, climate policies lead to the large-scale deployment of advanced, low-emissions technologies such as carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), concentrating solar power, and engineered geothermal systems. In particular, we find that the large-scale deployment of CCS technologies does not increase long-term water consumption from hydrocarbon-fueled power generation as compared with a no-policy scenario without CCS. Moreover, in sensitivity scenarios where low-emissions electricity technologies are required to use dry cooling systems, we find that the consequent additional costs and efficiency reductions do not limit the utility of these technologies in achieving cost-effective whole-system emissions mitigation.

  16. Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes how Learning-by-Doing (LBD) is implemented endogenously in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for generating plants. LBD is experiential learning that correlates to a generating technology's capacity growth. The annual amount of Learning-by-Doing affects the annual overnight cost reduction. Currently, there is no straightforward way to integrate and make sense of all the diffuse information related to the endogenous learning calculation in NEMS. This paper organizes the relevant information from the NEMS documentation, source code, input files, and output files, in order to make the model's logic more accessible. The end results are shown in three ways: in a simple spreadsheet containing all the parameters related to endogenous learning; by an algorithm that traces how the parameters lead to cost reductions; and by examples showing how AEO 2004 forecasts the reduction of overnight costs for generating technologies over time.

  17. Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This final technical report covers the period October 1, 1995 to February 29, 2008. This chapter begins with an overview of the history of Enhanced Oil Recovery techniques and specifically, CO2 flood. Subsequent chapters conform to the manner consistent with the Activities, Tasks, and Sub-tasks of the project as originally provided in Exhibit C1 in the Project Management Plan dated September 20, 1995. These chapters summarize the objectives, status and conclusions of the major project activities performed during the project period. The report concludes by describing technology transfer activities stemming from the project and providing a reference list of all publications of original research work generated by the project team or by others regarding this project. The overall objective of this project was a final research and development in the United States a technology that was developed at the Institute for Geology and Development of Fossil Fuels in Moscow, Russia. Before the technology can be convincingly adopted by United States oil and gas producers, the laboratory research was conducted at Mew Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experimental studies were conducted to measure the volume and the pressure of the CO{sub 2} gas generated according to the new Russian technology. Two experimental devices were designed, built and used at New Mexico Tech facilities for these purposes. The designed setup allowed initiating and controlling the reaction between the 'gas-yielding' (GY) and 'gas-forming' (GF) agents proposed by Russian technology. The temperature was controlled, and the generated gas pressure and volume were recorded during the reaction process. Additionally, the effect of surfactant addition on the effectiveness of the process was studied. An alternative GY reactant was tested in order to increase the efficiency of the CO2 gas generation process. The slim tube and the core flood experimental studies were conducted to define the sweep efficiency of the in-situ generated CO{sub 2} gas. A set of core flood experiments were conducted to define effect of surfactant on recovery efficiency. The results demonstrated obvious advantages of the foamy system over the brine solution in order to achieve higher sweep efficiency and recovery coefficient. It is shown that a slug injection is not an efficient method for mixing GY and GF solutions and it can't generate considerable gas inside the slim-tube.

  18. 11.11.2004 08:48:00 GMT China aims to employ nuclear fusion technology in power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Search 11.11.2004 08:48:00 GMT China aims to employ nuclear fusion technology in power generation to employ nuclear fusion technologies in power generation by 2050. China will adopt a three-step strategy with thermonuclear reactors; the second step aims to raise the utilization rate of nuclear fuels from the current 1

  19. Considerations Associated with Reactor Technology Selection for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the inception of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and during predecessor activities, alternative reactor technologies have been evaluated to determine the technology that best fulfills the functional and performance requirements of the targeted energy applications and market. Unlike the case of electric power generation where the reactor performance is primarily expressed in terms of economics, the targeted energy applications involve industrial applications that have specific needs in terms of acceptable heat transport fluids and the associated thermodynamic conditions. Hence, to be of interest to these industrial energy applications, the alternative reactor technologies are weighed in terms of the reactor coolant/heat transport fluid, achievable reactor outlet temperature, and practicality of operations to achieve the very high reliability demands associated with the petrochemical, petroleum, metals and related industries. These evaluations have concluded that the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) can uniquely provide the required ranges of energy needs for these target applications, do so with promising economics, and can be commercialized with reasonable development risk in the time frames of current industry interest – i.e., within the next 10-15 years.

  20. Application and development of technologies for engine-condition-based maintenance of emergency diesel generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, K. H.; Sang, G.; Choi, L. Y. S.; Lee, B. O. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company Central Research Institue, 70, 1312 -gil Yuseong-daero Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergency diesel generator (EDG) of a nuclear power plant has the role of supplying emergency electric power to protect the reactor core system in the event of the loss of offsite power supply. Therefore, EDGs should be subject to periodic surveillance testing to verify their ability to supply specified frequencies and voltages at design power levels within a limited time. To maintain optimal reliability of EDGs, condition monitoring/diagnosis technologies must be developed. Changing from periodic disassemble maintenance to condition-based maintenance (CBM) according to predictions of equipment condition is recommended. In this paper, the development of diagnosis technology for CBM and the application of a diesel engine condition-analysis system are described. (authors)

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Cummins at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ATP-LD; Cummins next generation tier...

  2. The effects of technological change, experience and environmental regulation on the construction of coal-burning generating units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an empirical analysis of the technological, regulatory and organizational factors that have influenced the costs of building coal-burning steam-electric generating units over the past twenty year. We ...

  3. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  4. Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of International Learning on Technology Cost. In Issues ofbetween initial new technology cost estimates and actualthe revolutionary technologies have cost reductions beyond

  5. Treatment technologies for hazardous ashes generated from possible incineration of navy waste. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, T.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Navy recognizes that thermal treatment of Navy hazardous wastes (HW) should, under the terms of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, be avoided. Combustion waste disposal may nonetheless become unavoidable in certain cases, even after all possible process enhancements that avoid HW production are implemented. Even then, some toxic constituents that may be present in the waste will not be destroyed by incineration and will persist in the ash residue produced by incineration. Such incinerator ashes will have to be disposed of in HW landfills. The Navy is thus evaluating methods of treatment of such ash to remove or immobilize the toxic constituents that persist following incineration in order to render the waste treatment residue nonhazardous. Appropriate technology identified in this work can be applied to ash produced by HW combuster operated by the Navy, if any, or be required for ash produced by commercial generators handling Navy HWs.

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

  7. Life Cycle analysis data and results for geothermal and other electricity generation technologies

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    Life cycle analysis (LCA) is an environmental assessment method that quantifies the environmental performance of a product system over its entire lifetime, from cradle to grave. Based on a set of relevant metrics, the method is aptly suited for comparing the environmental performance of competing products systems. This file contains LCA data and results for electric power production including geothermal power. The LCA for electric power has been broken down into two life cycle stages, namely plant and fuel cycles. Relevant metrics include the energy ratio and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios, where the former is the ratio of system input energy to total lifetime electrical energy out and the latter is the ratio of the sum of all incurred greenhouse gases (in CO2 equivalents) divided by the same energy output. Specific information included herein are material to power (MPR) ratios for a range of power technologies for conventional thermoelectric, renewables (including three geothermal power technologies), and coproduced natural gas/geothermal power. For the geothermal power scenarios, the MPRs include the casing, cement, diesel, and water requirements for drilling wells and topside piping. Also included herein are energy and GHG ratios for plant and fuel cycle stages for the range of considered electricity generating technologies. Some of this information are MPR data extracted directly from the literature or from models (eg. ICARUS – a subset of ASPEN models) and others (energy and GHG ratios) are results calculated using GREET models and MPR data. MPR data for wells included herein were based on the Argonne well materials model and GETEM well count results.

  8. Life Cycle analysis data and results for geothermal and other electricity generation technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, John

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Life cycle analysis (LCA) is an environmental assessment method that quantifies the environmental performance of a product system over its entire lifetime, from cradle to grave. Based on a set of relevant metrics, the method is aptly suited for comparing the environmental performance of competing products systems. This file contains LCA data and results for electric power production including geothermal power. The LCA for electric power has been broken down into two life cycle stages, namely plant and fuel cycles. Relevant metrics include the energy ratio and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios, where the former is the ratio of system input energy to total lifetime electrical energy out and the latter is the ratio of the sum of all incurred greenhouse gases (in CO2 equivalents) divided by the same energy output. Specific information included herein are material to power (MPR) ratios for a range of power technologies for conventional thermoelectric, renewables (including three geothermal power technologies), and coproduced natural gas/geothermal power. For the geothermal power scenarios, the MPRs include the casing, cement, diesel, and water requirements for drilling wells and topside piping. Also included herein are energy and GHG ratios for plant and fuel cycle stages for the range of considered electricity generating technologies. Some of this information are MPR data extracted directly from the literature or from models (eg. ICARUS – a subset of ASPEN models) and others (energy and GHG ratios) are results calculated using GREET models and MPR data. MPR data for wells included herein were based on the Argonne well materials model and GETEM well count results.

  9. Important requirements for RF generators for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.; Lawrence, G.P.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All Accelerator-Driven Transmutation applications require very large amounts of RF Power. For example, one version of a Plutonium burning system requires an 800-MeV, 80-mA, proton accelerator running at 100% duty factor. This accelerator requires approximately 110-MW of continuous RF power if one assumes only 10% reserve power for control of the accelerator fields. In fact, to minimize beam spill, the RF controls may need as much as 15 to 20% of reserve power. In addition, unlike an electron accelerator in which the beam is relativistic, a failed RF station can disturb the synchronism of the beam, possibly shutting down the entire accelerator. These issues and more lead to a set of requirements for the RF generators which are stringent, and in some cases, conflicting. In this paper, we will describe the issues and requirements, and outline a plan for RF generator development to meet the needs of the Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies. The key issues which will be discussed include: operating efficiency, operating linearity, effect on the input power grid, bandwidth, gain, reliability, operating voltage, and operating current.

  10. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward for 750–800°C Reactor Outlet Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the NGNP Critical PASSCs and defines their technical maturation path through Technology Development Roadmaps (TDRMs) and their associated Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). As the critical PASSCs advance through increasing levels of technical maturity, project risk is reduced and the likelihood of within-budget and on-schedule completion is enhanced. The current supplier-generated TRLs and TDRMs for a 750–800°C reactor outlet temperature (ROT) specific to each supplier are collected in Appendix A.

  11. The impact of instrument choice on investment in abatement technologies: a case study of tax versus trade incentives for CCS and Biomass for electricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laing, T; Grubb, Michael

    over damages or the social cost of carbon can be seen in Figure 1. Estimates for 2050, even for this specific model vary by a factor of more than twenty. The uncertainties can be grouped into two basic areas. The first concerns the likely ‘cost... to be larger for regulators than for firms due to asymmetric information between the parties. 3 Figure 1: Social cost of carbon over time, Hope and Newberry (2008) Our aim is to investigate the impact that the choice of instruments has on firm...

  12. Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 2002, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (Gen IV) Program has addressed the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. The six most promising systems identified for next-generation nuclear energy are described within this roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor-SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor-VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor-GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor-LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor-SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. At the inception of DOE's Gen IV program, it was decided to significantly pursue five of the six concepts identified in the Gen IV roadmap to determine which of them was most appropriate to meet the needs of future U.S. nuclear power generation. In particular, evaluation of the highly efficient thermal SCWR and VHTR reactors was initiated primarily for energy production, and evaluation of the three fast reactor concepts, SFR, LFR, and GFR, was begun to assess viability for both energy production and their potential contribution to closing the fuel cycle. Within the Gen IV Program itself, only the VHTR class of reactors was selected for continued development. Hence, this document will address the multiple activities under the Gen IV program that contribute to the development of the VHTR. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. The focus of this document will be the overall range of DOE's structural materials research activities being conducted to support VHTR development. By far, the largest portion of material's R&D supporting VHTR development is that being performed directly as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Supplementary VHTR materials R&D being performed in the DOE program, including university and international research programs and that being performed under direct contracts with the American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, will also be described. Specific areas of high-priority materials research that will be needed to deploy the NGNP and provide a basis for subsequent VHTRs are described, including the following: (1) Graphite: (a) Extensive unirradiated materials characterization and assessment of irradiation effects on properties must be performed to qualify new grades of graphite for nuclear service, including thermo-physical and mechanical properties and their changes, statistical variations from billot-to-billot and lot-to-lot, creep, and especially, irradiation creep. (b) Predictive models, as well as codification of the requirements and design methods for graphite core supports, must be developed to provide a basis for licensing. (2) Ceramics: Both fibrous and load-bearing ceramics must be qualified for environmental and radiation service as insulating materials. (3) Ceramic Composites: Carbon-carbon and SiC-SiC composites must be qualified for specialized usage in selected high-temperature components, such as core stabilizers, control rods, and insulating covers and ducting. This will require development of component-specific designs and fabrication processes, materials characterization, assessment of environmental and irradiation effects, and establishment of codes and standards for materials testing and design requirements. (4) Pressure Vessel Steels: (a) Qualification of short-term, high-temperature properties of light water rea

  13. FirstChoice Investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    FirstChoice Wholesale Investments Product Disclosure Statement Including FirstRate Wholesale Saver and FirstRate Wholesale Term Deposits This is a combined Financial Services Guide and Product Disclosure in FirstChoice Wholesale Investments 1 3 How FirstChoice Wholesale Investments works 2 4 Risks of investing

  14. HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM PLASMATRON REFORMERS: A PROMISING TECHNOLOGY FOR NOX ADSORBER REGENERATION AND OTHER AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bromberg, L.; Crane, S; Rabinovich, A.; Kong, Y; Cohn, D; Heywood, J; Alexeev, N.; Samokhin, A.

    2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasmatron reformers are being developed at MIT and ArvinMeritor [1]. In these reformers a special low power electrical discharge is used to promote partial oxidation conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into hydrogen and CO. The partial oxidation reaction of this very fuel rich mixture is difficult to initiate. The plasmatron provides continuous enhanced volume initiation. To minimize electrode erosion and electrical power requirements, a low current, high voltage discharge with wide area electrodes is used. The reformers operate at or slightly above atmospheric pressure. Plasmatron reformers provide the advantages of rapid startup and transient response; efficient conversion of the fuel to hydrogen rich gas; compact size; relaxation or elimination of reformer catalyst requirements; and capability to process difficult to reform fuels, such as diesel and bio-oils. These advantages facilitate use of onboard hydrogen-generation technology for diesel exhaust after-treatment. Plasma-enhanced reformer technology can provide substantial conversion even without the use of a catalyst. Recent progress includes a substantial decrease in electrical power consumption (to about 200 W), increased flow rate (above 1 g/s of diesel fuel corresponding to approximately 40 kW of chemical energy), soot suppression and improvements in other operational features.. Plasmatron reformer technology has been evaluated for regeneration of NOx adsorber after-treatment systems. At ArvinMeritor tests were performed on a dual-leg NOx adsorber system using a Cummins 8.3L diesel engine both in a test cell and on a vehicle. A NOx adsorber system was tested using the plasmatron reformer as a regenerator and without the reformer i.e., with straight diesel fuel based regeneration as the baseline case. The plasmatron reformer was shown to improve NOx regeneration significantly compared to the baseline diesel case. The net result of these initial tests was a significant decrease in fuel penalty, roughly 50% at moderate adsorber temperatures. This fuel penalty improvement is accompanied by a dramatic drop in slipped hydrocarbon emissions, which decreased by 90% or more. Significant advantages are demonstrated across a wide range of engine conditions and temperatures. The study also indicated the potential to regenerate NOx adsorbers at low temperatures where diesel fuel based regeneration is not effective, such as those typical of idle conditions. Two vehicles, a bus and a light duty truck, have been equipped for plasmatron reformer NOx adsorber regeneration tests.

  15. Research and Development Technology Development Roadmaps for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian McKirdy

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for process heat, hydrogen and electricity production. The reactor will be graphite moderated with helium as the primary coolant and may be either prismatic or pebble-bed. Although, final design features have not yet been determined. Research and Development (R&D) activities are proceeding on those known plant systems to mature the technology, codify the materials for specific applications, and demonstrate the component and system viability in NGNP relevant and integrated environments. Collectively these R&D activities serve to reduce the project risk and enhance the probability of on-budget, on-schedule completion and NRC licensing. As the design progresses, in more detail, toward final design and approval for construction, selected components, which have not been used in a similar application, in a relevant environment nor integrated with other components and systems, must be tested to demonstrate viability at reduced scales and simulations prior to full scale operation. This report and its R&D TDRMs present the path forward and its significance in assuring technical readiness to perform the desired function by: Choreographing the integration between design and R&D activities; and proving selected design components in relevant applications.

  16. Trinity College launches Computer Science Initiative for the 21st Century -Google supports next generation of technology leaders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    Trinity College launches Computer Science Initiative for the 21st Century Classroom - Google supports next generation of technology leaders Friday, 31 May 2013: Trinity College Dublin today announcedst Century Computer Science Teaching Skills, developed by the Trinity Access 21 network in Trinity

  17. Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Arc Steelmaking - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald R. Fosnacht; Iwao Iwasaki; Richard F. Kiesel; David J. Englund; David W. Hendrickson; Rodney L. Bleifuss

    2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The current trend in the steel industry is a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces, and an increasing number of alternative processes using metallic scrap iron, pig iron and metallized iron ore products. Currently, iron ores from Minnesota and Michigan are pelletized and shipped to the lower Great Lakes ports as blast furnace feed. The existing transportation system and infrastructure is geared to handling these bulk materials. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the needs of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling. A recent commercial installation employing Kobe Steel’s ITmk3 process, was installed in Northeastern Minnesota. The basic process uses a moving hearth furnace to directly reduce iron oxides to metallic iron from a mixture of iron ore, coals and additives. The resulting products can be shipped using the existing infrastructure for use in various steelmaking processes. The technology reportedly saves energy by 30% over the current integrated steelmaking process and reduces emissions by more than 40%. A similar large-scale pilot plant campaign is also currently in progress using JFE Steel’s Hi-QIP process in Japan. The objective of this proposal is to build upon and improve the technology demonstrated by Kobe Steel and JFE, by further reducing cost, improving quality and creating added incentive for commercial development. This project expands previous research conducted at the University of Minnesota Duluth’s Natural Resources Research Institute and that reported by Kobe and JFE Steel. Three major issues have been identified and are addressed in this project for producing high-quality nodular reduced iron (NRI) at low cost: (1) reduce the processing temperature, (2) control the furnace gas atmosphere over the NRI, and (3) effectively use sub-bituminous coal as a reductant. From over 4000 laboratory tube and box furnace tests, it was established that the correct combination of additives, fluxes, and reductant while controlling the concentration of CO and CO2 in the furnace atmosphere (a) lowers the operating temperature, (b) decreases the use of reductant coal (c) generates less micro nodules of iron, and (d) promotes desulphurization. The laboratory scale work was subsequently verified on 12.2 m (40 ft) long pilot scale furnace. High quality NRI could be produced on a routine basis using the pilot furnace facility with energy provided from oxy-gas or oxy-coal burner technologies. Specific strategies were developed to allow the use of sub-bituminous coals both as a hearth material and as part of the reaction mixture. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to study the overall carbothermic reduction and smelting process. The movement of the furnace gas on a pilot hearth furnace and larger simulated furnaces and various means of controlling the gas atmosphere were evaluated. Various atmosphere control methods were identified and tested during the course of the investigation. Based on the results, the appropriate modifications to the furnace were made and tested at the pilot scale. A series of reduction and smelting tests were conducted to verify the utility of the processing conditions. During this phase, the overall energy use characteristics, raw materials, alternative fuels, and the overall economics predicted for full scale implementation were analyzed. The results indicate that it should be possible to lower reaction temperatures while simultaneously producing low sulfur, high carbon NRI if the right mix chemistry and atmosphere are employed. Recommendations for moving the technology to the next stage of commercialization are presented.

  18. Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Jun

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Air Amendments helped lower the cost of natural gas turbines vis-a-vis coal based technologies.

  19. A REVIEW OF ASSUMPTIONS AND ANALYSIS IN EPRI EA-3409, "HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE CHOICE: REVISION OF REEPS BEHAVIORAL MODELS"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of residential space heating technology choice. That choicemarket for space heating technologies. EPRI modeled thesethe selection of space heating technology. It is more likely

  20. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Next Generation SCR-Dosing System Investigation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about next...

  1. Characterization of alternative electric generation technologies for the SPS comparative assessment: volume 2, central-station technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SPS Concept Development and Evaluation Program includes a comparative assessment. An early first step in the assessment process is the selection and characterization of alternative technologies. This document describes the cost and performance (i.e., technical and environmental) characteristics of six central station energy alternatives: (1) conventional coal-fired powerplant; (2) conventional light water reactor (LWR); (3) combined cycle powerplant with low-Btu gasifiers; (4) liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR); (5) photovoltaic system without storage; and (6) fusion reactor.

  2. Task 3.14 - Demonstration of Technologies for Remote Power Generation in Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Jones

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In over 165 villages in Alaska, the use of fossil fuel supplies or renewable energy resources could greatly reduce the cost of electricity and space heating. Currently, diesel generators are the most commonly used electrical generating systems; however, high fuel costs result in extremely high electrical power costs reIative to the lower 48 states. The reduction of fuel costs associated with the use of indigenous, locally available fuels running modular, high-efficiency power- generating systems would be extremely beneficial.

  3. Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biogas digester systems can generate electricity and thermal energy to serve heatingbiogas (mostly methane) can be captured and used to provide energy services either by direct heating

  4. Converting Limbo Lands to Energy-Generating Stations: Renewable Energy Technologies on Underused, Formerly Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, G.; Heimiller, D.; Dahle, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Brady-Sabeff, L.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the potential for using 'Limbo Lands' (underused, formerly contaminated sites, landfills, brownfields, abandoned mine lands, etc. ) as sites for renewable energy generating stations.

  5. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Ruchi; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of addition of renewable resources- solar and wind in the distribution system as deployed in the SGIG projects.

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Next Generation Environmentally Friendly Driving Feedback Systems Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by University of California at Riverside at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about next...

  7. Next Generation Safety Performance Monitoring at Signalized Intersections Using Connected Vehicle Technology 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zha, Liteng

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    and prone to human errors. The advent of connected vehicle technology allows vehicles to communicate with each other as well as infrastructure wirelessly. Through this platform, vehicle movements and signal status at the facilities can be automatically...

  8. Next Generation Safety Performance Monitoring at Signalized Intersections Using Connected Vehicle Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zha, Liteng

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    and prone to human errors. The advent of connected vehicle technology allows vehicles to communicate with each other as well as infrastructure wirelessly. Through this platform, vehicle movements and signal status at the facilities can be automatically...

  9. Entrepreneurial Tech-Ed. : using technology to fuel income generation education in rural Ghana/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossman, Breanna Faye

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates how decentralization of development occurs through merging small-scale technology hubs into the rural West African fabric by integrating with the secondary school system. This model redefines the ...

  10. General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

    Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

  11. Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaney, L.; Thundiyil, K.; Chidambaram, S.; Abbi, Y. P.; Anderson, S.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper quantifies the mobile air-conditioning fuel consumption of the typical Indian vehicle, exploring potential fuel savings and emissions reductions these systems for the next generation of vehicles.

  12. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies – Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a “solar hydrogen economy” has been projected. Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

  13. Illuminating Solar Decathlon Homes: Exploring Next Generation Lighting Technology - Light Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared by PNNL for the US Department of Energy Building Technologies Program, Solid-State Lighting Program. The report will be provided to teams of university students who are building houses for the 2009 Solar Decathlon, a home design competition sponsored in part by DOE, to encourage teams to build totally solar powered homes. One aspect of the competition is lighting. This report provides the teams with information about LED lighting that can help them determine how they incorporate LED lighting into their homes. The report provides an overview of LED technology, a status of where LED technology is today, questions and answers about lighting quality, efficiency, lifetime etc.; numerous examples of LED products; and several weblinks for further research.

  14. Marine Tidal Current Electric Power Generation Technology: State of the Art and Current Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    resurgence in development of renewable ocean energy technology. Therefore, several demonstration projects appreciated as a vast renewable energy source. The energy is stored in oceans partly as thermal energy, partly categories: wave energy, marine and tidal current energy, ocean thermal energy, energy from salinity

  15. Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rastler, D. M.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wires Manage Wires defer capital Optimize Energy Services Not Utility Business Not Utility Business New Business Opportunities DISTRIBUTED GENERATION Distributed generation includes small gas turbines, micro-turbines, fuel cells, storage... Residential Single Family Multi Family 1-10 kW 15- 50 kW Ultra micro-turbines Stirling Engines Fuel Cells PEMFC SOFC PV BatterylUPS Remote Loads 5 kW - 1,000 kW IC engines Off Grid Diesel Engine Micro turbine Stirling Engines Distribution...

  16. Maintaining a Technology-Neutral Approach to Hydrogen Production Process Development through Conceptual Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael W. Patterson

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), tasking the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with demonstrating High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology. The demonstration is to include the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of HTGR technology for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), a component of the DOE Hydrogen Program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy, is also investigating multiple approaches to cost effective hydrogen production from nuclear energy. The objective of NHI is development of the technology and information basis for a future decision on commercial viability. The initiatives are clearly intertwined. While the objectives of NGNP and NHI are generally consistent, NGNP has progressed to the project definition phase and the project plan has matured. Multiple process applications for the NGNP require process heat, electricity and hydrogen in varied combinations and sizes. Coupling these processes to the reactor in multiple configurations adds complexity to the design, licensing and demonstration of both the reactor and the hydrogen production process. Commercial viability of hydrogen production may depend on the specific application and heat transport configuration. A component test facility (CTF) is planned by the NGNP to support testing and demonstration of NGNP systems, including those for hydrogen production, in multiple configurations. Engineering-scale demonstrations in the CTF are expected to start in 2012 to support scheduled design and licensing activities leading to subsequent construction and operation. Engineering-scale demonstrations planned by NHI are expected to start at least two years later. Reconciliation of these schedules is recommended to successfully complete both initiatives. Hence, closer and earlier integration of hydrogen process development and heat transport systems is sensible. For integration purposes, an analysis comparing the design, cost and schedule impact of maintaining a technology neutral approach through conceptual design or making an early hydrogen process technology selection was performed. Early selection does not specifically eliminate a technology, but rather selects the first hydrogen technology for demonstration. A systems-engineering approach was taken to define decision-making criteria for selecting a hydrogen technology. The relative technical, cost and schedule risks of each approach were analyzed and risk mitigation strategies were recommended, including provisions to maintain close collaboration with the NHI. The results of these analyses are presented here.

  17. Bulk Electricity Generating Technologies This appendix describes the technical characteristics and cost and performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    income tax rate n/a 35% 35% Federal investment tax credit n/a 0% 0% Tax recovery period n/a 20 years 20-FIRED STEAM-ELECTRIC PLANTS Coal-fired steam-electric power plants are a mature technology, in use for over a century. Coal is the largest source of electric power in the United States as a whole, and the second

  18. MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter < MHKDUCK < MHK Technologies

  19. MHK Technologies/OCGen turbine generator unit TGU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK ProjectsFlagshipNAREC < MHKOCGen turbine generator

  20. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of new energy generation and storage technologies arenew energy generation and storage technologies is importantBased Energy Storage and Generation Technologies The world

  1. Building upon Historical Competencies: Next-generation Clean-up Technologies for World-Wide Application - 13368

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guevara, K.C. [DOE Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)] [DOE Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States); Fellinger, A.P.; Aylward, R.S.; Griffin, J.C.; Hyatt, J.E.; Bush, S.R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has a 60-year history of successfully operating nuclear facilities and cleaning up the nuclear legacy of the Cold War era through the processing of radioactive and otherwise hazardous wastes, remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, management of nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning of excess facilities. SRS recently unveiled its Enterprise.SRS (E.SRS) strategic vision to identify and facilitate application of the historical competencies of the site to current and future national and global challenges. E.SRS initiatives such as the initiative to Develop and Demonstrate Next generation Clean-up Technologies seek timely and mutually beneficial engagements with entities around the country and the world. One such ongoing engagement is with government and industry in Japan in the recovery from the devastation of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. (authors)

  2. Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaney, L.; Thundiyil, K.; Andersen, S.; Chidambaram, S.; Abbi, Y. P.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Up to 19.4% of vehicle fuel consumption in India is devoted to air conditioning (A/C). Indian A/C fuel consumption is almost four times the fuel penalty in the United States and close to six times that in the European Union because India's temperature and humidity are higher and because road congestion forces vehicles to operate inefficiently. Car A/C efficiency in India is an issue worthy of national attention considering the rate of increase of A/C penetration into the new car market, India's hot climatic conditions and high fuel costs. Car A/C systems originally posed an ozone layer depletion concern. Now that industrialized and many developing countries have moved away from ozone-depleting substances per Montreal Protocol obligations, car A/C impact on climate has captured the attention of policy makers and corporate leaders. Car A/C systems have a climate impact from potent global warming potential gas emissions and from fuel used to power the car A/Cs. This paper focuses on car A/C fuel consumption in the context of the rapidly expanding Indian car market and how new technological improvements can result in significant fuel savings and consequently, emission reductions. A 19.4% fuel penalty is associated with A/C use in the typical Indian passenger car. Car A/C fuel use and associated tailpipe emissions are strong functions of vehicle design, vehicle use, and climate conditions. Several techniques: reducing thermal load, improving vehicle design, improving occupants thermal comfort design, improving equipment, educating consumers on impacts of driver behaviour on MAC fuel use, and others - can lead to reduced A/C fuel consumption.

  3. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a New Technology for Extraction of Insoluble Impurities from Nuclear Power Plant Steam Generators with Purge Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bud'ko, I. O. [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation)] [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. G. [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)] [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental technology for the removal of insoluble impurities from a horizontal steam generator with purge water during planned shutdowns of the power generating unit is improved through a more representative determination of the concentration of impurities in the purge water ahead of the water cleanup facility and a more precise effective time for the duration of the purge process. Tests with the improved technique at power generating unit No. 1 of the Rostov Nuclear Power Plant show that the efficiency with which insoluble impurities are removed from the steam generator volume was more than two orders of magnitude greater than under the standard regulations.

  4. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails NewsTechnologyTechnology A

  5. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails NewsTechnologyTechnology

  6. FirstChoice Wholesale Investments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Richard

    FirstChoice Wholesale Investments Product Disclosure Statement Including FirstRate Wholesale Saver Colonial First State 1 2 Benefits of investing in FirstChoice Wholesale Investments 1 3 How FirstChoice Wholesale Investments works 2 4 Risks of investing 2 5 Fees and other costs 6 6 How managed investment

  7. Essays on the Evolution of Health Care Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hodgson, Ashley Renee

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    more tools for evaluating technology cost—effectiveness ifDiscourage Investment in Therapeutic Technology? 5 2.12008, “Input and Technology Choices in Regulated Indus-

  8. Photovoltaic (PV)energy conversion is a rapidly growing technology for converting solar energy into electricity. The current production is over 20

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    Photovoltaic (PV)energy conversion is a rapidly growing technology for converting solar energy to about $1.50 per watt, from over $100/W in the 1970s. The current generation of technology is mainly polymers, is making rapid strides towards becoming the low cost material of choice for PV energy conversion

  9. Maximum-Power-Point Tracking only using Current Sensor Information for Photovoltaic Power Generation System Hiroyuki Matsumoto, and Toshihiko Noguchi (Nagaoka University of Technology)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    SPC-02-88 * Maximum-Power-Point Tracking only using Current Sensor Information for Photovoltaic Power Generation System Hiroyuki Matsumoto, and Toshihiko Noguchi (Nagaoka University of Technology) Abstract This paper describes a novel strategy of maximum-power-point tracking for photovoltaic power

  10. Dye-Sentitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) are an emerging low-cost third generation photovoltaic technology particularly suited for efficient light-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dye-Sentitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) are an emerging low-cost third generation photovoltaic technology particularly suited for efficient light- to-electricity conversion in indoors low light-to -electricity conversion efficiency in early implementations under AM1.5 solar light. Easy

  11. Gorur D, Rasmussen CE. Dirichlet process Gaussian mixture models: Choice of the base distribution. JOURNAL OF COMPUTER SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY 25(4): 615626 July 2010/DOI 10.1007/s11390-010-1051-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edinburgh, University of

    G¨or¨ur D, Rasmussen CE. Dirichlet process Gaussian mixture models: Choice of the base distribution Rasmussen2,3 1 Gatsby Computational Neuroscience Unit, University College London, London WC1N 3AR, U.K. 2 Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1PZ, U.K. 3 Max Planck Institute

  12. A Stark Choice on Solar

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As a nation, we face a stark choice. We can sit back and cede our position in the burgeoning solar industry or we can stand up and compete.

  13. Editor's Choice Editor's Choice: Crop Genome Plasticity and Its Relevance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    . The term GE is preferred over the term "genetically modified" (commonly referred to as GMEditor's Choice Editor's Choice: Crop Genome Plasticity and Its Relevance to Food and Feed Safety of Genetically Engineered Breeding Stacks1 Genetically engineered (GE) stacks, combinations of two or more single

  14. Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment of Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment, it is therefore possible that large (~45%) reductions in CO2 emissions from UK electricity generation couldC/year. If required, however, a reduction in CO2 emissions of 15 MtC/year in the electricity generation sector by 2020

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Performance Cast Aluminum Alloys for Next Generation Passenger Vehicle Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

  16. Technology for Treatment of Liquid Radioactive Waste Generated during Uranium and Plutonium Chemical and Metallurgical Manufacturing in FSUE PO Mayak - 13616

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamovich, D. [SUE MosSIA Radon, 2/14 7th Rostovsky lane, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation)] [SUE MosSIA Radon, 2/14 7th Rostovsky lane, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation); Batorshin, G.; Logunov, M.; Musalnikov, A. [FSUE 'PO Mayak', 31 av. Lenin, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456780 (Russian Federation)] [FSUE 'PO Mayak', 31 av. Lenin, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456780 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Created technological scheme for treatment of liquid radioactive waste generated while uranium and plutonium chemical and metallurgical manufacturing consists of: - Liquid radioactive waste (LRW) purification from radionuclides and its transfer into category of manufacturing waste; - Concentration of suspensions containing alpha-nuclides and their further conversion to safe dry state (calcinate) and moving to long controlled storage. The following technologies are implemented in LRW treatment complex: - Settling and filtering technology for treatment of liquid intermediate-level waste (ILW) with volume about 1500m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8} Bq/dm{sup 3} - Membrane and sorption technology for processing of low-level waste (LLW) of radioactive drain waters with volume about 150 000 m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} Bq/dm{sup 3}. Settling and filtering technology includes two stages of ILW immobilization accompanied with primary settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following flushing and drying of the pulp generated; secondary deep after settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following solid phase concentration by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration. Besides, the installation capacity on permeate is not less than 3 m{sup 3}/h. Concentrates generated are sent to calcination on microwave drying (MW drying) unit. Membrane and sorption technology includes processing of averaged sewage flux by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration with total capacity of installations on permeate not less than 18 m{sup 3}/h and sorption extraction of uranium from permeate on anionite. According to radionuclide contamination level purified solution refers to general industrial waste. Concentrates generated during suspension filtering are evaporated in rotary film evaporator (RFE) in order to remove excess water, thereafter they are dried on infrared heating facility. Solid concentrate produced is sent for long controlled storage. Complex of the procedures carried out makes it possible to solve problems on treatment of LRW generated while uranium and plutonium chemical and metallurgical manufacturing in Federal State Unitary Enterprise (FSUE) Mayak and cease its discharge into open water reservoirs. (authors)

  17. BlueChoice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewind Generator RewindChronicEPO PLAN/Medicare

  18. BlueChoice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewind Generator RewindChronicEPO

  19. BlueChoice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewind Generator RewindChronicEPOActive EE &

  20. BlueChoice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced Materials Find FindRewind Generator RewindChronicEPOActive EE

  1. Next-generation transcriptome assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    technologies - the next generation. Nat Rev Genet 11, 31-algorithms for next-generation sequencing data. Genomicsassembly from next- generation sequencing data. Genome Res

  2. Science Centric -Science, health and technology, breaking news [PDA version] New tool for next-generation cancer treatments using nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    for next-generation cancer treatments using nanodiamonds Science Centric | 19 May 2009 15:50 GMT A research be used both as a research tool in the development of next-generation cancer treatments and as a nanomanufacturing tool to build the implantable drug delivery devices that will apply these treatments

  3. IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 22, NO. 10, MAY 15, 2010 715 Optical Arbitrary Waveform Generation-Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolner, Brian H.

    -bit 40-Gb/s label in nonreturn-to-zero and return-to- zero on­off keying formats indicate Generation-Based Packet Generation and All-Optical Separation for Optical-Label Switching Tingting He--This letter introduces a versatile modulation-format transparent optical-label switching (OLS) transmitter

  4. Mountain Health Choices Beneficiary Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    ................................................................................................................ 42 I. Access to Health Care Mountain Health Choices Beneficiary Report A Report to the West Virginia Bureau for Medical of Health and Human Resources, Bureau for Medical Services. #12; 1 Table of Contents I. EXECUTIVE

  5. Autotuning programs with algorithmic choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ansel, Jason (Jason Andrew)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The process of optimizing programs and libraries, both for performance and quality of service, can be viewed as a search problem over the space of implementation choices. This search is traditionally manually conducted by ...

  6. Network knowledge and route choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramming, Michael Scott

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of urban traveler route choice are reviewed in the context of Intelligent Transportation Systems, particularly Advanced Traveler Information S ystems. Existing models suffer from assumptions of perfect information ...

  7. Nonparametric choice modeling : applications to operations management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jagabathula, Srikanth

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the recent explosion of choices available to us in every walk of our life, capturing the choice behavior exhibited by individuals has become increasingly important to many businesses. At the core, capturing choice ...

  8. CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT - AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Helen Kerr

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (1) European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), (2) Norway (Klimatek) and (3) the U.S.A. (Department of Energy). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre -Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies are making substantial progress towards their goals. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion Decarbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing good progress and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options that may have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Many studies are nearing completion or have been completed. Their preliminary results are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

  9. Clean coal technologies: Research, development, and demonstration program plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Fossil Energy, has structured an integrated program for research, development, and demonstration of clean coal technologies that will enable the nation to use its plentiful domestic coal resources while meeting environmental quality requirements. The program provides the basis for making coal a low-cost, environmentally sound energy choice for electric power generation and fuels production. These programs are briefly described.

  10. JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 24, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2006 4263 PLC-Based Pulse-Train Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 24, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2006 4263 PLC-Based Pulse to the fab- rication of optical devices [1]­[3]. PLC-based fabrication is frequently employed in a wide range the range of applications utilizing PLC- based devices is enormous, the focus of this paper

  11. Self Control, Revealed Preference and Consumption Choice Wolfgang Pesendorfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the behavior generated by the time-inconsistency approach but, unlike time-inconsistent models, allows for self-controlSelf Control, Revealed Preference and Consumption Choice Faruk Gul and Wolfgang Pesendorfer Princeton University November 2002 Abstract We provide a time consistent model that addresses the preference

  12. In The Social Register: Pronoun Choice in Norwegian and English

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Carl

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Choice of second-person pronouns can shed light on the intersection of language, personality, and culture. In modern Norway a change has occurred in little more than a generation through which the polite forms De, Dem/Dykk, and Deres/Dykkar have...

  13. Measuring U.S. Consumer Preferences for Genetically Modified Foods Using Choice Modeling Experiments: The Role of Price,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neimark, Alexander V.

    Measuring U.S. Consumer Preferences for Genetically Modified Foods Using Choice Modeling attributes of price, product benefits, and technology influence consumer demand for genetically modified food Modified Foods Using Choice Modeling Experiments: The Role of Price, Product Benefits and Technology

  14. The Drafting Technology Program offers a certificate or associate of applied science in drafting technology. The certificate program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ickert-Bond, Steffi

    DRAFTING TECHNOLOGY The Drafting Technology Program offers a certificate or associate of applied science in drafting technology. The certificate program offers a choice of six areas of emphasis: architectural drafting; civil drafting; information technology; mechanical and electrical drafting; process

  15. Life Choices Student Survey Items

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baltisberger, Jay H.

    by Topical Area: Life Choices Berea-Specific Entering Survey, Fall Term First-Year Students and New Transfers for life-long learning Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP), Entering Fall Term Students 2012, Historical Trends) Please indicate the extent to which each of the following describe you Searching

  16. Career Choices: Industry vs. Academia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohs, Remo

    Career Choices: Industry vs. Academia Yan Liu Assistant Professor Computer Science Department, IBM TJ Watson Research Center · Now, USC #12;1) What career path did you consider most during your Ph industry, and where can one make the most impact? · Best virtues in all jobs ­ Hardworking ­ Good attitude

  17. Magnetic Processing – A Pervasive Energy Efficient Technology for Next Generation Materials for Aerospace and Specialty Steel Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Ludtka, G.M.; Ray, P. (Carpenter Technologies, Inc.); Magee, J. (Carpenter Technologies, Inc.)

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermomagnetic Magnetic Processing is an exceptionally fertile, pervasive and cross-cutting technology that is just now being recognized by several major industry leaders for its significant potential to increase energy efficiency and materials performance for a myriad of energy intensive industries in a variety of areas and applications. ORNL has pioneered the use and development of large magnetic fields in thermomagnetically processing (T-MP) materials for altering materials phase equilibria and transformation kinetics. ORNL has discovered that using magnetic fields, we can produce unique materials responses. T-MP can produce unique phase stabilities & microstructures with improved materials performance for structural and functional applications not achieved with traditional processing techniques. These results suggest that there are unprecedented opportunities to produce significantly enhanced materials properties via atomistic level (nano-) microstructural control and manipulation. ORNL (in addition to others) have shown that grain boundary chemistry and precipitation kinetics are also affected by large magnetic fields. This CRADA has taken advantage of ORNL’s unique, custom-designed thermo-magnetic, 9 Tesla superconducting magnet facility that enables rapid heating and cooling of metallic components within the magnet bore; as well as ORNL’s expertise in high magnetic field (HMF) research. Carpenter Technologies, Corp., is a a US-based industrial company, that provides enhanced performance alloys for the Aerospace and Specialty Steel products. In this CRADA, Carpenter Technologies, Corp., is focusing on applying ORNL’s Thermomagnetic Magnetic Processing (TMP) technology to improve their current and future proprietary materials’ product performance and open up new markets for their Aerospace and Specialty Steel products. Unprecedented mechanical property performance improvements have been demonstrated for a high strength bainitic alloy industrial/commercial alloy that is envisioned to provide the potential for new markets for this alloy. These thermomechanical processing results provide these alloys with a major breakthrough demonstrating that simultaneous improvements in yield strength and ductility are achieved: 12 %, 10%, 13%, and 22% increases in yield strength, elongation, reduction-in-area, and impact energy respectively. In addition, TMP appears to overcome detrimental chemical homogeneity impacts on uniform microstructure evolution.

  18. Emission allowances and utility compliance choices: Market development and regulatory response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McDermott, K.A. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state PUCs, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusion; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to date by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements. (VC)

  19. Emission allowances and utility compliance choices: Market development and regulatory response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); McDermott, K.A. (Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state PUCs, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusion; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to date by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements. (VC)

  20. Task 3.14 - demonstration of technologies for remote power generation in Alaska. Semi-annual report, July 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.L.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper very briefly summarizes progress in the demonstration of a small (up to 6 MWe), environmentally acceptable electric generating system fueled by indigenous fuels and waste materials to serve power distribution systems typical of Alaskan Native communities. Two detailed appendices supplement the report. The project is focused on two primary technologies: (1) atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC), and (2) coalbed methane and coal-fired diesel technologies. Two sites have been selected as possible locations for an AFBC demonstration, and bid proposals are under review. The transfer of a coal-fired diesel clean coal demonstration project from Maryland to Fairbanks, Alaska was approved, and the environmental assessment has been initiated. Federal support for a fuel cell using coalbed methane is also being pursued. The appendices included in the report provide: (1) the status of the conceptual design study for a 600-kWe coal-fired cogeneration plant in McGrath, Alaska; and (2) a global market assessment of coalbed methane, fluidized-bed combustion, and coal-fired diesel technologies in remote applications.

  1. Essays on School Choice and the Returns to School Quality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ajayi, Kehinde Funmilola

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    School Choice Model . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Preferences for SchoolHistory of School Choice Reforms in Ghana . . . . . . . . .

  2. *Tri-Generation is a novel technology that was conceived by the National Fuel Cell Research Center in 2001 to simultaneously generate electricity, hydrogen, and heat. It was developed into the first prototype in collaboration with FuelCell Energy, Inc., a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    and fuel cell electric vehicles), there are still emissions associated with the upstream processes Electric Vehicles Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles #12;*Tri-Generation is a novel technology that was conceived by the National Fuel Cell Research Center

  3. Choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feyrer, G.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standing on the balcony beside him, Mc Coy swirled his brandy snifter restlessly, and muttered under his breath, "I've never understood what Jim sees in those pouty lipped, Pekinese types." "Ruth," Spock said. Startled, wide blue eyes turnedon him..., and the Captain and McCoy had accepted their selections. The Doctor seemed quite at home in his cobalt blue velvet and pale blue brocade. Familiar or preferred colors, Spock wondered? They had offered him something similar,turquoise and black satin, but he had...

  4. Turbine Drive Gas Generator for Zero Emission Power Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Stephen E.; Anderson, Roger E.

    2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vision 21 Program seeks technology development that can reduce energy costs, reduce or eliminate atmospheric pollutants from power plants, provide choices of alternative fuels, and increase the efficiency of generating systems. Clean Energy Systems is developing a gas generator to replace the traditional boiler in steam driven power systems. The gas generator offers the prospects of lower electrical costs, pollution free plant operations, choices of alternative fuels, and eventual net plant efficiencies in excess of 60% with sequestration of carbon dioxide. The technology underlying the gas generator has been developed in the aerospace industry over the past 30 years and is mature in aerospace applications, but it is as yet unused in the power industry. This project modifies and repackages aerospace gas generator technology for power generation applications. The purposes of this project are: (1) design a 10 MW gas generator and ancillary hardware, (2) fabricate the gas generator and supporting equipment, (3) test the gas generator using methane as fuel, (4) submit a final report describing the project and test results. The principal test objectives are: (1) define start-up, shut down and post shutdown control sequences for safe, efficient operation; (2) demonstrate the production of turbine drive gas comprising steam and carbon dioxide in the temperature range 1500 F to 3000 F, at a nominal pressure of 1500 psia; (3) measure and verify the constituents of the drive gas; and (4) examine the critical hardware components for indications of life limitations. The 21 month program is in its 13th month. Design work is completed and fabrication is in process. The gas generator igniter is a torch igniter with sparkplug, which is currently under-going hot fire testing. Fabrication of the injector and body of the gas generator is expected to be completed by year-end, and testing of the full gas generator will begin in early 2002. Several months of testing are anticipated. When demonstrated, this gas generator will be the prototype for use in demonstration power plants planned to be built in Antioch, California and in southern California during 2002. In these plants the gas generator will demonstrate durability and its operational RAM characteristics. In 2003, it is expected that the gas generator will be employed in new operating plants primarily in clean air non-attainment areas, and in possible locations to provide large quantities of high quality carbon dioxide for use in enhanced oil recovery or coal bed methane recovery. Coupled with an emission free coal gasification system, the CES gas generator would enable the operation of high efficiency, non-polluting coal-fueled power plants.

  5. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations. This study begins with an examination of existing DER research. Building energy loads were then generated through simulation (DOE-2) and scaled to match available load data in the literature. Energy tariffs in Japan and the U.S. were then compared: electricity prices did not differ significantly, while commercial gas prices in Japan are much higher than in the U.S. For smaller DER systems, the installation costs in Japan are more than twice those in the U.S., but this difference becomes smaller with larger systems. In Japan, DER systems are eligible for a 1/3 rebate of installation costs, while subsidies in the U.S. vary significantly by region and application. For 10,000 m{sup 2} buildings, significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the economically optimal results. This was most noticeable in the sports facility, followed the hospital and hotel. This research demonstrates that office buildings can benefit from CHP, in contrast to popular opinion. For hospitals and sports facilities, the use of waste heat is particularly effective for water and space heating. For the other building types, waste heat is most effectively use

  6. Assessment of energy and economic impacts of particulate-control technologies in coal-fired power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under contract to Argonne National Laboratory, Midwest Research Institute has derived models to assess the economic and energy impacts of particulate-control systems for coal-fired power plants. The models take into account the major functional variables, including plant size and location, coal type, and applicable particulate-emission standards. The algorithms obtained predict equipment and installation costs, as well as operating costs (including energy usage), for five control devices: (1) cold-side electrostatic precipitators, (2) hot-side electrostatic precipitators, (3) reverse-flow baghouses, (4) shake baghouses, and (5) wet scrubbers. A steam-generator performance model has been developed, and the output from this model has been used as input for the control-device performance models that specify required design and operating parameters for the control systems under study. These parameters then have been used as inputs to the cost models. Suitable guideline values have been provided for independent variables wherever necessary, and three case studies are presented to demonstrate application of the subject models. The control-equipment models aggregate the following cost items: (1) first costs (capital investment), (2) total, first-year annualized costs, and (3) integrated cost of ownership and operation over any selected plant lifetime. Although the models have been programmed for rapid computation, the algorithms can be solved with a hand calculator.

  7. Proceedings of the 2. MIT international conference on the next generation of nuclear power technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the conference was to try to attract a variety of points of view from well-informed people to debate issues concerning nuclear power. Hopefully from that process a better understanding of what one should be doing will emerge. In organizing the conference lessons learned from the previous one were applied. A continuous effort was made to see to it that the arguments for the alternatives to nuclear power were given abundant time for presentation. This is ultimately because nuclear power is going to have to compete with all of the energy technologies. Thus, in discussing energy strategy all of the alternatives must be considered in a reasonable fashion. The structure the conference used has seven sessions. The first six led up to the final session which was concerned with what the future nuclear power strategy should be. Each session focused upon a question concerning the future. None of these questions has a unique correct answer. Rather, topics are addressed where reasonable people can disagree. In order to state some of the important arguments for each session`s question, the combination of a keynote paper followed by a respondent was used. The respondent`s paper is not necessarily included to be a rebuttal to the keynote; but rather, it was recognized that two people will look at a complex question with different shadings. Through those two papers the intention was to get out the most important arguments affecting the question for the session. The purpose of the papers was to set the stage for about an hour of discussion. The real product of this conference was that discussion.

  8. ADJUSTMENT COSTS, LEARNING-BY-DOING, AND TECHNOLOGY ADOPTION UNDER UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlova, Anna

    2003-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a variety of vintage capital models of a firm's choice of technology under uncertainty in the presence of adjustment costs and technology-specific learning. ...

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Centers of Excellence to provide future generations of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills in advanced automotive technologies. By funding curriculum...

  10. Editor's Choice Editor's Choice: Evaluating the Potential for Adverse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrott, Wayne

    breeders. The safe application of genetic engineering to food and feed crops is widely acknowledged- technology are identified by a number of terms, includ- ing genetically modified (GM), GE, transgenic Genetically Engineered Breeding Stacks1 Plant breeding has a long history of developing varieties

  11. Consumer Vehicle Choice Model Documentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Changzheng [ORNL] [ORNL; Greene, David L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the Fuel Economy and Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions standards, automobile manufacturers will need to adopt new technologies to improve the fuel economy of their vehicles and to reduce the overall GHG emissions of their fleets. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has developed the Optimization Model for reducing GHGs from Automobiles (OMEGA) to estimate the costs and benefits of meeting GHG emission standards through different technology packages. However, the model does not simulate the impact that increased technology costs will have on vehicle sales or on consumer surplus. As the model documentation states, “While OMEGA incorporates functions which generally minimize the cost of meeting a specified carbon dioxide (CO2) target, it is not an economic simulation model which adjusts vehicle sales in response to the cost of the technology added to each vehicle.” Changes in the mix of vehicles sold, caused by the costs and benefits of added fuel economy technologies, could make it easier or more difficult for manufacturers to meet fuel economy and emissions standards, and impacts on consumer surplus could raise the costs or augment the benefits of the standards. Because the OMEGA model does not presently estimate such impacts, the EPA is investigating the feasibility of developing an adjunct to the OMEGA model to make such estimates. This project is an effort to develop and test a candidate model. The project statement of work spells out the key functional requirements for the new model.

  12. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.nrel.govwind Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center...

  13. The fifth generation computer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moto-Oka, T.; Kitsuregawa, M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The leader of Japan's Fifth Generation computer project, known as the 'Apollo' project, and a young computer scientist elucidate in this book the process of how the idea came about, international reactions, the basic technology, prospects for realization, and the abilities of the Fifth Generation computer. Topics considered included forecasting, research programs, planning, and technology impacts.

  14. Finishing Using Next Generation Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Tonder, Andries [Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

    2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Andries van Tonder of Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute discusses a pipeline for finishing genomes to the gold standard on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  15. Energy Efficient IT IT for Energy Efficiency Clean Energy Generation Emissions Accounting Policy Considerations At Microsoft, we see information technology (IT) as a key tool to help address the daunting en-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    Energy Efficient IT IT for Energy Efficiency Clean Energy Generation Emissions Accounting Policy in energy conservation and integration of more renewable and zero-carbon energy sources into our economy. Microsoft envisions a clean energy ecosystem where information technology: · Empowers people

  16. Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Kurani, Kenneth; Heffner, Rusty

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Car Buyers and Fuel Economy? ” Energy Policy, vol. 35, 2007.Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice? BY TOMyou think about fuel economy? ” Rather, we listened closely

  17. Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Kurani, Kenneth S; Heffner, Reid R.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Car Buyers and Fuel Economy? ” Energy Policy, vol. 35, 2007.Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice? BY TOMyou think about fuel economy? ” Rather, we listened closely

  18. On the Transportation Problem with Market Choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pelin Damci-Kurt

    2013-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 3, 2013 ... Abstract: We study a variant of the classical transportation problem in which suppliers with limited capacities have a choice of which demands ...

  19. Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy conducts research on conventional hydropower technologies to increase generation and improve existing means of generating hydroelectricity.

  20. Virtually simulating the next generation of clean energy technologies: NETL's AVESTAR Center is dedicated to the safe, reliable and efficient operation of advanced energy plants with carbon capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Imagine using a real-time virtual simulator to learn to fly a space shuttle or rebuild your car's transmission without touching a piece of equipment or getting your hands dirty. Now, apply this concept to learning how to operate and control a state-of-the-art, electricity-producing power plant capable of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture. That's what the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR) Center (www.netl.doe.gov/avestar) is designed to do. Established as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative to advance new clean energy technology for power generation, the AVESTAR Center focuses primarily on providing simulation-based training for process engineers and energy plant operators, starting with the deployment of a first-of-a-kind operator training simulator for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Based on Invensys Operations Management's SimSci-Esscor DYNSIM software, the high-fidelity dynamic simulator provides realistic training on IGCC plant operations, including normal and faulted operations, as well as plant start-up, shutdown and power demand load changes. The highly flexible simulator also allows for testing of different types of fuel sources, such as petcoke and biomass, as well as co-firing fuel mixtures. The IGCC dynamic simulator is available at AVESTAR's two locations, NETL (Figure 1) and West Virginia University's National Research Center for Coal and Energy (www.nrcce.wvu.edu), both in Morgantown, W.Va. By offering a comprehensive IGCC training program, AVESTAR aims to develop a workforce well prepared to operate, control and manage commercial-scale gasification-based power plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The facility and simulator at West Virginia University promotes NETL's outreach mission by offering hands-on simulator training and education to researchers and university students.

  1. COMMUNITY CHOICE AGGREGATION PILOT PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    generation development @ 5.5%. b) 100% debt financing. c) Financing term is 30 years. d) Minimum debt.9 M per year plus 10 cents per MWh, including IT. d) Activities include scheduling coordination Geothermal, Solid Fuel Biomass, Land Fill Gas Biomass, and Concentrating Solar Power. b) The cost

  2. A virtual substitution of Brouwer choice sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus Lange

    2009-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Step by step a substitution of the well known Brouwer choice sequence will be constructed. It begins with an establishing of quasi alternating prime number series followed by a construction of a virtual sequence in sense of the virtual set definition. The last step gives reasons for why this virtual sequence substitutes the choice sequence created by L. E. J. Brouwer.

  3. Job Dislocation Making Smart Financial Choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Job Dislocation Making Smart Financial Choices after a Job Loss #12;Who We Are FINRA FINRA.workforceatm.org. #12;Job Dislocation MAKING SMART FINANCIAL CHOICES AFTER A JOB LOSS You may not be able to control in the event of unemployment; protect yourself when getting financial advice during a period of job dislocation

  4. Weakened regulation and fuel choice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowe, J.F. Jr. [Dewey Ballantine, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The restructuring of the electric power industry will fundamentally affect every aspect of its relationship with the natural gas industry. The electric power industry is being restructered far more rapidly than most stategists expected even a year ago; competition at all levels of the electric power industry is here. Uncertainty itself is stifling strategic planning; long-term commitments are becoming extremely risky and therefore unattractive in the face of uncertainty concerning the electric utility industry`s future. For many electric power industry participants, the prospect of industry restructuring is frightening, because it is driven by irresistible forces that they can barely influence; for natural gas industry players, it is frightening because it means pervasive change in the industry`s best hope for growth. While working their way through the upheavals produced by restructuring, electric utilities and non-utility generators alike will be timid and tenative when it comes to making substantial new commitments to gas, particularly for new base- and intermediate load capacity. Competition is likely to force efficiencies that suppress overall demand for new generating capacity in many regions for quite some time, and change the nature of the challenges the gas industry must face in competing for market share with other power generation fuels. Concepts like {open_quotes}long term{close_quotes}, {open_quotes}fixed price{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}assured cost recovery{close_quotes} will become quaint memories, and once the dust has settled, gas will have its share of opportunities to fuel power generation resources, but will have to share far more of the risk facing power generators than it has thus far.

  5. Power Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop Control Technology Power Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop Control Technology Poster presented at...

  6. Nanomaterials: Organic and Inorganic for Next-Generation Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanomaterials: Organic and Inorganic for Next-Generation Diesel Technologies Nanomaterials: Organic and Inorganic for Next-Generation Diesel Technologies 2007 Diesel...

  7. Magnetic Recording Media Technology for the Tb/In2 Era

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bertero, Gerardo (Wester Digital) [Wester Digital

    2010-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic recording has been the technology of choice of massive storage of information. The hard-disk drive industry has recently undergone a major technological transition from longitudinal magnetic recording (LMR) to perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR). However, convention perpendicular recording can only support a few new product generations before facing insurmountable physical limits. In order to support sustained recording areal density growth, new technological paradigms, such as energy-assisted recording and bit-patterined media recording are being contemplated and planned. In this talk, we will briefly discuss the LMR-to-PMR transition, the extendibility of current PMR recording, and the nature and merits of new enabling technologies. We will also discuss a technology roadmap toward recording densities approaching 10 Tv/in2, approximately 40 times higher than in current disk drives.

  8. Manhattan Project: Difficult Choices, 1942

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy, science, and technology-- Energy, science, andDCP-1 GOES

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Performance Cast Aluminum Alloys for Next Generation Passenger Vehicle Engines 2012 FOA 648 Topic 3a

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

  10. A Plug-in Hybrid Consumer Choice Model with Detailed Market Segmentation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Zhenhong [ORNL] [ORNL; Greene, David L [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a consumer choice model for projecting U.S. demand for plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEV) in competition among 13 light-duty vehicle technologies over the period 2005-2050. New car buyers are disaggregated by region, residential area, attitude toward technology risk, vehicle usage intensity, home parking and work recharging. The nested multinomial logit (NMNL) model of vehicle choice incorporates daily vehicle usage distributions, refueling and recharging availability, technology learning by doing, and diversity of choice among makes and models. Illustrative results are presented for a Base Case, calibrated to the Annual Energy Outlook (AEO) 2009 Reference Updated Case, and an optimistic technology scenario reflecting achievement of U.S. Department of Energy s (DOE s) FreedomCAR goals. PHEV market success is highly dependent on the degree of technological progress assumed. PHEV sales reach one million in 2037 in the Base Case but in 2020 in the FreedomCARGoals Case. In the FreedomCARGoals Case, PHEV cumulative sales reach 1.5 million by 2015. Together with efficiency improvements in other technologies, petroleum use in 2050 is reduced by about 45% from the 2005 level. After technological progress, PHEV s market success appears to be most sensitive to recharging availability, consumers attitudes toward novel echnologies, and vehicle usage intensity. Successful market penetration of PHEVs helps bring down battery costs for electric vehicles (EVs), resulting in a significant EV market share after 2040.

  11. Collective Choice with Uncertain Domain Moldels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards, Whitman

    2005-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    When groups of individuals make choices among several alternatives, the most compelling social outcome is the Condorcet winner, namely the alternative beating all others in a pair-wise contest. Obviously the Condorcet ...

  12. Expandability, reversibility, and optimal capacity choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixit, Avinash K.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We develop continuous-time models of capacity choice when demand fluctuates stochastically, and the firm's opportunities to expand or contract are limited. Specifically, we consider costs of investing or disinvesting that ...

  13. Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turrentine, Tom; Kurani, Kenneth; Heffner, Rusty

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    S. Kurani, “Car Buyers and Fuel Economy? ” Energy Policy,Fuel Economy: What Drives Consumer Choice? BY TOMa car, do they think about fuel costs over time, are they

  14. Use of Slip Ring Induction Generator for Wind Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K Y Patil; D S Chavan

    Wind energy is now firmly established as a mature technology for electricity generation. There are different types of generators that can be used for wind energy generation, among which Slip ring Induction generator proves to be more advantageous. To analyse application of Slip ring Induction generator for wind power generation, an experimental model is developed and results are studied. As power generation from natural sources is the need today and variable speed wind energy is ample in amount in India, it is necessary to study more beneficial options for wind energy generating techniques. From this need a model is developed by using Slip ring Induction generator which is a type of Asynchronous generator.

  15. Essays in asset pricing and portfolio choice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illeditsch, Philipp Karl

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ESSAYS IN ASSET PRICING AND PORTFOLIO CHOICE A Dissertation by PHILIPP KARL ILLEDITSCH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2007... Major Subject: Finance ESSAYS IN ASSET PRICING AND PORTFOLIO CHOICE A Dissertation by PHILIPP KARL ILLEDITSCH Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR...

  16. RESIDENTIAL LOCATION CHOICE AND TRAVEL BEHAVIOR: IMPLICATIONS FOR AIR QUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    RESIDENTIAL LOCATION CHOICE AND TRAVEL BEHAVIOR: IMPLICATIONS FOR AIR QUALITY UC Davis-Caltrans Air control measure. #12;RESIDENTIAL LOCATION CHOICE AND TRAVEL BEHAVIOR: IMPLICATIONS FOR AIR QUALITY.......................................................... 3 2.2 The Role of Residential Location Choice

  17. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry, Japan MT microturbine NEGA Japan Engine GeneratorGE), gas turbine (GT), microturbine (MT), fuel cell (FC),Fuel Cell Gas Turbine Microturbine Natual Gas Reciprocating

  18. Natural Gas Vehicle Webinar: Technology, Best Strategies, and Lessons Learned

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Clean Cities program webinar elaborates first on successful past technology choices and then suggests future technological pathways that can be taken for the United States to expand its use of...

  19. A Convex Optimization Approach for Computing Correlated Choice ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    tives (see Parsons and Kealy (28)), choice of car models involving 689 alternatives (see Brownstone,. Bunch and Train (6)) and choice of messenger bags ...

  20. Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

  1. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Ionic Liquids as Anti-Wear Additives for Next-Generation Low-Viscosity Fuel-Efficient Engine Lubricants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ionic liquids...

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about cost-competitive advanced...

  3. Modeling learning when alternative technologies are learning & resource constrained : cases In semiconductor & advanced automotive manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rand-Nash, Thomas

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When making technology choice decisions, firms must consider technology costs over time. In many industries, technology costs have been shown to decrease over time due to (a) improvements in production efficiency and the ...

  4. Compact neutron generator development at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generator Development at LBNL J. Reijonen, G. English, R.Technology Group in LBNL. The compact axial extraction

  5. U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Technologies Program to assess power generation costs and the potential for technology improvements to impact those generation costs. This webinar is an overview of...

  6. Generating Resources Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Generating Resources Advisory Committee February 27, 2014 Steven Simmons and Gillian Charles Upcoming Symposium 9:15 am Natural Gas Peaking Technologies Technology Trends Proposed reference plant Costing, Economies of Scale, Normalizations Reference Plants 12:30 pm Discussion of Next GRAC Meetings

  7. CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT-AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helen Kerr

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), Norway (Klimatek) and the U.S.A. (Department of Energy)). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion--technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel--where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with wet high concentrations of CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion--in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening--analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV)--providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies have completed their 2003 stagegate review and are reported here. Some will proceed to the next stagegate review in 2004. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. The workscopes planned for the next key stagegates are under review before work begins based on the current economic assessment of their performance. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options but even so some significant potential reductions in cost have been identified and will continue to be explored. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward and suggest that geologic sequestration can be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along old wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Wells are also easy to monitor and intervention is possible if needed. The project will continue to evaluate and bring in novel studies and ideas within the project scope as requested by the DOE. The results to date are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

  8. CO2 Capture Project-An Integrated, Collaborative Technology Development Project for Next Generation CO2 Separation, Capture and Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helen Kerr; Linda M. Curran

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) was a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, ENI, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union [DG RES & DG TREN], the Norwegian Research Council [Klimatek Program] and the U.S. Department of Energy [NETL]). The project objective was to develop new technologies that could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies were to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. Certain promising technology areas were increased in scope and the studies extended through 2004. The project budget was approximately $26.4 million over 4 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum cokes are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies showed excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. Post-combustion technologies emerged as higher cost options that may only have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies suggest that geologic sequestration will be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Economic modeling shows that options to reduce costs by 50% exist. A rigorous methodology for technology evaluation was developed. Public acceptance and awareness were enhanced through extensive communication of results to the stakeholder community (scientific, NGO, policy, and general public). Two volumes of results have been published and are available to all. Well over 150 technical papers were produced. All funded studies for this phase of the CCP are complete. The results are summarized in this report and all final reports are presented in the attached appendices.

  9. ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology Program The Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology (BSET) is a hands-on program based upon engineering technology fundamentals, engineering for employment or further education. The focus is on current engineering technology issues and applications used

  10. PowerChoice Residential Customer Response to TOU Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Jane S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    price effects were detected for single-family PowerChoice participant households: increased electricity

  11. Technology reviews: Glazing systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology; determine the performance range of available technologies; identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances; examine market forces and market trends; and develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fag into that class.

  12. Technology reviews: Shading systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends. Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

  13. Current Status of Concentrator Photovoltaic (CPV) Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (CPV) technology has recently entered the market as a utility- scale option for the generation of solar electricity. This report explores the current status of CPV technology...

  14. Decision Support for Choice of Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langseth, Helge

    Decision Support for Choice of Security Solution The Aspect-Oriented Risk Driven Development (AORDD decisions. (4) RDD annotation rules for security risk and security solution variable estimation. (5) The AORDD security solution trade-o¤ analysis and trade-o¤ tool BBN topology. (6) Rule set for how

  15. Sustainability: Preserving Choice for the Army

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Sharon J.

    Sustainability: Preserving Choice for the Army Friday, October 19, 2012 12:00 - 1:30 p.m. (lunch will be provided) Wrigley Hall, Room 481 Richard Kidd Deputy Assistant of the Army, Energy and Sustainability infrastructure. The development of Army-wide sustainability principles coupled with investments, training

  16. |Sustainable energy choices: comparing the options

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with an ethical distaste for resource waste. Nuclear power emits no air pollu- tants or greenhouse gases? Should we focus just on one? Is there an optimal combination? How would we make this decision? To what energy choices. In chapter 3, I predict that hydro- gen will become a partner alongside electricity

  17. 3866 JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 26, NO. 24, DECEMBER 15, 2008 Room-Temperature Stable Generation of 19 Watts of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    sources possessing excellent beam quality with overall optical efficiencies well over 10%. However, high-damage Generation of 19 Watts of Single-Frequency 532-nm Radiation in a Periodically Poled Lithium Tantalate Crystal, IEEE, Fellow, OSA Abstract--We report on a system that produces 19 W of diffrac- tion-limited radiation

  18. Choice set as an indicator for choice behavior when lanes are managed with value pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mastako, Kimberley Allen

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    (Interim Head of Department) December 2003 Major Subject: Civil Engineering ABSTRACT Choice Set as an Indicator for Choice Behavior When Lanes Are Managed with Value Pricing. (December 2003) Kimberley Allyn Mastako, B.S., California... users, non users, and businesses. Prior to the first round of project evaluations in the late 1990s, researchers relied on experience with changes in bridge and turnpike tolls, transit fares, and parking fees to identify the range of possible...

  19. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Characterization of Fatigue and Crash Performance of New Generation High Strength Steels for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda Yan; Dennis Urban

    2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2-year project (2001-2002) to generate fatigue and high strain data for a new generation of high strength steels (HSS) has been completed in December 2002. The project tested eleven steel grades, including Dual Phase (DP) steels, Transformation-Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels, Bake Hardenable (BH) steels, and conventional High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels. All of these steels are of great interest in automotive industry due to the potential benefit in weight reduction, improved fuel economy, enhanced crash energy management and total system cost savings. Fatigue behavior includes strain controlled fatigue data notch sensitivity for high strength steels. High strain rate behavior includes stress-strain data for strain rates from 0.001/s to 1000/s, which are considered the important strain rate ranges for crash event. The steels were tested in two phases, seven were tested in Phase 1 and the remaining steels were tested in Phase. In a addition to the fatigue data and high st rain rate data generated for the steels studied in the project, analyses of the testing results revealed that Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) exhibit significantly higher fatigue strength and crash energy absorption capability than conventional HSS. TRIP steels exhibit exceptionally better fatigue strength than steels of similar tensile strength but different microstructure, for conditions both with or without notches present

  20. Technology and international climate policy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clarke, Leon; Calvin, Kate; Edmonds, James A.; Kyle, Page; Wise, Marshall

    2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Both the nature of international climate policy architectures and the development and diffusion of new energy technologies could dramatically influence future costs of reducing global emissions of greenhouse gases. This paper explores the implications of interactions between technology availability and performance and international policy architectures for technology choice and the social cost of limiting atmospheric CO2 concentrations to 500 ppm by the year 2095. Key issues explored in the paper include the role of bioenergy production with CO2 capture and storage (CCS), overshoot concentration pathways, and the sensitivity of mitigation costs to policy and technology.

  1. Microscale Technologies for Tissue Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khademhosseini, Ali

    Microscale technologies are emerging as enabling tools for tissue engineering and biology. Here, we present our experience in developing microscale technologies to regulate cell-microenvironment interactions and generate ...

  2. INJECTION CHOICE FOR SPALLATION NEUTRON SOURCE RING.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    WEI,J.; BEEBE-WANG,J.; BLASKIEWICZ,M.; BRODOWSKI,J.; FEDOTOV,A.; GARDNER,C.; LEE,Y.Y.; RAPARIA,D.; DANILOV,V.; HOLMES,J.; PRIOR,C.; REES,G.; MACHIDA,S.

    2001-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection is key in the low-loss design of high-intensity proton facilities like the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). During the design of both the accumulator and the rapid-cycling-synchrotron version of the SNS, extensive comparison has been made to select injection scenarios that satisfy SNS's low-loss design criteria. This paper presents issues and considerations pertaining to the final choice of the SNS injection systems.

  3. Industrial innovations for tomorrow: Advances in industrial energy-efficiency technologies. Commercial power plant tests blend of refuse-derived fuel and coal to generate electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MSW can be converted to energy in two ways. One involves the direct burning of MSW to produce steam and electricity. The second converts MSW into refuse-derived fuel (RDF) by reducing the size of the MSW and separating metals, glass, and other inorganic materials. RDF can be densified or mixed with binders to form fuel pellets. As part of a program sponsored by DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory participated in a cooperative research and development agreement to examine combustion of binder-enhanced, densified refuse-derived fuel (b-d RDF) pellets with coal. Pelletized b-d RDF has been burned in coal combustors, but only in quantities of less than 3% in large utility systems. The DOE project involved the use of b-d RDF in quantities up to 20%. A major goal was to quantify the pollutants released during combustion and measure combustion performance.

  4. Clean Coal Technology (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A public utility may not use clean coal technology at a new or existing electric generating facility without first applying for and obtaining from the Utility Regulatory Commission a certificate...

  5. Costs influence male mate choice in a freshwater fish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keogh, Scott

    Costs influence male mate choice in a freshwater fish Bob B. M. Wong* and Michael D. Jennions that female mate choice decisions depend on the direct costs of choosing (either because of search costs or male-imposed costs). Far less is known about how direct fitness costs affect male mate choice. We

  6. Solar Choice Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries Pvt LtdShawangunk, New York:SiG26588°,SocorromercurySolaire DirectBrain SrlChoice

  7. Renewable Choice Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ | Roadmap JumpReliance Industries Product: SanChoice Energy

  8. Choice Soy Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport | Open EnergyChippewa ValleyChoice FuelCorp

  9. Energy Choice Simulator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489 No revision|LLC Place: Ketchum, Idaho Zip: ID 83340Choice

  10. ADVANCED RECIPROCATING COMPRESSION TECHNOLOGY (ARCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Danny M. Deffenbaugh; Klaus Brun; Ralph E. Harris; J. Pete Harrell; Robert J. Mckee; J. Jeffrey Moore; Steven J. Svedeman; Anthony J. Smalley; Eugene L. Broerman; Robert A Hart; Marybeth G. Nored; Ryan S. Gernentz; Shane P. Siebenaler

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. natural gas pipeline industry is facing the twin challenges of increased flexibility and capacity expansion. To meet these challenges, the industry requires improved choices in gas compression to address new construction and enhancement of the currently installed infrastructure. The current fleet of installed reciprocating compression is primarily slow-speed integral machines. Most new reciprocating compression is and will be large, high-speed separable units. The major challenges with the fleet of slow-speed integral machines are: limited flexibility and a large range in performance. In an attempt to increase flexibility, many operators are choosing to single-act cylinders, which are causing reduced reliability and integrity. While the best performing units in the fleet exhibit thermal efficiencies between 90% and 92%, the low performers are running down to 50% with the mean at about 80%. The major cause for this large disparity is due to installation losses in the pulsation control system. In the better performers, the losses are about evenly split between installation losses and valve losses. The major challenges for high-speed machines are: cylinder nozzle pulsations, mechanical vibrations due to cylinder stretch, short valve life, and low thermal performance. To shift nozzle pulsation to higher orders, nozzles are shortened, and to dampen the amplitudes, orifices are added. The shortened nozzles result in mechanical coupling with the cylinder, thereby, causing increased vibration due to the cylinder stretch mode. Valve life is even shorter than for slow speeds and can be on the order of a few months. The thermal efficiency is 10% to 15% lower than slow-speed equipment with the best performance in the 75% to 80% range. The goal of this advanced reciprocating compression program is to develop the technology for both high speed and low speed compression that will expand unit flexibility, increase thermal efficiency, and increase reliability and integrity. Retrofit technologies that address the challenges of slow-speed integral compression are: (1) optimum turndown using a combination of speed and clearance with single-acting operation as a last resort; (2) if single-acting is required, implement infinite length nozzles to address nozzle pulsation and tunable side branch absorbers for 1x lateral pulsations; and (3) advanced valves, either the semi-active plate valve or the passive rotary valve, to extend valve life to three years with half the pressure drop. This next generation of slow-speed compression should attain 95% efficiency, a three-year valve life, and expanded turndown. New equipment technologies that address the challenges of large-horsepower, high-speed compression are: (1) optimum turndown with unit speed; (2) tapered nozzles to effectively reduce nozzle pulsation with half the pressure drop and minimization of mechanical cylinder stretch induced vibrations; (3) tunable side branch absorber or higher-order filter bottle to address lateral piping pulsations over the entire extended speed range with minimal pressure drop; and (4) semi-active plate valves or passive rotary valves to extend valve life with half the pressure drop. This next generation of large-horsepower, high-speed compression should attain 90% efficiency, a two-year valve life, 50% turndown, and less than 0.75 IPS vibration. This program has generated proof-of-concept technologies with the potential to meet these ambitious goals. Full development of these identified technologies is underway. The GMRC has committed to pursue the most promising enabling technologies for their industry.

  11. RENEWABLE ENERGY: A VIABLE CHOICE By Antonia V. Herzog, Timothy E. Lipman, Jennifer L. Edwards, and Daniel M. Kammen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    RENEWABLE ENERGY: A VIABLE CHOICE By Antonia V. Herzog, Timothy E. Lipman, Jennifer L. Edwards, and Daniel M. Kammen Published in Environment, Vol. 43 No. 10 (December 2001) Renewable energy systems in transmission and distribution. A strong national energy policy is now needed. Renewable technologies have

  12. Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets Using PBI Membrane Technology Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets Using PBI...

  13. Next Generation Library Systems Convenient, Connected, User-Centric, Ubiquitous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    & Engineering Library; Digital Library Technologies Group 5 Barb Sagraves, Head Next Generation Library Systems Convenient, Connected, User-Centric, Ubiquitous Next Generation Library Taskforce

  14. Engaging the Next Generation of Automotive Engineers through...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engaging the Next Generation of Automotive Engineers through Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition Engaging the Next Generation of Automotive Engineers through Advanced Vehicle...

  15. Generating Resources Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Generating Resources Advisory Committee May 28, 2014 Steve Simmons Gillian Charles #12;2 9:30 AM plants 10:45 AM Break 11:00 AM Peaking Technologies Continued... 11:30 AM Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine and Utility Scale Solar PV Reference plant updates Levelized cost of energy 12:00 PM Lunch

  16. Technology disrupted

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papatheodorou, Y. [CH2M Hill (United States)

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three years ago, the author presented a report on power generation technologies which in summary said 'no technology available today has the potential of becoming transformational or disruptive in the next five to ten years'. In 2006 the company completed another strategic view research report covering the electric power, oil, gas and unconventional energy industries and manufacturing industry. This article summarises the strategic view findings and then revisits some of the scenarios presented in 2003. The cost per megawatt-hour of the alternatives is given for plants ordered in 2005 and then in 2025. The issue of greenhouse gas regulation is dealt with through carbon sequestration and carbon allowances or an equivalent carbon tax. Results reveal substantial variability through nuclear power, hydro, wind, geothermal and biomass remain competitive through every scenario. Greenhouse gas scenario analysis shows coal still be viable, albeit less competitive against nuclear and renewable technologies. A carbon tax or allowance at $24 per metric ton has the same effect on IGCC cost as a sequestration mandate. However, the latter would hurt gas plants much more than a tax or allowance. Sequestering CO{sub 2} from a gas plant is almost as costly per megawatt-hour as for coal. 5 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    integration of energy efficiency, distributed generation, renewable energy resources and energy storage technologies, both locally and globally, to maximize the value of the...

  18. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Generation - A Primer on Low-Temperature, Small-Scale Applications Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About...

  19. Faience Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Paul

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Joanne Hodges. Faience Technology, Nicholson, UEE 2009Egyptian materials and technology, ed. Paul T. Nicholson,Nicholson, 2009, Faience Technology. UEE. Full Citation:

  20. Selection of materials for sodium fast reactor steam generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubiez-Le Goff, S.; Garnier, S.; Gelineau, O. [AREVA (France); Dalle, F. [Commissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA (France); Blat-Yrieix, M.; Augem, J. M. [Electricite de France - EDF (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) is considered in France as the most mature technology of the different Generation IV systems. In the short-term the designing work is focused on the identification of the potential tracks to demonstrate licensing capability, availability, in-service inspection capability and economical performance. In that frame materials selection for the major components, as the steam generator, is a particularly key point managed within a French Research and Development program launched by AREVA, CEA and EDF. The choice of the material for the steam generator is indeed complex because various aspects shall be considered like mechanical and thermal properties at high temperature, interaction with sodium on one side and water and steam on the other side, resistance to wastage, procurement, fabrication, weldability and ability for inspection and in-situ intervention. The following relevant options are evaluated: the modified 9Cr1Mo ferritic-martensitic grade and the Alloy 800 austenitic grade. The objective of this paper is to assess for both candidates their abilities to reach the current SFR needs regarding material design data, from AFCEN RCC-MRx Code in particular, compatibility with environments and manufacturability. (authors)

  1. Advanced nuclear fuel cycles - Main challenges and strategic choices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Biez, V. [Corps des Mines, 35 bis rue Saint-Sabin, F-75011 Paris (France); Machiels, A.; Sowder, A. [Electric Power Research Institute, Inc. 3420, Hillview Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A graphical conceptual model of the uranium fuel cycles has been developed to capture the present, anticipated, and potential (future) nuclear fuel cycle elements. The once-through cycle and plutonium recycle in fast reactors represent two basic approaches that bound classical options for nuclear fuel cycles. Chief among these other options are mono-recycling of plutonium in thermal reactors and recycling of minor actinides in fast reactors. Mono-recycling of plutonium in thermal reactors offers modest savings in natural uranium, provides an alternative approach for present-day interim management of used fuel, and offers a potential bridging technology to development and deployment of future fuel cycles. In addition to breeder reactors' obvious fuel sustainability advantages, recycling of minor actinides in fast reactors offers an attractive concept for long-term management of the wastes, but its ultimate value is uncertain in view of the added complexity in doing so,. Ultimately, there are no simple choices for nuclear fuel cycle options, as the selection of a fuel cycle option must reflect strategic criteria and priorities that vary with national policy and market perspectives. For example, fuel cycle decision-making driven primarily by national strategic interests will likely favor energy security or proliferation resistance issues, whereas decisions driven primarily by commercial or market influences will focus on economic competitiveness.

  2. Choices and Requirements of Batteries for EVs, HEVs, PHEVs (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A. A.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation describes the choices available and requirements for batteries for electric vehicles, hybrid electric vehicles, plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

  3. Battery Choices for Different Plug-in HEV Configurations (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pesaran, A.

    2006-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Presents battery choices for different plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (HEV) configurations to reduce cost and to improve performance and life.

  4. The Power of Choice ? Cold War Patriots Day of Remembrance...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to control his choices while in prison in Zimbabwe as presented at the recent Cold War Patriots' Day of Remembrance. His presentations were inspiring and his personal example...

  5. Optimization Online - Minimizing Risk Exposure when the Choice of ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Erick Delage

    2015-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Jan 30, 2015 ... Minimizing Risk Exposure when the Choice of a Risk Measure is Ambiguous. Erick Delage(erick.delage ***at*** hec.ca) Jonathan Y.

  6. Technology reviews: Daylighting optical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize the state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends.Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

  7. Design and Performance Aspects of Steam Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganapathy, V.

    generators based on standard, pre-packaged designs. A "standard" boiler has several limitations such as pre-determined furnace dimensions, tube length, surface area, tube spacings etc, which may or may not be the optimum choice for a given steam demand...

  8. Choice of Gauge in Quantum Gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petr Hajicek

    1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is an extended version of the talk given at 19th Texas Symposium of Relativistic Astrophysics and Cosmology, Paris, 1998. It reviews of some recent work; mathematical details are skipped. It is well-known that a choice of gauge in generally covariant models has a twofold pupose: not only to render the dynamics unique, but also to define the spacetime points. A geometric way of choosing gauge that is not based on coordinate conditions---the so-called covariant gauge fixing---is described. After a covariant gauge fixing, the dynamics is unique and the background manifold points are well-defined, but the description remains invariant with respect to all diffeomorphisms of the background manifold. Transformations between different covariant gauge fixings form the well-known Bergmann-Komar group. Each covariant gauge fixing determines a so-called Kucha\\v{r} decomposition. The construction of the quantum theory is based on the Kucha\\v{r} form of the action and the Dirac method of operator constraints. It is demonstrated that the Bergmann-Komar group is too large to be implementable by unitary maps in the quantum domain.

  9. Power Generation Asset Management Technology Roadmap M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be done to determine optimal sensor deployment to address these criteria. TC8 Incorporate turbine layouts, make efforts and operational status within wind power plants to have more...

  10. Heat Transfer Enhancement: Second Generation Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergles, A. E.; Webb, R. L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    substantial benefits for the process and electric utility industries. Most process fluid, particularly water, have higher surface tension' than the fluorocarbon refrigerants. Thus, the closely spaced fins used by the refrigeration in~us? try (748-1378 fins... of refrigerants. A variety of structured surfaces are applied to the outside to enhance shell-side boiling of refrigerants (Fig. 5). These include various formed surfaces (a,b,c,d) and a porous metal lic matrix (e). These surfaces operate primarily...

  11. OpenEI Community - Power Generation Technologies

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff thedriving data

  12. Quadrennial Technology Review's Alternative Generation Workshop Slides |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to analysis3 News7:

  13. Other Distributed Generation Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympia GreenThesource HistoryOsram

  14. The Industrialization of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| DepartmentDepartmentTheEnergyDepartment of Energy The

  15. Distributed Generation Technologies DGT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling Farm <Site

  16. A New Generation of Parabolic Trough Technology

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613Portsmouth SitePresentations | Department ofCouncil OfficialsA

  17. Articles about Next-Generation Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource Heat 1PowerofSystems | DepartmentArticle1 Articles

  18. Measuring Transactions Costs from Observed Behavior: Market Choices in Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Measuring Transactions Costs from Observed Behavior: Market Choices in Peru Renos Vakis, Elisabeth Sadoulet, and Alain de Janvry October 2003 Abstract Farmers incur proportional and fixed transactions costs these transactions costs. When opportunities exist to sell a crop on alternative markets, the observed choice

  19. Factors Affecting Cotton Producers' Choice of Marketing Outlet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Jason 1979-

    2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies 4 Adoption Studies Employing Multinomial Logistic Regression ?.. 5 Hedging Studies ?????????????????????.. 8 Marketing Studies ????????????????????... 12 Non-cotton and General Commodity Marketing Studies ????. 12 Cotton Marketing Studies... Employing Multinomial Logistic Regression This paper will model the factors that influence several qualitative choices (cash marketing outlets) among cotton producers. The objective of qualitative choice modeling is to determine each explanatory...

  20. CSEM WP 112 Consumer Choice and Industrial Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    CSEM WP 112 Consumer Choice and Industrial Policy: A Study of UK Energy Markets Monica Giulietti and Industrial Policy: a study of UK Energy Markets# Monica Giulietti Aston Business School Catherine Waddams are responsible for any remaining errors. #12;2 Consumer Choice and Industrial Policy: a study of UK Energy

  1. Blue Choice New EnglandSM Summary of Benefits

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aalberts, Daniel P.

    Blue Choice New EnglandSM Summary of Benefits Williams College An Association of Independent Blue Cross and Blue Shield Plans This health plan meets Minimum Creditable Coverage Standards Reform Law. #12;Your Care Your Primary Care Provider. When you enroll in Blue Choice New England, you

  2. Children's School Help with Making School Choices October 18, 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Children's School Help with Making School Choices October 18, 2013 School choice decisions about schools, and Stop at the office to request information from the schools you are considering to discuss their views of the child, which will help parents choose a school whose program will best meet

  3. Children's School Help with Making School Choices November, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Children's School Help with Making School Choices November, 2014 School choice decisions are really to customize the attached issues document for your family's priorities. · providing information about schools, and Stop at the office to request information from the schools you are considering. · discussing your child

  4. Student Choices when Learning with Computer Simulations Noah S. Podolefsky*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    Student Choices when Learning with Computer Simulations Noah S. Podolefsky* , Wendy K. Adams Abstract. We examine student choices while using PhET computer simulations (sims) to learn physics content simulations. The PhET project is one such learning tool, a suite of over 80 computer simulations of science

  5. University of Michigan and NBER "Identification of Discrete Choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presenter: Jeremy Fox University of Michigan and NBER "Identification of Discrete Choice Models;Identification of Discrete Choice Models for Bundles and Binary Games Jeremy T. Fox University of Michigan and NBER Natalia Lazzati University of Michigan March 2014 Abstract We study nonparametric identification

  6. Defined Contribution Pensions: Plan Rules, Participant Choices, and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yiling

    Defined Contribution Pensions: Plan Rules, Participant Choices, and the Path of Least Resistance support from the MacArthur Foundation and the Sloan Foundation. #12;2 Defined Contribution Pensions: Plan Rules, Participant Choices, and the Path of Least Resistance Abstract: We assess the impact on savings

  7. COMBINING STATED AND REVEALED CHOICE RESEARCH TO INFORM ENERGY SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy System Simulation Models: The Case of Hybrid Electric Vehicles Report Number: 409 ExaminingCOMBINING STATED AND REVEALED CHOICE RESEARCH TO INFORM ENERGY SYSTEM SIMULATION MODELS: THE CASE parameters for a hybrid energy-economy model (called CIMS) using empirically derived choice models based

  8. Generation of hydrogen peroxide in a shorted fuel cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webb, S.P.; McIntyre, J.A. [Dow Chemical Company, Midland, MI (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrogen peroxide is a {open_quotes}green{close_quotes} chemical with a well-assured future. As such, significant growth in demand is predicted for this material. To meet this growth, new technologies of manufacture are being contemplated to compete with the established Anthraquinone process. Some of these new methods seek the niche market of on-site generation of hydrogen peroxide. One good example of this is Dow`s caustic/peroxide generation scheme for the bleaching of paper pulp. Others rely on externally-supplied electrical power in an electrochemical reactor scheme, where peroxide may be generated additionally in neutral or acidic solution. It has long been realized that the chemical potential of the reactants themselves can be used in a controlled manner in an electrolytic cell. This is the basis of fuel cells (to generate electrical power) and has been extended to the synthesis of useful chemical species, either using solid polymer electrolytes or active oxygen transporting membranes. Use has also been made of the inherent chemical potential in H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} reactions to produce hydrogen peroxide. This reactor utilized a liquid phase cathode with dissolved air or oxygen to produce small concentrations of peroxide in a fixed volume. In fact, most schemes for the direct, electrochemical production of peroxide from hydrogen and oxygen yield low, millimolar peroxide concentrations. This paper describes the development of a scalable, segmented-flow, shorted fuel cell for the generation of greater than 1 w/o hydrogen peroxide. Three areas are of major importance in the development of a continuous, peroxide-forming reactor: the reactor design, catalyst choice and application, and the operating parameters for the reactor. The cathode catalyst is probably the single most important part. Operating parameters include such basics as temperature, pressure, gas flow rate, and liquid flow rate. Each of these topics will be discussed.

  9. Configuration and technology implications of potential nuclear hydrogen system applications.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conzelmann, G.; Petri, M.; Forsberg, C.; Yildiz, B.; ORNL

    2005-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear technologies have important distinctions and potential advantages for large-scale generation of hydrogen for U.S. energy services. Nuclear hydrogen requires no imported fossil fuels, results in lower greenhouse-gas emissions and other pollutants, lends itself to large-scale production, and is sustainable. The technical uncertainties in nuclear hydrogen processes and the reactor technologies needed to enable these processes, as well waste, proliferation, and economic issues must be successfully addressed before nuclear energy can be a major contributor to the nation's energy future. In order to address technical issues in the time frame needed to provide optimized hydrogen production choices, the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI) must examine a wide range of new technologies, make the best use of research funding, and make early decisions on which technology options to pursue. For these reasons, it is important that system integration studies be performed to help guide the decisions made in the NHI. In framing the scope of system integration analyses, there is a hierarchy of questions that should be addressed: What hydrogen markets will exist and what are their characteristics? Which markets are most consistent with nuclear hydrogen? What nuclear power and production process configurations are optimal? What requirements are placed on the nuclear hydrogen system? The intent of the NHI system studies is to gain a better understanding of nuclear power's potential role in a hydrogen economy and what hydrogen production technologies show the most promise. This work couples with system studies sponsored by DOE-EE and other agencies that provide a basis for evaluating and selecting future hydrogen production technologies. This assessment includes identifying commercial hydrogen applications and their requirements, comparing the characteristics of nuclear hydrogen systems to those market requirements, evaluating nuclear hydrogen configuration options within a given market, and identifying the key drivers and thresholds for market viability of nuclear hydrogen options.

  10. TECHNOLOGY AND DEMOCRACY GEOG 804 (002) Wednesday 6-8:30 pm Saunders 219*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyle, Martin

    Syllabus: TECHNOLOGY AND DEMOCRACY GEOG 804 (002) Wednesday 6-8:30 pm Saunders 219* Instructor://blackboard.unc.edu Overview Are society's technological choices open to democratic participation? The graduate seminar and research workshop in TECHNOLOGY AND DEMOCRACY explores political dimensions of technological change

  11. GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

  12. Carbon Markets and Technological Innovation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, T A; Neuhoff, Karsten

    www.eprg.group.cam.ac.uk E P R G W O R K IN G P A P E R N O N -T E C H N IC A L S U M M A R Y Carbon Markets and Technological Innovation EPRG Working Paper 0917 Cambridge Working Paper in Economics 0932 Thomas A. Weber... and Karsten Neuhoff This paper examines how considering firm-level innovation in carbon-abatement technologies influences the optimal design choice for carbon pricing. It builds on Weitzman’s model (1974) that shows in what instances cap and trade...

  13. COPPER CABLE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chelsea Hubbard

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsors large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE's projects and to others in the D&D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased costs of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) generated a list of statements defining specific needs and problems where improved technology could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. One such need is to reduce the volume of waste copper wire and cable generated by D&D. Deactivation and decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities generates hundreds of tons of contaminated copper cable, which are sent to radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology separates the clean copper from contaminated insulation and dust materials in these cables. The recovered copper can then be reclaimed and, more importantly, landfill disposal volumes can be reduced. The existing baseline technology for disposing radioactively contaminated cables is to package the cables in wooden storage boxes and dispose of the cables in radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology is applicable to facility decommissioning projects at many Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and commercial nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning activities. The INEEL Copper Cable Recycling Technology Demonstration investigated the effectiveness and efficiency to recycle 13.5 tons of copper cable. To determine the effectiveness of separating out radioactive contamination, the copper cable was coated with a surrogate contaminant. The demonstration took place at the Bonneville County Technology Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho.

  14. The choice: evaluating and selecting scientific proposals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Navarra, Antonio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The selection process of proposals is a crucial component of scientific progress and innovations. Limited resources must be allocated in the most effective way to maximise advancements and the production of new knowledge, especially as it is becoming increasingly clear that technological and scientific innovation and creativity is an instrument of economic policy and social development. The traditional approach based on merit evaluation by experts has been the preferred method, but there is an issue regarding to what extent such a method can also be an instrument of effective policy. This paper discuss some of the basic processes involved in the evaluation and selection of proposals, indicating some criterion for an optimal solution.

  15. New venture commercialization of clean energy technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, David S. (David Seth)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean energy technologies lower harmful emissions associated with the generation and use of power (e.g. CO2) and many of these technologies have been shown to be cost effective and to provide significant benefits to adopters. ...

  16. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct...

  17. Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand, more flexible thermal generation, and lower costof VG technologies), more flexible thermal generation, pricedemand, more flexible thermal generation, and low-cost bulk-

  18. 10January 1998 Small-Scale Gasification-Based Biomass Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are the technologies of choice today for gasification-based power generationfrom biomass(Fig. I). Fuel cells and micro-gas turbines coupled with biomassgasifiers will offer considerably higher efficiencies at small

  19. Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microturbines: What is a Microturbine? ” OIT’s Industrial1999c. Summary of the Microturbine Technology Summit:s Emerging Companies; Microturbine Firm Hopes IPO Generates

  20. Thermoelectric Generators 1. Thermoelectric generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ho Sung

    1 Thermoelectric Generators HoSung Lee 1. Thermoelectric generator 1.1 Basic Equations In 1821 effects are called the thermoelectric effects. The mechanisms of thermoelectricity were not understood. Cold Hot I - -- - - - - -- Figure 1 Electron concentration in a thermoelectric material. #12;2 A large

  1. Public choice in water resource management: two case studies of the small-scale hydroelectric controversy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soden, D.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydroelectric issues have a long history in the Pacific Northwest, and more recently have come to focus on developing environmentally less-obtrusive means of hydroelectric generation. Small-scale hydroelectric represents perhaps the most important of these means of developing new sources of renewable resources to lessen the nation's dependence on foreign sources of energy. Each potential small-scale hydroelectric project, however, manifests a unique history which provides a highly useful opportunity to study the process of collective social choice in the area of new energy uses of water resources. Utilizing the basic concepts of public choice theory, a highly developed and increasingly widely accepted approach in the social sciences, the politicalization of small-scale hydroelectric proposals is analyzed. Through the use of secondary analysis of archival public opinion data collected from residents of the State of Idaho, and through the development of the two case studies - one on the Palouse River in Eastern Washington and the other at Elk Creek Falls in Northern Idaho, the policy relevant behavior and influence of major actors is assessed. Results provide a useful test of the utility of public-choice theory for the study of cases of natural-resources development when public involvement is high.

  2. CONNECTICUT BIOFUELS TECHNOLOGY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARTONE, ERIK

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    DBS Energy Inc. (“DBS”) intends on using the Connecticut Biofuels Technology Project for the purpose of developing a small-scale electric generating systems that are located on a distributed basis and utilize biodiesel as its principle fuel source. This project will include research and analysis on the quality and applied use of biodiesel for use in electricity production, 2) develop dispatch center for testing and analysis of the reliability of dispatching remote generators operating on a blend of biodiesel and traditional fossil fuels, and 3) analysis and engineering research on fuel storage options for biodiesel of fuels for electric generation.

  3. Sexual selection and mate choice Malte Andersson1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seoane, Javier

    Biology (M092), The University of Western Australia, Crawley 6009, WA, Australia The past two decades have,11,12]. Costs of mate choice, such as the loss of energy and time, might prevent Fisherian self

  4. Leading by Example: Argonne Senior Management Makes "Green" Vehicle Choices

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Peters, Mark; Kearns, Paul;

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne's senior management shows leadership in the sustainability arena with their own personal choices in "green" vehicles. They don't just talk the talk ? they walk the walk.

  5. Essays on Bank Optimal Portfolio Choice under Liquidity Constraint

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Eul Jin

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    portfolio choices under liquidity constraints. Our theory predicts that liquidation plays an important role in a bank's portfolio model. Even though liquidation is an off-equilibrium phenomenon, banks can have rich loan portfolios due to the possibility...

  6. Leading by Example: Argonne Senior Management Makes "Green" Vehicle Choices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Mark; Kearns, Paul

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Argonne's senior management shows leadership in the sustainability arena with their own personal choices in "green" vehicles. They don't just talk the talk — they walk the walk.

  7. Understanding the College Choice Process of Catholic Homeschooled Students

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henry, Linda Mary

    2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand how Catholic homeschooled students navigate the college choice process. With the growth of homeschooling in the United States nearly doubling in the past eight years (Cogan, 2010), this study...

  8. Natural Gas Utility Restructuring and Customer Choice Act (Montana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These regulations apply to natural gas utilities that have restructured in order to acquire rate-based facilities. The regulations address customer choice offerings by natural gas utilities, which...

  9. PowerChoice Residential Customer Response to TOU Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peters, Jane S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    January 15. Office of Tariffs and Markets. Laird, N.M. andseason load- data analysis Tariff Period Weekday Off-Peaka.m. Table 3-2. PowerChoice tariff seasons Months June July

  10. The Quantitative Genetics of Mate Choice Evolution: Theory and Empiricism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ratterman, Nicholas 1981-

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    emerged. From a theoretical standpoint, the nature of the genetic covariance built up by the process of mate choice has received considerable attention, though the models still make biologically unrealistic assumptions. Empirically, the difficulty...

  11. NREL: News - NREL Receives Editors' Choice Awards for Supercomputer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high-performance computer and the groundbreaking research it made possible. The Apollo 8000 system from HP has won one of R&D Magazine's Editors' Choice Awards. This...

  12. Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic Energy Agency. Nuclear Technology Review 2008. Vienna1: Generations of Nuclear Technology Time 53 1945-1965 -the expansion of their nuclear technology potential. 3 The

  13. President's Corner Technology Corner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    at Albany Peak oil, growing energy demand in India and China, global warming, and ter- rorism are slowly technologies that are end use­specific and tech- nologies that generate electricity, a "universal" energy). In the former category, one finds domestic and industrial hot water production; space heating, including both

  14. Technology Validation Sig Gronich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and validate integrated hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in a systems context under real operating in quantity that is powered by a wind turbine. · By 2008, validate hydrogen vehicles with greater than 250. . Distributed Generation TransportationBiomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil With

  15. Energy 101: Fuel Cell Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn how fuel cell technology generates clean electricity from hydrogen to power our buildings and transportation-while emitting nothing but water. This video illustrates the fundamentals of fuel cell technology and its potential to supply our homes, offices, industries, and vehicles with sustainable, reliable energy.

  16. Energy 101: Fuel Cell Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn how fuel cell technology generates clean electricity from hydrogen to power our buildings and transportation-while emitting nothing but water. This video illustrates the fundamentals of fuel cell technology and its potential to supply our homes, offices, industries, and vehicles with sustainable, reliable energy.

  17. 17.884J / 14.296J Collective Choice I, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snyder, James M.

    Examines political institutions from a rational choice perspective. The now burgeoning rational choice literature on legislatures, bureaucracies, courts, and elections constitutes the chief focus. Some focus on institutions ...

  18. Applying epoch-era analysis for homeowner selection of distributed generation power systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piña, Alexander L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The current shift from centralized energy generation to a more distributed model has opened a number of choices for homeowners to provide their own power. While there are a number of systems to purchase, there are no tools ...

  19. Power conversion technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, M. A.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Power Conversion Technologies thrust area identifies and sponsors development activities that enhance the capabilities of engineering at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the area of solid- state power electronics. Our primary objective is to be a resource to existing and emerging LLNL programs that require advanced solid-state power electronic technologies.. Our focus is on developing and integrating technologies that will significantly impact the capability, size, cost, and reliability of future power electronic systems. During FY-96, we concentrated our research efforts on the areas of (1) Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR); (2) novel solid-state opening switches; (3) advanced modulator technology for accelerators; (4) compact accelerators; and (5) compact pulse generators.

  20. A comparison of reversible chemical reactions for solar thermochemical power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    453 A comparison of reversible chemical reactions for solar thermochemical power generation O. M storage of the reaction products. A number of reactions have been proposed for solar thermochemical power to be a good choice for first generation solar thermochemical power generation. Revue Phys. Appl. 15 (1980) 453

  1. Digital Actuator Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Thomas; Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are significant developments underway in new types of actuators for power plant active components. Many of these make use of digital technology to provide a wide array of benefits in performance of the actuators and in reduced burden to maintain them. These new product offerings have gained considerable acceptance in use in process plants. In addition, they have been used in conventional power generation very successfully. This technology has been proven to deliver the benefits promised and substantiate the claims of improved performance. The nuclear industry has been reluctant to incorporate digital actuator technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns due to a number of concerns. These could be summarized as cost, regulatory uncertainty, and a certain comfort factor with legacy analog technology. The replacement opportunity for these types of components represents a decision point for whether to invest in more modern technology that would provide superior operational and maintenance benefits. Yet, the application of digital technology has been problematic for the nuclear industry, due to qualification and regulatory issues. With some notable exceptions, the result has been a continuing reluctance to undertake the risks and uncertainties of implementing digital actuator technology when replacement opportunities present themselves. Rather, utilities would typically prefer to accept the performance limitations of the legacy analog actuator technologies to avoid impacts to project costs and schedules. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the benefits of digital actuator technology can be significant in terms of plant performance and that it is worthwhile to address the barriers currently holding back the widespread development and use of this technology. It addresses two important objectives in pursuit of the beneficial use of digital actuator technology for nuclear power plants: 1. To demonstrate the benefits of digital actuator technology over legacy analog sensor technology in both quantitative and qualitative ways. 2. To recognize and address the added difficulty of digital technology qualification, especially in regard to software common cause failure (SCCF), that is introduced by the use of digital actuator technology.

  2. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOE’s Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database was updated in 2009 to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.

  3. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    confidential, or otherwise restricted information. Insert photo of your choice Drilling on the OIT campus Feb. 2009 2 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov * Timeline:...

  4. Department of Engineering Technology Technology Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    Department of Engineering Technology Technology Education A Teacher Education Program New Jersey Institute of Technology #12;WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? Technology teachers teach problem-based learning utilizing math, science and technology principles. Technological studies involve students: · Designing

  5. Enhanced Sampling and Analysis, Selection of Technology for Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svoboda, John; Meikrantz, David

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this study includes the investigation of sampling technologies used in industry and their potential application to nuclear fuel processing. The goal is to identify innovative sampling methods using state of the art techniques that could evolve into the next generation sampling and analysis system for metallic elements. This report details the progress made in the first half of FY 2010 and includes a further consideration of the research focus and goals for this year. Our sampling options and focus for the next generation sampling method are presented along with the criteria used for choosing our path forward. We have decided to pursue the option of evaluating the feasibility of microcapillary based chips to remotely collect, transfer, track and supply microliters of sample solutions to analytical equipment in support of aqueous processes for used nuclear fuel cycles. Microchip vendors have been screened and a choice made for the development of a suitable microchip design followed by production of samples for evaluation by ANL, LANL, and INL on an independent basis.

  6. A REVIEW OF ASSUMPTIONS AND ANALYSIS IN EPRI EA-3409, "HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE CHOICE: REVISION OF REEPS BEHAVIORAL MODELS"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Tech- nology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling," LBLTechnology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling" for a more

  7. Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization (Desiccant Technologies), January 2004 Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies), January 2004 The purpose of this report is to...

  8. Remote which-way-choice scheme: proposed foundations experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artur Szczepanski

    2005-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Twin photons from spontaneous parametric down-conversion with preselected polarization are used as spatially disjoint subsystems. One photon is subject to an interference measurement, while a projective measurement of the second photon induces the way-choice of the first photon. This would be an example of way-choice free of direct action on the interfering photon. Two further applications of the proposed scheme are considered: a new method of quantum information speed measurement, and a test of commutation of space-like remote measurements.

  9. Wind Generation Feasibility Study in Bethel, AK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom Humphrey, YKHC; Lance Kincaid, EMCOR Energy & Technologies

    2004-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report studies the wind resources in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation (YKHC) region, located in southwestern Alaska, and the applicability of wind generation technologies to YKHC facilities.

  10. Hardware model of a shipboard generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkins, Gregory L. (Gregory Lewis)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hardware model of the Gas Turbine Generator (GTG) in use on the US Navy's DDG-51 Class Destroyer is constructed for use as a lab apparatus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Laboratory for Electromagnetic and ...

  11. Next-generation information systems for genomics 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mungall, Christopher

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies is transforming biology by enabling individual researchers to sequence the genomes of individual organisms or cells on a massive scale. In order to realize the ...

  12. Coal Gasification for Power Generation, 3. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered include: an overview of Coal Generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; a description of gasification technology including processes and systems; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; a discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; an evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; a discussion of IGCC project development options; a discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and, a detailed description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

  13. Solar thermoelectrics for small scale power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amatya, Reja

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past two decades, there has been a surge in the research of new thermoelectric (TE) materials, driven party by the need for clean and sustainable power generation technology. Utilizing the Seebeck effect, the ...

  14. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) Technology Assessment Program (TAP) was developed to provide detailed, comparable data for environmental technologies and to disseminate this data to D&D professionals in a manner that will facilitate the review and selection of technologies to perform decontamination and decommissioning. The objectives for this project include the following: Determine technology needs through review of the Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) information and other applicable websites and needs databases; Perform a detailed review of industries that perform similar activities as those required in D&D operations to identify additional technologies; Define the technology assessment program for characterization and waste management problem sets; Define the data management program for characterization, dismantlement, and waste management problem sets; Evaluate baseline and innovative technologies under standard test conditions at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) and other locations and collect data in the areas of performance, cost, health and safety, operations and maintenance, and primary and secondary waste generation; Continue to locate, verify, and incorporate technology performance data from other sources into the multimedia information system; and Develop the conceptual design for a dismantlement technology decision analysis tool for dismantlement technologies.

  15. The Solar Photovoltaics Technology Conflict between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutch, John

    A Duel in the Sun The Solar Photovoltaics Technology Conflict between China and the United States A Duel in the Sun The Solar Photovoltaics Technology Conflict between China and the United States1 John domestically, and selling interna- tionally solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity- generating technology. Over

  16. Power Technologies Energy Data Book - Fourth Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aabakken, J.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, prepared by NREL's Strategic Energy Analysis Center, includes up-to-date information on power technologies, including complete technology profiles. The data book also contains charts on electricity restructuring, power technology forecasts, electricity supply, electricity capability, electricity generation, electricity demand, prices, economic indicators, environmental indicators, and conversion factors.

  17. Information technology equipment cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report The Electric Drive Technologies research and...

  19. Optimal Technology Selection and Operation of Microgrids inCommercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marnay, Chris; Venkataramanan, Giri; Stadler, Michael; Siddiqui,Afzal; Firestone, Ryan; Chandran, Bala

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The deployment of small (<1-2 MW) clusters of generators,heat and electrical storage, efficiency investments, and combined heatand power (CHP) applications (particularly involving heat activatedcooling) in commercial buildings promises significant benefits but posesmany technical and financial challenges, both in system choice and itsoperation; if successful, such systems may be precursors to widespreadmicrogrid deployment. The presented optimization approach to choosingsuch systems and their operating schedules uses Berkeley Lab'sDistributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model [DER-CAM], extendedto incorporate electrical storage options. DER-CAM chooses annual energybill minimizing systems in a fully technology-neutral manner. Anillustrative example for a San Francisco hotel is reported. The chosensystem includes two engines and an absorption chiller, providing anestimated 11 percent cost savings and 10 percent carbon emissionreductions, under idealized circumstances.

  20. arc generated carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as a single storage endpoint and a pool of distributed computing nodes. The next generation ARC middleware with its several new technologies provides new possibilities in...

  1. A Monte Carlo Approach To Generator Portfolio Planning And Carbon...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    providing positive net annual energy generation. These technologies may include demand response, vehicle-to-grid systems, and large-scale energy storage. Authors Elaine...

  2. Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    identified six next generation technologies for development including: the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor; the Sodium Fast Reactor; the Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor; the Molten Salt...

  3. Establishing Thermo-Electric Generator (TEG) Design Targets for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Hybrid Vehicles Establishing Thermo-Electric Generator (TEG) Design Targets for Hybrid Vehicles 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  4. Establishing Thermo-Electric Generator (TEG) Design Targets for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Establishing Thermo-Electric Generator (TEG) Design Targets for Hybrid Vehicles 2013 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review May 15th, 2013 R.Vijayagopal,...

  5. Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    generation of leaders in America's nuclear industry as well as support new and advanced nuclear technologies from reactor materials to innovative sensors and instruments to more...

  6. Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Outlook (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and...

  7. Secretary Chu Announces $45 Million to Support Next Generation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    energy technology by supporting the testing of next-generation wind turbine designs. "Wind power holds tremendous potential to help create new jobs and reduce carbon...

  8. Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Cinq-Mars; Timothy Burke; Dr. James Irish; Brian Gustafson; Dr. James Kirtley; Dr. Aiman Alawa

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: � Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. � Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. � Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. � Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. � Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. � Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. � Completed final reporting and deliverables

  9. Adaptive Control of Third Harmonic Generation via Genetic Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Xia

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    with selection, to improve the population as the evolution progresses from generation to generation. Femtosecond laser pulse tailoring, with the use of a pulse shaper, has become an important technology which enables applications in femtochemistry, micromachining...

  10. Technology '90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have a long history of excellence in performing research and development in a number of areas, including the basic sciences, applied-energy technology, and weapons-related technology. Although technology transfer has always been an element of DOE and laboratory activities, it has received increasing emphasis in recent years as US industrial competitiveness has eroded and efforts have increased to better utilize the research and development resources the laboratories provide. This document, Technology '90, is the latest in a series that is intended to communicate some of the many opportunities available for US industry and universities to work with the DOE and its laboratories in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. Technology '90 is divided into three sections: Overview, Technologies, and Laboratories. The Overview section describes the activities and accomplishments of the DOE research and development program offices. The Technologies section provides descriptions of new technologies developed at the DOE laboratories. The Laboratories section presents information on the missions, programs, and facilities of each laboratory, along with a name and telephone number of a technology transfer contact for additional information. Separate papers were prepared for appropriate sections of this report.

  11. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William H. Day

    2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

  12. Technology reviews: Dynamic curtain wall systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schuman, J.; Rubinstein, F.; Papamichael, K.; Beltran, L.; Lee, E.S.; Selkowitz, S.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a representative review of existing, emerging, and future technology options in each of five hardware and systems areas in envelope and lighting technologies: lighting systems, glazing systems, shading systems, daylighting optical systems, and dynamic curtain wall systems. The term technology is used here to describe any design choice for energy efficiency, ranging from individual components to more complex systems to general design strategies. The purpose of this task is to characterize die state of the art in envelope and lighting technologies in order to identify those with promise for advanced integrated systems, with an emphasis on California commercial buildings. For each technology category, the following activities have been attempted to the extent possible: Identify key performance characteristics and criteria for each technology. Determine the performance range of available technologies. Identify the most promising technologies and promising trends in technology advances. Examine market forces and market trends. Develop a continuously growing in-house database to be used throughout the project. A variety of information sources have been used in these technology characterizations, including miscellaneous periodicals, manufacturer catalogs and cut sheets, other research documents, and data from previous computer simulations. We include these different sources in order to best show the type and variety of data available, however publication here does not imply our guarantee of these data. Within each category, several broad classes are identified, and within each class we examine the generic individual technologies that fall into that class.

  13. Market Share Elasticities for Fuel and Technology Choice in Home Heating and Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Home Heating Anderson [21 Oil Price Electric Share Gas ShareBaughman and Joskow [3] Oil Price Gas Price Lin, Hirst,and Cohn [10] Gas Price Oil Price Hartman and Hollyer [8] (

  14. Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice, Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) (Fact Sheet)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cellsan FFV? An FFV, as

  15. Flexible Fuel Vehicles: Providing a Renewable Fuel Choice, Vehicle Technologies Program (VTP) (Fact Sheet)

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home PageStation LocationsGeneseeValley of theEthanol8 F l e e t

  16. Financial Flexibility, Risk Management, and Payout Choice* Alice Adams Bonaim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University of Technology, Sydney

    Financial Flexibility, Risk Management, and Payout Choice* Alice Adams Bonaimé University.hankins@uky.edu Jarrad Harford University of Washington Email: jarrad@uw.edu August 2011 Abstract: Risk management of hedging and for other determinants of payout policy and risk management, including institutional ownership

  17. Emotion Regulation Choice: A Conceptual Framework and Supporting Evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, James J.

    Emotion Regulation Choice: A Conceptual Framework and Supporting Evidence Gal Sheppes Tel Aviv that remains virtually unexplored is that of emotion regulation. This is surprising given that healthy adaptation requires flexibly choosing between regulation strategies in a manner that is responsive

  18. MoneyTips4Texas Lifestyle Choices & Your Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MoneyTips4Texas Lifestyle Choices & Your Health Andrew B. Crocker Angela B. Burkham Sara L. Dodd: To gain knowledge about factors that may affect personal health and wellness. Objectives: 1. Learn about things which may affect health and wellness. 2. Learn about resources to help improve health and wellness

  19. University of California Energy Institute Design Choices in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley. University of

    Electricity Market » Transmission pricing #12;University of California Energy Institute Restructuring Goals Choices: Details · Organization of Firms · Pricing the Products ­ Energy Price Formation Process ­ Pricing, and Marketers #12;University of California Energy Institute Pricing Energy · Mandatory vs. Voluntary Pool · Day

  20. National Transportation Policy Options: A Time for Choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    National Transportation Policy Options: A Time for Choice A white paper for participants of the 2008 James L. Oberstar Forum The Next Authorization: Transforming Transportation Policy? April 6­7, 2008 Minneapolis, Minnesota Sponsored by Center for Transportation Studies University of Minnesota

  1. Microarchitecture Choices (Implementation of the VAX) Yale N. Patt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patt, Yale

    Microarchitecture Choices (Implementation of the VAX) Yale N. Patt Electrical Engineering andComputerScience University of Michigan, Ann Arbor 48109-2122 ABSTRACT The VAX Architecture provides hardwareimple- mentors- tics all provide challenges to the microarchitect. The VAX architecture was introduced in 1977 with its

  2. Representational Format, Student Choice, and Problem Solving in Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colorado at Boulder, University of

    , pictorial, graphical, verbal).1 In a study of a 367-student algebra-based physics class, we examine student formats, and look for factors that may influence their ability or choices. As a control, part of the class or informal, abstract or concrete, or text-based versus graphics-based, to name just a few. Studies involving

  3. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Steam Generator and Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. K. Wright

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for application in heat exchangers and core internals for the NGNP. The primary candidates are Inconel 617, Haynes 230, Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy XR. Based on the technical maturity, availability in required product forms, experience base, and high temperature mechanical properties all of the vendor pre-conceptual design studies have specified Alloy 617 as the material of choice for heat exchangers. Also a draft code case for Alloy 617 was developed previously. Although action was suspended before the code case was accepted by ASME, this draft code case provides a significant head start for achieving codification of the material. Similarly, Alloy 800H is the material of choice for control rod sleeves. In addition to the above listed considerations, Alloy 800H is already listed in the nuclear section of the ASME Code; although the maximum use temperature and time need to be increased.

  4. Energy and Technology Review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quirk, W.J. [ed.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established in 1952 to do research on nuclear weapons and magnetic fusion energy. Since then, we other major programs have been added including laser fusion, and laser isotope separation, biomedical and environmental science, strategic defense and applied energy technology. These programs, in turn, require research in basic scientific disciplines, including chemistry and materials science, computer science and technology, engineering and physics. In this issue, Herald Brown, the Laboratory`s third director and now counselor at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, reminisces about his years at Livermore and comments about the Laboratory`s role in the future. Also an article on visualizing dynamic systems in three dimensions is presented. Researchers can use our interactive algorithms to translate massive quantities of numerical data into visual form and can assign the visual markers of their choice to represent three- dimensional phenomena in a two-dimensional setting, such as a monitor screen. Major work has been done in the visualization of climate modeling, but the algorithms can be used for visualizing virtually any phenomena.

  5. Generation Planning (pbl/generation)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGene ControlsCounselGeneral User Generation

  6. Fuel Cells as an Emerging Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewell, D. M.

    FUEL CELLS AS AN EMERGING TECHNOLOGY Douglas M. Jewell, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, West Virginia Introduction The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been directing a fuel cell research and develop ment... the technology base required to enable private sector commercialization of this new energy option for power generation to take place. Under sponsorship of DOE and other Government and private agencies, fuel cell technology has evolved from limited...

  7. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysts at NREL have developed and applied a systematic approach to review the LCA literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a procedure called 'harmonization.' Harmonization of the literature provides increased precision and helps clarify the impacts of specific electricity generation choices, producing more robust results.

  8. Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagurney, Anna

    Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain;Modeling Energy Taxes and Credits: The Genco's Choice · Each Genco has a portfolio of power plants · Each power plant can have different supply costs and transaction costs · Supply costs can reflect capital

  9. Updating and Enhancing the MA3T Vehicle Choice Model

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  10. Careers in science and technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this book is to expose junior and senior high school students to the science and technology fields. It also will convey the importance of getting a general education in science and mathematics while still in high school and of continuing such studies in college. This is intended to encourge students, particularly underrepresented minorities and women, to consider and prepare for careers in science and technology. This book attempts to point out the increasing importance of such knowledge in daily life regardless of occupational choice. This book is intended to be used by junior and senior high school students, as a classroom reference by teachers, and by scientist and engineers participating in outreach activities.

  11. Yes, your ideas and our technologies can contribute to economic, social and environmental progress. Alstom is a global leader in the world of power generation and rail infrastructure and sets the benchmark for innovative and environmentally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Alstom is a global leader in the world of power generation and rail infrastructure and sets the benchmark capacity automated metros in the world, and provides integrated power plant solutions and associated services for a wide variety of energy sources, including wind, solar, hydro, geothermal, ocean (wave), gas

  12. FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and fuel cells offer great promise for our energy future. Fuel cell vehicles are not yet commercially, such as a hydrogen fueling station or hydrogen fuel cell vehicle. Technology validation does not certify, and the Federal Government to evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicle and infrastructure technologies together in real

  13. Recipient allocation preferences and organizational choices: a fit perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogus, Celile Itir

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    . Christopher O. L. H. Porter was one of the most influential people throughout my graduate career, I thank him for his tremendous help with this dissertation and also for our work in the Team Research Lab. Mindy Bergman and Angelo DeNisi were very helpful... the relationship between different outcome types and choice of an allocation preference almost exclusively focused on the outcome categories proposed by the social exchange theory (Foa & Foa, 1975). The theory identifies six outcome categories that may...

  14. Choices for Growth: Quality of Life and the Natural Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, John

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    of interac- 6 Choices for Growth Smart growth A way to restore community and economic vitality while preserving natural areas In recent years there has been a renaissance in urban design that focuses on the human scale. Several names are used, including smart... growth, sensible growth, livable communities, and new urbanism. We use smart growth because it has the broadest base of practice in the US. Smart growth means development that ac- commodates growth in economically viable, environmentally responsible...

  15. Recipient allocation preferences and organizational choices: a fit perspective 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogus, Celile Itir

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    . Christopher O. L. H. Porter was one of the most influential people throughout my graduate career, I thank him for his tremendous help with this dissertation and also for our work in the Team Research Lab. Mindy Bergman and Angelo DeNisi were very helpful... the relationship between different outcome types and choice of an allocation preference almost exclusively focused on the outcome categories proposed by the social exchange theory (Foa & Foa, 1975). The theory identifies six outcome categories that may...

  16. Quantum mechanism helps agents combat "bad" social choice rules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haoyang Wu

    2011-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum strategies have been successfully applied to game theory for years. However, as a reverse problem of game theory, the theory of mechanism design is ignored by physicists. In this paper, the theory of mechanism design is generalized to a quantum domain. The main result is that by virtue of a quantum mechanism, agents who satisfy a certain condition can combat "bad" social choice rules instead of being restricted by the traditional mechanism design theory.

  17. Hybrid Fuel Cell Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None available

    2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purpose of this STI product and unless otherwise stated, hybrid fuel cell systems are power generation systems in which a high temperature fuel cell is combined with another power generating technology. The resulting system exhibits a synergism in which the combination performs with an efficiency far greater than can be provided by either system alone. Hybrid fuel cell designs under development include fuel cell with gas turbine, fuel cell with reciprocating (piston) engine, and designs that combine different fuel cell technologies. Hybrid systems have been extensively analyzed and studied over the past five years by the Department of Energy (DOE), industry, and others. These efforts have revealed that this combination is capable of providing remarkably high efficiencies. This attribute, combined with an inherent low level of pollutant emission, suggests that hybrid systems are likely to serve as the next generation of advanced power generation systems.

  18. Interactions among bioenergy feedstock choices, landscape dynamics, and land use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dale, Virginia H [ORNL; Kline, Keith L [ORNL; Wright, Lynn L [ORNL; Perlack, Robert D [ORNL; Downing, Mark [ORNL; Graham, Robin Lambert [ORNL

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Landscape implications of bioenergy feedstock choices are significant and depend on land-use practices and their environmental impacts. Although land-use changes and carbon emissions associated with bioenergy feedstock production are dynamic and complicated, lignocellulosic feedstocks may offer opportunities that enhance sustainability when compared to other transportation fuel alternatives. For bioenergy sustainability, major drivers and concerns revolve around energy security, food production, land productivity, soil carbon and erosion, greenhouse gas emissions, biodiversity, air quality, and water quantity and quality. The many implications of bioenergy feedstock choices require several indicators at multiple scales to provide a more complete accounting of effects. Ultimately, the long-term sustainability of bioenergy feedstock resources (as well as food supplies) throughout the world depends on land-use practices and landscape dynamics. Land-management decisions often invoke trade-offs among potential environmental effects and social and economic factors as well as future opportunities for resource use. The hypothesis being addressed in this paper is that sustainability of bioenergy feedstock production can be achieved via appropriately designed crop residue and perennial lignocellulosic systems. We find that decision makers need scientific advancements and adequate data that both provide quantitative and qualitative measures of the effects of bioenergy feedstock choices at different spatial and temporal scales and allow fair comparisons among available options for renewable liquid fuels.

  19. Insertion of Distributed Generation into Rural Feeders , R. MORENO+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    -generating technologies with new technologies that pollute less. Therefore, the use of renewable energies in the worldwide of renewable energy distributed generators (DG) to radial feeders is assessed. Often, the long distance between, however, are not usually designed to receive energy at the consumer end. This problem intensifies

  20. Including risk in stated-preference economic valuations: Experiments on choices for marine recreation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerber, Leah R.

    . All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Stated-preference valuation methods use hypothetical scenariosIncluding risk in stated-preference economic valuations: Experiments on choices for marine xxx Keywords: Choice experiments Diving Economic valuation Fishing Hypothetical bias Recreation Risk

  1. Photovoltaics: technological progress and its future in agriculture. Staff report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heid, W.G. Jr

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in photovoltaic technology are rapidly bringing it into the range of competitiveness with conventional and other alternative energy source. Photovoltaic systems can be used for nearly all of agriculture's stationary power needs, including energy to operate appliances and to heat farm homes. It is an appropriate technology for small as well as larger sized farms. As researchers and farmers weigh future alternative energy choices, photovoltaic systems should be included in their economic comparisons.

  2. Biomass Support for the China Renewable Energy Law: International Biomass Energy Technology Review Report, January 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subcontractor report giving an overview of the biomass power generation technologies used in China, the U.S., and Europe.

  3. Pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion for power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimer, R.F.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Second-generation Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (PCFBC) is the culmination of years of effort in the development of a new generation of power plants which can operate on lower-quality fuels with substantially improved efficiencies, meet environmental requirements, and provide a lower cost of electricity. Air Products was selected in the DOE Clean Coal Technology Round V program to build, own, and operate the first commercial power plant using second-generation PCFBC technology, to be located at an Air Products chemicals manufacturing facility in Calvert City, Kentucky. This paper describes the second-generation PCFBC concept and its critical technology components.

  4. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. David A. Petti

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a demonstration of the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology for the production of process heat, electricity, and hydrogen. This nuclear- based technology can provide high-temperature process heat (up to 950°C) that can be used as a substitute for the burning of fossil fuels for a wide range of commercial applications (see Figure 1). The substitution of the HTGR for burning fossil fuels conserves these hydrocarbon resources for other uses, reduces uncertainty in the cost and supply of natural gas and oil, and eliminates the emissions of greenhouse gases attendant with the burning of these fuels. The HTGR is a passively safe nuclear reactor concept with an easily understood safety basis that permits substantially reduced emergency planning requirements and improved siting flexibility compared to other nuclear technologies.

  5. ST ATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    conditioning (Carrier) and power generation (UTC Power). UTRC works directly with the UTC business units and outside partners to develop technology solutions that transition into...

  6. National Wind Technology Center to Debut New Dynamometer (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New test facility will be used to accelerate the development and deployment of next-generation offshore and land-based wind energy technologies.

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Silicon Nanowire...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Generation Energy Storage Presentation given by Amprius, Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

  8. Backup Power Cost of Ownership Analysis and Incumbent Technology...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    backup power and presents the estimated annualized cost of ownership for fuel cell backup power systems compared with the incumbent technologies of battery and diesel generator...

  9. Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition: Challenge-X 2008 DOE...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications EcoCAR the Next Generation IN-VEHICLE, HIGH-POWER ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS PENN STATE DOE GRADUATE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (GATE) PROGRAM FOR...

  10. ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP VOLUME 8: COMBINED HEAT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See "Technology Area Definitions" section No Explicit Systems Integration Renewable power generation creates income stream to support management of waste streams Very high...

  11. Divisionalization, product cannibalization and product location choice: Evidence from the U.S. automobile industry 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeong, Eui Kyo

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    division's new product location choice. But this study didn't find any significant role of divisional status on new product location choice. And contrary to our expectation, the results of intra-firm divisional domain overlap and new product location choice...

  12. New and traditional educational media : how to choose between them Teachers' Choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 New and traditional educational media : how to choose between them Teachers' Choices Alain the meaning of `new' in the context of new media, and what choices teachers have had. It looks at the time of these: What exactly does new media mean? Has there ever really been a choice? Isn't time a relative idea

  13. Technology Application Centers: Facilitating Technology Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhel, G. J.

    's approach to technology deployment seeks to blend an industrial customer's priorities with the utility's marketing and customer service objectives. A&C Enercom sees technology deployment as the sum of an equation: technology deployment equals technology...

  14. Assessment of coal technology options and implications for the State of Hawaii

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, J.L.; Elcock, D.; Elliott, T.J. [and others] [and others

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mandate of this research report was to provide the state of Hawaii with an assessment of the potential opportunities and drawbacks of relying on coal-fired generating technologies to diversify its fuel mix and satisfy future electric power requirements. This assessment was to include a review of existing and emerging coal-based power technologies-including their associated costs, environmental impacts, land use, and infrastructure requirements-to determine the range of impacts likely to occur if such systems were deployed in Hawaii. Coupled with this review, the report was also to (1) address siting and safety issues as they relate to technology choice and coal transport, (2) consider how environmental costs associated with coal usage are included in the integrated resource planning (ERP) process, and (3) develop an analytical tool from which the Department of Business, Economic Development & Tourism of the State of Hawaii could conduct first-order comparisons of power plant selection and siting. The prepared report addresses each element identified above. However, available resources and data limitations limited the extent to which particular characteristics of coal use could be assessed. For example, the technology profiles are current but not as complete regarding future developments and cost/emissions data as possible, and the assessment of coal technology deployment issues in Hawaii was conducted on an aggregate (not site-specific) basis. Nonetheless, the information and findings contained in this report do provide an accurate depiction of the opportunities for and issues associated with coal utilization in the state of Hawaii.

  15. Networking and Information Technology Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program, as required by the High-Performance Computing Act of 1991 (P.L. 102-194), the Next Generation Internet Research Act of...

  16. A REVIEW OF ASSUMPTIONS AND ANALYSIS IN EPRI EA-3409, "HOUSEHOLD APPLIANCE CHOICE: REVISION OF REEPS BEHAVIORAL MODELS"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, D.J.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and electric forced-air; heat pumps; and electric baseboard)are conventional air conditioning and heat pump, given theair choice elec forced-air choice heat pump choice elec

  17. Understanding and Managing Generation Y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Kevin

    2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There are four generations in the workplace today; they consist of the Silent Generation, Baby Boom Generation, Generation X, and Generation Y. Generation Y, being the newest generation, is the least understood generation although marketers...

  18. 2007 gasification technologies conference papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sessions covered: gasification industry roundtable; the gasification market in China; gasification for power generation; the gasification challenge: carbon capture and use storage; industrial and polygeneration applications; gasification advantage in refinery applications; addressing plant performance; reliability and availability; gasification's contribution to supplementing gaseous and liquid fuels supplies; biomass gasification for fuel and power markets; and advances in technology-research and development

  19. FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology Demonstration Program Technology Focus FEMPFederal Energy Management Program Trends in Energy Management Technology: BCS Integration Technologies ­ Open Communications into a complete EMCIS. The first article [1] covered enabling technologies for emerging energy management systems

  20. The detection of cheating in multiple choice examinations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richmond, Peter

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cheating in examinations is acknowledged by an increasing number of organizations to be widespread. We examine two different approaches to assess their effectiveness at detecting anomalous results, suggestive of collusion, using data taken from a number of multiple-choice examinations organized by the UK Radio Communication Foundation. Analysis of student pair overlaps of correct answers is shown to give results consistent with more orthodox statistical correlations for which confidence limits as opposed to the less familiar "Bonferroni method" can be used. A simulation approach is also developed which confirms the interpretation of the empirical approach.

  1. Lighting Choices to Save You Money | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your HomeLatestCenter (LMI-EFRC) -Choices to Save You Money

  2. Choice FuelCorp Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovationin Urban Transport | Open EnergyChippewa ValleyChoice FuelCorp Inc

  3. Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program: Project fact sheets 2000, status as of June 30, 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Coal Technology Demonstration Program (CCT Program), a model of government and industry cooperation, responds to the Department of Energy's (DOE) mission to foster a secure and reliable energy system that is environmentally and economically sustainable. The CCT Program represents an investment of over $5.2 billion in advanced coal-based technology, with industry and state governments providing an unprecedented 66 percent of the funding. With 26 of the 38 active projects having completed operations, the CCT Program has yielded clean coal technologies (CCTs) that are capable of meeting existing and emerging environmental regulations and competing in a deregulated electric power marketplace. The CCT Program is providing a portfolio of technologies that will assure that U.S. recoverable coal reserves of 274 billion tons can continue to supply the nation's energy needs economically and in an environmentally sound manner. As the nation embarks on a new millennium, many of the clean coal technologies have realized commercial application. Industry stands ready to respond to the energy and environmental demands of the 21st century, both domestically and internationally, For existing power plants, there are cost-effective environmental control devices to control sulfur dioxide (S02), nitrogen oxides (NO,), and particulate matter (PM). Also ready is a new generation of technologies that can produce electricity and other commodities, such as steam and synthetic gas, and provide efficiencies and environmental performance responsive to global climate change concerns. The CCT Program took a pollution prevention approach as well, demonstrating technologies that remove pollutants or their precursors from coal-based fuels before combustion. Finally, new technologies were introduced into the major coal-based industries, such as steel production, to enhance environmental performance. Thanks in part to the CCT Program, coal--abundant, secure, and economical--can continue in its role as a key component in the U.S. and world energy markets. The CCT Program also has global importance in providing clean, efficient coal-based technology to a burgeoning energy market in developing countries largely dependent on coal. Based on 1997 data, world energy consumption is expected to increase 60 percent by 2020, with almost half of the energy increment occurring in developing Asia (including China and India). By 2020, energy consumption in developing Asia is projected to surpass consumption in North America. The energy form contributing most to the growth is electricity, as developing Asia establishes its energy infrastructure. Coal, the predominant indigenous fuel, in that region will be the fuel of choice in electricity production. The CCTs offer a means to mitigate potential environmental problems associated with unprecedented energy growth, and to enhance the U.S. economy through foreign equipment sales and engineering services.

  4. Oakland Operations Office, Oakland, California: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE`s Office of Technology Development manages an aggressive national program for applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation. This program develops high, payoff technologies to clean up the inventory of DOE nuclear component manufacturing sites and to manage DOE-generated waste faster, safer, and cheaper than current environmental cleanup technologies. OTD programs are designed to make new, innovative, and more effective technologies available for transfer to users through progressive development. Projects are demonstrated, tested, and evaluated to produce solutions to current problems. Transition of technologies into more advanced stages of development is based upon technological, regulatory, economic, and institutional criteria. New technologies are made available for use in eliminating radioactive, hazardous, and other wastes in compliance with regulatory mandates. The primary goal is to protect human health and prevent further contamination. OTD technologies address three specific problem areas: (1) groundwater and soils cleanup; (2) waste retrieval and processing; and (3) pollution prevention.

  5. (Environmental technology)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boston, H.L.

    1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The traveler participated in a conference on environmental technology in Paris, sponsored by the US Embassy-Paris, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the French Environmental Ministry, and others. The traveler sat on a panel for environmental aspects of energy technology and made a presentation on the potential contributions of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to a planned French-American Environmental Technologies Institute in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Evry, France. This institute would provide opportunities for international cooperation on environmental issues and technology transfer related to environmental protection, monitoring, and restoration at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The traveler also attended the Fourth International Conference on Environmental Contamination in Barcelona. Conference topics included environmental chemistry, land disposal of wastes, treatment of toxic wastes, micropollutants, trace organics, artificial radionuclides in the environment, and the use biomonitoring and biosystems for environmental assessment. The traveler presented a paper on The Fate of Radionuclides in Sewage Sludge Applied to Land.'' Those findings corresponded well with results from studies addressing the fate of fallout radionuclides from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. There was an exchange of new information on a number of topics of interest to DOE waste management and environmental restoration needs.

  6. There is no time of year that generates as much excite-ment in the management of lawns and landscapes as

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    choice in develop- ing a management program for a lawn, especially if a soil test has not been doneThere is no time of year that generates as much excite- ment in the management of lawns be tempered enough so that you make sound agronomic and environmental man- agement decisions. Smart choices

  7. SELECTING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    April 2004 SELECTING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY PRODUCTS Shirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology Information technology security prod ucts are essential to better secure infor mation technology (IT) systems

  8. Alternative Fuel Sources for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Trevor Drake

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    configurations and materials would ideally be examined as well. Possible fuel assembly designs have been hypothesized by Ambrosi at the Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space Conference (2012) [4]. Preliminary research has shown that Am-241, Cm-242, Po.... AMBROSI, et al., “Development and Testing of Americium-241 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator: Concept Designs and Breadboard System,” Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space, (2012). 5. M. RAGHEB, “Radioisotopes Power Production,” mragheb...

  9. Alternaive Fuel Sources For Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Evan Sebastain

    2015-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    configurations and materials would ideally be examined as well. Possible fuel assembly designs have been hypothesized by Ambrosi at the Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space Conference (2012) [4]. Preliminary research has shown that Am-241, Cm-242, Po.... AMBROSI, et al., “Development and Testing of Americium-241 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator: Concept Designs and Breadboard System,” Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space, (2012). 5. M. RAGHEB, “Radioisotopes Power Production,” mragheb...

  10. Probabilistic transient analysis of fuel choices for sodium fast reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denman, Matthew R

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the implications of using a risk-informed licensing framework to inform the design of Sodium Fast Reactors. NUREG-1860, more commonly known as the Technology Neutral Framework (TNF), is a risk-informed ...

  11. Hydrogen Technology Park DTE Energy -Company Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gas Production Detroit Edison Power Generation Energy Services* Energy Trading Biomass Energy Coal billion · 2.6 million customers · 11,000 MW of generation · 600 BCF natural gas delivery · 11,000 employees #12;3 Diversified Energy and Energy Technology Company * Energy Services: Coal Based Fuels

  12. AALBORGUNIVERSITY DEPARTMENTOFENERGY TECHNOLOGY Transformer in series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, Filipe Faria Da

    AALBORGUNIVERSITY­ DEPARTMENTOFENERGY TECHNOLOGY Transformer in series Filipe Miguel Faria Da that corresponds to a neighbour transformer. Both loads are 3-phase loads, which can be unbalanced to generated. The harmonics are generated inside the farm, thus, the current source is grounded at the transformer's neutral

  13. NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin C. Wiant; Ihor S. Diakunchak; Dennis A. Horazak; Harry T. Morehead

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has conducted a study of Next Generation Gas Turbine Systems that embraces the goals of the DOE's High Efficiency Engines and Turbines and Vision 21 programs. The Siemens Westinghouse Next Generation Gas Turbine (NGGT) Systems program was a 24-month study looking at the feasibility of a NGGT for the emerging deregulated distributed generation market. Initial efforts focused on a modular gas turbine using an innovative blend of proven technologies from the Siemens Westinghouse W501 series of gas turbines and new enabling technologies to serve a wide variety of applications. The flexibility to serve both 50-Hz and 60-Hz applications, use a wide range of fuels and be configured for peaking, intermediate and base load duty cycles was the ultimate goal. As the study progressed the emphasis shifted from a flexible gas turbine system of a specific size to a broader gas turbine technology focus. This shift in direction allowed for greater placement of technology among both the existing fleet and new engine designs, regardless of size, and will ultimately provide for greater public benefit. This report describes the study efforts and provides the resultant conclusions and recommendations for future technology development in collaboration with the DOE.

  14. Managing nuclear predominant generating capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouget, Y.H.; Herbin, H.C.; Carbonnier, D.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most common belief, associated with nuclear power plant, leads to the conclusion that it can only operate, as a base load plant. This observation can be reversed, by just looking at large generating capacity, using an important nuclear generation mix. Nuclear plants may certainly load follow and contribute to the grid frequency control. The French example illustrates these possibilities. The reactor control of French units has been customized to accommodate the grid requests. Managing such a large nuclear plant fleet requires various actions be taken, ranging from a daily to a multi-annual perspective. The paper describes the various contributions leading to safe, reliable, well accepted and cost competitive nuclear plants in France. The combination of all aspects related to operations, maintenance scheduling, nuclear safety management, are presented. The use of PWR units carries considerable weight in economic terms, with several hundred million francs tied in with outage scheduling every year. This necessitates a global view of the entire generating system which can be mobilized to meet demand. There is considerable interaction between units as, on the one hand, they are competing to satisfy the same need, and, on the other hand, reducing maintenance costs means sharing the necessary resources, and thus a coordinated staggering of outages. In addition, nuclear fuel is an energy reserve which remains in the reactor for 3 or 4 years, with some of the fuel renewed each year. Due to the memory effect, the fuel retains a memory of past use, so that today's choices impact upon the future. A medium-term view of fuel management is also necessary.

  15. Next-Generation Solar Collectors for CSP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet on Next-Generation Collectors for CSP highlights a solar energy program awarded through the 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D awards. The team is developing new solar collector base technologies for next-generation heliostats used in power tower systems. If successful, this project will result in a 50% reduction in solar field equipment cost and a 30% reduction in field installation cost compared to existing heliostat designs.

  16. Emerging technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shin-yee

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Emerging Technologies thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is to help individuals establish technology areas that have national and commercial impact, and are outside the scope of the existing thrust areas. We continue to encourage innovative ideas that bring quality results to existing programs. We also take as our mission the encouragement of investment in new technology areas that are important to the economic competitiveness of this nation. In fiscal year 1992, we have focused on nine projects, summarized in this report: (1) Tire, Accident, Handling, and Roadway Safety; (2) EXTRANSYT: An Expert System for Advanced Traffic Management; (3) Odin: A High-Power, Underwater, Acoustic Transmitter for Surveillance Applications; (4) Passive Seismic Reservoir Monitoring: Signal Processing Innovations; (5) Paste Extrudable Explosive Aft Charge for Multi-Stage Munitions; (6) A Continuum Model for Reinforced Concrete at High Pressures and Strain Rates: Interim Report; (7) Benchmarking of the Criticality Evaluation Code COG; (8) Fast Algorithm for Large-Scale Consensus DNA Sequence Assembly; and (9) Using Electrical Heating to Enhance the Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds from Soil.

  17. Venus Technology Plan Venus Technology Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Venus Technology Plan May 2014 #12; ii Venus Technology Plan At the Venus Exploration Survey priorities, and (3) develop a Technology Plan for future Venus missions (after a Technology Forum at VEXAG Meeting 11 in November 2013). Here, we present the 2014 Venus Technology Plan

  18. Generation gaps in engineering?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, David J. (David Jinwoo)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is much enthusiastic debate on the topic of generation gaps in the workplace today; what the generational differences are, how to address the apparent challenges, and if the generations themselves are even real. ...

  19. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Science and Technology Policy Fellowship...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cell Technologies Office Science and Technology Policy Fellowship Opportunities Available Fuel Cell Technologies Office Science and Technology Policy Fellowship Opportunities...

  20. On the choice of parameters in solar structure inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. Rabello-Soares; Sarbani Basu; J. Christensen-Dalsgaard

    1999-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The observed solar p-mode frequencies provide a powerful diagnostic of the internal structure of the Sun and permit us to test in considerable detail the physics used in the theory of stellar structure. Amongst the most commonly used techniques for inverting such helioseismic data are two implementations of the optimally localized averages (OLA) method, namely the Subtractive Optimally Localized Averages (SOLA) and Multiplicative Optimally Localized Averages (MOLA). Both are controlled by a number of parameters, the proper choice of which is very important for a reliable inference of the solar internal structure. Here we make a detailed analysis of the influence of each parameter on the solution and indicate how to arrive at an optimal set of parameters for a given data set.

  1. Mutated hilltop inflation: a natural choice for early universe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pal, Barun Kumar; Pal, Supratik; Basu, B., E-mail: barunp1985@rediffmail.com, E-mail: supratik@isical.ac.in, E-mail: banasri@isical.ac.in [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 B.T.Road, Kolkata 700 108 (India)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a model of inflation with a suitable potential for a single scalar field which falls in the wide class of hilltop inflation. We derive the analytical expressions for most of the physical quantities related to inflation and show that all of them represent the true behavior as required from a model of inflation. We further subject the results to observational verification by formulating the theory of perturbations based on our model followed by an estimation for the values of those observable parameters. Our model is found to be in excellent agreement with observational data. Thus, the features related to the model leads us to infer that this type of hilltop inflation may be a natural choice for explaining the early universe.

  2. Mutated Hilltop Inflation : A Natural Choice for Early Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barun Kumar Pal; Supratik Pal; B. Basu

    2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a model of inflation with a suitable potential for a single scalar field which falls in the wide class of hilltop inflation. We derive the analytical expressions for most of the physical quantities related to inflation and show that all of them represent the true behavior as required from a model of inflation. We further subject the results to observational verification by formulating the theory of perturbations based on our model followed by an estimation for the values of those observable parameters. Our model is found to be in excellent agreement with observational data. Thus, the features related to the model leads us to infer that this type of hilltop inflation may be a natural choice for explaining the early universe.

  3. Bayesian decision making in human collectives with binary choices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eguíluz, Víctor M; Fernández-Gracia, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Here we focus on the description of the mechanisms behind the process of information aggregation and decision making, a basic step to understand emergent phenomena in society, such as trends, information spreading or the wisdom of crowds. In many situations, agents choose between discrete options. We analyze experimental data on binary opinion choices in humans. The data consists of two separate experiments in which humans answer questions with a binary response, where one is correct and the other is incorrect. The questions are answered without and with information on the answers of some previous participants. We find that a Bayesian approach captures the probability of choosing one of the answers. The influence of peers is uncorrelated with the difficulty of the question. The data is inconsistent with Weber's law, which states that the probability of choosing an option depends on the proportion of previous answers choosing that option and not on the total number of those answers. Last, the present Bayesian ...

  4. Clean coal technologies market potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drazga, B. (ed.)

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Looking at the growing popularity of these technologies and of this industry, the report presents an in-depth analysis of all the various technologies involved in cleaning coal and protecting the environment. It analyzes upcoming and present day technologies such as gasification, combustion, and others. It looks at the various technological aspects, economic aspects, and the various programs involved in promoting these emerging green technologies. Contents: Industry background; What is coal?; Historical background of coal; Composition of coal; Types of coal; Environmental effects of coal; Managing wastes from coal; Introduction to clean coal; What is clean coal?; Byproducts of clean coal; Uses of clean coal; Support and opposition; Price of clean coal; Examining clean coal technologies; Coal washing; Advanced pollution control systems; Advanced power generating systems; Pulverized coal combustion (PCC); Carbon capture and storage; Capture and separation of carbon dioxide; Storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide; Economics and research and development; Industry initiatives; Clean Coal Power Initiative; Clean Coal Technology Program; Coal21; Outlook; Case Studies.

  5. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; R. Bratton

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technology development plan is designed to provide a clear understanding of the research and development direction necessary for the qualification of nuclear grade graphite for use within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor. The NGNP will be a helium gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Considerable effort will be required to ensure that the graphite performance is not compromised during operation. Based upon the perceived requirements the major data needs are outlined and justified from the perspective of reactor design, reatcor performance, or the reactor safety case. The path forward for technology development can then be easily determined for each data need. How the data will be obtained and the inter-relationships between the experimental and modeling activities will define the technology development for graphite R&D. Finally, the variables affecting this R&D program are discussed from a general perspective. Factors that can significantly affect the R&D program such as funding, schedules, available resources, multiple reactor designs, and graphite acquisition are analyzed.

  6. Small Generator Aggregation (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section establishes requirements for electricity providers to purchase electricity from small generators, with the goal of ensuring that small electricity generators (those with a nameplate...

  7. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OIT’s Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the “waste” water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the “waste” water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  8. Technology and the Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maitland, Padma

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    its explorations of technology in partnership with radicalPadma Maitland Technology and the Box The room is thedisciplines. The theme of “Technology and the Box” emerged

  9. Hydrogen Technologies Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

  10. Innovation and Transportation's Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrison, William L.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    decision making. Innovation and technology lock-in hasStage 1 imagine the innovation and technology developmentof emphasizing innovation and technology development. Pull

  11. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE SYSTEM STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Macri

    2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Rolls-Royce has completed a preliminary design and marketing study under a Department of Energy (DOE) cost shared contract (DE-AC26-00NT40852) to analyze the feasibility of developing a clean, high efficiency, and flexible Next Generation Turbine (NGT) system to meet the power generation market needs of the year 2007 and beyond. Rolls-Royce evaluated the full range of its most advanced commercial aerospace and aeroderivative engines alongside the special technologies necessary to achieve the aggressive efficiency, performance, emissions, economic, and flexibility targets desired by the DOE. Heavy emphasis was placed on evaluating the technical risks and the economic viability of various concept and technology options available. This was necessary to ensure the resulting advanced NGT system would provide extensive public benefits and significant customer benefits without introducing unacceptable levels of technical and operational risk that would impair the market acceptance of the resulting product. Two advanced cycle configurations were identified as offering significant advantages over current combined cycle products available in the market. In addition, balance of plant (BOP) technologies, as well as capabilities to improve the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of industrial gas turbine engines, have been identified. A customer focused survey and economic analysis of a proposed Rolls-Royce NGT product configuration was also accomplished as a part of this research study. The proposed Rolls-Royce NGT solution could offer customers clean, flexible power generation systems with very high efficiencies, similar to combined cycle plants, but at a much lower specific cost, similar to those of simple cycle plants.

  12. Dual-speed wind turbine generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muljadi, E.; Butterfield, C.P. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)] [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Handman, D. [Flowind Corp., San Rafael, CA (United States)] [Flowind Corp., San Rafael, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Induction generator has been used since the early development of utility-scale wind turbine generation. An induction generator is the generator of choice because of its ruggedness and low cost. With an induction generator, the operating speed of the wind turbine is limited to a narrow range (almost constant speed). Dual- speed operation can be accomplished by using an induction generator with two different sets of winding configurations or by using a dual output drive train to drive two induction generators with two different rated speeds. With single-speed operation, the wind turbine operates at different power coefficients (Cp) as the wind speed varies. Operation at maximum Cp can occur only at a single wind speed. However, if the wind speed.varies across a wider range, the operating Cp will vary significantly. Dual-speed operation has the advantage of enabling the wind turbine to operate at near maximum Cp over a wider range of wind speeds. Thus, annual energy production can be increased. The dual-speed mode may generate less energy than a variable-speed mode; nevertheless, it offers an alternative which captures more energy than single-speed operation. In this paper, dual-speed operation of a wind turbine is investigated. Annual energy production is compared between single-speed and dual-speed operation. One type of control algorithm for dual-speed operation is proposed. Some results from a dynamic simulation will be presented to show how the control algorithm works as the wind turbine is exposed to varying wind speeds.

  13. TECHNOLOGY FORUM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| Department of Energy 51:Cross-Site66 -Topic Groups TECHNOLOGY

  14. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program. The program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new technologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity.

  15. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis...

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle...

  17. RESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND RESOURCE ASSESSMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Renewable Energy Center Technical Assessment of Small Hydro Power Technologies #12;California Renewable Energy Center Technical Assessment of In-conduit Small Hydro Power Technologies The goal of this study is to investigate and assess available small hydro power generation technologies and associated operating

  18. Residential mobility and location choice: a nested logit model with sampling of alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Brian H.; Waddell, Paul

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Waddell, P. : Modeling residential location in UrbanSim. In:D. (eds. ) Modelling Residential Location Choice. Springer,based model system and a residential location model. Urban

  19. attraction influences mate-choice: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Influences Social Influences on the Mate Choices of Male and Female Japanese Quail Bennett. The results of those studies are summarized here. Females prefer to affiliate with...

  20. Dezincing Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Service Div.; Morgan, W.A. [Metal Recovery Technologies, Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Half of the steel produced in the US is derived from scrap. With zinc-coated prompt scrap increasing fivefold since 1980, steel-makers are feeling the effect of increased contaminant loads on their operations. The greatest concern is the cost of treatment before disposal of waste dusts and water that arise from remelting zinc-coated scrap. An economic process is needed to strip and recover the zinc from scrap to provide a low residual scrap for steel- and iron-making. Metal Recovery Technologies, Inc., with the assistance of Argonne National Laboratory, have been developing a caustic leach dezincing process for upgrading galvanized stamping plant scrap into clean scrap with recovery of the zinc. With further development the technology could also process galvanized scrap from obsolete automobiles. This paper will review: (1) the status of recent pilot plant operations and plans for a commercial demonstration facility with a dezincing capacity of up to 250,000 tons/year, (2) the economics of caustic dezincing, and (3) benefits of decreased cost of environmental compliance, raw material savings, and improved operations with use of dezinced scrap.

  1. Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11/17/2014 1 Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Utility Scale Solar PV Steven doing recently around two key supply-side resource technologies 1. Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine #12;11/17/2014 4 Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Background Primary Components Gas-fired combustion

  2. WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS C. L. Liu and Thomas J. Ahrens Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 In order to record P- and S-waves on the interactions between incident P- and SV-waves and free-surfaces of rocks. The relations between particle

  3. Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation B.E. Logan Department accomplishing wastewater treatment in processes based on microbial fuel cell technologies. When bacteria oxidize.4 £ 106 L of wastewater, a wastewater treatment plant has the potential to become a 2.3 MW power plant

  4. Resources and capabilities in high-tech enterpreneurship : a study of two generations of Chinese startups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Lin, 1964 May 1-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By examining the origin and growth dynamics of two generations of high-tech startups in China's information technology sectors, this study presents empirical research on how Chinese technology startup companies, despite ...

  5. General com Technology community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Campus IT General com m unity Technology community ITsystem owners Campus Council for Information Technology (CCFIT) · ~30 members · Advisory evaluation and review role · Input from faculty, staff, students formal representation on steering team and subcommittees Technology Support Program · Technology support

  6. CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS -2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaram, Bhyravabotla

    CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS - 2013 GUIDELINES & PROFORMAE FOR NOMINATIONS Planning and Performance 2013 #12;CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS BRIEF DETAILS ,,CSIR Technology Awards were instituted in 1990 to encourage multi-disciplinary in- house team efforts and external interaction for technology development

  7. Northwest Regional Technology Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security The Northwest Regional Technology Center and deployment of technologies that are effective homeland security solutions for the region, and accelerate technology transfer to the national user community. Foster a collaborative spirit across agencies

  8. Microsoft BizTalk Server Making the Right Choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    Talk: Integration Powerhouse 1 · Comprehensive Industry and Technology Coverage 2 · Integration as a Business · Conclusion 8 · About the Authors 9 Table of Contents #12;BizTalk: Integration Powerhouse Integration within their integration landscape to include partner and customer systems. BizTalk Server 2009 provides more data exchange

  9. Generation to Generation: The Heart of Family Medicine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Robin O

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ageism in the Workplace. Generations Spring, 5. Westman,of caring for multiple generations simultaneously. StronglyGeneration to Generation: The Heart of Family Medicine

  10. First Generation Advanced High-Strength Steels Deformation Fundamental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting lm067sun2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Coherent Research Plan for the 3rd Generation...

  11. Generation of Web Service Descriptions and Web Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Generation of Web Service Descriptions and Web Service Module Implementation for Concept University of Science and Technology Software Systems Institute (STS) #12;Abstract Nowadays web services in order to initiate the communication. A web services endpoint communication interface utilizes

  12. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricant Additives for Next-Generation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricant Additives for Next-Generation Fuel-Efficient Engines May 15 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Jun Qu, Materials Science and Technology Division ORNL...

  13. Modeling of thin-film solar thermoelectric generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinstein, Lee Adragon

    Recent advances in solar thermoelectric generator (STEG) performance have raised their prospect as a potential technology to convert solar energy into electricity. This paper presents an analysis of thin-film STEGs. ...

  14. User-generated censorship : manipulating the maps of social media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Christopher E., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The last decade has seen the rise of new technologies for making information more broadly available and accessible. Variously called 'user-generated content,' 'social media,''social news,' 'crowd-curation,' and so on, these ...

  15. On the Universal Generation of Mobility Models Alberto Medina

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    On the Universal Generation of Mobility Models Alberto Medina Raytheon BBN Technologies amedina@bbn.com Gonca Gursun Computer Science Dept. Boston University goncag@cs.bu.edu Prithwish Basu Raytheon BBN

  16. Gamma ray generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

  17. Next Generation Inverter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  18. 2008 Geothermal Technologies Market Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cross, J.; Freeman, J.

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes market-wide trends for the geothermal industry throughout 2008 and the beginning of 2009. It begins with an overview of the U.S. DOE's Geothermal Technology Program's (GTP's) involvement with the geothermal industry and recent investment trends for electric generation technologies. The report next describes the current state of geothermal power generation and activity within the United States, costs associated with development, financing trends, an analysis of the levelized cost of energy (LCOE), and a look at the current policy environment. The report also highlights trends regarding direct use of geothermal energy, including geothermal heat pumps (GHPs). The final sections of the report focus on international perspectives, employment and economic benefits from geothermal energy development, and potential incentives in pending national legislation.

  19. Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hand, Maureen

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply. National Renewable20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology byTERMS wind-generated electricity; wind energy; 20% wind

  20. The Effects of an Exhaust Thermoelectric Generator of a GM Sierra...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Truck The Effects of an Exhaust Thermoelectric Generator of a GM Sierra Pickup Truck 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER) Conference Presentation: Hi-Z Technology Inc. and...

  1. PowerChoice Residential Customer Response to TOU Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Jane S.; Moezzi, Mithra; Lutzenhiser, Susan; Woods, James; Dethman, Linda; Kunkle, Rick

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research Into Action, Inc. and the Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) worked together to conduct research on the behaviors and energy use patterns of SMUD residential customers who voluntarily signed on to a Time-of-Use rate pilot launched under the PowerChoice label. The project was designed to consider the how and why of residential customers ability and willingness to engage in demand reduction behaviors, and to link social and behavioral factors to observed changes in demand. The research drew on a combination of load interval data and three successive surveys of participating households. Two experimental treatments were applied to test the effects of increased information on households ability to respond to the Time-of-Use rates. Survey results indicated that participants understood the purpose of the Time-of-Use rate and undertook substantial appropriate actions to shift load and conserve. Statistical tests revealed minor initial price effects and more marked, but still modest, adjustments to seasonal rate changes. Tests of the two information interventions indicated that neither made much difference to consumption patterns. Despite the lackluster statistical evidence for load shifting, the analysis points to key issues for critical analysis and development of residential Time-of-Use rates, especially pertinent as California sets the stage for demand response in more California residences.

  2. Risk implications of the deployment of renewables for investments in electricity generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sisternes, Fernando J. de (Fernando José de Sisternes Jiménez)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the potential risk implications that a large penetration of intermittent renewable electricity generation -such as wind and solar power- may have on the future electricity generation technology mix, ...

  3. ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Publications Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel...

  4. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  5. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

    2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  6. Cylindrical neutron generator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leung, Ka-Ngo

    2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

  7. Hydrogen Storage Technologies Long-term commercialization approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for hydrogen storage/delivery systems. #12;Propane in generator Gas/diesel in generator BA55 series batteriesHydrogen Storage Technologies Long-term commercialization approach with first products first per unit power helps show the market space for fuel cell power plants. #12;Propane in generator Gas

  8. Coal-fired generation staging a comeback. 2nd ed.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report is an overview of the renewed U.S. market interest in coal-fired power generation. It provides a concise look at what is driving interest in coal-fired generation, the challenges faced in implementing coal-fired generation projects, and the current and future state of coal-fired generation. Topics covered in the report include: An overview of coal-fired generation including its history, the current market environment, and its future prospects; An analysis of the key business factors that are driving renewed interest in coal-fired generation; An analysis of the challenges that are hindering the implementation of coal-fired generation projects; A description of coal-fired generation technologies; A review of the economic drivers of coal-fired generation project success; An evaluation of coal-fired generation versus other generation technologies; A discussion of the key government initiatives supporting new coal-fired generation; and A listing of planned coal-fired generation projects. 13 figs., 12 tabs., 1 app.

  9. EA-1939: Reese Technology Center Wind and Battery Integration Project, Lubbock County, TX

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a proposal by the Center for Commercialization of Electric Technologies to demonstrate battery technology integration with wind generated electricity by deploying and evaluating utility-scale lithium battery technology to improve grid performance and thereby aid in the integration of wind generation into the local electricity supply.

  10. WHERE ARE THE ELECTRIC VEHICLES?1 A SPATIAL MODEL FOR VEHICLE-CHOICE COUNT DATA2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    1 WHERE ARE THE ELECTRIC VEHICLES?1 A SPATIAL MODEL FOR VEHICLE-CHOICE COUNT DATA2 3 T. Donna Chen4 ABSTRACT29 30 Electric vehicles (EVs) are predicted to increase in market share as auto manufacturers: Electric vehicles, spatial count modeling, vehicle choice, vehicle ownership,1 consumer behavior

  11. On the method of optimal portfolio choice by cost-efficiency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rüschendorf, Ludger

    On the method of optimal portfolio choice by cost-efficiency Ludger R¨uschendorf*, Viktor Wolf Freiburg, Germany Abstract We develop the method of optimal portfolio choice based on the concept of cost-efficiency class of cost-efficient payoffs. While the results for the cost-efficient payoff given so far

  12. Improving behavioral realism in hybrid energy-economy models using discrete choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Improving behavioral realism in hybrid energy-economy models using discrete choice studies Abstract Hybrid energy-economy models combine top-down and bottom-up approaches to explore behaviorally models to inform key behavioral parameters in CIMS, a hybrid model. The discrete choice models

  13. Motivation Influences Choice in the Exploration/ Exploitation Dilemma: Regulatory Fit Effects in a Gambling Task

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maddox, W. Todd

    , D.A., Maddox, W.T., & Markman, A.B. (in press). Regulatory Fit Effects in a choice task. PsychonomicMotivation Influences Choice in the Exploration/ Exploitation Dilemma: Regulatory Fit Effects appealing options. ­In category learning, a regulatory fit has been shown to increase exploration

  14. What Drives the Choice of a Third Party Logistics Provider? Edward Anderson , Tim Coltman*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coltman, Tim

    1 What Drives the Choice of a Third Party Logistics Provider? Edward Anderson , Tim Coltman and the direction of the research project. #12;2 What Drives the Choice of a Third Party Logistics Provider of their distinctive value propositions ­ a fact one would also expect holds true when companies choose a logistics

  15. Optimal Choice for Number of Strands in a Litz-Wire Transformer Winding

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Optimal Choice for Number of Strands in a Litz-Wire Transformer Winding C. R. Sullivan Found Choice for Number of Strands in a Litz-Wire Transformer Winding Charles R. Sullivan Thayer School/inductor Abstract -- The number of strands to minimize loss in a litz-wire transformer winding is determined

  16. VALUING PUBLIC PREFERENCES FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER: A CHOICE EXPERIMENT APPROACH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    VALUING PUBLIC PREFERENCES FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER: A CHOICE EXPERIMENT APPROACH by Andrew D. Krueger All Rights Reserved #12;ii VALUING PUBLIC PREFERENCES FOR OFFSHORE WIND POWER: A CHOICE EXPERIMENT thank you for your perspective on offshore renewable energy regulation. As committee members, your

  17. Making Sustainable Energy Choices: Insights on the Energy/Water/Land Nexus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This periodic publication summarizes insights from the body of NREL analysis work. In this issue of Analysis Insights, we examine the implications of our energy choices on water, land use, climate, developmental goals, and other factors. Collectively, NREL's work helps policymakers and investors understand and evaluate energy choices within the complex web of connections, or nexus, between energy, water, and land.

  18. Choice of reconstructed tissue properties affects interpretation of lung EIT images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adler, Andy

    Choice of reconstructed tissue properties affects interpretation of lung EIT images Bartlomiej patients. In lung EIT, the EIT inverse problem is commonly linearised and only changes in electrical properties of the lung and artefacts introduced by the linearisation. #12;Choice of reconstructed tissue

  19. Journal of Transportation Engineering Modelling Automobile Driver's Toll-Lane Choice Behaviour at a Toll Plaza

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kundu, Debasis

    Journal of Transportation Engineering Modelling Automobile Driver's Toll-Lane Choice Behaviour at a Toll Plaza --Manuscript Draft-- Manuscript Number: TEENG-1181R3 Full Title: Modelling Automobile Driver to develop a random utility based discrete multinomial choice model for the behaviour of automobile drivers

  20. IMPROVED ROOF STABILIZATION TECHNOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian, Ph.D.

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) remediation sites have performed roof repair and roof replacement to stabilize facilities prior to performing deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) activities. This project will review the decision criteria used by these DOE sites, along with the type of repair system used for each different roof type. Based on this information, along with that compiled from roofing experts, a decision-making tool will be generated to aid in selecting the proper roof repair systems. Where appropriate, innovative technologies will be reviewed and applied to the decision-making tool to determine their applicability. Based on the results, applied research and development will be conducted to develop a method to repair these existing roofing systems, while providing protection for the D and D worker in a cost-efficient manner.