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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Definition: Generator Owner | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generator Owner Entity that owns and maintains generating units.1 References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up...

2

MEMORANDUM OWNER(S)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OWNER(S) OWNER(S) -------- past : Lb-J ' 0-c @+a+~-~% current: -- ________________________ ------7--- -- Owner cantacted 0 yes 4t no; if yes, date contacted TYPE OF OPERATION ----------------- q Research & Development 0 Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Manufacturing 0 Pilat Scale 0 Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studies Sample & Analysis 0 Production 0 Di5posal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT ----_----------- 0 Prime q Subcontractor Cl Purchase Order 0 University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Spohscred Facility 0 Other --------------------- . 0 Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, time 84 material, e,tc:) ------- 'Canfract/Purchase Order # --. CONTRACTING PERIOD: r4J~--___-----___---_____________ ----- OWNERSHIP:

3

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of generating 20 percent of my total capacity from say wind? And all of it replaces coal powered electricty ? What happended to GDP ? Is the economy a net gain or net loss ?...

4

OWNER(S) Past:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

--------------__ --------------__ CITY: ' -* -I c.l.&&!,Ck -------------------------- OWNER(S) ------__ Past: Owner contacted q yes current: -------------------------- if yea, date contacted ------_---___ TYPE OF OPERATION --------~~_~----_ q Research & Development 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process,. 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Sample & Analysis 0 Production 0 Disposal/Storage 0 Facility Type a Manufacturing (I University, 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility 0 Other ~~~--~~~---~~~------_ TYPE OF CONTRACT ---_---__------_ 0 Prinie 0 Subcantractbr 0 Purchase Order 0 Other information (i.e., cast + fixed fee, unit price, time b material, qtc) ----'w-- ~~--~~-~~~----~~----________ Contract/Purchase ' Order

5

SUBJECT: OWNER(S)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

HEHORANDUH HEHORANDUH ;;&; DC&b ------w--v SUBJECT: OWNER(S) -------- P1st a Owner contrctmd TYPE OF OPERATION ----------------- 0 Research I Development 0 Facility Type 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scrlr 0 Bench Seal0 Procemm 0 Theoretical Studier 0 Sample & Anrlyri l 0 Production x Dimpomrl/Storrgr 0 Hmufrcturing 0 University 0 Rmsmarch Organization 0 Government Sponmored Facility 0 Other -II---------------- TYPE OF CONTRACT ----u---------- 0 d ime Subcontract& 0 Purchrre Order 0 Other information (i.e., comt -w-e--- Contrrct/Purchrsa Order 0 CONTRACTING PERIOD: ------------------ . OWNERSHIPa AEC/HED OWNED m---w LANDS 0 BUILDINSS 0 EQUIPMENT 0 ORE OR RAW HA-I-L 0 FINAL PRODUCT q WASTE & RESIDUE 0 AEC/HED LEASED ---w-w E 0 0

6

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - If I generate 20 percent of my national electricity from wind and solar - what does it do to my GDP and Trade Balance ? Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community I think that the economics of fossil fuesl are well understood. Some gets to find the fuel and sell it. The fuel and all associated activities factor into the economic equation of the nation and the wrold. What is the economics of generating 20 percent of my total capacity from say wind? And all of it replaces coal powered electricty ? What happended to GDP ? Is the economy a net gain or net loss ? The value of the electricity came into the system, but no coal is bought or sold. Submitted by Jamespr on 6 May, 2013 - 17:46 0 answers Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group.

7

OWNER(S)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

l . . l . . ; * 3Tb'-j .I OWNER(S) rf yea, date contacted ___ TYPE OF OPERATION --~~----~---__--_ aResearch & Development q Facility Type 0 Production scale testing Et Pilot Scale q Hanufacturing 0 Bench Scale Process 0 University 0 Theoretical Studies 0 Research Organization Cl 0 Government Sponsored Facility Sample SC Analysis Cl Other --------__----___--_ 3 Production 1 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT --~_---__---____ m.p rime SC5 sLta4rM-J / Cl Subcqntractor 0 Purchase Order 0 Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price? Contract/Purchase Order # ~~~ti~ --------------------_____________ AECf MED OWNED -_--_ LANDS BUILDINGS ' EQUIPMENT ORE OR RAW MATL [3 FINAL PRODUCT 0 WASTE & RESIDUE q GOVT OWNED ----- GOUT LEASED -----_ E

8

OWNER(S)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

_----- _----- past: %J +c - fl*+;o.rrq -____------------- Owner contacted 0 yes Curr@nt: ______ -----------L-----l- if yes, date contacted TYPE OF OPERATION Reeearch & Development 0 Facility Type 0 Production scale testing Cl Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process 0 0 Research Organization Theoretical Studies 0 0 Government Sponsored Facility ~ ~*a;~a.a~~plysis 0 Other ~~~~~~~~------____--- 0 Production 0 DispdsalfStoraqe TYPE OF CONTRACT ---------------- 0 Prime 0 Subcontractor 0 Purchase Order 0 Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee, unit price, time & mater!&, etc) ------- --------------------LA------ ~~------------~~~-~--------- Contract/Purchase Order # ~-----~-~~~~~~~--~~~_____________ CONTRACTING PERIOD: f?Ar! lts' d' ------------------ ___-_ +----a-

9

OWNER(S)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

------ - ------ - Past: ~~~-~~~-~~~~~~~~~~rrent: Owner contacted q yes tina;-. ____ c-lti&pJ-~ lf yes, date contacted -_---__---___ TYPE OF OPERATION -_-----_--_--____ q Research & Development 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process : 'Theoretical Studier Sample & Analysis G Production 0 Disposal/Storage TYPE OF CONTRACT ~-~~~----~~----_ &, Facility Type q Manufacturing 0 University a Research Organizaticn a Other information (i.e., cost + fixed fee,, unit price, -_---- yryoi -37 J-1 4:~zL~~:~:q~&- ,-antract,purchase Order # ,L,U,-37-?\- ---------------------------- --------------------_____________ my~mx~~ai_~Gi~~~Q : _I 7 v 3 _ I 9 V-Y, ---_--_------------------------------ OWNERSHIP: AEC/MED AEC/MED GOUT GOUT

10

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Contribution to U.S. Electricity Supply. National Renewable20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology byTERMS wind-generated electricity; wind energy; 20% wind

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AEO 2007 high fuel price forecast Coal prices follow AEOcoal- and natural gas-based electricity generation analyzed here include decreased natural gas prices,

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants,natural gas plants, and combined cycle natural gas plants.generated largely from combined-cycle Capacity (GW) yd r as

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price Reduction Offsetting demand for natural gas in the electricity sector by increasing wind energy’price reductions, and water savings. Index Terms—power system modeling, wind energywind energy to offset coal- and natural gas-based electricity generation analyzed here include decreased natural gas prices,

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Energy Deployment System model was used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030. This generation capacity expansion model selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, nuclear plants, and wind technology to meet projected demand in future years. Technology cost and performance projections, as well as transmission operation and expansion costs, are assumed. This study demonstrates that producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology is technically feasible, not cost-prohibitive, and provides benefits in the forms of carbon emission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water savings.

Bolinger, Mark A; Hand, Maureen; Blair, Nate; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Hern, Tracy; Miller, Bart; O'Connell, R.

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

15

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

SciTech Connect

The Wind Energy Deployment System model was used to estimate the costs and benefits associated with producing 20% of the nation's electricity from wind technology by 2030. This generation capacity expansion model selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, nuclear plants, and wind technology to meet projected demand in future years. Technology cost and performance projections, as well as transmission operation and expansion costs, are assumed. This study demonstrates that producing 20% of the nation's projected electricity demand in 2030 from wind technology is technically feasible, not cost-prohibitive, and provides benefits in the forms of carbon emission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water savings.

Bolinger, Mark A; Hand, Maureen; Blair, Nate; Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Hern, Tracy; Miller, Bart; O& #39; Connell, R.

2008-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

16

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Supply and Disposition by State, 1996 Table State Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) Marketed Production Total Consumption Alabama................................................................... 3.02 2.69 1.48 Alaska ...................................................................... 5.58 2.43 2.04 Arizona..................................................................... NA 0 0.55 Arkansas.................................................................. 0.88 1.12 1.23 California.................................................................. 1.25 1.45 8.23 Colorado .................................................................. 4.63 2.90 1.40 Connecticut.............................................................. 0 0 0.58 D.C...........................................................................

17

Percent Distribution  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. . Percent Distribution of Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers by State, 1996 Table State Residential Commercial Industrial Vehicle Fuel Electric Utilities Alabama..................................... 1.08 0.92 2.27 0.08 0.23 Alaska ........................................ 0.31 0.87 0.85 - 1.16 Arizona....................................... 0.53 0.92 0.30 3.91 0.70 Arkansas.................................... 0.88 0.98 1.59 0.11 1.24 California.................................... 9.03 7.44 7.82 43.11 11.64 Colorado .................................... 2.12 2.18 0.94 0.58 0.20 Connecticut................................ 0.84 1.26 0.37 1.08 0.38 D.C............................................. 0.33 0.52 - 0.21 - Delaware.................................... 0.19 0.21 0.16 0.04 0.86 Florida........................................

18

Property:Owners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Owners Owners Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Owners Property Type Page Description A unique list of owners of all power plants in the area. Automatically populated using ask query on Property: Owner of Category: Energy Generation Facility with property InGeothermalResourceArea set to the the variable vName of the Geothermal Resource Area Subproperties This property has the following 301 subproperties: A Abraham Hot Springs Geothermal Area Adak Geothermal Area Akun Strait Geothermal Area Akutan Fumaroles Geothermal Area Alum Geothermal Area Alvord Hot Springs Geothermal Area Arrowhead Hot Springs Geothermal Area Ashton Warm Springs Geothermal Area Astor Pass Geothermal Area Augusta Mountains Geothermal Area B Bailey Bay Hot Springs Geothermal Area Baker Hot Spring Geothermal Area

19

TO: FILE MEMORANDUM SUBJECT: ALTERNATE OWNER(S)  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SUBJECT: SUBJECT: ALTERNATE OWNER(S) -__----- Owner csntacted r~ yes current: --------------------A----- if yes, date contacted TYPE OF OPERATION ------------_____ Research & Development 0 Facility Type 0 Production seal e testing 0 Pilot Scale 0 Bench Scale Process i Theoretical Studi es Sample & Analysis Producti on Di spas.31 /Storage a' Manufacturing q University 0 Research Organization 0 Government Sponsored Facility Cl Other ~~~~~~~----~~-------- 0 0 Prime q Other information (i.e., cast 0 Subcontractor 0 'Purchase Order + fixed fee, unit piice, pi time & material, gtc) ~~-----_------~~_-------~-~- .Contract./Purchaee Order # fi~k~ti;3 -----------_---------------- CONTRACTING PEXIOD: tit-k ------------------ would -------------------------------------

20

User_OrgOwner_Overview  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Organization Owner Overview Organization Owner Overview © 2011 SuccessFactors, Inc. - 1 - SuccessFactors Learning Confidential. All rights reserved. Job Aid: Organization Owner Overview Purpose The purpose of this job aid is to guide organization owners through the step-by-step process of available features within SuccessFactors Learning. The organization dashboard is a collection of charts and data tables that summarize learning data for your organizations and sub-organizations. Note: Depending on how permissions were configured in, access to the following features will vary for each organization. Task A. Organization Dashboard From the Home page, roll-over the Organization tab and select Dashboard from the list. 1 1 Succession Planner 7 Steps

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Geothermal energy in the western United States and Hawaii: Resources and projected electricity generation supplies. [Contains glossary and address list of geothermal project developers and owners  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal energy comes from the internal heat of the Earth, and has been continuously exploited for the production of electricity in the United States since 1960. Currently, geothermal power is one of the ready-to-use baseload electricity generating technologies that is competing in the western United States with fossil fuel, nuclear and hydroelectric generation technologies to provide utilities and their customers with a reliable and economic source of electric power. Furthermore, the development of domestic geothermal resources, as an alternative to fossil fuel combustion technologies, has a number of associated environmental benefits. This report serves two functions. First, it provides a description of geothermal technology and a progress report on the commercial status of geothermal electric power generation. Second, it addresses the question of how much electricity might be competitively produced from the geothermal resource base. 19 figs., 15 tabs.

Not Available

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Casablanca Carlos American Electric Power Transmission Owner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Facilitator) Chantal PJM Interconnection Not Applicable Horstmann John Dayton Power & Light Company (The) Transmission Owner Issermoyer John PPL Electric Utilities Corp. dba PPL Utilities Transmission Owner

Pjm Interconnection Llc; Teleconference Webex Participants; Firstenergy Solutions; Corp Transmission Owner; Boltz Jeff; Firstenergy Solutions; Corp Transmission Owner; Fecho Thomas; Indiana Michigan; Power Company; Transmission Owner; Patten Kevin; Company Transmission Owner

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Owners of nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Commercial nuclear power plants in this country can be owned by a number of separate entities, each with varying ownership proportions. Each of these owners may, in turn, have a parent/subsidiary relationship to other companies. In addition, the operator of the plant may be a different entity as well. This report provides a compilation on the owners/operators for all commercial power reactors in the United States. While the utility industry is currently experiencing changes in organizational structure which may affect nuclear plant ownership, the data in this report is current as of July 1996. The report is divided into sections representing different aspects of nuclear plant ownership.

Hudson, C.R.; White, V.S.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

U.S. Percent Utilization of Refinery Operable Capacity (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Annual : Download Data (XLS File) U.S. Percent Utilization of Refinery Operable Capacity (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1985: 74.0 ...

25

Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Variable Variable Average Absolute Percent Differences Percent of Projections Over- Estimated Gross Domestic Product Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2) 1.0 42.6 Petroleum Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a) 35.2 18.6 Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b) 34.7 19.7 Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4) 6.2 66.5 Crude Oil Production (Table 5) 6.0 59.6 Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6) 13.3 67.0 Natural Gas Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Constant $) (Table 7a) 30.7 26.1 Natural Gas Wellhead Prices (Nominal $) (Table 7b) 30.0 27.1 Total Natural Gas Consumption (Table 8) 7.8 70.2 Natural Gas Production (Table 9) 7.1 66.0 Natural Gas Net Imports (Table 10) 29.3 69.7 Coal Coal Prices to Electric Generating Plants (Constant $)** (Table 11a)

26

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2008" 1. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2008" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin Basin","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Northern Appalachian Basin","Delaware"," W"," $28.49",," W",," $131.87"," 21.6%", 59," W"," 100.0%"

27

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2008" 9. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2008" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin State","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Alabama","Alabama"," W"," $14.43",," W",," $65.38"," 22.1%"," 4,509"," W"," 81.8%"

28

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2009" 2. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, basin to state, 2009" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin Basin","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Northern Appalachian Basin","Florida"," W"," $38.51",," W",," $140.84"," 27.3%", 134," W"," 100.0%"

29

EIA","Percent  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2009" 0. Estimated rail transportation rates for coal, state to state, 2009" "comparison of EIA and STB data" ,,"Transportation cost per short ton (nominal)",,,"Percent difference EIA vs. STB ",,"Total delivered cost per short ton (nominal) EIA","Percent transportation cost is of total delivered cost EIA","Shipments (1,000 short tons) EIA","Shipments with transportation rates over total shipments (percent)" "Origin State","Destination State"," STB"," EIA",,,,,,,"STB ","EIA " "Alabama","Alabama"," W"," $13.59",," W",," $63.63"," 21.4%"," 3,612"," W"," 100.0%"

30

Indiana, Illinois, and Kentucky Refining District Percent ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indiana, Illinois, and Kentucky Refining District Percent Utilization of Refinery Operable Capacity (Percent)

31

Buildings Performance Database Helps Building Owners, Investors...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Buildings Performance Database Helps Building Owners, Investors Evaluate Energy Efficient Buildings Buildings Performance Database June 2013 A new database of building features and...

32

Business Owners: Prepare for Utility Disruptions | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

for Utility Disruptions for Utility Disruptions Business Owners: Prepare for Utility Disruptions Business Owners: Prepare for Utility Disruptions Have a plan in place in case a natural disaster or other hazard knocks out your business's electricity or natural gas service. Identify energy utilities-The utilities that are absolutely necessary to running your business. How might a disaster impact the availability of those utilities? Determine backup options-Contact your utility companies to discuss potential backup options, such as portable generators to provide power. Learn how and when to turn off utilities-For example, if you turn off your natural gas, a professional technician must turn it back on. Learn more Consider using backup generators-Generators can power the most important aspects of your business in an emergency. This will involve:

33

Business Owners: Respond to an Energy Emergency | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Respond to an Energy Emergency Respond to an Energy Emergency Business Owners: Respond to an Energy Emergency Business Owners: Respond to an Energy Emergency Ensure your building is safe to occupy-Initially allow only essential, critical-operations staff into restricted areas. Ask your local or State health department for guidance on determining the safety of your building. Decide whether to activate backup power-If your backup generator doesn't automatically turn on during a power outage, you'll have to determine when to activate backup systems. First determine whether power is likely to be restored within 24 hours. If not, you may want to activate those systems to protect your business assets. Learn more Contact your fuel supplier-If you rely on fuel supplies for your business, vehicles, generators, and other equipment, contact your fuel

34

River resort owners find LPG a power behind their success  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports on a restaurant and resort which runs entirely on LPG. It has two generators converted to LPG that supply the power for the complex. Energy supplied from the propane is used in the kitchens, to drive the water pump and provide electricity for lighting and other power needs, and to heat the swimming pool. Far more importantly for the owners has been the fuel cost savings of at least 60%.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

JOBAID-ORGANZIATION OWNER OVERVIEW | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OWNER OVERVIEW JOBAID-ORGANZIATION OWNER OVERVIEW The purpose of this job aid is to guide organization owners through the step-by-step process of available features within...

36

Energy Efficiency: Helping Home Owners and Businesses Understand...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency: Helping Home Owners and Businesses Understand Energy Usage Energy Efficiency: Helping Home Owners and Businesses Understand Energy Usage November 7, 2013 - 3:55pm...

37

Business Owners: Prepare for Fuel Shortages | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fuel Shortages Fuel Shortages Business Owners: Prepare for Fuel Shortages Business Owners: Prepare for Fuel Shortages You may need fuel for vehicles, generators, and other equipment to continue operating your business during an emergency. During a shortage, local authorities and fuel suppliers will prioritize getting fuel to key assets such as emergency operations centers, hospitals, food supply dealers, water supply plants, and telecommunication networks. Plan ahead to help make sure you have adequate supplies. Review your fuel supply contracts-Arrange priority contacts with fuel suppliers, including an out-of-region supplier, and include language for providing fuel supplies during an emergency. Can your fuel suppliers operate with no power? Do they have gravity-fed systems? What if your fuel

38

Danish Wind Turbine Owners Association | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Owners Association Owners Association Jump to: navigation, search Name Danish Wind Turbine Owners' Association Place Aarhus C, Denmark Zip DK-8000 Sector Wind energy Product Danish Wind Turbine Ownersâ€(tm) Association is a non-profit, independent association overseeing wind turbine ownersâ€(tm) mutual interests regarding the authorities, political decision-makers, utilities and wind turbine manufacturers. References Danish Wind Turbine Owners' Association[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Danish Wind Turbine Owners' Association is a company located in Aarhus C, Denmark . References ↑ "Danish Wind Turbine Owners' Association" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Danish_Wind_Turbine_Owners_Association&oldid=344068

39

TO: FILE GiR FROM: SUBJECT: I OWNER(S) Past: Current:  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

3 749 3 749 '*,. .,;L ----.-. _ 5' . iMEMORANDUM TO: FILE GiR FROM: , SUBJECT: I OWNER(S) ------__ Past: ------------------_----~ Current: Owner contacted q yes qnnc; ~~-~~~---------~~--_______ if yes, date contacted 1 ! I TYPE OF OPERATION --~_--___~---_--_ $ Research b Development a Facility Type 1 I 0 Production scale testing 0 Pilot Scale Bench Scale Process Theoretical 'Studies 0 Sample & Analysis G Production E Disposal/Storage 0 Research 0 Uther --------------T------ I T'/PE OF CONTRACT -----------_____ 0 Prime I2 C! Subcontractor Other information (i.e.:, cost q Purchase Order + fixed fee, unit Arice, time 84 material, etr) i ------- 'I ----------------------i__--_ Contract/Purchase Qrdei. W -----------I--k---j----- ~PJKJbL-I @J OWNERSHIP:

40

PP-82-3 The Joint Owners of the Highgate Interconnection Facilities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 The Joint Owners of the Highgate Interconnection Facilities PP-82-3 The Joint Owners of the Highgate Interconnection Facilities Presidential Permit authorizing The Joint Owners...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Percent Yield and Mass of Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Percent Yield and Mass of Water Percent Yield and Mass of Water Name: Lisa Status: educator Grade: 9-12 Location: CA Country: USA Date: Winter 2011-2012 Question: When doing a percent yield activity in lab, we use MgCl hexahydrate and CaSO4. How do we factor the mass of the water that is released during the reaction? Replies: Lisa, Based on your question, I am not quite sure what the experiment is. Are you heating the hydrates and looking at the percent-yield of water removed during the heating? If so, then you would calculate the theoretical yield (using stoichiometry and the balanced chemical equation: MgCl2.6H2O --> MgCl2 + 6H2O) of water released, and compare it to the actual yield of water released in the experiment to get percent yield. Greg (Roberto Gregorius) Canisius College

42

Property:Owner | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

property of type Page. property of type Page. Subproperties This property has the following 1 subproperty: G GRR/Section 4-FD-a - Exploration Permit BLM Pages using the property "Owner" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A AB Tehachapi Wind Farm + Coram Energy + AFCEE MMR Turbines + AFCEE + AG Land 1 + AG Land Energy LLC + AG Land 2 + AG Land Energy LLC + AG Land 3 + AG Land Energy LLC + AG Land 4 + AG Land Energy LLC + AG Land 5 + AG Land Energy LLC + AG Land 6 + AG Land Energy LLC + AVTEC + AVTEC + Aberdeen Biomass Facility + Sierra Pacific Industries + Adair Wind Farm I + Shafer Systems + Adair Wind Farm II + MidAmerican Energy + Aero Turbine + AeroTurbine Energy Company + Aeroman Repower Wind Farm + Coram Energy + Affinity Wind Farm + Affinity Wind LLC +

43

Michigan Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution Companies (Percent)

44

Realities of Chiller Plant Operation: Utility Impacts on Owner...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plant operating costs. The building owner, another engineering consultant, and the local utility representatives were confused by the rates and missed an opportunity to cut...

45

Rights and Duties of Mines and Mine Owners, General (Missouri)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This legislation addresses general operational guidelines for mine owners regarding public notices, fees, land and mineral ownership, requirements for mining in certain municipalities, and mining...

46

FEASIBILITY OF 100 PERCENT RDF FIRING FOR POWER GENERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-day-a-week basis. The RDF was co-fired with coal in Commonwealth Edison's 200-MW Crawford Unit 7 from late 1978 are made requiring funds which are presently not available. · In the Milwaukee project, RDF was co-fired Engineering, Inc. during the co-firing of coal and RDF at the WEPCO's Oak Creek power plant in Milwaukee, Wis

Columbia University

47

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

48

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

49

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Georgia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

50

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

51

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Maryland - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 35 28 43 43 34 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 35

52

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Florida - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S10. Summary statistics for natural gas - Florida, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 2,000 2,742 290 13,938 17,129 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

53

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 New Hampshire - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S31. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Hampshire, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

54

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Maryland - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S22. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maryland, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 7 7 7 8 9 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 28 43 43 34 44 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 28

55

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Missouri - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S27. Summary statistics for natural gas - Missouri, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 53 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

56

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Delaware - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

57

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

58

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

59

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Rhode Island - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S41. Summary statistics for natural gas - Rhode Island, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

60

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Indiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 525 563 620 914 819 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 8,814 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 285 310 230 210 212 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 5,825 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

62

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

38 38 Nevada - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S30. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nevada, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 4 4 4 3 4 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 4 4 4 3 4

63

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Connecticut - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S7. Summary statistics for natural gas - Connecticut, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

64

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Oregon - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18 21 24 26 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 409 778 821 1,407 1,344 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

65

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Idaho - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S14. Summary statistics for natural gas - Idaho, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

66

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Washington - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S49. Summary statistics for natural gas - Washington, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

67

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Maine - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S21. Summary statistics for natural gas - Maine, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

68

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

69

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 South Carolina - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S42. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Carolina, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

70

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

71

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 North Carolina - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S35. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Carolina, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

72

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Iowa - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S17. Summary statistics for natural gas - Iowa, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0

73

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Massachusetts - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S23. Summary statistics for natural gas - Massachusetts, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

74

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Oregon - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S39. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oregon, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 21 24 26 24 27 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 778 821 1,407 1,344 770 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

75

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Georgia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S11. Summary statistics for natural gas - Georgia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

76

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Minnesota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S25. Summary statistics for natural gas - Minnesota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

77

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Delaware - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S8. Summary statistics for natural gas - Delaware, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0

78

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 District of Columbia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S9. Summary statistics for natural gas - District of Columbia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

79

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 New Jersey - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S32. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Jersey, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0

80

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Tennessee - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S44. Summary statistics for natural gas - Tennessee, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 305 285 310 230 210 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells NA 4,700 5,478 5,144 4,851 From Oil Wells 3,942 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Nebraska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S29. Summary statistics for natural gas - Nebraska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 186 322 285 276 322 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,331 2,862 2,734 2,092 1,854 From Oil Wells 228 221 182 163 126 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

82

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Vermont - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S47. Summary statistics for natural gas - Vermont, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

83

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Wisconsin - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S51. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wisconsin, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0 0 0 0 0 Total 0 0 0

84

District of Columbia Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution Companies (Percent) District of Columbia Natural Gas Percent Sold to The Commercial Sectors by Local Distribution...

85

Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota Represented by the Price (Percent) Percent of Industrial Natural Gas...

86

Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota Represented by the Price (Percent) Percent of Commercial Natural Gas...

87

Visiting With Santa Fe Small Business Owners | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Visiting With Santa Fe Small Business Owners Visiting With Santa Fe Small Business Owners Visiting With Santa Fe Small Business Owners May 10, 2012 - 9:02am Addthis Dot Harris Dot Harris The Honorable Dot Harris, Director, Office of Economic Impact and Diversity You've got to do your homework in order to contract with the federal government. Whether you are a large or small business owner, learning the ins and outs of government contracting takes dedication, perseverance, and taking advantage of opportunities to meet face-to-face with procurement experts and other businesses. That's where our Small Business Roundtables, Business Opportunity Sessions, conference booths, and Regional Small Business Summits come in. We want to meet directly with small business owners, managers, and staffers, to hear what you need to learn from us to make the contracting

88

Tips for Renters and Property Owners | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tips for Renters and Property Owners Tips for Renters and Property Owners Tips for Renters and Property Owners July 5, 2012 - 4:51pm Addthis Tips for Renters and Property Owners If you rent, or if you own a rental unit, you can use many of the tips throughout this guide to save money and energy. Renters You can reduce your utility bills by following the tips in these sections: Lighting Heating and Cooling (if you control the thermostat) Appliances Home Office and Home Electronics Windows Transportation Encourage your landlord to follow these tips as well. They'll save energy and money, improving your comfort and lowering your utility bills even more. Property Owners Nearly all of the information in this guide applies to rental units. The section on Your Home's Energy Use focuses on air leaks, insulation, heating

89

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Michigan - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 10,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 16,959 20,867 7,345 18,470 17,041 From Oil Wells 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 4,470 From Coalbed Wells 0

90

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 50,700 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 191,444 192,896 151,401 167,113 397,313 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 1,477 From Coalbed Wells 0

91

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

80 80 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 27,350 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,649,284 R 1,764,084 R 1,806,807 R 1,787,599 1,709,218 From Oil Wells 159,039 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589

92

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 New York - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 7,176 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 25,985 From Oil Wells 714 576 650 629 439 From Coalbed Wells 0

93

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Wyoming - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S52. Summary statistics for natural gas - Wyoming, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 28,969 25,710 26,124 26,180 22,171 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,764,084 1,806,807 1,787,599 1,709,218 1,762,095 From Oil Wells 156,133 135,269 151,871 152,589 24,544

94

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Virginia - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 7,843 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 7,419 16,046 23,086 20,375 21,802 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 9 From Coalbed Wells 101,567 106,408

95

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 17,936 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 112,587 111,782 133,521 122,578 106,122 From Oil Wells 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

96

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Pennsylvania - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S40. Summary statistics for natural gas - Pennsylvania, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 52,700 55,631 57,356 44,500 54,347 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 182,277 R 188,538 R 184,795 R 173,450 242,305 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0

97

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Texas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 96,617 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 5,285,458 4,860,377 4,441,188 3,794,952 3,619,901 From Oil Wells 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301 860,675

98

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Alabama - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S1. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alabama, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,860 6,913 7,026 7,063 6,327 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 158,964 142,509 131,448 116,872 114,407 From Oil Wells 6,368 5,758 6,195 5,975 10,978

99

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 19,792 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,288,559 1,100,007 911,967 883,712 775,506 From Oil Wells 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505 49,380

100

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 89 102 100 95 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,098 1,561 1,300 933 14,396 From Oil Wells 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 689 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Kansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S18. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 17,862 21,243 22,145 25,758 24,697 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 286,210 269,086 247,651 236,834 264,610 From Oil Wells 45,038 42,647 39,071 37,194 0 From Coalbed Wells 44,066

102

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 6 Arkansas - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S4. Summary statistics for natural gas - Arkansas, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,592 6,314 7,397 8,388 8,538 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 173,975 164,316 152,108 132,230 121,684 From Oil Wells 7,378 5,743 5,691 9,291 3,000

103

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 California - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 1,423 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 120,579 From Oil Wells 122,345 121,949 151,369 120,880 70,900

104

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 4 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 40,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 1,452,148 1,413,759 1,140,111 1,281,794 1,394,859 From Oil Wells 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703 53,720

105

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Alaska - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 261 261 269 277 185 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 107,873 From Oil Wells 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654 3,056,918

106

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 8 Illinois - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 45 51 50 40 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells E 1,188 E 1,438 E 1,697 2,114 2,125 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 7 0 From Coalbed Wells E 0 E 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

107

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

50 50 North Dakota - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S36. Summary statistics for natural gas - North Dakota, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 194 196 188 239 211 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 13,738 11,263 10,501 14,287 22,261 From Oil Wells 54,896 45,776 38,306 27,739 17,434 From Coalbed Wells 0

108

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 1,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,673 337,168 387,026 429,829 404,457 From Oil Wells 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 43,421 From Coalbed Wells 7,250

109

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S48. Summary statistics for natural gas - Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,735 6,426 7,303 7,470 7,903 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 6,681 R 7,419 R 16,046 R 23,086 20,375 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells R 86,275 R 101,567

110

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Michigan - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S24. Summary statistics for natural gas - Michigan, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 9,712 9,995 10,600 10,100 11,100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 80,090 R 16,959 R 20,867 R 7,345 18,470 From Oil Wells 54,114 10,716 12,919 9,453 11,620 From Coalbed Wells 0

111

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Montana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S28. Summary statistics for natural gas - Montana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,925 7,095 7,031 6,059 6,477 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 69,741 R 67,399 R 57,396 R 51,117 37,937 From Oil Wells 23,092 22,995 21,522 19,292 21,777 From Coalbed Wells

112

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Mississippi - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S26. Summary statistics for natural gas - Mississippi, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,315 2,343 2,320 1,979 5,732 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 259,001 R 331,673 R 337,168 R 387,026 429,829 From Oil Wells 6,203 7,542 8,934 8,714 8,159 From Coalbed Wells

113

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Indiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S16. Summary statistics for natural gas - Indiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 2,350 525 563 620 914 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 3,606 4,701 4,927 6,802 9,075 From Oil Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells 0 0 0 0 0 From Shale Gas Wells 0

114

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 New York - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S34. Summary statistics for natural gas - New York, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 6,680 6,675 6,628 6,736 6,157 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 54,232 49,607 44,273 35,163 30,495 From Oil Wells 710 714 576 650 629 From Coalbed Wells 0

115

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Texas - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S45. Summary statistics for natural gas - Texas, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 76,436 87,556 93,507 95,014 100,966 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 4,992,042 R 5,285,458 R 4,860,377 R 4,441,188 3,794,952 From Oil Wells 704,092 745,587 774,821 849,560 1,073,301

116

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 2 Ohio - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 35,104 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 79,769 83,511 73,459 30,655 65,025 From Oil Wells 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 6,684 From Coalbed Wells 0

117

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Colorado - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 32,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 496,374 459,509 526,077 563,750 1,036,572 From Oil Wells 199,725 327,619 338,565

118

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 South Dakota - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S43. Summary statistics for natural gas - South Dakota, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 71 71 89 102 100 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 422 R 1,098 R 1,561 1,300 933 From Oil Wells 11,458 10,909 11,366 11,240 11,516 From Coalbed Wells 0 0

119

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Illinois - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S15. Summary statistics for natural gas - Illinois, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 43 45 51 50 40 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells RE 1,389 RE 1,188 RE 1,438 RE 1,697 2,114 From Oil Wells E 5 E 5 E 5 E 5 7 From Coalbed Wells RE 0 RE

120

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Colorado - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S6. Summary statistics for natural gas - Colorado, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 22,949 25,716 27,021 28,813 30,101 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 436,330 R 496,374 R 459,509 R 526,077 563,750 From Oil Wells 160,833 199,725 327,619

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Alaska - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S2. Summary statistics for natural gas - Alaska, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 239 261 261 269 277 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 165,624 150,483 137,639 127,417 112,268 From Oil Wells 3,313,666 3,265,401 3,174,747 3,069,683 3,050,654

122

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Ohio - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S37. Summary statistics for natural gas - Ohio, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 34,416 34,416 34,963 34,931 46,717 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 82,812 R 79,769 R 83,511 R 73,459 30,655 From Oil Wells 5,268 5,072 5,301 4,651 45,663 From Coalbed Wells

123

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

4 4 Kentucky - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S19. Summary statistics for natural gas - Kentucky, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 16,563 16,290 17,152 17,670 14,632 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 95,437 R 112,587 R 111,782 133,521 122,578 From Oil Wells 0 1,529 1,518 1,809 1,665 From Coalbed Wells 0

124

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Utah - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,197 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 271,890 R 331,143 R 340,224 R 328,135 351,168 From Oil Wells 35,104 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 From Coalbed Wells

125

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 California - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S5. Summary statistics for natural gas - California, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 1,540 1,645 1,643 1,580 1,308 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 93,249 91,460 82,288 73,017 63,902 From Oil Wells R 116,652 R 122,345 R 121,949 R 151,369 120,880

126

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0 0 Utah - Natural Gas 2012 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S46. Summary statistics for natural gas - Utah, 2008-2012 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 5,578 5,774 6,075 6,469 6,900 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells 331,143 340,224 328,135 351,168 402,899 From Oil Wells 36,056 36,795 42,526 49,947 31,440 From Coalbed Wells 74,399

127

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 Louisiana - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S20. Summary statistics for natural gas - Louisiana, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 18,145 19,213 18,860 19,137 21,235 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,261,539 R 1,288,559 R 1,100,007 R 911,967 883,712 From Oil Wells 106,303 61,663 58,037 63,638 68,505

128

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Oklahoma - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S38. Summary statistics for natural gas - Oklahoma, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 38,364 41,921 43,600 44,000 41,238 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 1,583,356 R 1,452,148 R 1,413,759 R 1,140,111 1,281,794 From Oil Wells 35,186 153,227 92,467 210,492 104,703

129

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 New Mexico - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S33. Summary statistics for natural gas - New Mexico, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 42,644 44,241 44,784 44,748 32,302 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 657,593 R 732,483 R 682,334 R 616,134 556,024 From Oil Wells 227,352 211,496 223,493 238,580 252,326

130

Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6 6 West Virginia - Natural Gas 2011 Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Million Cu. Feet Percent of National Total Total Net Movements: - Industrial: Dry Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Residential: Electric Power: Commercial: Total Delivered: Table S50. Summary statistics for natural gas - West Virginia, 2007-2011 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 Number of Producing Gas Wells at End of Year 48,215 49,364 50,602 52,498 56,813 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells R 189,968 R 191,444 R 192,896 R 151,401 167,113 From Oil Wells 701 0 0 0 0 From Coalbed Wells

131

Microsoft Word - 2.9 Chemical Owners 0913.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Owners Chemical Owners AFRD Line Management personnel who authorize the use of chemicals in their group's work retain responsibility for ensuring that the chemicals are properly inventoried, labeled, stored, used, and disposed. They may choose to remain Chemical Owners as described in the LBNL Chemical Hygiene and Safety Plan and manage the chemicals themselves, or delegate chemical management tasks to appropriately trained AFRD or matrixed personnel who have knowledge of the chemicals' hazards, controls, and procedures for using and storing them safely. The chemical inventory for each AFRD work area must be maintained on the Chemical Management System. When chemical management tasks are delegated, the AFRD Line Management personnel must also

132

Facility Name Facility Name Facility FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Name Facility Name Facility FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser Name Facility Name Facility FacilityType Owner Developer EnergyPurchaser Place GeneratingCapacity NumberOfUnits CommercialOnlineDate WindTurbineManufacturer FacilityStatus Coordinates D Metals D Metals D Metals Definition Small Scale Wind Valley City OH MW Northern Power Systems In Service AB Tehachapi Wind Farm AB Tehachapi Wind Farm AB Tehachapi Definition Commercial Scale Wind Coram Energy AB Energy Southern California Edison Co Tehachapi CA MW Vestas In Service AFCEE MMR Turbines AFCEE MMR Turbines AFCEE MMR Turbines Definition Commercial Scale Wind AFCEE Air Force Center for Engineering and the Environment Distributed generation net metered Camp Edwards Sandwich MA MW GE Energy In Service AG Land AG Land AG Land Definition Community Wind AG Land Energy LLC

133

Keywords Europe Home-owners Housing wealth Pensions Welfare  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Notwithstanding current market volatility, there has been exceptional expansion in owner-occupied housing sectors and increases in house prices across European countries in recent decades. In the EU, individual wealth held in housing equity, especially among older people, has been considered a substantial reserve that could be tapped into to meet future pension needs as the ageing of the population becomes a greater stress on European welfare states. This paper seeks to take the notion of ‘property-based welfare’ further by examining, in principle at least, how home ownership may function as a pension across EU states. This firstly involves very approximate estimates of the types of, and rates of, income homeowners could hypothetically generate from their homes, including forms of income in kind. Secondly, criteria are identified to estimate how ‘adequate ’ such potential incomes are in relation to working incomes and in bringing retired households above poverty levels. Thirdly, different circumstances across EU member states with regard to existing housing and pension arrangements are examined. Broad national groupings appear evident, with housing income having least impact in older member states in central and northern Europe. The paper concludes that while the potential outcome of housing wealth is country specific, in many cases, greater dependency on home ownership in welfare provision, particularly if it is used as a substitute rather than a complement to existing arrangements, may have adverse consequences for many.

John Doling; Richard Ronald; J. Doling; R. Ronald; R. Ronald

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Secretaries Chu and Donovan to Host Conference Call on Home Owners...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Donovan to Host Conference Call on Home Owners Energy-Saving Improvements Program Secretaries Chu and Donovan to Host Conference Call on Home Owners Energy-Saving Improvements...

135

Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Decade...

136

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal...

137

Hawaii Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Hawaii Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Hawaii Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

138

Missouri Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Missouri Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Missouri Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

139

Alaska Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Alaska Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Alaska Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

140

Arizona Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Arizona Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Arizona Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Iowa Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Iowa Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Iowa Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Decade...

142

Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Alabama Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

143

Florida Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Florida Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Florida Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

144

Wyoming Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Wyoming Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Wyoming Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

145

Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Kentucky Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

146

Illinois Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Illinois Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Illinois Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

147

Nevada Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Nevada Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Nevada Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

148

Oregon Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Oregon Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Oregon Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

149

Kansas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Kansas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Kansas Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

150

Tennessee Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Tennessee Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Tennessee Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)...

151

Maine Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Maine Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Maine Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Decade...

152

Realities of Chiller Plant Operation: Utility Impacts on Owner Operating  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Realities of Chiller Plant Operation: Utility Impacts on Owner Operating Realities of Chiller Plant Operation: Utility Impacts on Owner Operating Costs and Societal Environmental Issues Speaker(s): Don Aumann Date: March 21, 2000 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Satkartar K. Kinney Don Aumann, a Senior Consultant from BKi in Oakland, will present an overview of two projects he completed for the electric utility industry. The first, a case study evaluation of a hybrid chiller plant in Jefferson City, Missouri, demonstrates the importance of carefully evaluating the impact of utility rate structures on plant operating costs. The building owner, another engineering consultant, and the local utility representatives were confused by the rates and missed an opportunity to cut chiller-plant operating costs by about 20%, totaling $15,000 per year. In

153

Business Owners: Prepare a Business Recovery Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

a Business Recovery Plan a Business Recovery Plan Business Owners: Prepare a Business Recovery Plan Business Owners: Prepare a Business Recovery Plan Smart business owners develop and test a written business recovery plan to support them through disasters and help them stay in operation. Planning ahead will help your company get back to business more quickly. Consider your risks-How might a disaster affect your business operations? What natural disasters are most likely where you operate? Identify your critical business functions-What resources and personnel will you need to restore or reproduce these functions during a recovery? Assign disaster response duties to your employees. Identify critical suppliers-Identify suppliers, providers, shippers, resources, and other businesses you typically interact with and

154

Energy Efficiency: Helping Home Owners and Businesses Understand Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Efficiency: Helping Home Owners and Businesses Understand Efficiency: Helping Home Owners and Businesses Understand Energy Usage Energy Efficiency: Helping Home Owners and Businesses Understand Energy Usage November 7, 2013 - 3:55pm Addthis Building 90, an 89,000-square foot office building at Berkeley Lab, served as the commercial setting for the miscellaneous and electronic loads (MELs) study. 460 meters were placed throughout the building to serve as a representative sample of a wide range of device types. | Photo courtesy of Berkeley Lab. Building 90, an 89,000-square foot office building at Berkeley Lab, served as the commercial setting for the miscellaneous and electronic loads (MELs) study. 460 meters were placed throughout the building to serve as a representative sample of a wide range of device types. | Photo courtesy of

155

texas well owner network More than a million private water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

texas well owner network More than a million private water wells in Texas provide water to citi and are at a greater risk for exposure to compromised water quality. The Texas Water Resources Institute along with the Texas AgriLife Extension Service's Department of Soil and Crop Sciences and Department of Biological

156

Maintainability Implemented by Third-Party Contractor for Public Owner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is implementation of a computerized maintenance management system CMMS . The CMMS is a tool used to establish maintenance strategy for systems Construction manager · Conduct construction practices that do not alter by NASA, the owner. The policy directive endorses a maintenance management pro- gram capable of developing

Sheridan, Jennifer

157

Geothermal Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION A PRIMER ON LOW-TEMPERATURE, SMALL-SCALE APPLICATIONS by Kevin Rafferty Geo-Heat Center January 2000 REALITY CHECK Owners of low-temperature...

158

Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Commercial Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Deliveries (Percent) Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Commercial Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

159

Utah Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Utah Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

160

California Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) California Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ohio Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Ohio Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

162

Wisconsin Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Wisconsin Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

163

Michigan Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Michigan Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

164

Idaho Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Idaho Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

165

Vermont Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Vermont Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

166

Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Colorado Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

167

Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Industrial Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Deliveries (Percent) Alabama Natural Gas Percentage Total Industrial Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

168

Illinois Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Illinois Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

169

New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

170

New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Vehicle Fuel Deliveries (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vehicle Fuel Deliveries (Percent) New Mexico Natural Gas % of Total Vehicle Fuel Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

171

Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

% of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Texas Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

172

Focus group discussions among owners and non-owners of ground source heat pumps  

SciTech Connect

This research was sponsored by the Office of Buildings and Community Systems and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory as part of an ongoing effort to enhance the commercial use of federally developed technology. Federal dollars have supported research on the development of ground source heat pumps (GSHP) for several years. Though several companies currently sell GSHP's for residential use, their share of the total heating and air conditioning business remains less than one percent. Large manufacturing companies with national distribution have not yet added GSHP equipment to their product line. GSHP's use only about one half (Braud 1987) to one third (Bose 1987) of the energy needed to operate conventional furnaces and air conditioners. Consequently, a high level of market penetration by the GSHP offers direct benefits to both utility companies and individual users of the systems. Widespread use of these highly efficient systems will reduce both total energy consupmtion, and problems associated with high levels of energy use during peak periods. This will allow utility companies to delay capital expenditures for new facilities to meet the growing energy demand during peak periods. The cost effective use of electricity also reduces the likelihood of homeowners switching to a different fuel source for heating. 5 refs.

Roberson, B.F.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Utah Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utah Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

174

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

175

Kansas Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kansas Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

176

Kentucky Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kentucky Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

177

Mississippi Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Mississippi Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

178

West Virginia Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

179

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

180

Alabama Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alabama Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

North Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

182

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

183

Florida Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Florida Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

184

California Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

185

United States Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

186

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

187

Colorado Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

188

Texas Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

189

Oklahoma Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oklahoma Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

190

North Dakota Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

North Dakota Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

191

Wyoming Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wyoming Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

192

Florida Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Florida Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

193

Michigan Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

194

United States Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

195

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Federal Gulf Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

196

South Dakota Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota Percent of Historical Oil Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

197

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Wells by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

198

Solar PV Project Financing: Regulatory and Legislative Challenges for Third-Party PPA System Owners  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Residential and commercial end users of electricity who want to generate electricity using on-site solar photovoltaic (PV) systems face challenging initial and O&M costs. The third-party ownership power purchase agreement (PPA) finance model addresses these and other challenges. It allows developers to build and own PV systems on customers? properties and sell power back to customers. However, third-party electricity sales commonly face five regulatory challenges. The first three challenges involve legislative or regulatory definitions of electric utilities, power generation equipment, and providers of electric services. These definitions may compel third-party owners of solar PV systems to comply with regulations that may be cost prohibitive. Third-party owners face an additional challenge if they may not net meter, a practice that provides significant financial incentive to owning solar PV systems. Finally, municipalities and cooperatives worry about the regulatory implications of allowing an entity to sell electricity within their service territories. This paper summarizes these challenges, when they occur, and how they have been addressed in five states. This paper also presents alternative to the third-party ownership PPA finance model, including solar leases, contractual intermediaries, standardized contract language, federal investment tax credits, clean renewable energy bonds, and waived monopoly powers.

Kollins, K.; Speer, B.; Cory, K.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

DOE NSTB Researchers Demonstrate R&D Successes to Asset Owners...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE NSTB Researchers Demonstrate R&D Successes to Asset Owners at EnergySec Conference DOE NSTB Researchers Demonstrate R&D Successes to Asset Owners at EnergySec Conference...

200

Utah Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Utah Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

California Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

202

Ohio Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

203

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

204

Oklahoma Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Oklahoma Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

205

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Pennsylvania Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

206

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

207

Texas Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Texas Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

208

United States Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

209

United States Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

United States Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

210

Michigan Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

211

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alaska Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

212

Wt% = Weight percent of undissolved solids in the slurry = Density ...  

high-level radioactive waste stored in underground, tanks at the Hanford site. The ability to continuously monitor the solids weight percent of mixed slurries in these

213

Montana Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Montana Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

214

Ohio Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Ohio Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

215

Florida Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Florida Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

216

Kentucky Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Kentucky Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

217

Arkansas Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Arkansas Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

218

Tennessee Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Tennessee Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

219

West Virginia Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Virginia Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

220

Colorado Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Colorado Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Missouri Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Missouri Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

222

Wyoming Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wyoming Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

223

Alaska Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Alaska Percent of Historical Oil Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

224

South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

225

South Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

South Dakota Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

226

South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries (Percent) South Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential Deliveries...

227

New Mexico Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

New Mexico Percent of Historical Gas Well Production (BOE) by Production Rate Bracket. Energy Information Administration (U.S. Dept. of Energy)

228

North Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) North Dakota Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

229

New Jersey Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) New Jersey Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) New Jersey Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

230

North Carolina Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) North Carolina Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) North Carolina Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

231

West Virginia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) West Virginia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) West Virginia Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

232

Massachusetts Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Massachusetts Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (Percent) Massachusetts Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales...

233

Impacts of a 10-Percent Renewable Portfolio Standard  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This service report addresses the renewable portfolio standard provision of S. 1766. At Senator Murkowski's request it also includes an analysis of the impacts of a renewable portfolio standard patterned after the one called for in S. 1766, but where the required share is based on a 20 percent RPS by 2020 rather than the 10 percent RPS called for in S. 1766.

Alan Beamon

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Energy and Economic Impacts of Implementing Both a 25-Percent RPS and a 25-Percent RFS by 2025  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report responds to a request by Senator James Inhofe for analysis of a "25-by-25" proposal that combines a requirement that a 25-percent share of electricity sales be produced from renewable sources by 2025 with a requirement that a 25-percent share of liquid transportation fuel sales also be derived from renewable sources by 2025.

John J. Conti

2007-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

235

Which idling reduction system is most economical for truck owners?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Which idling reduction system is Which idling reduction system is most economical for truck owners? Linda Gaines Center for Transportation Research Argonne National Laboratory Commercial Vehicle Engineering Congress and Exposition Rosemont, Il October 7-9, 2008 The price of diesel is high *Idling a Class 8 truck uses 0.6-1.2 gallons per hour *That can total over $50 a night! *So even without regulations, there's an incentive to reduce idling *Even if the price goes down more, idling reduction makes sense 2 Why do sleepers idle overnight? For services to resting driver and friend y Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) y Power for appliances 8TV, microwave, refrigerator, computer, hair drier To keep fuel and engine warm To mask out noises and smells Because other drivers do it

236

Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Business  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Choosing the Right Backup Generator Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Business Owners Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Business Owners Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator - Business Owners Identify essential systems and equipment-What do you need to keep your business operating? These may include heating, ventilation, and air conditioning systems; industrial equipment and major appliances, such as refrigerators and freezers; lights (interior and exterior), computers, and other office equipment; pumps, including sump pumps, sprinkler system pumps, and well water pumps; and alarm systems. Some of these systems and equipment may have to operate continuously, while others may be needed only during normal business hours. Choose the generator's fuel source-Backup generators are

237

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal November 3, 2005 - 12:35pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the federal government has exceeded its goal of obtaining 2.5 percent of its electricity needs from renewable energy sources by September 30, 2005. The largest energy consumer in the nation, the federal government now uses 2375 Gigawatt hours (GWh) of renewable energy -- enough to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important that all Americans - including the

238

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal Federal Government Increases Renewable Energy Use Over 1000 Percent since 1999; Exceeds Goal November 3, 2005 - 12:35pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that the federal government has exceeded its goal of obtaining 2.5 percent of its electricity needs from renewable energy sources by September 30, 2005. The largest energy consumer in the nation, the federal government now uses 2375 Gigawatt hours (GWh) of renewable energy -- enough to power 225,000 homes or a city the size of El Paso, Texas, for a year. "Particularly in light of tight oil and gas supplies caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita, it is important that all Americans - including the

239

BOSS Measures the Universe to One-Percent Accuracy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This and future measures at this precision are the key to determining the nature of dark energy. "One-percent accuracy in the scale of the universe is the most precise such...

240

Impacts of a 15-Percent Renewable Portfolio Standard  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This analysis responds to a request from Senator Jeff Bingaman that the Energy Information Administration (EIA) analyze a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) requiring that 15 percent of U.S. electricity sales be derived from qualifying renewable energy resources.

Alan Beamon

2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

NETL: News Release - President's Initiative to Seek 90 Percent Mercury  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

April 21, 2004 April 21, 2004 President's Initiative to Seek 90 Percent Mercury Removal We Energies to Test TOXECON(tm) Process in Michigan Coal-fired Power Plant WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) and We Energies today initiated a joint venture to demonstrate technology that will remove an unprecedented 90 percent of mercury emissions from coal-based power plants. Presque Isle Power Plant - We Energies' Presque Isle Power Plant located on the shores of Lake Superior in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan. As part of the President's Clean Coal Power Initiative of technology development and demonstration, the new project supports current proposals to reduce mercury emissions in the range of 70 percent through a proposed regulation pending before the Environmental Protection Agency or, in the

242

DOE/NNSA Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Management Contracts Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor Award Date End Date Options/Award Term Ultimate Potential Expiration Date Contract FY Competed Parent Companies/ LLC Partners DOE Site Procurement Director DOE Contracting Officer SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) SC Stanford University DE-AC03-76SF00515 1/25/1981 9/30/2017 9/30/2017 M&O 1981 Stanford University Barbara Jackson 865-576-0976 Kyong H. Watson 650-926-5203 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) SC Battelle Memorial Institute DE-AC05-76RL01830 12/30/2002 9/30/2017 9/30/2017 M&O 1965 Battelle Memorial Institute Barbara Jackson 865-576-0976 Ryan Kilbury 509-372-4030 Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) SC Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC DE-AC02-98CH10886 1/5/1998 1/4/2015 1/4/2015 M&O 1998 Battelle Memorial Institute

243

DOE/NNSA Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Facility Management Contracts Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor Award Date End Date Options/Award Term Ultimate Potential Expiration Date Contract FY Competed Parent Companies/ LLC Partners DOE Site Procurement Director DOE Contracting Officer SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) SC Stanford University DE-AC03-76SF00515 1/25/1981 9/30/2017 9/30/2017 M&O 1981 Stanford University Barbara Jackson 865-576-0976 Kyong H. Watson 650-926-5203 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) SC Battelle Memorial Institute DE-AC05-76RL01830 12/30/2002 9/30/2017 9/30/2017 M&O 1965 Battelle Memorial Institute Barbara Jackson 865-576-0976 Ryan Kilbury 509-372-4030 Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) SC Brookhaven Science Associates, LLC DE-AC02-98CH10886 1/5/1998 1/4/2015 1/4/2015 M&O 1998 Battelle Memorial Institute

244

Personalized Face Verification System Using Owner-Specific Cluster-Dependent LDA-Subspace  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose an owner-specific cluster-dependent linear discriminant analysis (OSCD-LDA) method, and apply it to develop a personalized face verification system. Before the owner enrollment, our system first divides all the training face ...

Hsien-Chang Liu; Chan-Hung Su; Yueh-Hsuan Chiang; Yi-Ping Hung

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

U.S. Refinery Yield of Petroleum Coke (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Yield of Petroleum Coke (Percent) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's: 4.3: 4.3: 4.3: ...

246

U.S. Refinery Yield of Petroleum Coke (Percent)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Refinery Yield of Petroleum Coke (Percent) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 1993: 4.4: 4.6: 4.5: 4.3: 4.1: 4.2: 4.4: 4.3: ...

247

DOE NSTB Researchers Demonstrate R&D Successes to Asset Owners at EnergySec  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NSTB Researchers Demonstrate R&D Successes to Asset Owners at NSTB Researchers Demonstrate R&D Successes to Asset Owners at EnergySec Conference DOE NSTB Researchers Demonstrate R&D Successes to Asset Owners at EnergySec Conference More than 150 energy sector leaders-including nearly 100 asset owners and operators-gathered at the 2009 EnergySec Annual Summit in Seattle, WA, on Sept. 23-24, where researchers from the Department of Energy's National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) Program gave a four-hour demonstration and presentation of their Roadmap-related control systems security work. DOE NSTB Researchers Demonstrate R&D Successes to Asset Owners at EnergySec Conference More Documents & Publications DOE/OE National SCADA Test Bed Fiscal Year 2009 Work Plan Security is Not an Option DOE National SCADA Test Bed Program Multi-Year Plan

248

DOE NSTB Researchers Demonstrate R&D Successes to Asset Owners at EnergySec  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE NSTB Researchers Demonstrate R&D Successes to Asset Owners at DOE NSTB Researchers Demonstrate R&D Successes to Asset Owners at EnergySec Conference DOE NSTB Researchers Demonstrate R&D Successes to Asset Owners at EnergySec Conference October 1, 2009 - 1:26pm Addthis More than 150 energy sector leaders-including nearly 100 asset owners and operators-gathered at the 2009 EnergySec Annual Summit in Seattle, WA, on Sept. 23-24, where researchers from the Department of Energy's National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) Program gave a four-hour demonstration and presentation of their Roadmap-related control systems security work. EnergySec is an information sharing forum with more than 230 utility members representing 75 energy companies across the nation. Its fifth annual conference drew asset owners, vendors, and government

249

11.3 Percent of the Adult US population are Entrepreneurs  

Entrepreneur An owner or manager of a business enterprise who makes money through risk and initiative . Lifestyle Entrepreneur . A lifestyle entrepreneur places ...

250

Table 2. Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " Percent of Households with Vehicles, Selected Survey Years " ,"Survey Years" ,1983,1985,1988,1991,1994,2001 "Total",85.5450237,89.00343643,88.75545852,89.42917548,87.25590956,92.08566108 "Household Characteristics" "Census Region and Division" " Northeast",77.22222222,"NA",79.16666667,82.9015544,75.38461538,85.09615385 " New England",88.37209302,"NA",81.81818182,82.9787234,82,88.52459016 " Middle Atlantic ",73.72262774,"NA",78.37837838,82.31292517,74.30555556,83.67346939 " Midwest ",85.51401869,"NA",90.66666667,90.17094017,92.30769231,91.47286822 " East North Central",82,"NA",88.81987578,89.88095238,91.51515152,90.55555556

251

Development of a Dedicated 100 Percent Ventilation Air Heat Pump  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of using dedicated 100 percent ventilation makeup air conditioning units to meet indoor air quality standards is attractive because of the inherent advantages. However, it is challenging to design and build direct expansion unitary equipment for this purpose. EPRI teamed with ClimateMaster to develop and test a prototype of a vapor compression heat pump to advance the state of the art in such equipment. The prototype unit provides deep dehumidification and cooling of ventilation air in the su...

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

252

Letter of Intent: Commercial Real Estate Developer/Owner | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Letter of Intent: Commercial Real Estate Developer/Owner Letter of Intent: Commercial Real Estate Developer/Owner Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources

253

NIST Budget Request Proposes 7.3 Percent Increase in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... teams as needed to exploit rapidly changing innovation trends. ... Advanced Solar Technologies - Third Generation Photovoltaics (+$5 million); ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

254

Design Team:Owners Team: Solaris Group, LLC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Mixed-Use Development 4. Quality Architecture and Design 5. Increased Neighborhood Density 6. Smart) Charging Stations DC Mini Grid Supporting Clean On-Site Power Generation Centralized Hot and Chilled Water

255

Group Member Names: ________________________________________________ Scenario: You are the owner of a potato plant in Idaho. You have recently won a contract  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ ________________________________________________ Scenario: You are the owner of a potato plant in Idaho. You have recently won a contract to supply Mc

Provancher, William

256

MOTION TO INTERVENE OF THE NEW YORK TRANSMISSION OWNERS PP-230-4 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MOTION TO INTERVENE OF THE NEW YORK TRANSMISSION OWNERS PP-230-4 MOTION TO INTERVENE OF THE NEW YORK TRANSMISSION OWNERS PP-230-4 MOTION TO INTERVENE OF THE NEW YORK TRANSMISSION OWNERS PP-230-4 Pursuant to Rules 212 and 214 of the Rules of Practice and Procedure, 18 C.F.R. §§ 385.212 and 385.214 (2010), Central Hudson Gas & Electric Corporation, Consolidated Edison Company of New York, Inc., Long Island Power Authority, New York Power Authority, New York State Electric & Gas Corporation, Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation d/b/a National Grid, Orange and Rockland Utilities, Inc., and Rochester Gas and Electric Corporation (referred to herein as the "New York Transmission Owners"), individually and collectively move to intervene in the above-captioned proceeding and request an opportunity to comment on International Transmission Company's d/b/a/ ITCTransmission

257

A comparison of noxious facilities` impacts for home owners versus renters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The siting of noxious facilities, such as hazardous waste facilities, is often vigorously opposed by local residents, and thus it is now common for local residents to be compensated for the presence of the facility. One technique that has been employed to implicitly value noxious facilities is the intercity hedonic approach, which examines the wage and land rent premia between cities that result from the presence of the facility. However, most of the focus has been on the behavior of home owners as opposed to renters. Since these two groups of residents vary on numerous dimensions such as marital status, age, sex, and personal mobility, it would not be surprising to find different marginal valuations of local site characteristics. The authors use 1980 Census data to derive separate estimates for owners and renters of the implicit value placed on eight different types of noxious facilities. They find that renters and owners differ in their response to noxious facilities, although the differences are not systematic. Furthermore, the differences between owners and renters are not primarily due to differential mobility or socio-demographic factors. Controlling those factors decreases the differences between renters` and owners` implicit valuations of noxious facilities by less than 10%. Unmeasured differences between the two groups, such as tastes, risk aversion, or commitment to the community, must account for the remaining difference in valuations. These findings suggest that policymakers should separately consider the responses of owners and renters when estimating noxious facility impacts.

Clark, D.E. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Economics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nieves, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Connecting Distributed Energy Resources to the Grid: Their Benefits to the DER Owner etc.  

SciTech Connect

The vision of the Distributed Energy Research Program (DER) program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is that the United States will have the cleanest and most efficient and reliable energy system in the world by maximizing the use of affordable distributed energy resources. Electricity consumers will be able to choose from a diverse number of efficient, cost-effective, and environmentally friendly distributed energy options and easily connect them into the nation's energy infrastructure while providing benefits to their owners and other stakeholders. The long-term goal of this vision is that DER will achieve a 20% share of new electric capacity additions in the United States by 2010, thereby helping to make the nation's electric power generation and delivery system more efficient, reliable, secure, clean, economical, and diverse in terms of fuel use (oil, natural gas, solar, hydroelectric, etc.) and prime mover resource (solar, wind, gas turbines, etc.). Near- and mid-term goals are to develop new technologies for implementing and operating DER and address barriers associated with DER usage and then to reduce costs and emissions and improve the efficiency and reliability of DER. Numerous strategies for meeting these goals have been developed into a research, development, and demonstration (RD&D) program that supports generation and delivery systems architecture, including modeling and simulation tools. The benefits associated with DER installations are often significant and numerous. They almost always provide tangible economic benefits, such as energy savings or transmission and distribution upgrade deferrals, as well as intangible benefits, such as power quality improvements that lengthen maintenance or repair intervals for power equipment. Also, the benefits routinely are dispersed among end users, utilities, and the public. For instance, an end user may use the DER to reduce their peak demand and save money due to lower demand charges. Reduced end user peak demand, in turn, may lower a distribution system peak load such that upgrades are deferred or avoided. This could benefit other consumers by providing them with higher reliability and power quality as well as avoiding their cost share of a distribution system upgrade. In this example, the costs of the DER may be born by the end user, but that user reaps only a share of the benefits. This report, the first product of a study to quantify the value of DER, documents initial project efforts to develop an assessment methodology. The focus of currently available site-specific DER assessment techniques are typically limited to two parties, the owner/user and the local utility. Rarely are the impacts on other stakeholders, including interconnected distribution utilities, transmission system operators, generating system operators, other local utility customers, local and regional industry and business, various levels of government, and the environment considered. The goal of this assessment is to quantify benefits and cost savings that accrue broadly across a region, recognizing that DER installations may have local, regional, or national benefits.

Poore, WP

2003-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

259

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B ENEFITS Other benefits associated with wind energy includeof carbon costs, the benefit of wind energy in reducing theWind Energy Deployment System model used to estimate the costs and benefits

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J. Charles Smith (Utility Wind Integration Group) and Robertare the integration costs associated with wind power. The

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

States. ” National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO,Supply. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO.of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy National Renewable

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2008). 20% Wind Energy by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy’sOutlook, with Projections to 2030. Washington, DC: Energyfrom wind technology by 2030. 15. SUBJECT TERMS wind-

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

price elasticity of natural gas supply of 1.2; low and highfor natural gas, wind power may relieve gas supply pressures

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

price is constant Shallow Offshore Wind Technology Cost WindOhio was modified and offshore wind development in Texas was

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

curve for wind energy: energy costs including connection toavailable to transport wind energy, the cost of feeder linescapital and financing costs of wind and conventional energy

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in New England and New York, 30% higher in PJM East, 20%higher in PJM West, 20% higher in California No wheeling

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geographic regions via transmission lines. We assumed thatthe costs of building transmission lines directly from theevaluated. 3) New transmission lines – the WinDS model can

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

~11%) reduction in natural gas demand in the United StatesB. Natural Gas Price Reduction Offsetting demand for naturalFinally, by reducing demand for natural gas, wind power may

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Role of Forward Natural Gas Prices,” Energy Policy, vol.Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices through Increasedemission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2003. U.S. Department of Energy (2008). 20% Wind Energy by2030: Increasing Wind Energy’s Contribution to U.S.shows the results of the Wind Energy Deployment System model

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the relationship between wind power class and cost is showncosts associated with wind power. The cost implications ofprice electricity, wind power directly reduces exposure to

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Role of Forward Natural Gas Prices,” Energy Policy, vol. 34,Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices through Increasedemission reductions, natural gas price reductions, and water

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Guide to Combined Heat and Power Systems for Boiler Owners and Operators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined heat and power (CHP) or cogeneration is the sequential production of two forms of useful energy from a single fuel source. In most CHP applications, chemical energy in fuel is converted to both mechanical and thermal energy. The mechanical energy is generally used to generate electricity, while the thermal energy or heat is used to produce steam, hot water, or hot air. Depending on the application, CHP is referred to by various names including Building Cooling, Heating, and Power (BCHP); Cooling, Heating, and Power for Buildings (CHPB); Combined Cooling, Heating, and Power (CCHP); Integrated Energy Systems (IES), or Distributed Energy Resources (DER). The principal technical advantage of a CHP system is its ability to extract more useful energy from fuel compared to traditional energy systems such as conventional power plants that only generate electricity and industrial boiler systems that only produce steam or hot water for process applications. By using fuel energy for both power and heat production, CHP systems can be very energy efficient and have the potential to produce electricity below the price charged by the local power provider. Another important incentive for applying cogeneration technology is to reduce or eliminate dependency on the electrical grid. For some industrial processes, the consequences of losing power for even a short period of time are unacceptable. The primary objective of the guide is to present information needed to evaluate the viability of cogeneration for new or existing industrial, commercial, and institutional (ICI) boiler installations and to make informed CHP equipment selection decisions. Information presented is meant to help boiler owners and operators understand the potential benefits derived from implementing a CHP project and recognize opportunities for successful application of cogeneration technology. Topics covered in the guide follow: (1) an overview of cogeneration technology with discussions about benefits of applying cogeneration technology and barriers to implementing cogeneration technology; (2) applicable federal regulations and permitting issues; (3) descriptions of prime movers commonly used in CHP applications, including discussions about design characteristics, heat-recovery options and equipment, fuels and emissions, efficiency, maintenance, availability, and capital cost; (4) electrical generators and electrical interconnection equipment; (5) cooling and dehumidification equipment; (6) thermodynamic cycle options and configurations; (7) steps for evaluating the technical and economic feasibility of applying cogeneration technology; and (8) information sources.

Oland, CB

2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

Step 8: Work with the building owner to complete the ENERGY STAR lifecycle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8: Work with the building owner to complete the ENERGY STAR 8: Work with the building owner to complete the ENERGY STAR lifecycle Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Why you should design to earn the ENERGY STAR Follow EPA's step-by-step process Step 1: Assemble a team Step 2: Set an energy performance target Step 3: Evaluate your target using ENERGY STAR tools Step 4: Design to be energy efficient

275

Secretaries Chu and Donovan to Host Conference Call on Home Owners  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Donovan to Host Conference Call on Home Owners Donovan to Host Conference Call on Home Owners Energy-Saving Improvements Program Secretaries Chu and Donovan to Host Conference Call on Home Owners Energy-Saving Improvements Program April 20, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON - Thursday, April 21st, U.S. Department of Energy Secretary Steven Chu and U.S. Housing and Urban Development Secretary Shaun Donovan will launch a new pilot program intended to offer homeowners low-cost financing to help make their homes more energy efficient. The Federal Housing Administration's (FHA) new PowerSaver Program will offer homeowners up to $25,000 to finance the installation of insulation, duct sealing, replacement doors and windows, HVAC systems, water heaters, solar panels, and geothermal systems. Donovan and Chu will speak with reporters following a tour of a local

276

A comparison of noxious facilities` impacts for home owners versus renters  

SciTech Connect

The siting of noxious facilities, such as hazardous waste facilities, is often vigorously opposed by local residents. As a result, one would expect people`s residential and employment choices to reflect a desire to avoid proximity to such facilities. Ibis behavior would in turn affect labor and housing prices. One technique that has been employed to implicitly value impacts of noxious facilities is the intercity hedonic approach, which examines the wage and land rent differentials among cities that result from environmental amenities and disamenities. However, most of the research focus has been on the behavioral response of home owners as opposed to renters. Since these two groups of residents vary on numerous dimensions such as marital status, age, sex, and personal mobility, it would not be surprising to find different marginal valuations of local site characteristics. We use 1980 Census data to derive separate estimates for owners and renters of the implicit value placed on eight different types of noxious facilities. Although the magnitude of the responses of renters and owners to noxious facilities and other environmental characteristics varies, the signs are generally consistent. The differences in values between owners and renters are not primarily due to differential mobility or sociodemographic factors. Controlling those factors decreases the differences between renters` and owners` implicit valuations by less than 10%. Unmeasured differences in characteristics between the two groups, such as tastes, risk aversion, or commitment to the community, must account for the remaining difference in valuations. These findings suggest that policymakers should separately consider the responses of owners and renters when estimating noxious facility impacts.

Clark, D.E. [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States). Dept. of Economics]|[Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nieves, L.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Washington Nuclear Profile - Columbia Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Columbia Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

278

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Braidwood Generation Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Braidwood Generation Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

279

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Byron Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Byron Generating Station" ,"Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration date"...

280

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Dresden Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Dresden Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Cogeneration for industrial and mixed-use parks. Volume 3. A guide for park developers, owners, and tenants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Using cogeneration in mixed-use and industrial parks can cut energy costs ad smooth out peak load demands - benefits for servicing utilities and park owners and tenants. The two handbooks developed by this project can help utilities identify existing or planned parks as potential cogeneration sites as well as help developers and park owners evaluate the advantages of cogeneration. The second handbook (volume 3) describes the benefits of cogeneration for park developers, owners, and tenants.

Schiller, S.R.; Minicucci, D.D.; Tamaro, R.F.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Meeting the Challenge: The Prospect of Achieving 30 Percent Savings Through the Weatherization Assistance Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Weatherization Assistance Program has been installing energy-efficiency measures in low-income houses for over 25 years, achieving savings exceeding 30 percent of natural gas used for space heating. Recently, as part of its Weatherization Plus initiative, the Weatherization Assistance Program adopted the goal of achieving 30 percent energy savings for all household energy usage. The expansion of the Weatherization Assistance Program to include electric baseload components such as lighting and refrigerators provides additional opportunities for saving energy and meeting this ambitious goal. This report documents an Oak Ridge National Laboratory study that examined the potential savings that could be achieved by installing various weatherization measures in different types of dwellings throughout the country. Three different definitions of savings are used: (1) reductions in pre-weatherization expenditures; (2) savings in the amount of energy consumed at the house site, regardless of fuel type (''site Btus''); and (3) savings in the total amount of energy consumed at the source (''source Btus''), which reflects the fact that each Btu* of electricity consumed at the household level requires approximately three Btus to produce at the generation source. In addition, the effects of weatherization efforts on carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions are examined.

Schweitzer, M.

2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

283

Near Zero Emissions at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Detroit Diesel Corporation (DDC) has successfully completed a 10 year DOE sponsored heavy-duty truck engine program, hereafter referred to as the NZ-50 program. This program was split into two major phases. The first phase was called â??Near-Zero Emission at 50 Percent Thermal Efficiency,â? and was completed in 2007. The second phase was initiated in 2006, and this phase was named â??Advancements in Engine Combustion Systems to Enable High-Efficiency Clean Combustion for Heavy-Duty Engines.â? This phase was completed in September, 2010. The key objectives of the NZ-50 program for this first phase were to: â?¢ Quantify thermal efficiency degradation associated with reduction of engine-out NOx emissions to the 2007 regulated level of ~1.1 g/hp-hr. â?¢ Implement an integrated analytical/experimental development plan for improving subsystem and component capabilities in support of emerging engine technologies for emissions and thermal efficiency goals of the program. â?¢ Test prototype subsystem hardware featuring technology enhancements and demonstrate effective application on a multi-cylinder, production feasible heavy-duty engine test-bed. â?¢ Optimize subsystem components and engine controls (calibration) to demonstrate thermal efficiency that is in compliance with the DOE 2005 Joule milestone, meaning greater than 45% thermal efficiency at 2007 emission levels. â?¢ Develop technology roadmap for meeting emission regulations of 2010 and beyond while mitigating the associated degradation in engine fuel consumption. Ultimately, develop technical prime-path for meeting the overall goal of the NZ-50 program, i.e., 50% thermal efficiency at 2010 regulated emissions. These objectives were successfully met during the course of the NZ-50 program. The most noteworthy achievements in this program are summarized as follows: â?¢ Demonstrated technologies through advanced integrated experiments and analysis to achieve the technical objectives of the NZ-50 program with 50.2% equivalent thermal efficiency under EPA 2010 emissions regulations. â?¢ Experimentally demonstrate brake efficiency of 48.5% at EPA 2010 emission level at single steady-state point. â?¢ Analytically demonstrated additional brake efficiency benefits using advanced aftertreatment configuration concept and air system enhancement including, but not limited to, turbo-compound, variable valve actuator system, and new cylinder head redesign, thus helping to achieve the final program goals. â?¢ Experimentally demonstrated EPA 2010 emissions over FTP cycles using advanced integrated engine and aftertreatment system. These aggressive thermal efficiency and emissions results were achieved by applying a robust systems technology development methodology. It used integrated analytical and experimental tools for subsystem component optimization encompassing advanced fuel injection system, increased EGR cooling capacity, combustion process optimization, and advanced aftertreatment technologies. Model based controls employing multiple input and output techniques enabled efficient integration of the various subsystems and ensured optimal performance of each system within the total engine package. . The key objective of the NZ-50 program for the second phase was to explore advancements in engine combustion systems using high-efficiency clean combustion (HECC) techniques to minimize cylinder-out emissions, targeting a 10% efficiency improvement. The most noteworthy achievements in this phase of the program are summarized as follows: â?¢ Experimentally and analytically evaluated numerous air system improvements related to the turbocharger and variable valve actuation. Some of the items tested proved to be very successful and modifications to the turbine discovered in this program have since been incorporated into production hardware. â?¢ The combustion system development continued with evaluation of various designs of the 2-step piston bowl. Significant improvemen

None

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

284

Table B28. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 8. Percent of Floorspace Heated, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated","All Buildings","Not Heated","1 to 50 Percent Heated","51 to 99 Percent Heated","100 Percent Heated" "All Buildings ................",4657,641,576,627,2813,67338,5736,7593,10745,43264 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,366,230,272,1479,6774,1091,707,750,4227 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,164,194,149,603,8238,1148,1504,1177,4409

285

Table B29. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 199  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 9. Percent of Floorspace Cooled, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled","All Buildings","Not Cooled","1 to 50 Percent Cooled","51 to 99 Percent Cooled","100 Percent Cooled" "All Buildings ................",4657,1097,1012,751,1796,67338,8864,16846,16966,24662 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,668,352,294,1034,6774,1895,1084,838,2957 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,282,292,188,348,8238,2026,2233,1435,2544

286

Table B30. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspa  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" 0. Percent of Floorspace Lit When Open, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)",,,,,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit","All Buildings","Not Lita","1 to 50 Percent Lit","51 to 99 Percent Lit","100 Percent Lit" "All Buildings ................",4657,498,835,1228,2096,67338,3253,9187,20665,34233 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,323,351,517,1156,6774,915,1061,1499,3299 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,114,279,351,367,8238,818,2014,2614,2793

287

Operational experience and maintenance programs of Transamerica Delaval, Inc., diesel generators  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concerns regarding the reliability of large-bore, medium-speed diesel generators manufactured by Transamerica Delaval, Inc. (TDI) for application at domestic nuclear plants were first prompted by a crankshaft failure at Shoreham Nuclear Power Station in August 1983. A number of diesel generator components were identified which had potential deficiencies from a manufacturing and operational standpoint. In response to these problems, 11 (now 8) U.S. nuclear utility owners formed a TDI Diesel Generator Owners Group (Owners Group) to address operational and regulatory issues relative to diesel generator sets used for standby emergency power. The Owners` Group performed extensive design reviews of all key engine components and developed recommendations to be implemented by the individual owners concerning needed component replacements and modifications, component inspections to validate the {open_quotes}as-manufactured{close_quotes} and {open_quotes}as-assembled{close_quotes} quality of key engine components, engine testing, and an enhanced maintenance and surveillance program.

Rajan, J.R.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Analysis of a 10-Percent RPS - Response letter summarizing principal conclusions of supplement  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Transmittal letter for the supplement to the Service Report 'Analysis of a 10-Percent RenewablePortfolio Standard'

Alan Beamon

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

www.mdpi.com/journal/ijerph Restaurant and Bar Owners ’ Exposure to Secondhand Smoke and Attitudes Regarding Smoking Bans in Five Chinese Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Despite the great progress made towards smoke-free environments, only 9 % of countries worldwide mandate smoke-free restaurants and bars. Smoking was generally not regulated in restaurants and bars in China before 2008. This study was designed to examine the public attitudes towards banning smoking in these places in China. A convenience sample of 814 restaurants and bars was selected in five Chinese cities and all owners of these venues were interviewed in person by questionnaire in 2007. Eighty six percent of current nonsmoking subjects had at least one-day exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) at work in the past week. Only 51 % of subjects knew SHS could cause heart disease. Only 17 % and 11 % of subjects supported prohibiting smoking completely in restaurants and in bars, respectively, while their support for restricting smoking to designated areas was much higher. Fifty three percent of subjects were willing to prohibit or restrict smoking in their own venues. Of those unwilling to do so, 82 % thought smokingInt. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2011, 8 1521

Ruiling Liu; S. Katharine Hammond; Andrew Hyl; Mark J. Travers; Yan Yang; Yi Nan; Guoze Feng; Qiang Li; Yuan Jiang

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Solar PV Project Financing: Regulatory and Legislative Challenges for Third-Party PPA System Owners (Revised)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23 23 Revised February 2010 Solar PV Project Financing: Regulatory and Legislative Challenges for Third-Party PPA System Owners Katharine Kollins Duke University Bethany Speer and Karlynn Cory National Renewable Energy Laboratory National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC Contract No. DE-AC36-08-GO28308 Technical Report NREL/TP-6A2-46723 Revised February 2010 Solar PV Project Financing: Regulatory and Legislative Challenges for Third-Party PPA System Owners Katharine Kollins Duke University Bethany Speer and Karlynn Cory

291

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

0: March 26, 0: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #720: March 26, 2012 Eleven Percent of New Light Trucks Sold have Gasoline Direct Injection on Digg

292

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

293

DOE NSTB Researchers Demonstrate R&D Successes to Asset Owners at EnergySec Conference  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NSTB Researchers Demonstrate R&D Successes to Asset Owners at EnergySec Conference NSTB Researchers Demonstrate R&D Successes to Asset Owners at EnergySec Conference October 1, 2009 More than 150 energy sector leaders-including nearly 100 asset owners and operators-gathered at the 2009 EnergySec Annual Summit in Seattle, WA, on Sept. 23-24, where researchers from the Department of Energy's National SCADA Test Bed (NSTB) Program gave a four-hour demonstration and presentation of their Roadmap-related control systems security work. EnergySec is an information sharing forum with more than 230 utility members representing 75 energy companies across the nation. Its fifth annual conference drew asset owners, vendors, and government representatives for presentations and discussions on NERC CIP standards, collaborative industry efforts

294

"Table HC3.2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" 2 Living Space Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions) " ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Living Space Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Floorspace (Square Feet)" "Total Floorspace1" "Fewer than 500",3.2,1.1,"Q","Q","Q","Q",0.4 "500 to 999",23.8,7.2,3.5,0.3,0.3,0.9,2.2

295

"Table HC3.13 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" 3 Lighting Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit Zone, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Lighting Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Indoor Lights Turned On During Summer" "Number of Lights Turned On" "Between 1 and 4 Hours per Day",91.8,65,54.3,3.3,1.5,1.6,4.4 "1.",28.6,17.9,14,0.9,0.6,0.7,1.7

296

"Table HC3.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,0.3,"N","Q","Q","Q" "Have Main Space Heating Equipment",109.8,77.5,63.7,4.2,1.8,2.2,5.6

297

"Table HC3.8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 8 Water Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Water Heating Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Number of Water Heaters" "1.",106.3,74.5,60.9,4,1.8,2.2,5.5 "2 or More",3.7,3.3,3,"Q","Q","Q","Q" "Do Not Use Hot Water",1.1,0.3,"Q","Q","N","Q","Q"

298

"Table HC3.5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 5 Space Heating Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ," Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Space Heating Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S. Housing Units",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Heating Equipment",1.2,0.6,0.3,"N","Q","Q","Q" "Have Space Heating Equipment",109.8,77.5,63.7,4.2,1.8,2.2,5.6

299

"Table HC3.7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 7 Air-Conditioning Usage Indicators by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Usage Indicators",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,11.3,9.3,0.6,"Q",0.4,0.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,66.8,54.7,3.6,1.7,1.9,4.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,65.8,54,3.6,1.7,1.9,4.7

300

"Table HC3.11 Home Electronics Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" 1 Home Electronics Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions)" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Electronics Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Personal Computers" "Do Not Use a Personal Computer ",35.5,20.3,14.8,1.2,0.6,0.9,2.8 "Use a Personal Computer",75.6,57.8,49.2,2.9,1.2,1.4,3 "Number of Desktop PCs"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

"Table HC3.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HC3.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" HC3.9 Home Appliances Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Home Appliances Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total U.S.",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Cooking Appliances" "Conventional Ovens" "Use an Oven",109.6,77.3,63.4,4.1,1.8,2.3,5.6 "1.",103.3,71.9,58.6,3.9,1.6,2.2,5.5 "2 or More",6.2,5.4,4.8,"Q","Q","Q","Q"

302

"Table HC3.6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" 6 Air Conditioning Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Units, 2005" " Million U.S. Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Air Conditioning Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Do Not Have Cooling Equipment",17.8,11.3,9.3,0.6,"Q",0.4,0.9 "Have Cooling Equipment",93.3,66.8,54.7,3.6,1.7,1.9,4.8 "Use Cooling Equipment",91.4,65.8,54,3.6,1.7,1.9,4.7

303

"Table HC3.1 Housing Unit Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Housing Unit Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" Housing Unit Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005" " Million Housing Units" ,," Owner-Occupied Housing Units (millions)","Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit" ,"U.S. Housing Units (millions" ,,,"Single-Family Units",,"Apartments in Buildings With--" "Housing Unit Characteristics",,,"Detached","Attached","2 to 4 Units","5 or More Units","Mobile Homes" "Total",111.1,78.1,64.1,4.2,1.8,2.3,5.7 "Census Region and Division" "Northeast",20.6,13.4,10.4,1.4,1,0.3,0.4 "New England",5.5,3.8,3.1,"Q",0.3,"Q","Q" "Middle Atlantic",15.1,9.6,7.3,1.3,0.6,"Q","Q"

304

Community Resilience: Workshops on Private Sector and Property Owner Requirements for Recovery and Restoration from a Diasaster  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the results of a proejct sponsored by DTRA to 1) Assess the readiness of private-sector businesses, building owners, and service providers to restore property and recover operations in the aftermath of a wide-area dispersal of anthrax; and 2) Understand what private property owners and businesses "want and need" from federal, state, and local government to support recovery and restoration from such an incident.

Judd, Kathleen S.; Stein, Steven L.; Lesperance, Ann M.

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

305

Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 Response to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ERG/200801 Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 Response to The Nova Scotia. Sandy Cook. #12;Achieving a ten percent greenhouse gas reduction by 2020 1 Introduction In April 2007 matters. Central to the act is the government's commitment to reducing greenhouse gas emissions

Hughes, Larry

306

Illinois Nuclear Profile - LaSalle Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

LaSalle Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

307

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Salem Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PSEG Salem Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

308

California Nuclear Profile - San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

309

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PSEG Hope Creek Generating Station" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

310

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monumental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated More Documents & Publications 2011 ARRA Newsletters

311

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 May 12, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis DOE Report Analyzes U.S. Wind Resources, Technology Requirements, and Manufacturing, Siting and Transmission Hurdles to Increasing the Use of Clean and Sustainable Wind Power WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) today released a first-of-its kind report that examines the technical feasibility of harnessing wind power to provide up to 20 percent of the nation's total electricity needs by 2030. Entitled "20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030", the report identifies requirements to achieve this goal including reducing the cost of wind technologies, citing new transmission infrastructure, and

312

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 Wind Energy Could Produce 20 Percent of U.S. Electricity By 2030 May 12, 2008 - 11:30am Addthis DOE Report Analyzes U.S. Wind Resources, Technology Requirements, and Manufacturing, Siting and Transmission Hurdles to Increasing the Use of Clean and Sustainable Wind Power WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) today released a first-of-its kind report that examines the technical feasibility of harnessing wind power to provide up to 20 percent of the nation's total electricity needs by 2030. Entitled "20 Percent Wind Energy by 2030", the report identifies requirements to achieve this goal including reducing the cost of wind technologies, citing new transmission infrastructure, and

313

Table HC3.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

.4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 .4 Space Heating Characteristics by Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 2005 Million U.S. Housing Units Total................................................................ 111.1 78.1 64.1 4.2 1.8 2.3 5.7 Do Not Have Space Heating Equipment....... 1.2 0.6 0.3 N Q Q Q Have Main Space Heating Equipment.......... 109.8 77.5 63.7 4.2 1.8 2.2 5.6 Use Main Space Heating Equipment............ 109.1 77.2 63.6 4.2 1.8 2.1 5.6 Have Equipment But Do Not Use It.............. 0.8 0.3 Q N Q Q Q Main Heating Fuel and Equipment Natural Gas.................................................. 58.2 41.8 35.3 2.8 1.2 1.0 1.6 Central Warm-Air Furnace........................ 44.7 34.8 29.7 2.3 0.7 0.6 1.4 For One Housing Unit........................... 42.9 34.3 29.5 2.3 0.6 0.6 1.4 For Two Housing Units..........................

314

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried ... 97 percent of special nuclear material de-inventoried from LLNL Posted By Office of Public Affairs

315

Figure 75. U.S. electricity demand growth, 1950-2040 (percent, 3 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 75. U.S. electricity demand growth, 1950-2040 (percent, 3-year moving average) Year 3-year moving average Trendline 1950.00

316

Lessons Learned From Implementation of Westinghouse Owners Group Risk-Informed Inservice Inspection Methodology for Piping  

SciTech Connect

Risk-informed inservice inspection (ISI) programs have been in use for over seven years as an alternative to current regulatory requirements in the development and implementation of ISI programs for nuclear plant piping systems. Programs using the Westinghouse Owners Group (WOG) (now known as the Pressurized Water Reactor Owners Group - PWROG) risk-informed ISI methodology have been developed and implemented within the U.S. and several other countries. Additionally, many plants have conducted or are in the process of conducting updates to their risk-informed ISI programs. In the development and implementation of these risk-informed ISI programs and the associated updates to those programs, the following important lessons learned have been identified and are addressed. Concepts such as 'loss of inventory', which are typically not modeled in a plant's probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) model for all systems. The importance of considering operator actions in the identification of consequences associated with a piping failure and the categorization of segments as high safety significant (HSS) or low safety significant (LSS). The impact that the above considerations have had on the large early release frequency (LERF) and categorization of segments as HSS or LSS. The importance of automation. Making the update process more efficient to reduce costs associated with maintaining the risk-informed ISI program. The insights gained are associated with many of the steps in the risk-informed ISI process including: development of the consequences associated with piping failures, categorization of segments, structural element selection and program updates. Many of these lessons learned have impacted the results of the risk-informed ISI programs and have impacted the updates to those programs. This paper summarizes the lessons learned and insights gained from the application of the WOG risk-informed ISI methodology in the U.S., Europe and Asia. (authors)

Stevenson, Paul R.; Haessler, Richard L. [Westinghouse Electric Company, LLC (United States); McNeill, Alex [Dominion Energy, Innsbrook Technical Center (United States); Pyne, Mark A. [Duke Energy (United States); West, Raymond A. [Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc. - Dominion Generation (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Clean Electric Power Generation (Canada)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fossil fuels in Canada account for 27 percent of the electricity generated. The combustion of these fuels is a major source of emissions which affect air quality and climate change. The Government...

318

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test August 21, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The new sorbent, BrightBlack™, was originally developed for a different application by Advanced Technology Materials Inc. (ATMI) , a subcontractor to SRI for the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored test at the University of Toledo. Through partnering with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and others, SRI developed a method to

319

Moab Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches Significant Milestone Moab Mill Tailings Pile 25 Percent Disposed: DOE Moab Project Reaches Significant Milestone June 3, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Donald Metzler Moab Federal Project Director (970) 257-2115 Wendee Ryan S&K Aerospace Public Affairs Manager (970) 257-2145 Grand Junction, CO - One quarter of the uranium mill tailings pile located in Moab, Utah, has been relocated to the Crescent Junction, Utah, site for permanent disposal. Four million tons of the 16 million tons total has been relocated under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project managed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). A little over 2 years ago, Remedial Action Contractor EnergySolutions began

320

Recovery Act Exceeds Major Cleanup Milestone, DOE Complex Now 74 Percent Remediated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 2, 2012 November 2, 2012 WASHINGTON, D.C. - The Office of Environmental Management's (EM) American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Program recently achieved 74 percent footprint reduction, exceeding the originally established goal of 40 percent. EM has reduced its pre-Recovery Act footprint of 931 square miles, established in 2009, by 688 square miles. Reducing its contaminated footprint to 243 square miles has proven to be a monu- mental task, and a challenge the EM team was ready to take on from the beginning. In 2009, EM identified a goal of 40 percent footprint reduction by September 2011 as its High Priority Performance Goal. EM achieved that goal in April 2011, five months ahead of schedule, and continues to achieve footprint reduction, primarily at Savannah River Site and Hanford. Once

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal Moab Reaches 40-Percent Mark in Tailings Removal December 24, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis A haul truck carrying a container is loaded with mill tailings at the Moab site. Once loaded and lidded, the container will be placed on a railcar for shipment by train to the Crescent Junction disposal site. A haul truck carrying a container is loaded with mill tailings at the Moab site. Once loaded and lidded, the container will be placed on a railcar for shipment by train to the Crescent Junction disposal site. MOAB, Utah - The Moab Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action Project had a productive year, despite continued budget constraints and a first-ever, three-month curtailment of shipping operations last winter. On June 18, the project reached a significant milestone of having shipped 6

322

Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 Better Buildings Challenge Partners Pledge 20 Percent Energy Drop By 2020 November 9, 2011 - 10:00am Addthis This is the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Breakout Session Panel with representatives from the City of Atlanta Office of Sustainability, Southface, the U.S. General Services Administration, and two Atlanta BBC partner organizations. | Photo courtesy of Fred Perry Photography This is the Atlanta Better Buildings Challenge Breakout Session Panel with representatives from the City of Atlanta Office of Sustainability, Southface, the U.S. General Services Administration, and two Atlanta BBC partner organizations. | Photo courtesy of Fred Perry Photography Maria Tikoff Vargas

323

Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test Novel Sorbent Achieves 90 Percent Carbon Capture in DOE-Sponsored Test August 21, 2012 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - The successful bench-scale test of a novel carbon dioxide (CO2) capturing sorbent promises to further advance the process as a possible technological option for reducing CO2 emissions from coal-fired power plants. The new sorbent, BrightBlack™, was originally developed for a different application by Advanced Technology Materials Inc. (ATMI) , a subcontractor to SRI for the Department of Energy (DOE)-sponsored test at the University of Toledo. Through partnering with the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and others, SRI developed a method to

324

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Combustion Turbine Combined-Cycle Heat Recovery Steam Generator Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides information to assist personnel involved with the maintenance of the heat recovery steam generator at a combustion gas turbine combined cycle facility, including good maintenance practices, preventive maintenance techniques and troubleshooting guidance. BackgroundCombustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that can be unique to this particular type of power plant. As such, owners and ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

325

A numerical study of bench blast row delay timing and its influence on percent-cast  

SciTech Connect

The computer program, DMC (Distinct Motion Code), which was developed for simulating the rock motion associated with blasting, has been used to study the influence of row delay timing on rock motion. The numerical simulations correspond with field observations in that very short delays (< 50ms) and very long delays (> 300ms) produce a lower percent-cast than a medium delay (100 to 200 ms). The DMC predicted relationship between row delay timing and percent-cast is more complex than expected with a dip in the curve where the optimum timing might be expected. More study is required to gain a full understanding of this phenomenon.

Preece, D.S.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Table HC7-5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Home Office Equipment by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Home Office Equipment RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Home Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.3 0.3 2.1 3.0 1.6 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Households Using Office Equipment .......................... 67.5 59.0 2.0 1.7 4.8 7.0 Personal Computers 1 ................... 45.7 41.1 1.3 0.9 2.4 8.6 Number of Desktop PCs 1 .................................................. 34.1 30.5 1.0 0.7 1.9 9.7 2 or more .................................... 7.4 7.0 Q Q 0.2 18.4 Number of Laptop PCs 1 ..................................................

327

Table HC1-5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, 5a. Housing Unit Characteristics by Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit, Million U.S. Households, 2001 Housing Unit Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Owner- Occupied Units Type of Owner-Occupied Housing Unit RSE Row Factors Single-Family Apartments in Buildings With Mobile Homes Two to Four Units Five or More Units 0.4 0.4 1.8 2.1 1.4 Total ............................................... 72.7 63.2 2.1 1.8 5.7 6.7 Census Region and Division Northeast ...................................... 13.0 10.8 1.1 0.5 0.6 11.4 New England .............................. 3.5 3.1 0.2 Q 0.1 16.9 Middle Atlantic ............................ 9.5 7.7 0.9 0.4 0.4 13.4 Midwest ......................................... 17.5 16.0 0.3 Q 1.0 10.3 East North Central ......................

328

47318 Federal Register / Vol. 77, No. 153 / Wednesday, August 8, 2012 / Rules and Regulations bluefin tuna landed by owners of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bluefin tuna landed by owners of vessels not permitted to do so under § 635.4, or purchase, receive, or transfer, or attempt to purchase, receive, or transfer Atlantic bluefin tuna without the appropriate valid Federal Atlantic tunas dealer permit issued under § 635.4. Purchase, receive, or transfer or attempt

329

The consumer's guide to earth sheltered housing: A step-by-step workbook for prospective owners  

SciTech Connect

Earth sheltered homes have captured the imagination of many homeowners seeking the cost and energy savings features they offer. This book provides the discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of such homes and includes illustrations showing interiors and exteriors with advise to owners on dealine with architects and contractors.

Rollwagen, M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Safety Evaluation Report related to Hydrogen Control Owners Group assessment of Mark 3 containments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10 CFR), Section 50.44 Standards for Combustible Gas Control System in Light-Water-Cooled Power Reactors,'' requires that systems be provided to control hydrogen concentration in the containment atmosphere following an accident to ensure that containment integrity is maintained. The purpose of this report is to provide regulatory guidance to licensees with Mark III containments with regard to demonstrating compliance with 10 CFR 50.44, Section (c)(3)(vi) and (c)(3)(vii). In this report, the staff provides its evaluation of the generic methodology proposed by the Hydrogen Control Owners Group. This generic methodology is documented in Topical Report HGN-112-NP, Generic Hydrogen Control Information for BWR/6 Mark III Containments.'' In addition, the staff has recommended that the vulnerability to interruption of power to the hydrogen igniters be evaluated further on a plant-specific basis as part of the individual plant examination of the plants with Mark III containments. 10 figs., 1 tab.

Li, C.Y.; Kudrick, J.A.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Ninety-nine percent of women will be financially responsible for themselves or their  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or their families at some point in their lives, but less than half (47 percent) of working women have a retirement.S. and has reached more than 19,000 people to date. Wi$eUp is available as both an on-line course Calendar for the exact date and time of your annual update training. Agent Planning Work with other

332

Global Percent Tree Cover at a Spatial Resolution of 500 Meters: First Results of the MODIS Vegetation Continuous Fields Algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first results of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) vegetation continuous field algorithm's global percent tree cover are presented. Percent tree cover per 500-m MODIS pixel is estimated using a supervised regression ...

M. C. Hansen; R. S. DeFries; J. R. G. Townshend; M. Carroll; C. Dimiceli; R. A. Sohlberg

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Steam Generator Reference Book, Revision 1: Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Steam Generator Reference Book documents the state of the art in PWR steam generator technology, providing a comprehensive source for operators, owners, and designers of PWR nuclear power plants. The book summarizes pertinent steam generator operating issues and provides recommendations to improve operational efficiency. Information in the book represents 15 years of research and development activity over the course of several hundred research projects involving PWR steam generator issues.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

China's Pathways to Achieving 40percent 45percent Reduction in CO2 Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to 113 GW in Total electricity demand reaches 5930 TWh into 12%% by Total electricity demand reaches 5290 TWh in 202010% lower annual electricity demand with 5288 TWh generated

Zheng, Nina

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Winning in electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

Should you be a buyer or a seller of generation? In general, spot buyers should do very well, while many generation owners will be fortunate to recover their stranded costs. Successful generators will capitalize on superior operating performance and market knowledge. The smartest natural gas strategy in the early 1980`s was to short natural gas. Will this lesson of restructuring be written again of the electricity generation business of the late 1990`s? The authors will examine whether and how winners might emerge in the generation business of the future. The U.S. electric generation market, already marked by intense competition for new capacity and industrial demand, will become even more competitive as it makes the transition from regulated local monopoly to marketbased commodity pricing. At risk is up to $150 billion of shareholder equity and the future viability of half of the country`s investor-owned utilities. The winners in year 2005 will be those who early on developed strategies that simultaneously recovered existing generation investments while restructuring their asset portfolios and repositioning their plants to compete in the new market. Losers will have spent the time mired in indecision, their strategies ultimately forced upon them by regulators or competitors.

Hashimoto, L. [McKinsey & Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Jansen, P. [McKinsey & Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., San Francisco, CA (United States); Geyn, G. van [McKinsey & Co., Toronto (Canada)] [McKinsey & Co., Toronto (Canada)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source? - FAQ - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, ... Energy sources and percent share of total electricity generation in 2012 were:

337

STEPS TO ESTABLISH A REAL-TIME TRANSMISSION MONITORING SYSTEM FOR TRANSMISSION OWNERS AND OPERATORS WITHIN THE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

STEPS TO ESTABLISH A REAL-TIME TRANSMISSION MONITORING STEPS TO ESTABLISH A REAL-TIME TRANSMISSION MONITORING SYSTEM FOR TRANSMISSION OWNERS AND OPERATORS WITHIN THE EASTERN AND WESTERN INTERCONNECTIONS A REPORT TO CONGRESS PURSUANT TO SECTION 1839 OF THE ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 Prepared by United States Department of Energy & Federal Energy Regulatory Commission February 3, 2006 Report to Congress Joint Report by the Department of Energy and Federal Energy Regulatory Commission on Steps to Establish a Real-Time Transmission Monitoring System for Transmission Owners and Operators within the Eastern and Western Interconnections February 2006 Executive Summary In August 2003, an electrical outage in one state precipitated a cascading blackout across seven other states and as far north as a province in Canada, leaving more than 50 million

338

Field Guide: Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In conventional and combined-cycle plants, boiler and heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failures have been the main availability problem for as long as reliable statistics have been kept for each generating source. The three volumes of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) report Boiler and Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failures: Theory and Practice (1012757) present an in-depth description of the various HRSG and degradation mechanisms, providing plant owners and operators with the t...

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

electricity generating capacity | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generating capacity generating capacity Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual operational electricity generation capacity by plant type (1975 - 2009); estimated generating capacity by fuel type for North Island, South Island and New Zealand (2009); and information on generating plants (plant type, name, owner, commissioned date, and capacity), as of December 2009. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 03rd, 2009 (5 years ago) Keywords biomass coal Electric Capacity electricity generating capacity geothermal Hydro Natural Gas wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Operational Electricity Generation Capacity by Plant Type (xls, 42.5 KiB)

340

Internal Compliance Program for Approved North American Electric Reliability Corporation and Regional Reliability Standards: A Guide to Compliance for Fossil Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to provide guidance to generator owner and operator members of the Electric Power Research Institute in complying with the North American Electric Reliability Corporation’s (NERC’s) mandatory reliability standards. Included here are the standards and associated requirements applicable to generator owners and operators who have registered with their regional entity, along with guidance on how successful compliance has been achieved.This report ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Analysis of Percent On-Cell Reformation of Methane in SOFC Stacks: Thermal, Electrical and Stress Analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes a parametric analysis performed to determine the effect of varying the percent on-cell reformation (OCR) of methane on the thermal and electrical performance for a generic, planar solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack design. OCR of methane can be beneficial to an SOFC stack because the reaction (steam-methane reformation) is endothermic and can remove excess heat generated by the electrochemical reactions directly from the cell. The heat removed is proportional to the amount of methane reformed on the cell. Methane can be partially pre-reformed externally, then supplied to the stack, where rapid reaction kinetics on the anode ensures complete conversion. Thus, the thermal load varies with methane concentration entering the stack, as does the coupled scalar distributions, including the temperature and electrical current density. The endotherm due to the reformation reaction can cause a temperature depression on the anode near the fuel inlet, resulting in large thermal gradients. This effect depends on factors that include methane concentration, local temperature, and stack geometry.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Jarboe, Daniel T.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

2006-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

342

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release)-Electricity Generation  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Generation Electricity Generation Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (Early Release) Electricity Generation U.S. electricity consumption—including both purchases from electric power producers and on-site generation—increases steadily in the AEO2008 reference case, at an average rate of 1.3 percent per year. In comparison, electricity consumption grew by annual rates of 4.2 percent, 2.6 percent, and 2.3 percent in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s, respectively. The growth rate in the AEO2008 projection is lower than in the AEO2007 reference case (1.5 percent per year), and it leads to lower projections of electricity generation. Figure 4. Electricity generation by fuel, 1980-2030 (billion kilowatthours). Need help, contact the National Energy Information Center at 202-586-8800.

343

Below Regulatory Concern Owners Group: Assessment of the IMPACTS-BRC Code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To properly interpret values generated by the IMPACTS-BRC computer code, users need an awareness of its conservatisms, parameter sensitivities, and potential errors. A review of the code revealed some conservatism, documented the software's sensitivity to changes in modeling assumptions and parameter values, and assessed its accuracy in performing specified dose calculations.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Boiler and Heat Recovery Steam Generator Tube Failures: Theory and Practice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Boiler and heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) tube failures have been the primary availability problem for operators of conventional and combined cycle plants for as long as reliable statistics have been kept for each generating source. This book provides owners and operators with the technical basis to address tube failures and create permanent solutions.

2011-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

345

"EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" EIA-914 Production Weighted Response Rates, Percent" "Areas",38353,38384,38412,38443,38473,38504,38534,38565,38596,38626,38657,38687,38718,38749,38777,"application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel","application/vnd.ms-excel"

346

Distributed Renewable Energy Generation Impacts on Microgrid Operation and Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microgrids incorporating distributed generation, and particularly those incorporating renewable energy technologies, have the potential to improve electric power system efficiency and reliability while providing novel benefits to their owners, operators, and the system as a whole. This report focuses on the impact of renewable energy technologies on microgrids and on the larger question of the impact of distributed generation and microgrids on the electric power system.

2002-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

347

Examination of temperature-induced shape memory of uranium--5. 3-to 6. 9 weight percent niobium alloys  

SciTech Connect

The uranium-niobium alloy system was examined in the range of 5.3-to-6.9 weight percent niobium with respect to shape memory, mechanical properties, metallography, Coefficients of linear thermal expansion, and differential thermal analysis. Shape memory increased with increasing niobium levels in the study range. There were no useful correlations found between shape memory and the other tests. Coefficients of linear thermal expansion tests of as-quenched 5.8 and 6.2 weight percent niobium specimens, but not 5.3 and 6.9 weight percent niobium specimens, had a contraction component on heating, but the phenomenon was not a contributor to shape memory.

Hemperly, V.C.

1976-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

348

Does One Know the Properties of a MICE Solid or Liquid Absorber toBetter than 0.3 Percent?  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report discusses the report discusses whether the MICE absorbers can be characterized to {+-}0.3 percent, so that one predict absorber ionization cooling within the absorber. This report shows that most solid absorbers can be characterized to much better than {+-}0.3 percent. The two issues that dominate the characterization of the liquid cryogen absorbers are the dimensions of the liquid in the vessel and the density of the cryogenic liquid. The thickness of the window also plays a role. This report will show that a liquid hydrogen absorber can be characterized to better than {+-}0.3 percent, but a liquid helium absorber cannot be characterized to better and {+-}1 percent.

Green, Michael A.; Yang, Stephanie Q.

2006-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

349

Spatial and Temporal Variations in Long-Term Normal Percent Possible Solar Radiation Levels in the United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to analyze the time and space variations in long-term monthly-averaged daily percent possible solar radiation levels in the United States. Both principal components analysis and harmonic analysis were used to ...

Robert C. Balling Jr.; Randall S. Cerveny

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Channels and sources used to gather equine-related information by college-age horse owners and enthusiasts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis identifies the equine-related topics that are important to Texas college-age horse owners and enthusiasts and the channels/sources they use to get equine-related information. Little research has focused on this group to determine their information needs. Therefore, two focus groups were conducted in 2008 in Texas with college-age horse owners and enthusiasts to conduct a needs assessment. Participants were separated into competitive and recreational groups depending on their level of participation in the industry. They were asked what topics they consider important and what channels/sources they use to gain desired information. Training was the most mentioned topic overall, and the most mentioned by recreational participants. Alternative medical treatments was the most mentioned topic by competitive participants. Competitive participants reported a smaller number of topics as important, indicating that they have specialized information needs. Recreational participants emphasized broader, less specialized topics. Participants showed an interest in relevant and controversial topics affecting the equine industry. Participants also used a combination of channels/sources and competitive and recreational participants often placed importance on different channels/sources. Face-to-face communication was important to both groups. Magazines were important to competitive participants, while the Internet was important to recreational participants. Competitive participants doubted the trustworthiness of sources available through the Internet, but wanted more reliable sources to be made available in the future. Participants preferred to get information from industry specialist sources, such as trainers, veterinarians, other owners and enthusiasts, breed associations, and equine magazines. Participants’ perceptions of trustworthiness were affected by the source’s ability to demonstrate equine-specific knowledge and the source’s reputation and success among equine industry members. The results suggests that the influence of the Internet has altered the traditional models of communication in which source selection determines channel use. In this study, the participants’ Internet channel selection often determined their source use. The results also suggests that communicators wanting to reach this audience should target specific topics to competitive and recreational audiences, use a multi-channel approach, establish trustworthiness, and explore the changing role of the Internet in agricultural communication.

Sullivan, Erin Alene

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Message from the Owner of the Improved Financial Performance Initiative of the Presidents Management Agenda:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I am enthusiastic and proud to be the owner of the Improved Financial Performance initiative of the President's Management Agenda (PMA) in the Department of Energy (DOE). The Department has received clean opinions on its annual financial statements for six straight years with no material internal control weaknesses identified by the auditors. Further, DOE was successful in maintaining its clean opinion for the FY 2004 financial statements while accelerating issuance to 45 days after the end of the fiscal year. For the third quarter of FY 2004, when the Department of Energy received a Green status score on Improved Financial Performance, DOE was one of only five agencies with a Green status score on this initiative. I am enormously proud

352

transportation Total Percent delivered cost transportation Percent ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

$12.75 - - - - - 36.0% - 2005 $13.64 - $13.64 - - - - - 36.8% - 2006; $14.50 - $14.04 - - - - - 34.3% - 2007 $15 ...

353

Compare All CBECS Activities: Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

By Electricity Generation By Electricity Generation Compare Activities by ... Electricity Generation Capability For commercial buildings as a whole, approximately 8 percent of buildings had the capability to generate electricity, and only 4 percent of buildings actually generated any electricity. Most all buildings generated electricity only for the purpose of emergency back-up. Inpatient health care and public order and safety buildings were much more likely to have the capability to generate electricity than other building types. Over half of all inpatient health care buildings and about one-third of public order and safety buildings actually used this capability. Electricity Generation Capability and Use by Building Type Top Specific questions may be directed to: Joelle Michaels

354

"Table 1. Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" Aeo Reference Case Projection Results" "Variable","Average Absolute Percent Differences","Percent of Projections Over- Estimated" "Gross Domestic Product" "Real Gross Domestic Product (Average Cumulative Growth)* (Table 2)",0.9772689079,42.55319149 "Petroleum" "Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Constant $) (Table 3a)",35.19047501,18.61702128 "Imported Refiner Acquisition Cost of Crude Oil (Nominal $) (Table 3b)",34.68652106,19.68085106 "Total Petroleum Consumption (Table 4)",6.150682783,66.4893617 "Crude Oil Production (Table 5)",5.99969572,59.57446809 "Petroleum Net Imports (Table 6)",13.27260615,67.0212766 "Natural Gas"

355

A combined cycle designed to achieve greater than 60 percent efficiency  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In cooperation with the US Department of Energy`s Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Westinghouse is working on Phase 2 of an 8-year Advanced Turbine Systems Program to develop the technologies required to provide a significant increase in natural gas-fired combined cycle power generation plant efficiency. In this paper, the technologies required to yield an energy conversion efficiency greater than the Advanced Turbine Systems Program target value of 60% are discussed. The goal of 60% efficiency is achievable through an improvement in operating process parameters for both the combustion turbine and steam turbine, raising the rotor inlet temperature to 2,600 F (1,427 C), incorporation of advanced cooling techniques in the combustion turbine expander, and utilization of other cycle enhancements obtainable through greater integration between the combustion turbine and steam turbine.

Briesch, M.S.; Bannister, R.L.; Diakunchak, I.S.; Huber, D.J. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Orlando, FL (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Examination of Kewaunee Cold Leg Steam Generator Tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Destructive and non-destructive examination of three cold leg tubes removed from Kewaunee steam generator B in 1993 revealed 18 percent-29 percent throughwall intergranular degradation in tube support crevice regions, but burst pressures were nearly the same as for non-degraded tubes. Deposit and oxide film analyses suggest that alkaline conditions existed in tube support crevice regions.

1994-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Emergency Diesel Generator Single Component Vulnerability Review Guidance.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides guidance to owners and operators of nuclear power plants on performing emergency diesel generator (EDG) system single component vulnerability reviews. This guidance was developed based on a recommendation from the nuclear industry’s EDG Technical Advisory Committee (TAC) that plants perform a single component vulnerability review as discussed in the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations’ Industry Experience Report ...

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Generation Maintenance Applications Center: Combined-Cycle Combustion Turbine Steam Bypass Model Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundCombustion turbine combined-cycle (CTCC) facilities use various systems and components that are unique to this type of power generation plants and are not typically found in a nuclear or fossil power plant. As such, current CTCC facility owners’ use of the Electric Power ...

2013-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

359

The steam generator changeout at Beznau-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Beznau-1 nuclear power plant in Switzerland, the unit's two steam generators were replaced in the second quarter of 1993. The steam generator replacement portion of the outage - the period from when contractors were given access to the containment to when the steam generators were ready for hydrostatic pressure testing - was 44 days (April 12- May 26, 1993), shorter than the 46 days gained. Total length of the outage was 99 days (April 2 - July 9). Collective radiation dose received by project personnel was 110 person-rem, much less than the planned 250 person-rem. Project cost was about $50 million, including the new SGs and the replacement work, according to Nordostschweizerische Kraftwerke AG (NOK), plant owner and operator.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

10 Percent Rule  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and you can try to explain it. The natural law it illustrates is the second law of thermodynamics; entropy is created in any natural trnasfer of energy. Richard E. Barrans Jr. This...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Attemperator Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion turbine combined-cycle (CTCC) facilities use various components that are unique to these types of power-generation plants. Therefore, use of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Preventive Maintenance Basis Database (1018758) by owners of CTCC facilities is limited to only those components that are common to both types of power plants and that have been previously added to the database. Because of the projected growth in the number of CTCC facilities, the EPRI Generation ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

362

Portfolio Revenues in a Changing Power Infrastructure: Responses of Existing Generation to New Wind Capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Owners of generating units must frequently reevaluate the financial and physical operations of their units in order to assess impacts of changing business regulatory conditions and to consider how investments to improve efficiency, flexibility, and emissions will perform. A little understood development now occurring is growth in wind capacity in response to state renewable performance standards. This report describes a case study of how new wind generation can affect the revenues and operation of existi...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

363

Template:Energy Generation Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Template Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Template:Energy Generation Facility Jump to: navigation, search This is the Energy Generation Facility template. Includes facility properties table in sidebar. To update the Geothermal facilities display, edit Template:EnergyGenerationFacilityGeothermalFields. Trying to add your Energy Generation Facility? Add it on the Energy Generation form page instead of editing this page. It should be called in the following format: {{Energy Generation Facility |Facility= |Sector= |FacilityType= |FacilityStatus= |Owner= |Developer= |EnergyPurchaser= |Address= |Place= |Zip= |Coordinates=

364

Loranger Power Generation Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Loranger Power Generation Wind Farm Loranger Power Generation Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Loranger Power Generation Wind Farm Facility Loranger Power Generation Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Loranger Power Generation Developer Loranger Power Generation Location Berlin NH Coordinates 44.501183°, -71.231588° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.501183,"lon":-71.231588,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

365

Distributed Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Untapped Value of Backup Generation Untapped Value of Backup Generation While new guidelines and regulations such as IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) 1547 have come a long way in addressing interconnection standards for distributed generation, utilities have largely overlooked the untapped potential of these resources. Under certain conditions, these units (primarily backup generators) represent a significant source of power that can deliver utility services at lower costs than traditional centralized solutions. These backup generators exist today in large numbers and provide utilities with another option to reduce peak load, relieve transmission congestion, and improve power reliability. Backup generation is widely deployed across the United States. Carnegie Mellon's Electricity

366

NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

William H. Day

2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

367

NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

William H. Day

2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

368

Using Backup Generators: Alternative Backup Power Options | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alternative Backup Power Options Alternative Backup Power Options Using Backup Generators: Alternative Backup Power Options Using Backup Generators: Alternative Backup Power Options In addition to electric generators powered by fuel, homeowners and business owners may consider alternative backup power options. Battery-stored backup power-Allows you to continue operating lights, refrigerators and other appliances, fans, and communications during a power outage. These systems can connect to renewable sources of energy, like solar panels and small-scale wind generators, to help the batteries stay charged during an emergency. You can also recharge many of these battery systems with diesel generators. The length of time you will be able to draw electricity from your batteries will depend on the size of your

369

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

of February 2008 increased 1.9 percent compared to February 2007. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for February 2008 showed a 2.5-percent increase from February 2007...

370

Distributed Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with another option to reduce peak load, relieve transmission congestion, and improve power reliability. Backup generation is widely deployed across the United States. Carnegie...

371

Precision moisture generation and measurement.  

SciTech Connect

In many industrial processes, gaseous moisture is undesirable as it can lead to metal corrosion, polymer degradation, and other materials aging processes. However, generating and measuring precise moisture concentrations is challenging due to the need to cover a broad concentration range (parts-per-billion to percent) and the affinity of moisture to a wide range surfaces and materials. This document will discuss the techniques employed by the Mass Spectrometry Laboratory of the Materials Reliability Department at Sandia National Laboratories to generate and measure known gaseous moisture concentrations. This document highlights the use of a chilled mirror and primary standard humidity generator for the characterization of aluminum oxide moisture sensors. The data presented shows an excellent correlation in frost point measured between the two instruments, and thus provides an accurate and reliable platform for characterizing moisture sensors and performing other moisture related experiments.

Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Irwin, Adriane Nadine

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

Wind Generators and Market Power: Does it matter who owns them?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity production from wind generators holds significant importance in European Union’s 20 % renewable energy target by 2020. In this paper, I show that ownership of wind generators affects market outcomes by using both a Cournot oligopoly model and a real options model. In the Cournot oligopoly model, ownership of the wind generators by owners of fossil-fueled (peakload) generators decreases total peakload production and increases the market price. These effects increase with total wind generation and aggregate wind generator ownership. In the real options model, start up and shut down price thresholds are significantly higher when the monopolist at the peakload level owns both types of generators. Furthermore, when producing electricity with the peakload generator, the monopolist can avoid facing prices below marginal cost by owning a certain share of the wind generators.

Nihat Misir

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Guidance for growth factors, projections, and control strategies for the 15 percent rate-of-progress plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Section 182(b)(1) of the Clean Air Act (Act) requires all ozone nonattainment areas classified as moderate and above to submit a State Implementation Plan (SIP) revision by November 15, 1993, which describes, in part, how the areas will achieve an actual volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions reduction of at least 15 percent during the first 6 years after enactment of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA). In addition, the SIP revision must describe how any growth in emissions from 1990 through 1996 will be fully offset. It is important to note that section 182(b)(1) also requires the SIP for moderate areas to provide for reductions in VOC and nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions as necessary to attain the national primary ambient air quality standard for ozone by November 15, 1996. The guidance document focuses on the procedures for developing 1996 projected emissions inventories and control measures which moderate and above ozone nonattainment areas must include in their rate-of-progress plans. The document provides technical guidance to support the policy presented in the 'General Preamble: Implementation of Title I of the CAAA of 1990' (57 FR 13498).

Not Available

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant Unit 1, Unit 2","1,705","13,994",100.0,"Calvert Cliffs Nuclear PP Inc" "1 Plant 2...

375

Utility Solar Generation Valuation Methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tucson Electric Power (TEP) developed, tested and verified the results of a new and appropriate method for accurately evaluating the capacity credit of time variant solar generating sources and reviewed new methods to appropriately and fairly evaluate the value of solar generation to electric utilities. The project also reviewed general integrated approaches for adequately compensating owners of solar generation for their benefits to utilities. However, given the limited funding support and time duration of this project combined with the significant differences between utilities regarding rate structures, solar resource availability and coincidence of solar generation with peak load periods, it is well beyond the scope of this project to develop specific rate, rebate, and interconnection approaches to capture utility benefits for all possible utilities. The project developed computer software based evaluation method models to compare solar generation production data measured in very short term time increments called Sample Intervals over a typical utility Dispatch Cycle during an Evaluation Period against utility system load data. Ten second resolution generation production data from the SGSSS and actual one minute resolution TEP system load data for 2006 and 2007, along with data from the Pennington Street Garage 60 kW DC capacity solar unit installed in downtown Tucson will be applied to the model for testing and verification of the evaluation method. Data was provided by other utilities, but critical time periods of data were missing making results derived from that data inaccurate. The algorithms are based on previous analysis and review of specific 2005 and 2006 SGSSS production data. The model was built, tested and verified by in house TEP personnel. For this phase of the project, TEP communicated with, shared solar production data with and collaborated on the development of solar generation valuation tools with other utilities, including Arizona Public Service, Salt River Project, Xcel and Nevada Power Company as well as the Arizona electric cooperatives. In the second phase of the project, three years of 10 second power output data of the SGSSS was used to evaluate the effectiveness of frequency domain analysis, normal statistical distribution analysis and finally maximum/minimum differential output analysis to test the applicability of these mathematic methods in accurately modeling the output variations produced by clouds passing over the SGSSS array.

Hansen, Thomas N.; Dion, Phillip J.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

376

Evaluation of Thermal-, Creep-, and Corrosion-Fatigue of Heat Recovery Steam Generator Pressure Parts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The worldwide fleet of combined cycle units with heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) has exhibited a disappointing track record with respect to reliability and availability in terms of fatigue HRSG tube failures (HTF) which are thermal transient driven. This report, which forms part of a series, will assist designer, owners, and operators with the technical basis to facilitate specifying, designing, and operating HRSG in a manner to minimize fatigue damage.

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Combustion Turbine Combined-Cycle Steam Valves Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

 BackgroundCombustion turbine combined-cycle (CTCC) facilities use various components that are unique to these types of power generation plants. Therefore, use of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Preventive Maintenance Basis Database (1018758) by owners of CTCC facilities is somewhat limited to only those components that are common to both CTCC facilities and nuclear or fossil power plants. With the projected growth in the number of CTCC facilities, the ...

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

378

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Continuous Emissions Monitoring Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that are unique to these types of power-generation plants and that are not typically found in a nuclear or fossil-power plant.  As such, use of the EPRI PM Basis Database (PMDB) by current owners of CTCC facilities is limited to only those components that are common to both types of power plants and already in the database.  With the projected growth in the number of CTCC facilities, EPRI General Maintenance ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

GENERATING CAPACITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating capacity consistent with mandatory reliability criteria. A large part of the problem can be associated with the failure of wholesale spot market prices for energy and operating reserves to rise to high enough levels during periods when generating capacity is fully utilized. Reforms to wholesale energy markets, the introduction of well-design forward capacity markets, and symmetrical treatment of demand response and generating capacity resources to respond to market and institutional imperfections are discussed. This policy reform program is compatible with improving the efficiency of spot wholesale electricity markets, the continued evolution of competitive retail markets, and restores incentives for efficient investment in generating capacity consistent with operating reliability criteria applied by system operators. It also responds to investment disincentives that have been associated with volatility in wholesale energy prices, limited hedging opportunities and to concerns about regulatory opportunism. 1

Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Table A45. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation" " by Enclosed Floorspace, Percent Conditioned Floorspace, and Presence of Computer" " Controls for Building Environment, 1991" " (Estimates in Trillion Btu)" ,,"Presence of Computer Controls" ,," for Buildings Environment",,"RSE" "Enclosed Floorspace and"," ","--------------","--------------","Row" "Percent Conditioned Floorspace","Total","Present","Not Present","Factors" " "," " "RSE Column Factors:",0.8,1.3,0.9 "ALL SQUARE FEET CATEGORIES" "Approximate Conditioned Floorspace"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Magnetocumulative generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing providing a housing chamber with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber, from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

Pettibone, J.S.; Wheeler, P.C.

1981-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

382

PLASMA GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

Foster, J.S. Jr.

1958-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

383

Thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectric generator having a rigid coupling or stack'' between the heat source and the hot strap joining the thermoelements is described. The stack includes a member of an insulating material, such as ceramic, for electrically isolating the thermoelements from the heat source, and a pair of members of a ductile material, such as gold, one each on each side of the insulating member, to absorb thermal differential expansion stresses in the stack. (Official Gazette)

Pryslak, N.E.

1974-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

384

Photon generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni (Shoreham, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Cluster generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

Donchev, Todor I. (Urbana, IL); Petrov, Ivan G. (Champaign, IL)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

HEAT GENERATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heat is generated by the utilization of high energy neutrons produced as by nuclear reactions between hydrogen isotopes in a blanket zone containing lithium, a neutron moderator, and uranium and/or thorium effective to achieve multtplicatton of the high energy neutron. The rnultiplied and moderated neutrons produced react further with lithium-6 to produce tritium in the blanket. Thermal neutron fissionable materials are also produced and consumed in situ in the blanket zone. The heat produced by the aggregate of the various nuclear reactions is then withdrawn from the blanket zone to be used or otherwise disposed externally. (AEC)

Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

July 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In July 2009, the contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were below normal. This occurred because many States in the central and eastern part of the country set new records for the coolest July ever in 115 years of record. Accordingly, cooling degree days for the contiguous United States were 8.4 percent below the average for the month of July and 12.0 percent below a warmer July 2008. Retail sales of electricity decreased 6.5 percent in July 2009 compared to July 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused in part by the significant decline in industrial activity as observed by the 12.5-percent decrease in industrial retail sales over the same period. The average U.S. retail price of electricity decreased 2.9 percent in July 2009 compared to

389

Optimum Cycle Length and Discharge Burnup for Nuclear Fuel - A Comprehensive Study for BWRs and PWRs: Phase I: Results Achievable Wi thin the 5 Percent Enrichment Limit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Core reload design and economic analyses show that both pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs) can derive significant benefits by increasing the discharge burnup of their fuel above the currently licensed values. Optimum discharge burnup levels, however, may not be achievable without exceeding the current 5 wt percent limit on enrichment.

2001-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

390

Magnetocumulative generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing (100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105) providing a housing chamber (106) with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber (106) forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber (106), from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers (107, 108) disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber (106) which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

Pettibone, Joseph S. (Livermore, CA); Wheeler, Paul C. (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

EAC Recommendations for DOE Action on a Strategic Portable Generation Reserve - October 17, 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Richard Cowart, Chair DATE: October 17, 2012 RE: Recommendation on Strategic Portable Generation Reserve _________________________________________________________________________ The purpose of this memorandum is to convey to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) the Electricity Advisory Committee (EAC) recommendation that DOE not pursue a Strategic Portable Generation Reserve ("the Reserve") and to summarize the conclusions leading to this recommendation. DOE's establishment of the Reserve would designate it as the national backstop power source for emergencies, with associated fuel delivery responsibility, and position DOE as an owner of critical electric infrastructure. This DOE initiative would require significant effort and provide negligible improvement to electric service reliability.

392

Generation Maintenance Applications Center: Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Maintenance Guide for the Turbine Section of the Combu stion Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that are unique to these types of power-generation plants and that are not typically found in a nuclear or fossil-power plant.  As such, use of the EPRI PM Basis Database (PMDB) by current owners of CTCC facilities is limited to only those components that are common to both types of power plants.  With the projected growth in the number of CTCC facilities, EPRI General Maintenance Applications Center (GenMAC) ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

393

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Combined-Cycle Combustion Turbine Steam Turbine Stop and Control Valve Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BackgroundCombustion turbine combined-cycle (CTCC) facilities use various components that are unique to these types of power generation plants. Therefore, use of the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Preventive Maintenance Basis Database (1018758) by owners of CTCC facilities is somewhat limited to only those components that are common to both CTCC facilities and nuclear or fossil power plants. With the projected growth in the number of CTCC facilities, ...

2013-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

394

Generation Maintenance Applications Center: Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Maintenance Guide for the Compressor Section of the C ombustion Turbine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that are unique to these types of power-generation plants and that are not typically found in a nuclear or fossil-power plant.  As such, use of the EPRI PM Basis Database (PMDB) by current owners of CTCC facilities is limited to only those components that are common to both types of power plants.  With the projected growth in the number of CTCC facilities, EPRI General Maintenance Applications Center (GenMAC) ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Biogass Generator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Another internet tool by: Another internet tool by: Build Your Own Page 1 of 5 Teach...build...learn...renewable energy! Biogas Generator A Renewable Energy Project Kit The Pembina Institute What Is Biogas? Biogas is actually a mixture of gases, usually carbon dioxide and methane. It is produced by a few kinds of microorganisms, usually when air or oxygen is absent. (The absence of oxygen is called "anaerobic conditions.") Animals that eat a lot of plant material, particularly grazing animals such as cattle, produce large amounts of biogas. The biogas is produced not by the cow or elephant, but by billions of microor- ganisms living in its digestive system. Biogas also develops in bogs and at the bottom of lakes, where decaying organic matter builds up under wet and

396

California agriculture is large, diverse, complex and dynamic. It generated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California agriculture is large, diverse, complex and dynamic. It generated nearly $37.5 billion in cash receipts in 2010. California has been the nation's top agricultural state in cash receipts every in 1960 to about 12 percent in 2010. UniversityofCalifornia AgriculturalIssuesCenter The Measure

Ishida, Yuko

397

Financing Co-generation Projects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The 1980's will be a decade of intense adjustment by busine3s to the cost of money and energy. American Industry will require enormous amounts of capital for energy conservation to remain competitive. However, the average 3.8 percent after tax profit generated by energy intensive industries will not be sufficient to provide the capital required for both normal business expansion and energy conservation projects. Debt financing for energy saving equipment will adversely impact balance sheet figures and liquidity. It appears that only a few of the largest industrial firms have the cash flow to internally finance energy conserving cost reduction projects. These cost reduction projects will reinforce existing dominant cost advantages of industry leaders.

Young, R.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Solid oxide fuel cell distributed power generation  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that oxidize fuel without combustion to convert directly the fuel`s chemical energy into electricity. The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is distinguished from other fuel cell types by its all solid state structure and its high operating temperature (1,000 C). The Westinghouse tubular SOFC stack is process air cooled and has integrated thermally and hydraulically within its structure a natural gas reformer that requires no fuel combustion and no externally supplied water. In addition, since the SOFC stack delivers high temperature exhaust gas and can be operated at elevated pressure, it can supplant the combustor in a gas turbine generator set yielding a dry (no steam) combined cycle power system of unprecedented electrical generation efficiency (greater 70% ac/LHV). Most remarkably, analysis indicates that efficiencies of 60 percent can be achieved at power plant capacities as low as 250 kWe, and that the 70 percent efficiency level should be achievable at the two MW capacity level. This paper describes the individual SOFC, the stack, and the power generation system and its suitability for distributed generation.

Veyo, S.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

399

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data Temperatures throughout the contiguous United States were near normal for the fourth straight month in December 2008. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the western, northwest, and central United States experienced colder than normal temperatures while much of the Southeast experienced warmer than normal temperatures. Accordingly, heating degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 0.9 percent above the average for the month of December 2008 and 3.0 percent above a warmer December 2007. In December 2008, retail sales of electricity increased 0.7 percent compared to December 2007. For the 12-month period ending December 2008, retail sales of electricity decreased 0.3 percent when compared to the previous 12-month period ending December 2007. The average U.S. retail price of

400

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In the contiguous United States, near normal temperatures were observed throughout the country during the month of September 2008. The only deviation from normal temperatures occurred in the southern United States as below average temperatures prevailed for the month, while the western United States experienced above average temperatures during September 2008. Accordingly, cooling degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 9.7 percent above the average for the month of September, and 11.0 percent below a warmer September 2007. Retail sales of electricity for the month of September 2008 decreased 3.0 percent compared to the warmer temperatures and subsequent higher demand for electricity observed in September 2007. The average U.S. retail price of electricity for September 2008 showed a 9.1-percent increase

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

August 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were below normal in August 2009, particularly many States in the Central and Upper Midwest. However, above normal temperatures dominated the higher populated regions of the Northeast and Southeast, so on balance, total population-weighted cooling degree days for the contiguous United States were 6.6 percent above the average for the month of August. In August 2009, retail sales of electricity decreased 2.3 percent compared to August 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused in part by the significant decline in industrial activity as observed by the 7.7-percent decrease in industrial retail sales over the same period. The average U.S. retail price of electricity decreased 2.4 percent in August 2009

402

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In March 2009, the contiguous United States experienced slightly above average temperatures. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the Northwest experienced below average temperatures while the Southwest and Central regions observed above average temperatures. Heating degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 1.9 percent below the average for the month of March and 5.7 percent below a colder March 2008. Retail sales of electricity in March 2009 decreased 3.9 percent compared to March 2008. This decrease in March 2008-to-March 2009 retail sales was caused by the warmer weather observed in March 2009 and by the significant decline in industrial consumption as observed by the 12.7 percent decrease in industrial retail sales over the same period. The average U.S. retail price of electricity

403

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

June 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States as a whole experienced near normal temperatures in June 2009. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the South, Southeast, and Northwest all experienced above normal temperatures while the rest of the United States experienced below normal temperatures. Cooling degree days for the contiguous United States were 4.2 percent above the average for the month of June and 15.9 percent below a much warmer June 2008. In June 2009, retail sales of electricity decreased 7.3 percent compared to June 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused mainly by the significant decline in industrial consumption as observed by the 14.6-percent decrease in industrial retail

404

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

September 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In September 2009, the contiguous United States as a whole experienced temperatures that were above normal. This occurred because almost all western States experienced record or near record above average temperatures in September 2009. Total population-weighted cooling degree days for the contiguous United States were 7.1 percent above the average for the month of September, although they were 2.9 percent below September 2008. Accordingly, retail sales of electricity decreased by 3.9 percent compared to September 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused in part by the significant decline in industrial activity as observed by the 7.6-percent decrease in industrial retail

405

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

April 2009 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data The contiguous United States experienced near normal temperatures in April 2009. However, regional differences in temperature occurred as the Upper Midwest and parts of the Northwest experienced below average temperatures, while much of the Northeast experienced above average temperatures. Heating degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 0.3 percent above the average for the month of April and 8.5 percent above a much warmer April 2008. In April 2009, retail sales of electricity decreased 4.9 percent compared to April 2008. This decrease in retail sales was caused by the significant decline in industrial consumption as observed by the 13.6-percent decrease in industrial retail sales over the same period.

406

spaceheat_percent2001.pdf  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Products and Services Users can view and download selected pages or entire reports, search for information, download data and analysis applications, and find out about new...

407

Iowa Distributed Wind Generation Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Project Generation Project Jump to: navigation, search Name Iowa Distributed Wind Generation Project Facility Iowa Distributed Wind Generation Project Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Consortium -- Cedar Falls leads with 2/3 ownership Developer Iowa Distributed Wind Generation Project Energy Purchaser Consortium -- Cedar Falls leads with 2/3 ownership Location Algona IA Coordinates 43.0691°, -94.2255° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":43.0691,"lon":-94.2255,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

408

Microgeneration in the domestic sector in the Netherlands: > an agent-based model set-up for technology diffusion among households in > owner occupied dwellings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Abstract This research has examined the potential for micro-generation in the domestic sector in the Netherlands, focussing on three technologies: micro-CHP, solar PV and micro-wind… (more)

Haringa, D.B.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8 8 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data For the second straight month, near normal temperatures were observed throughout the contiguous United States in October 2008. On the regional level, temperatures did deviate above normal in the western United States while parts of the South, Southeast, and Northeast experienced below average temperatures. Accordingly, heating degree days for the contiguous United States as a whole were 1.4 percent above the average for the month of October, and 63.4 percent above a much warmer October 2007. In October 2008, retail sales of electricity decreased 4.4 percent compared to October 2007, which had warmer temperatures and subsequent higher demand for electricity. The average U.S. retail price of electricity continued to show an upward trend in October 2008, increasing 9.3

410

Data Quality Evaluation of Hazardous Air Pollutants Measurements for the US Environmental Protection Agency's Electric Utility Steam Generating Units Information Collection Request  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In December 2009, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued an Information Collection Request (ICR) to owners of fossil fuel-fired, electric steam generating units. Part III of the ICR required that almost 500 selected power plant stacks be tested for emissions of four groups of substances classified as hazardous air pollutants under the Clean Air Act: acid gases and hydrogen cyanide; metals; volatile and semivolatile organics; and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans, and polychlori...

2010-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

411

Analysis of Percent On-Cell Reformation of Methane in SOFC Stacks and the Effects on Thermal, Electrical, and Mechanical Performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations were performed to determine the effect that varying the percent on-cell steam-methane reformation would have on the thermal, electrical, and mechanical performance of generic, planar solid oxide fuel cell stacks. The study was performed using three-dimensional model geometries for cross-, co-, and counter-flow configuration stacks of 10x10- and 20x20-cm cell sizes. The analysis predicted the stress and temperature difference would be minimized for the 10x10-cm counter- and cross-flow stacks when 40 to 50% of the reformation reaction occurred on the anode. Gross electrical power density was virtually unaffected by the reforming. The co-flow stack benefited most from the on-cell reforming and had the lowest anode stresses of the 20x20-cm stacks. The analyses also suggest that airflows associated with 15% air utilization may be required for cooling the larger (20x20-cm) stacks.

Recknagle, Kurtis P.; Koeppel, Brian J.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Yokuda, Satoru T.; Singh, Prabhakar

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

Next Generation Radioisotope Generators | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

» Next Generation Radioisotope Generators » Next Generation Radioisotope Generators Next Generation Radioisotope Generators Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generator (ASRG) - The ASRG is currently being developed as a high-efficiency RPS technology to support future space missions on the Martian surface or in the vacuum of space. This system uses Stirling convertors, which have moving parts to mechanically convert heat to electricity. This power conversion system, if successfully deployed, will reduce the weight of each RPS and the amount of Pu-238 needed per mission. A HISTORY OF MISSION SUCCESSES For over fifty years, the Department of Energy has enabled space exploration on 27 missions by providing safe reliable radioistope power systems and radioisotope heater units for NASA, Navy and Air Force.

413

Generation Cogeneration [the data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal and natural-gas power plants lose as waste heat two-thirds of the energy they produce. Combined-heat-and-power (CHP) systems¿what used to be called cogeneration-attain 80 percent efficiency by capturing the heat and using it locally. CHP predates ...

P. Patel-Predd

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Environmental Issues arising from the Thermopower Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The present study is the outcome of a research assess of the thermopower generation and the environmental impacts in Brazil The idea was to establish a comparative analysis between the expansion of the power operation and the emissions of pollutants, for carrying out new prospective studies on this topic, as well as new regulatory proposal for the electricity system and the potential environmental risk related. Under the Decceniall Expansion Plan of Brazilian Government, the country’s total installed capacity will grow from 57.6 GW in 1997 to 90.2 GW in 2006, with the hydroelectric share declining from 92 to 83 percent, and the thermoelectric share growing from 8 to 17 percent over the same period. The option of thermopower plants could be a good opportunity to open the Brazilian Electric Sector to private investors, considering that low public financial capacity of the public sector to expand the electric system. But it is important to be note that the new power plants could generate large environmental impacts to the atmosphere if not controlled. This paper deals specifically with the analysis of atmospheric pollution from coal and natural gas power plants and the policy related in the the two fields above mentioned.

Marco Aurélio Dos Santos; Manoel Gonçalves Rodrigues

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Engineered Solutions. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop 2 Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  Intro to Teledyne Energy Systems  H 2 Generator Basics & Major Subsystems  H 2 Generating & Storage System Overview  Electrolysis System Efficiency & Economics  Focus for Attaining DOE H 2 Production Cost Goals 3 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Hunt Valley, Maryland  State-of-the-art thermoelectric,

416

Siemens Power Generation, Inc.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presented at the 2005 Pittsburgh Coal Conference Siemens Power Generation, Inc. Page 1 of 10 Siemens Power Generation, Inc., All Rights Reserved Development of a Catalytic...

417

Industrial Waste Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9) Page 2 of 7 Industrial Waste Generation Work with Engineered Nanomaterials Power Consumption Historical Contamination (groundwater, soil) Hazardous Waste Generation Atmospheric...

418

Variable Renewable Generation can Provide Balancing Control to the Electric Power System (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As wind and solar plants become more common in the electric power system, they may be called on to provide grid support services to help maintain system reliability. For example, through the use of inertial response, primary frequency response, and automatic generation control (also called secondary frequency response), wind power can provide assistance in balancing the generation and load on the system. These active power (i.e., real power) control services have the potential to assist the electric power system in times of disturbances and during normal conditions while also potentially providing economic value to consumers and variable renewable generation owners. This one-page, two-sided fact sheet discusses the grid-friendly support and benefits renewables can provide to the electric power system.

Not Available

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Prospects for hydrogen production by water electrolysis to be competitive with conventional methods. [Areas of research to reduce capital costs and approach 100 percent energy efficiencies  

SciTech Connect

With the impending unavailability of oil and natural gas, hydrogen will be produced on a large scale in the United States (1) from coal, or (2) by water electrolysis using electricity derived from nuclear or solar energy. In many parts of the world which lack fossil fuels, the latter will be the only possible method. The cost of purification of hydrogen produced from fossil fuels will increase its cost to about the same level as that of electrolytic hydrogen. When hydrogen is required in relatively small quantities too, the electrolytic method is advantageous. To minimize the cost of hydrogen produced by water electrolysis, it is necessary to reduce capital costs and approach 100 percent energy efficiencies. Areas of research, which will be necessary to achieve these goals are: (1) maximization of surface areas of electrodes; (2) use of thin electrolyte layers; (3) increase of operating temperature in alkaline water electrolysis cells to about 120-150/sup 0/C; (4) selection and evaluation of separator materials; (5) electrocatalysis of the hydrogen and oxygen electrode reaction; (6) mixed oxides as oxygen electrodes; and (7) photoelectrochemical effects. The progress made to date and proposed studies on these topics are briefly dealt with in this paper. The General Electric Solid Polymer Water Electrolyzer and Teledyne Alkaline Water Electrolysis Cells, both operating at about 120-150/sup 0/C, look mostpromising in achieving the goals of low capital cost and high energy efficiency. (auth)

Srinivasan, S.; Salzano, F.J.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Distributed Electrical Power Generation: Summary of Alternative Available Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Prepared for U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Washington, DC 20314-1000ABSTRACT: The Federal government is the greatest consumer of electricity in the nation. Federal procurement and installation of higher efficiency energy sources promises many benefits, in terms of economy, employment, export, and environment. While distributed generation (DG) technologies offer many of the benefits of alternative, efficient energy sources, few DG systems can currently be commercially purchased “off the shelf, ” and complicated codes and standards deter potential users. Federal use of distributed generation demonstrates the technology, can help drive down costs, and an help lead the general public to accept a changing energy scheme. This work reviews and describes various distributed generation technologies, including fuel cells, microturbines, wind turbines, photovoltaic arrays, and Stirling engines. Issues such as fuel availability, construction considerations, protection controls are addressed. Sources of further information are provided. DISCLAIMER: The contents of this report are not to be used for advertising, publication, or promotional purposes. Citation of trade names does not constitute an official endorsement or approval of the use of such commercial products. All product names and trademarks cited are the property of their respective owners. The findings of this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents.

Sarah J. Scott; Franklin H. Holcomb; Nicholas M. Josefik; Sarah J. Scott; Franklin H. Holcomb; Nicholas M. Josefik

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Waste acceptance criteria for closure generated waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The PORTS Facility has been operating since 1954. The PORTS Facility is used to enrich uranium for nuclear navy applications and commercial nuclear reactors. The PORTS process uses molecular diffusion techniques to separate the U-235 isotope from the U-238 isotope. The PORTS Facility consists of a complex cascade of compressors and converters through which gaseous uranium hexafluoride feed is processed. The feed contains approximately 0.7 percent U-235 by weight while products contain from 4 to 97 percent U-235 by weight, depending on the final application. In general, the majority of the closure wastes generated at PORTS consists of personal protective equipment (PPE), rags, soils, decontamination solutions, and construction related debris. These hazardous wastes will be predominately characterized on the basis of process knowledge. PORTS assumes its conservative waste characterizations that are based on process knowledge are correct unless and until further investigation and/or analysis proves the constituents are not present or are present at concentrations below characteristic regulatory thresholds. Waste Acceptance Criteria for wastes generated by the closure of active and inactive RCRA facilities at PORTS has been developed. The criteria presented in this document govern the activities that are performed during the closure and subsequent generation of waste and relocation from the closure locations to the storage unit. These criteria are intended to ensure the proper handling, classification, processing, and storage of wastes in order to prevent hazardous waste release that may pose a threat to human health or the environment. Any wastes currently stored at each of the facilities that are to be closed will be transferred to the X-326 or X-7725 Storage Units. The waste transfers will be accomplished in accordance with the Container Transfer Plan.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

SUBJECT: Insights and Implications of Steam Generator Operating, Inspecting and Maintenance Experience  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The steam generator tube failure event at Indian Point Unit 2 and the potential issues surrounding the in-situ pressure testing of selected tubes and test specimens at Arkansas Nuclear One Unit 2, prompted industry to evaluate its generic steam generator guidelines, plant experiences, and insights gained from the periodic steam generator program review visits conducted by the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO). The purpose of this letter is to share with the NRC staff the industry conclusions and actions taken. As the NRC staff is well aware, the operation, inspection, and maintenance of steam generators are a high industry priority. Given the critical role of the steam generator in providing safe, reliable, and economic power production, steam generator performance has received broad industry attention for years. Generic industry activities, managed by EPRI, have been underway continuously since 1978. NRC staff is familiar with those efforts based on past briefings on the activities of the EPRI Steam Generator Management Program (SGMP) and attendance at selected SGMP workshops. More recently, other industry support organizations, such as NEI, INPO, and NSSS Owners Groups, have played important roles as well. Industry data indicates continual improvement in steam generator performance since the initiation of these efforts.

David J. Modeen; Dr. Brian; W. Sheron

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Annual report of waste generation and pollution prevention progress 1998  

SciTech Connect

This seventh Annual Report presents and analyzes DOE Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention activities at 45 reporting sites from 1993 through 1998. This section summarizes Calendar Year 1998 Complex-wide waste generation and pollution prevention accomplishments. More detailed information follows this section in the body of the Report. In May 1996, the Secretary of Energy established a 50 percent Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goal (relative to the 1993 baseline) for routine operations radioactive, mixed, and hazardous waste generation, to be achieved by December31, 1999. DOE has achieved its Complex-Wide Waste Reduction Goals for routine operations based upon a comparison of 1998 waste generation to the 1993 baseline. Excluding sanitary waste, routine operations waste generation decreased 67 percent overall from 1993 to 1998. However, for the first time since 1994, the total amount of materials recycled by the Complex decreased from 109,600 metric tons in 1997 to 92,800 metric tons in 1998. This decrease is attributed to the fact that in 1997, several large ''one-time only'' recycling projects were conducted throughout the Complex. In order to demonstrate commitment to DOE's Complex-wide recycling goal, it is important for sites to identify all potential large-scale recycling/reuse opportunities.

NONE

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Using Backup Generators  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Power outages are commonplace during disasters, and they may last for several days. You can reduce losses and speed the recovery process by installing an emergency generator. Portable generators...

425

Next Generation Light Source  

•Next Generation Light Source – Super Thin Light Bulb, Energy Efficient, Long Life, Dimmable, and Uniform Illumination •High Entry Barrier – 71 ...

426

Main Generator Rotor Maintenance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Main generator rotors are constructed and designed to provide decades of reliable and trouble-free operation. However, a number of incidences have occurred over the years that can adversely impact reliable operation of generator rotors and, ultimately, production of electrical power. This report is a guide for power plant personnel responsible for reliable operation and maintenance of main generators. As a guide, this report provides knowledge and experience from generator experts working at power plants...

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

427

California agriculture is large, diverse, complex and dynamic. It generated nearly $37.5 billion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

California agriculture is large, diverse, complex and dynamic. It generated nearly $37.5 billion in cash receipts in 2010. California has been the nation's top agricultural state in cash receipts every in 1960 to about 12 percent in 2010. UniversityofCalifornia AgriculturalIssuesCenter The Measure

California at Davis, University of

428

Renewable Energy Requirements for Future Building Codes: Energy Generation and Economic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

As the model energy codes are improved to reach efficiency levels 50 percent greater than current codes, installation of on-site renewable energy generation is likely to become a code requirement. This requirement will be needed because traditional mechanisms for code improvement, including the building envelope, mechanical systems, and lighting, have been maximized at the most cost-effective limit.

Russo, Bryan J.; Weimar, Mark R.; Dillon, Heather E.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

Selenide isotope generators. [Performance characteristics for 1981, 1983, and 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of design studies which were performed to establish the Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) performance characteristics which can be expected from the use of selenide thermoelectric materials are presented. Since the selenide thermoelectric materials have exhibited an efficiency growth potential as a function of improvements in both material composition and increased operating temperature, performance characteristics have been established for the 1981, 1983 and 1985 time intervals. The 1981 generator has been designed for the Jupiter Orbiter Probe Mission and exhibits an efficiency of 10.5 percent, a specific power of 3 W/lb. and an envelope of 22 in. by 46 in. in dia for a nominal 250 W electrical unit. The 1983 system promises efficiencies of 11 percent, specific power of 3.5 W/lb. and an envelope of 25 by 44 in. for a typical mission such as the Jupiter-Out-of-the-Ecliptic Mission. In 1985 system efficiencies of 13.5 percent, specific powers of 3.8 to 4.5 W/lb and envelope of 25 by 35 in. can be expected.

Hammel, T.E.; Osmeyer, W.E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Generating safe template languages  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Template languages are widely used within generative programming, because they provide intuitive means to generate software artefacts expressed in a specific object language. However, most template languages perform template instantiation on the level ... Keywords: generative programming, language extension, safe authoring, template language

Florian Heidenreich; Jendrik Johannes; Mirko Seifert; Christian Wende; Marcel Böhme

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Motor/generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A motor/generator is provided for connecting between a transmission input shaft and an output shaft of a prime mover. The motor/generator may include a motor/generator housing, a stator mounted to the motor/generator housing, a rotor mounted at least partially within the motor/generator housing and rotatable about a rotor rotation axis, and a transmission-shaft coupler drivingly coupled to the rotor. The transmission-shaft coupler may include a clamp, which may include a base attached to the rotor and a plurality of adjustable jaws.

Hickam, Christopher Dale (Glasford, IL)

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

432

Steam Turbine and Generator Designs for Combined-Cycle Applications: Durability, Reliability, and Procurement Considerations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combined-cycle power plants are currently preferred for new power generation capacity in much of the world, particularly in the United States. Steam turbines and electrical generators are vital components affecting plant performance and reliability. Over 90 percent of the world's combined-cycle steam turbines are provided by six major manufacturers: Alstom, General Electric, Siemens-Westinghouse, Mitsubishi, Toshiba, and Hitachi. This report provides information on their model offerings and consideration...

2003-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

433

California Regional Wind Energy Forecasting System Development, Volume 4: California Wind Generation Research Dataset (CARD)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The rated capacity of wind generation in California is expected to grow rapidly in the future beyond the approximately 2100 megawatts in place at the end of 2005. The main drivers are the state's 20 percent renewable portfolio standard requirement in 2010 and the low cost of wind energy relative to other renewable energy sources. As wind is an intermittent generation resource and weather changes can cause large and rapid changes in output, system operators will need accurate and robust wind energy forec...

2006-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

434

Production Tax Credit for Renewable Electricity Generation (released in AEO2005)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

In the late 1970s and early 1980s, environmental and energy security concerns were addressed at the Federal level by several key pieces of energy legislation. Among them, the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA), P.L. 95-617, required regulated power utilities to purchase alternative electricity generation from qualified generating facilities, including small-scale renewable generators; and the Investment Tax Credit (ITC), P.L. 95-618, part of the Energy Tax Act of 1978, provided a 10-percent Federal tax credit on new investment in capital-intensive wind and solar generation technologies.

Information Center

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Operation of a third generation wind turbine  

SciTech Connect

A modern wind turbine was installed on May 26, 1982, at the USDA Conservation and Production Research Laboratory, Bushland, Texas. This wind machine was used to provide electrical energy for irrigation pumping and other agricultural loads. The wind turbine purchased for this research is an Enertech Model 44, manufactured by Enertech Corporation, Norwich, Vermont. The horizontal-axis wind turbine has a 13.4 m diameter, three-bladed, fixed-pitch rotor on a 24.4-m tower. The blades are laminated epoxy-wood, and are attached to a steel hub. A 25-kW induction generator provides 240 V, 60 Hz, single-phase electrical power. The wind turbine operated 64 percent of the time, while being available to operate over 94 percent of the time. The unit had a net energy production of over 80,000 kWh in an average windspeed of 5.9 m/s at a height of 10 m in a 16-month period. The blade pitch was originally offset two degrees from design to maintain power production within the limitations of the gearbox, generator, and brakes. A maximum output of 23.2 kW averaged over a 15-second period indicated that with a new brake, the system was capable of handling more power. After a new brake was installed, the blade pitch was changed to one degree from design. The maximum power output measured after the pitch change was 29.3 kW. Modified blade tip brakes were installed on the wind turbine on July 7, 1983. These tip brakes increased power production at lower windspeeds while reducing power at higher windspeeds.

Vosper, F.C.; Clark, R.N.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Effects of voltage control in utility interactive dispersed storage and generation systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

When a small generator is connected to the distribution system, the voltage at the point of interconnection is determined largely by the system and not the generator. This report examines the effect on the generator, on the load voltage and on the distribution system of a number of different voltage control strategies in the generator. Synchronous generators with three kinds of exciter control are considered, as well as induction generators and dc/ac inverters, with and without capacitor compensation. The effect of varying input power during operation (which may be experienced by generators based on renewable resources) is explored, as well as the effect of connecting and disconnecting the generator at ten percent of its rated power.

Kirkham, H.; Das, R.

1983-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

437

Distributed Generation Dispatch Optimization under VariousElectricity Tariffs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The on-site generation of electricity can offer buildingowners and occupiers financial benefits as well as social benefits suchas reduced grid congestion, improved energy efficiency, and reducedgreenhouse gas emissions. Combined heat and power (CHP), or cogeneration,systems make use of the waste heat from the generator for site heatingneeds. Real-time optimal dispatch of CHP systems is difficult todetermine because of complicated electricity tariffs and uncertainty inCHP equipment availability, energy prices, and system loads. Typically,CHP systems use simple heuristic control strategies. This paper describesa method of determining optimal control in real-time and applies it to alight industrial site in San Diego, California, to examine: 1) the addedbenefit of optimal over heuristic controls, 2) the price elasticity ofthe system, and 3) the site-attributable greenhouse gas emissions, allunder three different tariff structures. Results suggest that heuristiccontrols are adequate under the current tariff structure and relativelyhigh electricity prices, capturing 97 percent of the value of thedistributed generation system. Even more value could be captured bysimply not running the CHP system during times of unusually high naturalgas prices. Under hypothetical real-time pricing of electricity,heuristic controls would capture only 70 percent of the value ofdistributed generation.

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Steam generator support system  

SciTech Connect

A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances.

Moldenhauer, James E. (Simi Valley, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Steam generator designs  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle is any one of combinations of gas turbines, steam generators or heat recovery equipment, and steam turbines assembled for the reduction in plant cost or improvement of cycle efficiency in the utility power generation process. The variety of combined cycles discussed for the possibilities for industrial applications include gas turbine plus unfired steam generator; gas turbine plus supplementary fired steam generator; gas turbine plus furnace-fired steam generator; and supercharged furnace-fired system generator plus gas turbine. These units are large enough to meet the demands for the utility applications and with the advent of economical coal gasification processes to provide clean fuel, the combined-cycle applications are solicited. (MCW)

Clayton, W.H.; Singer, J.G.

1973-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Steam generator support system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source is disclosed. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances. 4 figs.

Moldenhauer, J.E.

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

generation | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generation generation Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 16, and contains only the reference case. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO generation renewable energy renewable energy generating capacity Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generating Capacity and Generation- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035 License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL) Comment Rate this dataset Usefulness of the metadata

442

Method of grid generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method of grid generation that uses the geometry of the problem space and the governing relations to generate a grid. The method can generate a grid with minimized discretization errors, and with minimal user interaction. The method of the present invention comprises assigning grid cell locations so that, when the governing relations are discretized using the grid, at least some of the discretization errors are substantially zero. Conventional grid generation is driven by the problem space geometry; grid generation according to the present invention is driven by problem space geometry and by governing relations. The present invention accordingly can provide two significant benefits: more efficient and accurate modeling since discretization errors are minimized, and reduced cost grid generation since less human interaction is required.

Barnette, Daniel W. (Veguita, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Unprecedented Generation Shifts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The economic recession, which reduced electricity demand, and falling natural gas costs have brought about unprecedented shifts in electric generation. These developments have affected coal-fired generation the most, leading to operational challenges (cycling and shut downs), deterioration of financial performance, and an awareness of the vulnerability of many units to retirement. A third force, though usually affecting natural gas unit operations more than coal, is the build-up of wind generation. This ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

444

Steam generator replacement overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since nuclear power began to be widely used for commercial purposes in the 1960s, unit operators have experienced a variety of problems with major components. Although many of the problems have diminished considerably, those associated with pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators persist. Steam generator problems rank second, behind refueling outages, as the most significant contributor to lost electricity generation. As of December 31, 1995, 38 steam generators had been replaced in 13 of the 72 operating PWRs, and three units had been shut down prematurely, due primarily (or partially) to degradation of their steam generators: Portland General Electric`s Trojan unit, located in Prescott, OR, in 1992; Southern California Edison`s San Onofre 1, located in San Clemente, CA, in 1992; and Sacramento Municipal Utility District`s Rancho Seco unit in 1989. In the coming years, operators of PWRs in the US with degraded steam generators will have to decide whether to make annual repairs (with eventual derating likely), replace the generators or shut the plants down prematurely. To understand the issues and decisions utility managers face, this article examines problems encountered at steam generators over the past few decades and identifies some of the remedies that utility operators and the nuclear community have employed, including operational changes, maintenance, repairs and steam generator replacement.

Chernoff, H. [Science Applications International Corp., McLean, VA (United States); Wade, K.C. [USDOE Energy Information Administration, Washington, DC (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

EIA - Electricity Generating Capacity  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation,...

446

Generator backup overcurrent protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A concern that the characteristics and correct application of the generator backup relay are misunderstood is addressed in this report to the Power Systems Protection Committee. It is inherently a secure device, and rarely has the opportunity to operate in its intended capacity. So the question was asked, ''Do generator backup overcurrent relays really protect anything.'' In response a description of the function and operating characteristics of the backup relays, a discussion of generator fault current behavior, examples of relay settings for a typical application, and methods and criteria for determining that the relay both protects the generator and operates selectively with other protective devices are included.

Baker, D.S.

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Next Generation Neural Implants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... They are still bulky, rigid, power hungry, and functionally limited. ... This talk will review progress on next generation implants, which must be miniature ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

448

Next Generation Test Bed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 3 machine rooms (safety, security, power, & A/C). Supports COOP ... ii. Developing methods and technologies for next generation biometric testing. ...

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

Isolated trigger pulse generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A trigger pulse generation system capable of delivering a multiplicity of isolated 100 kV trigger pulses with picosecond simultaneity. 2 figs.

Aaland, K.

1980-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

450

Radioisotope Power Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radioisotope Power Generation Long lived power sources are needed for equipment that is too remote or inaccessible for replacement. By choosing a radioactive element with a long...

451

New Generation of MJTCs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... After years of effort and scores of iterations, PML researchers have developed a new generation of devices that can reduce the uncertainties in ac ...

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

452

Generation IV Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

an international initiative. A group of ten nations, including France, Japan, Russia, Korea, China, and Canada, are participating in the planning and development of Generation IV...

453

JMLUnit: the next generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Designing unit test suites for object-oriented systems is a painstaking, repetitive, and error-prone task, and significant research has been devoted to the automatic generation of test suites. One method for generating unit tests is to use formal class ...

Daniel M. Zimmerman; Rinkesh Nagmoti

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

455

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

457

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect).

Warner, Bruce E. (Livermore, CA); Duncan, David B. (Auburn, CA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Kivalina wind generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project reported was to construct a system to harness the winds of an Arctic site to generate electricity that would power a greenhouse where fruit and vegetables could be raised for local consumption. The installation of the tower and an Enertech 4K wind generator are described. (LEW)

Aldrich, D.

1984-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

459

Internal split field generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator includes a coil of conductive material. A stationary magnetic field source applies a stationary magnetic field to the coil. An internal magnetic field source is disposed within a cavity of the coil to apply a moving magnetic field to the coil. The stationary magnetic field interacts with the moving magnetic field to generate an electrical energy in the coil.

Thundat; ,Thomas George (Knoxville, TN); Van Neste, Charles W. (Kingston, TN); Vass, Arpad Alexander (Oak Ridge, TN)

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

460

Numerical Generation of Entropies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The spurious numerical generation and/or destruction of various types of entropies in models is investigated. It is shown that entropy s? of dry matter tends to be generated if potential temperature is advected by a damping scheme. There is no ...

Joseph Egger

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation percent owner" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Generative model transformer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Generative Model Transformer (GMT) project is an Open Source initiative to build a Model Driven Architecure™ tool that allows fully customisable Platform Independent Models, Platform Description Models, Texture Mappings, and Refinement Transformations. ... Keywords: QVT, domain-specific languages, generative model transformer (GMT), model driven architecture (MDA), model transformation, open source

Jorn Bettin; Ghica van Emde Boas

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Solid aerosol generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

Prescott, Donald S. (Shelley, ID); Schober, Robert K. (Midwest City, OK); Beller, John (Idaho Falls, ID)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

Invariant generation in vampire  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes a loop invariant generator implemented in the theorem prover Vampire. It is based on the symbol elimination method proposed by two authors of this paper. The generator accepts a program written in a subset of C, finds loops in it, ...

Kryštof Hoder; Laura Kovács; Andrei Voronkov

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Reactivity of Acid Generators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Reactivity of Acid Generators for Chemically Amplified Resists with Low-Energy Electrons Atsuro Nakano, Takahiro Kozawa, Seiichi Tagawa, Tomasz Szreder, James F. Wishart, Toshiyuki Kai and Tsutomu Shimokawa Jpn. J. Appl. Phys., 45, L197-L200 (2006). [Find paper at the Japanese Journal of Applied Physics] Abstract: In chemically amplified resists for ionizing radiations such as electron beams and extreme ultraviolet (EUV), low-energy electrons play an important role in the pattern formation processes. The reactivity of acid generators with low-energy electrons was evaluated using solvated electrons in tetrahydrofuran, which were generated by a pulsed electron beam. The rate constants of acid generators with the solvated electrons ranged from 0.6 to 1.9 x 1011 M-1s-1

465

TFTR Motor Generator  

SciTech Connect

A general description is given of 475 MVA pulsed motor generators for TFTR at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Two identical generators operating in parallel are capable of supplying 950 MVA for an equivalent square pulse of 6.77 seconds and 4,500 MJ at 0.7 power factor to provide the energy for the pulsed electrical coils and heating system for TFTR. The description includes the operational features of the 15,000 HP wound rotor motors driving each generator with its starting equipment and cycloconverter for controlling speed, power factor, and regulating line voltage during load pulsing where the generator speed changes from 87.5 to 60 Hz frequency variation to provide the 4,500 MJ or energy. The special design characteristics such as fatigue stress calculations for 10/sup 6/ cycles of operation, forcing factor on exciter to provide regulation, and low generator impedance are reviewed.

Murray, J.G.; Bronner, G.; Horton, M.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Steam Generator Management Program: Steam Generator Progress Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1985, EPRI has published the Steam Generator Progress Report (SGPR), which provides historical information on worldwide steam generator activities.

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

467

4. Net Generation Trends  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. Th U.S. Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. Th information contained herein should be attributed to the U.S. Energy Information Administration and should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy o the Department of Energy or any other organization. For additional information, contact Chris Cassar at 202-586-5448, or at Christopher.Cassar@eia.doe.gov. Monthly Flash Estimates of Data for: May 2010 Section 1. Commentary Electric Power Data In May 2010, the heavily populated Northeast experienced temperatures that were significantly above average. The total population- weighted cooling degree days for the United States were 35.1 percent above the May average.

468

Second Generation PFBC Systems R&D  

SciTech Connect

No work was performed; the two remaining Multi Annular Swirl Burner test campaigns are on hold pending selection of a new test facility (replacement for the shut down UTSI burner test facility) and identification of associated testing costs. The Second-Generation PFB Combustion Plant conceptual design prepared in 1987 is being updated to reflect the benefit of pilot plant test data and the latest advances in gas turbine technology. The updated plant is being designed to operate with 95 percent sulfur capture and a single Siemens Westinghouse (SW) 501G gas turbine. Using carbonizer and gas turbine data generated by Foster Wheeler (FW) and SW respectively, Parsons Infrastructure & Technology prepared preliminary plant heat and material balances based on carbonizer operating temperatures of 1700 and 1800 F; the former yielded the higher plant efficiency and has been selected for the design update. The 501G gas turbine has an air compressor discharge temperature of 811EF and an exhaust temperature of 1140 F. Both of these streams represent high sources of heat and must be cooled, the air to 600 F to be compatible with a 650 F PCFB pressure vessel design temperature and the exhaust for a 275 F stack gas temperature. Because of their relatively high temperature, they can be used for feed water heating, steam generation and/or steam superheating and reheating. As a result, the plant could have one boiler (the PCFB boiler), or as many as three boilers if their cooling is used to generate steam. Three different plant arrangements using one, two and then three boilers were considered with the three-boiler arrangement minimizing the feedwater flow/steam turbine size and maximizing the plant efficiency. After reviewing the three arrangements it was felt the operating complexity associated with a three-boiler plant did not justify the 1/2 point increase in plant efficiency it provided and a two-boiler plant was selected.

Archie Robertson

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

469

Magnetic field generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A magnetic field generating device provides a useful magnetic field within a specific retgion, while keeping nearby surrounding regions virtually field free. By placing an appropriate current density along a flux line of the source, the stray field effects of the generator may be contained. One current carrying structure may support a truncated cosine distribution, and it may be surrounded by a current structure which follows a flux line that would occur in a full coaxial double cosine distribution. Strong magnetic fields may be generated and contained using superconducting cables to approximate required current surfaces.

Krienin, Frank (Shoreham, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Modern generator protection systems  

SciTech Connect

The special problems of the protection of generating stations with large machines connected to large integrated networks are presented. The coordination between the protective relays and tripping functions and the reliability of the protection scheme are important considerations in modern plants. Primary and backup protective functions, the applications, and their divisions into fault detection and ''fault prevention'' categories are considered. Testing and maintenance of the generator protection system including automatic calibration testing equipment is also discussed. The concept of the generator protection as a completely coordinated system and its realization with solid state protective relays is also presented. 9 refs.

Pencinger, C.J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

PULSE SYNTHESIZING GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>An electronlc circuit for synthesizing electrical current pulses having very fast rise times includes several sinewave generators tuned to progressively higher harmonic frequencies with signal amplitudes and phases selectable according to the Fourier series of the waveform that is to be synthesized. Phase control is provided by periodically triggering the generators at precisely controlled times. The outputs of the generators are combined in a coaxial transmission line. Any frequency-dependent delays that occur in the transmission line can be readily compensated for so that the desired signal wave shape is obtained at the output of the line. (AEC)

Kerns, Q.A.

1963-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

generating | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generating generating Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 9, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts. The data is broken down into power only, combined heat and power, cumulative planned additions, cumulative unplanned conditions, and cumulative retirements and total electric power sector capacity . Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO capacity consumption EIA Electricity generating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Electricity Generating Capacity- Reference Case (xls, 130.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

473

Scram signal generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

Johanson, Edward W. (New Lenox, IL); Simms, Richard (Westmont, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Vector generator scan converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

Moore, James M. (Livermore, CA); Leighton, James F. (Livermore, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Financing Distributed Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper introduces the engineer who is undertaking distributed generation projects to a wide range of financing options. Distributed generation systems (such as internal combustion engines, small gas turbines, fuel cells and photovoltaics) all require an initial investment, which is recovered over time through revenues or savings. An understanding of the cost of capital and financing structures helps the engineer develop realistic expectations and not be offended by the common requirements of financing organizations. This paper discusses several mechanisms for financing distributed generation projects: appropriations; debt (commercial bank loan); mortgage; home equity loan; limited partnership; vendor financing; general obligation bond; revenue bond; lease; Energy Savings Performance Contract; utility programs; chauffage (end-use purchase); and grants. The paper also discusses financial strategies for businesses focusing on distributed generation: venture capital; informal investors (''business angels''); bank and debt financing; and the stock market.

Walker, A.

2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

476

Generation -IV Reactor Concepts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Thomas H. Fanning Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA The Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) is a multi-national research and development (R&D) collaboration. The GIF pursues the development of advanced, next generation reactor technology with goals to improve: a) sustainability (effective fuel utilization and minimization of waste) b) economics (competitiveness with respect to other energy sources) c) safety and reliability (e.g., no need for offsite emergency response), and d) proliferation resistance and physical protection The GIF Technology Roadmap exercise selected six generic systems for further study: the Gas- cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR),

477

Micro Turbine Generator Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A number of micro turbines generators have recently been announced as currently commercially available for sale to customers, such as end users, utilities, and energy service providers. Manufacturers and others are reporting certain performance capabilities ...

Stephanie L. Hamilton

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Next Generation Biomaterials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Apr 2, 2012 ... Characterization of Next-Generation Nickel-Titanium Rotary ... Manufacturing of Composite Fibrous Membranes for Biomedical and Energy Storage ... Prediction of the Stress Distribution and the Coating Delamination in ...

479

Relativistic electron beam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

1975-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

480

Financing Distributed Generation  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces the engineer who is undertaking distributed generation projects to a wide range of financing options. Distributed generation systems (such as internal combustion engines, small gas turbines, fuel cells and photovoltaics) all require an initial investment, which is recovered over time through revenues or savings. An understanding of the cost of capital and financing structures helps the engineer develop realistic expectations and not be offended by the common requirements of financing organizations. This paper discusses several mechanisms for financing distributed generation projects: appropriations; debt (commercial bank loan); mortgage; home equity loan; limited partnership; vendor financing; general obligation bond; revenue bond; lease; Energy Savings Performance Contract; utility programs; chauffage (end-use purchase); and grants. The paper also discusses financial strategies for businesses focusing on distributed generation: venture capital; informal investors (''business angels''); bank and debt financing; and the stock market.

Walker, A.

2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Energy and Mass Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modifications in the energy momentum dispersion laws due to a noncommutative geometry, have been considered in recent years. We examine the oscillations of extended objects in this perspective and find that there is now a "generation" of energy.

Burra G. Sidharth

2010-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

482

Biomass for Electricity Generation  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper examines issues affecting the uses of biomass for electricity generation. The methodology used in the National Energy Modeling System to account for various types of biomass is discussed, and the underlying assumptions are explained.

Zia Haq

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Baroclinic Tsunami Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical and experimental study of the baroclinic waves generated by a monopole dislocation of the sea floor is presented. Analytical results are based on a two-dimensional and linearized description of motion using a two-layer approximation ...

Joseph L. Hammack

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Local entropy generation analysis  

SciTech Connect

Second law analysis techniques have been widely used to evaluate the sources of irreversibility in components and systems of components but the evaluation of local sources of irreversibility in thermal processes has received little attention. While analytical procedures for evaluating local entropy generation have been developed, applications have been limited to fluid flows with analytical solutions for the velocity and temperature fields. The analysis of local entropy generation can be used to evaluate more complicated flows by including entropy generation calculations in a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code. The research documented in this report consists of incorporating local entropy generation calculations in an existing CFD code and then using the code to evaluate the distribution of thermodynamic losses in two applications: an impinging jet and a magnetic heat pump. 22 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

Drost, M.K.; White, M.D.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Vector generator scan converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

1988-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

486

Steam Generator Management Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 24th EPRI Steam Generator NDE Workshop took place in San Diego, California, July 1113, 2005. It covered one full day and two half days of presentations. Attendees included representatives from domestic and overseas nuclear utilities, nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) vendors, nondestructive evaluation (NDE) service and equipment organizations, research laboratories, and regulatory bodies. This annual workshop serves as a forum for NDE specialists to gather and discuss current steam generator NDE iss...

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

487

Steam generator tube failures  

SciTech Connect

A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Electrical generating plant availability  

SciTech Connect

A discussion is given of actions that can improve availability, including the following: the meaning of power plant availability; The organization of the electric power industry; some general considerations of availability; the improvement of power plant availability--design factors, control of shipping and construction, maintenance, operating practices; sources of statistics on generating plant availability; effects of reducing forced outage rates; and comments by electric utilities on generating unit availability.

1975-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

The Installed Base of Distributed Electrical Generating Resources in the U.S.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generation of electric power at or near electric loads, referred to here as distributed resources (DR), has received considerable attention during recent years, with some experts projecting that DR technologies may provide up to 30 percent of all new generation resources installed in the United States within a couple of decades. There are, in fact, many electric generators in place that are or could be used as DR. There has not, however, been a concerted effort to quantify this fleet nor to understan...

2003-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

490

Gas Generation Testing of Neptunium Oxide Generated Using the HB-Line Phase IIFlowsheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas generation rate for neptunium dioxide (NpO{sub 2}) samples produced on a laboratory scale using the HB-Line Phase II flowsheet has been measured following exposure to 75% relative humidity (RH). As expected, the observed H{sub 2} generation rates for these samples increase with increasing moisture content. A maximum H{sub 2} generation rate of 1.8 x 10{sup -6} moles per day per kilogram (mol {center_dot} day{sup -1} kg{sup -1}) was observed for NpO{sub 2} samples with approximately one and one-half times (1 1/2 X) the expected specific surface area (SSA) for the HB-Line Phase II product. The SSA of NpO{sub 2} samples calcined at 650 C is similar to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) calcined at 950 C according to the Department of Energy (DOE) standard for packaging and storage of PuO{sub 2}. This low SSA of the HB-Line Phase II product limits moisture uptake to less than 0.2 weight percent (wt %) even with extended exposure to 75% RH.

Duffey, J

2003-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

491

DOE Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Univ. Of Chicago Argonne Univ. Of Chicago Argonne LLC 7/31/2006 9/30/2011 4 yrs Award Term Earned/additional 11 yrs Award Term Available 9/30/2026 M&O 2006 http://www.anl.gov/contract/ Patricia Schuneman 630-252-2956 Sergio Martinez 630-252-2075 Kristin Palmer 630-252-2127 Oak Ridge Environmental Management EM Bechtel Jacobs Co LLC 12/18/1997 12/31/2011 12/31/2011 Environmental Mgmt 1998 http://www.oakridge.doe.gov/external/Home/Procurement/RecentAwards/tabid/101/De fault.aspx Barbara Jackson 865-576-0976 Karen Shears 865-241-6411 Ames National Laboratory SC Iowa State University 12/4/2006 12/31/2011 4yrs Award Term Earned/additional 11yrs Award Term Available 12/31/2026 M&O 2007 http://www.ameslab.gov/operations/resources/contract Patricia Schuneman

492

Certification of Timesharing LOGON ID Owner Responsibilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FORM AD-798 FORM AD-798 (3-78) Section 1 - Section 2 - Section 3 - Section 4 - Section 5 - Hi - 3 Dates (Include all Within-Grade Increases) (Begin with most recent date in Card 20) Service Periods For Which Retirement Deductions Were Withdrawn (Begin with old- est period in Card 30) Service Periods For Which Retirement Deductions Were Not Withheld (Begin with old- est period in Card 40) Periods of Separation Prior to 10/1/56 (Begin with most recent date in Card 50) Request Number 1 45 49 50 20 30 40 50 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 21 31 41 51 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 22 32 42 52 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 23 33 43 53 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 24 34 44 54 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 25 35 45 55 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 26 36 46 56 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 27 37 47 57 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 28 38 48 58 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 29 39 49 59 / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / / 11 11 11 11 12 12 12 12 13 13 13 13 18 18 18 18 19 19 19 19 24 24 24 24 25 25 25 29 29 29 30 30 30 32 32 32 33 33 33 35 35 35 52 53 58 59 62 63 68 69 70 75

493

DOE Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ultimate Potential Ultimate Potential Expiration Date Contract FY Competed Parent Companies INEEL (AMWTP Ops) EM Bechtel BWXT Idaho LLC (Under Protest) 6/15/1999 3/31/2011 2 three month option periods until protest resolved 9/30/2011 M&O 1999 Bechtel National, Inc. (67%) and Babcock and Wilcox Company (33%) Portsmouth Remediation EM LATA/Parallax 1/10/2005 6/30/2010 2/28/2011 Site Clean up 2005 Los Alamos Technical Associates (LATA) 51%; Parallax (name changed to ES Performance Plus) 49% Paducah Remediation EM LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky 4/22/2010 7/21/2015 7/21/2015 Site Clean up 2009 Los Alamos Technical Associates, Inc. 100% West Valley Demonstration Project EM West Valley Environmental Svcs 6/29/2007 6/30/2011 6/30/2011 Site Clean up 2007 URS -60% Jacobs - 20% ECC - 10% Paralax - 10%

494

DOE Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7292008 9302013 one 5 Yr Option Avaialble 9302018 M&O 2008 http:www.eere.energy.govgoldenNRELPrime.aspx Carol Battershell 303-275- 1438 Steve Scott 303-275-4724...

495

DOE Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

transition) transition) 6/15/1999 6/30/2011 2 three month option periods 9/30/2011 M&O 1999 http://www.id.energy.gov/PSD/AMWTPHomepage.html Mike Adams 208-526-5277 Wendy Bauer 208-526-2808 Paducah Remediation EM LATA Environmental Services of Kentucky 4/22/2010 7/21/2015 7/21/2015 Site Clean up 2009 http://www.emcbc.doe.gov/dept/contracting/primecontracts.php Pam Thompson 859-219-4056 Bill Creech 859-219-4044 Argonne National Laboratory SC UChicago Argonne, LLC 7/31/2006 9/30/2015 4 yrs Award Term Earned/additional 11 yrs Award Term Available 9/30/2026 M&O 2006 http://www.anl.gov/contract/ Patricia Schuneman 630-252-2956 Sergio Martinez 630-252-2075 Kristin Palmer 630-252-2127 Oak Ridge Environmental Management

496

DOE Facility Management Contracts Facility Owner Contractor  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

UChicago Argonne, LLC UChicago Argonne, LLC 7/31/2006 9/30/2011 4 yrs Award Term Earned/additional 11 yrs Award Term Available 9/30/2026 M&O 2006 http://www.anl.gov/contract/ Patricia Schuneman 630-252-2956 Sergio Martinez 630-252-2075 Kristin Palmer 630-252-2127 Oak Ridge Environmental Management EM Bechtel Jacobs Co LLC 12/18/1997 12/31/2011 12/31/2011 Environmental Mgmt 1998 http://www.oakridge.doe.gov/external/Home/Procurement/RecentAwards/tabid/101/De fault.aspx Barbara Jackson 865-576-0976 Karen Shears 865-241-6411 Ames National Laboratory SC Iowa State University 12/4/2006 12/31/2011 4yrs Award Term Earned/additional 11 yrs Award Term Available 12/31/2026 M&O 2007 http://www.ameslab.gov/operations/resources/contract Patricia Schuneman

497

Scott Roseman: Owner, New Leaf Community Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history, first met Roseman while she was an undergraduate student at UCSC doing an internship in alternative energy

Reti, Irene H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Corporate Law's Current-Owner Bias  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reported on firms’ financial statements do not reflect theto the firm’s financial statements. Following the corporatein the footnotes to firms’ financial statements, and thus is

Fried, Jesse M.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Corporate Law's Current-Owner Bias  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reported on firms’ financial statements do not reflect theto the firm’s financial statements. Following the corporatein the footnotes to firms’ financial statements, and thus is

Fried, Jesse M.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Scott Roseman: Owner, New Leaf Community Markets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

there was some kind of, say, cod-type fish that was eitheror yellow, we didn’t carry a cod fish that was red. It wasn’

Reti, Irene H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z