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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Multiple output timing and trigger generator  

SciTech Connect

In support of the development of a multiple stage pulse modulator at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed a first generation, multiple output timing and trigger generator. Exploiting Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) Micro Controller Units (MCU's), the timing and trigger generator provides 32 independent outputs with a timing resolution of about 500 ns. The timing and trigger generator system is comprised of two MCU boards and a single PC. One of the MCU boards performs the functions of the timing and signal generation (the timing controller) while the second MCU board accepts commands from the PC and provides the timing instructions to the timing controller. The PC provides the user interface for adjusting the on and off timing for each of the output signals. This system provides 32 output or timing signals which can be pre-programmed to be in an on or off state for each of 64 time steps. The width or duration of each of the 64 time steps is programmable from 2 {micro}s to 2.5 ms with a minimum time resolution of 500 ns. The repetition rate of the programmed pulse train is only limited by the time duration of the programmed event. This paper describes the design and function of the timing and trigger generator system and software including test results and measurements.

Wheat, Robert M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dale, Gregory E [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Mesoscale Forecasts Generated from Operational Numerical Weather-Prediction Model Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique called Model Output Enhancement (MOE) has been developed for the generation and display of mesoscale weather forecasts. The MOE technique derives mesoscale or high-resolution (order of 1 km) weather forecasts from synoptic-scale ...

John G. W. Kelley; Joseph M. Russo; Toby N. Carlson; J. Ronald Eyton

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Optimising maximum power output and minimum entropy generation of Atkinson cycle using mutable smart bees algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this article is optimising maximum power output (MPO) and minimum entropy generation (MEG) of an Atkinson cycle as a multi-objective constraint thermodynamic problem by a new improved artificial bee colony algorithm which utilises 'mutable ...

Mofid Gorji; Ahmad Mozaffari; Sina Mohammadrezaei Noudeh

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Performance of Double-Output Induction Generator for Wind Energy Conversion Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With growing concerns about environmental pollution and a possible energy shortage, great efforts have been taken by the governments around the world to implement renewable energy programs, based mainly on wind power, solar energy, small hydro-electric ... Keywords: Double-output induction generator (DOIG), steady state model, field-oriented control, dynamic model, PWM converters

B. Chitti Babu; K. B. Mohanty; C. Poongothai

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Sensorless Adaptive Output Feedback Control of Wind Energy Systems with PMS Generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Sensorless Adaptive Output Feedback Control of Wind Energy Systems with PMS Generators A. El the problem of controlling wind energy conversion (WEC) systems involving permanent magnet synchronous is to maximize wind energy extraction which cannot be achieved without letting the wind turbine rotor operate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

6

Simulation of one-minute power output from utility-scale photovoltaic generation systems.  

SciTech Connect

We present an approach to simulate time-synchronized, one-minute power output from large photovoltaic (PV) generation plants in locations where only hourly irradiance estimates are available from satellite sources. The approach uses one-minute irradiance measurements from ground sensors in a climatically and geographically similar area. Irradiance is translated to power using the Sandia Array Performance Model. Power output is generated for 2007 in southern Nevada are being used for a Solar PV Grid Integration Study to estimate the integration costs associated with various utility-scale PV generation levels. Plant designs considered include both fixed-tilt thin-film, and single-axis-tracked polycrystalline Si systems ranging in size from 5 to 300 MW{sub AC}. Simulated power output profiles at one-minute intervals were generated for five scenarios defined by total PV capacity (149.5 MW, 222 WM, 292 MW, 492 MW, and 892 MW) each comprising as many as 10 geographically separated PV plants.

Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

PV output smoothing using a battery and natural gas engine-generator.  

SciTech Connect

In some situations involving weak grids or high penetration scenarios, the variability of photovoltaic systems can affect the local electrical grid. In order to mitigate destabilizing effects of power fluctuations, an energy storage device or other controllable generation or load can be used. This paper describes the development of a controller for coordinated operation of a small gas engine-generator set (genset) and a battery for smoothing PV plant output. There are a number of benefits derived from using a traditional generation resource in combination with the battery; the variability of the photovoltaic system can be reduced to a specific level with a smaller battery and Power Conditioning System (PCS) and the lifetime of the battery can be extended. The controller was designed specifically for a PV/energy storage project (Prosperity) and a gas engine-generator (Mesa Del Sol) currently operating on the same feeder in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A number of smoothing simulations of the Prosperity PV were conducted using power data collected from the site. By adjusting the control parameters, tradeoffs between battery use and ramp rates could be tuned. A cost function was created to optimize the control in order to balance, in this example, the need to have low ramp rates with reducing battery size and operation. Simulations were performed for cases with only a genset or battery, and with and without coordinated control between the genset and battery, e.g., without the communication link between sites or during a communication failure. The degree of smoothing without coordinated control did not change significantly because the battery dominated the smoothing response. It is anticipated that this work will be followed by a field demonstration in the near future.

Johnson, Jay; Ellis, Abraham; Denda, Atsushi [Shimizu Corporation; Morino, Kimio [Shimizu Corporation; Shinji, Takao [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.; Ogata, Takao [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.; Tadokoro, Masayuki [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Analysis of Temporal and Spatial Characteristics on Output of Wind Farms with Doubly Fed Induction Generator Wind Turbines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the large number of wind turbines and covering too large area in a large wind farm, wake effects among wind turbines and wind speed time delays will have a greater impact of wind farms models. Taking wind farms with doubly fed induction generator(DFIG) ... Keywords: wind farm, modeling, temporal and spatial characteristics, DFIG, output characteristics

Shupo Bu, Xunwen Su

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Modeling of electromagnetic power output in a vibration-induced micro-generator with a silicon-based helical micro-spring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper develops an electromagnetic power output model in a vibration-induced micro-generator with a silicon helical micro-spring to predict the electricity output. The generator consists of a movable ferro-platinum permanent magnet membrane on the ... Keywords: Analytical model, Electromagnetic, Helical micro-spring, Micro-generator, Vibration-induced

W. L. Lu; Y. M. Hwang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

System and method to improve the power output and longetivity of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By using the helium generated by the alpha emissions of a thermoelectric generator during space travel for cooling the thermal degradation of the thermoelectric generator can be slowed. Slowing degradation allows missions to be longer with little additional expense or payload.

Mowery, A.L. Jr.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

11

System and method to improve the power output and longetivity of a radioisotope thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

By using the helium generated by the alpha emissions of a thermoelectric generator during space travel for cooling, the thermal degradation of the thermoelectric generator can be slowed. Slowing degradation allows missions to be longer with little additional expense or payload.

Mowery, Jr., Alfred L. (Potomac, MD)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

An 800-2400 MC Signal Generator with Automaticallv-Leveled Output Power J f  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ence with microwave signal generators development of new technological advances 1Arthur Fong and W. D. Myers “The-hp- Direct-Reading UHF Signal

See Also

1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Next generation input-output data format for HEP using Google's protocol buffers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose a data format for Monte Carlo (MC) events, or any structural data, including experimental data, in a compact binary form using variable-size integer encoding as implemented in the Google's Protocol Buffers package. This approach is implemented in the so-called ProMC library which produces smaller file sizes for MC records compared to the existing input-output libraries used in high-energy physics (HEP). Other important features are a separation of abstract data layouts from concrete programming implementations, self-description and random access. Data stored in ProMC files can be written, read and manipulated in a number of programming languages, such C++, Java and Python.

S. V. Chekanov

2013-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

14

An Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

chains and emission factors for the generation, transmission and distribution portions of the electricityAn Electricity-focused Economic Input-output Model: Life-cycle Assessment and Policy Implications of Future Electricity Generation Scenarios Joe Marriott Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements

15

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 193,120 57,296 105,416 227 30,182 2003 197,827 69,695 92,384 309 35,440 2004 245,389 116,086 90,747 259 38,297 2005 256,441 115,727 111,098 260 29,356 2006 246,687 102,117 98,314 269 45,987 2007 208,198 77,941 81,845 348 48,064 2008 180,034 64,843 79,856 280 35,055 2009 166,449 77,919 52,428 245 35,856 2010 173,078 94,331 41,090 340 37,317 2011 176,349 99,257 40,167 173 36,752 2012 144,266 60,862 24,925 353 58,126 2010 January 14,949 7,995 3,716 38 3,199

16

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 1,005,144 767,803 209,703 1,405 26,232 2003 1,031,778 757,384 247,732 1,816 24,846 2004 1,044,798 772,224 244,044 1,917 26,613 2005 1,065,281 761,349 276,135 1,922 25,875 2006 1,053,783 753,390 273,246 1,886 25,262 2007 1,069,606 764,765 280,377 1,927 22,537 2008 1,064,503 760,326 280,254 2,021 21,902 2009 955,190 695,615 238,012 1,798 19,766 2010 1,001,411 721,431 253,621 1,720 24,638 2011 956,470 689,316 243,168 1,668 22,319 2012 845,066 615,467 208,085 1,450 20,065

17

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 64,629 2,456 26,514 5,323 30,337 2004 49,443 2,014 21,294 6,935 19,201 2005 55,862 2,485 17,640 6,763 28,974 2006 54,693 2,611 16,348 6,755 28,980 2007 60,840 2,992 19,155 6,692 32,001 2008 66,139 3,409 22,419 5,227 35,085 2009 66,658 3,679 23,586 5,398 33,994 2010 77,150 3,668 22,884 5,438 45,159 2011 74,255 4,488 22,574 5,382 41,810 2012 77,205 4,191 22,654 5,812 44,548 2010 January 7,109 189 2,166 458 4,295 February 6,441 275 2,151 429 3,586

18

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 7,135,572 2,307,358 3,481,961 75,985 1,270,268 2003 6,498,549 1,809,003 3,450,177 60,662 1,178,707 2004 6,912,661 1,857,247 3,749,945 73,744 1,231,725 2005 7,220,520 2,198,098 3,837,717 69,682 1,115,023 2006 7,612,500 2,546,169 3,847,644 69,401 1,149,286 2007 8,181,986 2,808,500 4,219,827 71,560 1,082,099 2008 7,900,986 2,803,283 4,046,069 67,571 984,062 2009 8,138,385 2,981,285 4,062,633 77,077 1,017,390 2010 8,694,186 3,359,035 4,191,241 87,357 1,056,553

19

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 137,414 9,168 122,100 3,280 2,865 2004 146,018 11,250 126,584 4,091 4,093 2005 143,822 11,490 124,030 5,232 3,070 2006 162,084 16,617 136,632 7,738 1,096 2007 168,762 17,442 144,490 5,699 1,131 2008 196,802 20,465 170,001 5,668 668 2009 207,585 19,583 181,234 6,106 661 2010 219,954 19,975 193,623 5,905 451 2011 235,990 22,086 183,609 29,820 474 2012 259,564 25,193 204,753 27,012 2,606 2010 January 17,649 1,715 15,406 491 37 February 16,300 1,653 14,198 410 38

20

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 7,353 2,125 3,691 8 1,529 2003 7,067 2,554 3,245 11 1,257 2004 8,721 4,150 3,223 9 1,339 2005 9,113 4,130 3,953 9 1,020 2006 8,622 3,619 3,482 10 1,511 2007 7,299 2,808 2,877 12 1,602 2008 6,314 2,296 2,823 10 1,184 2009 5,828 2,761 1,850 9 1,209 2010 6,053 3,325 1,452 12 1,264 2011 6,092 3,449 1,388 6 1,248 2012 5,021 2,105 869 13 2,034 2010 January 525 283 130 1 110 February 497 258 131 1 106 March 522 308 119 1 94

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, C. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 146,643 88,595 39,320 1,210 17,517 2003 189,260 105,319 62,617 1,394 19,929 2004 185,761 103,793 57,843 1,963 22,162 2005 185,631 98,223 63,546 1,584 22,278 2006 87,898 53,529 18,332 886 15,150 2007 95,895 56,910 24,097 691 14,198 2008 61,379 38,995 14,463 621 7,300 2009 51,690 31,847 11,181 477 8,185 2010 44,968 30,806 9,364 376 4,422 2011 31,152 20,844 6,637 301 3,370 2012 25,702 17,521 5,102 394 2,685 2010 January 6,193 4,381 1,188 48 576

22

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 66,270 3,930 59,149 1,753 1,438 2004 70,489 5,373 60,929 2,098 2,089 2005 68,897 5,650 59,144 2,571 1,532 2006 77,004 8,287 64,217 3,937 563 2007 80,697 8,620 68,657 2,875 544 2008 94,768 10,242 81,300 2,879 346 2009 100,261 9,748 87,086 3,089 337 2010 106,681 10,029 93,405 3,011 236 2011 114,173 11,146 91,279 11,497 251 2012 125,927 12,721 101,379 10,512 1,315 2010 January 8,502 853 7,379 251 19 February 7,882 830 6,823 209 20

23

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 912,218 553,390 243,561 7,229 108,031 2003 1,174,795 658,868 387,341 8,534 120,051 2004 1,156,763 651,712 358,685 11,763 134,603 2005 1,160,733 618,811 395,489 9,614 136,820 2006 546,529 335,130 112,052 5,444 93,903 2007 595,191 355,999 147,579 4,259 87,354 2008 377,848 242,379 87,460 3,743 44,266 2009 315,420 196,346 66,834 2,903 49,336 2010 273,357 188,987 55,444 2,267 26,660 2011 186,753 125,755 39,093 1,840 20,066 2012 153,189 105,179 29,952 2,364 15,695

24

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, F. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 1,287,114 10,659 139,532 1,196 1,135,727 2003 1,265,669 16,545 150,745 1,199 1,097,180 2004 1,360,258 19,973 145,216 1,661 1,193,408 2005 1,352,582 27,373 157,600 1,235 1,166,373 2006 1,399,235 27,455 154,360 1,314 1,216,106 2007 1,335,511 31,568 154,388 2,040 1,147,516 2008 1,262,675 29,150 148,198 1,410 1,083,917 2009 1,136,729 29,565 150,481 1,408 955,276 2010 1,225,571 40,167 155,429 1,338 1,028,637 2011 1,240,937 35,474 146,684 1,504 1,057,275

25

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and F. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 161,803 5,766 132,065 21,953 2,020 2004 161,567 3,705 129,562 25,204 3,096 2005 164,635 4,724 131,080 24,914 3,918 2006 168,716 4,078 135,127 25,618 3,893 2007 162,482 4,557 133,509 21,393 3,022 2008 166,723 4,476 136,080 26,108 59 2009 165,755 3,989 132,877 27,868 1,021 2010 162,436 3,322 130,467 27,509 1,138 2011 152,007 3,433 121,648 25,664 1,262 2012 152,045 3,910 117,598 28,923 1,614 2010 January 13,015 244 10,405 2,260 107

26

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and C. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 22,554 695 18,611 2,952 296 2004 22,330 444 17,959 3,439 488 2005 22,089 560 17,655 3,289 584 2006 22,469 500 18,068 3,356 545 2007 21,796 553 17,885 2,921 437 2008 22,134 509 18,294 3,323 8 2009 22,095 465 17,872 3,622 137 2010 21,725 402 17,621 3,549 152 2011 19,016 388 15,367 3,103 158 2012 18,954 418 14,757 3,577 203 2010 January 1,737 30 1,402 291 14 February 1,562 25 1,276 250 11 March 1,854 36 1,500 306 12

27

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at 1. Emissions from Energy Consumption at Conventional Power Plants and Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Metric Tons) Year Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) 2002 2,423,963 10,881 5,194 2003 2,445,094 10,646 4,532 2004 2,486,982 10,309 4,143 2005 2,543,838 10,340 3,961 2006 2,488,918 9,524 3,799 2007 2,547,032 9,042 3,650 2008 2,484,012 7,830 3,330 2009 2,269,508 5,970 2,395 2010 2,388,596 5,400 2,491 2011 2,287,071 4,845 2,406 2012 2,156,875 3,704 2,148 Notes: The emissions data presented include total emissions from both electricity generation and the production of useful thermal output. See Appendix A, Technical Notes, for a description of the sources and methodology used to develop the emissions estimates.

28

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 993 0 116 0 876 2004 2,174 0 735 10 1,429 2005 1,923 0 965 435 522 2006 2,051 0 525 1,094 433 2007 1,988 0 386 1,102 501 2008 1,025 0 454 433 138 2009 793 0 545 176 72 2010 1,623 0 1,195 370 58 2011 3,195 0 2,753 351 91 2012 3,189 0 2,788 340 61 2010 January 118 0 83 30 5 February 110 0 79 27 5 March 132 0 94 32 6 April 131 0 93 33 6 May 132 0 92 34 6 June 139 0 104 30 5 July 140 0 102 33 5 August 132 0 95 32 5 September 148 0 113 30 5

29

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 517 0 111 6 399 2003 763 0 80 9 675 2004 1,043 0 237 8 798 2005 783 0 206 8 568 2006 1,259 0 195 9 1,055 2007 1,262 0 162 11 1,090 2008 897 0 119 9 769 2009 1,007 0 126 8 873 2010 1,059 0 98 11 950 2011 1,080 0 112 6 962 2012 1,346 0 113 11 1,222 2010 January 92 0 10 1 81 February 93 0 10 1 82 March 84 0 12 1 71 April 76 0 9 1 66 May 84 0 10 0 75 June 93 0 8 0 86 July 89 0 8 0 80 August 87 0 2 1 84 September 82 0 2 1 79

30

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 500 0 61 0 439 2004 1,158 0 415 5 738 2005 994 0 519 212 263 2006 1,034 0 267 549 218 2007 985 0 226 532 228 2008 552 0 271 211 70 2009 440 0 313 91 37 2010 847 0 643 174 30 2011 1,635 0 1,422 165 48 2012 1,630 0 1,441 156 32 2010 January 61 0 44 14 3 February 58 0 42 13 3 March 67 0 49 15 3 April 67 0 49 15 3 May 68 0 49 16 3 June 73 0 56 14 3 July 73 0 55 16 2 August 69 0 52 15 3 September 79 0 62 14 3 October 75 0 59 14 2

31

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 17,561 0 2,255 929 14,377 2003 17,720 0 2,080 1,234 14,406 2004 24,275 0 3,809 1,540 18,926 2005 23,833 0 3,918 1,544 18,371 2006 23,227 0 3,834 1,539 17,854 2007 22,810 0 3,795 1,566 17,449 2008 22,168 0 3,689 1,652 16,827 2009 20,507 0 3,935 1,481 15,091 2010 21,727 0 3,808 1,406 16,513 2011 21,532 0 3,628 1,321 16,584 2012 19,333 0 2,790 1,143 15,400 2010 January 1,972 0 371 160 1,440 February 1,820 0 347 139 1,334 March 1,839 0 338 123 1,378 April 2,142 0 284 95 1,764

32

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 29,854 0 10,655 757 18,442 2004 30,228 0 12,055 2,627 15,547 2005 38,010 0 10,275 2,086 25,649 2006 36,966 0 8,561 2,318 26,087 2007 41,757 0 10,294 2,643 28,820 2008 41,851 0 9,674 1,542 30,635 2009 41,810 0 10,355 1,638 29,817 2010 47,153 0 8,436 1,648 37,070 2011 43,483 0 6,460 1,566 35,458 2012 46,863 0 6,914 1,796 38,153 2010 January 4,885 0 1,088 137 3,661 February 4,105 0 943 137 3,025 March 4,398 0 845 136 3,417 April 4,224 0 399 138 3,688

33

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 14,395 0 3,192 179 11,024 2003 21,170 0 2,282 244 18,644 2004 29,342 0 6,768 226 22,347 2005 22,224 0 5,935 228 16,061 2006 38,169 0 5,672 236 32,262 2007 38,033 0 4,710 303 33,019 2008 27,100 0 3,441 243 23,416 2009 29,974 0 3,652 213 26,109 2010 31,303 0 2,855 296 28,152 2011 31,943 0 3,244 153 28,546 2012 38,777 0 3,281 315 35,181 2010 January 2,683 0 285 33 2,365 February 2,770 0 302 29 2,439 March 2,424 0 338 36 2,050 April 2,257 0 255 22 1,980

34

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 1,358 0 311 865 182 2004 2,743 0 651 1,628 464 2005 2,719 0 623 1,536 560 2006 2,840 0 725 1,595 520 2007 2,219 0 768 1,136 315 2008 2,328 0 806 1,514 8 2009 2,426 0 823 1,466 137 2010 2,287 0 819 1,316 152 2011 2,044 0 742 1,148 154 2012 1,986 0 522 1,273 190 2010 January 191 0 69 107 14 February 178 0 61 106 11 March 204 0 66 126 12 April 207 0 67 127 13 May 249 0 67 167 15 June 204 0 69 120 14 July 194 0 68 115 11

35

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 13,694 0 3,118 8,858 1,718 2004 19,991 0 4,746 12,295 2,950 2005 20,296 0 4,551 11,991 3,754 2006 21,729 0 5,347 12,654 3,728 2007 16,174 0 5,683 8,350 2,141 2008 18,272 0 6,039 12,174 59 2009 18,785 0 6,229 11,535 1,021 2010 17,502 0 6,031 10,333 1,138 2011 16,766 0 5,807 9,731 1,227 2012 16,310 0 4,180 10,615 1,515 2010 January 1,476 0 518 851 107 February 1,365 0 444 835 86 March 1,572 0 486 992 93 April 1,598 0 495 1,003 100

36

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 12,228 0 286 384 11,558 2003 14,124 0 1,197 512 12,414 2004 20,654 0 1,501 1,203 17,951 2005 20,494 0 1,392 1,004 18,097 2006 14,077 0 1,153 559 12,365 2007 13,462 0 1,303 441 11,718 2008 7,533 0 1,311 461 5,762 2009 8,128 0 1,301 293 6,534 2010 4,866 0 1,086 212 3,567 2011 3,826 0 1,004 168 2,654 2012 3,097 0 992 122 1,984 2010 January 606 0 105 31 470 February 504 0 78 26 401 March 335 0 46 7 281 April 355 0 86 9 260 May 340 0 93 14 232

37

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 885,987 0 267,675 45,359 572,953 2003 762,779 0 250,120 21,238 491,421 2004 1,085,191 0 398,476 40,122 646,593 2005 1,008,404 0 392,842 35,037 580,525 2006 968,574 0 339,047 33,928 595,599 2007 894,272 0 347,181 36,689 510,402 2008 813,794 0 333,197 33,434 447,163 2009 836,863 0 312,553 42,032 482,279 2010 841,521 0 308,246 47,001 486,274 2011 861,006 0 315,411 40,976 504,619 2012 909,087 0 330,354 48,944 529,788 2010 January 74,586 0 27,368 4,148 43,070 February 65,539 0 24,180 3,786 37,573

38

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 2. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 40,020 1,319 2,550 214,137 5,961 12,550 4,732 281,269 2003 38,249 5,551 1,828 200,077 9,282 19,785 3,296 278,068 2004 39,014 5,731 2,486 239,416 18,200 17,347 3,822 326,017 2005 39,652 5,571 2,238 239,324 36,694 18,240 3,884 345,605 2006 38,133 4,812 2,253 207,095 22,567 17,284 4,435 296,579 2007 38,260 5,294 1,862 212,705 20,473 19,166 4,459 302,219 2008 37,220 5,479 1,353 204,167 22,109 17,052 4,854 292,234 2009 38,015 5,341 1,445 190,875 19,830 17,625 5,055 278,187

39

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 76,737 0 1,669 3,276 71,788 2003 85,488 0 6,963 3,176 75,349 2004 124,809 0 8,592 7,219 108,997 2005 125,689 0 8,134 6,145 111,410 2006 87,137 0 6,740 3,481 76,916 2007 82,768 0 7,602 2,754 72,412 2008 45,481 0 7,644 2,786 35,051 2009 48,912 0 7,557 1,802 39,552 2010 29,243 0 6,402 1,297 21,545 2011 22,799 0 5,927 1,039 15,833 2012 18,233 0 5,871 746 11,616 2010 January 3,648 0 614 190 2,843 February 3,027 0 422 157 2,447 March 2,015 0 272 43 1,699

40

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 682,060 0 9,585 727 671,747 2003 746,375 0 10,893 762 734,720 2004 1,016,124 0 14,968 1,493 999,663 2005 997,331 0 19,193 1,028 977,111 2006 1,049,161 0 18,814 1,045 1,029,303 2007 982,486 0 21,435 1,756 959,296 2008 923,889 0 18,075 1,123 904,690 2009 816,285 0 19,587 1,135 795,563 2010 876,041 0 18,357 1,064 856,620 2011 893,314 0 16,577 1,022 875,716 2012 883,158 0 19,251 949 862,958 2010 January 73,418 0 1,677 91 71,651 February 67,994 0 1,689 81 66,224

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commerical Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 3. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Commerical Sector Combined Heat and Power, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 18,477 2,600 143 36,265 0 6,902 4,801 69,188 2003 22,780 2,520 196 16,955 0 8,296 6,142 56,889 2004 22,450 4,118 165 21,851 0 8,936 6,350 63,871 2005 22,601 3,518 166 20,227 0 8,647 5,921 61,081 2006 22,186 2,092 172 19,370 0.22 9,359 6,242 59,422 2007 22,595 1,640 221 20,040 0 6,651 3,983 55,131 2008 22,991 1,822 177 20,183 0 8,863 6,054 60,091 2009 20,057 1,095 155 25,902 0 8,450 5,761 61,420 2010 19,216 845 216 29,791 13 7,917 5,333 63,330 2011 17,234 687 111 24,848 14 7,433 5,988 56,314

42

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, B. Natural Gas: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 860,024 0 263,619 41,435 554,970 2003 721,267 0 225,967 19,973 475,327 2004 1,052,100 0 388,424 39,233 624,443 2005 984,340 0 384,365 34,172 565,803 2006 942,817 0 330,878 33,112 578,828 2007 872,579 0 339,796 35,987 496,796 2008 793,537 0 326,048 32,813 434,676 2009 816,787 0 305,542 41,275 469,970 2010 821,775 0 301,769 46,324 473,683 2011 839,681 0 308,669 39,856 491,155 2012 886,103 0 322,607 47,883 515,613 2010 January 72,867 0 26,791 4,086 41,990

43

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, E. Coal: Consumption for Useful Thermal Output, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 421,084 0 50,041 23,099 347,944 2003 416,700 0 47,817 28,479 340,405 2004 564,497 0 87,981 34,538 441,978 2005 548,666 0 88,364 34,616 425,685 2006 532,561 0 84,335 34,086 414,140 2007 521,717 0 83,838 34,690 403,189 2008 503,096 0 81,416 36,163 385,517 2009 462,674 0 90,867 32,651 339,156 2010 490,931 0 90,184 30,725 370,022 2011 479,822 0 84,855 28,056 366,911 2012 420,923 0 58,275 23,673 338,975 2010 January 44,514 0 8,627 3,445 32,442 February 40,887 0 8,041 3,024 29,823

44

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Planned Generating Capacity Changes, by Energy Source, 2013-2017 5. Planned Generating Capacity Changes, by Energy Source, 2013-2017 Generator Additions Generator Retirements Net Capacity Additions Energy Source Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity 2013 U.S. Total 513 15,144 179 12,604 334 2,540 Coal 4 1,482 28 4,465 -24 -2,983 Petroleum 21 45 41 1,401 -20 -1,356 Natural Gas 87 6,818 55 2,950 32 3,868 Other Gases -- -- 1 4 -1 -4 Nuclear -- -- 4 3,576 -4 -3,576 Hydroelectric Conventional 17 385 36 185 -19 201 Wind 25 2,225 -- -- 25 2,225 Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic 277 3,460 1 1 276 3,459 Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels 10 489 -- -- 10 489 Geothermal 5 50 1 11 4 39

45

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 1. Useful Thermal Output by Energy Source: Total Combined Heat and Power (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Renewable Sources Other Total Annual Totals 2002 336,848 61,313 11,513 708,738 117,513 571,509 48,263 1,855,697 2003 333,361 68,329 16,934 610,122 110,263 632,366 54,960 1,826,335 2004 351,871 80,824 16,659 654,242 126,157 667,341 45,456 1,942,550 2005 341,806 79,362 13,021 624,008 138,469 664,691 41,400 1,902,757 2006 332,548 54,224 24,009 603,288 126,049 689,549 49,308 1,878,973 2007 326,803 50,882 25,373 554,394 116,313 651,230 46,822 1,771,816 2008 315,244 29,554 18,263 509,330 110,680 610,131 23,729 1,616,931 2009 281,557 32,591 20,308 513,002 99,556 546,974 33,287 1,527,276

46

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Petroleum Liquids as the Primary Fuel, 2. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Petroleum Liquids as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Fuel-Switchable Part of Total Producer Type Total Net Summer Capacity of All Generators Reporting Petroleum as the Primary Fuel Net Summer Capacity of Petroleum-Fired Generators Reporting the Ability to Switch to Natural Gas Fuel Switchable Capacity as Percent of Total Maximum Achievable Net Summer Capacity Using Natural Gas Electric Utilities 26,732 7,640 28.6 7,224 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 18,644 7,867 42.2 6,628 Independent Power Producers, Combined Heat and Power Plants 317 -- -- -- Electric Power Sector Subtotal 45,693 15,507 33.9 13,852 Commercial Sector 443 21 4.8 21

47

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 1. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel, by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Fuel-Switchable Part of Total Producer Type Total Net Summer Capacity of All Generators Reporting Natural Gas as the Primary Fuel Net Summer Capacity of Natural Gas-Fired Generators Reporting the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Fuel Switchable Capacity as Percent of Total Maximum Achievable Net Summer Capacity Using Petroleum Liquids Fuel Switchable Net Summer Capacity Reported to Have No Factors that Limit the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Electric Utilities 206,774 78,346 37.9 74,835 23,624 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 170,654 42,509 24.9 40,788 12,216

48

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: 4. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Commercial Sector by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Middle Atlantic 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

49

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Average Cost of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 9. Average Cost of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Connecticut -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Maine -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Massachusetts -- -- -- -- -- -- -- New Hampshire -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Rhode Island -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vermont -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Middle Atlantic -- W W -- -- -- W New Jersey -- -- -- -- -- -- -- New York -- W W -- -- -- W Pennsylvania -- -- -- -- -- -- -- East North Central W W W 4.10 4.01 W W

50

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Average Tested Heat Rates by Prime Mover and Energy Source, 2007 - 2012 2. Average Tested Heat Rates by Prime Mover and Energy Source, 2007 - 2012 (Btu per Kilowatthour) Prime Mover Coal Petroluem Natural Gas Nuclear 2007 Steam Generator 10,158 10,398 10,440 10,489 Gas Turbine -- 13,217 11,632 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,447 10,175 -- Combined Cycle W 10,970 7,577 -- 2008 Steam Generator 10,138 10,356 10,377 10,452 Gas Turbine -- 13,311 11,576 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,427 9,975 -- Combined Cycle W 10,985 7,642 -- 2009 Steam Generator 10,150 10,349 10,427 10,459 Gas Turbine -- 13,326 11,560 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,428 9,958 -- Combined Cycle W 10,715 7,605 -- 2010 Steam Generator 10,142 10,249 10,416 10,452 Gas Turbine -- 13,386 11,590 -- Internal Combustion -- 10,429 9,917 --

51

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Total Capacity of Distributed and Dispersed Generators by Technology Type, 9. Total Capacity of Distributed and Dispersed Generators by Technology Type, 2005 through 2012 Capacity (MW) Year Internal Combustion Combustion Turbine Steam Turbine Hydro Wind Photovoltaic Storage Other Wind and Other Total Number of Generators Distributed Generators 2005 4,025.0 1,917.0 1,830.0 999.0 -- -- -- -- 995.0 9,766.0 17,371 2006 3,646.0 1,298.0 2,582.0 806.0 -- -- -- -- 1,081.0 9,411.0 5,044 2007 4,624.0 1,990.0 3,596.0 1,051.0 -- -- -- -- 1,441.0 12,702.0 7,103 2008 5,112.0 1,949.0 3,060.0 1,154.0 -- -- -- -- 1,588.0 12,863.0 9,591 2009 4,339.0 4,147.0 4,621.0 1,166.0 -- -- -- -- 1,729.0 16,002.0 13,006 2010 886.8 186.0 109.9 97.4 98.9 236.3 -- 372.7 -- 1,988.0 15,630

52

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Consumption of Petroleum Coke for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 1. Consumption of Petroleum Coke for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 56 121 -54% 0 0 0 94 0 0 56 27

53

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: 5. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Industrial Sector by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 19 0.66 6.9 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 19 0.66 6.9 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

54

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Independent Power Producers by State, 2012 3. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Independent Power Producers by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 732 0.87 10.5 41 0.09 2.0 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 41 0.09 2.0 0 -- -- Maine 32 0.80 7.0 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 700 0.88 10.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

55

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Electric Utilties by State, 2012 2. Receipts and Quality of Coal by Rank Delivered for Electricity Generation: Electric Utilties by State, 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Census Division and State Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight New England 353 2.20 7.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Connecticut 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Maine 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Massachusetts 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- New Hampshire 353 2.20 7.7 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Rhode Island 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- -- Vermont 0 -- -- 0 -- -- 0 -- --

56

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators: From Natural Gas to Petroleum Liquids, 4. Fuel-Switching Capacity of Operable Generators: From Natural Gas to Petroleum Liquids, by Year of Initial Commercial Operation, 2012 (Megawatts, Percent) Year of Initial Commercial Operation Number of Generators Net Summer Capacity Fuel Switchable Net Summer Capacity Reported to Have No Factors that Limit the Ability to Switch to Petroleum Liquids Pre-1970 318 11,735 7,535 1970-1974 376 18,210 11,033 1975-1979 105 11,031 7,283 1980-1984 46 945 211 1985-1989 107 3,155 413 1990-1994 208 11,738 1,453 1995-1999 134 9,680 2,099 2000-2004 392 39,841 5,098 2005-2009 116 14,791 2,066 2010-2012 78 8,479 320 Total 1,880 129,604 37,510 Notes: Petroleum includes distillate fuel oil (all diesel and No. 1, No. 2, and No. 4 fuel oils), residual fuel oil (No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils and bunker C fuel oil), jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke (converted to liquid petroleum, see Technical Notes for conversion methodology), waste oil, and beginning in 2011, synthetic gas and propane. Prior to 2011, synthetic gas and propane were included in Other Gases.

57

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Existing Capacity by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts) 4. Existing Capacity by Producer Type, 2012 (Megawatts) Producer Type Number of Generators Generator Nameplate Capacity Net Summer Capacity Net Winter Capacity Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities 9,624 680,592 621,785 644,358 Independent Power Producers, Non-Combined Heat and Power Plants 6,148 412,045 374,964 389,349 Independent Power Producers, Combined Heat and Power Plants 609 39,916 35,266 38,023 Total 16,381 1,132,554 1,032,015 1,071,729 Commercial and Industrial Sectors Commercial Sector 962 3,610 3,223 3,349 Industrial Sector 1,680 31,832 27,795 29,381 Total 2,642 35,442 31,018 32,730 All Sectors Total 19,023 1,167,995 1,063,033 1,104,459 Notes: In 2011, EIA corrected the NAICS codes of several plants which resulted in a net capacity shift from the electric utility sector to the commercial sector.

58

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3.A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 3.A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 395,943 22,241 8,368 378,044 1,763 272,684 18,189 44,466 -1,309 8,612 1,149,001 2003 452,433 35,818 7,949 380,337 2,404 304,904 21,890 46,060 -1,003 8,088 1,258,879 2004 443,547 33,574 7,410 427,510 3,194 312,846 19,518 48,636 -962 7,856 1,303,129 2005 507,199 37,096 9,664 445,625 3,767 345,690 21,486 51,708 -1,174 6,285 1,427,346 2006 498,316 10,396 8,409 452,329 4,223 361,877 24,390 59,345 -1,277 6,412 1,424,421

59

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, 9. Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 1,787 2,998 -40% 520 898 1,257 2,087 0 0 10 12 Connecticut 297 317 -6.5% 0 0 297 317 0 0 0 0 Maine 11 14 -18% 0 0 6 7 0 0 5 6 Massachusetts 959 1,769 -46% 0 0 954 1,763 0 0 5 6 New Hampshire 520 898 -42% 520 898 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 44,000 53,658 -18% 6 16 43,734 53,052 4 1 256 589

60

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 835,481 553,390 241,892 3,953 36,243 2003 1,089,307 658,868 380,378 5,358 44,702 2004 1,031,954 651,712 350,093 4,544 25,606 2005 1,035,045 618,811 387,355 3,469 25,410 2006 459,392 335,130 105,312 1,963 16,987 2007 512,423 355,999 139,977 1,505 14,942 2008 332,367 242,379 79,816 957 9,215 2009 266,508 196,346 59,277 1,101 9,784 2010 244,114 188,987 49,042 970 5,115 2011 163,954 125,755 33,166 801 4,233 2012 134,956 105,179 24,081 1,618 4,078 2010 January 33,737 26,715 6,282 100 639

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Wood / Wood Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 605,054 10,659 129,947 469 463,980 2003 519,294 16,545 139,852 437 362,460 2004 344,134 19,973 130,248 168 193,745 2005 355,250 27,373 138,407 207 189,263 2006 350,074 27,455 135,546 269 186,803 2007 353,025 31,568 132,953 284 188,220 2008 338,786 29,150 130,122 287 179,227 2009 320,444 29,565 130,894 274 159,712 2010 349,530 40,167 137,072 274 172,016 2011 347,623 35,474 130,108 482 181,559 2012 390,342 32,723 138,217 478 218,924 2010 January 29,578 3,731 11,954 23 13,870

62

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 1,933,130 78,701 15,867 691,006 11,463 780,064 264,329 79,109 -8,743 13,527 3,858,452 2003 1,973,737 102,734 16,672 649,908 15,600 763,733 275,806 79,487 -8,535 14,045 3,883,185 2004 1,978,301 100,391 20,754 710,100 15,252 788,528 268,417 83,067 -8,488 14,232 3,970,555 2005 2,012,873 99,840 22,385 760,960 13,464 781,986 270,321 87,329 -6,558 12,821 4,055,423 2006 1,990,511 44,460 19,706 816,441 14,177 787,219 289,246 96,525 -6,558 12,974 4,064,702

63

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Average Cost of Petroleum Liquids Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 8. Average Cost of Petroleum Liquids Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 18.64 W W 21.43 21.12 18.47 W Connecticut W 21.91 W 23.87 NM W 21.93 Maine W W W -- NM W W Massachusetts 17.17 19.76 -13% 17.45 NM 17.16 19.66 New Hampshire 23.23 W W 23.23 19.90 -- W Rhode Island -- W W -- NM -- W Vermont 24.11 NM NM 24.11 NM -- -- Middle Atlantic W 20.15 W 21.01 19.21 W 20.66 New Jersey 19.77 18.36 7.7% -- NM 19.77 20.28 New York W 19.66 W 21.01 20.00 W 19.36 Pennsylvania 21.84 22.19 -1.6% -- NM 21.84 22.19

64

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 21,196 695 18,300 2,087 115 2004 19,587 444 17,308 1,811 24 2005 19,370 560 17,033 1,753 25 2006 19,629 500 17,343 1,761 25 2007 19,576 553 17,116 1,785 122 2008 19,805 509 17,487 1,809 0 2009 19,669 465 17,048 2,155 0 2010 19,437 402 16,802 2,233 0 2011 16,972 388 14,625 1,955 4 2012 16,968 418 14,235 2,304 12 2010 January 1,546 30 1,332 184 0 February 1,384 25 1,215 144 0 March 1,650 36 1,434 180 0 April 1,655 33 1,426 196 0

65

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Consumption of Landfill Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 3. Consumption of Landfill Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 9,595 9,945 -3.5% 0 0 9,074 9,945 520 0 0 0 Connecticut 595 624 -4.6% 0 0 595 624 0 0 0 0 Maine 518 524 -1.0% 0 0 518 524 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 3,603 3,623 -0.6% 0 0 3,603 3,623 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 1,790 1,485 21% 0 0 1,270 1,485 520 0 0 0 Rhode Island 2,409 3,037 -21% 0 0 2,409 3,037 0 0 0 0

66

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 136,421 9,168 121,984 3,280 1,989 2004 143,844 11,250 125,848 4,081 2,665 2005 141,899 11,490 123,064 4,797 2,548 2006 160,033 16,617 136,108 6,644 664 2007 166,774 17,442 144,104 4,598 630 2008 195,777 20,465 169,547 5,235 530 2009 206,792 19,583 180,689 5,931 589 2010 218,331 19,975 192,428 5,535 393 2011 232,795 22,086 180,856 29,469 384 2012 256,376 25,193 201,965 26,672 2,545 2010 January 17,531 1,715 15,323 461 32 February 16,189 1,653 14,120 384 33

67

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Petroleum Coke: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,836 2,125 3,580 2 1,130 2003 6,303 2,554 3,166 2 582 2004 7,677 4,150 2,985 1 541 2005 8,330 4,130 3,746 1 452 2006 7,363 3,619 3,286 1 456 2007 6,036 2,808 2,715 2 512 2008 5,417 2,296 2,704 1 416 2009 4,821 2,761 1,724 1 335 2010 4,994 3,325 1,354 2 313 2011 5,012 3,449 1,277 1 286 2012 3,675 2,105 756 1 812 2010 January 433 283 121 0.17 29 February 404 258 120 0.15 25 March 438 308 108 0.19 23 April 382 253 107 0.12 22 May 415 261 129 0 25

68

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Consumption of Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 4. Consumption of Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,041 4,122 -2.0% 0 0 3,838 3,922 203 200 0 0 Connecticut 1,415 1,442 -1.9% 0 0 1,415 1,442 0 0 0 0 Maine 440 445 -1.3% 0 0 237 246 203 200 0 0 Massachusetts 2,017 2,063 -2.2% 0 0 2,017 2,063 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 169 172 -2.0% 0 0 169 172 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

69

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 0 N/A N/A 29,643 N/A N/A N/A 0 3,825 N/A 2003 0 0 0 27,988 96 36 583 0 4,222 32,926 2004 0 0 0 28,367 120 30 647 0 3,248 32,413 2005 0 0 0 28,271 113 34 585 0 3,195 32,199 2006 0 0 0 28,400 29 35 509 0 2,899 31,872 2007 0 0 0 28,287 27 40 565 0 1,590 30,509 2008 0 0 0 26,641 21 0 800 0 1,676 29,138 2009 0 0 0 25,292 22 0 718 0 1,868 27,901 2010 0 2 0 25,706 15 0 853 0 1,668 28,244

70

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Net Generation from Other Energy Sources 6. Net Generation from Other Energy Sources by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 2,153 2,019 6.7% 0 0 1,944 1,888 88 84 121 46 Connecticut 756 705 7.3% 0 0 756 704 0 0 0 1 Maine 424 390 8.7% 0 0 245 261 88 84 92 45 Massachusetts 906 860 5.5% 0 0 877 860 0 0 29 0 New Hampshire 66 64 2.6% 0 0 66 64 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 2,497 2,441 2.3% 0 0 1,924 1,975 465 344 107 122

71

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Landfill Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 65,770 3,930 59,089 1,753 998 2004 69,331 5,373 60,514 2,093 1,351 2005 67,902 5,650 58,624 2,360 1,269 2006 75,970 8,287 63,950 3,388 345 2007 79,712 8,620 68,432 2,344 316 2008 94,215 10,242 81,029 2,668 276 2009 99,821 9,748 86,773 2,999 301 2010 105,835 10,029 92,763 2,837 205 2011 112,538 11,146 89,857 11,332 203 2012 124,297 12,721 99,938 10,356 1,282 2010 January 8,441 853 7,335 236 17 February 7,824 830 6,781 197 17 March 9,056 1,013 7,796 226 21

72

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,249,585 2,307,358 3,214,286 30,626 697,315 2003 5,735,770 1,809,003 3,200,057 39,424 687,286 2004 5,827,470 1,857,247 3,351,469 33,623 585,132 2005 6,212,116 2,198,098 3,444,875 34,645 534,498 2006 6,643,926 2,546,169 3,508,597 35,473 553,687 2007 7,287,714 2,808,500 3,872,646 34,872 571,697 2008 7,087,191 2,803,283 3,712,872 34,138 536,899 2009 7,301,522 2,981,285 3,750,080 35,046 535,111 2010 7,852,665 3,359,035 3,882,995 40,356 570,279 2011 8,052,309 3,511,732 3,906,484 48,509 585,584

73

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 213 N/A N/A 709 N/A N/A N/A 1,402 242,302 N/A 2003 354 2 0 882 394 326 214 1,249 249,622 253,043 2004 405 6 0 1,209 460 198 166 1,248 245,546 249,238 2005 1,046 16 0 1,829 503 250 175 1,126 245,553 250,499 2006 2,351 15 0.18 1,937 705 228 190 1,162 261,864 268,452 2007 4,361 10 1 2,226 751 240 226 1,139 226,734 235,687 2008 6,899 16 1 1,888 844 211 252 1,197 229,645 240,953

74

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Petroleum Liquids: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Barrels) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 134,415 88,595 39,035 826 5,959 2003 175,136 105,319 61,420 882 7,514 2004 165,107 103,793 56,342 760 4,212 2005 165,137 98,223 62,154 580 4,180 2006 73,821 53,529 17,179 327 2,786 2007 82,433 56,910 22,793 250 2,480 2008 53,846 38,995 13,152 160 1,538 2009 43,562 31,847 9,880 184 1,652 2010 40,103 30,806 8,278 164 855 2011 27,326 20,844 5,633 133 716 2012 22,604 17,521 4,110 272 702 2010 January 5,587 4,381 1,083 17 106 February 2,156 1,599 454 15 88

75

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 148,110 5,766 128,947 13,095 302 2004 141,577 3,705 124,815 12,909 146 2005 144,339 4,724 126,529 12,923 164 2006 146,987 4,078 129,779 12,964 165 2007 146,308 4,557 127,826 13,043 881 2008 148,452 4,476 130,041 13,934 0 2009 146,971 3,989 126,649 16,333 0 2010 144,934 3,322 124,437 17,176 0 2011 135,241 3,433 115,841 15,933 34 2012 135,735 3,910 113,418 18,307 100 2010 January 11,540 244 9,886 1,410 0 February 10,313 190 9,030 1,094 0

76

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Pumped Storage) Power 5. Net Generation from Hydroelectric (Pumped Storage) Power by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England -305 -435 -29.9% 0 0 -305 -435 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 3 6 -51.5% 0 0 3 6 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts -308 -440 -30.1% 0 0 -308 -440 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic -1,022 -1,124 -9.0% -579 -630 -443 -494 0 0 0 0

77

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 21,525 3,196 1,207 79,013 9,493 0 3,825 30,489 0 3,832 152,580 2003 19,817 3,726 1,559 78,705 12,953 0 4,222 28,704 0 4,843 154,530 2004 19,773 4,128 1,839 78,959 11,684 0 3,248 29,164 0 5,129 153,925 2005 19,466 3,804 1,564 72,882 9,687 0 3,195 29,003 0 5,137 144,739 2006 19,464 2,567 1,656 77,669 9,923 0 2,899 28,972 0 5,103 148,254 2007 16,694 2,355 1,889 77,580 9,411 0 1,590 28,919 0 4,690 143,128

78

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Average Cost of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 0. Average Cost of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 3.69 4.94 -25% 4.73 5.70 3.68 4.93 Connecticut 3.88 4.97 -22% 6.45 NM 3.87 4.96 Maine W W W -- -- W W Massachusetts 3.55 4.88 -27% 4.47 5.75 3.53 4.87 New Hampshire W W W 5.54 6.01 W W Rhode Island 3.86 5.01 -23% -- -- 3.86 5.01 Vermont 4.06 5.22 -22% 4.06 5.22 -- -- Middle Atlantic 3.52 5.14 -32% 3.86 5.32 3.46 5.11 New Jersey 3.52 5.11 -31% -- -- 3.52 5.11 New York 3.85 5.45 -29% 3.86 5.32 3.84 5.50

79

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Generation from Natural Gas 0. Net Generation from Natural Gas by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 62,490 63,236 -1.2% 345 357 58,757 59,763 901 700 2,488 2,416 Connecticut 16,537 15,188 8.9% 6 NM 15,801 14,715 397 211 333 227 Maine 6,044 6,877 -12.1% 0 0 4,057 4,850 26 0.26 1,960 2,026 Massachusetts 24,672 25,940 -4.9% 278 240 23,812 25,120 416 443 166 136 New Hampshire 7,050 6,658 5.9% 58 80 6,947 6,552 16 0 29 26 Rhode Island 8,185 8,571 -4.5% 0 0 8,140 8,525 45 46 0 0

80

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Receipts of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 5. Receipts of Petroleum Coke Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Tons) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 106 79 35% 0 0 0 23 0 0 106 56 New Jersey 0 NM NM 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 NM

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81

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Net Generation 6. Net Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 120,887 123,338 -2.0% 3,278 4,408 111,191 112,613 1,178 949 5,240 5,368 Connecticut 36,118 33,745 7.0% 37 93 35,347 33,208 397 211 337 233 Maine 14,429 15,974 -9.7% 0.17 1 10,186 10,890 208 176 4,035 4,907 Massachusetts 36,198 38,055 -4.9% 591 610 34,321 36,783 469 490 817 172 New Hampshire 19,264 20,066 -4.0% 2,017 2,994 17,170 17,020 49 20 29 31

82

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Average Cost of Coal Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 7. Average Cost of Coal Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Dollars per MMBtu) Census Division and State Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 3.59 3.68 -2.4% 4.07 3.55 3.34 3.74 Connecticut W W W -- -- W W Maine W W W -- -- W W Massachusetts W W W -- -- W W New Hampshire 4.07 3.55 15% 4.07 3.55 -- -- Rhode Island -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vermont -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Middle Atlantic 2.50 2.68 -6.7% -- 2.92 2.50 2.63 New Jersey 4.05 4.18 -3.1% -- -- 4.05 4.18 New York 3.12 3.27 -4.6% -- 3.88 3.12 3.27 Pennsylvania 2.43 2.55 -4.7% -- 2.91 2.43 2.45

83

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Generation from Solar 0. Net Generation from Solar by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 35 7 427.1% 9 4 25 2 1 1 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 30 5 521.6% 9 4 20 0.14 1 1 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 5 2 179.0% 0 0 5 2 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 389 98 295.3% 41 19 303 65 37 8 8 5

84

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 0 N/A N/A 13 N/A N/A N/A 0 13 N/A 2003 0 0 0 13 152 717 420 0 72 1,374 2004 0 0 0 13 172 945 444 0 105 1,680 2005 0 0 0 16 218 953 486 0 86 1,759 2006 0 0 0 21 173 956 470 0 93 1,713 2007 0 0 0 15 203 962 434 0 77 1,691 2008 0 0.08 0 21 234 911 389 0 60 1,615 2009 0.21 0.04 0 20 318 1,045 386 0 71 1,839 2010 16 5 0 21 256 1,031 386 0 80 1,794 2011 51 84 0 26 952 971 393 0 26 2,502

85

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Net Generation from Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric 4. Net Generation from Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 8,557 8,015 6.8% 664 574 5,652 5,352 136 104 2,105 1,985 Connecticut 667 660 1.0% 0 0 667 660 0 0 0 0 Maine 4,099 4,495 -8.8% 0 0 2,468 2,421 92 89 1,539 1,985 Massachusetts 1,843 1,207 52.8% 68 48 1,198 1,145 11 13 566 0 New Hampshire 1,381 1,091 26.6% 347 291 1,003 800 31 0 0 0.35 Rhode Island 102 130 -21.8% 0 0 102 130 0 0 0 0

86

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Net Generation from Petroleum Coke 9. Net Generation from Petroleum Coke by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Middle Atlantic 76 344 -78.0% 0 0 0 263 0 0 76 81 New Jersey 40 58 -30.6% 0 0 0 0 0 0 40 58

87

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Coal: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 19,996,890 15,517,857 4,215,043 9,168 254,821 2003 20,366,879 15,391,188 4,745,545 13,080 217,066 2004 20,375,751 15,610,335 4,606,584 8,251 150,581 2005 20,801,716 15,397,688 5,250,824 8,314 144,889 2006 20,527,410 15,211,077 5,166,001 7,526 142,807 2007 20,841,871 15,436,110 5,287,202 7,833 110,727 2008 20,548,610 15,189,050 5,242,194 8,070 109,296 2009 18,240,611 13,744,178 4,390,596 7,007 98,829 2010 19,196,315 14,333,496 4,709,686 6,815 146,318 2011 18,074,298 13,551,416 4,399,144 7,263 116,475

88

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 1,514,670 52,838 6,286 229,639 206 507,380 242,302 3,089 -7,434 480 2,549,457 2003 1,500,281 62,774 7,156 186,967 243 458,829 249,622 3,421 -7,532 519 2,462,281 2004 1,513,641 62,196 11,498 199,662 374 475,682 245,546 3,692 -7,526 467 2,505,231 2005 1,484,855 58,572 11,150 238,204 10 436,296 245,553 4,945 -5,383 643 2,474,846 2006 1,471,421 31,269 9,634 282,088 30 425,341 261,864 6,588 -5,281 700 2,483,656

89

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, A. Natural Gas: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2002 6,126,062 2,259,684 3,148,595 32,545 685,239 2003 5,616,135 1,763,764 3,145,485 38,480 668,407 2004 5,674,580 1,809,443 3,265,896 32,839 566,401 2005 6,036,370 2,134,859 3,349,921 33,785 517,805 2006 6,461,615 2,478,396 3,412,826 34,623 535,770 2007 7,089,342 2,736,418 3,765,194 34,087 553,643 2008 6,895,843 2,730,134 3,612,197 33,403 520,109 2009 7,121,069 2,911,279 3,655,712 34,279 519,799 2010 7,680,185 3,290,993 3,794,423 39,462 555,307 2011 7,883,865 3,446,087 3,819,107 47,170 571,501

90

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Consumption of Nautral Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2. Consumption of Nautral Gas for Electricity Generation by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 460,887 461,590 -0.2% 3,652 4,218 428,781 432,350 8,630 6,287 19,824 18,735 Connecticut 120,380 110,546 8.9% 69 730 113,620 105,965 3,952 2,061 2,739 1,790 Maine 44,424 49,352 -10% 0 0 28,456 33,555 307 12 15,662 15,785 Massachusetts 184,330 190,063 -3.0% 2,792 2,393 176,497 182,865 3,749 3,761 1,293 1,045 New Hampshire 50,678 46,927 8.0% 754 1,046 49,655 45,765 139 0 131 115

91

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

D. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, D. Other Waste Biomass: Consumption for Electricity Generation, by Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Billion Btus) Electric Power Sector Period Total (all sectors) Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Annual Totals 2003 34,775 2,456 15,859 4,566 11,894 2004 19,215 2,014 9,240 4,308 3,654 2005 17,852 2,485 7,365 4,677 3,325 2006 17,727 2,611 7,788 4,436 2,893 2007 19,083 2,992 8,861 4,049 3,181 2008 24,288 3,409 12,745 3,684 4,450 2009 24,847 3,679 13,231 3,760 4,177 2010 29,996 3,668 14,449 3,790 8,090 2011 30,771 4,488 16,115 3,816 6,352 2012 30,342 4,191 15,740 4,016 6,395 2010 January 2,223 189 1,078 321 635 February 2,336 275 1,208 291 561 March 2,287 311 1,079 302 594

92

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Receipts of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 6. Receipts of Natural Gas Delivered for Electricity Generation by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Cubic Feet) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 440,421 484,260 -9.1% 3,652 4,226 419,062 434,504 3,636 13,156 14,072 32,373 Connecticut 112,084 116,563 -3.8% 71 738 112,012 107,121 0 3,210 0 5,494 Maine 42,374 56,230 -25% 0 0 28,302 33,578 0 NM 14,072 22,639 Massachusetts 175,314 198,295 -12% 2,789 2,393 168,890 184,156 3,636 7,872 0 3,875 New Hampshire 50,408 47,137 6.9% 754 1,046 49,655 45,725 0 0 0 NM

93

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Net Generation from Petroleum Liquids 8. Net Generation from Petroleum Liquids by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 413 639 -35.4% 52 120 267 374 49 55 45 90 Connecticut 112 166 -32.6% 4 5 104 155 0.05 0 4 5 Maine 84 178 -52.8% 0.17 1 65 89 2 3 16 85 Massachusetts 174 197 -11.2% 15 40 98 128 37 28 25 NM New Hampshire 22 78 -72.1% 20 57 0.12 1 2 20 0.17 0.10 Rhode Island 18 14 31.0% 11 10 0.12 1 7 2 0 0 Vermont 3 8 -58.1% 2 6 0 0 1 2 0 0

94

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 A. Net Generation by Energy Source: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Coal Petroleum Liquids Petroleum Coke Natural Gas Other Gas Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Renewable Sources Excluding Hydroelectric Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Total Annual Totals 2002 992 426 6 4,310 0.01 0 13 1,065 0 603 7,415 2003 1,206 416 8 3,899 0 0 72 1,302 0 594 7,496 2004 1,340 493 7 3,969 0 0 105 1,575 0 781 8,270 2005 1,353 368 7 4,249 0 0 86 1,673 0 756 8,492 2006 1,310 228 7 4,355 0.04 0 93 1,619 0 758 8,371 2007 1,371 180 9 4,257 0 0 77 1,614 0 764 8,273 2008 1,261 136 6 4,188 0 0 60 1,555 0 720 7,926 2009 1,096 157 5 4,225 0 0 71 1,769 0 842 8,165

95

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Net Generation from Biomass 8. Net Generation from Biomass by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 7,229 7,138 1.3% 570 515 4,428 4,544 125 94 2,105 1,985 Connecticut 667 660 1.0% 0 0 667 660 0 0 0 0 Maine 3,212 3,788 -15.2% 0 0 1,581 1,714 92 89 1,539 1,985 Massachusetts 1,724 1,140 51.2% 0 0 1,157 1,137 1 3 566 0 New Hampshire 1,173 1,025 14.4% 347 291 795 734 31 0 0 0.35 Rhode Island 101 127 -21.1% 0 0 101 127 0 0 0 0

96

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 10,141 N/A N/A 8,300 N/A N/A N/A 13,089 18,189 N/A 2003 10,834 0 532 8,645 4,435 7,227 1,211 13,175 21,890 67,949 2004 13,739 0 569 8,528 4,377 6,978 884 13,563 19,518 68,154 2005 16,764 0 535 8,741 4,308 7,092 701 13,566 21,486 73,195 2006 24,238 0 493 8,404 4,771 7,259 774 13,406 24,390 83,736 2007 30,089 6 595 8,486 5,177 7,061 839 13,498 19,109 84,860 2008 48,464 60 787 8,750 6,057 6,975 1,040 13,643 23,451 109,226

97

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Net Generation from Nuclear Energy 2. Net Generation from Nuclear Energy by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 36,116 34,283 5.3% 0 0 36,116 34,283 0 0 0 0 Connecticut 17,078 15,928 7.2% 0 0 17,078 15,928 0 0 0 0 Maine 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Massachusetts 5,860 5,085 15.2% 0 0 5,860 5,085 0 0 0 0 New Hampshire 8,189 8,363 -2.1% 0 0 8,189 8,363 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 4,989 4,907 1.7% 0 0 4,989 4,907 0 0 0 0

98

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Net Generation from Coal 7. Net Generation from Coal by State, by Sector, 2012 and 2011 (Thousand Megawatthours) Electric Power Sector Census Division and State All Sectors Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Commercial Sector Industrial Sector Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,103 6,848 -40.1% 1,268 2,208 2,793 4,592 0 0 42 47 Connecticut 653 526 24.2% 0 0 653 526 0 0 0 0 Maine 45 55 -18.0% 0 0 30 38 0 0 15 18 Massachusetts 2,137 4,059 -47.4% 0 0 2,110 4,029 0 0 27 30 New Hampshire 1,268 2,208 -42.6% 1,268 2,208 0 0 0 0 0 0 Rhode Island 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Vermont 0 0 -- 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

99

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Total Electric Power Industry Summary Statistics, 2012 and 2011 1. Total Electric Power Industry Summary Statistics, 2012 and 2011 Net Generation and Consumption of Fuels for January through December Total (All Sectors) Electric Power Sector Commercial Industrial Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Fuel Year 2012 Year 2011 Percentage Change Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Net Generation (Thousand Megawatthours) Coal 1,514,043 1,733,430 -12.7% 1,146,480 1,301,107 354,076 416,783 883 1,049 12,603 14,490 Petroleum Liquids 13,403 16,086 -16.7% 9,892 11,688 2,757 3,655 191 86 563 657 Petroleum Coke 9,787 14,096 -30.6% 5,664 9,428 1,758 3,431 6 3 2,359 1,234 Natural Gas 1,225,894 1,013,689 20.9% 504,958 414,843 627,833 511,447 6,603 5,487 86,500 81,911

100

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 B. Net Generation from Renewable Sources: Total (All Sectors), 2002 - 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Period Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Landfill Gas Biogenic Municipal Solid Waste Other Waste Biomass Geothermal Conventional Hydroelectric Total Renewable Sources Annual Totals 2002 10,354 N/A N/A 38,665 N/A N/A N/A 14,491 264,329 N/A 2003 11,187 2 532 37,529 5,077 8,306 2,428 14,424 275,806 355,293 2004 14,144 6 569 38,117 5,128 8,151 2,141 14,811 268,417 351,485 2005 17,811 16 535 38,856 5,142 8,330 1,948 14,692 270,321 357,651 2006 26,589 15 493 38,762 5,677 8,478 1,944 14,568 289,246 385,772 2007 34,450 16 596 39,014 6,158 8,304 2,063 14,637 247,510 352,747

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Declination Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Declination Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name Declination Solar Place San Francisco, California Sector Solar Product San Francisco solar installation firm acquired by...

102

test output enable Veto  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to BIP/FSCC's RESET to (NIM) test output FSCC/COM (NIM) INPUT TRIGGER GLOBAL 0.08­19.5 usec adjustable

Berns, Hans-Gerd

103

Energy Input Output Calculator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Input Output Calculator Input Output Calculator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Input-Output Calculator Agency/Company /Organization: Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx Web Application Link: www2.eere.energy.gov/analysis/iocalc/Default.aspx OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Language: English References: EERE Energy Input-Output Calculator[1] The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate the economic development impacts from investments in alternate electricity generating technologies. About the Calculator The Energy Input-Output Calculator (IO Calculator) allows users to estimate

104

UFO - The Universal FeynRules Output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new model format for automatized matrix-element generators, the so- called Universal FeynRules Output (UFO). The format is universal in the sense that it features compatibility with more than one single generator and is designed to be flexible, modular and agnostic of any assumption such as the number of particles or the color and Lorentz structures appearing in the interaction vertices. Unlike other model formats where text files need to be parsed, the information on the model is encoded into a Python module that can easily be linked to other computer codes. We then describe an interface for the Mathematica package FeynRules that allows for an automatic output of models in the UFO format.

Degrande, Céline; Fuks, Benjamin; Grellscheid, David; Mattelaer, Olivier; Reiter, Thomas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

UFO - The Universal FeynRules Output  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new model format for automatized matrix-element generators, the so- called Universal FeynRules Output (UFO). The format is universal in the sense that it features compatibility with more than one single generator and is designed to be flexible, modular and agnostic of any assumption such as the number of particles or the color and Lorentz structures appearing in the interaction vertices. Unlike other model formats where text files need to be parsed, the information on the model is encoded into a Python module that can easily be linked to other computer codes. We then describe an interface for the Mathematica package FeynRules that allows for an automatic output of models in the UFO format.

Céline Degrande; Claude Duhr; Benjamin Fuks; David Grellscheid; Olivier Mattelaer; Thomas Reiter

2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

106

8.5. Adding New Outputs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... have fixed values in the Output definition will not ... are a few example Output definitions, extracted from ... an example, illustrating the Energy output and ...

2013-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

107

Coded output support vector machine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors propose a coded output support vector machine (COSVM) by introducing the idea of information coding to solve multi-class classification problems for large-scale datasets. The COSVM is built based on the support vector regression (SVR) machine ... Keywords: coded output, multi-class classification, number system, parallel implementation, support vector machine (SVM)

Tao Ye; Xuefeng Zhu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

rifsimp_output.html - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Whenever DiffConstraint or UnSolve entries are present in the output, some parts of the algorithm have been disabled by options, and the resulting cases must ...

109

-OGP 04 (1) -Predicting Injectivity Decline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- OGP 04 (1) - Predicting Injectivity Decline in Water Injection Wells by Upscaling On-Site Core, resulting in injectivity decline of injection wells. Particles such as biomass, corrosion products, silt on permeability. These data were then processed, upscaled to model injection wells and, finally, history matched

Abu-Khamsin, Sidqi

110

Recommendation for Cryptographic Key Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 100 Bureau Drive (Mail Stop 8930) Gaithersburg ... Output of a Random Bit Generator ..... ... 7.1 The “Direct Generation” of Symmetric ...

2013-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

111

Remotely sensed heat anomalies linked with Amazonian forest biomass declines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with Amazonian forest biomass declines Michael Toomey, 1 Darof aboveground living biomass (p biomass declines, Geophys. Res.

Toomey, M.; Roberts, D. A.; Still, C.; Goulden, M. L.; McFadden, J. P.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Canada Week: Canada is a declining market for U.S. coal ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Exports of U.S. coal to Canada have declined in recent years as Canada has reduced its coal-fired electric generation. U.S. coal exports to Canada totaled 3.2 million ...

113

Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator  

SciTech Connect

The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean (Bettendorf, IA); Vuk, Carl Thomas (Denver, IA)

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

114

Method and system for managing an electrical output of a turbogenerator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The system and method manages an electrical output of a turbogenerator in accordance with multiple modes. In a first mode, a direct current (DC) bus receives power from a turbogenerator output via a rectifier where turbogenerator revolutions per unit time (e.g., revolutions per minute (RPM)) or an electrical output level of a turbogenerator output meet or exceed a minimum threshold. In a second mode, if the turbogenerator revolutions per unit time or electrical output level of a turbogenerator output are less than the minimum threshold, the electric drive motor or a generator mechanically powered by the engine provides electrical energy to the direct current bus.

Stahlhut, Ronnie Dean (Bettendorf, IA); Vuk, Carl Thomas (Denver, IA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

115

Overload protection circuit for output driver  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A protection circuit for preventing excessive power dissipation in an output transistor whose conduction path is connected between a power terminal and an output terminal. The protection circuit includes means for sensing the application of a turn on signal to the output transistor and the voltage at the output terminal. When the turn on signal is maintained for a period of time greater than a given period without the voltage at the output terminal reaching a predetermined value, the protection circuit decreases the turn on signal to, and the current conduction through, the output transistor.

Stewart, Roger G. (Neshanic Station, NJ)

1982-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

116

Urban Decline in Rust-Belt Cities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many Rust-Belt cities have seen almost half their populations move from inside the city borders to the surrounding suburbs and elsewhere since the 1970s. As populations shifted, neighborhoods changed—in their average income, educational profi le, and housing prices. But the shift did not happen in every neighborhood at the same rate. Recent research has uncovered some of the patterns characterizing the process. Most major Rust-Belt cities have seen their populations shrink since their heydays, and with that decline, the average income of the remaining residents has fallen as well. Cities such as Buffalo, Cleveland, Detroit, and Pittsburgh have each lost more than 40 percent of their populations over the last four decades. However, the losses have not been uniform across neighborhoods. Some neighborhoods have declined more rapidly than others. The uneven population decline across neighborhoods implies that the distributions of income, house prices, and human capital have also shifted within cities and the larger

Daniel Hartley

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Pemex faces up to field decline  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although Mexican state oil company Pemex publishes only the most general statistics about its operations, there is indirect evidence that the nation's oil fields are in serious decline. To increase hydrocarbon production 3% a year, Pemex says it will be necessary to bring 1.6 million bopd of new production onstream over the next five years. When combined with estimated production from secondary recovery, this figure implies an annual field decline rate of 16%. The rate may even be higher for Mexico's two major oil provinces, Campeche and Reforma.

Baker, G.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Optimal Filtering of AC Output Anemometers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The output of pulsed and AC output anemometers suffer from discretization noise when such anemometers are sampled at fast rates (>1 Hz). This paper describes the construction of an optimal filter designed to reduce this noise. By comparing the ...

J. C. Barnard; L. L. Wendell; V. R. Morris

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Scram signal generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A scram signal generating circuit for nuclear reactor installations monitors a flow signal representing the flow rate of the liquid sodium coolant which is circulated through the reactor, and initiates reactor shutdown for a rapid variation in the flow signal, indicative of fuel motion. The scram signal generating circuit includes a long-term drift compensation circuit which processes the flow signal and generates an output signal representing the flow rate of the coolant. The output signal remains substantially unchanged for small variations in the flow signal, attributable to long term drift in the flow rate, but a rapid change in the flow signal, indicative of a fast flow variation, causes a corresponding change in the output signal. A comparator circuit compares the output signal with a reference signal, representing a given percentage of the steady state flow rate of the coolant, and generates a scram signal to initiate reactor shutdown when the output signal equals the reference signal.

Johanson, Edward W. (New Lenox, IL); Simms, Richard (Westmont, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Reliable Gas Turbine Output: Attaining Temperature Independent Performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Improvements in gas turbine efficiency, coupled with dropping gas prices, has made gas turbines a popular choice of utilities to supply peaking as well as base load power in the form of combined cycle power plants. Today, because of the gas turbine's compactness, low maintenance, and high levels of availability, it is the major option for future power generation. One inherent disadvantage of gas turbines is the degradation of output as the ambient air temperature increases. This reduction in output during times of peak load create a reliability concern as more gas turbines are added to the electric system. A 10% reduction in gas turbine output, when it comprises only 10% of the electric system, does not cause reliability concerns. A 10% reduction in gas turbine output, when it comprises 50% of the electric system, could create reliability and operational problems. This paper explores the potential for maintaining constant, reliable outputs from gas turbines by cooling ambient air temperatures before the air is used in the compressor section of the gas turbine.

Neeley, J. E.; Patton, S.; Holder, F.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Choose best option for enhancing combined-cycle output  

SciTech Connect

This article describes several methods available for boosting the output of gas-turbine-based combined-cycle plants during warm-weather operation. The technology comparisons help choose the option that is most appropriate. Amidst the many advantages of gas-turbine (GT) combined cycles (CC), one drawback is that their achievable output decreases significantly as ambient temperature increases. Reason: The lower density of warm air reduces mass flow through the GT. Unfortunately, hot weather typically corresponds to peak power loads in many areas. Thus, the need to meet peak-load and power-sales contract requirements causes many plant developers to compensate for ambient-temperature-related output loss. The three most common methods of increasing output include: (1) injecting water or steam into the GT, (2) precooling GT inlet air, and/or (3) supplementary firing of the heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG). All of these options require significant capital outlays and affect other performance parameters. In addition, they may uniquely impact the operation and/or selection of other components, including boiler feedwater and condensate pumps, valves, steam turbine/generators, condensers, cooling towers, and emissions control systems. Although plant-specific issues will have a significant effect on selecting an option, comparing the performance of different systems based on a theoretical reference plant can be helpful. The comparisons here illustrate the characteristics, advantages, and disadvantages of the major power augmentation technologies now in use.

Boswell, M.; Tawney, R.; Narula, R.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Electricity generation from coal and natural gas both increased ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal generation shares declined in some regions ... the share of natural gas-fired power generation is most influenced by the availability of hydroelectric power, ...

123

Light output simulation of LYSO single crystal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We used the Geant4 simulation toolkit to estimate the light collection in a LYSO crystal by using cosmic muons and E=105 MeV electrons. The light output as a function of the crystal length is studied. Significant influence of the crystal wrapping in the reflective paper and optical grease coupling to the photodetectors on the light output is demonstrated.

Usubov, Zafar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Shape control of conditional output probability density functions for linear stochastic systems with random parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a controller design for shaping conditional output probability density functions (pdf) for non-Gaussian dynamic stochastic systems whose coefficients are random and represented by their known pdfs. The moment-generating ...

Aiping Wang; Yongji Wang; Hong Wang

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

The Decline and Death of Nuclear Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

their] clean energy strategy” (BC Hydro, 2010). In Japan,with clean energy and jobs. BC Hydro - For Generations.

Melville, Jonathan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Matrix converter technology in doubly-fed induction generators for wind generators.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Wind generator technologies have been widely researched and documented. Modern wind generator systems are now being implemented with an output power of up to 5… (more)

Harris, Benjamin J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Relativistic electron beam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

1975-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

128

Method for leveling the power output of an electromechanical battery as a function of speed  

SciTech Connect

The invention is a method of leveling the power output of an electromechanical battery during its discharge, while at the same time maximizing its power output into a given load. The method employs the concept of series resonance, employing a capacitor the parameters of which are chosen optimally to achieve the desired near-flatness of power output over any chosen charged-discharged speed ratio. Capacitors are inserted in series with each phase of the windings to introduce capacitative reactances that act to compensate the inductive reactance of these windings. This compensating effect both increases the power that can be drawn from the generator before inductive voltage drops in the windings become dominant and acts to flatten the power output over a chosen speed range. The values of the capacitors are chosen so as to optimally flatten the output of the generator over the chosen speed range.

Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining March 1, 2012 - 11:02am Addthis Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov...

130

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 February 1, 2012...

131

A Multi-State Model for the Reliability Assessment of a Distributed Generation System via Universal Generating Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the power output of one solar module u-function of the power output of one solar module, Number of functioning solar modules in the solar generator Power output of a single solar module at solar irradiance-function of the mechanical condition of one renewable generator, Random variable representing the power output of a solar

132

Current responsive devices for synchronous generators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for detecting current imbalance between phases of a polyphase alternating current generator. A detector responds to the maximum peak current in the generator, and detecting means generates an output for each phase proportional to the peak current of each phase. Comparing means generates an output when the maximum peak current exceeds the phase peak current.

Karlicek, Robert F. (Fullerton, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Current responsive devices for synchronous generators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for detecting current imbalance between phases of a polyphase alternating current generator. A detector responds to the maximum peak current in the generator, and detecting means generates an output for each phase proportional to the peak current of each phase. Comparing means generates an output when the maximum peak current exceeds the phase peak current. 11 figs.

Karlicek, R.F.

1983-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

134

Characterizing output bottlenecks in a supercomputer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Supercomputer I/O loads are often dominated by writes. HPC (High Performance Computing) file systems are designed to absorb these bursty outputs at high bandwidth through massive parallelism. However, the delivered write bandwidth often falls well below ...

Bing Xie; Jeffrey Chase; David Dillow; Oleg Drokin; Scott Klasky; Sarp Oral; Norbert Podhorszki

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Dynamical Properties of Model Output Statistics Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The dynamical properties of forecasts corrected using model output statistics (MOS) schemes are explored, with emphasis on the respective role of model and initial condition uncertainties. Analytical and numerical investigations of low-order ...

S. Vannitsem; C. Nicolis

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Ensemble Model Output Statistics for Wind Vectors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A bivariate ensemble model output statistics (EMOS) technique for the postprocessing of ensemble forecasts of two-dimensional wind vectors is proposed, where the postprocessed probabilistic forecast takes the form of a bivariate normal probability ...

Nina Schuhen; Thordis L. Thorarinsdottir; Tilmann Gneiting

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Boosting America's Hydropower Output | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output Boosting America's Hydropower Output October 9, 2012 - 2:10pm Addthis The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. City of Boulder employees celebrate the completion of the Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Modernization project. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado. The Boulder Canyon Hydroelectric Facility's new, highly-efficient turbine. | Photo courtesy of the city of Boulder, Colorado.

138

PV output smoothing with energy storage.  

SciTech Connect

This report describes an algorithm, implemented in Matlab/Simulink, designed to reduce the variability of photovoltaic (PV) power output by using a battery. The purpose of the battery is to add power to the PV output (or subtract) to smooth out the high frequency components of the PV power that that occur during periods with transient cloud shadows on the PV array. The control system is challenged with the task of reducing short-term PV output variability while avoiding overworking the battery both in terms of capacity and ramp capability. The algorithm proposed by Sandia is purposely very simple to facilitate implementation in a real-time controller. The control structure has two additional inputs to which the battery can respond. For example, the battery could respond to PV variability, load variability or area control error (ACE) or a combination of the three.

Ellis, Abraham; Schoenwald, David Alan

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Decline curve derivative analysis for homogeneous and composite reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this study, the rate decline and rate decline derivatives of a constant pressure well are presented for infinite, constant pressure outer boundary, and closed outer boundary homogeneous reservoirs. A rate derivative type curve is provided for these cases as well. The effects of the dimensionless reservoir exterior radius are discussed. Rate decline and rate decline derivatives of a constant pressure well in an infinite composite reservoir are also presented. For composite reservoirs, the effects of mobility ratios and discontinuity distance on both rate decline and rate decline derivatives are presented. Type curves for dimensionless wellbore flow rate derivatives for infinite composite reservoirs are provided. A new correlating group for the derivative type curve is provided, and is different than the correlating group for the rate type curve presented in the past. Finally, an analysis method that comprises type curve and derivative type curve matching to determine the dimensionless variables is proposed and demonstrated with a simulated example.

Demski, J.A.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The Declining U.S. Equity Premium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

study demonstrates U.S. equity premium declined significantly during the three decades. study calculates equity premium a variation a formula the classic Gordon stock valuation model. calculation includes bond yield, stock dividend yield, expected dividend growth rate, which this formulation change over study calculates premium several measures aggregate U.S. stock portfolio and several assumptions about bond yields stock dividends basically same result. premium averaged about percentage points during 1926--70 about percentage point that. This result is shown to reasonable by demonstrating roughly equal returns investments stocks consol bonds same duration would have earned between 1982 and 1999, years when equity premium is estimated views expressed herein those of authors and necessarily of Federal Reserve Bank Minneapolis Federal Reserve System. Historically, investors holding corporate equities have earned a premium, extra return holding equities instead of bonds, which more predictable returns. Es- timates equity premium in United States erage around 4 percentage points past centu- (Siegel 1998) around 7 percentage points 1926 period (Center Research in Security Prices). historical size of U.S. equity premium puz- economists since mid-1980s. Economists sumed size premium is primarily a measure compensation investors demand taking extra risk inherent equity investments. stan- dard asset pricing model which incorporates assump- been able account equity premium large 4 percentage points; with reasonable levels risk aversion and other standard assumptions, model pre- dicts instead a premium around 0.25 percentage point (Mehra Prescott 1985, Hansen and Jagannathan 1991). This discrepancy between data and theory come known as equity premium puzzle. puzzle some fruitful w...

Ravi Jagannathan; Ellen McGrattan; Anna Scherbina

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

PULSE SYNTHESIZING GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>An electronlc circuit for synthesizing electrical current pulses having very fast rise times includes several sinewave generators tuned to progressively higher harmonic frequencies with signal amplitudes and phases selectable according to the Fourier series of the waveform that is to be synthesized. Phase control is provided by periodically triggering the generators at precisely controlled times. The outputs of the generators are combined in a coaxial transmission line. Any frequency-dependent delays that occur in the transmission line can be readily compensated for so that the desired signal wave shape is obtained at the output of the line. (AEC)

Kerns, Q.A.

1963-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Fuel cell generator energy dissipator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are disclosed for eliminating the chemical energy of fuel remaining in a fuel cell generator when the electrical power output of the fuel cell generator is terminated. During a generator shut down condition, electrically resistive elements are automatically connected across the fuel cell generator terminals in order to draw current, thereby depleting the fuel

Veyo, Stephen Emery (Murrysville, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey Todd (Valencia, PA); Gordon, John Thomas (Ambridge, PA); Shockling, Larry Anthony (Pittsburgh, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Energy Perspectives: United States energy imports decline while ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information ... Financial market analysis and financial data for major energy companies ... United States energy imports decline while energy exports increase.

144

Annual Production with 2 Percent Annual Growth & Decline  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

It is unlikely that any single constant growth or decline rate would persist before or after the year of peak production. World oil production has sometimes ...

145

System dynamics model of construction output in Kenya.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study investigates fluctuations of construction output, and growth of the output in Kenya. Fluctuation and growth of construction activity are matters of concern in… (more)

Mbiti, T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Contributions of weather and fuel mix to recent declines in U.S.energy and carbon intensity  

SciTech Connect

A recent (1996-2000) acceleration of declines in energy andcarbon intensity in the U.S. remains largely unexplained. This study usesDivisia decomposition and regression to test two candidate explanations -fuel mix and weather. The Divisia method demonstrates that fuel mix doesnot explain the declines in carbon intensity. The fuel mix, both overalland for electricity generation, became slightly more carbon intensiveover the study period (though the slight trend reversed before the end ofthe period). A regression-based correction to the Divisia indices,accounting for variation in heating- and cooling-degree-days, indicatesthat warmer weather accounts for about 30 percent ofthe total declines.This leaves declines of more than 2 percent per year (and an accelerationof more than 1 percent over previous decade) remaining to beexplained.

Davis, W. Bart; Sanstad, Alan H.; Koomey, Jonathan G.

2002-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

147

Characterizing output bottlenecks in a supercomputer  

SciTech Connect

Supercomputer I/O loads are often dominated by writes. HPC (High Performance Computing) file systems are designed to absorb these bursty outputs at high bandwidth through massive parallelism. However, the delivered write bandwidth often falls well below the peak. This paper characterizes the data absorption behavior of a center-wide shared Lustre parallel file system on the Jaguar supercomputer. We use a statistical methodology to address the challenges of accurately measuring a shared machine under production load and to obtain the distribution of bandwidth across samples of compute nodes, storage targets, and time intervals. We observe and quantify limitations from competing traffic, contention on storage servers and I/O routers, concurrency limitations in the client compute node operating systems, and the impact of variance (stragglers) on coupled output such as striping. We then examine the implications of our results for application performance and the design of I/O middleware systems on shared supercomputers.

Xie, Bing [Duke University; Chase, Jeffrey [Duke University; Dillow, David A [ORNL; Drokin, Oleg [Intel Corporation; Klasky, Scott A [ORNL; Oral, H Sarp [ORNL; Podhorszki, Norbert [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Monitoring of Photovoltaic Plant Output and Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The performance of photovoltaic (PV) systems, including variability characteristics, is of increasing interest to utilities as they integrate more solar energy onto the electric grid. This study is part of a multi-year research series to investigate influencing factors that affect PV plant output, variability, and approaches to system management. It explores PV variability both from a grid perspective and through examination of project design aspects that can affect annual power production. ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

149

Single Inductor Dual Output Buck Converter  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The portable electronics market is rapidly migrating towards more compact devices with multiple functionalities. Form factor, performance, cost and efficiency of these devices constitute the factors of merit of devices like cell phones, MP3 players and PDA's. With advancement in technology and more intelligent processors being used, there is a need for multiple high integrity voltage supplies for empowering the systems in portable electronic devices. Switched mode power supplies (SMPS's) are used to regulate the battery voltage. In an SMPS, maximum area is taken by the passive components such as the inductor and the capacitor. This work demonstrates a single inductor used in a buck converter with two output voltages from an input battery with voltage of value 3V. The main focus areas are low cross regulation between the outputs and supply of completely independent load current levels while maintaining desired values (1.2V,1.5V) within well controlled ripple levels. Dynamic hysteresis control is used for the single inductor dual output buck converter in this work. Results of schematic and post layout simulations performed in CADENCE prove the merits of this control method, such as nil cross regulation and excellent transient response.

Eachempatti, Haritha

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Characterizing detonator output using dynamic witness plates  

SciTech Connect

A sub-microsecond, time-resolved micro-particle-image velocimetry (PIV) system is developed to investigate the output of explosive detonators. Detonator output is directed into a transparent solid that serves as a dynamic witness plate and instantaneous shock and material velocities are measured in a two-dimensional plane cutting through the shock wave as it propagates through the solid. For the case of unloaded initiators (e.g. exploding bridge wires, exploding foil initiators, etc.) the witness plate serves as a surrogate for the explosive material that would normally be detonated. The velocity-field measurements quantify the velocity of the shocked material and visualize the geometry of the shocked region. Furthermore, the time-evolution of the velocity-field can be measured at intervals as small as 10 ns using the PIV system. Current experimental results of unloaded exploding bridge wire output in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) witness plates demonstrate 20 MHz velocity-field sampling just 300 ns after initiation of the wire.

Murphy, Michael John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Adrian, Ronald J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Comparison of CAISO-run Plexos output with LLNL-run Plexos output  

SciTech Connect

In this report we compare the output of the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) 33% RPS Plexos model when run on various computing systems. Specifically, we compare the output resulting from running the model on CAISO's computers (Windows) and LLNL's computers (both Windows and Linux). We conclude that the differences between the three results are negligible in the context of the entire system and likely attributed to minor differences in Plexos version numbers as well as the MIP solver used in each case.

Schmidt, A; Meyers, C; Smith, S

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

152

Motor/generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A motor/generator is provided for connecting between a transmission input shaft and an output shaft of a prime mover. The motor/generator may include a motor/generator housing, a stator mounted to the motor/generator housing, a rotor mounted at least partially within the motor/generator housing and rotatable about a rotor rotation axis, and a transmission-shaft coupler drivingly coupled to the rotor. The transmission-shaft coupler may include a clamp, which may include a base attached to the rotor and a plurality of adjustable jaws.

Hickam, Christopher Dale (Glasford, IL)

2008-05-13T23:59:59.000Z

153

Motor/generator - Energy Innovation Portal  

A motor/generator is provided for connecting between a transmission input shaft and an output shaft of a prime mover. The motor/generator may include a motor ...

154

Energy conserving automatic light output system  

SciTech Connect

An energy conserving lighting system is provided wherein a plurality of fluorescent lamps are powered by a poorly regulated voltage source power supply which provides a decreasing supply voltage with increasing arc current so as to generally match the volt-ampere characteristics of the lamps. A transistor ballast and control circuit connected in the arc current path controls the arc current, and hence the light output, in accordance with the total ambient light, i.e., the light produced by the lamps together with whatever further light is produced by other sources such as daylight. In another embodiment, a transistor ballast is utilized in combination with an inductive ballast. The transistor ballast provides current control over a wide dynamic range up to a design current maximum at which maximum the transistor is saturated and the inductive ballast takes over the current limiting function. An operational amplifier is preferably connected in the base biassing circuit of the control transistor of the transistor ballast. In an embodiment wherein two sets of lamps with separate inductive ballasts are provided, the arc currents for the two ballasts are scaled or matched to provide the desired light output.

Widmayer, D.F.

1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

155

SARAH 3.2: Dirac Gauginos, UFO output, and more  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SARAH is a Mathematica package optimized for the fast, efficient and precise study of supersymmetric models beyond the MSSM: a new model can be defined in a short form and all vertices are derived. This allows SARAH to create model files for FeynArts/FormCalc, CalcHep/CompHep and WHIZARD/OMEGA. The newest version of SARAH now provides the possibility to create model files in the UFO format which is supported by MadGraph 5, MadAnalysis, GoSam, and soon by Herwig++. Furthermore, SARAH also calculates the mass matrices, RGEs and one-loop corrections to the mass spectrum. This information is used to write source code for SPheno in order to create a precision spectrum generator for the given model. This spectrum-generator-generator functionality as well as the output of WHIZARD and CalcHep model files have seen further improvement in this version. Also models including Dirac Gauginos are supported with the new version of SARAH, and additional checks for the consistency of model implementations have been created.

Florian Staub

2012-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

156

Vector generator scan converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O (input/output) channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardward for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold.

Moore, James M. (Livermore, CA); Leighton, James F. (Livermore, CA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

LBA-ECO DECAF Model Output Data Set Published  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DECAF Model Output Data Set Published The ORNL DAAC announces the publication of the model output data product, Deforestation Carbon Flux (DECAF), from the LBA Land Use-Land Cover...

158

Compact waveguide power divider with multiple isolated outputs  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The waveguide power divider comprises an input waveguide of rectangular cross-section coupled to multiple reduced height output waveguides of rectangular cross-section. The input is coupled to the output waveguides by axial slots. The length of the slots is selected such that the wave direction of the input waveguide is preserved in the output waveguides. The width of the output guide is equal to the width of the input waveguide so that the input and output guides have the same cutoff wavelength. Waves will then travel with the same phase velocity in the input and output guides. The unused ends of the input and output guides are terminated in matched loads. The load at the end of the input guide absorbs power that is not coupled to the output guides.

Moeller, C.P.

1986-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

159

Robust MPC with output feedback of integrating systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, it is presented a new contribution to the design of a robust MPC with output feedback, input constraints, and uncertain model. Multivariable predictive controllers have been used in industry to reduce the variability of the process output ...

J. M. Perez; D. Odloak; E. L. Lima

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining March 1, 2012 - 11:02am Addthis Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov Megan Slack Deputy Director of Digital Content, White House Office of Digital Strategy What are the key facts? America's dependence on foreign oil has decreased every year since President Obama took office. We need an all-out, all-of-the-above strategy to protect Americans from high energy prices in the long run. Editor's Note: This post originally appeared on the White House Blog. America's dependence on foreign oil has gone down every single year since President Obama took office. In 2010, we imported less than 50 percent of the oil our nation consumed-the first time that's happened in 13

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining Our Dependence on Foreign Oil Is Declining March 1, 2012 - 11:02am Addthis Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov Image courtesy of whitehouse.gov Megan Slack Deputy Director of Digital Content, White House Office of Digital Strategy What are the key facts? America's dependence on foreign oil has decreased every year since President Obama took office. We need an all-out, all-of-the-above strategy to protect Americans from high energy prices in the long run. Editor's Note: This post originally appeared on the White House Blog. America's dependence on foreign oil has gone down every single year since President Obama took office. In 2010, we imported less than 50 percent of the oil our nation consumed-the first time that's happened in 13

162

PRISM 2.0: Simulated Solar Energy Output Data for the Lower 48 States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) engaged AWS Truepower (AWST) to provide simulated solar energy output data for the lower 48 states under the PRISM 2.0 Project. AWST obtained and processed historical modeled solar irradiance data over the 14-year period 1997–2010. The project team used the data to identify the best solar resource in each of the lower 48 states up to 1% of developable land area; generate solar power output time series for utility-scale sites for several ...

2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

163

Church, Drama, & the Cool Hand Luke Effect: The Decline of Mainline Churches in America  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1967, Warner Bros. released the film Cool Hand Luke and out of this film came one of the most famous quotes in the history of motion pictures: “What we’ve got here is a failure to communicate.” That same year marked the beginning of a slow decline in mainline Christian denominations in America, such as the United Methodist Church, despite the overall growth of Christianity. The purpose of this thesis is to present, explore, and evaluate one possible reason for this decline. Throughout American history, there is an interesting phenomenon in which the acceptance of Christian drama in America largely depended upon primary mass communication media being visual or image-centric. Therefore, this thesis hypothesizes that the decline of mainline Christian denominations can be attributed to a breakdown in communication between the church and American society as a whole; evidence of this communication breakdown can be found by simultaneously analyzing the history of advances in communication media, societal shifts along the left-brain/right-brain spectrum, and Christian drama. Due to the vastness of all that is “Christian drama,” the scope of this thesis is primarily limited to surveying the development of Christian drama in America. However, this thesis also examines the rise, evolution, and decline of the Corpus Christi York Cycle in medieval England so as to lay the groundwork for understanding the development of Christian drama in America. The decline of this immensely popular form of medieval Christian drama is one of the clearest examples of the Protestant Reformation’s effects in generating suspicions of and antagonism towards Catholicism. This suspicion would later influence the beliefs of sixteenth century Puritans and affect the creation of “American” values. The relationship between the church and theater would remain deeply antagonistic until well into the late nineteenth century. This animosity would eventually subside before the arrival of the twentieth century, particularly following the invention of film, which provided a new medium for Christian drama. The invention and diffusion of television is arguably the single greatest causative factor in the decline of mainline Christian denominations.

Purdy, Jennifer 1987-

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Fail safe controllable output improved version of the Electromechanical battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mechanical means are provided to control the voltages induced in the windings of a generator/motor. In one embodiment, a lever is used to withdraw or insert the entire stator windings from the cavity where the rotating field exists. In another embodiment, voltage control and/or switching off of the output is achievable with a variable-coupling generator/motor. A stator is made up of two concentric layers of windings, with a larger number of turns on the inner layer of windings than the outer layer of windings. The windings are to be connected in series electrically, that is, their voltages add vectorially. The mechanical arrangement is such that one or both of the windings can be rotated with respect to the other winding about their common central axis. Another improved design for the stator assembly of electromechanical batteries provides knife switch contacts that are in electrical contact with the stator windings. The operation of this embodiment depends on the fact that an abnormally large torque will be exerted on the stator structure during any short-circuit condition.

Post, Richard F. (Walnut Creek, CA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Fail safe controllable output improved version of the electromechanical battery  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Mechanical means are provided to control the voltages induced in the windings of a generator/motor. In one embodiment, a lever is used to withdraw or insert the entire stator windings from the cavity where the rotating field exists. In another embodiment, voltage control and/or switching off of the output is achievable with a variable-coupling generator/motor. A stator is made up of two concentric layers of windings, with a larger number of turns on the inner layer of windings than the outer layer of windings. The windings are to be connected in series electrically, that is, their voltages add vectorially. The mechanical arrangement is such that one or both of the windings can be rotated with respect to the other winding about their common central axis. Another improved design for the stator assembly of electromechanical batteries provides knife switch contacts that are in electrical contact with the stator windings. The operation of this embodiment depends on the fact that an abnormally large torque will be exerted on the stator structure during any short-circuit condition. 4 figs.

Post, R.F.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

166

Heat engine generator control system  

SciTech Connect

An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power.

Rajashekara, Kaushik (Carmel, IN); Gorti, Bhanuprasad Venkata (Towson, MD); McMullen, Steven Robert (Anderson, IN); Raibert, Robert Joseph (Fishers, IN)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Heat engine generator control system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrical power generation system includes a heat engine having an output member operatively coupled to the rotor of a dynamoelectric machine. System output power is controlled by varying an electrical parameter of the dynamoelectric machine. A power request signal is related to an engine speed and the electrical parameter is varied in accordance with a speed control loop. Initially, the sense of change in the electrical parameter in response to a change in the power request signal is opposite that required to effectuate a steady state output power consistent with the power request signal. Thereafter, the electrical parameter is varied to converge the output member speed to the speed known to be associated with the desired electrical output power. 8 figs.

Rajashekara, K.; Gorti, B.V.; McMullen, S.R.; Raibert, R.J.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

168

U.S. energy intensity projected to continue its steady decline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In the United States, energy intensity has been declining steadily since the early 1970s and continues to decline in EIA's long-term projection.

169

Thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoacoustic magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator includes an intrinsically irreversible thermoacoustic heat engine coupled to a magnetohydrodynamic electrical generator. The heat engine includes an electrically conductive liquid metal as the working fluid and includes two heat exchange and thermoacoustic structure assemblies which drive the liquid in a push-pull arrangement to cause the liquid metal to oscillate at a resonant acoustic frequency on the order of 1000 Hz. The engine is positioned in the field of a magnet and is oriented such that the liquid metal oscillates in a direction orthogonal to the field of the magnet, whereby an alternating electrical potential is generated in the liquid metal. Low-loss, low-inductance electrical conductors electrically connected to opposite sides of the liquid metal conduct an output signal to a transformer adapted to convert the low-voltage, high-current output signal to a more usable higher voltage, lower current signal.

Wheatley, J.C.; Swift, G.W.; Migliori, A.

1984-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

170

Input--output capital coefficients for energy technologies. [Input-output model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Input-output capital coefficients are presented for five electric and seven non-electric energy technologies. They describe the durable goods and structures purchases (at a 110 sector level of detail) that are necessary to expand productive capacity in each of twelve energy source sectors. Coefficients are defined in terms of 1967 dollar purchases per 10/sup 6/ Btu of output from new capacity, and original data sources include Battelle Memorial Institute, the Harvard Economic Research Project, The Mitre Corp., and Bechtel Corp. The twelve energy sectors are coal, crude oil and gas, shale oil, methane from coal, solvent refined coal, refined oil products, pipeline gas, coal combined-cycle electric, fossil electric, LWR electric, HTGR electric, and hydroelectric.

Tessmer, R.G. Jr.

1976-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

VARIABLE TIME-INTERVAL GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to a pulse generator and more particularly to a time interval generator wherein the time interval between pulses is precisely determined. The variable time generator comprises two oscillators with one having a variable frequency output and the other a fixed frequency output. A frequency divider is connected to the variable oscillator for dividing its frequency by a selected factor and a counter is used for counting the periods of the fixed oscillator occurring during a cycle of the divided frequency of the variable oscillator. This defines the period of the variable oscillator in terms of that of the fixed oscillator. A circuit is provided for selecting as a time interval a predetermined number of periods of the variable oscillator. The output of the generator consists of a first pulse produced by a trigger circuit at the start of the time interval and a second pulse marking the end of the time interval produced by the same trigger circuit.

Gross, J.E.

1959-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

172

Rock mass response to the decline in underground coal mining  

SciTech Connect

Geomechanical problems of mining in the Ostrava-Karvina Coal Basin were studied on the basis of longterm experience gained from seismological observations. They could serve as reasonable models of rock-mass response to temporary reduction and gradual decline in mining activities and mine closure.

Holub, K. [Academy of Science in Czech Republic, Prague (Czech Republic)

2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

173

Arctic Sea Ice Decline: Observations, Projections, Mechanisms, and Implications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or phase space. In this work we con- sider the trajectory of sea ice in the ice thickness phase space. We175 Arctic Sea Ice Decline: Observations, Projections, Mechanisms, and Implications Geophysical Is the Trajectory of Arctic Sea Ice? Harry L. Stern and Ronald W. Lindsay Polar Science Center, Applied Physics

Lindsay, Ron

174

Energy solutions for CO2 emission peak and subsequent decline  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy solutions for CO2 emission peak and subsequent decline Edited by Leif Sønderberg Petersen and Hans Larsen Risø-R-1712(EN) September 2009 Proceedings Risø International Energy Conference 2009 #12;Editors: Leif Sønderberg Petersen and Hans Larsen Title: Energy solutions for CO2 emission peak

175

Comparison of Emperical Decline Curve Analysis for Shale Wells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This study compares four recently developed decline curve methods and the traditional Arps or Fetkovich approach. The four methods which are empirically formulated for shale and tight gas wells are: 1. Power Law Exponential Decline (PLE). 2. Stretched Exponential Decline (SEPD). 3. Duong Method. 4. Logistic Growth Model (LGM). Each method has different tuning parameters and equation forms. The main objective of this work is to determine the best method(s) in terms of Estimated Ultimate Recovery (EUR) accuracy, goodness of fit, and ease of matching. In addition, these methods are compared against each other at different production times in order to understand the effect of production time on forecasts. As a part of validation process, all methods are benchmarked against simulation. This study compares the decline methods to four simulation cases which represent the common shale declines observed in the field. Shale wells, which are completed with horizontal wells and multiple traverse highly-conductive hydraulic fractures, exhibit long transient linear flow. Based on certain models, linear flow is preceded by bilinear flow if natural fractures are present. In addition to this, linear flow is succeeded by Boundary Dominated Flow (BDF) decline when pressure wave reaches boundary. This means four declines are possible, hence four simulation cases are required for comparison. To facilitate automatic data fitting, a non-linear regression program was developed using excel VBA. The program optimizes the Least-Square (LS) objective function to find the best fit. The used optimization algorithm is the Levenberg-Marquardt Algorithm (LMA) and it is used because of its robustness and ease of use. This work shows that all methods forecast different EURs and some fit certain simulation cases better than others. In addition, no method can forecast EUR accurately without reaching BDF. Using this work, engineers can choose the best method to forecast EUR after identifying the simulation case that is most analogous to their field wells. The VBA program and the matching procedure presented here can help engineers automate these methods into their forecasting sheets.

Kanfar, Mohammed Sami

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

WHY DO TUNA MAINTAIN ELEVATED SLOW MUSCLE TEMPERATURES? POWER OUTPUT OF MUSCLE ISOLATED FROM ENDOTHERMIC AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been hypothesised that regional endothermy has evolved in the muscle of some tunas to enhance the locomotory performance of the fish by increasing muscle power output. Using the work loop technique, we have determined the relationship between cycle frequency and power output, over a range of temperatures, in isolated bundles of slow muscle fibres from the endothermic yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacares) and its ectothermic relative the bonito (Sarda chiliensis). Power output in all preparations was highly temperature-dependent. A counter-current heat exchanger which could maintain a 10 °C temperature differential would typically double maximum muscle power output and the frequency at which maximum power is generated (fopt). The deep slow muscle of the tuna was able to operate at higher temperatures than slow muscle from the bonito, but was more sensitive to Summary temperature change than more superficially located slow fibres from both tuna and bonito. This suggests that it has undergone some evolutionary specialisation for operation at higher, but relatively stable, temperatures. fopt of slow muscle was higher than the tailbeat frequency of undisturbed cruising tuna and, together with the high intrinsic power output of the slow muscle mass, suggests that cruising fish have a substantial slow muscle power reserve. This reserve should be sufficient to power significantly higher sustainable swimming speeds, presumably at lower energetic cost than if intrinsically less efficient fast fibres were recruited.

Ectothermic Fish; John D. Altringham; Barbara A. Block

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Numerical performance prediction for FAU's first generation ocean current turbine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents the analytically predicted position, motion, attitude, power output and forces on Florida Atlantic University's (FAU) first generation ocean current turbine for a… (more)

Vanrietvelde, Nicolas.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Numerical performance prediction for FAU's first generation ocean current turbine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? This thesis presents the analytically predicted position, motion, attitude, power output and forces on Florida Atlantic University's (FAU) first generation ocean current turbine for… (more)

Vanrietvelde, Nicolas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Using the output file from a Gaussian frequency calculation to ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... extract the essential data from a Gaussian output file and compute thermodynamic functions at several temperatures. The basic data are also ...

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

180

Today in Energy - Seasonal hydroelectric output drives down ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Increased hydroelectric output in the Pacific Northwest drove daily, on-peak prices of electricity below $10 per megawatthour in late April (see chart above) at the ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Energy-related carbon dioxide emissions declined in 2012 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, ... which shifted power generation from the most carbon-intensive fossil fuel ...

182

Electrical pulse generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A technique for generating high-voltage, wide dynamic range, shaped electrical pulses in the nanosecond range. Two transmission lines are coupled together by resistive elements distributed along the length of the lines. The conductance of each coupling resistive element as a function of its position along the line is selected to produce the desired pulse shape in the output line when an easily produced pulse, such as a step function pulse, is applied to the input line.

Norris, Neil J. (Santa Barbara, CA)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Mapping of Indian computer science research output, 1999---2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The research output of India in computer science during 1999---2008 is analyzed in this paper on several parameters including total research output, its growth, rank and global publication share, citation impact, share of international collaborative ... Keywords: Computer science, Information technology, Mapping, Research priorities in computer

B. M. Gupta; Avinash Kshitij; Charu Verma

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

SLAC 16-channel differential TTL output module (Engineering Materials)  

SciTech Connect

The drawings listed on the Drawing List provide the data and specifications for constructing a SLAC 16-channel differential TTL output module as used in the SLAC PEP storage ring instrumentation and control system. It is a CAMAC module used as an output interface module from CAMAC signals.

Not Available

1983-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

185

Digitally programmable signal generator and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A digitally programmable waveform generator for generating completely arbitrary digital or analog waveforms from very low frequencies to frequencies in the gigasample per second range. A memory array with multiple parallel outputs is addressed; then the parallel output data is latched into buffer storage from which it is serially multiplexed out at a data rate many times faster than the access time of the memory array itself. While data is being multiplexed out serially, the memory array is accessed with the next required address and presents its data to the buffer storage before the serial multiplexing of the last group of data is completed, allowing this new data to then be latched into the buffer storage for smooth continuous serial data output. In a preferred implementation, a plurality of these serial data outputs are paralleled to form the input to a digital to analog converter, providing a programmable analog output.

Priatko, Gordon J. (Oakland, CA); Kaskey, Jeffrey A. (San Leandro, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Effect of Ambient Design Temperature on Air-Cooled Binary Plant Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Air-cooled binary plants are designed to provide a specified level of power production at a particular air temperature. Nominally this air temperature is the annual mean or average air temperature for the plant location. This study investigates the effect that changing the design air temperature has on power generation for an air-cooled binary plant producing power from a resource with a declining production fluid temperature and fluctuating ambient temperatures. This analysis was performed for plants operating both with and without a geothermal fluid outlet temperature limit. Aspen Plus process simulation software was used to develop optimal air-cooled binary plant designs for specific ambient temperatures as well as to rate the performance of the plant designs at off-design operating conditions. Results include calculation of annual and plant lifetime power generation as well as evaluation of plant operating characteristics, such as improved power generation capabilities during summer months when electric power prices are at peak levels.

Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

California hydro forecast declines on dry weather - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. Total Energy.

188

Dual output acoustic wave sensor for molecular identification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of identification and quantification of absorbed chemical species by measuring changes in both the velocity and the attenuation of an acoustic wave traveling through a thin film into which the chemical species is sorbed. The dual output response provides two independent sensor responses from a single sensing device thereby providing twice as much information as a single output sensor. This dual output technique and analysis allows a single sensor to provide both the concentration and the identity of a chemical species or permits the number of sensors required for mixtures to be reduced by a factor of two.

Frye, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM); Martin, Stephen J. (Albuquerque, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the tranducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

Beene, J.R.; Bemis, C.E. Jr.

1984-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

190

Device for frequency modulation of a laser output spectrum  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for fast frequency modulating the output spectrum of multimode lasers and single frequency lasers that are not actively stabilized. A piezoelectric transducer attached to a laser cavity mirror is driven in an unconventional manner to excite resonance vibration of the transducer to rapidly, cyclicly change the laser cavity length. The result is a cyclic sweeping of the output wavelength sufficient to fill the gaps in the laser output frequency spectrum. When such a laser is used to excite atoms or molecules, complete absorption line coverage is made possible.

Beene, James R. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bemis, Jr., Curtis E. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Vector generator scan converter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High printing speeds for graphics data are achieved with a laser printer by transmitting compressed graphics data from a main processor over an I/O channel to a vector generator scan converter which reconstructs a full graphics image for input to the laser printer through a raster data input port. The vector generator scan converter includes a microprocessor with associated microcode memory containing a microcode instruction set, a working memory for storing compressed data, vector generator hardware for drawing a full graphic image from vector parameters calculated by the microprocessor, image buffer memory for storing the reconstructed graphics image and an output scanner for reading the graphics image data and inputting the data to the printer. The vector generator scan converter eliminates the bottleneck created by the I/O channel for transmitting graphics data from the main processor to the laser printer, and increases printer speed up to thirty fold. 7 figs.

Moore, J.M.; Leighton, J.F.

1988-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

192

Decline curve analysis of vapor-dominated reservoirs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Geothermal Program activities at the INEEL include a review of the transient and pseudosteady state behavior of production wells in vapor-dominated systems with a focus on The Geysers field. The complicated history of development, infill drilling, injection, and declining turbine inlet pressures makes this field an ideal study area to test new techniques. The production response of a well can be divided into two distinct periods: transient flow followed by pseudo-steady state (depletion). The transient period can be analyzed using analytic equations, while the pseudo-steady state period is analyzed using empirical relationships. Yet by reviewing both periods, a great deal of insight can be gained about the well and reservoir. An example is presented where this approach is used to determine the permeability thickness product, kh, injection and production interference, and estimate the empirical Arps decline parameter b. When the production data is reinitialized (as may be required by interference effects), the kh determined from the new transient period is repeatable. This information can be used for well diagnostics, quantification of injection benefits, and the empirical estimation of remaining steam reserves.

Faulder, D.D.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Documentation for RISKIN: A risk integration code for MACCS (MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System) output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document has been prepared as a user's guide for the computer program RISKIN developed at Sandia National Laboratories. The RISKIN code generates integrated risk tables and the weighted mean risk associated with a user-selected set of consequences from up to five output files generated by the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS). Each MACCS output file can summarize the health and economic consequences resulting from up to 60 distinct severe accident source terms. Since the accident frequency associated with these source terms is not included as a MACCS input parameter a postprocessor is required to derived results that must incorporate accident frequency. The RISKIN code is such a postprocessor. RISKIN will search the MACCS output files for the mean and peak consequence values and the complementary cumulative distributive function (CCDF) tables for each requested consequence. Once obtained, RISKIN combines this data with accident frequency data to produce frequency weighted results. A postprocessor provides RISKIN an interface to the proprietary DISSPLA plot package. The RISKIN code has been written using ANSI Standard FORTRAN 77 to maximize its portability.

Rollstin, J.A. (GRAM, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Hong, Kou-John (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

50-47676 March 2010 Development of Regional Wind Resource and Wind Plant Output Datasets Final Subcontract Report 15 October 2007 - 15 March 2009 3TIER Seattle, Washington National...

195

Generalized Exponential Markov and Model Output Statistics: A Comparative Verification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We performed a comparative verification of Model Output Statistics (MOS) against Generalized Exponential Markov (GEM), a single station forecasting technique which uses only the surface observation and climatology as input. The verification was ...

Thomas J. Perrone; Robert G. Miller

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Model-Inspired Predictors for Model Output Statistics (MOS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article addresses the problem of the choice of the predictors for the multiple linear regression in model output statistics. Rather than devising a selection procedure directly aimed at the minimization of the final scores, it is examined ...

Piet Termonia; Alex Deckmyn

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Community Climate System Model (CCSM) Experiments and Output Data  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The CCSM web makes the source code of various versions of the model freely available and provides access to experiments that have been run and the resulting output data.

198

Sustainable development and comprehensive capital : The post-Soviet decline of Central Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The general post-Soviet decline of the states of Central Asia (Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, and Uzbekistan) mirrors specific declines in the robustness of these states' stocks of financial, physical, ...

Sievers, Eric

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Dynamic characteristics of an orthogonal turbine and output-control systems for TPP with high-voltage frequency converter  

SciTech Connect

A mathematical description of a closed control system with allowance for pressure fluctuations in the head system, which makes it possible to analyze the regime stability of orthogonal generating sets at tidal electric power plants when operating in the complete range of heads, outputs, and rotational speeds, and to select parameters of the control system, is obtained for an orthogonal hydroturbine and a generator with a load regulator.

Berlin, V. V.; Murav'ev, O. A.; Golubev, A. V.

2012-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Frequency regulator for synchronous generators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a novel frequency regulator which controls a generator output frequency for variations in both the input power to the generator and the power supplied to an uncontrolled external load. The present invention further includes over current and current balance protection devices which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be encapsulated to provide protection from the operating environment and which respond more quickly than previously known electromechanical devices.

Karlicek, Robert F. (1920 Camino Centroloma, Fullerton, CA 92633)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Frequency regulator for synchronous generators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is directed to a novel frequency regulator which controls a generator output frequency for variations in both the input power to the generator and the power supplied to an uncontrolled external load. The present invention further includes over current and current balance protection devices which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be encapsulated to provide protection from the operating environment and which respond more quickly than previously known electromechanical devices. 11 figs.

Karlicek, R.F.

1982-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

202

California hydro forecast declines on dry weather - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

California hydroelectric generators are found along different river basins, and the weather patterns can be significantly different between the two regions, ...

203

Market Power and Technological Bias: The Case of Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collective output isQg, and intermittent generators (which we will assume here is wind generation) whose output is assumed to have a fixed and stochastic component Qw,0+ ?w. We assume that E[?w] = 0 and V ar[?w] = ?2w. The intermittent output is produced by a... conventional generation assets. In equilibrium demand matches supply: DT = Qg +Qw,0 + ?w, (2) and using (1) gives: p = D0 ? b(Qg +Qw,0 + ?w). (3) We assume that a conventional generator has a quadratic cost function: Cg(Qg) = ?Qg + ? 2Q 2 g, (4) and thus...

Twomey, Paul; Neuhoff, Karsten

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

204

Generating conditional atomic entanglement by measuring photon number in a single output channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The polarization analysis of quantized probe light transmitted through an atomic ensemble has been used to prepare entangled collective atomic states. In a "balanced" detection configuration, where the difference signal from two detection ports is analyzed, the continuous monitoring of a component of the Stokes field vector provides a means for conditional projective measurements on the atomic system. Here, we make use of classical driving fields, in the pulsed regime, and of an "unbalanced" detection setup (single detector) where the effective photon number of scattered photons is the detected observable. Conditional atomic spin squeezed states and superpositions of such squeezed states can be prepared in this manner.

Berman, C G P R

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Generating conditional atomic entanglement by measuring photon number in a single output channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The polarization analysis of quantized probe light transmitted through an atomic ensemble has been used to prepare entangled collective atomic states. In a "balanced" detection configuration, where the difference signal from two detection ports is analyzed, the continuous monitoring of a component of the Stokes field vector provides a means for conditional projective measurements on the atomic system. Here, we make use of classical driving fields, in the pulsed regime, and of an "unbalanced" detection setup (single detector) where the effective photon number of scattered photons is the detected observable. Conditional atomic spin squeezed states and superpositions of such squeezed states can be prepared in this manner.

C. Genes P. R. Berman

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

The world of quantum noise and the fundamental output process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A stationary theory of quantum stochastic processes of second order is outlined. It includes KMS processes in wide sense like the equilibrium finite temperature quantum noise given by the Planck's spectral formula. It is shown that for each stationary noise there exists a natural output process output process which is identical to the noise in the infinite temperature limit, and flipping with the noise if the time is reversed at finite temperature. A canonical Hilbert space representation of the quantum noise and the fundamental output process is established and a decomposition of their spectra is found. A brief explanation of quantum stochastic integration with respect to the input-output processes is given using only correlation functions. This provides a mathematical foundation for linear stationary filtering transformations of quantum stochastic processes. It is proved that the colored quantum stationary noise and its time-reversed version can be obtained in the second order theory by a linear nonadapted filtering of the standard vacuum noise uniquely defined by the canonical creation and annihilation operators on the spectrum of the input-output pair.

V. P. Belavkin; O. Hirota; R. Hudson

2005-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

207

OECD Input-Output Tables | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OECD Input-Output Tables OECD Input-Output Tables Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Input-Output Tables Agency/Company /Organization: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Topics: Co-benefits assessment, Market analysis, Co-benefits assessment, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.oecd.org/document/3/0,3343,en_2649_34445_38071427_1_1_1_1,00.html Country: Sweden, Finland, Japan, South Korea, Argentina, Australia, China, Israel, United Kingdom, Portugal, Romania, Greece, Poland, Slovakia, Chile, India, Canada, New Zealand, United States, Denmark, Norway, Spain, Austria, Italy, Netherlands, Ireland, France, Belgium, Brazil, Czech Republic, Estonia, Germany, Hungary, Luxembourg, Mexico, Slovenia, South Africa, Turkey, Indonesia, Switzerland, Taiwan, Russia

208

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Capture, Transport and Storage Regulatory Test Exercise: Output Report Focus Area: Clean Fossil Energy Topics: Market Analysis Website: cdn.globalccsinstitute.com/sites/default/files/publications/7326/carbo Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/carbon-capture-transport-and-storage- Policies: Regulations Regulations: Emissions Mitigation Scheme The Scottish Government published this report to identify regulatory gaps or overlaps in the nation's framework for regulating carbon capture and storage (CCS). The report aims to streamline and better manage CCS regulation. It focuses on evaluating the risks, barriers, information gaps,

209

Shaping the output pulse of a linear-transformer-driver module.  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate that a wide variety of current-pulse shapes can be generated using a linear-transformer-driver (LTD) module that drives an internal water-insulated transmission line. The shapes are produced by varying the timing and initial charge voltage of each of the module's cavities. The LTD-driven accelerator architecture outlined in [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 10, 030401 (2007)] provides additional pulse-shaping flexibility by allowing the modules that drive the accelerator to be triggered at different times. The module output pulses would be combined and symmetrized by water-insulated radial-transmission-line impedance transformers [Phys. Rev. ST Accel. Beams 11, 030401 (2008)].

Long, Finis W.; McKee, G. Randall; Stoltzfus, Brian Scott; Woodworth, Joseph Ray; McKenney, John Lee; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos; Porter, John L.; Stygar, William A.; Savage, Mark Edward; LeChien, Keith, R.; Van De Valde, David M. (EG& G, Albuquerque, NM)

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Maximal output purity and capacity for asymmetric unital qudit channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider generalizations of depolarizing channels to maps in which the identity channel is replaced by a convex combinations of unitary conjugations. We show that one can construct unital channels of this type for which the input which achieves maximal output purity is unique. We give conditions under which multiplicativity of the maximal p-norm and additivity of the minimal output entropy. We also show that the Holevo capacity need not equal log d - the minimal entropy as one might expect for a convex combination of unitary conjugations. Conversely, we give examples for which this condition holds, but the channel has no evident covariance properties.

Nilanjana Datta; Mary Beth Ruskai

2005-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

211

High reliability low jitter pulse generator  

SciTech Connect

A method and concomitant apparatus for generating pulses comprising providing a laser light source, disposing a voltage electrode between ground electrodes, generating laser sparks using the laser light source via laser spark gaps between the voltage electrode and the ground electrodes, and outputting pulses via one or more insulated ground connectors connected to the voltage electrode.

Savage, Mark E.; Stoltzfus, Brian S.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Digital slip frequency generator and method for determining the desired slip frequency  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The output frequency of an electric power generator is kept constant with variable rotor speed by automatic adjustment of the excitation slip frequency. The invention features a digital slip frequency generator which provides sine and cosine waveforms from a look-up table, which are combined with real and reactive power output of the power generator.

Klein, Frederick F. (Monroeville, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Identification of Wiener systems with binary-valued output observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is concerned with identification of Wiener systems whose outputs are measured by binary-valued sensors. The system consists of a linear FIR (finite impulse response) subsystem of known order, followed by a nonlinear function with a known parametrization ... Keywords: Binary-valued observations, Identification, Joint identifiability, Parameter estimation, Periodic inputs, Sensor thresholds, Wiener systems

Yanlong Zhao; Le Yi Wang; G. George Yin; Ji-Feng Zhang

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

The continuity of the output entropy of positive maps  

SciTech Connect

Global and local continuity conditions for the output von Neumann entropy for positive maps between Banach spaces of trace-class operators in separable Hilbert spaces are obtained. Special attention is paid to completely positive maps: infinite dimensional quantum channels and operations. It is shown that as a result of some specific properties of the von Neumann entropy (as a function on the set of density operators) several results on the output entropy of positive maps can be obtained, which cannot be derived from the general properties of entropy type functions. In particular, it is proved that global continuity of the output entropy of a positive map follows from its finiteness. A characterization of positive linear maps preserving continuity of the entropy (in the following sense: continuity of the entropy on an arbitrary subset of input operators implies continuity of the output entropy on this subset) is obtained. A connection between the local continuity properties of two completely positive complementary maps is considered. Bibliography: 21 titles.

Shirokov, Maxim E [Steklov Mathematical Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2011-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

215

Asymptotically efficient parameter estimation using quantized output observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies identification of systems in which only quantized output observations are available. An identification algorithm for system gains is introduced that employs empirical measures from multiple sensor thresholds and optimizes their convex ... Keywords: Cramér-Rao bound, Efficient estimator, Quantized observation, System identification

Le Yi Wang; G. George Yin

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 TRICOLOR LIGHT EMITTING DIODE DOT MATRIX DISPLAY SYSTEM WITHAUDIO OUTPUT Grantham Pang, Chi emitting diodes; tricolor display; audio communication. I. Introduction This paper relates to a tricolor broadcasting through the visible light rays transmitted by the display panel or assembly. Keywords: light

Pang, Grantham

217

Improved Model Output Statistics Forecasts through Model Consensus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Consensus forecasts are computed by averaging model output statistics (MOS) forecasts based on the limited-area fine-mesh (LFM) model and the nested grid model (NGM) for the three-year period 1990–92. The test consists of four weather elements (...

Robert L. Vislocky; J. Michael Fritsch

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Geek-Up[04.01.2011]: Charting Wind, Thermal, Hydro Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of Public Affairs Check out Bonneville Power Administration's new near real-time energy monitoring - it displays the output of all wind, thermal and hydro generation in...

219

Strategies for OPEC`s pricing and output decisions  

SciTech Connect

This paper examines OPEC pricing and output strategies, both to provide an understanding of OPECs unwise price doubling in 1979-80 and also to analyze what strategy might serve it best for the future. We focus on the unavoidable uncertainty regarding the underlying parameters that characterize the world oil market (price elasticities, income growth rates), and the sensitivity of discounted OPEC revenue to changes in these parameters, for various pricing strategies. In 1979-80, OPEC chose a high-price strategy, which could have yielded good results (like many other price-paths) if the market`s underlying parameters had been more favorable. But the price elasticities of demand and non-OPEC supply were much higher than anticipated, so that OPEC did very poorly-not only in absolute terms, but also relative to what it could have achieved if it had set its price more cautiously. We search for a robustly optimal strategy for OPEC in the future, which will serve it well relative to other strategies, regardless of the true parameter values underlying the market (within some plausible range). We conclude that OPEC`s interests will be served best by a policy of moderate output growth, at a rate no faster than that of world income growth. This will require that OPEC slow its rate of output growth since 1985, cutting it at least in half. Slowing its output growth will allow OPEC gradually to regain the market share lost after its disastrous 1979-80 price doubling, but without jeopardizing its revenue, as might a policy of more rapid increases in output. This will yield a consistently good result for OPEC, relative to alternative strategies, over a fairly wide range of demand and supply conditions. 53 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

Gately, D. [New York Univ., New York, NY (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

220

U.S. energy intensity projected to continue its steady decline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil ... Energy use in homes, ... the role of energy-intensive industries in the United States declined with continuing structural changes ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Decline curve analysis in unconventional resource plays using logistic growth models.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Current models used to forecast production in unconventional oil and gas formations are often not producing valid results. When traditional decline curve analysis models are… (more)

Clark, Aaron James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

The rising cost of electricity generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades. (author)

Winters, Tobey

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

223

The Rising Cost of Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades.

Tobey Winters

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

Pesticides and amphibian declines in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pacific chorus frog (Pseudacris regilla) hatchlings were translocated and placed in cages in sites (~2,200 m elevation) located in Lassen, Yosemite, and Sequoia National Parks. DDE was found in 97% of Yosemite National Park samples, 84% in Sequoia National Park samples, and 15% of Lassen Volcanic National Park samples in 2001 and 2002. Total endosulfans were detected in 3% of Sequoia samples, 9% of Lassen samples and 24% of Yosemite samples. Both pesticides were detected in tadpoles and metamorphs raised at the three parks regardless of origin. Because the tadpoles were translocated post hatching, this finding indicates that the pesticides, particularly DDE, were accumulated at the site, instead of through deposition in the egg mass. Liver cells from 108 newly metamorphosed frogs were examined with flow cytometry (FCM) techniques for evaluation of chromosome breakage as measured by the half-peak coefficient of variation (HPCV) of the G1 peak. Regardless of origin, experimental groups raised at Lassen, the reference site, had significantly less chromosomal breakage (p=0.04) than metamorphs raised at the other two parks. This is the first documented evidence of DNA damage in juvenile frogs in the Sierra Nevada Mountains. Cholinesterase (ChE) was measured in tadpoles collected at 28 days and in juvenile frogs collected upon metamorphosis. In 2001, ChE activity was significantly higher in animals raised at Lassen (reference site), than at the other two parks, indicating less exposure to cholinesterase-inhibiting pesticides. This trend was not observed in 2002, although Sequoia ChE values were consistently lower than the other two parks. Temperatures were significantly different among the three parks for both years (plevels. Survivorship to metamorphosis, days to metamorphosis, snout-vent lengths (SVL), and malformations were evaluated. Animals raised in Sequoia had shorter SVLs, took longer to metamorphose, and had lower survivorship to metamorphosis than in the other two parks (p<0.0001). Effects noted in P. regilla may be magnified in long lived ranid species. These findings may be important in evaluating the overall impact of aerially transported pesticides on declining frog populations in the Sierra Nevada Mountains.

Cowman, Deborah Fay

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Pulsed infrared difference frequency generation in CdGeAs/sub 2/  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A laser apparatus for generating a line-tunable pulsed infrared difference frequency output is described. The apparatus comprises a CO/sub 2/ laser which produces a first frequency, a CO laser which produces a second frequency, and a mixer for combining the output of the CO/sub 2/ and CO lasers so as to produce a final output comprising a difference frequency from the first and second frequency outputs.

Piltch, M.S.; Rink, J.P.; Tallman, C.R.

1975-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

226

Optical device with conical input and output prism faces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device for radially translating radiation in which a right circular cylinder is provided at each end thereof with conical prism faces. The faces are oppositely extending and the device may be severed in the middle and separated to allow access to the central part of the beam. Radiation entering the input end of the device is radially translated such that radiation entering the input end at the perimeter is concentrated toward the output central axis and radiation at the input central axis is dispersed toward the output perimeter. Devices are disclosed for compressing beam energy to enhance drilling techniques, for beam manipulation of optical spatial frequencies in the Fourier plane and for simplification of dark field and color contrast microscopy. Both refracting and reflecting devices are disclosed.

Brunsden, Barry S. (Chicago, IL)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

An Advanced simulation Code for Modeling Inductive Output Tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the Phase I program, CCR completed several major building blocks for a 3D large signal, inductive output tube (IOT) code using modern computer language and programming techniques. These included a 3D, Helmholtz, time-harmonic, field solver with a fully functional graphical user interface (GUI), automeshing and adaptivity. Other building blocks included the improved electrostatic Poisson solver with temporal boundary conditions to provide temporal fields for the time-stepping particle pusher as well as the self electric field caused by time-varying space charge. The magnetostatic field solver was also updated to solve for the self magnetic field caused by time changing current density in the output cavity gap. The goal function to optimize an IOT cavity was also formulated, and the optimization methodologies were investigated.

Thuc Bui; R. Lawrence Ives

2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

228

OPEC influence grows with world output in next decade  

SciTech Connect

World crude oil and condensate output will rise to 75 million bopd in 2004, concludes a recently released Petroconsultant study, entitled Worldwide Crude Oil 10-Year Forecast. It also projects that OPEC`s role in supplying demand will simultaneously grow to nearly 50% of total output. In reaching these conclusions, this report analyzed and predicted each of 94 significant producing nations for the 1995--2004 period. Output has been projected separately for the onshore and offshore sectors. Each nation, including the new republics of the former Soviet Union and individual emirates of the United Arab Emirates, is discussed within its regional and global framework; and key aspects of each of the seven major regions have been delineated. The study integrated full-cycle resource analysis, economics, infrastructure, politics, history, consumption levels and patterns, energy balances, and other pertinent data to cover both supply and demand pictures. The entire discovery and production history was used to frame exploration and development maturity. Future discovery potential has been estimated from largely geologic parameters.

Foreman, N.E. [Petroconsultants, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Distributed Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Untapped Value of Backup Generation Untapped Value of Backup Generation While new guidelines and regulations such as IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) 1547 have come a long way in addressing interconnection standards for distributed generation, utilities have largely overlooked the untapped potential of these resources. Under certain conditions, these units (primarily backup generators) represent a significant source of power that can deliver utility services at lower costs than traditional centralized solutions. These backup generators exist today in large numbers and provide utilities with another option to reduce peak load, relieve transmission congestion, and improve power reliability. Backup generation is widely deployed across the United States. Carnegie Mellon's Electricity

230

Current mode instrumentation amplifier with rail-to-rail input and output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Current Mode Instrumentation Amplifier with rail-to-rail input and output is presented. It is based on constant gm input stages, and cascode output stages. Although this CMIA structure has a good Input Common Mode Voltage, it suffers from a poor output ... Keywords: analog integrated circuits, current mode instrumentation amplifier, rail-to-rail input and output

Filipe Costa Beber Vieira; Cesar Augusto Prior; Cesar Ramos Rodrigues; Leonardo Perin; Joao Baptista dos Santos Martins

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Brief paper: Speed regulation with measured output feedback in the control of heavy haul trains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An approach of output regulation with measurement feedback is proposed for the control of heavy haul trains. The objective is to regulate all cars' speeds to a prescribed speed profile. The output regulation problem of nonlinear systems with measurement ... Keywords: ECP braking system, Heavy haul trains, Measured output feedback, Output regulation, Quadratic programming

X. Zhuan; X. Xia

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Precision linear ramp function generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ramp function generator is provided which produces a precise linear ramp function which is repeatable and highly stable. A derivative feedback loop is used to stabilize the output of an integrator in the forward loop and control the ramp rate. The ramp may be started from a selected baseline voltage level and the desired ramp rate is selected by applying an appropriate constant voltage to the input of the integrator.

Jatko, W.B.; McNeilly, D.R.; Thacker, L.H.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #506: February 18, 2008 Declining Rate of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6: February 18, 6: February 18, 2008 Declining Rate of Highway Fatalities and Injuries is Good News for Safety and Congestion Mitigation to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #506: February 18, 2008 Declining Rate of Highway Fatalities and Injuries is Good News for Safety and Congestion Mitigation on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #506: February 18, 2008 Declining Rate of Highway Fatalities and Injuries is Good News for Safety and Congestion Mitigation on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #506: February 18, 2008 Declining Rate of Highway Fatalities and Injuries is Good News for Safety and Congestion Mitigation on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #506: February 18, 2008 Declining Rate of Highway Fatalities and Injuries is Good News for Safety

234

Definition: Ramp Rate(Generator) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

generator changes its output.1 References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline...

235

A microfabricated ElectroQuasiStatic induction turbine-generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ElectroQuasiStatic (EQS) induction machine has been fabricated and has generated net electric power. A maximum power output of 192 [mu]W at 235 krpm has been measured under driven excitation of the six phases. Self ...

Steyn, J. Lodewyk (Jasper Lodewyk), 1976-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Thermoelectric generator apparatus and operation method  

SciTech Connect

A method of operating a thermoelectric generator includes: cyclically producing increasing then decreasing temperature differences in the thermoelectric material of the generator; and generating a cyclically increasing then decreasing electrical generator output signal, in response to such temperature differences, to transmit electrical power generated by the generator from the generator. Part of the thermoelectric material reaches temperatures substantially above the melting temperature of the material. The thermoelectric material of the generator forms a part of a closed electrical loop about a transformer core so that the inductor voltage for the loop serves as the output signal of the generator. A thermoelectric generator, which can be driven by the described method of operation, incorporates fins into a thermopile to conduct heat toward or away from the alternating spaces between adjacent layers of different types of thermoelectric material. The fins extend from between adjacent layers, so that they can also conduct electrical current between such layers, perpendicularly to the direction of stacking of the layers. The exhaust from an internal combustion engine can be employed to drive the thermoelectric generator, and, also, to act as a driver for a thermoelectric generator in accordance with the method of operation initially described.

Lowther, F.E.

1984-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

237

NREL: Energy Analysis: Impacts of Conventional Generators  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts on Conventional Generators Impacts on Conventional Generators Impacts of Renewable Electricity Generation on Efficiency and Emissions of Conventional Generators With increasing penetration of wind and solar generation, conventional fossil-fired power plants may be required to adjust their output level, start up, or shut down more frequently to accommodate the variability and uncertainty of these technologies. These operational changes can negatively impact plant efficiency and emissions. NREL's analyses are focused on understanding and quantifying the emissions and costs associated with these operational changes. NREL's impacts of renewable electricity generation on conventional generators analyses show that: While the emissions impacts of generator cycling and part-loading can be significant (e.g., combined cycle generators), these impacts are

238

Northwest hydroelectric output above five-year range for much ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The 2011 hydro season began earlier and lasted significantly longer than in recent years, well into the summer months (see chart above). Hydroelectric generation in ...

239

Solar-powered aroma generator  

SciTech Connect

In combination with a switch-controlled electric light bulb having a threaded plug and a threaded socket disposed in a room which is also subject to natural ambient light, a switchless aroma generator is installed in the room which is automatically activated only when the electric light bulb is switched on. The activated generator functions to discharge an air current into the room which conveys an aromatic vapor to modify the atmosphere. The generator described in this patent consists of: A.) an air-permeable cartridge containing an aroma supply which is exuded into the atmosphere at a relatively rapid rate as an air current is forced through the cartridge; B.) a fan driven by a low-voltage, direct-current motor having predetermined power requirements, the fan being arranged to force an air current through the cartridge; C.) a housing incorporating the cartridge and the motordriven fan, the housing containing an apparatus for mounting it on a wall in the room; and D.) a solar cell assembly producing a direct-current output placed in close proximity to the bulb in the room and irradiated when the bulb is switched on. The assembly is connected to the motor to supply power, the electrical relationship of the assembly to the motor being such that the cell output is sufficient to power the motor only when the bulb is switched on to irradiate the assembly, and is insufficient when the bulb is switched off. The cell output then depends on ambient light in the room, and the operation of the generator is coordinated with that of the bulb despite the absence of a wired connection between and an aroma is generated only when the bulb is switched on.

Spector, D.

1986-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

240

Solar concentration of 50,000 achieved with output power approaching 1 kW  

SciTech Connect

The authors have achieved a 50,000 {+-} 3,000 times concentration of sunlight using a unique dielectric nonimaging concentrator in an experiment performed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. The scale of the experiment is several times larger than that of previous experiments. Total output power approaching 1 kW passes through a 4.6 mm diameter aperture. An extractor tip is added to the concentrator profile which allows measurement of flux levels using an air calorimeter. This new device has the potential to allow the use of dielectric concentrators at larger scale for thermal electric power generation. The authors report on the implications of this experiment for the future use of dielectric concentrators.

Jenkins, D.; Winston, R.; Bliss, J.; O`Gallagher, J. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Lewandowski, A.; Bingham, C. [National Renewal Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Distributed Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with another option to reduce peak load, relieve transmission congestion, and improve power reliability. Backup generation is widely deployed across the United States. Carnegie...

242

U.S. oil imports to decline with rising oil production through...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

oil imports to decline with rising oil production through 2014 The United States will need fewer oil imports over the next two years because of rising U.S. oil production. The new...

243

Design After Decline: How America Rebuilds Shrinking Cities, by Brent Ryan  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. cities such as Detroit, St. Louis, Buffalo, and others.clearance strategies in Detroit, Philadelphia, and otherof economic decline, and Detroit, the central city within a

Wegmann, Jake

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

ORISE report shows number of health physics Ph.D.s declined in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORISE report shows number of health physics Ph.D.s declined in 2009 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 15, 2010 FY10-37 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-Health physics undergraduate degrees increased...

245

Attribution of Declining Western U.S. Snowpack to Human Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations show snowpack has declined across much of the western United States over the period 1950–99. This reduction has important social and economic implications, as water retained in the snowpack from winter storms forms an important part ...

David W. Pierce; Tim P. Barnett; Hugo G. Hidalgo; Tapash Das; Céline Bonfils; Benjamin D. Santer; Govindasamy Bala; Michael D. Dettinger; Daniel R. Cayan; Art Mirin; Andrew W. Wood; Toru Nozawa

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Generating power with drained coal mine methane  

SciTech Connect

The article describes the three technologies most commonly used for generating electricity from coal mine methane: internal combustion engines, gas turbines, and microturbines. The most critical characteristics and features of these technologies, such as efficiency, output and size are highlighted. 5 refs.

NONE

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Source codes as random number generators  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—A random number generator generates fair coin flips by processing deterministically an arbitrary source of nonideal randomness. An optimal random number generator generates asymptotically fair coin flips from a stationary ergodic source at a rate of bits per source symbol equal to the entropy rate of the source. Since optimal noiseless data compression codes produce incompressible outputs, it is natural to investigate their capabilities as optimal random number generators. In this paper we show under general conditions that optimal variable-length source codes asymptotically achieve optimal variable-length random bit generation in a rather strong sense. In particular, we show in what sense the Lempel–Ziv algorithm can be considered an optimal universal random bit generator from arbitrary stationary ergodic random sources with unknown distributions. Index Terms — Data compression, entropy, Lempel–Ziv algorithm, random number generation, universal source coding.

Karthik Visweswariah; Student Member; Sanjeev R. Kulkarni; Senior Member; Sergio Verdú

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability: Preprint  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Measurement and Modeling of Measurement and Modeling of Solar and PV Output Variability Preprint M. Sengupta To be presented at SOLAR 2011 Raleigh, North Carolina May 17-21, 2011 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-51105 April 2011 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes. This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States government. Neither the United States government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

249

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors May 3, 2011 -...

250

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors May 3, 2011 - 12:00am...

251

A New Series of Rate Decline Relations Based on the Diagnosis of Rate-Time Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The so-called "Arps" rate decline relations are by far the most widely used tool for assessing oil and gas reserves from rate performance. These relations (i.e., the exponential and hyperbolic decline relations) are empirical where the starting point for their derivation is given by the definitions of the "loss ratio" and the "derivative of the loss ratio", where the "loss ratio" is the ratio of rate data to derivative of rate data, and the "derivative of the loss ratio" is the "b-parameter" as defined by Arps [1945]. The primary goal of this work is the interpretation of the b-parameter continuously over time and thus the better understanding of its character. As is shown below we propose "monotonically decreasing functional forms" for the characterization of the b-parameter, in addition to the exponential and hyperbolic rate decline relations, where the b-parameter is assumed to be zero and constant, respectively. The proposed equations are as follow: b(t)=constant (Arps' hyperbolic rate-decline relation), []tbbtb10exp)(-bt= (exponential function), (power-law function), 10)(btbtb=)/(1)(10tbbtb+= (rational function). The corresponding rate decline relation for each case is obtained by solving the differential equation associated with the selected functional for the b-parameter. The next step of this procedure is to test and validate each of the rate decline relations by applying them to various numerical simulation cases (for gas), as well as for field data cases obtained from tight/shale gas reservoirs. Our results indicate that b-parameter is never constant but it changes continuously with time. The ultimate objective of this work is to establish each model as a potential analysis/diagnostic relation. Most of the proposed models yield more realistic estimations of gas reserves in comparison to the traditional Arps' rate decline relations (i.e., the hyperbolic decline) where the reserves estimates are inconsistent and over-estimated. As an example, the rational b-parameter model seems to be the most accurate model in terms of representing the character of rate data; and therefore, should yield more realistic reserves estimates. Illustrative examples are provided for better understanding of each b-parameter rate decline model. The proposed family of rate decline relations was based on the character of the b-parameter computed from the rate-time data and they can be applied to a wide range of data sets, as dictated by the character of rate data.

Boulis, Anastasios

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Utility Solar Generation Valuation Methods  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tucson Electric Power (TEP) developed, tested and verified the results of a new and appropriate method for accurately evaluating the capacity credit of time variant solar generating sources and reviewed new methods to appropriately and fairly evaluate the value of solar generation to electric utilities. The project also reviewed general integrated approaches for adequately compensating owners of solar generation for their benefits to utilities. However, given the limited funding support and time duration of this project combined with the significant differences between utilities regarding rate structures, solar resource availability and coincidence of solar generation with peak load periods, it is well beyond the scope of this project to develop specific rate, rebate, and interconnection approaches to capture utility benefits for all possible utilities. The project developed computer software based evaluation method models to compare solar generation production data measured in very short term time increments called Sample Intervals over a typical utility Dispatch Cycle during an Evaluation Period against utility system load data. Ten second resolution generation production data from the SGSSS and actual one minute resolution TEP system load data for 2006 and 2007, along with data from the Pennington Street Garage 60 kW DC capacity solar unit installed in downtown Tucson will be applied to the model for testing and verification of the evaluation method. Data was provided by other utilities, but critical time periods of data were missing making results derived from that data inaccurate. The algorithms are based on previous analysis and review of specific 2005 and 2006 SGSSS production data. The model was built, tested and verified by in house TEP personnel. For this phase of the project, TEP communicated with, shared solar production data with and collaborated on the development of solar generation valuation tools with other utilities, including Arizona Public Service, Salt River Project, Xcel and Nevada Power Company as well as the Arizona electric cooperatives. In the second phase of the project, three years of 10 second power output data of the SGSSS was used to evaluate the effectiveness of frequency domain analysis, normal statistical distribution analysis and finally maximum/minimum differential output analysis to test the applicability of these mathematic methods in accurately modeling the output variations produced by clouds passing over the SGSSS array.

Hansen, Thomas N.; Dion, Phillip J.

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

253

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2: August 13, 2: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #482: August 13, 2007 Refinery Output by World Region on AddThis.com... Fact #482: August 13, 2007

254

Design of a high-gain flux-compression generator  

SciTech Connect

The current gain of a high-gain, high-explosive helical magnetic-flux-compression generator (HEG) is limited both by nonuniformities in stator expansion and by armature-stator misalignment. We set out to achieve three goals: first, an output current of at least 2 MA with a current gain greater than 1000 to drive a 150- to 300-nH load; second, a generator with an acceptably small volume and length; and finally, generator output of a reliable magnitude. 5 refs., 6 figs.

Pincosy, P.A.; Abe, D.K.; Chase, J.B. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Efficient Partitioning of Fragment Shaders for Multiple-Output Hardware  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Partitioning fragment shaders into multiple rendering passes is an effective technique for virtualizing shading resource limits in graphics hardware. The Recursive Dominator Split (RDS) algorithm is a polynomial-time algorithm for partitioning fragment shaders for real-time rendering that has been shown to generate efficient partitions.

Tim Foley; Mike Houston; Pat Hanrahan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Project Recap Humanitarian Engineering Biodiesel Boiler System for Steam Generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project Recap Humanitarian Engineering ­ Biodiesel Boiler System for Steam Generator Currently 70 biodiesel boiler system to drive a steam engine generator. This system is to provide electricity the customer needs, a boiler fueled by biodiesel and outputting to a steam engine was decided upon. The system

Demirel, Melik C.

257

Generator of pumping pulses for powerful semiconductor lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The generator of electric and optic pulses are built using powerful MOS transistors and an ILPI-103 semiconductor laser generates pumping pulses with an amplitude of 15 A and optic pulses with a duration of 9 to 30 nsec at a repetition rate of up to 90 kHz. The output signal is TTL. The device is designed for open optic communication lines.

An, V.I.; Kolesnikov, Yu.Yu. [Voronezh Scientific Research Institute of Communications, Voronezh (Russian Federation)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A variable voltage MPPT control method for photovoltaic generation system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To increase the output efficiency of a photovoltaic (PV) generation system it is important to have an efficient maximum power point tracking (MPPT) technique. This paper describes the analysis, design and implementation of an efficient tracking method ... Keywords: maximum power point tracking (MPPT), photovoltaic generation system, pulse-width-modulation (PWM), solar energy, variable voltage

Liu Liqun; Wang Zhixin

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Demonstration of a nitrogen based carburizing atmosphere (energy consumption of the endothermic generator). First quarterly report, 1 October 1978--30 December 1978  

SciTech Connect

This first quarterly report details the energy consumption of an endothermic generator. Two different sized generators were studied and found to have basically the same energy usage characteristics. The energy consumption was found to be dependent on generator output, with less energy consumption per unit volume at higher outputs.

Peartree, R.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Fixed and variable speed induction generators for real power loss minimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The application of induction generators in the wind power industry is standard practice. An induction generator draws reactive power from the network depending on its real power output, such that the greater the real power exported to the network, the ... Keywords: doubly- fed induction generator, induction generator, line loss, reactive power

S. Durairaj; D. Flynn; B. Fox

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Title 20, California Code of Regulations Article 5. Electricity Generation Source Disclosure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Commission. (e) "Facility" means one or all generating units at an electric generating station. (f) "Fuel (b)(3)(C) of section 1392. (g) "Generating facility output" means the electrical energy and/or fuel1 Title 20, California Code of Regulations Article 5. Electricity Generation Source Disclosure

262

GENERATING CAPACITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Evidence from the U.S. and some other countries indicates that organized wholesale markets for electrical energy and operating reserves do not provide adequate incentives to stimulate the proper quantity or mix of generating capacity consistent with mandatory reliability criteria. A large part of the problem can be associated with the failure of wholesale spot market prices for energy and operating reserves to rise to high enough levels during periods when generating capacity is fully utilized. Reforms to wholesale energy markets, the introduction of well-design forward capacity markets, and symmetrical treatment of demand response and generating capacity resources to respond to market and institutional imperfections are discussed. This policy reform program is compatible with improving the efficiency of spot wholesale electricity markets, the continued evolution of competitive retail markets, and restores incentives for efficient investment in generating capacity consistent with operating reliability criteria applied by system operators. It also responds to investment disincentives that have been associated with volatility in wholesale energy prices, limited hedging opportunities and to concerns about regulatory opportunism. 1

Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow; Paul L. Joskow

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

The 1995-1996 Decline of R Coronae Borealis - High Resolution Optical Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A set of high-resolution optical spectra of RCrB acquired before, during, and after its 1995-1996 decline is discussed. All of the components reported from earlier declines are seen. This novel dataset provides new information on these components including several aspects not previously seen in declines of RCrB and other RCBs. In the latter category is the discovery that the decline's onset is marked by distortions of absorption lines of high-excitation lines, and quickly followed by emission in these and in low excitation lines. This 'photospheric trigger' implies that dust causing the decline is formed close to the star. These emission lines fade quickly. After 1995 November 2, low excitation narrow (FWHM ~12 km s-1) emission lines remain. These appear to be a permanent feature, slightly blue-shifted from the systemic velocity, and unaffected by the decline except for a late and slight decrease of flux at minimum light. The location of the warm, dense gas providing these lines is uncertain. Absorption lines unaffected by overlying sharp emission are greatly broadened, weakened, and red-shifted at the faintest magnitudes when scattered light from the star is a greater contributor than direct light transmitted through the fresh soot cloud. A few broad lines are seen at and near minimum light with approxiamately constant flux: prominent among these are the He I triplet series, Na I D, and [N II] lines. These lines are blue-shifted by about 30 km s(-1) relative to the systemic velocity with no change in velocity over the several months for whicht he lines were seen. It is suggested that these lines, especially the He I lines, arise from an accretion disk around an unseen compact companion, which may be a low-mass white dwarf. If so, R CrB is similar to the unusual post-AGB star 89 Her.

N. Kameswara Rao; David L. Lambert; Mark T. Adams; David R. Doss; Guillermo Gonzalez; Artie P. Hatzes; C. Renee James; C. M. Johns-Krull; R. Earle Luck; Gajendra Pandey; Klaus Reinsch; Jocelyn Tomkin; Vincent M. Woolf

1999-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

264

Short rise time intense electron beam generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generator for producing an intense relativistic electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

Olson, Craig L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Microelectromechanical power generator and vibration sensor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microelectromechanical (MEM) apparatus is disclosed which can be used to generate electrical power in response to an external source of vibrations, or to sense the vibrations and generate an electrical output voltage in response thereto. The MEM apparatus utilizes a meandering electrical pickup located near a shuttle which holds a plurality of permanent magnets. Upon movement of the shuttle in response to vibrations coupled thereto, the permanent magnets move in a direction substantially parallel to the meandering electrical pickup, and this generates a voltage across the meandering electrical pickup. The MEM apparatus can be fabricated by LIGA or micromachining.

Roesler, Alexander W. (Tijeras, NM); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

266

Advanced Planning Method for Integrating Large-Scale Variable Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the penetration and size of renewable generation resources increase, the industry must expand transmission infrastructure to accommodate increasing renewable resource output. Conventional transmission expansion planning requires sufficient transmission capacities to transfer the full name plate capacity of all power plants to load centers at the same time. However, renewable resources, such as wind and solar, have highly variable output and are spatially diversified. Thus, transmission expansion plann...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

267

The development and use of radionuclide generators in nuclear medicine -- recent advances and future perspectives  

SciTech Connect

Although the trend in radionuclide generator research has declined, radionuclide generator systems continue to play an important role in nuclear medicine. Technetium-99m obtained from the molybdenum-99/technetium-99m generator system is used in over 80% of all diagnostic clinical studies and there is increasing interest and use of therapeutic radioisotopes obtained from generator systems. This paper focuses on a discussion of the major current areas of radionuclide generator research, and the expected areas of future research and applications.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Is Tourism the Solution to Rural Decline? Evaluating the "Promise of Rural Tourism" to Close the Gap between Rhetoric and Practice.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Rural areas across the developed world have encountered economic decline due to trends of industrialisation and urbanisation (Lane, 1994). The damaging effects of the declining… (more)

Janecka, Nicola

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Magnetocumulative generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing providing a housing chamber with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber, from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

Pettibone, J.S.; Wheeler, P.C.

1981-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

270

Cluster generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

Donchev, Todor I. (Urbana, IL); Petrov, Ivan G. (Champaign, IL)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

271

Thermoelectric generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermoelectric generator having a rigid coupling or stack'' between the heat source and the hot strap joining the thermoelements is described. The stack includes a member of an insulating material, such as ceramic, for electrically isolating the thermoelements from the heat source, and a pair of members of a ductile material, such as gold, one each on each side of the insulating member, to absorb thermal differential expansion stresses in the stack. (Official Gazette)

Pryslak, N.E.

1974-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

272

Photon generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A photon generator includes an electron gun for emitting an electron beam, a laser for emitting a laser beam, and an interaction ring wherein the laser beam repetitively collides with the electron beam for emitting a high energy photon beam therefrom in the exemplary form of x-rays. The interaction ring is a closed loop, sized and configured for circulating the electron beam with a period substantially equal to the period of the laser beam pulses for effecting repetitive collisions.

Srinivasan-Rao, Triveni (Shoreham, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

PLASMA GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

Foster, J.S. Jr.

1958-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Development and Decline of Hawaii's Skipjack Tuna Fishery CHRISTOFER H. BOGGS and BERT S. KIKKAWA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Development and Decline of Hawaii's Skipjack Tuna Fishery CHRISTOFER H. BOGGS and BERT S. KIKKAWA Introduction Historically, the pole-and-line, live bait fishery for skipjack tuna, Katsuwonus pelamis, was the largest commercial fishery in Hawaii. Annual pole-and-line landings of skipjack tuna

275

Steady decline of east Asian monsoon winds, 19692000: Evidence from direct ground measurements of wind speed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steady decline of east Asian monsoon winds, 1969­2000: Evidence from direct ground measurements winter monsoon but strengthen the summer monsoon, because of stronger warming over high-latitude land with the east Asian monsoon has significantly weakened in both winter and summer in the recent three decades

Chang, Chih-Pei

276

Electrical power converter method and system employing multiple output converters  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A support may receive one or more power electronic circuits. The support may aid in removing heat from the circuits through fluid circulating through the support. The support, in conjunction with other packaging features may form a shield from both external EMI/RFI and from interference generated by operation of the power electronic circuits. Features may be provided to permit and enhance connection of the circuitry to external circuitry, such as improved terminal configurations. Modular units may be assembled that may be coupled to electronic circuitry via plug-in arrangements or through interface with a backplane or similar mounting and interconnecting structures.

Beihoff, Bruce C. (Wauwatosa, WI); Radosevich, Lawrence D. (Muskego, WI); Meyer, Andreas A. (Richmond Heights, OH); Gollhardt, Neil (Fox Point, WI); Kannenberg, Daniel G. (Waukesha, WI)

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

New results in forecasting of photovoltaic systems output based on solar radiation forecasting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate short term forecasting of photovoltaic (PV) systems output has a great significance for fast development of PV parks in South-East Europe

Laurentiu Fara

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

A New Transadmittance Type First-Order Allpass Filter Employing Single Third Generation Current Conveyor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel transadmittance (TA) mode first-order all-pass filter configuration is proposed. The proposed circuit uses a third generation current conveyor (CCIII), three resistors and a grounded capacitor. The output of the filter exhibits high output impedance ... Keywords: all-pass filter, analog integrated circuits, current conveyor

U?ur Çam

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

HEAT GENERATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Heat is generated by the utilization of high energy neutrons produced as by nuclear reactions between hydrogen isotopes in a blanket zone containing lithium, a neutron moderator, and uranium and/or thorium effective to achieve multtplicatton of the high energy neutron. The rnultiplied and moderated neutrons produced react further with lithium-6 to produce tritium in the blanket. Thermal neutron fissionable materials are also produced and consumed in situ in the blanket zone. The heat produced by the aggregate of the various nuclear reactions is then withdrawn from the blanket zone to be used or otherwise disposed externally. (AEC)

Imhoff, D.H.; Harker, W.H.

1963-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Deterministic and stochastic analyses to quantify the reliability of uncertainty estimates in production decline modeling of shale gas reservoirs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Decline curve analysis seeks to predict the future performance of oil and gas wells by fitting a mathematical function to historical production data and extrapolating… (more)

Johanson, Brent L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Magnetocumulative generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved magnetocumulative generator is described that is useful for producing magnetic fields of very high energy content over large spatial volumes. The polar directed pleated magnetocumulative generator has a housing (100, 101, 102, 103, 104, 105) providing a housing chamber (106) with an electrically conducting surface. The chamber (106) forms a coaxial system having a small radius portion and a large radius portion. When a magnetic field is injected into the chamber (106), from an external source, most of the magnetic flux associated therewith positions itself in the small radius portion. The propagation of an explosive detonation through high-explosive layers (107, 108) disposed adjacent to the housing causes a phased closure of the chamber (106) which sweeps most of the magnetic flux into the large radius portion of the coaxial system. The energy content of the magnetic field is greatly increased by flux stretching as well as by flux compression. The energy enhanced magnetic field is utilized within the housing chamber itself.

Pettibone, Joseph S. (Livermore, CA); Wheeler, Paul C. (Livermore, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Dual output acoustic wave sensor for molecular identification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention comprises a method for the identification and quantification of sorbed chemical species onto a coating of a device capable of generating and receiving an acoustic wave, by measuring the changes in the velocity of the acoustic wave resulting from the sorption of the chemical species into the coating as the wave travels through the coating and by measuring the changes in the attenuation of an acoustic wave resulting from the sorption of the chemical species into the coating as the wave travels through the coating. The inventive method further correlates the magnitudes of the changes of velocity with respect to changes of the attenuation of the acoustic wave to identify the sorbed chemical species. The absolute magnitudes of the velocity changes or the absolute magnitude of the attenuation changes are used to determine the concentration of the identified chemical species.

Frye, G.C.; Martin, S.J.

1990-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

283

Photonic Crystals: Enhancing the Light Output of Scintillation Based Detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A scintillator is a material which emits light when excited by ionizing radiation. Such materials are used in a diverse range of applications; From high energy particle physics experiments, X-ray security, to nuclear cameras or positron emission tomography. Future high-energy physics (HEP) experiments as well as next generation medical imaging applications are more and more pushing towards better scintillation characteristics. One of the problems in heavy scintillating materials is related to their high index of refraction. As a consequence, most of the scintillation light produced in the bulk material is trapped inside the crystal due to total internal reflection. The same problem also occurs with light emitting diodes (LEDs) and has for a long time been considered as a limiting factor for their overall efficiency. Recent developments in the area of nanophotonics were showing now that those limitations can be overcome by introducing a photonic crystal (PhC) slab at the outcoupling surface of the substrate. P...

Knapitsch, Arno Richard

284

NREL: Transmission Grid Integration - Generator Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generator Modeling Generator Modeling NREL works with the solar and wind industries to provide utilities and grid operators with generator models to help them analyze the impact of variable generation on power system performance and reliability. As the amount of variable generation increases, the need for such models increases. Ensuring the models are as generic as possible allows for ease of use, model validation, data exchange, and analysis. To address this need, NREL researchers are developing generic dynamic models of wind and solar power plants. NREL's dynamic modeling efforts include: Collecting wind plant output data with corresponding wind resource data (speed, direction, and air density) from meteorological towers and performing multivariate analysis of the data to develop an equivalent wind

285

Brief paper: Output feedback strict passivity of discrete-time nonlinear systems and adaptive control system design with a PFC  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a passivity-based adaptive output feedback control for discrete-time nonlinear systems is considered. Output Feedback Strictly Passive (OFSP) conditions in order to design a stable adaptive output control system will be established. Further, ... Keywords: Adaptive control, Discrete nonlinear systems, Output feedback, Parallel feedforward compensator, Strict passivity

Ikuro Mizumoto; Satoshi Ohdaira; Zenta Iwai

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

ARM: ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

ARSCL: multiple outputs from first Clothiaux algorithms on Vaisala or Belfort ceilometers, Micropulse lidar, and MMCR

Richard Coulter; Kevin Widener; Nitin Bharadwaj; Karen Johnson; Timothy Martin

287

Student Research Workshop, RANLP 2009 -Borovets, Bulgaria, pages 2934 Improving the Output from Software that Generates Multiple Choice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and one at Swindon College. A further two mechanical apprentices and one electrical apprentice joined by IMechE, thereby joining the electrical apprentices who can be awarded Eng Tech by the Institute a bath of water, would provide the fuel for 200,000 kW-hours of electricity ­ the same as 70 tonnes

288

Biogass Generator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Another internet tool by: Another internet tool by: Build Your Own Page 1 of 5 Teach...build...learn...renewable energy! Biogas Generator A Renewable Energy Project Kit The Pembina Institute What Is Biogas? Biogas is actually a mixture of gases, usually carbon dioxide and methane. It is produced by a few kinds of microorganisms, usually when air or oxygen is absent. (The absence of oxygen is called "anaerobic conditions.") Animals that eat a lot of plant material, particularly grazing animals such as cattle, produce large amounts of biogas. The biogas is produced not by the cow or elephant, but by billions of microor- ganisms living in its digestive system. Biogas also develops in bogs and at the bottom of lakes, where decaying organic matter builds up under wet and

289

Using Decline Map Anlaysis (DMA) to Test Well Completion Influence on Gas Production Decline Curves in Barnett Shale (Denton, Wise, and Tarrant Counties)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The increasing interest and focus on unconventional reservoirs is a result of the industry's direction toward exploring alternative energy sources. It is due to the fact that conventional reservoirs are being depleted at a fast pace. Shale gas reservoirs are a very favorable type of energy sources due to their low cost and long-lasting gas supply. In general, according to Ausubel (1996), natural gas serves as a transition stage to move from the current oil-based energy sources to future more stable and environment-friendly ones. By looking through production history in the U.S Historical Production Database, HPDI (2009), we learn that the Barnett Shale reservoir in Newark East Field has been producing since the early 90's and contributing a fraction of the U.S daily gas production. Zhao et al. (2007) estimated the Barnett Shale to be producing 1.97 Bcf/day of gas in 2007. It is considered the most productive unconventional gas shale reservoir in Texas. By 2004 and in terms of annual gas production volume, Pollastro (2007) considered the Barnett Shale as the second largest unconventional gas reservoir in the United States. Many studies have been conducted to understand better the production controls in Barnett Shale. However, this giant shale gas reservoir is still ambiguous. Some parts of this puzzle are still missing. It is not fully clear what makes the Barnett well produce high or low amounts of gas. Barnett operating companies are still trying to answer these questions. This study adds to the Barnett chain of studies. It tests the effects of the following on Barnett gas production in the core area (Denton, Wise, and Tarrant counties): * Barnett gross thickness, including the Forestburg formation that divides Barnett Shale. * Perforation footage. * Perforated zones of Barnett Shale. Instead of testing these parameters on each well production decline curve individually, this study uses a new technique to simplify this process. Decline Map Analysis (DMA) is introduced to measure the effects of these parameters on all production decline curves at the same time. Through this study, Barnett gross thickness and perforation footage are found not to have any definite effects on Barnett gas production. However, zone 3 (Top of Lower Barnett) and zone 1 (Bottom of Lower Barnett) are found to contribute to cumulative production. Zone 2 (Middle of Lower Barnett) and zone 4 (Upper Barnett), on the other hand, did not show any correlation or influence on production through their thicknesses.

Alkassim, Ibrahim

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Brief paper: Output tracking of continuous bioreactors through recirculation and by-pass  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose to regulate the output of an auto-catalytic bioprocess (a biological process associated with a growth of a micro-organism) by means of a recirculation loop and by-pass. We give conditions on the volume of the reactor and the ... Keywords: Continuous bioreactor, Nonlinear control design, Output regulation, Recirculation loop

Jérôme Harmand; Alain Rapaport; Frédéric Mazenc

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Estimating Solar PV Output Using Modern Space/Time Geostatistics (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation describes a project that uses mapping techniques to predict solar output at subhourly resolution at any spatial point, develop a methodology that is applicable to natural resources in general, and demonstrate capability of geostatistical techniques to predict the output of a potential solar plant.

Lee, S. J.; George, R.; Bush, B.

2009-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

292

ANN Models for Steam Turbine Power Output Toward Condenser Circulating Water Flux  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aimed the costliness and the complex process of performance test for steam turbine power output toward circulating water flux and in view of the non—linear advantage about neural network, it brings forward predicting the performance using artificial ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, steam turbine power output, performance prediction

Jia Ruixuan; Xu Hong

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Brief paper: A multi-regulator sliding mode control strategy for output-constrained systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a multi-regulator control scheme for single-input systems, where the setpoint of a regulated output must be changed under the constraint that a set of minimum-phase outputs remain within prescribed bounds. The strategy is based on ... Keywords: Aircraft engines, Control with constraints, Hybrid systems, Selector systems, Sliding modes

Hanz Richter

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Impact of unit commitment constraints on generation expansion planning with renewables  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growing use of renewables pushes thermal generators against operating constraints - e.g. ramping, minimum output, and operating reserves - that are traditionally ignored in expansion planning models. We show how including ...

Palmintier, Bryan Stephen

295

Generating Rainfall and Temperature Scenarios at Multiple Sites: Examples from the Mediterranean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical downscaling methodology was implemented to generate daily time series of temperature and rainfall for point locations within a catchment, based on the output from general circulation models. The rainfall scenarios were constructed ...

J. P. Palutikof; C. M. Goodess; S. J. Watkins; T. Holt

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Predicting the Energy Output of Wind Farms Based on Weather Data: Important Variables and their Correlation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wind energy plays an increasing role in the supply of energy world-wide. The energy output of a wind farm is highly dependent on the weather condition present at the wind farm. If the output can be predicted more accurately, energy suppliers can coordinate the collaborative production of different energy sources more efficiently to avoid costly overproductions. With this paper, we take a computer science perspective on energy prediction based on weather data and analyze the important parameters as well as their correlation on the energy output. To deal with the interaction of the different parameters we use symbolic regression based on the genetic programming tool DataModeler. Our studies are carried out on publicly available weather and energy data for a wind farm in Australia. We reveal the correlation of the different variables for the energy output. The model obtained for energy prediction gives a very reliable prediction of the energy output for newly given weather data.

Vladislavleva, Katya; Neumann, Frank; Wagner, Markus

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

ORISE report shows number of health physics Ph.D.s declined in 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORISE report shows number of health physics Ph.D.s declined in 2009 ORISE report shows number of health physics Ph.D.s declined in 2009 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 15, 2010 FY10-37 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-Health physics undergraduate degrees increased slightly in 2009 continuing a six-year trend, but doctorate degrees reported a 40-year low, says a report recently released by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. The report also showed the number of M.S. degrees was 21 percent less than in 2008. The ORISE report, Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees Survey, 2009 Data, surveyed 24 academic programs with enrollment and degree data and included students majoring in health physics or in an option program equivalent to a major. According to the survey, a total of 154 health physics B.S., M.S. and Ph.D degrees were earned in 2009.

298

Reasons for production decline in the diatomite, Belridge oil field: a rock mechanics view  

SciTech Connect

This work summarized research conducted on diatomite cores from the Belridge oil field in Kern County. The study was undertaken to try to explain the rapid decline in oil production in diatomite wells. Characterization of the rock showed that the rock was composed principally of amorphous opaline silica diatoms with only a trace of crystoballite quartz or chert quartz. Physical properties tests showed the diatomite to be of low strength and plastic. Finally, it was established that long-term creep of diatomite into a propped fracture proceeds at a rate of approximately 6 x 10-5 in./day, a phenomenon which may be a primary cause of rapid production declines. The testing program also revealed a matrix stength for the formation of calculated 1325 PSI, a value to consider when depleting the reservoir. This also may help to explain the phase transformation of opal ct at calculated 2000 to 2500 ft depth.

Strickland, F.G.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Determination of uncertainty in reserves estimate from analysis of production decline data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysts increasingly have used probabilistic approaches to evaluate the uncertainty in reserves estimates based on a decline curve analysis. This is because the results represent statistical analysis of historical data that usually possess significant amounts of noise. Probabilistic approaches usually provide a distribution of reserves estimates with three confidence levels (P10, P50 and P90) and a corresponding 80% confidence interval. The question arises: how reliable is this 80% confidence interval? In other words, in a large set of analyses, is the true value of reserves contained within this interval 80% of the time? Our investigation indicates that it is common in practice for true values of reserves to lie outside the 80% confidence interval much more than 20% of the time using traditional statistical analyses. This indicates that uncertainty is being underestimated, often significantly. Thus, the challenge in probabilistic reserves estimation using a decline curve analysis is not only how to appropriately characterize probabilistic properties of complex production data sets, but also how to determine and then improve the reliability of the uncertainty quantifications. This thesis presents an improved methodology for probabilistic quantification of reserves estimates using a decline curve analysis and practical application of the methodology to actual individual well decline curves. The application of our proposed new method to 100 oil and gas wells demonstrates that it provides much wider 80% confidence intervals, which contain the true values approximately 80% of the time. In addition, the method yields more accurate P50 values than previously published methods. Thus, the new methodology provides more reliable probabilistic reserves estimation, which has important impacts on economic risk analysis and reservoir management.

Wang, Yuhong

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Application of field-modulated generator systems to dispersed solar thermal electric generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A Parabolic Dish-Electric Transport concept for dispersed solar thermal generation is considered. In this concept the power generated by 15 kWe Solar Generation Units is electrically collected in a large plant. Various approaches are possible for the conversion of mechanical shaft output of the heat engines to electricity. This study focuses on the Application of Field Modulated Generation System (FMGS) for that purpose. Initially the state-of-the-art of FMGS is presented, and the application of FMGS to dispersed solar thermal electric generation is investigated. This is followed by the definition of the control and monitoring requirements for solar generation system. Then comparison is made between FMGS approach and other options. Finally, the technology developmental needs are identified.

Ramakumar, R.; Bahrami, K.

1979-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Fueled viking generator S/N 106 acceptance vibration test report  

SciTech Connect

The Viking Generator S/N 106 was vibrated to the Teledyne Isotope Flight Acceptance Schedule (Random Only) with no deviation from normal generator functional output. Radiographic analysis and power tests before and after the vibration test indicated no change in the condition of the generator. The work was conducted in the Alpha Fuels Environmental Test Facility at Mound Laboratory.

Anderson, C.; Brewer, C.O.; Abrahamson, S.G.

1976-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

302

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 February 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis This figure shows the downward trends of EM TRC and DART case rates for the last three fiscal years. These three years correspond to the time of substantial increase in work activities in support of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This figure shows the downward trends of EM TRC and DART case rates for the last three fiscal years. These three years correspond to the time of substantial increase in work activities in support of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. EM’s TRC and DART case cumulative rate trend lines over the past 15 quarters remain well below comparable industries’ TRC and DART Case rates. For benchmark comparison, the Construction Industry and the Waste Management & Remediation Service Industry numbers are selected to best approximate the complex-wide decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remediation, waste management and facility construction activities contracted by EM

303

ADVANCED STEAM GENERATORS  

SciTech Connect

Concerns about climate change have encouraged significant interest in concepts for ultra-low or ''zero''-emissions power generation systems. In some proposed concepts, nitrogen is removed from the combustion air and replaced with another diluent such as carbon dioxide or steam. In this way, formation of nitrogen oxides is prevented, and the exhaust stream can be separated into concentrated CO{sub 2} and steam or water streams. The concentrated CO{sub 2} stream could then serve as input to a CO{sub 2} sequestration process or utilized in some other way. Some of these concepts are illustrated in Figure 1. This project is an investigation of one approach to ''zero'' emission power generation. Oxy-fuel combustion is used with steam as diluent in a power cycle proposed by Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) [1,2]. In oxy-fuel combustion, air separation is used to produce nearly pure oxygen for combustion. In this particular concept, the combustion temperatures are moderated by steam as a diluent. An advantage of this technique is that water in the product stream can be condensed with relative ease, leaving a pure CO{sub 2} stream suitable for sequestration. Because most of the atmospheric nitrogen has been separated from the oxidant, the potential to form any NOx pollutant is very small. Trace quantities of any minor pollutants species that do form are captured with the CO{sub 2} or can be readily removed from the condensate. The result is a nearly zero-emission power plant. A sketch of the turbine system proposed by CES is shown in Figure 2. NETL is working with CES to develop a reheat combustor for this application. The reheat combustion application is unusual even among oxy-fuel combustion applications. Most often, oxy-fuel combustion is carried out with the intent of producing very high temperatures for heat transfer to a product. In the reheat case, incoming steam is mixed with the oxygen and natural gas fuel to control the temperature of the output stream to about 1480 K. A potential concern is the possibility of quenching non-equilibrium levels of CO or unburned fuel in the mixing process. Inadequate residence times in the combustor and/or slow kinetics could possibly result in unacceptably high emissions. Thus, the reheat combustor design must balance the need for minimal excess oxygen with the need to oxidize the CO. This paper will describe the progress made to date in the design, fabrication, and simulation of a reheat combustor for an advanced steam generator system, and discuss planned experimental testing to be conducted in conjunction with NASA Glenn Research Center-Plumb Brook Station.

Richards, Geo. A.; Casleton, Kent H.; Lewis, Robie E.; Rogers, William A. (U.S. DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory); Woike, Mark R.; Willis; Brian P. (NASA Glenn Research Center)

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

304

Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

305

Prediction of Boiler Output Variables Through the PLS Linear Regression Technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: In this work, we propose to use the linear regression partial least square method to predict the output variables of the RA1G boiler. This method consists in finding the regression of an output block regarding an input block. These two blocks represent the outputs and inputs of the process. A criteria of cross validation, based on the calculation of the predicted residual sum of squares, is used to select the components of the model in the partial least square regression. The obtained results illustrate the effectiveness of this method for prediction purposes.

Abdelmalek Kouadri; Mimoun Zelmat; Alhussein Albarbar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

A method for reducing harmonics in output voltages of a double-connected inverter  

SciTech Connect

A new method for reducing harmonics involved in output voltages of the double-connected inverter is proposed. By adding four auxiliary switching devices and an interphase transformer with secondary winding to the conventional 12-step inverter, output voltages of the proposed circuit can be almost the same waveforms as a conventional 36-step inverter. In this paper, circuit performances and output voltage waveforms are discussed, and the optimum parameters are derived. Then, effects on harmonic reductions can be clarified by theoretical and experimental results, and ratings of system components are investigated.

Masukawa, Shigeo; Iida, Shoji (Tokyo Denki Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Electrical Engineering)

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Capture of charge carriers and output power of a quantum well laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of noninstantaneous carrier capture by a nanoscale active region on the power characteristics of a semiconductor laser is studied. A laser structure based on a single quantum well is considered. It is shown that delayed carrier capture by the quantum well results in a decrease in the internal differential quantum efficiency and sublinearity of the light-current characteristic of the laser. The main parameter of the developed theoretical model is the velocity of carrier capture from the bulk (waveguide) region to the two-dimensional region (quantum well). The effect of the capture velocity on the dependence of the following laser characteristics on the pump current density is studied: the output optical power, internal quantum efficiency of stimulated emission, current of stimulated recombination in the quantum well, current of spontaneous recombination in the optical confinement layer, and carrier concentration in the optical confinement layer. A decrease in the carrier capture velocity results in a larger sublinearity of the light-current characteristic, which results from an increase in the injection current fraction expended to parasitic spontaneous recombination in the optical confinement layer and, hence, a decrease in the injection current fraction expended to stimulated recombination in the quantum well. A comparison of calculated and experimental light-current characteristics for a structure considered as an example shows that good agreement between them (up to a very high injection current density of 45 kA/cm{sup 2}) is attained at a capture velocity of 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} cm/s. The results of this study can be used to optimize quantum well lasers for generating high optical powers.

Sokolova, Z. N., E-mail: Zina.Sokolova@mail.ioffe.ru; Tarasov, I. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical Technical Institute (Russian Federation); Asryan, L. V. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (United States)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

308

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors New Research Center to Increase Safety and Power Output of U.S. Nuclear Reactors May 3, 2011 - 3:41pm Addthis Oak Ridge, Tenn. - Today the Department of Energy dedicated the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL), an advanced research facility that will accelerate the advancement of nuclear reactor technology. CASL researchers are using supercomputers to study the performance of light water reactors and to develop highly sophisticated modeling that will help accelerate upgrades at existing U.S. nuclear plants. These upgrades could improve the energy output of our existing reactor fleet by as much as seven reactors' worth at a fraction of the cost of building new reactors, while providing continued improvements in

309

Optimization of the optical output in a C-to-C pulsed gas laser  

SciTech Connect

An investigation of the optimum condition for maximum optical output in a C-to-C pulsed gas laser (N{sub 2} laser) showed that this condition does not happen when the two capacitances are equal (C{sub 1} = C{sub 2}) as this happens in the ``Doubling circuit`` case, but when the peaking capacitance obtains a critical value. This behavior is attributed to the electric pumping pulse formed by the temporary loading of the peaking capacitor. This electric pumping pulse increases as the peaking capacitor increases. However, for low values of the peaking capacitor the optical output follows the rise of the electric pumping pulse. On the other hand, for higher values of the peaking capacitor than a critical one, a part of the electric energy arrives at the laser channel after the laser output, while the exploitable electric energy decreases causing reduction of the optical output.

Persephonis, P.; Giannetas, V.; Parthenios, J.; Ioannou, A.; Georgiades, C. [Univ. of Patras, Patra (Greece). Dept. of Physics

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Examining the Variability of Wind Power Output in the Regulation Time Frame: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This work examines the distribution of changes in wind power for different time scales in the regulation time frame as well as the correlation of changes in power output for individual wind turbines in a wind plant.

Hodge, B. M.; Shedd, S.; Florita, A.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Estimates of Cn2 from Numerical Weather Prediction Model Output and Comparison with Thermosonde Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Area-averaged estimates of Cn2 from high-resolution numerical weather prediction (NWP) model output are produced from local estimates of the spatial structure functions of refractive index with corrections for the inherent smoothing and filtering ...

Rod Frehlich; Robert Sharman; Francois Vandenberghe; Wei Yu; Yubao Liu; Jason Knievel; George Jumper

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Diagnostic and Forecast Graphics Products at NMC Using High Frequency Model Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Archived hourly output from the National Meteorological Center (NMC) prediction models has provided the basis for advanced graphic diagnostic and forecast tools. The high-frequency data are available on a regional selected station network. Each ...

David W. Plummer

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The Application of Model Output Statistics to Precipitation Prediction in Australia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model output Statistics (MOS) technique has been used to produce forecasts of both the probability of precipitation and the rain amount for seven major Australian cities in subtropical and middle latitudes. Single station equations were ...

R. G. Tapp; F. Woodcock; G. A. Mills

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

An Application of Model Output Statistics to the Development of a Local Wind Regime Forecast Procedure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Model Output Statistics (MOS) approach is used to develop a procedure for forecasting the occurrence of a local wind regime at Rota, Spain known as the levante. Variables derived solely from surface pressure and 500 mb height forecast fields ...

Robert A. Godfrey

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Calibrated Probabilistic Forecasting Using Ensemble Model Output Statistics and Minimum CRPS Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ensemble prediction systems typically show positive spread-error correlation, but they are subject to forecast bias and dispersion errors, and are therefore uncalibrated. This work proposes the use of ensemble model output statistics (EMOS), an ...

Tilmann Gneiting; Adrian E. Raftery; Anton H. Westveld III; Tom Goldman

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Model Output Statistics Forecasts: Three Years of Operational Experience in the Netherlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Netherlands, one to five day Model Output Statistics (MOS) forecasts have been used operationally since November 1983. The weather elements predicted are the probability of precipitation, the conditional probability of frozen precipitation,...

C. Lemcke; S. Kruizinga

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

A Single-Station Approach to Model Output Statistics Temperature Forecast Error Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Error characteristics of model output statistics (MOS) temperature forecasts are calculated for over 200 locations around the continental United States. The forecasts are verified on a station-by-station basis for the year 2001. Error measures ...

Andrew A. Taylor; Lance M. Leslie

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Australian Experimental Model Output Statistics Forecasts of Daily Maximum and Minimum Temperature  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Model output statistics (MOS) forecasts of daily temperature maxima and minima are developed for seven Australian cities. The developmental data and method of derivation of the MOS equations are described and the equations briefly compared to ...

F. Woodcock

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Single-inductor, multiple-output buck converter with parallel source transient recovery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To address the need for multiple regulated voltage supplies in electronic devices, this thesis presents a modeling and design study of a single-inductor, multiple-output (SIMO) DC-DC buck converter with parallel source ...

King, Charles Jackson, III

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Reduced-basis output bound methods for parametrized partial differential equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An efficient and reliable method for the prediction of outputs of interest of partial differential equations with affine parameter dependence is presented. To achieve efficiency we employ the reduced-basis method: a weighted ...

Rovas, Dimitrios V. (Dimitrios Vasileios), 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 4e. Gross Output by Selected Industries...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

e Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 4e. Gross Output1by Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Billion 2000 Dollars 2) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002...

322

Exploring the Structure of Regional Climate Scenarios by Combining Synoptic and Dynamic Guidance and GCM Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A set of regional climate scenarios is constructed for two study regions in North America using a combination of GCM output and synoptic–dynamical reasoning. The approach begins by describing the structure and components of a climate scenario and ...

James S. Risbey; Peter J. Lamb; Ron L. Miller; Michael C. Morgan; Gerard H. Roe

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Use of Medium-Range Numerical Weather Prediction Model Output to Produce Forecasts of Streamflow  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines an archive containing over 40 years of 8-day atmospheric forecasts over the contiguous United States from the NCEP reanalysis project to assess the possibilities for using medium-range numerical weather prediction model output ...

Martyn P. Clark; Lauren E. Hay

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Experiments in probability of Precipitation Amount Forecasting Using Model Output Statistics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modifications to current model output statistics procedures for quantitative precipitation forecasting were explored. Probability of precipitation amount equations were developed for warm and cool seasons in a region in the eastern United States. ...

Raymond W. Arritt; William M. Frank

1985-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Estimating Potential Evaporation from Vegetated Surfaces for Water Management Impact Assessments Using Climate Model Output  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

River basin managers concerned with maintaining water supplies and mitigating flood risk in the face of climate change are taking outputs from climate models and using them in hydrological models for assessment purposes. While precipitation is the ...

Victoria A. Bell; Nicola Gedney; Alison L. Kay; Roderick N. B. Smith; Richard G. Jones; Robert J. Moore

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.3b Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion Btu)

327

Rising U.S. oil output leads world oil supply growth  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

is well on its way to topping 8 million barrels per day by 2014. In its new monthly forecast, the U.S. Energy Information Administration expects daily oil output will average 7.3...

328

Statistical Downscaling of Precipitation in Korea Using Multimodel Output Variables as Predictors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pattern projection downscaling method is applied to predict summer precipitation at 60 stations over Korea. The predictors are multiple variables from the output of six operational dynamical models. The hindcast datasets span a period of 21 yr ...

Hongwen Kang; Chung-Kyu Park; Saji N. Hameed; Karumuri Ashok

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Downscaling Solar Power Output to 4-Seconds for Use in Integration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Downscaling Solar Power Output to 4-Seconds for Use in Integration Studies Marissa Hummon 3 rd International Solar Power Integration Workshop October 20-22, 2013 London, UK NREL...

330

Downscaling Solar Power Output to 4-Seconds for Use in Integration...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Downscaling Solar Power Output to 4-Seconds for Use in Integration Studies Preprint M. Hummon, A. Weekley, K. Searight, and K. Clark To be presented at the 3rd International...

331

Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.3c Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.3a; Trillion ...

332

On Time-Invariant Purified-Output-Based Discrete Time Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oct 14, 2005 ... On Time-Invariant Purified-Output-Based Discrete Time Control. Aharon Ben-Tal (abental ***at*** ie.technion.ac.il) Stephen Boyd (boyd ***at*** ...

333

Monte Carlo simulation of the effect of miniphantom on in-air output ratio  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of the study was to quantify the effect of miniphantoms on in-air output ratio measurements, i.e., to determine correction factors for in-air output ratio. Methods: Monte Carlo (MC) simulations were performed to simulate in-air output ratio measurements by using miniphantoms made of various materials (PMMA, graphite, copper, brass, and lead) and with different longitudinal thicknesses or depths (2-30 g/cm{sup 2}) in photon beams of 6 and 15 MV, respectively, and with collimator settings ranging from 3x3 to 40x40 cm{sup 2}. EGSnrc and BEAMnrc (2007) software packages were used. Photon energy spectra corresponding to the collimator settings were obtained from BEAMnrc code simulations on a linear accelerator and were used to quantify the components of in-air output ratio correction factors, i.e., attenuation, mass energy absorption, and phantom scatter correction factors. In-air output ratio correction factors as functions of miniphantom material, miniphantom longitudinal thickness, and collimator setting were calculated and compared to a previous experimental study. Results: The in-air output ratio correction factors increase with collimator opening and miniphantom longitudinal thickness for all the materials and for both energies. At small longitudinal thicknesses, the in-air output ratio correction factors for PMMA and graphite are close to 1. The maximum magnitudes of the in-air output ratio correction factors occur at the largest collimator setting (40x40 cm{sup 2}) and the largest miniphantom longitudinal thickness (30 g/cm{sup 2}): 1.008{+-}0.001 for 6 MV and 1.012{+-}0.001 for 15 MV, respectively. The MC simulations of the in-air output ratio correction factor confirm the previous experimental study. Conclusions: The study has verified that a correction factor for in-air output ratio can be obtained as a product of attenuation correction factor, mass energy absorption correction factor, and phantom scatter correction factor. The correction factors obtained in the present study can be used in studies involving in-air output ratio measurements using miniphantoms.

Li Jun; Zhu, Timothy C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19107 (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Coiled transmission line pulse generators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods and apparatus are provided for fabricating and constructing solid dielectric "Coiled Transmission Line" pulse generators in radial or axial coiled geometries. The pour and cure fabrication process enables a wide variety of geometries and form factors. The volume between the conductors is filled with liquid blends of monomers, polymers, oligomers, and/or cross-linkers and dielectric powders; and then cured to form high field strength and high dielectric constant solid dielectric transmission lines that intrinsically produce ideal rectangular high voltage pulses when charged and switched into matched impedance loads. Voltage levels may be increased by Marx and/or Blumlein principles incorporating spark gap or, preferentially, solid state switches (such as optically triggered thyristors) which produce reliable, high repetition rate operation. Moreover, these Marxed pulse generators can be DC charged and do not require additional pulse forming circuitry, pulse forming lines, transformers, or an a high voltage spark gap output switch. The apparatus accommodates a wide range of voltages, impedances, pulse durations, pulse repetition rates, and duty cycles. The resulting mobile or flight platform friendly cylindrical geometric configuration is much more compact, light-weight, and robust than conventional linear geometries, or pulse generators constructed from conventional components. Installing additional circuitry may accommodate optional pulse shape improvements. The Coiled Transmission Lines can also be connected in parallel to decrease the impedance, or in series to increase the pulse length.

McDonald, Kenneth Fox (Columbia, MO)

2010-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

335

Active-Site Inhibitors of mTOR Target Rapamycin-Resistant Outputs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Active-Site Inhibitors of mTOR Target Rapamycin-Resistant Outputs of mTORC1 and mTORC2 Morris E. (2009) Active-site inhibitors of mTOR target rapamycin-resistant outputs of mTORC1 and mTORC2. PLoS Biol and activated by growth factor stimulation via the canonical phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)!Akt!mTOR pathway

Halazonetis, Thanos

336

Recommended methods for evaluating the benefits of ECUT Program outputs. [Energy Conversion and Utilization  

SciTech Connect

This study was conducted to define and develop techniques that could be used to assess the complete spectrum of positive effects resulting from the Energy Conversion and Utilization Technologies (ECUT) Program activities. These techniques could then be applied to measure the benefits from past ECUT outputs. In addition, the impact of future ECUT outputs could be assessed as part of an ongoing monitoring process, after sufficient time has elapsed to allow their impacts to develop.

Levine, L.O.; Winter, C.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

CORRELATIONS BETWEEN VAPOR SATURATION, FLUID COMPOSITION, AND WELL DECLINE IN LARDERELLO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A large body of field data from Larderello shows striking temporal correlations between decline of well flow-rate, produced gas/steam ratio, chloride concentration and produced vapor fraction. The latter is inferred from measured concentrations of non-condensible gases in samples of well fluid, using chemical phase equilibrium principles. Observed temporal changes in the vapor fractions can be interpreted in term of a ''multiple source'' model, as suggested by D'Amore and Truesdell (1979). This provides clues to the dynamics of reservoir depletion, and to the evaluation of well productivity and longevity.

D'Amore, F.; Pruess, K.

1985-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

338

An Intelligent User Interface to Support Weather Report Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern-day computers have greatly advanced our ability to generate reasonably accurate weather forecast models in a timely manner. High-powered workstations have put the output from these models, as well as a tremendous amount of raw and analyzed ...

Darryl N. Leon; Michael L. Talbert

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Sequential generation of matrix-product states in cavity QED  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the sequential generation of entangled photonic and atomic multiqubit states in the realm of cavity QED. We extend the work of C. Schoen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 110503 (2005)], where it was shown that all states generated in a sequential manner can be classified efficiently in terms of matrix-product states. In particular, we consider two scenarios: photonic multiqubit states sequentially generated at the cavity output of a single-photon source and atomic multiqubit states generated by their sequential interaction with the same cavity mode.

Schoen, C. [Blackett Laboratory, Imperial College London, Prince Consort Road, London SW7 2BZ (United Kingdom); Hammerer, K. [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Innsbruck, 6020 Innsbruck (Austria); Wolf, M. M.; Cirac, J. I. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany); Solano, E. [Physics Department, ASC, and CeNS, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet, Theresienstrasse 37, 80333 Munich (Germany); Seccion Fisica, Departamento de Ciencias, Pontificia Universidad Catolica del Peru, Apartado Postal 1761, Lima (Peru)

2007-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Evaluation of the potential to upgrade the Sandia Atomic Iodine Laser SAIL-1 to higher output energies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The predicted output energy of the Sandia Atomic Iodine Laser SAIL-1 is given for various numbers of preamplifier stages and for various small signal gains in each stage. Additional possibilities for further increasing the output energy are given.

Riley, M.E.; Palmer, R.E.

1977-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

The effect of small field output factor measurements on IMRT dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate how changes in the measured small field output factors affect the doses in intensity-modulated treatment planning. Methods: IMRT plans were created using Philips Pinnacle treatment planning system. The plans were optimized to treat a cylindrical target 2 cm in diameter and 2 cm in length. Output factors for 2 Multiplication-Sign 2 and 3 Multiplication-Sign 3 cm{sup 2} field sizes were changed by {+-}5%, {+-}10%, and {+-}20% increments from the baseline measurements and entered into the planning system. The treatment units were recommissioned in the treatment planning system after each modification of the output factors and treatment plans were reoptimized. All plans were delivered to a solid water phantom and dose measurements were made using an ionization chamber. The percentage differences between measured and computed doses were calculated. An Elekta Synergy and a Varian 2300CD linear accelerator were separately evaluated. Results: For the Elekta unit, decreasing the output factors resulted in higher measured than computed doses by 0.8% for -5%, 3.6% for -10%, and 8.7% for -20% steps. Increasing the output factors resulted in lower doses by 2.9% for +5%, 5.4% for +10%, and 8.3% for +20% steps. For the Varian unit no changes were observed for either increased or decreased output factors. Conclusions: The measurement accuracy of small field output factors are of importance especially when the treatment plan consists of small segments as in IMRT. The method proposed here could be used to verify the accuracy of the measured small field output factors for certain linear accelerators as well as to test the beam model. The Pinnacle treatment planning system model uses output factors as a function of jaw setting. Consequently, plans using the Elekta unit, which conforms the jaws to the segments, are sensitive to small field measurement accuracy. On the other hand, for the Varian unit, jaws are fixed and segments are modeled as blocked fields hence, the impact of small field output factors on IMRT monitor unit calculation is not evaluable by this method.

Azimi, Rezvan; Alaei, Parham; Higgins, Patrick [Department of Therapeutic Radiology-Radiation Oncology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Litterfall 15N Abundance Indicates Declining Soil N Availability in a Free Air CO2-Enrichment Experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: DOE Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Change in leaf litterfall d15N over time Office of Science, Biological and Environmental Research Litterfall 15N Abundance Indicates Declining

343

Reasons for production decline in the diatomite, Belridge oil field: a rock mechanics view  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes research conducted on diatomite cores from the Belridge oil field in Kern County, CA. The study was undertaken to explain the rapid decline in oil production in diatomite wells by investigating three of six possible reasons. Characterization of the rock indicated that the rock was composed of principally amorphous opaline silica diatoms with only a trace of crystoballite quartz or chert quartz. Physical properties tests showed the diatomite to be of very low strength and plastic. It was established that longterm creep of diatomite into a propped fracture proceeds at a rate of approximately 1.5 microns/D (1.5 ..mu..m/d), a phenomenon that may contribute to rapid production declines. Also revealed was a matrix strength for the formation of about 1,325 psi (9136 kPa), a critical value to consider when depleting the reservoir. This also may help to explain the phase transformation to Opal CT around 2,000to 2,500-ft (610- to 762-m) depth.

Strickland, F.G.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Optimization of the LCLS X-ray FEL output performance in the presence of strong undulator wakefields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Optimization of the LCLS X-ray FEL output performance in the presence of strong undulator wakefields

Reiche, S; Emma, P; Fawley, W M; Huang, Z; Nuhn, H D; Stupakov, G V

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

DC Motor control using motor-generator set with controlled generator field  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A d.c. generator is connected in series opposed to the polarity of a d.c. power source supplying a d.c. drive motor. The generator is part of a motor-generator set, the motor of which is supplied from the power source connected to the motor. A generator field control means varies the field produced by at least one of the generator windings in order to change the effective voltage output. When the generator voltage is exactly equal to the d.c. voltage supply, no voltage is applied across the drive motor. As the field of the generator is reduced, the drive motor is supplied greater voltage until the full voltage of the d.c. power source is supplied when the generator has zero field applied. Additional voltage may be applied across the drive motor by reversing and increasing the reversed field on the generator. The drive motor may be reversed in direction from standstill by increasing the generator field so that a reverse voltage is applied across the d.c. motor.

Belsterling, Charles A. (Norristown, PA); Stone, John (Medford, NJ)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Frequency Response Adequacy and Assessment: Global Industry Practices and Potential Impact of Changing Generation Mix  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power industry, the North American Reliability Corporation (NERC), and the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) have expressed concerns about frequency response of the North American power system, which has supposedly declined over the past few decades. In light of the changing generation mix due to increasing penetration of variable generation and planned retirement of fossil-fired generation, the industry is concerned about having adequate primary frequency control ...

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

347

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by High-Voltage Size and NERC Region, 2012 Sustained Automatic Outage Counts High-Side Voltage (kV) Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 100-199 -- -- -- -- 200-299 -- -- 1.00 1.00 300-399 2.00 -- 4.00 6.00 400-599 14.00 -- 11.00 25.00 600+ -- -- -- -- Grand Total 16.00 -- 16.00 32.00 Sustained Automatic Outage Hours High-Side Voltage (kV) Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 100-199 -- -- -- -- 200-299 -- -- 27.58 27.58 300-399 153.25 -- 15.87 169.12 400-599 3,070.88 -- 258.37 3,329.25 600+ -- -- -- -- Grand Total 3,224.13 -- 301.82 3,525.95 Outage Hours per Outage Incident Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S.

348

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 6. Coal Consumption at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",20,52,24,73,83,-12.4 " Pennsylvania",20,52,24,73,83,-12.4 "East North Central",112,197,127,309,331,-6.8 " Illinois",34,45,29,79,66,18.9 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

349

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2012" Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Mine Production Range, 2012" ,"Mine Production Range (thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State, Region1","Above 1,000","Above 500","Above 200","Above 100","Above 50","Above 10","Above 0","Zero2","Total Number" "and Mine Type",,"to 1,000","to 500","to 200","to 100","to 50","to 10",,"of Employees" "Alabama",3415,97,655,317,160,224,54,105,5041 " Underground",2981,"-","-","-",36,88,"-",81,3190 " Surface",434,97,655,317,124,136,54,24,1851

350

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" 8. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" "(dollars per short ton)" ,2012,,,2011,,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State" "Alabama",107.73,104.51,106.57,100.17,108.71,102.69,7.6,-3.9,3.8 "Alaska","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arizona","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w"

351

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012" Underground Coal Production by State and Mining Method, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State and Region1","Continuous2","Conventional and","Longwall4","Total" ,,"Other3" "Alabama",139,20,12410,12570 "Arkansas",96,"-","-",96 "Colorado",757,"-",22889,23646 "Illinois",18969,"-",23868,42837 "Indiana",15565,"-","-",15565 "Kentucky Total",56179,2018,"-",58198 " Kentucky (East)",22090,2010,"-",24100 " Kentucky (West)",34089,9,"-",34098 "Maryland",797,"-","-",797 "Montana","-","-",5708,5708

352

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012" Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" ,"Union",,"Nonunion" "Coal-Producing State and Region1","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface" "Alabama",1.69,"-",0.66,1.8 "Alaska","-",5.98,"-","-" "Arizona","-",7.38,"-","-" "Arkansas","-","-",0.59,"-" "Colorado",4.9,6.09,6.02,4.45 "Illinois",2.09,"-",5.34,4.7 "Indiana","-","-",3.23,5.41 "Kentucky Total",3.02,2.45,2.36,3.06 " Kentucky (East)","-",2.45,1.64,2.65

353

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of U.S. Coal by State and Disposition, 2012" Average Sales Price of U.S. Coal by State and Disposition, 2012" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Open Market1","Captive2","Total3" "Alabama",85.06,"-",106.57 "Alaska","w","-","w" "Arizona","w","-","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w" "Colorado",38.51,43.19,37.54 "Illinois",49.04,54.71,53.08 "Indiana",49.16,54.5,52.01 "Kentucky Total",61.85,73.08,63.12 " Kentucky (East)",75.8,73.08,75.62 " Kentucky (West)",48.6,"-",48.67 "Louisiana","w","-","w"

354

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Emissions from Energy Consumption at 5. Emissions from Energy Consumption at Conventional Power Plants and Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants, by State, 2011 and 2012 (Thousand Metric Tons) Census Division and State Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Sulfur Dioxide (SO2) Nitrogen Oxides (NOx) Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 34,766 37,698 33 58 39 37 Connecticut 8,987 8,196 7 1 12 6 Maine 3,722 4,351 8 12 7 8 Massachusetts 14,346 16,404 15 22 14 14 New Hampshire 4,295 5,127 2 23 4 5 Rhode Island 3,403 3,595 0.03 0.07 2 3 Vermont 12 24 0.05 0.09 1 1 Middle Atlantic 161,786 171,603 275 370 187 203 New Jersey 16,120 16,917 4 5 14 13 New York 35,669 37,256 31 52 40 43 Pennsylvania 109,997 117,430 240 313 133 147

355

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" "(million short tons)" ,2012,,2011 "Coal-Producing","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Percent Change" "State","Reserves","Percentage","Reserves","Percentage","Recoverable Coal" ,,,,,"Reserves" "Alabama",265,53.63,306,55.39,-13.2 "Alaska","w","w","w","w","w" "Arizona","w","w","w","w","w" "Arkansas","w","w","w","w","w"

356

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: 7. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2003 - December 2012 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2003 8.72 8.03 5.11 7.54 7.44 2004 8.95 8.17 5.25 7.18 7.61 2005 9.45 8.67 5.73 8.57 8.14 2006 10.40 9.46 6.16 9.54 8.90 2007 10.65 9.65 6.39 9.70 9.13 2008 11.26 10.36 6.83 10.74 9.74 2009 11.51 10.17 6.81 10.65 9.82 2010 11.54 10.19 6.77 10.57 9.83 2011 11.72 10.23 6.82 10.46 9.90 2012 11.88 10.09 6.67 10.21 9.84 2010 January 10.49 9.55 6.50 10.17 9.28 February 10.89 9.89 6.55 10.48 9.47 March 11.11 9.95 6.53 10.28 9.48 April 11.71 9.95 6.55 10.52 9.53 May 11.91 10.15 6.64 10.52 9.72

357

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 1. Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Period Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroluem Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) End of Year Stocks 2002 141,714 43,935 1,711 116,952 29,601 328 24,761 14,334 1,383 2003 121,567 45,752 1,484 97,831 28,062 378 23,736 17,691 1,105 2004 106,669 46,750 937 84,917 29,144 627 21,751 17,607 309 2005 101,137 47,414 530 77,457 29,532 374 23,680 17,882 156 2006 140,964 48,216 674 110,277 29,799 456 30,688 18,416 217

358

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by High-Voltage Size and NERC Region, 2012 Sustained Automatic Outage Counts Voltage Region Type Operating (kV) FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. AC 200-299 142 49 14 141 242 49 -- 484 1,121 AC 300-399 -- 88 107 95 46 56 80 165 637 AC 400-599 9 3 -- 22 86 -- -- 125 245 AC 600+ -- -- 6 9 -- -- -- -- 15 AC Total 151 140 127 267 374 105 80 774 2,018 DC 100-199 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- DC 200-299 -- 18 -- -- -- -- -- 5 23 DC 300-399 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- DC 400-499 -- 5 -- -- -- -- -- -- 5 DC 500-599 -- -- -- 5 -- -- -- 17 22 DC 600+ -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

359

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012" Sales Price of Coal by State and Underground Mining Method, 2012" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Continuous1","Conventional and","Longwall3","Total" ,,"Other2" "Alabama","w","-","w",107.73 "Arkansas","w","-","-","w" "Colorado","w","-",37.18,"w" "Illinois",48.08,"-",59.51,54.18 "Indiana",52.94,"-","-",52.94 "Kentucky Total","w","w","-",62.24 " Kentucky (East)","w","w","-",79.23 " Kentucky (West)",50.18,"-","-",50.18

360

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Steam Coal Exports by Customs District" Steam Coal Exports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",4951041,5566950,6554494,10517991,11407664,-7.8 " Baltimore, MD",1275530,831976,1715016,2107506,2852092,-26.1 " Boston, MA",7,"-",12,7,24,-70.8 " Buffalo, NY",1180,1516,2826,2696,5257,-48.7 " New York City, NY",3088,2664,2168,5752,6106,-5.8 " Norfolk, VA",3578715,4697769,4760354,8276484,8443756,-2 " Ogdensburg, NY",36894,3610,3090,40504,6838,492.3 " Philadelphia, PA",55513,29255,34241,84768,56733,49.4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Number of Mines by State, County, and Mine Type, 2012" and Number of Mines by State, County, and Mine Type, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Underground",,"Surface",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production" "State and County" "Alabama",8,12570,38,6752,46,19321 " Bibb","-","-",2,119,2,119 " Blount","-","-",2,236,2,236 " Fayette",1,2249,"-","-",1,2249 " Franklin","-","-",2,137,2,137 " Jackson","-","-",3,152,3,152 " Jefferson",3,3589,9,1106,12,4695

362

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (continued) 0. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commerical Sector, 2002 - 2012 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2002 0 0 -- -- -- -- 18,671 18,256 3.44 3.52 24.7 3.03 2003 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 18,169 17,827 4.96 5.06 30.5 4.02 2004 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 16,176 15,804 5.93 6.07 21.9 4.58 2005 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 17,600 17,142 8.38 8.60 25.2 6.25 2006 0 0 -- -- -- 0.0 21,369 20,819 8.33 8.55 30.7 6.42

363

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 4. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector 2002 through 2012 (Cents per kilowatthour) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 8.44 7.89 4.88 N/A 6.75 7.20 2003 8.72 8.03 5.11 7.54 N/A 7.44 2004 8.95 8.17 5.25 7.18 N/A 7.61 2005 9.45 8.67 5.73 8.57 N/A 8.14 2006 10.40 9.46 6.16 9.54 N/A 8.90 2007 10.65 9.65 6.39 9.70 N/A 9.13 2008 11.26 10.36 6.83 10.74 N/A 9.74 2009 11.51 10.17 6.81 10.65 N/A 9.82 2010 11.54 10.19 6.77 10.57 N/A 9.83 2011 11.72 10.23 6.82 10.46 N/A 9.90 2012 11.88 10.09 6.67 10.21 N/A 9.84 Full-Service Providers 2002 8.40 7.77 4.78 N/A 6.65 7.13 2003 8.68 7.89 5.01 6.82 N/A 7.38

364

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports" Average Price of U.S. Steam Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",65.1,63.67,73.81,64.48,78.9,-18.3 " Canada*",59.34,55.22,63.02,57.57,73.63,-21.8 " Dominican Republic",78.47,74.41,73.89,75.4,76.61,-1.6 " Honduras","-",54.58,54.43,54.58,54.43,0.3 " Jamaica",480,54.43,"-",54.72,55.42,-1.3 " Mexico",69.42,73.33,82.64,70.83,86.44,-18.1 " Other**",80.33,389.3,70.37,82.45,76.1,8.3

365

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2012" Coal Production by Coalbed Thickness and Mine Type, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal Thickness (inches)","Underground","Surface","Total" "Under 7","-",17,17 "7 - Under 13","-",2108,2108 "13 - Under 19",429,6688,7117 "19 - Under 25",111,14107,14217 "25 - Under 31",4147,12913,17060 "31 - Under 37",15128,19022,34150 "37 - Under 43",23868,17285,41153 "43 - Under 49",26035,15597,41632 "49 - Under 55",18909,22544,41453 "55 - Under 61",36946,11285,48231 "61 - Under 67",43146,15074,58220 "67 - Under 73",40983,8783,49766 "73 - Under 79",32914,10193,43107 "79 - Under 85",27011,3554,30565

366

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Carbon Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors 3. Carbon Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Factor (Pounds of CO2 Per Million Btu)*** Bituminous Coal BIT Source: 1 205.30000 Distillate Fuel Oil DFO Source: 1 161.38600 Geothermal GEO Estimate from EIA, Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting 16.59983 Jet Fuel JF Source: 1 156.25800 Kerosene KER Source: 1 159.53500 Lignite Coal LIG Source: 1 215.40000 Municipal Solid Waste MSW Source: 1 (including footnote 2 within source) 91.90000 Natural Gas NG Source: 1 117.08000 Petroleum Coke PC Source: 1 225.13000 Propane Gas PG Sources: 1 139.17800 Residual Fuel Oil RFO Source: 1 173.90600 Synthetic Coal SC Assumed to have the emissions similar to Bituminous Coal. 205.30000

367

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Imports by Customs District" Coal Imports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",469878,331008,156004,800886,350124,128.7 " Baltimore, MD","-","-",106118,"-",154318,"-" " Boston, MA",373985,154438,"-",528423,51185,"NM" " Buffalo, NY",44,"-","-",44,"-","-" " New York City, NY",1373,1402,487,2775,507,447.3 " Norfolk, VA","-",68891,"-",68891,35856,92.1 " Ogdensburg, NY","-",1,12,1,12,-91.7

368

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coke Exports" U.S. Coke Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",162796,79217,201795,242013,340944,-29 " Canada*",73859,17837,112348,91696,161596,-43.3 " Mexico",88535,60517,86721,149052,176163,-15.4 " Other**",402,863,2726,1265,3185,-60.3 "South America Total",223,217,591,440,1158,-62 " Other**",223,217,591,440,1158,-62 "Europe Total",48972,59197,"-",108169,6,"NM" " Other**",347,11743,"-",12090,"-","-"

369

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013" 7. U.S. Coal Stocks, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Coal Consumers" "Last Day of Quarter","Electric","Coke","Other","Commercial","Total","Coal Producers","Total" ,"Power","Plants","Industrial2","and",,"and" ,"Sector1",,,"Institutional Users",,"Distributors" 2007 " March 31",141389,2444,5756,"-",149588,34007,183595 " June 30",154812,2364,5672,"-",162849,32484,195333 " September 30",142666,1972,5811,"-",150448,30090,180538 " December 31",151221,1936,5624,"-",158781,33977,192758

370

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Unit of Measure Equivalents 5. Unit of Measure Equivalents Unit Equivalent Kilowatt (kW) 1,000 (One Thousand) Watts Megawatt (MW) 1,000,000 (One Million) Watts Gigawatt (GW) 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Watts Terawatt (TW) 1,000,000,000,000 (One Trillion) Watts Gigawatt 1,000,000 (One Million) Kilowatts Thousand Gigawatts 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Kilowatts Kilowatthours (kWh) 1,000 (One Thousand) Watthours Megawatthours (MWh) 1,000,000 (One Million) Watthours Gigawatthours (GWh) 1,000,000,000 (One Billion) Watthours Terawatthours (TWh) 1,000,000,000,000 (One Trillion) Watthours Gigawatthours 1,000,000 (One Million) Kilowatthours Thousand Gigawatthours 1,000,000,000(One Billion Kilowatthours U.S. Dollar 1,000 (One Thousand) Mills U.S. Cent 10 (Ten) Mills Barrel of Oil 42 Gallons

371

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (continued) 6. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Electric Utilities, 2002 - 2012 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2002 75,711 2,677 0.63 17.68 4.98 126.0 1,680,518 1,634,734 3.68 3.78 72.3 1.53 2003 89,618 3,165 0.74 20.94 5.51 124.0 1,486,088 1,439,513 5.59 5.77 81.6 1.74 2004 107,985 3,817 0.89 25.15 5.10 92.0 1,542,746 1,499,933 6.15 6.33 82.9 1.87 2005 102,450 3,632 1.29 36.31 5.16 87.9 1,835,221 1,780,721 8.32 8.57 83.4 2.38

372

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: 2 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 Census Division and State Coal (Thousand Tons) Petroleum Liquids (Thousand Barrels) Petroleum Coke (Thousand Tons) December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change New England 1,030 1,389 -26% 2,483 2,680 -7.3% 0 0 -- Connecticut W W W 1,300 954 36% 0 0 -- Maine 0 0 -- W W W 0 0 -- Massachusetts W 675 W 837 990 -15% 0 0 -- New Hampshire W W W W W W 0 0 -- Rhode Island 0 0 -- W W W 0 0 -- Vermont 0 0 -- 51 49 3.0% 0 0 -- Middle Atlantic 7,553 7,800 -3.2% 5,496 6,591 -17% W W W New Jersey 926 871 6.3% 1,084 1,113 -2.6% 0 0 --

373

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 0. Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",25,54,32,79,90,-12 " Pennsylvania",25,54,32,79,90,-12 "East North Central",115,183,117,298,301,-0.9 " Illinois",31,42,28,73,67,8.1 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

374

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "New England","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Maine","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Massachusetts","w","w","w","w","w","w" "Middle Atlantic",627,587,637,1214,1254,-3.1 " New York",214,178,194,392,377,4

375

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major U.S. Coal Mines, 2012" Major U.S. Coal Mines, 2012" "Rank","Mine Name / Company","Mine Type","State","Production (short tons)" 1,"North Antelope Rochelle Mine / Peabody Powder River Mining Ll","Surface","Wyoming",107639188 2,"Black Thunder / Thunder Basin Coal Company Llc","Surface","Wyoming",93082919 3,"Cordero Mine / Cordero Mining Llc","Surface","Wyoming",39204736 4,"Antelope Coal Mine / Antelope Coal Llc","Surface","Wyoming",34316314 5,"Belle Ayr Mine / Alpha Coal West, Inc.","Surface","Wyoming",24227846 6,"Eagle Butte Mine / Alpha Coal West, Inc.","Surface","Wyoming",22466733

376

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013" U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,"January - March",,"April - June",,"July - September",,"October - December",,"Total" "Year","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports" 2007,11139,8786,14702,8405,16198,10559,17124,8597,59163,36347 2008,15802,7640,23069,8982,20321,8485,22329,9101,81519,34208 2009,13335,6325,12951,5426,15159,5441,17653,5447,59097,22639 2010,17807,4803,21965,5058,21074,4680,20870,4811,81716,19353 2011,26617,3381,26987,3419,25976,3588,27679,2700,107259,13088 2012,28642,2022,37534,2329,31563,2415,28006,2394,125746,9159

377

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Nitrogen Oxides Uncontrolled Emission Factors 2. Nitrogen Oxides Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel, Code, Source and Emission Units Combustion System Type / Firing Configuration Cyclone Boiler Fluidized Bed Boiler Opposed Firing Boiler Spreader Stoker Boiler Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Emissions Units Lbs = Pounds MMCF = Million Cubic Feet MG = Thousand Gallons Dry-Bottom Boilers Dry-Bottom Boilers Dry-Bottom Boilers Wet-Bottom Boilers Dry-Bottom Boilers Agricultural Byproducts AB Source: 1 Lbs per ton 1.20 1.20 1.20 N/A 1.20 Blast Furnace Gas BFG Sources: 1 (including footnote 7 within source); EIA estimates Lbs per MMCF 15.40 15.40 15.40 N/A 15.40 Bituminous Coal BIT Source: 2, Table 1.1-3 Lbs per ton 33.00 5.00 12.00 31.00 11.00 Black Liquor BLQ Source: 1 Lbs per ton ** 1.50 1.50 1.50 N/A 1.50

378

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2.1. Number of Ultimate Customers Served by Sector, by Provider, 2.1. Number of Ultimate Customers Served by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 116,622,037 15,333,700 601,744 N/A 1,066,554 133,624,035 2003 117,280,481 16,549,519 713,221 1,127 N/A 134,544,348 2004 118,763,768 16,606,783 747,600 1,025 N/A 136,119,176 2005 120,760,839 16,871,940 733,862 518 N/A 138,367,159 2006 122,471,071 17,172,499 759,604 791 N/A 140,403,965 2007 123,949,916 17,377,219 793,767 750 N/A 142,121,652 2008 124,937,469 17,562,726 774,713 727 N/A 143,275,635 2009 125,177,175 17,561,661 757,519 705 N/A 143,497,060 2010 125,717,935 17,674,338 747,746 239 N/A 144,140,258 2011 126,143,072 17,638,062 727,920 92 N/A 144,509,146

379

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coke Exports" Average Price of U.S. Coke Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",240.59,241.38,218.4,240.85,225.8,6.7 " Canada*",147.49,330.47,243.04,183.08,286.56,-36.1 " Mexico",316.57,211.63,189.12,273.97,171.71,59.6 " Other**",612.42,485.63,134.48,525.92,135.04,289.5 "South America Total",140.65,156.15,322.7,148.29,250.36,-40.8 " Other**",140.65,156.15,322.7,148.29,250.36,-40.8 "Europe Total",259.26,255.24,"-",257.06,427.83,-39.9

380

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program 2. Demand-Side Management Program Annual Effects by Program Category, by Sector, 2002 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Energy Efficiency - Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) 2002 15,284 24,803 10,242 -- 50,328 2003 12,914 24,758 10,031 551 48,254 2004 17,185 24,290 11,137 50 52,663 2005 18,894 28,073 11,986 47 59,000 2006 21,150 28,720 13,155 50 63,076 2007 22,772 30,359 14,038 108 67,278 2008 25,396 34,634 14,766 75 74,871 2009 27,395 34,831 14,610 76 76,912 2010 32,150 37,416 17,259 89 86,914 2011 46,790 50,732 23,061 76 120,659 2012 54,516 58,894 25,023 92 138,525 Energy Efficiency - Actual Peak Load Reduction (MW) 2002 5,300 5,389 2,768 -- 13,457 2003 5,909 4,911 2,671 94 13,585

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 8. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Kilowatthours) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 47,208 47,481 44,864 45,018 27,818 27,927 566 569 120,456 120,995 Connecticut 12,758 12,919 12,976 13,087 3,566 3,668 193 185 29,492 29,859 Maine 4,481 4,382 4,053 4,018 3,027 3,016 0 0 11,561 11,415 Massachusetts 20,313 20,473 17,723 17,767 16,927 16,974 350 357 55,313 55,570 New Hampshire 4,439 4,454 4,478 4,478 1,953 1,936 0 0 10,870 10,869 Rhode Island 3,121 3,129 3,640 3,660 923 916 24 27 7,708 7,732

382

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

C. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Fossil Fuels and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) C. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Fossil Fuels and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) Census Division and State Natural Gas Fired Combined Cycle Natural Gas Fired Combustion Turbine Other Natural Gas Coal Petroleum Coke Petroleum Liquids Other Gases Total Fossil Fuels Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 12,190.5 11,593.8 1,090.0 1,058.9 876.4 830.1 2,546.1 2,755.5 0.0 0.0 7,916.1 7,915.3 0.0 0.0 24,619.1 24,153.6 Connecticut 2,513.4 2,447.7 458.1 432.7 61.0 44.7 389.1 564.4 0.0 0.0 3,186.1 3,185.0 0.0 0.0 6,607.7 6,674.5 Maine 1,250.0 1,250.0 306.0 302.2 119.0 93.0 85.0 85.0 0.0 0.0 1,004.9 1,007.2 0.0 0.0 2,764.9 2,737.4

383

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" 0. U.S. Coal Stocks at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" "(thousand short tons)" "NAICS Code","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" ,,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "311 Food Manufacturing",875,926,1015,-13.9 "312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg.",26,17,19,35.8 "313 Textile Mills",22,22,25,-13.9 "315 Apparel Manufacturing","w","w","w","w" "321 Wood Product Manufacturing","w","w","w","w" "322 Paper Manufacturing",570,583,743,-23.3 "324 Petroleum and Coal Products*",127,113,156,-18.7

384

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing U.S. Mines by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012" Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing U.S. Mines by Mine Production Range and Mine Type, 2012" "(million short tons)" ,"Underground",,"Surface",,"Total" "Mine Production Range","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery","Recoverable Coal","Average Recovery" "(thousand short tons)","Reserves","Percentage","Reserves","Percentage","Reserves","Percentage" "Over 1,000",4874,57.96,11153,91.28,16028,81.15 "Over 500 to 1,000",531,47.14,226,81.9,757,57.49 "Over 200 to 500",604,52.72,333,69.16,938,58.57

385

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Productive Capacity of Coal Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" Productive Capacity of Coal Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,2012,,,2011,,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State" "Alabama",14594,7967,22561,16102,8911,25013,-9.4,-10.6,-9.8 "Alaska","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arizona","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w","w","-","w","w","-","w"

386

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Quantity and Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports by Origin, 2007 - 2013" Quantity and Average Price of U.S. Coal Imports by Origin, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons and dollars per short ton)" "Year and Quarter","Australia","Canada","Colombia","Indonesia","China","Venezuela","Other","Total" ,,,,,,,"Countries" 2007,66,1967,26864,3663,50,3425,311,36347 2008,149,2027,26262,3374,45,2312,39,34208 2009,152,1288,17787,2084,9,1297,21,22639 2010,380,1767,14584,1904,53,582,83,19353 2011,62,1680,9500,856,22,779,188,13088 2012 " January - March","-",260,1594,59,7,80,22,2022 " April - June","-",281,1728,49,21,170,80,2329 " July - September","-",297,1762,266,39,"-",51,2415

387

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012" Average Sales Price of Coal by State, County, and Number of Mines, 2012" "Coal-Producing State and County","Number of Mines","Sales","Average Sales Price" ,,"(thousand short tons)","(dollars per short ton)" "Alabama",39,19021,106.57 " Bibb",1,"w","w" " Blount",2,"w","w" " Fayette",1,"w","w" " Franklin",1,"w","w" " Jackson",2,"w","w" " Jefferson",11,4298,146.04 " Marion",1,"w","w" " Tuscaloosa",7,8599,111.55 " Walker",11,2370,81.88

388

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 2. Coal Stocks at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" "Census Division","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" "and State",,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "Middle Atlantic",62,58,56,10.9 " Pennsylvania",62,58,56,10.9 "East North Central",168,171,197,-14.7 " Illinois","w","w","w","w" " Indiana",75,76,75,0.5 " Michigan","w","w","w","w" " Ohio",25,15,19,27 " Wisconsin",5,5,3,59.1 "West North Central",66,75,97,-32.2

389

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013" 3. Summary Statistics for Coal Refining Plants, 2012 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" "Year and","Coal Receipts","Average Price of Coal Receipts","Coal Used","Coal Stocks1" "Quarter",,"(dollars per short ton)" 2012 " January - March",2151,27.47,1756,771 " April - June",3844,25.42,3688,825 " July - September",5399,24.32,5286,812 " October - December",4919,24.55,4680,787 " Total",16313,25.06,15410 2013 " January - March",5067,24.6,4989,793 " April - June",4015,25.24,3754,756 " Total",9082,24.88,8744 "1 Reported as of the last day of the quarter." "Note: Average price is based on the cost, insurance, and freight (c.i.f. value). Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding."

390

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Proposed Transmission Capacity Additions by High-Voltage Size, 2013 - 2019 B. Proposed Transmission Capacity Additions by High-Voltage Size, 2013 - 2019 (Circuit Miles of Transmission) Voltage Circuit Miles Type Operating (kV) Year 2013 Year 2014 Year 2015 Year 2016 Year 2017 Year 2018 Year 2019 All Years AC 100-199 954 1,222 992 1,047 392 382 176 5,165 AC 200-299 1,003 792 1,398 319 539 427 118 4,596 AC 300-399 4,779 839 1,532 1,527 502 1,650 349 11,178 AC 400-599 399 708 669 643 660 1,151 334 4,564 AC 600+ -- -- 14 -- -- 69 -- 83 AC Total 7,134 3,562 4,606 3,536 2,092 3,679 978 25,586 DC 100-199 2 11 5 -- -- 7 -- 25 DC 200-299 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- DC 300-399 -- -- -- -- 333 -- -- 333 DC 400-599 -- -- 10 -- -- -- -- 10 DC 600+ -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

391

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Existing Net Summer Capacity of Other Renewable Sources by Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) B. Existing Net Summer Capacity of Other Renewable Sources by Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) Year Wind Solar Thermal and Photovoltaic Wood and Wood-Derived Fuels Geothermal Other Biomass Total (Other Renewable Sources) Total (All Sectors) 2002 4,417 397 5,844 2,252 3,800 16,710 2003 5,995 397 5,871 2,133 3,758 18,153 2004 6,456 398 6,182 2,152 3,529 18,717 2005 8,706 411 6,193 2,285 3,609 21,205 2006 11,329 411 6,372 2,274 3,727 24,113 2007 16,515 502 6,704 2,214 4,134 30,069 2008 24,651 536 6,864 2,229 4,186 38,466 2009 34,296 619 6,939 2,382 4,317 48,552 2010 39,135 866 7,037 2,405 4,369 53,811 2011 45,676 1,524 7,077 2,409 4,536 61,221 2012 59,075 3,170 7,508 2,592 4,811 77,155

392

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012" Recoverable Coal Reserves and Average Recovery Percentage at Producing Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012" "(million short tons)" ,"Continuous1",,"Conventional and Other2",,"Longwall3",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Recoverable","Average Recovery","Recoverable","Average Recovery","Recoverable","Average Recovery","Recoverable","Average Recovery" "State","Coal Reserves","Percentage","Coal Reserves","Percentage","Coal Reserves","Percentage","Coal Reserves","Percentage" ,"at Producing",,"at Producing",,"at Producing",,"at Producing"

393

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Outages by Type and NERC region, 2012 A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Outages by Type and NERC region, 2012 Outage Type FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Circuit Outage Counts Automatic Outages (Sustained) 151.00 163.00 127.00 272.00 374.00 105.00 80.00 796.00 2,068.00 Non-Automatic Outages (Operational) 77.00 44.00 97.00 230.00 192.00 27.00 45.00 337.00 1,049.00 Non-Automatic Outages (Planned) 2,650.00 453.00 512.00 2,050.00 2,450.00 369.00 472.00 2,744.00 11,700.00 Circuit Outage Hours Automatic Outages (Sustained) 2,852.28 1,312.97 14,244.87 19,857.23 7,123.70 1,509.51 682.60 24,238.64 71,821.80 Non-Automatic Outages (Operational) 186.87 27.08 67.68 186.08 426.59 3.32 13.96 67.59 979.17 Non-Automatic Outages (Planned) 872.65 710.33 1,222.36 1,095.46 503.01 357.44 105.06 1,105.43 5,971.74

394

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011" 4. Average Price of Coal Delivered to End Use Sector by Census Division and State, 2012 and 2011" "(dollars per short ton)" ,2012,,,,2011,,,,"Annual Percent Change" "Census Division","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial" "and State","Power1","Industrial",,"and","Power1","Industrial",,"and","Power1","Industrial",,"and" ,,,,"Institutional",,,,"Institutional",,,,"Institutional" "New England",88.32,165.17,"-","-",87.62,"w","-","-",0.8,"w","-","-"

395

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013" U.S. Coal Consumption by End-Use Sector, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,"Other Industrial",,,"Commercial and Institutional" "Year and","Electric","Coke","CHP2","Non-","Total","CHP4","Non-","Total","Total" "Quarter","Power","Plants",,"CHP3",,,"CHP5" ,"Sector1" 2007 " January - March",257516,5576,5834,8743,14578,547,510,1058,278727 " April - June",246591,5736,5552,8521,14074,426,279,705,267106 " July - September",283556,5678,5546,8180,13725,458,247,705,303665 " October - December",257478,5726,5605,8634,14238,495,563,1058,278500

396

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" 9. Average Price of U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "NAICS Code","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "311 Food Manufacturing",51.17,49.59,50.96,50.35,50.94,-1.2 "312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg.",111.56,115.95,113.47,113.49,117.55,-3.5 "313 Textile Mills",115.95,118.96,127.41,117.4,128.07,-8.3 "315 Apparel Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w" "321 Wood Product Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w"

397

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 . Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Average Cost Average Cost Average Cost Average Cost Period Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Receipts (Thousand Barrels) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Receipts (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per MMBtu) 2002 884,287 0.94 1.25 25.52 120,851 1.64 3.34 20.77 5,607,737 3.56 1.86 2003 986,026 0.97 1.28 26.00 185,567 1.53 4.33 26.78 5,500,704 5.39 2.28 2004 1,002,032 0.97 1.36 27.42 186,655 1.66 4.29 26.56 5,734,054 5.96 2.48 2005 1,021,437 0.98 1.54 31.20 194,733 1.61 6.44 39.65 6,181,717 8.21 3.25

398

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commercial Sector, 2002 - 2012 9. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Commercial Sector, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2002 9,580 399 2.10 50.44 2.59 28.4 503 91 5.38 29.73 0.02 7.5 2003 8,835 372 1.99 47.24 2.43 20.5 248 43 7.00 40.82 0.04 3.1 2004 10,682 451 2.08 49.32 2.48 23.5 3,066 527 6.19 35.96 0.20 26.9 2005 11,081 464 2.57 61.21 2.43 24.2 1,684 289 8.28 48.22 0.17 18.3 2006 12,207 518 2.63 61.95 2.51 27.5 798 137 13.50 78.70 0.17 15.5

399

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants" Coke and Breeze Production at Coke Plants" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",2303,2314,2365,4617,4754,-2.9 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",4152,4098,4104,8249,8233,0.2 "Coke Total",3954,3841,3863,7795,7721,1

400

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Electric Power Industry - Electricity Sales for Resale, 2. Electric Power Industry - Electricity Sales for Resale, 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Megawatthours) Year Electric Utilities Energy-Only Providers Independent Power Producers Combined Heat and Power U.S. Total 2002 1,838,901 5,757,283 943,531 28,963 8,568,678 2003 1,824,030 3,906,220 1,156,796 33,909 6,920,954 2004 1,923,440 3,756,175 1,053,364 25,996 6,758,975 2005 1,925,710 2,867,048 1,252,796 26,105 6,071,659 2006 1,698,389 2,446,104 1,321,342 27,638 5,493,473 2007 1,603,179 2,476,740 1,368,310 31,165 5,479,394 2008 1,576,976 2,718,661 1,355,017 30,079 5,680,733 2009 1,495,636 2,240,399 1,295,857 33,139 5,065,031 2010 1,541,554 2,946,452 1,404,137 37,068 5,929,211 2011 1,529,434 2,206,981 1,372,306 34,400 5,143,121

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401

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: 5. Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers: Total by End-Use Sector, 2003 - December 2012 (Million Kilowatthours) Period Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Annual Totals 2003 1,275,824 1,198,728 1,012,373 6,810 3,493,734 2004 1,291,982 1,230,425 1,017,850 7,224 3,547,479 2005 1,359,227 1,275,079 1,019,156 7,506 3,660,969 2006 1,351,520 1,299,744 1,011,298 7,358 3,669,919 2007 1,392,241 1,336,315 1,027,832 8,173 3,764,561 2008 1,379,981 1,335,981 1,009,300 7,700 3,732,962 2009 1,364,474 1,307,168 917,442 7,781 3,596,865 2010 1,445,708 1,330,199 970,873 7,712 3,754,493 2011 1,422,801 1,328,057 991,316 7,672 3,749,846 2012 1,374,515 1,327,101 985,714 7,320 3,694,650 2010

402

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division" 3. Coal Carbonized at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",3051,2997,3092,6048,6156,-1.8 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",5471,5280,5296,10751,10579,1.6 "w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure."

403

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, A. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, 2002 - 2012, Actual Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Summer Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2002 37,951 55,164 430,396 101,251 54,296 53,267 -- -- 28,825 -- -- 154,459 38,298 55,833 117,032 696,376 2003 40,387 53,936 422,253 98,487 53,566 53,617 -- -- 28,775 -- -- 148,380 39,428 59,282 120,894 696,752 2004 42,243 51,580 419,349 95,300 52,049 50,499 -- -- 29,094 -- -- 153,024 39,383 58,531 121,205 692,908

404

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Steam Coal Exports" U.S. Steam Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",1619502,1246181,2153814,2865683,3065683,-6.5 " Canada*",797861,599752,841061,1397613,1280803,9.1 " Dominican Republic",51698,160672,124720,212370,312741,-32.1 " Honduras","-",41664,34161,41664,68124,-38.8 " Jamaica",25,36311,"-",36336,33585,8.2 " Mexico",717687,407422,1116653,1125109,1331754,-15.5 " Other**",52231,360,37219,52591,38676,36

405

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Receipts and Quality of Coal Delivered for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 . Receipts and Quality of Coal Delivered for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Bituminous Subbituminous Lignite Period Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Receipts (Thousand Tons) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight 2002 423,128 1.47 10.1 391,785 0.36 6.2 65,555 0.93 13.3 2003 467,286 1.50 10.0 432,513 0.38 6.4 79,869 1.03 14.4 2004 470,619 1.52 10.4 445,603 0.36 6.0 78,268 1.05 14.2 2005 480,179 1.56 10.5 456,856 0.36 6.2 77,677 1.02 14.0 2006 489,550 1.59 10.5 504,947 0.35 6.1 75,742 0.95 14.4 2007 467,817 1.62 10.3 505,155 0.34 6.0 71,930 0.90 14.0

406

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" Coal Consumption at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "New England","w","w",20,"w","w","w" " Maine","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Massachusetts","w","w","w","w","w","w" "Middle Atlantic",583,589,651,1171,1237,-5.3 " New York",155,181,206,337,374,-10.1

407

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division" 4. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",157.29,176.84,199.7,166.21,198.26,-16.2 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",157.26,171.51,191.48,163.85,190.51,-14

408

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Demand-Side Management Program Direct and Indirect Costs, 5. Demand-Side Management Program Direct and Indirect Costs, 2002 through 2012 (Thousand Dollars) Year Energy Efficiency Load Management Direct Cost Indirect Cost Total Cost 2002 1,032,911 410,323 1,443,234 206,169 1,649,403 2003 807,403 352,137 1,159,540 137,670 1,340,686 2004 910,816 510,281 1,421,097 132,295 1,560,578 2005 1,180,576 622,287 1,802,863 127,925 1,939,115 2006 1,270,602 663,980 1,934,582 128,886 2,072,962 2007 1,677,969 700,362 2,378,331 160,326 2,604,711 2008 2,137,452 836,359 2,973,811 181,843 3,186,742 2009 2,221,480 944,261 3,165,741 394,193 3,607,076 2010 2,906,906 1,048,356 3,955,262 275,158 4,230,420 2011 4,002,672 1,213,102 5,215,774 328,622 5,544,396 2012 4,397,635 1,270,391 5,668,026 332,440 6,000,466

409

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Power Plant Operating Expenses for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Mills per Kilowatthour) 4. Average Power Plant Operating Expenses for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Mills per Kilowatthour) Operation Maintenance Year Nuclear Fossil Steam Hydro-electric Gas Turbine and Small Scale Nuclear Fossil Steam Hydro-electric Gas Turbine and Small Scale 2002 9.00 2.59 3.71 3.26 5.04 2.67 2.62 2.38 2003 9.12 2.74 3.47 3.50 5.23 2.72 2.32 2.26 2004 8.97 3.13 3.83 4.27 5.38 2.96 2.76 2.14 2005 8.26 3.21 3.95 3.69 5.27 2.98 2.73 1.89 2006 9.03 3.57 3.76 3.51 5.69 3.19 2.70 2.16 2007 9.54 3.63 5.44 3.26 5.79 3.37 3.87 2.42 2008 9.89 3.72 5.78 3.77 6.20 3.59 3.89 2.72 2009 10.00 4.23 4.88 3.05 6.34 3.96 3.50 2.58 2010 10.50 4.04 5.33 2.79 6.80 3.99 3.81 2.73

410

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Price of U.S. Coal Imports" Price of U.S. Coal Imports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Origin",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",147.86,138.39,191.01,144.86,197.96,-26.8 " Canada",147.86,138.39,191,144.86,197.95,-26.8 " Mexico","-","-",286.23,"-",286.23,"-" "South America Total",75.29,80.74,86.52,77.2,87.17,-11.4 " Argentina","-","-",504.7,"-",504.7,"-" " Colombia",74.87,80.74,83.03,76.96,85.25,-9.7 " Peru",87.09,"-","-",87.09,"-","-"

411

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" 5. U.S. Coal Consumption at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "NAICS Code","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "311 Food Manufacturing",2256,2561,1864,4817,4343,10.9 "312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg.",38,50,48,88,95,-7.7 "313 Textile Mills",31,29,21,60,59,2.2 "315 Apparel Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w" "321 Wood Product Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w"

412

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Average Quality of Fossil Fuel Receipts for the Electric Power Industry, 3. Average Quality of Fossil Fuel Receipts for the Electric Power Industry, 2002 through 2012 Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Period Average Btu per Pound Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Average Btu per Gallon Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Average Ash Percent by Weight Average Btu per Cubic Foot 2002 10,168 0.94 8.7 147,903 1.64 0.2 1,025 2003 10,137 0.97 9.0 147,086 1.53 0.1 1,030 2004 10,074 0.97 9.0 147,286 1.66 0.2 1,027 2005 10,107 0.98 9.0 146,481 1.61 0.2 1,028 2006 10,063 0.97 9.0 143,883 2.31 0.2 1,027 2007 10,028 0.96 8.8 144,546 2.10 0.1 1,027 2008 9,947 0.97 9.0 142,205 2.21 0.3 1,027 2009 9,902 1.01 8.9 141,321 2.14 0.2 1,025 2010 9,842 1.16 8.8 140,598 2.14 0.2 1,022

413

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports" Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",78.29,77.25,102.62,77.88,105.14,-25.9 " Canada*",81.61,80.7,110.67,81.3,112.16,-27.5 " Dominican Republic",78.54,75.09,73.89,75.77,76.61,-1.1 " Honduras","-",54.58,54.43,54.58,54.43,0.3 " Jamaica",480,54.43,"-",54.72,55.42,-1.3 " Mexico",73.45,75.81,94.36,74.35,100.95,-26.3 " Other**",80.33,389.3,70.37,82.45,76.1,8.3

414

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins B. Summer Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2012 Actual, 2013-2017 Projected Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Summer Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region MAPP MISO PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2012 44,338 58,319 469,273 4,967 96,769 156,319 158,041 53,177 66,548 130,465 768,943 Projected 2013 42,532 59,969 447,171 5,022 91,644 144,378 152,949 53,177 65,901 129,278 744,851 Projected 2014 43,142 60,654 448,912 5,161 92,331 144,497 152,843 54,080 67,592 128,200 748,499 Projected 2015 43,812 61,428 457,865 5,270 93,017 147,568 157,287 54,722 69,679 129,553 762,336

415

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Existing Net Summer Capacity by Energy Source and Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) A. Existing Net Summer Capacity by Energy Source and Producer Type, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatts) Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Other Renewable Sources Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Energy Sources Total Total (All Sectors) 2002 315,350 59,651 312,512 2,008 98,657 79,356 16,710 20,371 686 905,301 2003 313,019 60,730 355,442 1,994 99,209 78,694 18,153 20,522 684 948,446 2004 313,020 59,119 371,011 2,296 99,628 77,641 18,717 20,764 746 962,942 2005 313,380 58,548 383,061 2,063 99,988 77,541 21,205 21,347 887 978,020 2006 312,956 58,097 388,294 2,256 100,334 77,821 24,113 21,461 882 986,215 2007 312,738 56,068 392,876 2,313 100,266 77,885 30,069 21,886 788 994,888

416

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Average Operating Heat Rate for Selected Energy Sources, . Average Operating Heat Rate for Selected Energy Sources, 2002 through 2012 (Btu per Kilowatthour) Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Nuclear 2002 10,314 10,641 9,533 10,442 2003 10,297 10,610 9,207 10,422 2004 10,331 10,571 8,647 10,428 2005 10,373 10,631 8,551 10,436 2006 10,351 10,809 8,471 10,435 2007 10,375 10,794 8,403 10,489 2008 10,378 11,015 8,305 10,452 2009 10,414 10,923 8,159 10,459 2010 10,415 10,984 8,185 10,452 2011 10,444 10,829 8,152 10,464 2012 10,498 10,991 8,039 10,479 Coal includes anthracite, bituminous, subbituminous and lignite coal. Waste coal and synthetic coal are included starting in 2002. Petroleum includes distillate fuel oil (all diesel and No. 1 and No. 2 fuel oils), residual fuel oil (No. 5 and No. 6 fuel oils and bunker C fuel oil, jet fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke, and waste oil.

417

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 4. Average Quality of Coal Received at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State1",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic" " Btu",12906,12815,11709,12844,12440,3.2 " Sulfur",1.03,0.92,0.99,0.96,0.97,-1 " Ash",8.94,8.62,10,8.72,9.11,-4.3 "Pennsylvania" " Btu",12906,12815,11709,12844,12440,3.2 " Sulfur",1.03,0.92,0.99,0.96,0.97,-1 " Ash",8.94,8.62,10,8.72,9.11,-4.3 "East North Central" " Btu",11928,12228,11682,12112,11933,1.5

418

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2012" Major U.S. Coal Producers, 2012" "Rank","Controlling Company Name","Production (thousand short tons)","Percent of Total Production" 1,"Peabody Energy Corp",192563,18.9 2,"Arch Coal Inc",136992,13.5 3,"Alpha Natural Resources LLC",104306,10.3 4,"Cloud Peak Energy",90721,8.9 5,"CONSOL Energy Inc",55752,5.5 6,"Alliance Resource Operating Partners LP",35406,3.5 7,"Energy Future Holdings Corp",31032,3.1 8,"Murray Energy Corp",29216,2.9 9,"NACCO Industries Inc",28207,2.8 10,"Patriot Coal Corp",23946,2.4 11,"Peter Kiewit Sons Inc",22725,2.2 12,"Westmoreland Coal Co",22215,2.2 13,"BHP Billiton Ltd",12580,1.2

419

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Renewable Energy Sources and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) B. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units Using Primarily Renewable Energy Sources and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) Census Division and State Wind Solar Photovoltaic Solar Thermal Conventional Hydroelectric Biomass Sources Geothermal Total Renewable Sources Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 784.1 422.8 49.2 13.9 0.0 0.0 1,956.9 1,946.9 1,367.5 1,421.6 0.0 0.0 4,157.7 3,805.2 Connecticut 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 122.2 121.7 172.5 178.2 0.0 0.0 294.7 299.9 Maine 427.6 322.5 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 742.3 742.3 534.6 576.0 0.0 0.0 1,704.5 1,640.8 Massachusetts 63.8 29.6 41.2 11.7 0.0 0.0 261.1 262.7 395.4 406.9 0.0 0.0 761.5 710.9

420

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. Count of Electric Power Industry Power Plants, by Sector, by Predominant Energy Sources within Plant, 2002 through 2012 . Count of Electric Power Industry Power Plants, by Sector, by Predominant Energy Sources within Plant, 2002 through 2012 Year Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Other Renewables Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Energy Sources Total (All Sectors) 2002 633 1,147 1,649 40 66 1,426 682 38 28 2003 629 1,166 1,693 40 66 1,425 741 38 27 2004 625 1,143 1,670 46 66 1,425 749 39 28 2005 619 1,133 1,664 44 66 1,422 781 39 29 2006 616 1,148 1,659 46 66 1,421 843 39 29 2007 606 1,163 1,659 46 66 1,424 929 39 25 2008 598 1,170 1,655 43 66 1,423 1,076 39 29 2009 593 1,168 1,652 43 66 1,427 1,219 39 28 2010 580 1,169 1,657 48 66 1,432 1,355 39 32

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (continued) 2. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2002 3,846 138 0.76 21.20 5.91 9.1 852,547 828,439 3.36 3.46 66.8 2.88 2003 16,383 594 1.04 28.74 5.73 47.3 823,681 798,996 5.32 5.48 69.9 4.20 2004 14,876 540 0.98 27.01 5.59 40.4 839,886 814,843 6.04 6.22 68.4 4.76 2005 16,620 594 1.21 33.75 5.44 58.2 828,882 805,132 8.00 8.24 74.3 6.18

422

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Existing Transmission Capacity by High-Voltage Size, 2012 A. Existing Transmission Capacity by High-Voltage Size, 2012 Voltage Circuit Miles Type Operating (kV) FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. AC 100-199 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- AC 200-299 6,018 7,813 1,538 6,933 21,757 2,948 -- 38,410 85,416 AC 300-399 -- 7,362 5,850 13,429 3,650 5,303 9,529 10,913 56,036 AC 400-599 1,201 543 -- 2,618 8,876 94 -- 12,794 26,125 AC 600-799 -- -- 190 2,226 -- -- -- -- 2,416 AC Multi-Circuit Structure 200-299 1,198 686 36 2,008 4,156 9 -- -- 8,092 AC Multi-Circuit Structure 300-399 -- 372 274 3,706 313 153 2,747 -- 7,564 AC Multi-Circuit Structure 400-599 -- -- -- 90 857 -- -- -- 947 AC Multi-Circuit Structure 600-799 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- --

423

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Energy for Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, A. Net Energy for Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2002 - 2012, Actual Net Energy (Thousands of Megawatthours) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2002 211,116 286,199 2,301,321 567,897 273,907 279,264 -- -- 150,058 -- -- 835,319 194,876 280,269 666,696 3,745,601 2003 219,021 288,791 2,255,233 545,109 276,600 267,068 -- -- 153,918 -- -- 826,964 185,574 283,868 664,754 3,711,667 2004 220,335 292,725 2,313,180 553,236 283,646 274,760 -- -- 152,975 -- -- 856,734 191,829 289,146 682,053 3,797,439 2005 226,544 303,607 2,385,461 -- -- -- -- -- 216,633 -- 1,005,226 962,054 201,548 299,225 685,624 3,900,461

424

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Exports" U.S. Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",3122664,2010882,3565711,5133546,5327583,-3.6 " Canada*",1773644,943061,2101534,2716705,3176066,-14.5 " Dominican Republic",51792,211736,124720,263528,312741,-15.7 " Honduras","-",41664,34161,41664,68124,-38.8 " Jamaica",25,36311,"-",36336,33585,8.2 " Mexico",1244972,777750,1268077,2022722,1698391,19.1 " Other**",52231,360,37219,52591,38676,36

425

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 B. U.S. Transformer Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 Transformer Outage Counts Sustained Outage Causes FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Weather, excluding lightning -- -- -- -- 1.00 -- -- -- 1.00 Lightning -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Environmental -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Contamination 1.00 -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 1.00 Foreign Interference -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Fire -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Vandalism, Terrorism, or Malicious Acts -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Failed AC Substation Equipment 3.00 1.00 -- 1.00 5.00 -- -- 4.00 14.00 Failed AC/DC Terminal Equipment -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- Failed Protection System Equipment -- 1.00 -- -- 3.00 -- -- -- 4.00

426

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units by Technology and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) A. Net Summer Capacity of Utility Scale Units by Technology and by State, 2012 and 2011 (Megawatts) Census Division and State Renewable Sources Fossil Fuels Hydroelectric Pumped Storage Other Energy Storage Nuclear All Other Sources All Sources Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 4,157.7 3,805.2 24,619.1 24,153.6 1,753.4 1,709.4 3.0 3.0 4,630.3 4,653.7 48.0 26.0 35,211.5 34,350.9 Connecticut 294.7 299.9 6,607.7 6,674.5 29.4 29.4 0.0 0.0 2,102.5 2,102.5 26.0 26.0 9,060.3 9,132.3 Maine 1,704.5 1,640.8 2,764.9 2,737.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 22.0 0.0 4,491.4 4,378.2 Massachusetts 761.5 710.9 11,155.2 10,637.8 1,724.0 1,680.0 3.0 3.0 677.3 684.7 0.0 0.0 14,321.0 13,716.4

427

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by State" by State" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Coal-Producing Region","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Alabama",4649,4410,5171,9059,10150,-10.8 "Alaska",442,300,542,742,1091,-32 "Arizona",2184,1825,2002,4009,4169,-3.8 "Arkansas",2,4,11,6,33,-83.1 "Colorado",5297,5781,6885,11079,13914,-20.4 "Illinois",13474,13996,12487,27470,24419,12.5 "Indiana",9516,9422,9147,18938,18794,0.8 "Kansas",5,5,5,9,8,23.7 "Kentucky Total",20683,20594,22803,41276,49276,-16.2 " Eastern (Kentucky)",10392,10144,12444,20536,27516,-25.4

428

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, A. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Assessment Area, 2002 - 2012, Actual Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Winter Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region ECAR MAAC MAIN MAPP MISO MRO PJM RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. 2002 / 2003 42,001 45,980 360,748 84,844 46,159 39,974 -- -- 23,090 -- -- 137,541 29,140 44,719 94,554 588,002 2003 / 2004 36,229 47,850 357,026 86,332 45,625 39,955 -- -- 24,042 -- -- 133,244 27,828 41,988 100,337 583,430 2004 / 2005 41,449 47,859 371,011 91,800 45,565 40,618 -- -- 24,446 -- -- 139,486 29,096 44,010 101,002 605,331

429

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2012" Coal Consumers in the Manufacturing and Coke Sectors, 2012" "Company Name","Plant Location" "Top Ten Manufacturers" "American Crystal Sugar Co","MN, ND" "Archer Daniels Midland","IA, IL, MN, ND, NE" "Carmeuse Lime Stone Inc","AL, IL, IN, KY, MI, OH, PA, TN, VA, WI" "Cemex Inc","AL, CA, CO, FL, GA, KY, OH, TN, TX" "Dakota Gasification Company","ND" "Eastman Chemical Company","TN" "Georgia-Pacific LLC","AL, GA, OK, VA, WI" "Holcim (US) Inc","AL, CO, MD, MO, MT, OK, SC, TX, UT" "NewPage Corporation","MD, MI, WI" "U S Steel Corporation","AL, IN, MI, MN"

430

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State" 3. Average Quality of Coal Received at Manufacturing and Coke Plants by Census Division and State" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State1",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "New England" " Btu",13323,13196,13391,13253,13339,-0.6 " Sulfur",0.84,0.89,0.72,0.87,0.72,20.3 " Ash",5.95,5.81,5.93,5.87,6.09,-3.6 "Maine" " Btu","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Sulfur","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Ash","w","w","w","w","w","w"

431

SAS Output  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B. U.S. Transformer Outages by Type and NERC region, 2012 Outage Type Eastern Interconnection TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Circuit Outage Counts Automatic Outages (Sustained) 16.00 --...

432

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

components because of independent rounding." "Source: U.S. Department of Labor, Mine Safety and Health Administration, Form 7000-2, 'Quarterly Mine Employment and Coal Production...

433

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

28,723 30,920 ......Production 17,714 18,143 19,559 20,752 23,921 25,799 ......Transmission 524 579 637 665 679 748 ......Distribution 1,589 1,681 1,787 1,860 1,895 2,037...

434

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

by Sector, 2002 through 2011 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Energy Efficiency - Energy Savings (Thousand MWh) 2002 1,205 1,720 700 -- 3,625 2003 855...

435

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Recoverable Coal Reserves at Producing Mines, Estimated Recoverable Reserves, and Demonstrated Reserve by Mining Method, 2012" "(million short tons)" ,"Underground - Minable...

436

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Productivity by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" ,"Number of Mining Operations2",,,"Number of Employees3",,,"Average Production per Employee Hour" ,,,"(short tons)4"...

437

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Kingdom","-",115,10,115,10,"NM" "Asia Total",337715,127022,70962,464737,136534,240.4 " China",19536,8692,20964,28228,27697,1.9 " India","-",849,611,849,611,39 "...

438

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Quantity and Net Summer Capacity of Operable Environmental Equipment, 2001 - 2011 Flue Gas Desulfurization Systems Electrostatic Precipitators Baghouses Select Catalytic and...

439

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coal Exports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent"...

440

SAS Output  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Cooling Ponds Dry Cooling Systems Hybrid Wet and Dry Cooling Systems Other Cooling System Types Energy Source Quantity Associated Net Summer Capacity (MW) Quantity Associated Net...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Revenue and Expense Statistics for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) 3. Revenue and Expense Statistics for Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) Description 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 Utility Operating Revenues 219,609 230,151 238,759 265,652 275,501 270,964 ......Electric Utility 200,360 206,268 213,012 234,909 246,736 240,864 ......Other Utility 19,250 23,883 25,747 30,743 28,765 30,100 Utility Operating Expenses 189,062 201,057 206,960 236,786 245,589 241,198 ......Electric Utility 171,604 179,044 183,121 207,830 218,445 213,076 ............Operation 116,660 125,436 131,560 150,645 158,893 153,885 ..................Production 90,715 98,305 103,871 120,586 127,494 121,700 ........................Cost of Fuel 24,149 26,871 28,544 36,106 37,945 39,548

442

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Coke Imports" U.S. Coke Imports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Origin",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",10284,2293,159462,12577,183712,-93.2 " Canada",3009,2293,159462,5302,183712,-97.1 " Panama",7275,"-","-",7275,"-","-" "South America Total",25267,13030,88424,38297,106612,-64.1 " Brazil","-","-",78595,"-",78595,"-" " Colombia",25267,13030,9829,38297,28017,36.7 "Europe Total",6044,40281,165027,46325,485791,-90.5

443

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production and Coalbed Thickness by Major Coalbeds and Mine Type, 2012" Coal Production and Coalbed Thickness by Major Coalbeds and Mine Type, 2012" ,"Production (thousand short tons)",,,"Thickness (inches)" "Coalbed ID Number1","Underground","Surface","Total","Average2","Low","High" "Coalbed Name" "1699 Wyodak","-",351188,351188,778,160,913 "0036 Pittsburgh",52476,3871,56348,74,18,138 "0489 No. 9",42193,12181,54374,61,24,74 "0484 Herrin (Illinois No. 6)",48526,1910,50436,71,46,89 "0212 Pittsburgh",27355,76,27431,75,27,98 "1701 Smith","-",23847,23847,822,745,912 "1696 Anderson-Dietz 1-Dietz 2","-",18992,18992,932,660,960

444

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 0. Average Retail Price of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Cents per Kilowatthour) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 15.71 15.89 13.68 14.31 11.83 12.55 6.68 7.85 14.02 14.49 Connecticut 17.34 18.11 14.65 15.57 12.67 13.24 9.69 10.25 15.54 16.35 Maine 14.66 15.38 11.53 12.29 7.98 8.88 -- -- 11.81 12.58 Massachusetts 14.91 14.67 13.84 14.33 12.57 13.38 4.91 6.14 13.79 14.11 New Hampshire 16.07 16.52 13.36 14.04 11.83 12.27 -- -- 14.19 14.74 Rhode Island 14.40 14.33 11.87 12.37 10.68 11.27 8.28 14.11 12.74 13.04

445

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 3. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 (Million Dollars) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Total Electric Industry 2002 106,834 87,117 48,336 N/A 7,124 249,411 2003 111,249 96,263 51,741 514 N/A 259,767 2004 115,577 100,546 53,477 519 N/A 270,119 2005 128,393 110,522 58,445 643 N/A 298,003 2006 140,582 122,914 62,308 702 N/A 326,506 2007 148,295 128,903 65,712 792 N/A 343,703 2008 155,433 138,469 68,920 827 N/A 363,650 2009 157,008 132,940 62,504 828 N/A 353,280 2010 166,782 135,559 65,750 815 N/A 368,906 2011 166,714 135,926 67,606 803 N/A 371,049 2012 163,280 133,898 65,761 747 N/A 363,687

446

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",1503162,764701,1411897,2267863,2261900,0.3 " Canada*",975783,343309,1260473,1319092,1895263,-30.4 " Dominican Republic",94,51064,"-",51158,"-","-" " Mexico",527285,370328,151424,897613,366637,144.8 "South America Total",2091488,2561772,2389018,4653260,4543747,2.4 " Argentina",104745,155806,203569,260551,253841,2.6 " Brazil",1921144,2352098,2185449,4273242,4022618,6.2

447

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" 1. Average Price of Coal Receipts at Commercial and Institutional Users by Census Division and State" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Middle Atlantic",139.64,145,158.61,143.29,158.91,-9.8 " Pennsylvania",139.64,145,158.61,143.29,158.91,-9.8 "East North Central",87.62,97.3,87.11,93.56,95.13,-1.7 " Illinois",59.27,60.3,62.17,59.86,66.69,-10.2 " Indiana","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Michigan","w","w","w","w","w","w"

448

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" Average Price of Coal Receipts at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "and State",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "New England","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Maine","w","w","w","w","w","w" " Massachusetts","w","w","w","w","w","w" "Middle Atlantic",87.05,93.03,93.73,89.93,95.68,-6 " New York",102.14,105.8,117.15,103.8,117.61,-11.7

449

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division" 8. Coal Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(thousand short tons)" "Census Division","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" ,,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",1313,1177,1326,-1 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",2500,2207,2295,8.9 "w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure." "Note: Total may not equal sum of components because of independent rounding."

450

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 7 Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2002 3,710,847 182,482 1.37 27.96 1.15 87.0 186,271 30,043 4.19 25.98 0.61 76.4 2003 4,365,996 223,984 1.34 26.20 1.15 90.4 347,546 56,138 5.41 33.50 0.58 89.7 2004 4,410,775 227,700 1.41 27.27 1.13 93.3 337,011 54,152 5.35 33.31 0.61 93.6 2005 4,459,333 229,071 1.56 30.39 1.10 83.0 381,871 61,753 8.30 51.34 0.54 97.2

451

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Metallurgical Coal Exports by Customs District" Metallurgical Coal Exports by Customs District" "(short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Customs District","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "Eastern Total",11716074,14136513,15167377,25852587,27578514,-6.3 " Baltimore, MD",2736470,4225450,5123600,6961920,9037970,-23 " Boston, MA","-","-","-","-",28873,"-" " Buffalo, NY",247714,121347,524040,369061,725698,-49.1 " Norfolk, VA",8730257,9784866,9519119,18515123,17784479,4.1 " Ogdensburg, NY",1633,4850,618,6483,1494,333.9 "Southern Total",3551564,3824484,4264938,7376048,8976503,-17.8

452

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: 3 Stocks of Coal, Petroleum Liquids, and Petroleum Coke: Electric Power Sector, by Census Divison, 2012 and 2011 Electric Power Sector Electric Utilities Independent Power Producers Census Division December 2012 December 2011 Percentage Change December 2012 December 2011 December 2012 December 2011 Coal (Thousand Tons) New England 1,030 1,389 -25.9% W W W W Middle Atlantic 7,553 7,800 -3.2% W W W W East North Central 36,139 37,262 -3.0% 27,069 27,316 9,070 9,946 West North Central 30,554 28,544 7.0% 30,554 28,544 0 0 South Atlantic 38,859 36,920 5.3% 35,527 33,163 3,331 3,757 East South Central 19,657 17,185 14.4% 19,657 17,185 0 0 West South Central 28,807 22,910 25.7% 17,047 15,125 11,760 7,785

453

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

10.6. Advanced Metering Count by Technology Type, 10.6. Advanced Metering Count by Technology Type, 2007 through 2012 Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Automated Meter Reading (AMR) 2007 25,785,782 2,322,329 44,015 109 28,152,235 2008 36,425,943 3,529,985 77,122 13 40,033,063 2009 41,462,111 4,239,531 107,033 11 45,808,686 2010 43,913,225 4,611,877 159,315 626 48,685,043 2011 41,451,888 4,341,105 172,692 77 45,965,762 2012 43,455,437 4,691,018 185,862 125 48,330,822 Advanced Metering Infrastructure (AMI) 2007 2,202,222 262,159 9,106 2 2,473,489 2008 4,190,244 444,003 12,757 12 4,647,016 2009 8,712,297 876,419 22,675 10 9,611,401 2010 18,369,908 1,904,983 59,567 67 20,334,525 2011 33,453,548 3,682,159 154,659 7 37,290,373

454

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Net Metering Customers and Capacity by Technology Type, by End Use Sector, 0. Net Metering Customers and Capacity by Technology Type, by End Use Sector, 2003 through 2012 Capacity (MW) Customers Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Total Historical Data 2003 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 5,870 775 168 -- 6,813 2004 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 14,114 1,494 215 3 15,826 2005 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 19,244 1,565 337 -- 21,146 2006 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 30,689 2,553 376 -- 33,618 2007 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 44,450 3,513 391 -- 48,354 2008 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 64,400 5,305 304 -- 70,009 2009 N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 88,205 7,365 919 -- 96,489 Photovoltaic 2010 697.890 517.861 243.051 -- 1,458.802 137,618 11,897 1,225 -- 150,740

455

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Summary Statistics for the United States, 2002 - 2012 2. Summary Statistics for the United States, 2002 - 2012 (From Table 2.1.) Number of Ultimate Customers Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total 2002 116,622,037 15,333,700 601,744 N/A 1,066,554 133,624,035 2003 117,280,481 16,549,519 713,221 1,127 N/A 134,544,348 2004 118,763,768 16,606,783 747,600 1,025 N/A 136,119,176 2005 120,760,839 16,871,940 733,862 518 N/A 138,367,159 2006 122,471,071 17,172,499 759,604 791 N/A 140,403,965 2007 123,949,916 17,377,219 793,767 750 N/A 142,121,652 2008 124,937,469 17,562,726 774,713 727 N/A 143,275,635 2009 125,177,175 17,561,661 757,519 705 N/A 143,497,060 2010 125,717,935 17,674,338 747,746 239 N/A 144,140,258 2011 126,143,072 17,638,062 727,920 92 N/A 144,509,146

456

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Disposition by State, 2012" Coal Disposition by State, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State","Open Market Sales1","Captive Sales / Transactions2","Exports3","Total" "Alabama",8688,"-",10333,19021 "Alaska","w","-",968,"w" "Arizona","w","-","-","w" "Arkansas","w","-","-","w" "Colorado",20836,4552,3468,28856 "Illinois",29252,5113,12341,46705 "Indiana",17127,18404,375,35906 "Kentucky Total",76602,6884,5668,89154 " Kentucky (East)",37324,6884,3588,47796 " Kentucky (West)",39277,"-",2081,41358

457

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. U.S. Coal Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013" 1. U.S. Coal Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" "Year and","Production1","Imports","Waste Coal","Producer and","Consumption","Exports","Consumer","Losses and" "Quarter",,,"Supplied","Distributor",,,"Stocks2","Unaccounted" ,,,,"Stocks2",,,,"For3" 2007 " January - March",286041,8786,3264,34007,278727,11139,149588 " April - June",285687,8405,3387,32484,267106,14702,162849 " July - September",286035,10559,3697,30090,303665,16198,150448 " October - December",288872,8597,3727,33977,278500,17124,158781 " Total",1146635,36347,14076,,1127998,59163,,4085

458

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 1. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Industrial Sector, 2002 - 2012 Coal Petroleum Liquids Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Barrels) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Barrel) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption Annual Totals 2002 294,234 13,659 1.45 31.29 1.56 52.1 29,137 4,638 3.55 22.33 1.24 26.5 2003 322,547 15,076 1.45 31.01 1.37 60.7 27,538 4,624 4.85 28.86 1.25 23.2 2004 326,495 15,324 1.63 34.79 1.43 57.6 25,491 4,107 4.98 30.93 1.38 18.5 2005 339,968 16,011 1.94 41.17 1.42 61.9 36,383 5,876 6.64 41.13 1.36 26.4

459

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012" Productive Capacity and Capacity Utilization of Underground Coal Mines by State and Mining Method, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Continuous1",,"Conventional and Other2",,"Longwall3",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Productive","Capacity","Productive","Capacity","Productive","Capacity","Productive","Capacity" "State","Capacity","Utilization","Capacity","Utilization","Capacity","Utilization","Capacity","Utilization" ,,"Percent",,"Percent",,"Percent",,"Percent" "Alabama","w","w","-","-","w","w",14594,85.99

460

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 A. U.S. Transmission Circuit Sustained Automatic Outage Counts and Hours by Cause Code and by NERC Region, 2012 AC & DC Circuit Outage Counts Sustained Outage Causes FRCC MRO NPCC RFC SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Weather, excluding lightning 6.00 27.00 3.00 30.00 63.00 12.00 -- 69.00 210.00 Lightning 5.00 10.00 8.00 5.00 31.00 16.00 13.00 57.00 145.00 Environmental -- 1.00 1.00 5.00 -- 1.00 -- -- 8.00 Contamination 14.00 -- -- -- 22.00 3.00 6.00 7.00 52.00 Foreign Interference 34.00 3.00 -- 4.00 13.00 1.00 2.00 14.00 71.00 Fire -- 2.00 -- 1.00 6.00 3.00 1.00 85.00 98.00 Vandalism, Terrorism, or Malicious Acts -- -- -- -- 2.00 -- -- 1.00 3.00 Failed AC Substation Equipment 18.00 16.00 35.00 63.00 57.00 16.00 15.00 65.00 285.00

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins B. Winter Net Internal Demand, Capacity Resources, and Capacity Margins by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2012 Actual, 2013-2017 Projected Net Internal Demand (Megawatts) -- Winter Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region MAPP MISO PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2012 / 2013 36,409 45,545 386,359 4,925 74,430 122,566 149,359 35,079 46,909 101,706 616,927 Projected 2013 / 2014 43,384 46,008 399,149 5,385 75,320 132,229 145,657 40,558 51,435 107,341 647,317 Projected 2014 / 2015 44,060 46,090 403,883 5,500 76,252 134,742 146,130 41,259 53,742 109,418 657,192 Projected 2015 / 2016 44,596 46,184 408,927 5,563 77,058 137,338 147,201 41,767 55,346 110,814 665,866

462

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, B. Noncoincident Peak Load by North American Electric Reliability Corporation Assessment Area, 2012 Actual, 2013-2017 Projected Summer Peak Load (Megawatts) Eastern Interconnection ERCOT Western Interconnection All Interconnections Period FRCC NPCC Balance of Eastern Region MAPP MISO PJM SERC SPP TRE WECC Contiguous U.S. Actual 2012 44,338 58,319 468,092 5,051 96,769 154,339 161,687 50,246 66,548 130,465 767,762 Projected 2013 45,668 59,969 469,857 5,109 96,192 155,553 159,032 53,971 67,998 133,523 777,015 Projected 2014 46,338 60,654 475,005 5,249 96,879 158,717 159,457 54,703 69,289 132,731 784,017 Projected 2015 47,053 61,428 484,637 5,360 97,565 162,216 164,150 55,346 71,423 134,183 798,724

463

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012" 3. Coal Mining Productivity by State, Mine Type, and Mine Production Range, 2012" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" ,"Mine Production Range (thousand short tons)" "Coal-Producing State, Region1","Above 1,000","Above 500","Above 200","Above 100","Above 50","Above 10","10 or Under","Total2" "and Mine Type",,"to 1,000","to 500","to 200","to 100","to 50" "Alabama",1.69,2.5,1.95,1.72,1.83,0.69,0.55,1.68 " Underground",1.73,"-","-","-",1.08,0.31,"-",1.64 " Surface",1.36,2.5,1.95,1.72,2.11,1.19,0.55,1.75

464

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Receipts at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent"...

465

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Open Market Sales and Average Price of Coke and Breeze" "(thousand short tons and dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Commodity","April - June","January - March","April -...

466

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Union Status, 2012" Average Number of Employees at Underground and Surface Mines by State and Union Status, 2012" ,"Union",,"Nonunion" "Coal-Producing State","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface" "and Region1" "Alabama",3044,70,89,1677 "Alaska","-",143,"-","-" "Arizona","-",432,"-","-" "Arkansas","-","-",70,"-" "Colorado",174,212,1858,261 "Illinois",647,58,3291,534 "Indiana","-","-",2054,1868 "Kentucky Total",564,93,10122,4595 " Kentucky (East)",48,93,6821,3943 " Kentucky (West)",516,"-",3301,652

467

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Number of Employees by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" Average Number of Employees by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" ,2012,,,2011,,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State and Region1" "Alabama",3190,1851,5041,3138,1618,4756,1.7,14.4,6 "Alaska","-",143,143,"-",136,136,"-",5.1,5.1 "Arizona","-",432,432,"-",419,419,"-",3.1,3.1 "Arkansas",70,3,73,67,3,70,4.5,"-",4.3 "Colorado",2032,473,2505,1927,478,2405,5.4,-1,4.2 "Illinois",3938,574,4512,3563,542,4105,10.5,5.9,9.9

468

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Capacity Utilization of Coal Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" Capacity Utilization of Coal Mines by State, 2012 and 2011" "(percent)" ,2012,,,2011 "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Total","Underground","Surface","Total" "State" "Alabama",85.99,83.96,85.28,67.52,90.91,75.85 "Alaska","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arizona","-","w","w","-","w","w" "Arkansas","w","-","w","w","-","w" "Colorado","w","w",76.65,"w","w",74.63 "Illinois",71.02,57.41,69.11,71.73,53.22,68.54

469

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. U.S. Coke Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013" 2. U.S. Coke Summary Statistics, 2007 - 2013" "(thousand short tons)" "Year and","Production","Imports","Producer and","Consumption2","Exports" "Quarter",,,"Distributor" ,,,"Stocks1" 2007 " January - March",4000,454,717,4078,343 " April - June",4083,685,767,4428,291 " July - September",4063,521,637,4371,344 " October - December",4055,800,632,4394,466 " Total",16201,2460,,17270,1444 2008 " January - March",4036,850,478,4723,316 " April - June",3810,1243,505,4559,466 " July - September",4107,998,464,4494,653 " October - December",3694,512,916,3229,524

470

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2012" 2. Underground Coal Mining Productivity by State and Mining Method, 2012" "(short tons produced per employee hour)" "Coal-Producing State, Region1 and Mine Type","Continuous2","Conventional and","Longwall4","Total" ,,"Other3" "Alabama",0.71,"-",1.69,1.66 "Arkansas",0.59,"-","-",0.59 "Colorado",1.9,"-",6.38,5.93 "Illinois",3.65,"-",6.6,4.86 "Indiana",3.25,"-","-",3.25 "Kentucky Total",2.43,1.77,"-",2.39 " Kentucky (East)",1.61,1.77,"-",1.62 " Kentucky (West)",3.61,"-","-",3.56 "Maryland",1.8,"-","-",1.8

471

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012" 1. Average Sales Price of Coal by State and Coal Rank, 2012" "(dollars per short ton)" "Coal-Producing State","Bituminous","Subbituminous","Lignite","Anthracite","Total" "Alabama",106.57,"-","-","-",106.57 "Alaska","-","w","-","-","w" "Arizona","w","-","-","-","w" "Arkansas","w","-","-","-","w" "Colorado","w","w","-","-",37.54 "Illinois",53.08,"-","-","-",53.08 "Indiana",52.01,"-","-","-",52.01

472

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013" Average Price of U.S. Coal Exports and Imports, 2007 - 2013" "(dollars per short ton)" ,"January - March",,"April - June",,"July - September",,"October - December",,"Total" "Year","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports","Exports","Imports" 2007,74.13,45.91,64.3,46.86,72.1,47.38,71.09,50.51,70.25,47.64 2008,81.81,52.91,97.24,55.59,102.51,64.65,104.97,65.33,97.68,59.83 2009,113.08,61.03,93.28,65.44,98.7,64.93,100.98,64.72,101.44,63.91 2010,106.52,62.02,121.36,71.91,125.45,77.12,126.16,76.18,120.41,71.77 2011,139.34,86,153,105.86,155.88,112.06,147.38,110.19,148.86,103.32

473

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division" 1. Coke and Breeze Stocks at Coke Plants by Census Division" "(thousand short tons)" "Census Division","April - June","January - March","April - June","Percent Change" ,2013,2013,2012,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "Middle Atlantic","w","w","w","w" "East North Central",724,510,509,42.1 "South Atlantic","w","w","w","w" "East South Central","w","w","w","w" "U.S. Total",914,690,674,35.6 "Coke Total",757,573,594,27.5 "Breeze Total",157,117,80,95.2 "w = Data withheld to avoid disclosure."

474

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" Coal Production and Number of Mines by State and Mine Type, 2012 and 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,2012,,2011,,"Percent Change" "Coal-Producing","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production","Number of Mines","Production" "State and Region1" "Alabama",46,19321,52,19071,-11.5,1.3 " Underground",8,12570,9,10879,-11.1,15.5 " Surface",38,6752,43,8192,-11.6,-17.6 "Alaska",1,2052,1,2149,"-",-4.5 " Surface",1,2052,1,2149,"-",-4.5 "Arizona",1,7493,1,8111,"-",-7.6 " Surface",1,7493,1,8111,"-",-7.6 "Arkansas",2,98,2,133,"-",-26.4

475

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Year-End Coal Stocks by Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011" 7. Year-End Coal Stocks by Sector, Census Division, and State, 2012 and 2011" "(thousand short tons)" ,2012,,,,,2011,,,,,"Total" "Census Division","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Producer","Electric","Other","Coke","Commercial","Producer",2012,2011,"Percent" "and State","Power1","Industrial",,"and","and","Power1","Industrial",,"and","and",,,"Change" ,,,,"Institutional","Distributor",,,,"Institutional","Distributor" "New England",1030,13,"-","-","-",1389,"w","-","-","-",1042,"w","w"

476

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Nitrogen Oxides Control Technology Emissions Reduction Factors 4. Nitrogen Oxides Control Technology Emissions Reduction Factors Nitrogen Oxides Control Technology EIA-Code(s) Reduction Factor Advanced Overfire Air AA 30% Alternate Burners BF 20% Flue Gas Recirculation FR 40% Fluidized Bed Combustor CF 20% Fuel Reburning FU 30% Low Excess Air LA 20% Low NOx Burners LN 30% Other (or Unspecified) OT 20% Overfire Air OV 20% Selective Catalytic Reduction SR 70% Selective Catalytic Reduction With Low Nitrogen Oxide Burners SR and LN 90% Selective Noncatalytic Reduction SN 30% Selective Noncatalytic Reduction With Low NOx Burners SN and LN 50% Slagging SC 20% Notes: Starting with 1995 data, reduction factors for Advanced Overfire Air, Low NOx Burners, and Overfire Air were reduced by 10 percent.

477

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Retail Sales and Direct Use of Electricity to Ultimate Customers 2. Retail Sales and Direct Use of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by Sector, by Provider, 2002 through 2012 (Megawatthours) Year Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation Other Total Direct Use Total End Use Total Electric Industry 2002 1,265,179,869 1,104,496,607 990,237,631 N/A 105,551,904 3,465,466,011 166,184,296 3,631,650,307 2003 1,275,823,910 1,198,727,601 1,012,373,247 6,809,728 N/A 3,493,734,486 168,294,526 3,662,029,012 2004 1,291,981,578 1,230,424,731 1,017,849,532 7,223,642 N/A 3,547,479,483 168,470,002 3,715,949,485 2005 1,359,227,107 1,275,079,020 1,019,156,065 7,506,321 N/A 3,660,968,513 150,015,531 3,810,984,044 2006 1,351,520,036 1,299,743,695 1,011,297,566 7,357,543 N/A 3,669,918,840 146,926,612 3,816,845,452

478

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, 9. Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity to Ultimate Customers by End-Use Sector, by State, 2012 and 2011 (Million Dollars) Residential Commercial Industrial Transportation All Sectors Census Division and State Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 Year 2012 Year 2011 New England 7,418 7,546 6,137 6,441 3,292 3,504 38 45 16,885 17,536 Connecticut 2,213 2,339 1,901 2,038 452 486 19 19 4,584 4,882 Maine 657 674 467 494 242 268 0 0 1,366 1,436 Massachusetts 3,029 3,003 2,453 2,547 2,127 2,270 17 22 7,627 7,842 New Hampshire 713 736 598 629 231 238 0 0 1,543 1,602 Rhode Island 450 449 432 453 99 103 2 4 982 1,008 Vermont 356 346 285 281 142 139 0 0 784 766

479

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 (continued) 8. Receipts, Average Cost, and Quality of Fossil Fuels: Independent Power Producers, 2002 - 2012 (continued) Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts Average Cost Average Cost Period (Billion Btu) (Thousand Tons) (Dollars per MMbtu) (Dollars per Ton) Average Sulfur Percent by Weight Percentage of Consumption (Billion Btu) (Thousand Mcf) (Dollars per MMBtu) (Dollars per Mcf) Percentage of Consumption (Dollars per MMBtu) Annual Totals 2002 47,805 1,639 1.03 29.98 4.85 44.4 3,198,108 3,126,308 3.55 3.63 91.6 2.42 2003 59,377 2,086 0.60 17.16 4.88 64.3 3,335,086 3,244,368 5.33 5.48 96.2 3.15 2004 73,745 2,609 0.72 20.30 4.95 81.0 3,491,942 3,403,474 5.86 6.01 93.1 3.43 2005 92,706 3,277 0.90 25.42 5.09 82.9 3,675,165 3,578,722 8.20 8.42 95.8 4.69

480

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

9. Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" 9. Coal Stocks at Other Industrial Plants by Census Division and State" "(thousand short tons)" "Census Division","June 30 2013","March 31 2013","June 30 2012","Percent Change" "and State",,,,"(June 30)" ,,,,"2013 versus 2012" "New England","w","w",21,"w" " Maine","w","w","w","w" " Massachusetts","w","w","w","w" "Middle Atlantic",295,251,286,3.2 " New York",137,78,107,27.6 " Pennsylvania",158,172,179,-11.5 "East North Central",734,692,761,-3.5 " Illinois",160,152,187,-14.1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation output declined" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Stocks of Coal by Coal Rank: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 4. Stocks of Coal by Coal Rank: Electric Power Sector, 2002 - 2012 Electric Power Sector Period Bituminous Coal Subbituminous Coal Lignite Coal Total End of Year Stocks 2002 70,704 66,593 4,417 141,714 2003 57,716 59,884 3,967 121,567 2004 49,022 53,618 4,029 106,669 2005 52,923 44,377 3,836 101,137 2006 67,760 68,408 4,797 140,964 2007 63,964 82,692 4,565 151,221 2008 65,818 91,214 4,556 161,589 2009 91,922 92,448 5,097 189,467 2010 81,108 86,915 6,894 174,917 2011 82,056 85,151 5,179 172,387 2012 86,437 93,833 4,846 185,116 2010, End of Month Stocks January 86,354 86,893 4,845 178,091 February 82,469 83,721 4,836 171,026 March 86,698 86,014 5,030 177,742 April 92,621 89,545 7,095 189,260 May 93,069 91,514 7,085 191,669

482

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" 8. U.S. Coal Receipts at Manufacturing Plants by North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) Code" "(thousand short tons)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "NAICS Code","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" ,2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "311 Food Manufacturing",2214,2356,1994,4570,4353,5 "312 Beverage and Tobacco Product Mfg.",48,37,53,85,90,-5.6 "313 Textile Mills",31,29,22,59,63,-6.1 "315 Apparel Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w" "321 Wood Product Manufacturing","w","w","w","w","w","w"

483

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" Average Price of U.S. Metallurgical Coal Exports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Destination",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",92.5,99.4,146.56,94.82,140.7,-32.6 " Canada*",99.83,125.2,142.46,106.43,138.19,-23 " Dominican Republic",114.6,77.21,"-",77.27,"-","-" " Mexico",78.93,78.54,180.76,78.77,153.65,-48.7 "South America Total",119.26,117.51,167.05,118.3,168.12,-29.6 " Argentina",146.7,131.08,182.47,137.36,196.37,-30.1 " Brazil",119.21,117.38,165.61,118.2,171.84,-31.2

484

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012" Coal Production by State, Mine Type, and Union Status, 2012" "(thousand short tons)" ,"Union",,"Nonunion",,"Total" "Coal-Producing","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface","Underground","Surface" "State and Region1" "Alabama",12410,"-",139,6669,12549,6669 "Alaska","-",2052,"-","-","-",2052 "Arizona","-",7493,"-","-","-",7493 "Arkansas","-","-",96,"-",96,"-" "Colorado",1673,2655,21955,2265,23628,4920 "Illinois",2897,"-",39939,5649,42837,5649

485

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Sulfur Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors 1. Sulfur Dioxide Uncontrolled Emission Factors Fuel, Code, Source and Emission Units Combustion System Type / Firing Configuration Fuel EIA Fuel Code Source and Tables (As Appropriate) Emissions Units Lbs = Pounds MMCF = Million Cubic Feet MG = Thousand Gallons Cyclone Boiler Fluidized Bed Boiler Opposed Firing Boiler Spreader Stoker Boiler Tangential Boiler All Other Boiler Types Combustion Turbine Internal Combustion Engine Agricultural Byproducts AB Source: 1 Lbs per ton 0.08 0.01 0.08 0.08 0.08 0.08 N/A N/A Blast Furnace Gas BFG Sources: 1 (including footnote 7 within source); 2, Table 1.4-2 (including footnote d within source) Lbs per MMCF 0.60 0.06 0.60 0.60 0.60 0.60 0.60 0.60 Bituminous Coal* BIT Source: 2, Table 1.1-3 Lbs per ton 38.00 3.80 38.00 38.00 38.00 38.00 N/A N/A

486

SAS Output  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Average Price of U.S. Coke Imports" Average Price of U.S. Coke Imports" "(dollars per short ton)" ,,,,"Year to Date" "Continent and Country","April - June","January - March","April - June",2013,2012,"Percent" "of Origin",2013,2013,2012,,,"Change" "North America Total",263.21,252.66,353.05,261.29,356.01,-26.6 " Canada",263.51,252.66,353.05,258.82,356.01,-27.3 " Panama",263.09,"-","-",263.09,"-","-" "South America Total",196.86,194.14,175.88,195.94,181.01,8.2 " Brazil","-","-",157.6,"-",157.6,"-" " Colombia",196.86,194.14,322.06,195.94,246.68,-20.6

487

Harmonic generation at high intensities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atomic electrons subject to intense laser fields can absorb many photons, leading either to multiphoton ionization or the emission of a single, energetic photon which can be a high multiple of the laser frequency. The latter process, high-order harmonic generation, has been observed experimentally using a range of laser wavelengths and intensities over the past several years. Harmonic generation spectra have a generic form: a steep decline for the low order harmonics, followed by a plateau extending to high harmonic order, and finally an abrupt cutoff beyond which no harmonics are discernible. During the plateau the harmonic production is a very weak function of the process order. Harmonic generation is a promising source of coherent, tunable radiation in the XUV to soft X-ray range which could have a variety of scientific and possibly technological applications. Its conversion from an interesting multiphoton phenomenon to a useful laboratory radiation source requires a complete understanding of both its microscopic and macroscopic aspects. We present some recent results on the response of single atoms at intensities relevant to the short pulse experiments. The calculations employ time-dependent methods, which we briefly review in the next section. Following that we discuss the behavior of the harmonics as a function of laser intensity. Two features are notable: the slow scaling of the harmonic intensities with laser intensity, and the rapid variation in the phase of the individual harmonics with respect to harmonic order. We then give a simple empirical formula that predicts the extent of the plateau for a given ionization potential, wavelength and intensity.

Schafer, K.J.; Krause, J.L.; Kulander, K.C.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

A new current source GTO inverter with sinusoidal output voltage and current  

SciTech Connect

A new current source inverter with sinusoidal output voltage and current is presented. Gate turn-off thyristors (GTO's) and pulsewidth modulation (PWM) control techniques are used in the current source inverter to produce the sinusoidal output voltage and current. Three capacitors are connected to the ac output terminals to absorb overvoltages which occur when the GTO current is cut off and to provide a filter function for reducing harmonics in the output current. Voltage spikes, which have been a serious problem in the practical application of this inverter, are suppressed by adding gate pulses which force the inverter into a state of shoot-through. Moreover, this inverter permits the capacitance of an ac output terminal capacitor for absorbing overvoltages to be reduced to one-tenth or less of that of a commutating capacitor in a conventional thyristor type current source inverter. A 3.7-kW induction motor is driven by the inverter. The motor efficiency and noise level are measured and compared with those obtained when the motor is driven by a conventional voltage source PWM inverter. An operating efficiency five or six percent higher and noise level 10 dB lower are obtained for the former. Therefore, this current source GTO inverter is very suitable for ac motor variable speed drives.

Hombu, M.; Matsuda, Y.; Ueda, A.; Ueda, S.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Determining Reserves in Low Permeability and Layered Reservoirs Using the Minimum Terminal Decline Rate Method: How Good are the Predictions?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis evaluates the applicability of forecasting production from low permeability and layered tight gas wells using the Arps hyperbolic equation at earlier times and then switching to the exponential form of the equation at a predetermined minimum decline rate. This methodology is called the minimum terminal decline rate method. Two separate completion types have been analyzed. The first is horizontal completions with multi-stage hydraulic fractures while the second is vertical fractured wells in layered formations, completed with hydraulic fractures. For both completion types both simulated data and real world well performance histories have been evaluated using differing minimum terminal decline rates and the benefit of increasing portions of production history to make predictions. The application of the minimum terminal decline rate method to the simulated data in this study (3 percent minimum decline applied to multiple fractured horizontal wells MFHW- and 7 percent applied to vertical fractured layered wells) gave high errors for some simulations within the first two years. Once additional production data is considered in making predictions, the errors in estimated ultimate recovery and in remaining reserves is significantly reduced. This result provides a note of caution, when using the minimum decline rate method for forecasting using small quantities of production history. The evaluation of real world data using the minimum terminal decline rate method introduces other inaccuracies such as poor data quality, low data frequency, operational changes which affect the production profile and workovers / re-stimulations which require a restart of production forecasting process. Real well data for MFHW comes from the Barnett Shale completions of the type which have been widely utilized since 2004. There is insufficient production history from real wells to determine an appropriate minimum terminal decline rate. In the absence of suitable analogs for the determination of the minimum terminal decline rate it would be impossible to correctly apply this methodology. Real well data for vertical fractured layered wells from the Carthage Cotton Valley field indicate that for wells similar to Conoco operated Panola County wells a feasible decline rate is between 5 percent and 10 percent. Further if a consistent production trend and with more than 2 years of production history are used to forecast, the EUR can be predicted to within plus/minus 10 percent and remaining reserves to within plus/minus 15 percent.

McMillan, Marcia Donna

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Average spot natural gas prices declined during the first half of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ...

491

Sources of productivity decline in US coal mining, 1972-1977  

SciTech Connect

Following a discussion of coal-mining technology, estimates of production functions for surface and underground coal mines are used to estimate mine productivity, to explain productivity differentials across mines, and to assess the importance of several assumed sources of productivity decline in the industry. While coal-mining techniques and equipment vary substantially between underground and surface mining, the effects of learning-by-doing appear to dominate the resource-exhaustion effects in both. The authors project that detrimental productivity effects of surface mining due to resource extraction will continue to be offset by learning by doing and other positive productivity effects until the year 2003. However, rapid growth of either surface or underground mining will hasten the appearance of detrimental resource-exhaustion effects. 9 references, 8 tables.

Kruvant, W.J. (General Accounting Office, Washington, DC); Moody, C.E. Jr.; Valentine, P.L.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Declining Volatility, a General Property of Disparate Systems: From Fossils, to Stocks, to the Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There may be structural principles pertaining to the general behavior of systems that lead to similarities in a variety of different contexts. Classic examples include the descriptive power of fractals, the importance of surface area to volume constraints, the universality of entropy in systems, and mathematical rules of growth and form. Documenting such overarching principles may represent a rejoinder to the Neodarwinian synthesis that emphasizes adaptation and competition. Instead, these principles could indicate the importance of constraint and structure on form and evolution. Here we document a potential example of a phenomenon suggesting congruent behavior of very different systems. We focus on the notion that universally there has been a tendency for more volatile entities to disappear from systems such that the net volatility in these systems tends to decline. We specifically focus on origination and extinction rates in the marine animal fossil record, the performance of stocks in the stock market, and...

Lieberman, Bruce S

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

The Stolper-Samuelson Effects of a Decline in Aggregate Consumption ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consider an economy in which various types of labor are used to produce consumption, but not all types of labor are useful for upgrading the stock of organization capital—that is, for replacing old projects with more productive new projects. When news induces consumers to want to save more, low-quality projects are destroyed across all sectors of the economy, even though the economy is set to increase its stock of new projects. Labor that can be used to create new projects becomes more expensive and labor that cannot becomes cheap. Average wages may not change at all, and the employment of workers who cannot invest in new projects will decline. If physical capital complements the inputs of these workers, investment in physical capital tends to move together with their employment. These results are derived analytically for a prototype economy that has the essential ingredients of empirically relevant equilibrium models of firm heterogeneity.

Erzo G. J. Luttmer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Iterative equalization and decoding using reduced-state sequence estimation based soft-output algorithms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study and analyze the performance of iterative equalization and decoding (IED) using an M-BCJR equalizer. We use bit error rate (BER), frame error rate simulations and extrinsic information transfer (EXIT) charts to study and compare the performances of M-BCJR and BCJR equalizers on precoded and non-precoded channels. Using EXIT charts, the achievable channel capacities with IED using the BCJR, M-BCJR and MMSE LE equalizers are also compared. We predict the BER performance of IED using the M-BCJR equalizer from EXIT charts and explain the discrepancy between the observed and predicted performances by showing that the extrinsic outputs of the $M$-BCJR algorithm are not true logarithmic-likelihood ratios (LLR's). We show that the true LLR's can be estimated if the conditional distributions of the extrinsic outputs are known and finally we design a practical estimator for computing the true LLR's from the extrinsic outputs of the M-BCJR equalizer.

Tamma, Raja Venkatesh

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Using light emitting diode arrays as touchsensitive input and output devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) offer long life, low cost, efficiency, brightness, and a full range of colors. Because of these properties, they are widely used for simple displays in electronic devices. A previously characterized, but little known property of LEDs allows them to be used as photo sensors. In this paper, we show how this capability can be used to turn unmodified, off the shelf, LED arrays into touch sensitive input devices (while still remaining capable of producing output). The technique is simple and requires little or no extra hardware – in some cases operating with the same micro-controller based circuitry normally used to produce output, requiring only software changes. We will describe a simple hybrid input/output device prototype implemented with this technique, and discuss the design opportunities that this type of device opens up. Categories and Subject Descriptors:

Scott E. Hudson

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Bottom-up forcing and the decline of Steller sea lions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Declines of Steller sea lion (Eumetopias jubatus) populations in the Aleutian Islands and Gulf of Alaska could be a consequence of physical oceanographic changes associated with the 1976--77 climate regime shift. Changes in ocean climate are hypothesized to have affected the quantity, quality, and accessibility of prey, which in turn may have affected the rates of birth and death of sea lions. Recent studies of the spatial and temporal variations in the ocean climate system of the North Pacific support this hypothesis. Ocean climate changes appear to have created adaptive opportunities for various species that are preyed upon by Steller sea lions at mid-trophic levels. The east--west asymmetry of the oceanic response to climate forcing after 1976-- 77 is consistent with both the temporal aspect (populations decreased after the late 1970s) and the spatial aspect of the decline (western, but not eastern, sea lion populations decreased). These broad-scale climate variations appear to be modulated by regionally sensitive biogeographic structures along the Aleutian Islands and Gulf of Alaska, which include a transition point from coastal to open-ocean conditions at Samalga Pass westward along the Aleutian Islands. These transition points delineate distinct clusterings of different combinations of prey species, which are in turn correlated with differential population sizes and trajectories of Steller sea lions. Archaeological records spanning 4000 yr further indicate that sea lion populations have experienced major shifts in abundance in the past. Shifts in ocean climate are the most parsimonious underlying explanation for the broad suite of ecosystem changes that have been observed in the North Pacific Ocean in recent decades.

Eumetopias Jubatas In; Andrew W. Trites; Arthur J. Miller; Herbert D. G. Maschner; Michael A; Steven J. Bograd; John A; Antonietta Capotondi; Kenneth O. Coyle; Emanuele Di; Bruce P. Finney; Edward J; Chester E. Grosch; Steven R; Douglas J. Neilson; Stephen R; Katherine L. Reedy-maschner; Thomas C. Royer; Franklin B; Julian X. L. Wang; Arliss J. Winship

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Using Economic Input/Output Tables to Predict a Country’s Nuclear Status  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both nuclear power and nuclear weapons programs should have (related) economic signatures which are detectible at some scale. We evaluated this premise in a series of studies using national economic input/output (IO) data. Statistical discrimination models using economic IO tables predict with a high probability whether a country with an unknown predilection for nuclear weapons proliferation is in fact engaged in nuclear power development or nuclear weapons proliferation. We analyzed 93 IO tables, spanning the years 1993 to 2005 for 37 countries that are either members or associates of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The 2009 OECD input/output tables featured 48 industrial sectors based on International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) Revision 3, and described the respective economies in current country-of-origin valued currency. We converted and transformed these reported values to US 2005 dollars using appropriate exchange rates and implicit price deflators, and addressed discrepancies in reported industrial sectors across tables. We then classified countries with Random Forest using either the adjusted or industry-normalized values. Random Forest, a classification tree technique, separates and categorizes countries using a very small, select subset of the 2304 individual cells in the IO table. A nation’s efforts in nuclear power, be it for electricity or nuclear weapons, are an enterprise with a large economic footprint -- an effort so large that it should discernibly perturb coarse country-level economics data such as that found in yearly input-output economic tables. The neoclassical economic input-output model describes a country’s or region’s economy in terms of the requirements of industries to produce the current level of economic output. An IO table row shows the distribution of an industry’s output to the industrial sectors while a table column shows the input required of each industrial sector by a given industry.

Weimar, Mark R.; Daly, Don S.; Wood, Thomas W.

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

498

HIGH VOLTAGE GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to high voltage supply circuits adapted for providing operating voltages for GeigerMueller counter tubes, and is especially directed to an arrangement for maintaining uniform voltage under changing conditions of operation. In the usual power supply arrangement for counter tubes the counter voltage is taken from across the power supply output capacitor. If the count rate exceeds the current delivering capaciiy of the capacitor, the capacitor voltage will drop, decreasing the counter voltage. The present invention provides a multivibrator which has its output voltage controlled by a signal proportional to the counting rate. As the counting rate increases beyond the current delivering capacity of the capacitor, the rectified voltage output from the multivibrator is increased to maintain uniform counter voltage.

Zito, G.V.

1959-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

499

Down-hole periodic seismic generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A down hole periodic seismic generator system is disclosed for transmitting variable frequency, predominantly shear-wave vibration into earth strata surrounding a borehole. The system comprises a unitary housing operably connected to a well head by support and electrical cabling and contains clamping apparatus for selectively clamping the housing to the walls of the borehole. The system further comprises a variable speed pneumatic oscillator and a self-contained pneumatic reservoir for producing a frequency-swept seismic output over a discrete frequency range.

Hardee, H.C.; Hills, R.G.; Striker, R.P.

1982-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

500

Modeling of biogas generation in bioreactor landfills using neuro-fuzzy system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas generation in anaerobic bioreactor landfills is modeled using the neuro-fuzzy system. The implemented inference system was an adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS). The fuzzy logic controller featured a Multi-Input-Single-Output (MISO) ... Keywords: biogas generation, bioreactor landfills, neuro-fuzzy model

Mohamed S. Abdallah; Leta Fernandes; Mostafa A. Warith

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z