Sample records for generation iv technology

  1. Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds Future Collaboration December 31, 2013 - 12:14pm...

  2. Updated Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan, Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Halsey, William [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Hayner, George [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Klett, James William [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Program will address the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. Such R&D will be guided by the technology roadmap developed for the Generation IV International Forum (GIF) over two years with the participation of over 100 experts from the GIF countries. The roadmap evaluated over 100 future systems proposed by researchers around the world. The scope of the R&D described in the roadmap covers the six most promising Generation IV systems. The effort ended in December 2002 with the issue of the final Generation IV Technology Roadmap [1.1]. The six most promising systems identified for next generation nuclear energy are described within the roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor - SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor - VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor - GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor - LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor - SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides, and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. Accordingly, DOE has identified materials as one of the focus areas for Gen IV technology development.

  3. DEVELOPMENT OF RISK-BASED AND TECHNOLOGY-INDEPENDENT SAFETY CRITERIA FOR GENERATION IV SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William E. Kastenberg; Edward Blandford; Lance Kim

    2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has developed quantitative safety goals for Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. These safety goals are risk based and technology independent. The foundations for a new approach to risk analysis has been developed, along with a new operational definition of risk. This project has furthered the current state-of-the-art by developing quantitative safety goals for both Gen IV reactors and for the overall Gen IV nuclear fuel cycle. The risk analysis approach developed will quantify performance measures, characterize uncertainty, and address a more comprehensive view of safety as it relates to the overall system. Appropriate safety criteria are necessary to manage risk in a prudent and cost-effective manner. This study is also important for government agencies responsible for managing, reviewing, and for approving advanced reactor systems because they are charged with assuring the health and safety of the public.

  4. Generation IV Reactors Integrated Materials Technology Program Plan: Focus on Very High Temperature Reactor Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corwin, William R [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; McGreevy, Timothy E [ORNL; Nanstad, Randy K [ORNL; Ren, Weiju [ORNL; Snead, Lance Lewis [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 2002, the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems (Gen IV) Program has addressed the research and development (R&D) necessary to support next-generation nuclear energy systems. The six most promising systems identified for next-generation nuclear energy are described within this roadmap. Two employ a thermal neutron spectrum with coolants and temperatures that enable hydrogen or electricity production with high efficiency (the Supercritical Water Reactor-SCWR and the Very High Temperature Reactor-VHTR). Three employ a fast neutron spectrum to enable more effective management of actinides through recycling of most components in the discharged fuel (the Gas-cooled Fast Reactor-GFR, the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor-LFR, and the Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor-SFR). The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) employs a circulating liquid fuel mixture that offers considerable flexibility for recycling actinides and may provide an alternative to accelerator-driven systems. At the inception of DOE's Gen IV program, it was decided to significantly pursue five of the six concepts identified in the Gen IV roadmap to determine which of them was most appropriate to meet the needs of future U.S. nuclear power generation. In particular, evaluation of the highly efficient thermal SCWR and VHTR reactors was initiated primarily for energy production, and evaluation of the three fast reactor concepts, SFR, LFR, and GFR, was begun to assess viability for both energy production and their potential contribution to closing the fuel cycle. Within the Gen IV Program itself, only the VHTR class of reactors was selected for continued development. Hence, this document will address the multiple activities under the Gen IV program that contribute to the development of the VHTR. A few major technologies have been recognized by DOE as necessary to enable the deployment of the next generation of advanced nuclear reactors, including the development and qualification of the structural materials needed to ensure their safe and reliable operation. The focus of this document will be the overall range of DOE's structural materials research activities being conducted to support VHTR development. By far, the largest portion of material's R&D supporting VHTR development is that being performed directly as part of the Next-Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. Supplementary VHTR materials R&D being performed in the DOE program, including university and international research programs and that being performed under direct contracts with the American Society for Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, will also be described. Specific areas of high-priority materials research that will be needed to deploy the NGNP and provide a basis for subsequent VHTRs are described, including the following: (1) Graphite: (a) Extensive unirradiated materials characterization and assessment of irradiation effects on properties must be performed to qualify new grades of graphite for nuclear service, including thermo-physical and mechanical properties and their changes, statistical variations from billot-to-billot and lot-to-lot, creep, and especially, irradiation creep. (b) Predictive models, as well as codification of the requirements and design methods for graphite core supports, must be developed to provide a basis for licensing. (2) Ceramics: Both fibrous and load-bearing ceramics must be qualified for environmental and radiation service as insulating materials. (3) Ceramic Composites: Carbon-carbon and SiC-SiC composites must be qualified for specialized usage in selected high-temperature components, such as core stabilizers, control rods, and insulating covers and ducting. This will require development of component-specific designs and fabrication processes, materials characterization, assessment of environmental and irradiation effects, and establishment of codes and standards for materials testing and design requirements. (4) Pressure Vessel Steels: (a) Qualification of short-term, high-temperature properties of light water rea

  5. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    of electricity and total emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2 )--a greenhouse gas. According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, electricity generation currently produces about 40 percent of our CO2 emissions in per capita use of electricity and total emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2 )--a greenhouse gas

  6. Generation IV International Forum | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneral Guidance on NEPA GeneralForum Generation IV

  7. Synergies Between Generation-IV and Advanced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /17 Outline · Background Gen IV Program Fusion Power Plant Programs · Materials · Environmental Impact of experimental scenarios #12;9/14/2004 16th TOFE: Gen IV + ARIES 10/17 Environmental Impact · Gen IV & Fusion these concepts #12;9/14/2004 16th TOFE: Gen IV + ARIES 6/17 Advanced Fusion Power Plants · ARIES Long history

  8. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

  9. Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies Next-Generation Photovoltaic Technologies Print Monday, 06 February 2012 15:48 Organic solar cells based on the polymerfullerene bulk...

  10. Automatic generation and analysis of solar cell IV curves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kraft, Steven M.; Jones, Jason C.

    2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A photovoltaic system includes multiple strings of solar panels and a device presenting a DC load to the strings of solar panels. Output currents of the strings of solar panels may be sensed and provided to a computer that generates current-voltage (IV) curves of the strings of solar panels. Output voltages of the string of solar panels may be sensed at the string or at the device presenting the DC load. The DC load may be varied. Output currents of the strings of solar panels responsive to the variation of the DC load are sensed to generate IV curves of the strings of solar panels. IV curves may be compared and analyzed to evaluate performance of and detect problems with a string of solar panels.

  11. Generation IV International Forum | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologiesNATIONAL003Not Measurement

  12. The Industrialization of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Industrialization of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology The Industrialization of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology Presents module and system requirements for...

  13. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Ten-Year Program Plan Fiscal Year 2005, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As reflected in the U.S. ''National Energy Policy'', nuclear energy has a strong role to play in satisfying our nation's future energy security and environmental quality needs. The desirable environmental, economic, and sustainability attributes of nuclear energy give it a cornerstone position, not only in the U.S. energy portfolio, but also in the world's future energy portfolio. Accordingly, on September 20, 2002, U.S. Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham announced that, ''The United States and nine other countries have agreed to develop six Generation IV nuclear energy concepts''. The Secretary also noted that the systems are expected to ''represent significant advances in economics, safety, reliability, proliferation resistance, and waste minimization''. The six systems and their broad, worldwide research and development (R&D) needs are described in ''A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems'' (hereafter referred to as the Generation IV Roadmap). The first 10 years of required U.S. R&D contributions to achieve the goals described in the Generation IV Roadmap are outlined in this Program Plan.

  14. Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Charter of the Generation IV Roadmap Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group (FCCG) is to (1) examine the fuel cycle implications for alternative nuclear power scenarios in terms of Generation...

  15. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

  16. Generation IV PR and PP Methods and Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bari,R.A.

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an evaluation methodology for proliferation resistance and physical protection (PR&PP) of Generation IV nuclear energy systems (NESs). For a proposed NES design, the methodology defines a set of challenges, analyzes system response to these challenges, and assesses outcomes. The challenges to the NES are the threats posed by potential actors (proliferant States or sub-national adversaries). The characteristics of Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate the response of the system and determine its resistance against proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and terrorism threats. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of six measures for PR and three measures for PP, which are the high-level PR&PP characteristics of the NES. The methodology is organized to allow evaluations to be performed at the earliest stages of system design and to become more detailed and more representative as design progresses. Uncertainty of results are recognized and incorporated into the evaluation at all stages. The results are intended for three types of users: system designers, program policy makers, and external stakeholders. Particular current relevant activities will be discussed in this regard. The methodology has been illustrated in a series of demonstration and case studies and these will be summarized in the paper.

  17. Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive Waste Heat at GM Advanced Thermoelectric Materials and Generator Technology for Automotive Waste Heat at GM...

  18. Innovative Energy Technologies: The Next Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Peter B.

    Innovative Energy Technologies: The Next Generation T E C H N O L O G Y G U I D E #12;Our lifestyle is sustained by energy. Technologies developed at Carnegie Mellon have the ability to enhance energy generation Generation Energy Technologies? 7 How Do We Realize the Benefits of Next Generation Energy Technologies? 9

  19. Agent Technology: Enabling Next Generation Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luck, Michael

    Agent Technology: Enabling Next Generation Computing A Roadmap for Agent Based Computing MichaelTechnology:ARoadmapLuck,McBurney&PreistAgentLink #12;i AgentLink Roadmap Agent Technology: Enabling Next Generation Computing A Roadmap for Agent, Peter McBurney and Chris Preist Agent Technology: Enabling Next Generation Computing A Roadmap for Agent

  20. A Project Management and Systems Engineering Structure for a Generation IV Very High Temperature Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ed Gorski; Dennis Harrell; Finis Southworth

    2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) will be an advanced, very high temperature (approximately 1000o C. coolant outlet temperature), gas cooled nuclear reactor and is the nearest term of six Generation IV reactor technologies for nuclear assisted hydrogen production. In 2001, the Generation IV International Forum (GIF), a ten nation international forum working together with the Department of Energys (DOE) Nuclear Energy Research Advisory Committee (NERAC), agreed to proceed with the development of a technology roadmap and identified the next generation of nuclear reactor systems for producing new sources of power. Since a new reactor has not been licensed in the United States since the 1970s, the risks are too large for a single utility to assume in the development of an unprecedented Generation IV reactor. The government must sponsor and invest in the research to resolve major first of a kind (FOAK) issues through a full-scale demonstration prior to industry implementation. DOEs primary mission for the VHTR is to demonstrate nuclear reactor assisted cogeneration of electricity and hydrogen while meeting the Generation IV goals for safety, sustainability, proliferation resistance and physical security and economics. The successful deployment of the VHTR as a demonstration project will aid in restarting the now atrophied U.S. nuclear power industry infrastructure. It is envisioned that VHTR project participants will include DOE Laboratories, industry partners such as designers, constructors, manufacturers, utilities, and Generation IV international countries. To effectively mange R&D, engineering, procurement, construction, and operation for this multi-organizational and technologically complex project, systems engineering will be used extensively to ensure delivery of the final product. Although the VHTR is an unprecedented FOAK system, the R&D, when assessed using the Office of Science and Technology Gate Model, falls primarily in the 3rd - Exploratory Development, 4th Advanced Development, and 5th- Engineering Development stages of maturity rather than in the basic and viability stages. Therefore the R&D must be controlled and project driven from the top down to address specific issues of feasibility, proof of design or support of engineering. The design evolution must be through the systems approach including an iterative process of high-level requirements definition, engineering to focus R&D to verify feasibility, requirements development and conceptual design, R&D to verify design and refine detailed requirements for final detailed design. This paper will define a framework for project management and application of systems engineering at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The VHTR Project includes an overall reactor design and construction activity and four major supporting activities: fuel development and qualification, materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, and the hydrogen production plant.

  1. Articles about Next-Generation Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stories about next-generation technologies featured by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Wind Program.

  2. Selection of Correlations and Look-Up Tables for Critical Heat Flux Prediction in the Generation IV "IRIS" Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romano, A.

    In order to fulfill the goals set forth by the Generation IV International Forum, the current NERI funded

  3. Feasibility of risk-informed regulation for Generation-IV reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matos, Craig H

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the advent of new and innovative Generation-IV reactor designs, new regulations must be developed to assure the safety of these plants. In the past a purely deterministic way of developing design basis accidents was ...

  4. Sandia National Laboratories: next generation energy technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    next generation energy technology SWiFT Commissioned to Study Wind Farm Optimization On July 29, 2013, in Energy, Facilities, News, News & Events, Partnership, Renewable Energy,...

  5. Utility Generation and Clean Coal Technology (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute establishes the state's support and incentives for the development of new energy production and generating facilities implementing advanced clean coal technology, such as coal...

  6. Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV Agenda National Institute of Standards and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cloud Computing Forum & Workshop IV Agenda National Institute of Standards and Technology 100 Policy, Department of State 1. Yeong Ro Lee, National Standards Coordinator for Cloud Computing for Information Society and Media, European Commission 10:40 11:00 USG Cloud Computing Technology Roadmap

  8. Entropy Generation Analysis of Desalination Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mistry, Karan Hemant

    Increasing global demand for fresh water is driving the development and implementation of a wide variety of seawater desalination technologies. Entropy generation analysis, and specifically, Second Law efficiency, is an ...

  9. Overview of Progress in Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Progress in Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan Overview of Progress in Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan Presents progress in government- and...

  10. Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy Storage Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy Storage 2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  11. Activity Stream - Energy Generation by State and Technology ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Generation by State and Technology (2009) 22 days ago harvest created the dataset Energy Generation by State and Technology (2009) 1 month ago harvest created the dataset...

  12. Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy Storage Silicon Nanostructure-based Technology for Next Generation Energy Storage 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells...

  13. On modeling pollution-generating technologies July 22, 2010 On modeling pollution-generating technologies.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bandyopadhyay, Antar

    On modeling pollution-generating technologies July 22, 2010 On modeling pollution modeling pollution-generating technologies July 22, 2010 Abstract We distinguish between intended with respect to inputs and intended outputs that cause pollution. We derive implications from the phenomenon

  14. Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy ChinaofSchaefer To: Congestion StudyForecasting. |OctoberNiketaGeneralThis

  15. Generation IV International Forum Updates Technology Roadmap and Builds

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneral Guidance on NEPA General

  16. Fundamental Understanding of Crack Growth in Structural Components of Generation IV Supercritical Light Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iouri I. Balachov; Takao Kobayashi; Francis Tanzella; Indira Jayaweera; Palitha Jayaweera; Petri Kinnunen; Martin Bojinov; Timo Saario

    2004-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This work contributes to the design of safe and economical Generation-IV Super-Critical Water Reactors (SCWRs) by providing a basis for selecting structural materials to ensure the functionality of in-vessel components during the entire service life. During the second year of the project, we completed electrochemical characterization of the oxide film properties and investigation of crack initiation and propagation for candidate structural materials steels under supercritical conditions. We ranked candidate alloys against their susceptibility to environmentally assisted degradation based on the in situ data measure with an SRI-designed controlled distance electrochemistry (CDE) arrangement. A correlation between measurable oxide film properties and susceptibility of austenitic steels to environmentally assisted degradation was observed experimentally. One of the major practical results of the present work is the experimentally proven ability of the economical CDE technique to supply in situ data for ranking candidate structural materials for Generation-IV SCRs. A potential use of the CDE arrangement developed ar SRI for building in situ sensors monitoring water chemistry in the heat transport circuit of Generation-IV SCWRs was evaluated and proved to be feasible.

  17. Integrated, Automated Distributed Generation Technologies Demonstration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Kevin

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the NETL Project was to develop a diverse combination of distributed renewable generation technologies and controls and demonstrate how the renewable generation could help manage substation peak demand at the ATK Promontory plant site. The Promontory plant site is located in the northwestern Utah desert approximately 25 miles west of Brigham City, Utah. The plant encompasses 20,000 acres and has over 500 buildings. The ATK Promontory plant primarily manufactures solid propellant rocket motors for both commercial and government launch systems. The original project objectives focused on distributed generation; a 100 kW (kilowatt) wind turbine, a 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit, a 500 kW energy storage system, and an intelligent system-wide automation system to monitor and control the renewable energy devices then release the stored energy during the peak demand time. The original goal was to reduce peak demand from the electrical utility company, Rocky Mountain Power (RMP), by 3.4%. For a period of time we also sought to integrate our energy storage requirements with a flywheel storage system (500 kW) proposed for the Promontory/RMP Substation. Ultimately the flywheel storage system could not meet our project timetable, so the storage requirement was switched to a battery storage system (300 kW.) A secondary objective was to design/install a bi-directional customer/utility gateway application for real-time visibility and communications between RMP, and ATK. This objective was not achieved because of technical issues with RMP, ATK Information Technology Departments stringent requirements based on being a rocket motor manufacturing facility, and budget constraints. Of the original objectives, the following were achieved: Installation of a 100 kW wind turbine. Installation of a 300 kW battery storage system. Integrated control system installed to offset electrical demand by releasing stored energy from renewable sources during peak hours of the day. Control system also monitors the wind turbine and battery storage system health, power output, and issues critical alarms. Of the original objectives, the following were not achieved: 100 kW new technology waste heat generation unit. Bi-directional customer/utility gateway for real time visibility and communications between RMP and ATK. 3.4% reduction in peak demand. 1.7% reduction in peak demand was realized instead.

  18. Overview of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Discusses thermoelectric power generation technologies as applied to waste heat recovery, renewable thermal energy sources, and energy harvesting

  19. Status of advanced fuel candidates for Sodium Fast Reactor within the Generation IV International Forum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    F. Delage; J. Carmack; C. B. Lee; T. Mizuno; M. Pelletier; J. Somers

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The main challenge for fuels for future Sodium Fast Reactor systems is the development and qualification of a nuclear fuel sub-assembly which meets the Generation IV International Forum goals. The Advanced Fuel project investigates high burn-up minor actinide bearing fuels as well as claddings and wrappers to withstand high neutron doses and temperatures. The R&D outcome of national and collaborative programs has been collected and shared between the AF project members in order to review the capability of sub-assembly material and fuel candidates, to identify the issues and select the viable options. Based on historical experience and knowledge, both oxide and metal fuels emerge as primary options to meet the performance and the reliability goals of Generation IV SFR systems. There is a significant positive experience on carbide fuels but major issues remain to be overcome: strong in-pile swelling, atmosphere required for fabrication as well as Pu and Am losses. The irradiation performance database for nitride fuels is limited with longer term R&D activities still required. The promising core material candidates are Ferritic/Martensitic (F/M) and Oxide Dispersed Strengthened (ODS) steels.

  20. SMALL TURBOGENERATOR TECHNOLOGY FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sy Ali; Bob Moritz

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is produced in under Contract DE-FC26-00NT40914, awarded in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy solicitation DE-PS26-00FT40759, ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Fossil Energy-Wide Coal, Natural Gas and Oil R&D Programs'', area of interest 7, ''Advanced Turbines and Engines.'' As a result of ten years of collaborative fuel cell systems studies with U.S. fuel cell manufacturers, initiated to evaluate the gas turbine opportunities likely to result from this technology, Rolls-Royce in Indianapolis has established a clear need for the creation of a turbogenerator to a specification that cannot be met by available units. Many of the required qualities are approached, but not fully met, by microturbines, which tend to be too small and low in pressure ratio. Market evaluation suggests a 1 MW fuel cell hybrid, incorporating a turbogenerator of about 250 kW, is a good market entry product (large enough to spread the costs of a relatively complex plant, but small enough to be acceptable to early adopters). The fuel cell stack occupies the position of a combustor in the turbogenerator, but delivers relatively low turbine entry temperature (1600 F [870 C]). If fitted with a conventional combustor and run stand-alone at full uncooled turbine temperature (1800 F [980 C]), the turbogenerator will develop more power. The power can be further enhanced if the turbogenerator is designed to have flow margin in its fuel cell role (by running faster). This margin can be realized by running at full speed and it is found that power can be increased to the 0.7 to 1.0 MW range, depending on initial fuel cell stack flow demand. The fuel cell hybrid applications require increased pressure ratio (at least 6 rather than the 3-4 of microturbines) and very long life for a small machine. The outcome is a turbogenerator that is very attractive for stand-alone operation and has been the subject of unsolicited enthusiasm from potential users who see an application in grid support. The machine is consistent with 21st century power generation objectives. It will be more efficient than a microturbine and also more cost effective because it does not require an expensive recuperator. It will produce ultra-low emissions because it has a low combustor delivery temperature. It will also avoid producing hazardous waste because it requires no lube system. These qualities are obtained by combining, and in some instances extending, the best of available technologies rather than breaking wholly new ground. Limited ''barrier technology'' rig tests of bearing systems and alternator configuration are proposed to support the extension of technology. Low combustion temperature also has merit in handling alternative fuels with minimum emissions and minimum materials degradation. Program continuation is proposed that will simultaneously provide technology support to a SECA fuel cell hybrid system and a distributed generation turbogenerator. This technology program will be led by a Rolls-Royce team based in Indianapolis with access to extensive small turbogenerator experience gathered in DOE (and other) programs by Allison Mobile Power Systems. It is intended that subsequent production will be in the U.S., but the products may have substantial export potential.

  1. EVALUATION METHODOLOGY FOR PROLIFERATION RESISTANCE AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION OF GENERATION IV NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEMS: AN OVERVIEW.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARI, R.; ET AL.

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: (1) System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. (2) Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. (3) Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include information important to the evaluation methodology users and to the decisions of a proliferant State or adversary. They are first evaluated for segments and then aggregated for complete pathways. Results are aggregated as appropriate to permit pathway comparisons and system assessment. The paper highlights the current achievements in the development of the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Evaluation Methodology. The way forward is also briefly presented together with some conclusions.

  2. Evaluation Methodology For Proliferation Resistance And Physical Protection Of Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Bjornard; R. Bari; R. Nishimura; P. Peterson; J. Roglans; D. Bley; J. Cazalet; G.G.M. Cojazzi; P. Delaune; M. Golay; G. Rendad; G. Rochau; M. Senzaki; I. Therios; M. Zentner

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an overview of the methodology approach developed by the Generation IV International Forum Expert Group on Proliferation Resistance & Physical Protection for evaluation of Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection robustness of Generation IV nuclear energy systems options. The methodology considers a set of alternative systems and evaluates their resistance or robustness to a collection of potential threats. For the challenges considered, the response of the system to these challenges is assessed and expressed in terms of outcomes. The challenges to the system are given by the threats posed by potential proliferant States and sub-national adversaries on the nuclear systems. The characteristics of the Generation IV systems, both technical and institutional, are used to evaluate their response to the threats and determine their resistance against the proliferation threats and robustness against sabotage and theft threats. System response encompasses three main elements: 1.System Element Identification. The nuclear energy system is decomposed into smaller elements (subsystems) at a level amenable to further analysis. 2.Target Identification and Categorization. A systematic process is used to identify and select representative targets for different categories of pathways, within each system element, that actors (proliferant States or adversaries) might choose to use or attack. 3.Pathway Identification and Refinement. Pathways are defined as potential sequences of events and actions followed by the proliferant State or adversary to achieve its objectives (proliferation, theft or sabotage). For each target, individual pathway segments are developed through a systematic process, analyzed at a high level, and screened where possible. Segments are connected into full pathways and analyzed in detail. The outcomes of the system response are expressed in terms of PR&PP measures. Measures are high-level characteristics of a pathway that include information important to the evaluation methodology users and to the decisions of a proliferant State or adversary. They are first evaluated for segments and then aggregated for complete pathways. Results are aggregated as appropriate to permit pathway comparisons and system assessment. The paper highlights the current achievements in the development of the Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection Evaluation Methodology. The way forward is also briefly presented together with some conclusions.

  3. ZERO EMISSION POWER GENERATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Bischoff; Stephen Doyle

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Energy Systems (CES) was previously funded by DOE's ''Vision 21'' program. This program provided a proof-of-concept demonstration that CES' novel gas generator (combustor) enabled production of electrical power from fossil fuels without pollution. CES has used current DOE funding for additional design study exercises which established the utility of the CES-cycle for retrofitting existing power plants for zero-emission operations and for incorporation in zero-emission, ''green field'' power plant concepts. DOE funding also helped define the suitability of existing steam turbine designs for use in the CES-cycle and explored the use of aero-derivative turbines for advanced power plant designs. This work is of interest to the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. California's air quality districts have significant non-attainment areas in which CES technology can help. CEC is currently funding a CES-cycle technology demonstration near Bakersfield, CA. The Norwegian government is supporting conceptual studies for a proposed 40 MW zero-emission power plant in Stavager, Norway which would use the CES-cycle. The latter project is called Zero-Emission Norwegian Gas (ZENG). In summary, current engineering studies: (1) supported engineering design of plant subsystems applicable for use with CES-cycle zero-emission power plants, and (2) documented the suitability and availability of steam turbines for use in CES-cycle power plants, with particular relevance to the Norwegian ZENG Project.

  4. DESIGN AND LAYOUT CONCEPTS FOR COMPACT, FACTORY-PRODUCED, TRANSPORTABLE, GENERATION IV REACTOR SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mynatt Fred R.; Townsend, L.W.; Williamson, Martin; Williams, Wesley; Miller, Laurence W.; Khan, M. Khurram; McConn, Joe; Kadak, Andrew C.; Berte, Marc V.; Sawhney, Rapinder; Fife, Jacob; Sedler, Todd L.; Conway, Larry E.; Felde, Dave K.

    2003-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research project is to develop compact (100 to 400 MWe) Generation IV nuclear power plant design and layout concepts that maximize the benefits of factory-based fabrication and optimal packaging, transportation and siting. The reactor concepts selected were compact designs under development in the 2000 to 2001 period. This interdisciplinary project was comprised of three university-led nuclear engineering teams identified by reactor coolant type (water, gas, and liquid metal) and a fourth Industrial Engineering team. The reactors included a Modular Pebble Bed helium-cooled concept being developed at MIT, the IRIS water-cooled concept being developed by a team led by Westinghouse Electric Company, and a Lead-Bismuth-cooled concept developed by UT. In addition to the design and layout concepts this report includes a section on heat exchanger manufacturing simulations and a section on construction and cost impacts of proposed modular designs.

  5. Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vierow, Karen; Aldemir, Tunc

    2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The project entitled, Uncertainty Quantification in the Reliability and Risk Assessment of Generation IV Reactors, was conducted as a DOE NERI project collaboration between Texas A&M University and The Ohio State University between March 2006 and June 2009. The overall goal of the proposed project was to develop practical approaches and tools by which dynamic reliability and risk assessment techniques can be used to augment the uncertainty quantification process in probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) methods and PRA applications for Generation IV reactors. This report is the Final Scientific/Technical Report summarizing the project.

  6. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

    2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

  7. Energy Generation by State and Technology (2009) - Energy Generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Generation by Fuel ... Download Energy Generation by Fuel Source and State, 2009 URL: http:en.openei.orgdatasetsdataset03f65dc9-ddc9-41ce-806f-edafad486a1fresource...

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Next Generation Inverter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about next generation inverter.

  9. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Next Generation Inverter

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about next generation inverter.

  10. Overview of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in Japan...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    in Japan Discusses thermoelectric power generation technologies as applied to waste heat recovery, renewable thermal energy sources, and energy harvesting kajikawa.pdf...

  11. Next-Generation Wind Technology | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and reliability of next-generation wind technologies while lowering the cost of wind energy. The program's research efforts have helped to increase the average capacity...

  12. F POWER MEASUREMENT FOR GENERATION IV SODIUM FAST R. COULON, S. NORMAND, M. MICHEL, L. BARBOT, T. DOMENECH,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    .F-84500 Bollène, France. ABSTRACT The Phénix nuclear power plant has been a French Sodium Fast Reactor the research of power tagging agents. Then, simulation study has been done to evaluate measurability using high20 F POWER MEASUREMENT FOR GENERATION IV SODIUM FAST REACTORS R. COULON, S. NORMAND, M. MICHEL, L

  13. The Long-Life Core Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) Generation IV Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greenspan, E.; Barak, A.; Saphier, D. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Buongiorno, J. [Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, P.O. Box 1625, Idaho Falls, ID 83415 (United States); Brown, N.W.; Hossain, Q. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Carelli, M.D.; Conway, L.; Dzodzo, M. [Westinghouse Electric Co., Sci. and Tech., 1344 Beulah Rd., Pittsburgh, PA 15235 (United States); Feldman, E.; Sienicki, J.J.; Sofu, T.; Wade, D.C. [Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Hong, S.G.; Kim, Y.I. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Yusong, Taejon 305-600, Rep. of Korea (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long-life core for the Encapsulated Nuclear Heat Source (ENHS) reactor has been redesigned so as to provide for fuel rod clad integrity up to the discharge burnup design goal. It was found feasible to design a nearly zero burnup reactivity swing long-life core that will maintain the fuel rod integrity up to the peak discharge burnup while enabling to handle the rated power using natural circulation. The core life is limited by radiation damage to its structural material. The core power shape is exceptionally constant throughout the core life. The new reference core design can deliver 125 MW{sub th} while having very generous margins for maximum acceptable temperatures or temperature differences. Using a cover-gas lift-pump it may be possible to design an ENHS module to deliver {approx}50% more power than the set goal. Briefly reviewed are unique features of the ENHS reactor along with the potential of this reactor to meet the goals set for Generation IV reactors. (authors)

  14. NREL: Technology Deployment - Distributed Generation Interconnection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Distributed Generation Interconnection Collaborative Become a Member DGIC members are included in quarterly informational meetings and discussions related to distributed PV...

  15. III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    29 III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27 The previous chapters focused on first generation biofuels. In this chapter we focus on second generation biofuels, specifically biofuels derived from cellulosic or lignocellulosic conversion. Advocates for the development of cellulosic

  16. Supporting Technology for Enhanced Oil Recovery-EOR Thermal Processes Report IV-12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izequeido, Alexandor

    2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Ninth Amendment and Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Agreement. The report is presented in sections (for each of the 6 tasks) and each section contains one or more reports prepared by various individuals or groups describing the results of efforts under each of the tasks. A statement of each task, taken from the agreement, is presented on the first page of each section. The tasks are numbered 62 through 67. The first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eight, and ninth reports on Annex IV, [Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, and IV-8 (DOE/BETC/SP-83/15, DOE/BC-84/6/SP, DOE/BC-86/2/SP, DOE/BC-87/2/SP, DOE/BC-89/1/SP, DOE/BC-90/1/SP) DOE/BC-92/1/SP, DOE/BC-93/3/SP, and DOE/BC-95/3/SP] contain the results from the first 61 tasks. Those reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1! 987, November 1988, December 1989, October 1991, February 1993, and March 1995 respectively.

  17. Fuel cycle comparison of distributed power generation technologies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

    2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the application of fuel cells to distributed power generation were evaluated and compared with the combustion technologies of microturbines and internal combustion engines, as well as the various technologies associated with grid-electricity generation in the United States and California. The results were primarily impacted by the net electrical efficiency of the power generation technologies and the type of employed fuels. The energy use and GHG emissions associated with the electric power generation represented the majority of the total energy use of the fuel cycle and emissions for all generation pathways. Fuel cell technologies exhibited lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and other combustion technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than those for combustion generators. The dependence of all natural-gas-based technologies on petroleum oil was lower than that of internal combustion engines using petroleum fuels. Most fuel cell technologies approaching or exceeding the DOE target efficiency of 40% offered significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions.

  18. Michigan Technological University Generations of Discovery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michigan Tech to acquire the resources needed to continue to grow as a premier research university, the University also has been able to establish the Pavlis Institute for Global Technological Leadership and bring Mineral Museum, and Sherman Field. Alumni play a key role in any capital campaign. We invite you and other

  19. Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

  20. Clean coal technologies in electric power generation: a brief overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janos Beer; Karen Obenshain [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), MA (United States)

    2006-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper talks about the future clean coal technologies in electric power generation, including pulverized coal (e.g., advanced supercritical and ultra-supercritical cycles and fluidized-bed combustion), integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC), and CO{sub 2} capture technologies. 6 refs., 2 tabs.

  1. Ontology Generation for Large Email Collections Language Technologies Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    Ontology Generation for Large Email Collections Hui Yang Language Technologies Institute School Callan Language Technologies Institute School of Computer Science Carnegie Mellon University 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA, 15213 callan@cs.cmu.edu ABSTRACT This paper presents a new approach

  2. Power Generation Technologies | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroupPerfectenergyInformation to ReducePoseidonPowderPowerPower Generation

  3. Investigation of a Novel NDE Method for Monitoring Thermomechanical Damage and Microstructure Evolution in Ferritic-Martensitic Steels for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagy, Peter

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The main goal of the proposed project is the development of validated nondestructive evaluation (NDE) techniques for in situ monitoring of ferritic-martensitic steels like Grade 91 9Cr-1Mo, which are candidate materials for Generation IV nuclear energy structural components operating at temperatures up to ~650{degree}C and for steam-generator tubing for sodium-cooled fast reactors. Full assessment of thermomechanical damage requires a clear separation between thermally activated microstructural evolution and creep damage caused by simultaneous mechanical stress. Creep damage can be classified as "negligible" creep without significant plastic strain and "ordinary" creep of the primary, secondary, and tertiary kind that is accompanied by significant plastic deformation and/or cavity nucleation and growth. Under negligible creep conditions of interest in this project, minimal or no plastic strain occurs, and the accumulation of creep damage does not significantly reduce the fatigue life of a structural component so that low-temperature design rules, such as the ASME Section III, Subsection NB, can be applied with confidence. The proposed research project will utilize a multifaceted approach in which the feasibility of electrical conductivity and thermo-electric monitoring methods is researched and coupled with detailed post-thermal/creep exposure characterization of microstructural changes and damage processes using state-of-the-art electron microscopy techniques, with the aim of establishing the most effective nondestructive materials evaluation technique for particular degradation modes in high-temperature alloys that are candidates for use in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) as well as providing the necessary mechanism-based underpinnings for relating the two. Only techniques suitable for practical application in situ will be considered. As the project evolves and results accumulate, we will also study the use of this technique for monitoring other GEN IV materials. Through the results obtained from this integrated materials behavior and NDE study, new insight will be gained into the best nondestructive creep and microstructure monitoring methods for the particular mechanisms identified in these materials. The proposed project includes collaboration with a national laboratory partner and the results will also serve as a foundation to guide the efforts of scientists in the DOE laboratory, university, and industrial communities concerned with the technological challenges of monitoring creep and microstructural evolution in materials planned to be used in Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems.

  4. Technological development under global warning : roadmap of the coal generation technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furuyama, Yasushi, 1963-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis explores the measures for the Japanese electric power utilities to meet the Kyoto Target, and the technological development of the coal thermal power generation to meet the further abatement of the carbon dioxide ...

  5. Development of Modeling Techniques for A Generation IV Gas Fast Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dercher, Andrew Steven

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    to the harmful biological effects caused by excessive radiation exposure, one can understand why people are concerned about mankind?s ability to safely operate ____________ This thesis follows the style of International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer. 2... to increase plant life and plant safety, a new class of nuclear reactors is being considered in order to meet the world?s ever-growing energy demands. This class of new reactors has been termed as the Gen IV class of nuclear reactors. These new reactors...

  6. Floating Offshore Wind Technology Generating Resources Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Floating Offshore Wind Technology Jeff King Generating Resources Advisory Committee May 28, 2014 1 to site) Potential interconnection to future offshore PNWCA intertie 4 #12;5 Ave wind speed >= 10 m. (2010) Large-scale Offshore Wind Power in the United States National Renewable Energy Laboratory. (2012

  7. Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

  8. A Comparison of the Safety Analysis Process and the Generation IV Proliferation Resistance/Physical Protection Assessment Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. A. Bjornard; M. D. Zentner

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Generation IV International Forum (GIF) is a vehicle for the cooperative international development of future nuclear energy systems. The Generation IV program has established primary objectives in the areas of sustainability, economics, safety and reliability, and Proliferation Resistance and Physical Protection (PR&PP). In order to help meet the latter objective a program was launched in December 2002 to develop a rigorous means to assess nuclear energy systems with respect to PR&PP. The study of Physical Protection of a facility is a relatively well established methodology, but an approach to evaluate the Proliferation Resistance of a nuclear fuel cycle is not. This paper will examine the Proliferation Resistance (PR) evaluation methodology being developed by the PR group, which is largely a new approach and compare it to generally accepted nuclear facility safety evaluation methodologies. Safety evaluation methods have been the subjects of decades of development and use. Further, safety design and analysis is fairly broadly understood, as well as being the subject of federally mandated procedures and requirements. It is therefore extremely instructive to compare and contrast the proposed new PR evaluation methodology process with that used in safety analysis. By so doing, instructive and useful conclusions can be derived from the comparison that will help to strengthen the PR methodological approach as it is developed further. From the comparison made in this paper it is evident that there are very strong parallels between the two processes. Most importantly, it is clear that the proliferation resistance aspects of nuclear energy systems are best considered beginning at the very outset of the design process. Only in this way can the designer identify and cost effectively incorporate intrinsic features that might be difficult to implement at some later stage. Also, just like safety, the process to implement proliferation resistance should be a dynamic, iterative process that continually evolves with the design.

  9. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the use of Virtual Environments: Task 1 Completion Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whisker, V.E.; Baratta, A.J.; Shaw, T.S.; Winters, J.W.; Trikouros, N.; Hess, C.

    2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK B204 The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. Specifically, this project will test the suitability of Immersive Projection Display (IPD) technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups.

  10. The Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey. IV. NGC 4216: A Bombarded Spiral in the Virgo Cluster

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paudel, Sanjaya; Cote, Patrick; Cuillandre, Jean-Charles; Ferrarese, Laura; Ferriere, Etienne; Gwyn, Stephen D J; Mihos, J Christopher; Vollmer, Bernd; Balogh, Michael L; Carlberg, Ray G; Boissier, Samuel; Boselli, Alessandro; Durrell, Patrick R; Emsellem, Eric; MacArthur, Lauren A; Mei, Simona; Michel-Dansac, Leo; van Driel, Wim

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an investigation into the origins of a series of interlaced narrow filamentary stellar structures, loops and plumes in the vicinity of the Virgo Cluster, edge-on spiral galaxy, NGC 4216 that were previously identified by the Blackbird Telescope. Using the deeper, higher-resolution and precisely calibrated optical CFHT/MegaCam images obtained as part of the Next Generation Virgo Cluster Survey (NGVS), we confirm the previously identified features and identify a few additional structures. The NGVS data allowed us to make a physical study of these low-surface brightness features and investigate their origin. The likely progenitors of the structures were identified as either already catalogued VCC dwarfs or newly discovered satellites caught in the act of being destroyed. They have the same g-i color index and likely contain similar stellar populations. The alignment of three dwarfs along an apparently single stream is intriguing, and we cannot totally exclude that these are second-generation dwarf gal...

  11. Unlocking the Standard Model. IV. N=2 generations of quarks : spectrum and mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machet, Bruno

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Glashow-Salam-Weinberg model for 2 generations of quarks is extended to 8 composite Higgs multiplets, with no adjunction of extra fermions. It is the minimal number of Higgs doublets required to suitably account, simultaneously, for the spectrum of pseudoscalar mesons that can be built with 4 quarks and for the mass of the W gauge bosons. These masses being used as input, together with elementary low energy considerations for the pions, we calculate all other parameters, masses and couplings. We focus in this work on the spectrum of the 8 Higgs bosons (which all potentially contribute to the W and quark masses), and on the mixing (Cabibbo) angle, leaving the study of couplings to a subsequent work. The Higgs bosons fall into one triplet, two doublets and one singlet. In the triplet stand three states with masses \\sqrt{2} x that of heaviest pseudoscalar meson D_s, which, for 2 generations, pushes them up to 2.80 GeV. The 2 components of the first doublet have masses close to 1.25 GeV. The singlet has a mas...

  12. ON THE GENERATION OF FLUX-TUBE WAVES IN STELLAR CONVECTION ZONES. IV. LONGITUDINAL WAVE ENERGY SPECTRA AND FLUXES FOR STARS WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulmschneider, Peter

    ON THE GENERATION OF FLUX-TUBE WAVES IN STELLAR CONVECTION ZONES. IV. LONGITUDINAL WAVE ENERGY- tudinal tube waves in stellar convection zones and used it to compute the wave energy spectra and fluxes are important only for cool stars with Teff wave energy decreases

  13. MHK Technologies/Syphon Wave Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter < MHK TechnologiesSyphon Wave Generator

  14. Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

  15. Unlocking the Standard Model. IV. N=1 AND 2 generations of quarks : spectrum and mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruno Machet

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a one-to-one correspondence between its complex Higgs doublet and very specific quadruplets of bilinear quark operators, the Glashow-Salam-Weinberg model for 2 generations is extended, without adding any extra fermion, to 8 composite Higgs multiplets. 8 is the minimal number required to suitably account, simultaneously, for the pseudoscalar mesons that can be built with 4 quarks and for the mass of the W gauge bosons. Their masses being used as input, together with elementary low energy considerations for the pions, we calculate all other parameters, masses and couplings. We focus in this work on the spectrum of the 8 Higgs bosons, and on the two u-c and d-s mixing angles, showing that this is very fine-tuned physics. We show in particular that the u-c mixing angle cannot be safely tuned to 0. Symmetries are investigated in detail. We leave the study of couplings and of their content of non-standard physics to a forthcoming work.

  16. Sustainable solar thermal power generation (STPG) technologies in Indian context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, R.S. [Ministry of Non-Conventional Energy Sources, New Delhi (India). Solar Energy Centre

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    India is a fast developing country. Some of the factors like population growth, industrialization, liberalization in economic policies, green revolution and awareness toward the environment, are increasing the electricity demand rapidly. As per the 14th Power Survey Report, an energy deficit of (+) 9% and peak demand deficit of (+) 18% have been estimated. Keeping in view the liberalization in economic policies, this deficit may be higher by the year 2000 AD. An estimation indicates that India is blessed with solar energy to the tune of 5 x 10{sup 15} kWh/yr. Being clean and inexhaustible source of energy, it can be used for large-scale power generation in the country. Keeping in view the present state-of-art technologies for STPG in MW range, best possible efforts are required to be made by all the concerned, to develop sustainable STPG technology of the future, specially for tropical regions. Standardization of vital equipment is an important aspect. There are a few required criteria like simple and robust technology, its transfer and adaptation in tropical climate conditions; high plant load factor without fossil-fired backup; availability of plant during evening peak and night hours; least use of fragile components, and capacity optimization for MW plants as per solar irradiance and environmental factors. In this paper, efforts have been made to compare the different STPG technologies. On the basis, of literature surveyed and studies carried out by the author, it may be stated that Central Receiver System technologies using molten salt and volumetric air receiver, along with molten salt and ceramic thermal storage respectively seems to be suitable and comparable in Indian context. Performance of SOLAR-TWO and PHOEBUS plants may be decisive.

  17. Generation IV benchmarking of TRISO fuel performance models under accident conditions. Modeling input data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaise Collin

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the benchmark plan for the calculation of particle fuel performance on safety testing experiments that are representative of operational accidental transients. The benchmark is dedicated to the modeling of fission product release under accident conditions by fuel performance codes from around the world, and the subsequent comparison to post-irradiation experiment (PIE) data from the modeled heating tests. The accident condition benchmark is divided into three parts: the modeling of a simplified benchmark problem to assess potential numerical calculation issues at low fission product release; the modeling of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis safety testing experiments; and, the comparison of the AGR-1 and HFR-EU1bis modeling results with PIE data. The simplified benchmark case, thereafter named NCC (Numerical Calculation Case), is derived from ''Case 5'' of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Program (CRP) on coated particle fuel technology [IAEA 2012]. It is included so participants can evaluate their codes at low fission product release. ''Case 5'' of the IAEA CRP-6 showed large code-to-code discrepancies in the release of fission products, which were attributed to ''effects of the numerical calculation method rather than the physical model''[IAEA 2012]. The NCC is therefore intended to check if these numerical effects subsist. The first two steps imply the involvement of the benchmark participants with a modeling effort following the guidelines and recommendations provided by this document. The third step involves the collection of the modeling results by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the comparison of these results with the available PIE data. The objective of this document is to provide all necessary input data to model the benchmark cases, and to give some methodology guidelines and recommendations in order to make all results suitable for comparison with each other. The participants should read this document thoroughly to make sure all the data needed for their calculations is provided in the document. Missing data will be added to a revision of the document if necessary.

  18. Venezuela-MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report IV-11: Supporting technology for enhanced oil recovery - EOR thermal processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venezuela

    2000-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains the results of efforts under the six tasks of the Tenth Amendment anti Extension of Annex IV, Enhanced Oil Recovery Thermal Processes of the Venezuela/USA Energy Agreement. This report is presented in sections (for each of the six Tasks) and each section contains one or more reports that were prepared to describe the results of the effort under each of the Tasks. A statement of each Task, taken from the Agreement Between Project Managers, is presented on the first page of each section. The Tasks are numbered 68 through 73. The first through tenth report on research performed under Annex IV Venezuela MEM/USA-DOE Fossil Energy Report Number IV-1, IV-2, IV-3, IV-4, IV-5, IV-6, IV-7, IV-8, IV-9, IV-10 contain the results of the first 67 Tasks. These reports are dated April 1983, August 1984, March 1986, July 1987, November 1988, December 1989, October 1991, February 1993, March 1995, and December 1997, respectively.

  19. Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The development of advanced nuclear energy systems in the U.S. will depend greatly on the continued success of currently operating light water nuclear power plants and the ordering of new...

  20. Super Boiler 2nd Generation Technology for Watertube Boilers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mr. David Cygan; Dr. Joseph Rabovitser

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes Phase I of a proposed two phase project to develop and demonstrate an advanced industrial watertube boiler system with the capability of reaching 94% (HHV) fuel-to-steam efficiency and emissions below 2 ppmv NOx, 2 ppmv CO, and 1 ppmv VOC on natural gas fuel. The boiler design would have the capability to produce >1500 F, >1500 psig superheated steam, burn multiple fuels, and will be 50% smaller/lighter than currently available watertube boilers of similar capacity. This project is built upon the successful Super Boiler project at GTI. In that project that employed a unique two-staged intercooled combustion system and an innovative heat recovery system to reduce NOx to below 5 ppmv and demonstrated fuel-to-steam efficiency of 94% (HHV). This project was carried out under the leadership of GTI with project partners Cleaver-Brooks, Inc., Nebraska Boiler, a Division of Cleaver-Brooks, and Media and Process Technology Inc., and project advisors Georgia Institute of Technology, Alstom Power Inc., Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Phase I of efforts focused on developing 2nd generation boiler concepts and performance modeling; incorporating multi-fuel (natural gas and oil) capabilities; assessing heat recovery, heat transfer and steam superheating approaches; and developing the overall conceptual engineering boiler design. Based on our analysis, the 2nd generation Industrial Watertube Boiler when developed and commercialized, could potentially save 265 trillion Btu and $1.6 billion in fuel costs across U.S. industry through increased efficiency. Its ultra-clean combustion could eliminate 57,000 tons of NOx, 460,000 tons of CO, and 8.8 million tons of CO2 annually from the atmosphere. Reduction in boiler size will bring cost-effective package boilers into a size range previously dominated by more expensive field-erected boilers, benefiting manufacturers and end users through lower capital costs.

  1. Low dimension structures and devices for new generation photonic technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, D. H.; Tang, D. Y.; Chen, T. P. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 679798 (Singapore); Mei, T. [Institute of Optoelectronic Materials and Technology, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Yuan, X. C. [Institute of Modern Optics, Nankai University, Tianjin 300071 (China)

    2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Low dimensional structures and devices are the key technological building blocks for new generation of electronic and photonic technology. Such structures and devices show novel properties and can be integrated into systems for wide applications in many areas, including medical, biological and military and advancement of science. In this invited talk, I will present the main results achieved in our competitive research program which aims to explore the application of the mesoscopic structures in light source, manipulation and imaging and integrate them into advanced systems. In the light source aspect, we have for the first time developed graphene mode-locked lasers which are in the process of commercialization. Nanocrystal Si embedded in dielectrics was formed by ion implantation and subsequent annealing. Si light emitting devices with external quantum efficiency of about 2.910{sup ?3}% for visible emission were demonstrated at room temperature and the color of emitted light can be tuned electrically from violet to white by varying the injected current. In light manipulation, loss compensation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) using quantum well (QW) gain media was studied theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. The SPP propagation length was effectively elongated several times through electrical pumping. One and two microring resonators based on silicon on insulator and III-V semiconductors technologies have been successfully fabricated and they can be used as filter and switch in the photonic circuit. In imaging, both SPP and low dimension structures are investigated and resolution far beyond diffraction limit in visible range has been realized. The integration of the components in the three aspects into complicated systems is on the way.

  2. Assessing the environmental impact of energy generating clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leslie, A.C.D.; McMillen, M. [Energetics, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States); Pell, J. [Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Clean Coal Technology (CCT) Program of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is a partnership between government and industry designed for cleaner and more efficient use of coal, both for electric power generation and industrial applications. Approximately seven billion dollars have been committed to the CCT program (two and half-billion dollars from DOE and the rest by industry). The potential environmental effects of CCT projects are subject to review because a proposal by DOE to cost-share a CCT project constitutes a {open_quotes}major federal action{close_quotes} under section 102(2)(c) of NEPA. Consequently, by virtue of numerous NEPA impact evaluations of CCT projects, a great deal has been learned about environmental impact analyses for coal combustion sources. In the course of NEPA review of CCT projects, air quality is often a significant environmental issue. This paper focuses on CCT air quality issues from a NEPA perspective, including Prevention of Significant Deterioration, New Source Review, atmospheric visibility, global climate change, and acidic deposition. The analyses of the impacts of the proposed action, alternative actions, and cumulative effects will be examined. (It is a {open_quotes}given{close_quotes} that any action must comply with Federal and State requirements and the provision of the Clean Air Act and other regulatory statues.) NEPA is not a permitting process, but rather it is a process to provide decision makers with the information they require make an informed decision about the potential environmental consequences of undertaking an action. The NEPA review of environmental effects has been instrumental in effectuating beneficial changes in some past CCT projects-changes that have mitigated potentially adverse environmental impacts. Accordingly, NEPA has served as a constructive analytical tool, with similar implications for other actions related to the electric power generation industry that are subject to environmental review.

  3. Insuring Electric Power for Critical Services After Disasters with Building-Sited Electric Generating Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Insuring Electric Power for Critical Services After Disasters with Building-Sited Electric Generating Technologies Jerry Jackson, Associate Professor, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX Abstract Electric power failures... available with new building-sited combined heat and power (CHP) electric generation technologies. This paper evaluates the physical requirements and costs of preemptively installing these new building- sited electric generation technologies to insure...

  4. Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rastler, D. M.

    Wires Manage Wires defer capital Optimize Energy Services Not Utility Business Not Utility Business New Business Opportunities DISTRIBUTED GENERATION Distributed generation includes small gas turbines, micro-turbines, fuel cells, storage...UTILITYIINDUSTRY PARTNERSHIPS INVOLVING DISTRIBUTED GENERATION TECHNOLOGIES IN EVOLVING ELECTRICITY MARKETS Daniel M. Rastler Manager, Fuel Cells and Distributed Generation Electric Power Research Institute Palo Alto, California ABSTRACT...

  5. Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laura Wesson; Prapas Lohateeraparp; Jeffrey Harwell; Bor-Jier Shiau

    2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The principle objective of this project was to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focused on reservoirs in the Pennsylvanian-aged (Penn) sands. In order to meet this objective the characteristic curvatures (Cc) of twenty-eight anionic surfactants selected for evaluation for use in chemical flooding formulations were determined. The Cc values ranged from -6.90 to 2.55 with the majority having negative values. Crude oil samples from nine Penn sand reservoirs were analyzed for several properties pertinent to surfactant formulation for EOR application. These properties included equivalent alkane carbon numbers, total acid numbers, and viscosity. The brine samples from these same reservoirs were analyzed for several cations and for total dissolved solids. Surfactant formulations were successfully developed for eight reservoirs by the end of the project period. These formulations were comprised of a tertiary mixture of anionic surfactants. The identities of these surfactants are considered proprietary, but suffice to say the surfactants in each mixture were comprised of varying chemical structures. In addition to the successful development of surfactant formulations for EOR, there were also two successful single-well field tests conducted. There are many aspects that must be considered in the development and implementation of effective surfactant formulations. Taking into account these other aspects, there were four additional studies conducted during this project. These studies focused on the effect of the stability of surfactant formulations in the presence of polymers with an associated examination of polymer rheology, the effect of the presence of iron complexes in the brine on surfactant stability, the potential use of sacrificial agents in order to minimize the loss of surfactant to adsorption, and the effect of electrolytes on surfactant adsorption. In these last four studies the effects of such things as temperature, electrolyte concentration and the effect of different types of electrolytes were taken into consideration.

  6. Heat generation from electronics increases with the advent of high-density integrated circuit technology. To

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    circuit technology. To come up with the heat generation, microscale cooling has been thought as a promising technology. Prediction of heat transfer rate is crucial in design of microscale cooling device1 Abstract Heat generation from electronics increases with the advent of high-density integrated

  7. Analysis of supercritical CO{sub 2} cycle control strategies and dynamic response for Generation IV Reactors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moisseytsev, A.; Sienicki, J. J. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of specific control strategies and dynamic behavior of the supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO{sub 2}) Brayton cycle has been extended to the two reactor types selected for continued development under the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative; namely, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) and the Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor (SFR). Direct application of the standard S-CO{sub 2} recompression cycle to the VHTR was found to be challenging because of the mismatch in the temperature drop of the He gaseous reactor coolant through the He-to-CO{sub 2} reactor heat exchanger (RHX) versus the temperature rise of the CO{sub 2} through the RHX. The reference VHTR features a large temperature drop of 450 C between the assumed core outlet and inlet temperatures of 850 and 400 C, respectively. This large temperature difference is an essential feature of the VHTR enabling a lower He flow rate reducing the required core velocities and pressure drop. In contrast, the standard recompression S-CO{sub 2} cycle wants to operate with a temperature rise through the RHX of about 150 C reflecting the temperature drop as the CO{sub 2} expands from 20 MPa to 7.4 MPa in the turbine and the fact that the cycle is highly recuperated such that the CO{sub 2} entering the RHX is effectively preheated. Because of this mismatch, direct application of the standard recompression cycle results in a relatively poor cycle efficiency of 44.9%. However, two approaches have been identified by which the S-CO{sub 2} cycle can be successfully adapted to the VHTR and the benefits of the S-CO{sub 2} cycle, especially a significant gain in cycle efficiency, can be realized. The first approach involves the use of three separate cascaded S-CO{sub 2} cycles. Each S-CO{sub 2} cycle is coupled to the VHTR through its own He-to-CO{sub 2} RHX in which the He temperature is reduced by 150 C. The three respective cycles have efficiencies of 54, 50, and 44%, respectively, resulting in a net cycle efficiency of 49.3 %. The other approach involves reducing the minimum cycle pressure significantly below the critical pressure such that the temperature drop in the turbine is increased while the minimum cycle temperature is maintained above the critical temperature to prevent the formation of a liquid phase. The latter approach also involves the addition of a precooler and a third compressor before the main compressor to retain the benefits of compression near the critical point with the main compressor. For a minimum cycle pressure of 1 MPa, a cycle efficiency of 49.5% is achieved. Either approach opens up the door to applying the SCO{sub 2} cycle to the VHTR. In contrast, the SFR system typically has a core outlet-inlet temperature difference of about 150 C such that the standard recompression cycle is ideally suited for direct application to the SFR. The ANL Plant Dynamics Code has been modified for application to the VHTR and SFR when the reactor side dynamic behavior is calculated with another system level computer code such as SAS4A/SYSSYS-1 in the SFR case. The key modification involves modeling heat exchange in the RHX, accepting time dependent tabular input from the reactor code, and generating time dependent tabular input to the reactor code such that both the reactor and S-CO{sub 2} cycle sides can be calculated in a convergent iterative scheme. This approach retains the modeling benefits provided by the detailed reactor system level code and can be applied to any reactor system type incorporating a S-CO{sub 2} cycle. This approach was applied to the particular calculation of a scram scenario for a SFR in which the main and intermediate sodium pumps are not tripped and the generator is not disconnected from the electrical grid in order to enhance heat removal from the reactor system thereby enhancing the cooldown rate of the Na-to-CO{sub 2} RHX. The reactor side is calculated with SAS4A/SASSYS-1 while the S-CO{sub 2} cycle is calculated with the Plant Dynamics Code with a number of iterations over a timescale of 500 seconds. It is found that the RHX u

  8. Motion-to-Energy (M2E?) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking. To learn more,

  9. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    INL

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  10. Fuel Cell Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Fuel-Cycle Analysis of Hydrogen-Powered Fuel-Cell Systems with the GREET Model Fuel Cell Development Status Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) Technology for Greener Airplanes...

  11. Motion-to-Energy (M2E) Power Generation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    INL

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking.

  12. Motion-to-Energy (M2E™) Power Generation Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Idaho National Laboratory

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    INL researchers developed M2E, a new technology that converts motion to energy. M2E uses an innovative, optimized microgenerator with power management circuitry that kinetically charges mobile batteries from natural motion such as walking. To learn more,

  13. Comments on US LMFBR steam generator base technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, W.R.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of steam generators for the LMFBR was recognized from the onset by the AEC, now DOE, as a difficult, challenging, and high-priority task. The highly reactive nature of sodium with water/steam requires that the sodium-water/steam boundaries of LMFBR steam generators possess a degree of leak-tightness reliability not normally attempted on a commercial scale. In addition, the LMFBR steam generator is subjected to high fluid temperatures and severe thermal transients. These requirements place great demand on materials, fabrication processes, and inspection methods; and even greater demands on the designer to provide steam generators that can meet these demanding requirements, be fabricated without unreasonable shop requirements, and tolerate off-normal effects.

  14. Learning About Wind Turbine Technology, Motors and Generators...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Subscribe to all future posts Who Steven Wik What Energy Electrical Machines Generators Smart Grid Why Building Subscribe You Might Also Like MunichinteriorV 10 Years ON: From...

  15. Next Generation Lighting Technologies (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Siminovittch, Micheal

    2014-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    For the past several years, Michael Siminovittch, a researcher in the Environmental Energy Technologies Division of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, has worked to package efficient lighting in an easy-to-use and good-looking lamp. His immensely popular "Berkeley Lamp" has redefined how America lights its offices.

  16. Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

    2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

  17. Systematic Review and Harmonization of Life Cycle GHG Emission Estimates for Electricity Generation Technologies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heath, G.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This powerpoint presentation to be presented at the World Renewable Energy Forum on May 14, 2012, in Denver, CO, discusses systematic review and harmonization of life cycle GHG emission estimates for electricity generation technologies.

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Next-generation Ultra-Lean Burn Powertrain

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by MAHLE Powertrain LLC at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about next-generation ultra...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Next-Generation Ultra Lean Burn Powertrain

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by MAHLE Powertrain, LLC at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about next-generation ultra...

  20. GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION CONTROL OPTIONS: ASSESSING TRANSPORTATION AND ELECTRICITY GENERATION TECHNOLOGIES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kockelman, Kara M.

    power generation, energy policy, fuel economy ABSTRACT Prioritizing the numerous technology and policy Publications for book titled "Energy Consumption: Impacts of Human Activity, Current and Future Challenges, Environmental and Ecological Effects," August 2013. KEY WORDS: Greenhouse gases, transportation energy, electric

  1. The Future of Combustion Turbine Technology for Industrial and Utility Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, A. D.; Simbeck, D. R.

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    examines the status, economic outlook, and future directions of combustion turbine technology for industrial and utility power generation. The discussion takes into account the ongoing deregulation and increasing competition that are shaping the electric...

  2. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Systems, Subsystems, and Components, establishes a baseline for the current technology readiness status, and provides a path forward to achieve increasing levels of technical maturity.

  3. Market Power and Technological Bias: The Case of Electricity Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Twomey, Paul; Neuhoff, Karsten

    2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    , the intermittent nature of output from wind turbines and solar panels is frequently discussed as a potential obstacle to larger scale application of these tech- nologies. Contributions of 10-20% of electrical energy from individual intermittent technologies create... fixed, exogenously set, strike price. The results are not sensitive to the strike price - but further research is required to assess the impact of multiple types of option contracts with different strike prices. The outline of this paper is as follows...

  4. Next generation sequencing (NGS)technologies and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vuyisich, Momchilo [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    NGS technology overview: (1) NGS library preparation - Nucleic acids extraction, Sample quality control, RNA conversion to cDNA, Addition of sequencing adapters, Quality control of library; (2) Sequencing - Clonal amplification of library fragments, (except PacBio), Sequencing by synthesis, Data output (reads and quality); and (3) Data analysis - Read mapping, Genome assembly, Gene expression, Operon structure, sRNA discovery, and Epigenetic analyses.

  5. Combustion technology developments in power generation in response to environmental challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    and clean coal-fired systems. The most promising of these include pulverized coal combustionCombustion technology developments in power generation in response to environmental challenges J.M. Beer* Department of Chemical Engineering, Room 66-548, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

  6. Design Features and Technology Uncertainties for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John M. Ryskamp; Phil Hildebrandt; Osamu Baba; Ron Ballinger; Robert Brodsky; Hans-Wolfgang Chi; Dennis Crutchfield; Herb Estrada; Jeane-Claude Garnier; Gerald Gordon; Richard Hobbins; Dan Keuter; Marilyn Kray; Philippe Martin; Steve Melancon; Christian Simon; Henry Stone; Robert Varrin; Werner von Lensa

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the conclusions, observations, and recommendations of the Independent Technology Review Group (ITRG) regarding design features and important technology uncertainties associated with very-high-temperature nuclear system concepts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The ITRG performed its reviews during the period November 2003 through April 2004.

  7. Teaching Sodium Fast Reactor Technology and Operation for the Present and Future Generations of SFR Users

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Teaching Sodium Fast Reactor Technology and Operation for the Present and Future Generations of SFR or development of sodium fast reactors and related experimental facilities. The sum of courses provided by CEA on sodium fast reactor design, technology, safety and operation experience, decommissioning aspects

  8. New Materials for NGNP/Gen IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Swindeman; Douglas L. Marriott

    2009-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The bounding conditions were briefly summarized for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) that is the leading candidate in the Department of Energy Generation IV reactor program. Metallic materials essential to the successful development and proof of concept for the NGNP were identified. The literature bearing on the materials technology for high-temperature gas-cooled reactors was reviewed with emphasis on the needs identified for the NGNP. Several materials were identified for a more thorough study of their databases and behavioral features relative to the requirements ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section III, Division 1, Subsection NH.

  9. The role of advanced technology in the future of the power generation industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel, T.F.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation reviews the directions that technology has given the power generation industry in the past and how advanced technology will be the key for the future of the industry. The topics of the presentation include how the industry`s history has defined its culture, how today`s economic and regulatory climate has constrained its strategy, and how certain technology options might give some of the players an unfair advantage.

  10. Novel Thermal Storage Technologies for Concentrating Solar Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neti, Sudhakar; Oztekin, Alparslan; Chen, John; Tuzla, Kemal; Misiolek, Wojciech

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The technologies that are to be developed in this work will enable storage of thermal energy in 100 MWe solar energy plants for 6-24 hours at temperatures around 300oC and 850oC using encapsulated phase change materials (EPCM). Several encapsulated phase change materials have been identified, fabricated and proven with calorimetry. Two of these materials have been tested in an airflow experiment. A cost analysis for these thermal energy storage systems has also been conducted that met the targets established at the initiation of the project.

  11. Fuel Cell Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdfTechnologies Program (FCTP) (Fact Sheet) |Energy 12Kathy4

  12. Overview of Progress in Thermoelectric Power Generation Technologies in

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartmentOutreach toTransmissionProgramTechnologiesCells

  13. MHK Technologies/Current Electric Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK Projects JumpPlane < MHKGenerator.jpg Technology

  14. MHK Technologies/Electric Generating Wave Pipe | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK Projects JumpPlaneElectric Buoy.jpg Technology

  15. MHK Technologies/Gyroscopic wave power generation system | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK ProjectsFlagship < MHK Technologies

  16. MHK Technologies/Sub Surface Counter Rotation Current Generator | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter < MHK Technologies Jump to:SihwaEnergy

  17. MHK Technologies/Submergible Power Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter < MHK Technologies Jump

  18. MHK Technologies/The Linear Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter < MHKDUCK < MHK Technologies

  19. MHK Technologies/Water Current Generator Motor | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAG Buoy < MHK TechnologiesWEPTOSNZWAP

  20. MHK Technologies/Yu Oscillating Generator YOG | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter <WAG BuoyYOG < MHK Technologies Jump

  1. MHK Technologies/Floating wave Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK Projects JumpPlaneElectricBuoy.jpgGenerator < MHK

  2. MHK Technologies/KESC Tidal Generator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK ProjectsFlagship <HelixKESC Tidal Generator <

  3. Regenerative Heater Optimization for Steam Turbo-Generation Cycles of Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants with a Comparison of Two Concepts for the Westinghouse International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, W.C.

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The intent of this study is to discuss some of the many factors involved in the development of the design and layout of a steam turbo-generation unit as part of a modular Generation IV nuclear power plant. Of the many factors involved in the design and layout, this research will cover feed water system layout and optimization issues. The research is arranged in hopes that it can be generalized to any Generation IV system which uses a steam powered turbo-generation unit. The research is done using the ORCENT-II heat balance codes and the Salisbury methodology to be reviewed herein. The Salisbury methodology is used on an original cycle design by Famiani for the Westinghouse IRIS and the effects due to parameter variation are studied. The vital parameters of the Salisbury methodology are the incremental heater surface capital cost (S) in $/ft{sup 2}, the value of incremental power (I) in $/kW, and the overall heat transfer coefficient (U) in Btu/ft{sup 2}-degrees Fahrenheit-hr. Each is varied in order to determine the effects on the cycles overall heat rate, output, as well as, the heater surface areas. The effects of each are shown. Then the methodology is then used to compare the optimized original Famiani design consisting of seven regenerative feedwater heaters with an optimized new cycle concept, INRC8, containing four regenerative heaters. The results are shown. It can be seen that a trade between the complexity of the seven stage regenerative Famiani cycle and the simplicity of the INRC8 cycle can be made. It is desired that this methodology can be used to show the ability to evaluate modularity through the value of size a complexity of the system as well as the performance. It also shows the effectiveness of the Salisbury methodology in the optimization of regenerative cycles for such an evaluation.

  4. New generation enrichment monitoring technology for gas centrifuge enrichment plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexandrov, Boian S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Thomas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macarthur, Duncan W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marks, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moss, Calvin E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheppard, Gregory A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The continuous enrichment monitor, developed and fielded in the 1990s by the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided a go-no-go capability to distinguish between UF{sub 6} containing low enriched (approximately 4% {sup 235}U) and highly enriched (above 20% {sup 235}U) uranium. This instrument used the 22-keV line from a {sup 109}Cd source as a transmission source to achieve a high sensitivity to the UF{sub 6} gas absorption. The 1.27-yr half-life required that the source be periodically replaced and the instrument recalibrated. The instrument's functionality and accuracy were limited by the fact that measured gas density and gas pressure were treated as confidential facility information. The modern safeguarding of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant producing low-enriched UF{sub 6} product aims toward a more quantitative flow and enrichment monitoring concept that sets new standards for accuracy stability, and confidence. An instrument must be accurate enough to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of material, have virtually zero false alarms, and protect the operator's proprietary process information. We discuss a new concept for advanced gas enrichment assay measurement technology. This design concept eliminates the need for the periodic replacement of a radioactive source as well as the need for maintenance by experts. Some initial experimental results will be presented.

  5. Effect of different intravenous iron preparations on lymphocyte intracellular reactive oxygen species generation and subpopulation survival.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Ajay; Zhuo, Jiaying; Zha, Junli; Reddy, Srinivasa; Olp, Jonathan; Pai, Amy

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IV iron compounds induced greater intracellular ROS generation,IV iron preparations on intracellular reactive oxygen species generationIV iron preparations on intracellular immune cell ROS generation

  6. Coal-fired power generation: Proven technologies and pollution control systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balat, M. [University of Mah, Trabzon (Turkey)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last two decades, significant advances have been made in the reduction of emissions from coal-fired power generating plants. New technologies include better understanding of the fundamentals of the formation and destruction of criteria pollutants in combustion processes (low nitrogen oxides burners) and improved methods for separating criteria pollutants from stack gases (FGD technology), as well as efficiency improvements in power plants (clean coal technologies). Future demand for more environmentally benign electric power, however, will lead to even more stringent controls of pollutants (sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides) and greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide.

  7. HPI Future SOC Lab: Call for Projects Next generation technology, such as multicore CPUs as well as increasing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weske, Mathias

    - Memory Computing Technology (SAP HANA). The SAP Business ByDesign systemHPI Future SOC Lab: Call for Projects Next generation technology, such as multicore, developers of service-oriented computing systems have to understand

  8. Technology status and project development risks of advanced coal power generation technologies in APEC developing economies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lusica, N.; Xie, T.; Lu, T.

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report reviews the current status of IGCC and supercritical/ultrasupercritical pulverized-coal power plants and summarizes risks associated with project development, construction and operation. The report includes an economic analysis using three case studies of Chinese projects; a supercritical PC, an ultrasupercritical PC, and an IGCC plant. The analysis discusses barriers to clean coal technologies and ways to encourage their adoption for new power plants. 25 figs., 25 tabs.

  9. A. Kusiak, Data Mining and Decision Making, in B.V. Dasarathy (Ed.), Proceedings of the SPIE Conference on Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery: Theory, Tools, and Technology IV, Vol. 4730, SPIE, Orlando, FL, April 2002, pp. 155-165.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kusiak, Andrew

    A. Kusiak, Data Mining and Decision Making, in B.V. Dasarathy (Ed.), Proceedings of the SPIE Conference on Data Mining and Knowledge Discovery: Theory, Tools, and Technology IV, Vol. 4730, SPIE, Orlando, FL, April 2002, pp. 155-165. Data Mining and Decision Making Andrew Kusiak Department of Mechanical

  10. Laboratory Glass Columns "Next Generation" technology for high-performance preparative chromatography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lebendiker, Mario

    SNAP Laboratory Glass Columns "Next Generation" technology for high-performance preparative lesiones graves o la muerte! WARNING Glass SNAP columns are intended for use in a liquid environment disassembly or cleaning for scratches, chips or defects, particularly on the glass surfaces. DO NOT use column

  11. The Future of Combustion Turbine Technology for Industrial and Utility Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karp, A. D.; Simbeck, D. R.

    Low capital cost and ample low-cost natural gas supplies will make natural gas-fired combustion turbine systems the power generation technology of choice over the next decade. Against the background of earlier use by electric utilities, this paper...

  12. Competitiveness of Second Generation Biofuel Feedstocks: Role of Technology and Policy (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khanna, Madhu

    2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Madhu Khanna from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute on "Competitiveness of Second Generation Biofuel Feedstocks: Role of Technology and Policy" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  13. N-PERT BACK JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS: AN OPTION FOR THE NEXT INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY GENERATION?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are introducing a new solar cell design: the Passivated Emitter and Rear Cell (PERC), which features a full-PERT (Passivated Emitter, Rear Totally Diffused) solar cells with a processing sequence based on an industrialN-PERT BACK JUNCTION SOLAR CELLS: AN OPTION FOR THE NEXT INDUSTRIAL TECHNOLOGY GENERATION? Bianca

  14. General equilibrium, electricity generation technologies and the cost of carbon abatement: A structural sensitivity analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : C61 C68 D58 Q43 Keywords: Carbon policy Energy modeling Electric power sector Bottom-up Top of generation technologies and the overall electricity system. By construction, these models are partial equilib of an integrated representation of economic and electricity systems makes simplifying assumptions appealing

  15. Competitiveness of Second Generation Biofuel Feedstocks: Role of Technology and Policy (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Khanna, Madhu

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Madhu Khanna from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and the Energy Biosciences Institute on "Competitiveness of Second Generation Biofuel Feedstocks: Role of Technology and Policy" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  16. ARE660 Wind Generator: Low Wind Speed Technology for Small Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert W. Preus; DOE Project Officer - Keith Bennett

    2008-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is for the design of a wind turbine that can generate most or all of the net energy required for homes and small businesses in moderately windy areas. The purpose is to expand the current market for residential wind generators by providing cost effective power in a lower wind regime than current technology has made available, as well as reduce noise and improve reliability and safety. Robert W. Preus experience designing and/or maintaining residential wind generators of many configurations helped identify the need for an improved experience of safety for the consumer. Current small wind products have unreliable or no method of stopping the wind generator in fault or high wind conditions. Consumers and their neighbors do not want to hear their wind generators. In addition, with current technology, only sites with unusually high wind speeds provide payback times that are acceptable for the on-grid user. Abundant Renewable Energys (ARE) basic original concept for the ARE660 was a combination of a stall controlled variable speed small wind generator and automatic fail safe furling for shutdown. The stall control for a small wind generator is not novel, but has not been developed for a variable speed application with a permanent magnet alternator (PMA). The fail safe furling approach for shutdown has not been used to our knowledge.

  17. Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

    2005-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The nation's power system is facing a diverse and broad set of challenges. These range from restructuring and increased competitiveness in power production to the need for additional production and distribution capacity to meet demand growth, and demands for increased quality and reliability of power and power supply. In addition, there are growing concerns about emissions from fossil fuel powered generation units and generators are seeking methods to reduce the CO{sub 2} emission intensity of power generation. Although these challenges may create uncertainty within the financial and electricity supply markets, they also offer the potential to explore new opportunities to support the accelerated deployment of cleaner and cost-effective technologies to meet such challenges. The federal government and various state governments, for example, support the development of a sustainable electricity infrastructure. As part of this policy, there are a variety of programs to support the development of ''cleaner'' technologies such as combined heat and power (CHP, or cogeneration) and renewable energy technologies. Energy from renewable energy sources, such as solar, wind, hydro, and biomass, are considered carbon-neutral energy technologies. The production of renewable energy creates no incremental increase in fossil fuel consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. Electricity and thermal energy production from all renewable resources, except biomass, produces no incremental increase in air pollutants such as nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, particulate matter, and carbon monoxide. There are many more opportunities for the development of cleaner electricity and thermal energy technologies called ''recycled'' energy. A process using fossil fuels to produce an energy service may have residual energy waste streams that may be recycled into useful energy services. Recycled energy methods would capture energy from sources that would otherwise be unused and convert it to electricity or useful thermal energy. Recycled energy produces no or little increase in fossil fuel consumption and pollutant emissions. Examples of energy recycling methods include industrial gasification technologies to increase energy recovery, as well as less traditional CHP technologies, and the use of energy that is typically discarded from pressure release vents or from the burning and flaring of waste streams. These energy recovery technologies have the ability to reduce costs for power generation. This report is a preliminary study of the potential contribution of this ''new'' generation of clean recycled energy supply technologies to the power supply of the United States. For each of the technologies this report provides a short technical description, as well as an estimate of the potential for application in the U.S., estimated investment and operation costs, as well as impact on air pollutant emission reductions. The report summarizes the potential magnitude of the benefits of these new technologies. The report does not yet provide a robust cost-benefit analysis. It is stressed that the report provides a preliminary assessment to help focus future efforts by the federal government to further investigate the opportunities offered by new clean power generation technologies, as well as initiate policies to support further development and uptake of clean power generation technologies.

  18. Influence of Climate Change Mitigation Technology on Global Demands of Water for Electricity Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Dooley, James J.; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.

    2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Globally, electricity generation accounts for a large and potentially growing water demand, and as such is an important component to assessments of global and regional water scarcity. However, the current suiteas well as potential future suitesof thermoelectric generation technologies has a very wide range of water demand intensities, spanning two orders of magnitude. As such, the evolution of the generation mix is important for the future water demands of the sector. This study uses GCAM, an integrated assessment model, to analyze the global electric sectors water demands in three futures of climate change mitigation policy and two technology strategies. We find that despite five- to seven-fold expansion of the electric sector as a whole from 2005 to 2095, global electric sector water withdrawals remain relatively stable, due to the retirement of existing power plants with water-intensive once-through flow cooling systems. In the scenarios examined here, climate policies lead to the large-scale deployment of advanced, low-emissions technologies such as carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), concentrating solar power, and engineered geothermal systems. In particular, we find that the large-scale deployment of CCS technologies does not increase long-term water consumption from hydrocarbon-fueled power generation as compared with a no-policy scenario without CCS. Moreover, in sensitivity scenarios where low-emissions electricity technologies are required to use dry cooling systems, we find that the consequent additional costs and efficiency reductions do not limit the utility of these technologies in achieving cost-effective whole-system emissions mitigation.

  19. Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes how Learning-by-Doing (LBD) is implemented endogenously in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for generating plants. LBD is experiential learning that correlates to a generating technology's capacity growth. The annual amount of Learning-by-Doing affects the annual overnight cost reduction. Currently, there is no straightforward way to integrate and make sense of all the diffuse information related to the endogenous learning calculation in NEMS. This paper organizes the relevant information from the NEMS documentation, source code, input files, and output files, in order to make the model's logic more accessible. The end results are shown in three ways: in a simple spreadsheet containing all the parameters related to endogenous learning; by an algorithm that traces how the parameters lead to cost reductions; and by examples showing how AEO 2004 forecasts the reduction of overnight costs for generating technologies over time.

  20. Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

    2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This final technical report covers the period October 1, 1995 to February 29, 2008. This chapter begins with an overview of the history of Enhanced Oil Recovery techniques and specifically, CO2 flood. Subsequent chapters conform to the manner consistent with the Activities, Tasks, and Sub-tasks of the project as originally provided in Exhibit C1 in the Project Management Plan dated September 20, 1995. These chapters summarize the objectives, status and conclusions of the major project activities performed during the project period. The report concludes by describing technology transfer activities stemming from the project and providing a reference list of all publications of original research work generated by the project team or by others regarding this project. The overall objective of this project was a final research and development in the United States a technology that was developed at the Institute for Geology and Development of Fossil Fuels in Moscow, Russia. Before the technology can be convincingly adopted by United States oil and gas producers, the laboratory research was conducted at Mew Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experimental studies were conducted to measure the volume and the pressure of the CO{sub 2} gas generated according to the new Russian technology. Two experimental devices were designed, built and used at New Mexico Tech facilities for these purposes. The designed setup allowed initiating and controlling the reaction between the 'gas-yielding' (GY) and 'gas-forming' (GF) agents proposed by Russian technology. The temperature was controlled, and the generated gas pressure and volume were recorded during the reaction process. Additionally, the effect of surfactant addition on the effectiveness of the process was studied. An alternative GY reactant was tested in order to increase the efficiency of the CO2 gas generation process. The slim tube and the core flood experimental studies were conducted to define the sweep efficiency of the in-situ generated CO{sub 2} gas. A set of core flood experiments were conducted to define effect of surfactant on recovery efficiency. The results demonstrated obvious advantages of the foamy system over the brine solution in order to achieve higher sweep efficiency and recovery coefficient. It is shown that a slug injection is not an efficient method for mixing GY and GF solutions and it can't generate considerable gas inside the slim-tube.

  1. 11.11.2004 08:48:00 GMT China aims to employ nuclear fusion technology in power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Search 11.11.2004 08:48:00 GMT China aims to employ nuclear fusion technology in power generation to employ nuclear fusion technologies in power generation by 2050. China will adopt a three-step strategy with thermonuclear reactors; the second step aims to raise the utilization rate of nuclear fuels from the current 1

  2. Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy Policy, Vol. 34 Generation IV International Forum. Introduction to Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems and theIII Plus 2030-onward Generation IV 2030-onward 2030-onward

  3. Development and Analysis of Advanced High-Temperature Technology for Nuclear Heat Transport and Power Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Per F. Peterson

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project by the Thermal Hydraulics Research Laboratory at U.C. Berkeley Studied advanced high-temperature heat transport and power conversion technology, in support of the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative and Generation IV.

  4. Considerations Associated with Reactor Technology Selection for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L.E. Demick

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the inception of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and during predecessor activities, alternative reactor technologies have been evaluated to determine the technology that best fulfills the functional and performance requirements of the targeted energy applications and market. Unlike the case of electric power generation where the reactor performance is primarily expressed in terms of economics, the targeted energy applications involve industrial applications that have specific needs in terms of acceptable heat transport fluids and the associated thermodynamic conditions. Hence, to be of interest to these industrial energy applications, the alternative reactor technologies are weighed in terms of the reactor coolant/heat transport fluid, achievable reactor outlet temperature, and practicality of operations to achieve the very high reliability demands associated with the petrochemical, petroleum, metals and related industries. These evaluations have concluded that the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) can uniquely provide the required ranges of energy needs for these target applications, do so with promising economics, and can be commercialized with reasonable development risk in the time frames of current industry interest i.e., within the next 10-15 years.

  5. Application and development of technologies for engine-condition-based maintenance of emergency diesel generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, K. H.; Sang, G.; Choi, L. Y. S.; Lee, B. O. [Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Company Central Research Institue, 70, 1312 -gil Yuseong-daero Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-343 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emergency diesel generator (EDG) of a nuclear power plant has the role of supplying emergency electric power to protect the reactor core system in the event of the loss of offsite power supply. Therefore, EDGs should be subject to periodic surveillance testing to verify their ability to supply specified frequencies and voltages at design power levels within a limited time. To maintain optimal reliability of EDGs, condition monitoring/diagnosis technologies must be developed. Changing from periodic disassemble maintenance to condition-based maintenance (CBM) according to predictions of equipment condition is recommended. In this paper, the development of diagnosis technology for CBM and the application of a diesel engine condition-analysis system are described. (authors)

  6. Magnetic Exchange Coupling in Chloride-Bridged 5f-3d Heterometallic Complexes Generated via Insertion into a Uranium(IV) Dimethylpyrazolate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Insertion into a Uranium(IV) Dimethylpyrazolate Dimer Stosh A. Kozimor, Bart M. Bartlett, Jeffrey D. Rinehart, and Jeffrey R. Long* Department of Chemistry, UniVersity of California, Berkeley, California additional products were observed: a THF adduct, (Me2Pz)4U(THF), and a salt of the pentapyrazolate uranium

  7. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: ATP-LD; Cummins Next Generation Tier 2 Bin 2 Diesel Engine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Cummins at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ATP-LD; Cummins next generation tier...

  8. The effects of technological change, experience and environmental regulation on the construction of coal-burning generating units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joskow, Paul L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides an empirical analysis of the technological, regulatory and organizational factors that have influenced the costs of building coal-burning steam-electric generating units over the past twenty year. We ...

  9. Renewable Electricity Futures Study. Volume 2: Renewable Electricity Generation and Storage Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Augustine, C.; Bain, R.; Chapman, J.; Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Hall, D.G.; Lantz, E.; Margolis, R.; Thresher, R.; Sandor, D.; Bishop, N.A.; Brown, S.R.; Cada, G.F.; Felker, F.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Electricity Futures (RE Futures) Study investigated the challenges and impacts of achieving very high renewable electricity generation levels in the contiguous United States by 2050. The analysis focused on the sufficiency of the geographically diverse U.S. renewable resources to meet electricity demand over future decades, the hourly operational characteristics of the U.S. grid with high levels of variable wind and solar generation, and the potential implications of deploying high levels of renewables in the future. RE Futures focused on technical aspects of high penetration of renewable electricity; it did not focus on how to achieve such a future through policy or other measures. Given the inherent uncertainties involved with analyzing alternative long-term energy futures as well as the multiple pathways that might be taken to achieve higher levels of renewable electricity supply, RE Futures explored a range of scenarios to investigate and compare the impacts of renewable electricity penetration levels (30%-90%), future technology performance improvements, potential constraints to renewable electricity development, and future electricity demand growth assumptions. RE Futures was led by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

  10. OPTICAL DIFFERENCE FREQUENCY GENERATION OF FAR INFRARED RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morris, J.R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Absorption on Far-Infrared Generation IV. V. Comparison withIII CHAPTER IV. PHASE MATCHED FAR-INFRARED GENERATION BY THE1970). CHAPTER IV. PHASE MATCHED FAR-INFRARED GENERATION BY

  11. Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of International Learning on Technology Cost. In Issues ofbetween initial new technology cost estimates and actualthe revolutionary technologies have cost reductions beyond

  12. Treatment technologies for hazardous ashes generated from possible incineration of navy waste. Technical note

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Torres, T.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Navy recognizes that thermal treatment of Navy hazardous wastes (HW) should, under the terms of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976, be avoided. Combustion waste disposal may nonetheless become unavoidable in certain cases, even after all possible process enhancements that avoid HW production are implemented. Even then, some toxic constituents that may be present in the waste will not be destroyed by incineration and will persist in the ash residue produced by incineration. Such incinerator ashes will have to be disposed of in HW landfills. The Navy is thus evaluating methods of treatment of such ash to remove or immobilize the toxic constituents that persist following incineration in order to render the waste treatment residue nonhazardous. Appropriate technology identified in this work can be applied to ash produced by HW combuster operated by the Navy, if any, or be required for ash produced by commercial generators handling Navy HWs.

  13. CONSTRUCTION OF WEB-ACCESSIBLE MATERIALS HANDBOOK FORGENERATION IV NUCLEAR REACTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of a web-accessible materials handbook in support of the materials selection and structural design for the Generation IV nuclear reactors is being planned. Background of the reactor program is briefly introduced. Evolution of materials handbooks for nuclear reactors over years is reviewed in light of the trends brought forth by the rapid advancement in information technologies. The framework, major features, contents, and construction considerations of the web-accessible Gen IV Materials Handbook are discussed. Potential further developments and applications of the handbook are also elucidated.

  14. Life Cycle analysis data and results for geothermal and other electricity generation technologies

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sullivan, John

    Life cycle analysis (LCA) is an environmental assessment method that quantifies the environmental performance of a product system over its entire lifetime, from cradle to grave. Based on a set of relevant metrics, the method is aptly suited for comparing the environmental performance of competing products systems. This file contains LCA data and results for electric power production including geothermal power. The LCA for electric power has been broken down into two life cycle stages, namely plant and fuel cycles. Relevant metrics include the energy ratio and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios, where the former is the ratio of system input energy to total lifetime electrical energy out and the latter is the ratio of the sum of all incurred greenhouse gases (in CO2 equivalents) divided by the same energy output. Specific information included herein are material to power (MPR) ratios for a range of power technologies for conventional thermoelectric, renewables (including three geothermal power technologies), and coproduced natural gas/geothermal power. For the geothermal power scenarios, the MPRs include the casing, cement, diesel, and water requirements for drilling wells and topside piping. Also included herein are energy and GHG ratios for plant and fuel cycle stages for the range of considered electricity generating technologies. Some of this information are MPR data extracted directly from the literature or from models (eg. ICARUS a subset of ASPEN models) and others (energy and GHG ratios) are results calculated using GREET models and MPR data. MPR data for wells included herein were based on the Argonne well materials model and GETEM well count results.

  15. Life Cycle analysis data and results for geothermal and other electricity generation technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, John

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Life cycle analysis (LCA) is an environmental assessment method that quantifies the environmental performance of a product system over its entire lifetime, from cradle to grave. Based on a set of relevant metrics, the method is aptly suited for comparing the environmental performance of competing products systems. This file contains LCA data and results for electric power production including geothermal power. The LCA for electric power has been broken down into two life cycle stages, namely plant and fuel cycles. Relevant metrics include the energy ratio and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios, where the former is the ratio of system input energy to total lifetime electrical energy out and the latter is the ratio of the sum of all incurred greenhouse gases (in CO2 equivalents) divided by the same energy output. Specific information included herein are material to power (MPR) ratios for a range of power technologies for conventional thermoelectric, renewables (including three geothermal power technologies), and coproduced natural gas/geothermal power. For the geothermal power scenarios, the MPRs include the casing, cement, diesel, and water requirements for drilling wells and topside piping. Also included herein are energy and GHG ratios for plant and fuel cycle stages for the range of considered electricity generating technologies. Some of this information are MPR data extracted directly from the literature or from models (eg. ICARUS a subset of ASPEN models) and others (energy and GHG ratios) are results calculated using GREET models and MPR data. MPR data for wells included herein were based on the Argonne well materials model and GETEM well count results.

  16. Important requirements for RF generators for Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies (ADTT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lynch, M.T.; Tallerico, P.J.; Lawrence, G.P.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All Accelerator-Driven Transmutation applications require very large amounts of RF Power. For example, one version of a Plutonium burning system requires an 800-MeV, 80-mA, proton accelerator running at 100% duty factor. This accelerator requires approximately 110-MW of continuous RF power if one assumes only 10% reserve power for control of the accelerator fields. In fact, to minimize beam spill, the RF controls may need as much as 15 to 20% of reserve power. In addition, unlike an electron accelerator in which the beam is relativistic, a failed RF station can disturb the synchronism of the beam, possibly shutting down the entire accelerator. These issues and more lead to a set of requirements for the RF generators which are stringent, and in some cases, conflicting. In this paper, we will describe the issues and requirements, and outline a plan for RF generator development to meet the needs of the Accelerator-Driven Transmutation Technologies. The key issues which will be discussed include: operating efficiency, operating linearity, effect on the input power grid, bandwidth, gain, reliability, operating voltage, and operating current.

  17. Shipment and Disposal of Solidified Organic Waste (Waste Type IV) to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D'Amico, E. L [Washington TRU Solutions (United States); Edmiston, D. R. [John Hart and Associates (United States); O'Leary, G. A. [CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (United States); Rivera, M. A. [Aspen Resources Ltd., Inc. (United States); Steward, D. M. [Boulder Research Enterprises, LLC (United States)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April of 2005, the last shipment of transuranic (TRU) waste from the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site to the WIPP was completed. With the completion of this shipment, all transuranic waste generated and stored at Rocky Flats was successfully removed from the site and shipped to and disposed of at the WIPP. Some of the last waste to be shipped and disposed of at the WIPP was waste consisting of solidified organic liquids that is identified as Waste Type IV in the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC) document. Waste Type IV waste typically has a composition, and associated characteristics, that make it significantly more difficult to ship and dispose of than other Waste Types, especially with respect to gas generation. This paper provides an overview of the experience gained at Rocky Flats for management, transportation and disposal of Type IV waste at WIPP, particularly with respect to gas generation testing. (authors)

  18. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward for 750800C Reactor Outlet Temperature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John Collins

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents the NGNP Critical PASSCs and defines their technical maturation path through Technology Development Roadmaps (TDRMs) and their associated Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). As the critical PASSCs advance through increasing levels of technical maturity, project risk is reduced and the likelihood of within-budget and on-schedule completion is enhanced. The current supplier-generated TRLs and TDRMs for a 750800C reactor outlet temperature (ROT) specific to each supplier are collected in Appendix A.

  19. HYDROGEN GENERATION FROM PLASMATRON REFORMERS: A PROMISING TECHNOLOGY FOR NOX ADSORBER REGENERATION AND OTHER AUTOMOTIVE APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bromberg, L.; Crane, S; Rabinovich, A.; Kong, Y; Cohn, D; Heywood, J; Alexeev, N.; Samokhin, A.

    2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Plasmatron reformers are being developed at MIT and ArvinMeritor [1]. In these reformers a special low power electrical discharge is used to promote partial oxidation conversion of hydrocarbon fuels into hydrogen and CO. The partial oxidation reaction of this very fuel rich mixture is difficult to initiate. The plasmatron provides continuous enhanced volume initiation. To minimize electrode erosion and electrical power requirements, a low current, high voltage discharge with wide area electrodes is used. The reformers operate at or slightly above atmospheric pressure. Plasmatron reformers provide the advantages of rapid startup and transient response; efficient conversion of the fuel to hydrogen rich gas; compact size; relaxation or elimination of reformer catalyst requirements; and capability to process difficult to reform fuels, such as diesel and bio-oils. These advantages facilitate use of onboard hydrogen-generation technology for diesel exhaust after-treatment. Plasma-enhanced reformer technology can provide substantial conversion even without the use of a catalyst. Recent progress includes a substantial decrease in electrical power consumption (to about 200 W), increased flow rate (above 1 g/s of diesel fuel corresponding to approximately 40 kW of chemical energy), soot suppression and improvements in other operational features.. Plasmatron reformer technology has been evaluated for regeneration of NOx adsorber after-treatment systems. At ArvinMeritor tests were performed on a dual-leg NOx adsorber system using a Cummins 8.3L diesel engine both in a test cell and on a vehicle. A NOx adsorber system was tested using the plasmatron reformer as a regenerator and without the reformer i.e., with straight diesel fuel based regeneration as the baseline case. The plasmatron reformer was shown to improve NOx regeneration significantly compared to the baseline diesel case. The net result of these initial tests was a significant decrease in fuel penalty, roughly 50% at moderate adsorber temperatures. This fuel penalty improvement is accompanied by a dramatic drop in slipped hydrocarbon emissions, which decreased by 90% or more. Significant advantages are demonstrated across a wide range of engine conditions and temperatures. The study also indicated the potential to regenerate NOx adsorbers at low temperatures where diesel fuel based regeneration is not effective, such as those typical of idle conditions. Two vehicles, a bus and a light duty truck, have been equipped for plasmatron reformer NOx adsorber regeneration tests.

  20. Research and Development Technology Development Roadmaps for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ian McKirdy

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for process heat, hydrogen and electricity production. The reactor will be graphite moderated with helium as the primary coolant and may be either prismatic or pebble-bed. Although, final design features have not yet been determined. Research and Development (R&D) activities are proceeding on those known plant systems to mature the technology, codify the materials for specific applications, and demonstrate the component and system viability in NGNP relevant and integrated environments. Collectively these R&D activities serve to reduce the project risk and enhance the probability of on-budget, on-schedule completion and NRC licensing. As the design progresses, in more detail, toward final design and approval for construction, selected components, which have not been used in a similar application, in a relevant environment nor integrated with other components and systems, must be tested to demonstrate viability at reduced scales and simulations prior to full scale operation. This report and its R&D TDRMs present the path forward and its significance in assuring technical readiness to perform the desired function by: Choreographing the integration between design and R&D activities; and proving selected design components in relevant applications.

  1. Trinity College launches Computer Science Initiative for the 21st Century -Google supports next generation of technology leaders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Mahony, Donal E.

    Trinity College launches Computer Science Initiative for the 21st Century Classroom - Google supports next generation of technology leaders Friday, 31 May 2013: Trinity College Dublin today announcedst Century Computer Science Teaching Skills, developed by the Trinity Access 21 network in Trinity

  2. Next Generation Metallic Iron Nodule Technology in Electric Arc Steelmaking - Phase II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald R. Fosnacht; Iwao Iwasaki; Richard F. Kiesel; David J. Englund; David W. Hendrickson; Rodney L. Bleifuss

    2010-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The current trend in the steel industry is a gradual decline in conventional steelmaking from taconite pellets in blast furnaces, and an increasing number of alternative processes using metallic scrap iron, pig iron and metallized iron ore products. Currently, iron ores from Minnesota and Michigan are pelletized and shipped to the lower Great Lakes ports as blast furnace feed. The existing transportation system and infrastructure is geared to handling these bulk materials. In order to expand the opportunities for the existing iron ore mines beyond their blast furnace customer base, a new material is needed to satisfy the needs of the emerging steel industry while utilizing the existing infrastructure and materials handling. A recent commercial installation employing Kobe Steels ITmk3 process, was installed in Northeastern Minnesota. The basic process uses a moving hearth furnace to directly reduce iron oxides to metallic iron from a mixture of iron ore, coals and additives. The resulting products can be shipped using the existing infrastructure for use in various steelmaking processes. The technology reportedly saves energy by 30% over the current integrated steelmaking process and reduces emissions by more than 40%. A similar large-scale pilot plant campaign is also currently in progress using JFE Steels Hi-QIP process in Japan. The objective of this proposal is to build upon and improve the technology demonstrated by Kobe Steel and JFE, by further reducing cost, improving quality and creating added incentive for commercial development. This project expands previous research conducted at the University of Minnesota Duluths Natural Resources Research Institute and that reported by Kobe and JFE Steel. Three major issues have been identified and are addressed in this project for producing high-quality nodular reduced iron (NRI) at low cost: (1) reduce the processing temperature, (2) control the furnace gas atmosphere over the NRI, and (3) effectively use sub-bituminous coal as a reductant. From over 4000 laboratory tube and box furnace tests, it was established that the correct combination of additives, fluxes, and reductant while controlling the concentration of CO and CO2 in the furnace atmosphere (a) lowers the operating temperature, (b) decreases the use of reductant coal (c) generates less micro nodules of iron, and (d) promotes desulphurization. The laboratory scale work was subsequently verified on 12.2 m (40 ft) long pilot scale furnace. High quality NRI could be produced on a routine basis using the pilot furnace facility with energy provided from oxy-gas or oxy-coal burner technologies. Specific strategies were developed to allow the use of sub-bituminous coals both as a hearth material and as part of the reaction mixture. Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling was used to study the overall carbothermic reduction and smelting process. The movement of the furnace gas on a pilot hearth furnace and larger simulated furnaces and various means of controlling the gas atmosphere were evaluated. Various atmosphere control methods were identified and tested during the course of the investigation. Based on the results, the appropriate modifications to the furnace were made and tested at the pilot scale. A series of reduction and smelting tests were conducted to verify the utility of the processing conditions. During this phase, the overall energy use characteristics, raw materials, alternative fuels, and the overall economics predicted for full scale implementation were analyzed. The results indicate that it should be possible to lower reaction temperatures while simultaneously producing low sulfur, high carbon NRI if the right mix chemistry and atmosphere are employed. Recommendations for moving the technology to the next stage of commercialization are presented.

  3. Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishii, Jun

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean Air Amendments helped lower the cost of natural gas turbines vis-a-vis coal based technologies.

  4. Sustainable Power Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Sustainable Power Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Bicarbonate Buffer and Proton Transfer applications, especially for wastewater treatment. Introduction Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has drawn of electrodes (69), (iii) selection and treatment of membranes (1012), and (iv) optimization of the MFC design

  5. Synthesis and Characterization of Pt(IV) Fluorescein Conjugates to Investigate Pt(IV) Intracellular Transformations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Ying

    Pt(IV) anticancer compounds typically operate as prodrugs that are reduced in the hypoxic environment of cancer cells, losing two axial ligands in the process to generate active Pt(II) species. Here we report the synthesis ...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Next Generation SCR-Dosing System Investigation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about next...

  7. Characterization of alternative electric generation technologies for the SPS comparative assessment: volume 2, central-station technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SPS Concept Development and Evaluation Program includes a comparative assessment. An early first step in the assessment process is the selection and characterization of alternative technologies. This document describes the cost and performance (i.e., technical and environmental) characteristics of six central station energy alternatives: (1) conventional coal-fired powerplant; (2) conventional light water reactor (LWR); (3) combined cycle powerplant with low-Btu gasifiers; (4) liquid metal fast breeder reactor (LMFBR); (5) photovoltaic system without storage; and (6) fusion reactor.

  8. A New Generation: Ethnicity, Socioeconomic Status, Immigration and the Undergraduate Experience at the University of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brint, S; Douglass, John Aubrey; Flacks, Richard; Thomson, Gregg; Chatman, Steve

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    BERKELEY A New Generation: SERU Project Report iv V . WhatA New Generation: SERU Project Report IV. How Engaged Are UC

  9. Task 3.14 - Demonstration of Technologies for Remote Power Generation in Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael L. Jones

    1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In over 165 villages in Alaska, the use of fossil fuel supplies or renewable energy resources could greatly reduce the cost of electricity and space heating. Currently, diesel generators are the most commonly used electrical generating systems; however, high fuel costs result in extremely high electrical power costs reIative to the lower 48 states. The reduction of fuel costs associated with the use of indigenous, locally available fuels running modular, high-efficiency power- generating systems would be extremely beneficial.

  10. Deployment of a Suite of High-Performance Computational Tools for Multi-scale Multi-physics Simulation of Generation IV Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Podowski, Michael Z

    2013-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of this project has been to deploy advanced simulation capabilities for next generation reactor systems utilizing newly available, high-performance computing facilities. The approach includes the following major components: The development of new simulation capabilities using state-of-the-art computer codes of different scales: molecular dynamics (MD) level, DNS (FronTier and PHASTA) and CFD (NPHASE-CMFD); The development of advanced numerical solvers for large-size computational problems; The deployment of a multiple-code computational platform for multiscale simulations of gas/liquid two-phase flow during reactor transients and accidents; and Application of the new computational methodology to study the progression of loss-of-flow accident in sodium fast reactor (SFR).

  11. Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    biogas digester systems can generate electricity and thermal energy to serve heatingbiogas (mostly methane) can be captured and used to provide energy services either by direct heating

  12. Converting Limbo Lands to Energy-Generating Stations: Renewable Energy Technologies on Underused, Formerly Contaminated Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mosey, G.; Heimiller, D.; Dahle, D.; Vimmerstedt, L.; Brady-Sabeff, L.

    2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the potential for using 'Limbo Lands' (underused, formerly contaminated sites, landfills, brownfields, abandoned mine lands, etc. ) as sites for renewable energy generating stations.

  13. Evaluation of Representative Smart Grid Investment Grant Project Technologies: Distributed Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Ruchi; Vyakaranam, Bharat GNVSR

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is one of a series of reports estimating the benefits of deploying technologies similar to those implemented on the Smart Grid Investment Grant (SGIG) projects. Four technical reports cover the various types of technologies deployed in the SGIG projects, distribution automation, demand response, energy storage, and renewables integration. A fifth report in the series examines the benefits of deploying these technologies on a national level. This technical report examines the impacts of addition of renewable resources- solar and wind in the distribution system as deployed in the SGIG projects.

  14. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Next Generation Environmentally Friendly Driving Feedback Systems Research and Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by University of California at Riverside at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about next...

  15. Next Generation Safety Performance Monitoring at Signalized Intersections Using Connected Vehicle Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zha, Liteng

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    and prone to human errors. The advent of connected vehicle technology allows vehicles to communicate with each other as well as infrastructure wirelessly. Through this platform, vehicle movements and signal status at the facilities can be automatically...

  16. Next Generation Safety Performance Monitoring at Signalized Intersections Using Connected Vehicle Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zha, Liteng

    2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    and prone to human errors. The advent of connected vehicle technology allows vehicles to communicate with each other as well as infrastructure wirelessly. Through this platform, vehicle movements and signal status at the facilities can be automatically...

  17. Entrepreneurial Tech-Ed. : using technology to fuel income generation education in rural Ghana/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rossman, Breanna Faye

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates how decentralization of development occurs through merging small-scale technology hubs into the rural West African fabric by integrating with the secondary school system. This model redefines the ...

  18. Role of minerals in the thermal alteration of organic matter. IV. Generation of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and alkenes in laboratory experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huizinga, B.J.; Tannenbaum, E.; Kaplan, I.R.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of pyrolysis experiments, utilizing two different immature oil-prone kerogens mixed with common sedimentary minerals (calcite, illite, or Na-montmorillonite), was conducted to study the effects of minerals on the generation of n-alkanes, acyclic isoprenoids, and alkenes during laboratory-simulated catagenesis of kerogen. The influence of clay minerals on the aliphatic hydrocarbons is critically dependent on the water concentration during laboratory thermal maturation. Under extremely low contents of water, C/sub 12+/-range n-alkanes and acyclic isoprenoids are mostly destroyed by montmorillonite but undergo only a minor alteration with illite. Both clay minerals significantly reduce alkene formation during dry pyrolysis. Under hydrous conditions (mineral/water = 2:1), the effects of the clay minerals are substantially reduced. In addition, the dry-pyrolysis experiments show that illite and montmorillonite preferentially retain large amounts of the polar constituents of bitumen, but not n-alkanes of acyclic isoprenoids. Therefore, bitumen fractionation according to polarity differences occurs in the presence of these clay minerals. By this process, n-alkanes, and acyclic isoprenoids are concentrated in the bitumen fraction that is not strongly adsorbed on the clay matrices. In contrast, calcite has no significant influence on the thermal evolution of the hydrocarbons. In addition, calcite is incapable of retaining bitumen. Therefore, the fractionation of n-alkanes or acyclic isoprenoids relative to the polar constituents of bitumen is insignificant in the presence of calcite.

  19. General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

    Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

  20. Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaney, L.; Thundiyil, K.; Chidambaram, S.; Abbi, Y. P.; Anderson, S.

    2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper quantifies the mobile air-conditioning fuel consumption of the typical Indian vehicle, exploring potential fuel savings and emissions reductions these systems for the next generation of vehicles.

  1. Global Assessment of Hydrogen Technologies Task 5 Report Use of Fuel Cell Technology in Electric Power Generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouad, Fouad H.; Peters, Robert W.; Sisiopiku, Virginia P.; Sullivan Andrew J.; Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this work was to assess the performance of high temperature membranes and observe the impact of different parameters, such as water-to-carbon ratio, carbon formation, hydrogen formation, efficiencies, methane formation, fuel and oxidant utilization, sulfur reduction, and the thermal efficiency/electrical efficiency relationship, on fuel cell performance. A 250 KW PEM fuel cell model was simulated [in conjunction with Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) with the help of the fuel cell computer software model (GCtool)] which would be used to produce power of 250 kW and also produce steam at 120oC that can be used for industrial applications. The performance of the system was examined by estimating the various electrical and thermal efficiencies achievable, and by assessing the effect of supply water temperature, process water temperature, and pressure on thermal performance. It was concluded that increasing the fuel utilization increases the electrical efficiency but decreases the thermal efficiency. The electrical and thermal efficiencies are optimum at ~85% fuel utilization. The low temperature membrane (70oC) is unsuitable for generating high-grade heat suitable for useful cogeneration. The high temperature fuel cells are capable of producing steam through 280oC that can be utilized for industrial applications. Increasing the supply water temperature reduces the efficiency of the radiator. Increasing the supply water temperature beyond the dew point temperature decreases the thermal efficiency with the corresponding decrease in high-grade heat utilization. Increasing the steam pressure decreases the thermal efficiency. The environmental impacts of fuel cell use depend upon the source of the hydrogen rich fuel used. By using pure hydrogen, fuel cells have virtually no emissions except water. Hydrogen is rarely used due to problems with storage and transportation, but in the future, the growth of a solar hydrogen economy has been projected. Photovoltaic cells convert sunlight into electricity. This electricity can be used to split water (electrolysis) into hydrogen and oxygen, to store the sun's energy as hydrogen fuel. In this scenario, fuel cell powered vehicles or generating stations have no real emissions of greenhouse or acid gases, or any other pollutants. It is predominantly during the fuel processing stage that atmospheric emissions are released by a fuel cell power plant. When methanol from biomass is used as a fuel, fuel cells have no net emissions of carbon dioxide (CO2, a greenhouse gas) because any carbon released was recently taken from the atmosphere by photosynthetic plants. Any high temperature combustion, such as that which would take place in a spark ignition engine fueled by methanol, produces nitrous oxides (NOx), gases which contribute to acid rain. Fuel cells virtually eliminate NOx emissions because of the lower temperatures of their chemical reactions. Fuel cells, using processed fossil fuels, have emissions of CO2 and sulfur dioxide (SO2) but these emissions are much lower than those from traditional thermal power plants or spark ignition engines due to the higher efficiency of fuel cell power plants. Higher efficiencies result in less fuel being consumed to produce a given amount of electricity or to travel a given distance. This corresponds to lower CO2 and SO2 emissions. Fuel cell power plants also have longer life expectancies and lower maintenance costs than their alternatives.

  2. Illuminating Solar Decathlon Homes: Exploring Next Generation Lighting Technology - Light Emitting Diodes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, Kelly L.; Gilbride, Theresa L.

    2008-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was prepared by PNNL for the US Department of Energy Building Technologies Program, Solid-State Lighting Program. The report will be provided to teams of university students who are building houses for the 2009 Solar Decathlon, a home design competition sponsored in part by DOE, to encourage teams to build totally solar powered homes. One aspect of the competition is lighting. This report provides the teams with information about LED lighting that can help them determine how they incorporate LED lighting into their homes. The report provides an overview of LED technology, a status of where LED technology is today, questions and answers about lighting quality, efficiency, lifetime etc.; numerous examples of LED products; and several weblinks for further research.

  3. Marine Tidal Current Electric Power Generation Technology: State of the Art and Current Status

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    resurgence in development of renewable ocean energy technology. Therefore, several demonstration projects appreciated as a vast renewable energy source. The energy is stored in oceans partly as thermal energy, partly categories: wave energy, marine and tidal current energy, ocean thermal energy, energy from salinity

  4. Utility/Industry Partnerships Involving Distributed Generation Technologies in Evolving Electricity Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rastler, D. M.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wires Manage Wires defer capital Optimize Energy Services Not Utility Business Not Utility Business New Business Opportunities DISTRIBUTED GENERATION Distributed generation includes small gas turbines, micro-turbines, fuel cells, storage... Residential Single Family Multi Family 1-10 kW 15- 50 kW Ultra micro-turbines Stirling Engines Fuel Cells PEMFC SOFC PV BatterylUPS Remote Loads 5 kW - 1,000 kW IC engines Off Grid Diesel Engine Micro turbine Stirling Engines Distribution...

  5. Maintaining a Technology-Neutral Approach to Hydrogen Production Process Development through Conceptual Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael W. Patterson

    2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), tasking the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with demonstrating High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology. The demonstration is to include the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of HTGR technology for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), a component of the DOE Hydrogen Program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy, is also investigating multiple approaches to cost effective hydrogen production from nuclear energy. The objective of NHI is development of the technology and information basis for a future decision on commercial viability. The initiatives are clearly intertwined. While the objectives of NGNP and NHI are generally consistent, NGNP has progressed to the project definition phase and the project plan has matured. Multiple process applications for the NGNP require process heat, electricity and hydrogen in varied combinations and sizes. Coupling these processes to the reactor in multiple configurations adds complexity to the design, licensing and demonstration of both the reactor and the hydrogen production process. Commercial viability of hydrogen production may depend on the specific application and heat transport configuration. A component test facility (CTF) is planned by the NGNP to support testing and demonstration of NGNP systems, including those for hydrogen production, in multiple configurations. Engineering-scale demonstrations in the CTF are expected to start in 2012 to support scheduled design and licensing activities leading to subsequent construction and operation. Engineering-scale demonstrations planned by NHI are expected to start at least two years later. Reconciliation of these schedules is recommended to successfully complete both initiatives. Hence, closer and earlier integration of hydrogen process development and heat transport systems is sensible. For integration purposes, an analysis comparing the design, cost and schedule impact of maintaining a technology neutral approach through conceptual design or making an early hydrogen process technology selection was performed. Early selection does not specifically eliminate a technology, but rather selects the first hydrogen technology for demonstration. A systems-engineering approach was taken to define decision-making criteria for selecting a hydrogen technology. The relative technical, cost and schedule risks of each approach were analyzed and risk mitigation strategies were recommended, including provisions to maintain close collaboration with the NHI. The results of these analyses are presented here.

  6. Bulk Electricity Generating Technologies This appendix describes the technical characteristics and cost and performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    income tax rate n/a 35% 35% Federal investment tax credit n/a 0% 0% Tax recovery period n/a 20 years 20-FIRED STEAM-ELECTRIC PLANTS Coal-fired steam-electric power plants are a mature technology, in use for over a century. Coal is the largest source of electric power in the United States as a whole, and the second

  7. KNMI publication; 196 -IV Rainfall generator for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    , or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording or otherwise in retrieval systems, or transmitted, in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying and Water Management, Institute for Inland Water Management and Waste Water Treatment RIZA, P.O. Box 17

  8. MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconverter < MHKDUCK < MHK Technologies

  9. Tsunami Information Sources: Part 4 (With a section on impulsively generated waves by a rapid mass movement, either submerged, or into a body of water)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegel, Robert L.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generation, Modeling, Risk and Mitigation, NATO Science Series, IV,Generation, Modeling, Risk and Mitigation, NATO Science Series, IV,Generation, Modeling, Risk and Mitigation, Istanbul, Turkey, May 23-26, 2001, NATO Science Series, IV,

  10. MHK Technologies/OCGen turbine generator unit TGU | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK ProjectsFlagshipNAREC < MHKOCGen turbine generator

  11. Nanostructured Materials for Energy Generation and Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Javed Miller

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of new energy generation and storage technologies arenew energy generation and storage technologies is importantBased Energy Storage and Generation Technologies The world

  12. Building upon Historical Competencies: Next-generation Clean-up Technologies for World-Wide Application - 13368

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guevara, K.C. [DOE Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)] [DOE Savannah River Operations Office, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States); Fellinger, A.P.; Aylward, R.S.; Griffin, J.C.; Hyatt, J.E.; Bush, S.R. [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)] [Savannah River National Laboratory, Aiken, South Carolina 29808 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's Savannah River Site has a 60-year history of successfully operating nuclear facilities and cleaning up the nuclear legacy of the Cold War era through the processing of radioactive and otherwise hazardous wastes, remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, management of nuclear materials, and deactivation and decommissioning of excess facilities. SRS recently unveiled its Enterprise.SRS (E.SRS) strategic vision to identify and facilitate application of the historical competencies of the site to current and future national and global challenges. E.SRS initiatives such as the initiative to Develop and Demonstrate Next generation Clean-up Technologies seek timely and mutually beneficial engagements with entities around the country and the world. One such ongoing engagement is with government and industry in Japan in the recovery from the devastation of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. (authors)

  13. Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaney, L.; Thundiyil, K.; Andersen, S.; Chidambaram, S.; Abbi, Y. P.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Up to 19.4% of vehicle fuel consumption in India is devoted to air conditioning (A/C). Indian A/C fuel consumption is almost four times the fuel penalty in the United States and close to six times that in the European Union because India's temperature and humidity are higher and because road congestion forces vehicles to operate inefficiently. Car A/C efficiency in India is an issue worthy of national attention considering the rate of increase of A/C penetration into the new car market, India's hot climatic conditions and high fuel costs. Car A/C systems originally posed an ozone layer depletion concern. Now that industrialized and many developing countries have moved away from ozone-depleting substances per Montreal Protocol obligations, car A/C impact on climate has captured the attention of policy makers and corporate leaders. Car A/C systems have a climate impact from potent global warming potential gas emissions and from fuel used to power the car A/Cs. This paper focuses on car A/C fuel consumption in the context of the rapidly expanding Indian car market and how new technological improvements can result in significant fuel savings and consequently, emission reductions. A 19.4% fuel penalty is associated with A/C use in the typical Indian passenger car. Car A/C fuel use and associated tailpipe emissions are strong functions of vehicle design, vehicle use, and climate conditions. Several techniques: reducing thermal load, improving vehicle design, improving occupants thermal comfort design, improving equipment, educating consumers on impacts of driver behaviour on MAC fuel use, and others - can lead to reduced A/C fuel consumption.

  14. Technology Options for a Fast Spectrum Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. M. Wachs; R. W. King; I. Y. Glagolenko; Y. Shatilla

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Idaho National Laboratory in collaboration with Argonne National Laboratory has evaluated technology options for a new fast spectrum reactor to meet the fast-spectrum irradiation requirements for the USDOE Generation IV (Gen IV) and Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) programs. The US currently has no capability for irradiation testing of large volumes of fuels or materials in a fast-spectrum reactor required to support the development of Gen IV fast reactor systems or to demonstrate actinide burning, a key element of the AFCI program. The technologies evaluated and the process used to select options for a fast irradiation test reactor (FITR) for further evaluation to support these programmatic objectives are outlined in this paper.

  15. Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a New Technology for Extraction of Insoluble Impurities from Nuclear Power Plant Steam Generators with Purge Water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bud'ko, I. O. [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation)] [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. G. [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)] [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An experimental technology for the removal of insoluble impurities from a horizontal steam generator with purge water during planned shutdowns of the power generating unit is improved through a more representative determination of the concentration of impurities in the purge water ahead of the water cleanup facility and a more precise effective time for the duration of the purge process. Tests with the improved technique at power generating unit No. 1 of the Rostov Nuclear Power Plant show that the efficiency with which insoluble impurities are removed from the steam generator volume was more than two orders of magnitude greater than under the standard regulations.

  16. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails NewsTechnologyTechnology A

  17. Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del SolStrengthening a solidSynthesis of 2D AlloysTrails NewsTechnologyTechnology

  18. Maximum-Power-Point Tracking only using Current Sensor Information for Photovoltaic Power Generation System Hiroyuki Matsumoto, and Toshihiko Noguchi (Nagaoka University of Technology)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fujimoto, Hiroshi

    SPC-02-88 * Maximum-Power-Point Tracking only using Current Sensor Information for Photovoltaic Power Generation System Hiroyuki Matsumoto, and Toshihiko Noguchi (Nagaoka University of Technology) Abstract This paper describes a novel strategy of maximum-power-point tracking for photovoltaic power

  19. Dye-Sentitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) are an emerging low-cost third generation photovoltaic technology particularly suited for efficient light-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dye-Sentitized Solar Cells (DSSCs) are an emerging low-cost third generation photovoltaic technology particularly suited for efficient light- to-electricity conversion in indoors low light-to -electricity conversion efficiency in early implementations under AM1.5 solar light. Easy

  20. Industrial Waste Landfill IV upgrade package

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The Y-12 Plant, K-25 Site, and ORNL are managed by DOE`s Operating Contractor (OC), Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. (Energy Systems) for DOE. Operation associated with the facilities by the Operating Contractor and subcontractors, DOE contractors and the DOE Federal Building result in the generation of industrial solid wastes as well as construction/demolition wastes. Due to the waste streams mentioned, the Y-12 Industrial Waste Landfill IV (IWLF-IV) was developed for the disposal of solid industrial waste in accordance to Rule 1200-1-7, Regulations Governing Solid Waste Processing and Disposal in Tennessee. This revised operating document is a part of a request for modification to the existing Y-12 IWLF-IV to comply with revised regulation (Rule Chapters 1200-1-7-.01 through 1200-1-7-.08) in order to provide future disposal space for the ORR, Subcontractors, and the DOE Federal Building. This revised operating manual also reflects approved modifications that have been made over the years since the original landfill permit approval. The drawings referred to in this manual are included in Drawings section of the package. IWLF-IV is a Tennessee Department of Environmental and Conservation/Division of Solid Waste Management (TDEC/DSWM) Class 11 disposal unit.

  1. Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX(tm) Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX(tm) Technology Addressing Biomass Supply Chain Challenges With AFEX(tm) Technology Plenary IV: Advances in Bioenergy...

  2. America's Next Generation Spacecraft ORIONA to Z

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    America's Next Generation Spacecraft ORIONA to Z Orion's First Step to Deep Space: Exploration. ORIONA to Z #12;#12;DELTA IV HEAVY The Delta IV Heavy rocket is the largest launch vehicle available. That's the equivalent of four full-grown elephants or about 13 typical pickup trucks! The Delta IV

  3. Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment of Carbon Capture and Storage Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haszeldine, Stuart

    Scope for Future CO2 Emission Reductions from Electricity Generation through the Deployment, it is therefore possible that large (~45%) reductions in CO2 emissions from UK electricity generation couldC/year. If required, however, a reduction in CO2 emissions of 15 MtC/year in the electricity generation sector by 2020

  4. Hotline IV ?High Temperature ESP

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Hotline IV - High Temperature ESP Brindesh Dhruva (principal Inv.) Michael Dowling (presenter) Schlumberger Track Name May 18, 2010 This presentation does not contain any...

  5. EnvWiltonIV-EIS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wilton IV Wind Energy Center Draft EIS Western Area Power Administration (Western) prepared this draft environmental impact statement (DEIS) in response to a request from NextEra...

  6. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: High Performance Cast Aluminum Alloys for Next Generation Passenger Vehicle Engines

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

  7. POLICY IV.4.1 Volume IV: Human Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POLICY IV.4.1 Volume IV: Human Resources Chapter 4: Classification Issuing Office: Human Resource Resource Services Originally Issued: August 19, 1968 Most Recently Revised: March 3, 2006 1 Classification Responsibilities 7 History 7 Official Documentation 7 Statement of Policy Human Resource Services classifies

  8. Technology for Treatment of Liquid Radioactive Waste Generated during Uranium and Plutonium Chemical and Metallurgical Manufacturing in FSUE PO Mayak - 13616

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamovich, D. [SUE MosSIA Radon, 2/14 7th Rostovsky lane, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation)] [SUE MosSIA Radon, 2/14 7th Rostovsky lane, Moscow, 119121 (Russian Federation); Batorshin, G.; Logunov, M.; Musalnikov, A. [FSUE 'PO Mayak', 31 av. Lenin, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456780 (Russian Federation)] [FSUE 'PO Mayak', 31 av. Lenin, Ozyorsk, Chelyabinsk region, 456780 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Created technological scheme for treatment of liquid radioactive waste generated while uranium and plutonium chemical and metallurgical manufacturing consists of: - Liquid radioactive waste (LRW) purification from radionuclides and its transfer into category of manufacturing waste; - Concentration of suspensions containing alpha-nuclides and their further conversion to safe dry state (calcinate) and moving to long controlled storage. The following technologies are implemented in LRW treatment complex: - Settling and filtering technology for treatment of liquid intermediate-level waste (ILW) with volume about 1500m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 6} to 10{sup 8} Bq/dm{sup 3} - Membrane and sorption technology for processing of low-level waste (LLW) of radioactive drain waters with volume about 150 000 m{sup 3}/year and alpha-activity from 10{sup 3} to 10{sup 4} Bq/dm{sup 3}. Settling and filtering technology includes two stages of ILW immobilization accompanied with primary settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following flushing and drying of the pulp generated; secondary deep after settling of radionuclides on transition metal hydroxides with the following solid phase concentration by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration. Besides, the installation capacity on permeate is not less than 3 m{sup 3}/h. Concentrates generated are sent to calcination on microwave drying (MW drying) unit. Membrane and sorption technology includes processing of averaged sewage flux by the method of tangential flow ultrafiltration with total capacity of installations on permeate not less than 18 m{sup 3}/h and sorption extraction of uranium from permeate on anionite. According to radionuclide contamination level purified solution refers to general industrial waste. Concentrates generated during suspension filtering are evaporated in rotary film evaporator (RFE) in order to remove excess water, thereafter they are dried on infrared heating facility. Solid concentrate produced is sent for long controlled storage. Complex of the procedures carried out makes it possible to solve problems on treatment of LRW generated while uranium and plutonium chemical and metallurgical manufacturing in Federal State Unitary Enterprise (FSUE) Mayak and cease its discharge into open water reservoirs. (authors)

  9. Foreign Trip Report MATGEN-IV Sep 24- Oct 26, 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de Caro, M S

    2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Gen-IV activities in France, Japan and US focus on the development of new structural materials for Gen-IV nuclear reactors. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) F/M steels have raised considerable interest in nuclear applications. Promising collaborations can be established seeking fundamental knowledge of relevant Gen-IV ODS steel properties (see attached travel report on MATGEN- IV 'Materials for Generation IV Nuclear Reactors'). Major highlights refer to results on future Ferritic/Martensitic steel cladding candidates (relevant to Gen-IV materials properties for LFR Materials Program) and on thermodynamic and mechanic behavior of metallic FeCr binary alloys, base matrix for future candidate steels (for the LLNL-LDRD project on Critical Issues on Materials for Gen-IV Reactors).

  10. LABORATORY IV CONSERVATION OF ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    Lab IV - 1 LABORATORY IV CONSERVATION OF ENERGY In this lab you will begin to use the principle of conservation of energy to determine the motion resulting from interactions that are difficult to analyze using force concepts alone. You will explore how conservation of energy is applied to real interactions. Keep

  11. Next-generation transcriptome assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    technologies - the next generation. Nat Rev Genet 11, 31-algorithms for next-generation sequencing data. Genomicsassembly from next- generation sequencing data. Genome Res

  12. Science Centric -Science, health and technology, breaking news [PDA version] New tool for next-generation cancer treatments using nanodiamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Espinosa, Horacio D.

    for next-generation cancer treatments using nanodiamonds Science Centric | 19 May 2009 15:50 GMT A research be used both as a research tool in the development of next-generation cancer treatments and as a nanomanufacturing tool to build the implantable drug delivery devices that will apply these treatments

  13. IEEE PHOTONICS TECHNOLOGY LETTERS, VOL. 22, NO. 10, MAY 15, 2010 715 Optical Arbitrary Waveform Generation-Based

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kolner, Brian H.

    -bit 40-Gb/s label in nonreturn-to-zero and return-to- zero onoff keying formats indicate Generation-Based Packet Generation and All-Optical Separation for Optical-Label Switching Tingting He--This letter introduces a versatile modulation-format transparent optical-label switching (OLS) transmitter

  14. CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT - AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Helen Kerr

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (1) European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), (2) Norway (Klimatek) and (3) the U.S.A. (Department of Energy). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre -Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies are making substantial progress towards their goals. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion Decarbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing good progress and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options that may have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Many studies are nearing completion or have been completed. Their preliminary results are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

  15. Impacts of Title IV in Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherwell, J. [Dept. of Natural Resources, Annapolis, MD (United States); Ellis, H. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States); Corio, L.; Seinfelt, J. [Versar, Inc., Columbia, MD (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Maryland Department of Natural Resources` Power Plant Research Program has evaluated the environmental effects of acid deposition on Maryland`s air, land, water (especially the Chesapeake Bay), and human resources since the mid-1980`s. Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90) has focused much attention on the mandated reductions of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) to control acid deposition. Baseline data on acidic deposition and air emissions/pollution control for NO{sub x} and SO{sub 2} acquired through PPRP studies have proved useful in evaluating the impacts of Title IV on Maryland power plants and resources. Three example programs are discussed: The first is an evaluation of SO{sub 2} emissions on ecosystems through the use of critical loads--the amount of acid rain that an ecosystem can tolerate without continuing to acidify. Results support the use of broadly based emissions trading scenarios: The second study is an evaluation of the potential for reducing nitrate loading in the Chesapeake Bay by reducing NO{sub x} emissions. Results indicate substantial NO{sub x} emission reductions could offer significant reductions in nitrate deposition to the Bay: The final study is a review of the impacts of Title IV on the Maryland coal industry and the prospects for coal cleaning and advanced combustion technologies. Current results indicate that Maryland coal will meet Phase 2 SO{sub 2} emission standards using advanced combustion techniques, such as fluidized bed technologies, but that additional emissions controls, such as a scrubber would be required in a conventional boiler.

  16. DOE Hydrogen Program FY 2005 Progress Report IV.F Photoelectrochemical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DOE Hydrogen Program FY 2005 Progress Report 13 IV.F Photoelectrochemical IV.F.1 High-Efficiency Generation of Hydrogen Using Solar Thermochemical Splitting of Water - UNLV: Photoelectrochemical Hydrogen hydrogen using solar energy to photoelectrochemically split water Specific focus on developing multi

  17. JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 24, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2006 4263 PLC-Based Pulse-Train Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purdue University

    JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 24, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 2006 4263 PLC-Based Pulse to the fab- rication of optical devices [1]­[3]. PLC-based fabrication is frequently employed in a wide range the range of applications utilizing PLC- based devices is enormous, the focus of this paper

  18. FINAL STAFF PAPER A New Generation of Combined Heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , distributed generation #12;iv #12;v TABLE OF CONTENTS Page Acknowledgements FINAL STAFF PAPER A New Generation of Combined Heat and Power: Policy Planning. Neff , Bryan. A New Generation of Combined Heat and Power: Policy Planning for 2030. 2012. California

  19. Magnetic Processing A Pervasive Energy Efficient Technology for Next Generation Materials for Aerospace and Specialty Steel Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackiewicz-Ludtka, G.; Ludtka, G.M.; Ray, P. (Carpenter Technologies, Inc.); Magee, J. (Carpenter Technologies, Inc.)

    2010-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermomagnetic Magnetic Processing is an exceptionally fertile, pervasive and cross-cutting technology that is just now being recognized by several major industry leaders for its significant potential to increase energy efficiency and materials performance for a myriad of energy intensive industries in a variety of areas and applications. ORNL has pioneered the use and development of large magnetic fields in thermomagnetically processing (T-MP) materials for altering materials phase equilibria and transformation kinetics. ORNL has discovered that using magnetic fields, we can produce unique materials responses. T-MP can produce unique phase stabilities & microstructures with improved materials performance for structural and functional applications not achieved with traditional processing techniques. These results suggest that there are unprecedented opportunities to produce significantly enhanced materials properties via atomistic level (nano-) microstructural control and manipulation. ORNL (in addition to others) have shown that grain boundary chemistry and precipitation kinetics are also affected by large magnetic fields. This CRADA has taken advantage of ORNLs unique, custom-designed thermo-magnetic, 9 Tesla superconducting magnet facility that enables rapid heating and cooling of metallic components within the magnet bore; as well as ORNLs expertise in high magnetic field (HMF) research. Carpenter Technologies, Corp., is a a US-based industrial company, that provides enhanced performance alloys for the Aerospace and Specialty Steel products. In this CRADA, Carpenter Technologies, Corp., is focusing on applying ORNLs Thermomagnetic Magnetic Processing (TMP) technology to improve their current and future proprietary materials product performance and open up new markets for their Aerospace and Specialty Steel products. Unprecedented mechanical property performance improvements have been demonstrated for a high strength bainitic alloy industrial/commercial alloy that is envisioned to provide the potential for new markets for this alloy. These thermomechanical processing results provide these alloys with a major breakthrough demonstrating that simultaneous improvements in yield strength and ductility are achieved: 12 %, 10%, 13%, and 22% increases in yield strength, elongation, reduction-in-area, and impact energy respectively. In addition, TMP appears to overcome detrimental chemical homogeneity impacts on uniform microstructure evolution.

  20. Task 3.14 - demonstration of technologies for remote power generation in Alaska. Semi-annual report, July 1, 1996--December 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, M.L.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper very briefly summarizes progress in the demonstration of a small (up to 6 MWe), environmentally acceptable electric generating system fueled by indigenous fuels and waste materials to serve power distribution systems typical of Alaskan Native communities. Two detailed appendices supplement the report. The project is focused on two primary technologies: (1) atmospheric fluidized bed combustion (AFBC), and (2) coalbed methane and coal-fired diesel technologies. Two sites have been selected as possible locations for an AFBC demonstration, and bid proposals are under review. The transfer of a coal-fired diesel clean coal demonstration project from Maryland to Fairbanks, Alaska was approved, and the environmental assessment has been initiated. Federal support for a fuel cell using coalbed methane is also being pursued. The appendices included in the report provide: (1) the status of the conceptual design study for a 600-kWe coal-fired cogeneration plant in McGrath, Alaska; and (2) a global market assessment of coalbed methane, fluidized-bed combustion, and coal-fired diesel technologies in remote applications.

  1. *Tri-Generation is a novel technology that was conceived by the National Fuel Cell Research Center in 2001 to simultaneously generate electricity, hydrogen, and heat. It was developed into the first prototype in collaboration with FuelCell Energy, Inc., a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mease, Kenneth D.

    and fuel cell electric vehicles), there are still emissions associated with the upstream processes Electric Vehicles Fuel Cell Electric Vehicles #12;*Tri-Generation is a novel technology that was conceived by the National Fuel Cell Research Center

  2. Next Generation On-Line Dynamic Security Assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Next Generation On-Line Dynamic Security Assessment Parts III and IV Final Project Report Power;Next Generation On-Line Dynamic Security Assessment Parts III and IV Final Project Report Parts III Research Center (PSERC) research project titled "Next Generation On-Line Dynamic Security Assessment

  3. Supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibres: Modelling and dispersion engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Supercontinuum generation in photonic crystal fibres: Modelling and dispersion engineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 2.4 The split-step Fourier method . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 #12;iv CONTENTS 2

  4. Paving the path for next-generation nuclear energy | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    heat that could be used for industrial processes such as seawater desalination or plastics production. Today, China has begun construction of a prototype Generation-IV reactor,...

  5. Endonuclease IV of Escherichia coli is induced by paraquat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, E.; Weiss, B.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The addition of paraquat (methyl viologen) to a growing culture of Escherichia coli K-12 led within 1 hr to a 10- to 20-fold increase in the level of endonuclease IV, a DNase for apurinic/apyrimidinic sites. The induction was blocked by chloramphenicol. Increases of 3-fold or more were also seen with plumbagin, menadione, and phenazine methosulfate. H/sub 2/O/sub 2/ produced no more than a 2-fold increase in endonuclease IV activity. The following agents had no significant effect: streptonigrin, nitrofurantoin, tert-butyl hydroperoxide, ..gamma.. rays, 260-nm UV radiation, methyl methanesulfonate, mitomycin C, and ascorbate. Paraquat, plumbagin, menadione, and phenazine methosulfate are known to generate superoxide radical anions via redox cycling in vivo. A mutant lacking superoxide dismutase was unusually sensitive to induction by paraquat. In addition, endonuclease IV could be induced by merely growing the mutant in pure O/sub 2/. The levels of endonuclease IV in uninduced or paraquat-treated cells were unaffected by mutations of oxyR, a H/sub 2/O/sub 2/-inducible gene that governs an oxidative-stress regulon. The results indicate that endonuclease IV is an inducible DNA-repair enzyme and that its induction can be mediated via the production of superoxide radicals.

  6. Design and Transient Analysis of Passive Safety Cooling Systems for Advanced Nuclear Reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galvez, Cristhian

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advisory Committee and Generation IV International Forum.Nuclear Energy Agency The Generation IV International Forum.Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems.

  7. What controls the C IV line profile in active galactic nuclei?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Baskin; Ari Laor

    2004-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The high ionization lines in active galactic nuclei (AGN), such as C IV, tend to be blueshifted with respect to the lower ionization lines, such as H beta, and often show a strong blue excess asymmetry not seen in the low ionization lines. There is accumulating evidence that the H beta profile is dominated by gravity, and thus provides a useful estimate of the black hole mass in AGN. The shift and asymmetry commonly seen in C IV suggest that non gravitational effects, such as obscuration and radiation pressure, may affect the line profile. We explore the relation between the H beta and C IV profiles using UV spectra available for 81 of the 87 z 4000 km/s. This argues against the view that C IV generally originates closer to the center, compared to H beta. (3) C IV appears to provide a significantly less accurate, and possibly biased estimate of the black hole mass in AGN, compared with H beta. (4) All objects where C IV is strongly blueshifted and asymmetric have a high L/L_Edd, but the reverse is not true. This suggests that a high L/L_Edd is a necessary but not sufficient condition for generating a blueshifted asymmetric C IV emission. (5) We also find indications for dust reddening and scattering in `normal' AGN. In particular, PG quasars with a redder optical-UV continuum slope show weaker C IV emission, stronger C IV absorption, and a higher optical continuum polarization.

  8. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The August 2003 blackout of the northeastern U.S. and CANADA caused great economic losses and inconvenience to New York City and other affected areas. The blackout was a warning to the rest of the world that the ability of conventional power systems to meet growing electricity demand is questionable. Failure of large power systems can lead to serious emergencies. Introduction of on-site generation, renewable energy such as solar and wind power and the effective utilization of exhaust heat is needed, to meet the growing energy demands of the residential and commercial sectors. Additional benefit can be achieved by integrating these distributed technologies into distributed energy resource (DER) systems. This work demonstrates a method for choosing and designing economically optimal DER systems. An additional purpose of this research is to establish a database of energy tariffs, DER technology cost and performance characteristics, and building energy consumption for Japan. This research builds on prior DER studies at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and with their associates in the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS) and operation, including the development of the microgrid concept, and the DER selection optimization program, the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM). DER-CAM is a tool designed to find the optimal combination of installed equipment and an idealized operating schedule to minimize a site's energy bills, given performance and cost data on available DER technologies, utility tariffs, and site electrical and thermal loads over a test period, usually an historic year. Since hourly electric and thermal energy data are rarely available, they are typically developed by building simulation for each of six end use loads used to model the building: electric-only loads, space heating, space cooling, refrigeration, water heating, and natural-gas-only loads. DER-CAM provides a global optimization, albeit idealized, that shows how the necessary useful energy loads can be provided for at minimum cost by selection and operation of on-site generation, heat recovery, cooling, and efficiency improvements. This study examines five prototype commercial buildings and uses DER-CAM to select the economically optimal DER system for each. The five building types are office, hospital, hotel, retail, and sports facility. Each building type was considered for both 5,000 and 10,000 square meter floor sizes. The energy consumption of these building types is based on building energy simulation and published literature. Based on the optimization results, energy conservation and the emissions reduction were also evaluated. Furthermore, a comparison study between Japan and the U.S. has been conducted covering the policy, technology and the utility tariffs effects on DER systems installations. This study begins with an examination of existing DER research. Building energy loads were then generated through simulation (DOE-2) and scaled to match available load data in the literature. Energy tariffs in Japan and the U.S. were then compared: electricity prices did not differ significantly, while commercial gas prices in Japan are much higher than in the U.S. For smaller DER systems, the installation costs in Japan are more than twice those in the U.S., but this difference becomes smaller with larger systems. In Japan, DER systems are eligible for a 1/3 rebate of installation costs, while subsidies in the U.S. vary significantly by region and application. For 10,000 m{sup 2} buildings, significant decreases in fuel consumption, carbon emissions, and energy costs were seen in the economically optimal results. This was most noticeable in the sports facility, followed the hospital and hotel. This research demonstrates that office buildings can benefit from CHP, in contrast to popular opinion. For hospitals and sports facilities, the use of waste heat is particularly effective for water and space heating. For the other building types, waste heat is most effectively use

  9. air purification technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report IV.E Air Management Subsystems Renewable Energy Websites Summary: . Approach Use automotive and aerospace...

  10. air filtration technologies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report IV.E Air Management Subsystems Renewable Energy Websites Summary: . Approach Use automotive and aerospace...

  11. Assessment of energy and economic impacts of particulate-control technologies in coal-fired power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under contract to Argonne National Laboratory, Midwest Research Institute has derived models to assess the economic and energy impacts of particulate-control systems for coal-fired power plants. The models take into account the major functional variables, including plant size and location, coal type, and applicable particulate-emission standards. The algorithms obtained predict equipment and installation costs, as well as operating costs (including energy usage), for five control devices: (1) cold-side electrostatic precipitators, (2) hot-side electrostatic precipitators, (3) reverse-flow baghouses, (4) shake baghouses, and (5) wet scrubbers. A steam-generator performance model has been developed, and the output from this model has been used as input for the control-device performance models that specify required design and operating parameters for the control systems under study. These parameters then have been used as inputs to the cost models. Suitable guideline values have been provided for independent variables wherever necessary, and three case studies are presented to demonstrate application of the subject models. The control-equipment models aggregate the following cost items: (1) first costs (capital investment), (2) total, first-year annualized costs, and (3) integrated cost of ownership and operation over any selected plant lifetime. Although the models have been programmed for rapid computation, the algorithms can be solved with a hand calculator.

  12. Proceedings of the 2. MIT international conference on the next generation of nuclear power technology. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the conference was to try to attract a variety of points of view from well-informed people to debate issues concerning nuclear power. Hopefully from that process a better understanding of what one should be doing will emerge. In organizing the conference lessons learned from the previous one were applied. A continuous effort was made to see to it that the arguments for the alternatives to nuclear power were given abundant time for presentation. This is ultimately because nuclear power is going to have to compete with all of the energy technologies. Thus, in discussing energy strategy all of the alternatives must be considered in a reasonable fashion. The structure the conference used has seven sessions. The first six led up to the final session which was concerned with what the future nuclear power strategy should be. Each session focused upon a question concerning the future. None of these questions has a unique correct answer. Rather, topics are addressed where reasonable people can disagree. In order to state some of the important arguments for each session`s question, the combination of a keynote paper followed by a respondent was used. The respondent`s paper is not necessarily included to be a rebuttal to the keynote; but rather, it was recognized that two people will look at a complex question with different shadings. Through those two papers the intention was to get out the most important arguments affecting the question for the session. The purpose of the papers was to set the stage for about an hour of discussion. The real product of this conference was that discussion.

  13. Granular Dynamics in Pebble Bed Reactor Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laufer, Michael Robert

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Engineeringapproach is based on the Generation IV Roadmap [72] and the

  14. Technology Roadmap Instrumentation, Control, and Human-Machine Interface to Support DOE Advanced Nuclear Energy Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donald D Dudenhoeffer; Burce P Hallbert

    2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Instrumentation, Controls, and Human-Machine Interface (ICHMI) technologies are essential to ensuring delivery and effective operation of optimized advanced Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear energy systems. In 1996, the Watts Bar I nuclear power plant in Tennessee was the last U.S. nuclear power plant to go on line. It was, in fact, built based on pre-1990 technology. Since this last U.S. nuclear power plant was designed, there have been major advances in the field of ICHMI systems. Computer technology employed in other industries has advanced dramatically, and computing systems are now replaced every few years as they become functionally obsolete. Functional obsolescence occurs when newer, more functional technology replaces or supersedes an existing technology, even though an existing technology may well be in working order.Although ICHMI architectures are comprised of much of the same technology, they have not been updated nearly as often in the nuclear power industry. For example, some newer Personal Digital Assistants (PDAs) or handheld computers may, in fact, have more functionality than the 1996 computer control system at the Watts Bar I plant. This illustrates the need to transition and upgrade current nuclear power plant ICHMI technologies.

  15. Plutonium(IV) precipitates formed in alkaline media in the presence of various anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krot, N.N.; Shilov, V.P.; Yusov, A.B.; Tananaev, I.G.; Grigoriev, M.S.; Garnov, A.Yu.; Perminov, V.P.; Astafurova, L.N.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The tendency of Pu(IV) to hydrolyze and form true solutions, colloid solutions, or insoluble precipitates has been known since the Manhattan Project. Since then, specific studies have been performed to examine in detail the equilibria of Pu(IV) hydrolytic reactions in various media. Great attention also has been paid to the preparation, structure, and properties of Pu(IV) polymers or colloids. These compounds found an important application in sol-gel technology for the preparation of nuclear fuel materials. A most important result of these works was the conclusion that Pu(IV) hydroxide, after some aging, consists of very small PuO{sub 2} crystallites and should therefore be considered to be Pu(IV) hydrous oxide. However, studies of the properties and behavior of solid Pu(IV) hydroxide in complex heterogeneous systems are rare. The primary goal of this investigation was to obtain data on the composition and properties of Pu(IV) hydrous oxide or other compounds formed in alkaline media under different conditions. Such information is important to understand Pu(IV) behavior and the forms of its existence in the Hanford Site alkaline tank waste sludge. This knowledge then may be applied in assessing plutonium criticality hazards in the storage, retrieval, and treatment of Hanford Site tank wastes as well as in understanding its contribution to the transuranic waste inventory (threshold at 100 nCi/g or about 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} M) of the separate solution and solid phases.

  16. Relativistic Modeling of Quark Stars with Tolman IV Type Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malaver, Manuel

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we studied the behavior of relativistic objects with anisotropic matter distribution considering Tolman IV form for the gravitational potential Z. The equation of state presents a quadratic relation between the energy density and the radial pressure. New exact solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell system are generated. A physical analysis of electromagnetic field indicates that is regular in the origin and well behaved. We show as the presence of an electrical field modifies the energy density, the radial pressure and the mass of the stellar object and generates a singular charge density.

  17. Relativistic Modeling of Quark Stars with Tolman IV Type Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manuel Malaver

    2015-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we studied the behavior of relativistic objects with anisotropic matter distribution considering Tolman IV form for the gravitational potential Z. The equation of state presents a quadratic relation between the energy density and the radial pressure. New exact solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell system are generated. A physical analysis of electromagnetic field indicates that is regular in the origin and well behaved. We show as the presence of an electrical field modifies the energy density, the radial pressure and the mass of the stellar object and generates a singular charge density.

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: Graduate Automotive Technology Education...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Centers of Excellence to provide future generations of engineers and scientists with knowledge and skills in advanced automotive technologies. By funding curriculum...

  19. National Wind Technology Center (Fact Sheet), National Wind Technology...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NATIONAL WIND TECHNOLOGY CENTER www.nrel.govwind Wind energy is one of the fastest growing electricity generation sources in the world. NREL's National Wind Technology Center...

  20. Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    concepts for meeting future energy challenges. The ten member countries include: Argentina, Brazil, Canada, France, Japan, South Africa, South Korea, Switzerland, the United...

  1. Generation IV International Forum Framework Agreement Extended to 2025 |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneral Guidance on NEPA General GuidanceDepartment of

  2. Generation IV International Forum Signs Agreement to Collaborate on Sodium

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneral Guidance on NEPA General GuidanceDepartment

  3. The fifth generation computer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moto-Oka, T.; Kitsuregawa, M.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The leader of Japan's Fifth Generation computer project, known as the 'Apollo' project, and a young computer scientist elucidate in this book the process of how the idea came about, international reactions, the basic technology, prospects for realization, and the abilities of the Fifth Generation computer. Topics considered included forecasting, research programs, planning, and technology impacts.

  4. Finishing Using Next Generation Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Tonder, Andries [Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute

    2010-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Andries van Tonder of Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute discusses a pipeline for finishing genomes to the gold standard on June 3, 2010 at the "Sequencing, Finishing, Analysis in the Future" meeting in Santa Fe, NM

  5. Energy Efficient IT IT for Energy Efficiency Clean Energy Generation Emissions Accounting Policy Considerations At Microsoft, we see information technology (IT) as a key tool to help address the daunting en-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasayya, Vivek

    Energy Efficient IT IT for Energy Efficiency Clean Energy Generation Emissions Accounting Policy in energy conservation and integration of more renewable and zero-carbon energy sources into our economy. Microsoft envisions a clean energy ecosystem where information technology: Empowers people

  6. Shiloh IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey JumpAirPower Partners WindSherbino 2ShikunIII JumpIV

  7. Miravalles IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee|MililaniMindanaoMinuanoIV Jump to: navigation, search

  8. Safety evaluation of RTG launches aboard Titan IV launch vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosko, Robert J.; Loughin, Stephen [Lockheed Martin Missiles and Space P.O. Box 8555 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19101 (United States)

    1997-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The analytical tool used to evaluate accidents aboard a Titan IV launch vehicle involving a Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (RTG) is discussed. The Launch Accident Scenario Evaluation Program-Titan IV version (LASEP-T) uses a Monte Carlo approach to determine the response of an RTG to various threatening environments. The threatening environments arise from a complex interplay of probabilistic and deterministic processes, and are therefore parameterized by a set of random variables with probability distributions. The assessment of the RTG response to a given environment is based on both empirical data and theoretical modeling. Imbedding detailed, complex response models into the LASEP-T calculation was not practical. Simpler response models have been constructed to capture both the inherent variability due to the phenomenology of the accident scenario along with the uncertainty of predicting response behavior. The treatment of variability and uncertainty as it pertains to the launch accident evaluation of RTG response will be discussed.

  9. Conventional Hydropower Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy conducts research on conventional hydropower technologies to increase generation and improve existing means of generating hydroelectricity.

  10. Virtually simulating the next generation of clean energy technologies: NETL's AVESTAR Center is dedicated to the safe, reliable and efficient operation of advanced energy plants with carbon capture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zitney, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Imagine using a real-time virtual simulator to learn to fly a space shuttle or rebuild your car's transmission without touching a piece of equipment or getting your hands dirty. Now, apply this concept to learning how to operate and control a state-of-the-art, electricity-producing power plant capable of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture. That's what the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR) Center (www.netl.doe.gov/avestar) is designed to do. Established as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative to advance new clean energy technology for power generation, the AVESTAR Center focuses primarily on providing simulation-based training for process engineers and energy plant operators, starting with the deployment of a first-of-a-kind operator training simulator for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Based on Invensys Operations Management's SimSci-Esscor DYNSIM software, the high-fidelity dynamic simulator provides realistic training on IGCC plant operations, including normal and faulted operations, as well as plant start-up, shutdown and power demand load changes. The highly flexible simulator also allows for testing of different types of fuel sources, such as petcoke and biomass, as well as co-firing fuel mixtures. The IGCC dynamic simulator is available at AVESTAR's two locations, NETL (Figure 1) and West Virginia University's National Research Center for Coal and Energy (www.nrcce.wvu.edu), both in Morgantown, W.Va. By offering a comprehensive IGCC training program, AVESTAR aims to develop a workforce well prepared to operate, control and manage commercial-scale gasification-based power plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The facility and simulator at West Virginia University promotes NETL's outreach mission by offering hands-on simulator training and education to researchers and university students.

  11. Chapter IV LNA Design and Optimization Chapter IVChapter IVChapter IVChapter IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    Amplifier Design and Optimization IV.1 CMOS LNA Design and Optimization Overview Low Noise Amplifier (LNAChapter IV LNA Design and Optimization 84 Chapter IVChapter IVChapter IVChapter IV Low Noise proper circuit depends on the specific application for which the LNA is designed and the designer

  12. IV. Environmental Impact, Setting, and Mitigation Measures LBNL LRDP EIR IV.G-1 ESA / 201074

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jason R.

    IV. Environmental Impact, Setting, and Mitigation Measures LBNL LRDP EIR IV.G-1 ESA / 201074 Public discusses existing surface water and groundwater conditions at LBNL and analyzes the potential Setting IV.G.2.1 Hydrologic Setting Surface Water LBNL is situated within Blackberry and Strawberry

  13. Power Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop Control Technology Power Generating Stationary Engines Nox Control: A Closed Loop Control Technology Poster presented at...

  14. Nanomaterials: Organic and Inorganic for Next-Generation Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Nanomaterials: Organic and Inorganic for Next-Generation Diesel Technologies Nanomaterials: Organic and Inorganic for Next-Generation Diesel Technologies 2007 Diesel...

  15. Geothermal Program Review IV: proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The research and development program of DOE's Geothermal Technology Division is reviewed in separate presentations according to program area. Separate abstracts have been prepared for the individual papers. (ACR)

  16. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: High Performance Cast Aluminum Alloys for Next Generation Passenger Vehicle Engines 2012 FOA 648 Topic 3a

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about high...

  17. Use of Slip Ring Induction Generator for Wind Power Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K Y Patil; D S Chavan

    Wind energy is now firmly established as a mature technology for electricity generation. There are different types of generators that can be used for wind energy generation, among which Slip ring Induction generator proves to be more advantageous. To analyse application of Slip ring Induction generator for wind power generation, an experimental model is developed and results are studied. As power generation from natural sources is the need today and variable speed wind energy is ample in amount in India, it is necessary to study more beneficial options for wind energy generating techniques. From this need a model is developed by using Slip ring Induction generator which is a type of Asynchronous generator.

  18. Stage IV work hardening in cubic metals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rollett, A.D.; Kocks, U.F.; Doherty, R.D.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work hardening of fcc metals at large strains is discussed with reference to the linear stress-strain behavior often observed at large strains and known as Stage IV. The experimental evidence shows that Stage IV is a work hardening phenomenon that is found quite generally, even in pure fcc metals subjected to homogeneous deformation. A simple model for Stage IV in pure metals is presented, based on the accumulation of dislocation debris. Experiments are described for large strain torsion tests on four aluminum alloys. The level and extent of Stage IV scaled with the saturation stress that would represent the end of Stage III in the absence of a Stage IV. Reversing the torsion after large prestrains produced transient reductions in the work hardening. The strain rate sensitivity was also measured before and during the transient and found not to vary significantly. The microstructure observed at large strains in an Mg alloy suggest that Stage IV can occur in the absence of microband formation. Previous proposals for the cause of Stage IV are reviewed and found to be not supported by recent experimental data.

  19. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and Environmental Effects Research Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Marine Renewable Energy Test Centers and...

  20. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte Solutions for Vanadium Redox Flow Battery . Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Studies on Vanadium(IV) Electrolyte Solutions for...

  1. The potential for distributed generation in Japanese prototype buildings: A DER-CAM analysis of policy, tariff design, building energy use, and technology development (English Version)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Nan; Marnay, Chris; Firestone, Ryan; Gao, Weijun; Nishida, Masaru

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Industry, Japan MT microturbine NEGA Japan Engine GeneratorGE), gas turbine (GT), microturbine (MT), fuel cell (FC),Fuel Cell Gas Turbine Microturbine Natual Gas Reciprocating

  2. Renewable Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in renewable electricity generation technologies including solar, water, wind, and geothermal.

  3. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Ionic Liquids as Anti-Wear Additives for Next-Generation Low-Viscosity Fuel-Efficient Engine Lubricants

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about ionic liquids...

  4. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct Conversion of Vehicle Waste Heat into Useful Electrical Power

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by General Motors at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about cost-competitive advanced...

  5. Compact neutron generator development at LBNL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generator Development at LBNL J. Reijonen, G. English, R.Technology Group in LBNL. The compact axial extraction

  6. EIS-0402: Remediation of Area IV of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE is preparing an EIS for cleanup of Area IV, including the Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), as well as the Northern Buffer Zone of the Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL) in eastern Ventura County, California, approximately 29 miles north of downtown Los Angeles. (DOEs operations bordered the Northern Buffer Zone. DOE is responsible for soil cleanup in Area IV and the Northern Buffer Zone.) In the EIS, DOE will evaluate reasonable alternatives for disposition of radiological facilities and support buildings, remediation of contaminated soil and groundwater, and disposal of all resulting waste at permitted facilities.

  7. U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Electricity Technology Evaluation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Technologies Program to assess power generation costs and the potential for technology improvements to impact those generation costs. This webinar is an overview of...

  8. Generating Resources Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Generating Resources Advisory Committee February 27, 2014 Steven Simmons and Gillian Charles Upcoming Symposium 9:15 am Natural Gas Peaking Technologies Technology Trends Proposed reference plant Costing, Economies of Scale, Normalizations Reference Plants 12:30 pm Discussion of Next GRAC Meetings

  9. Under the Saturn IV Rocket

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    I went to Space Camp! In January I went to the Davidson Space and Rocket Center (the home of Space Camp) in Huntsville Alabama for a workshop sponsored by the Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office (AMNPO). Over 350 people from private companies, universities, and state and federal government agencies came to learn more about and discuss the hot-off- the-press "Preliminary Design of the National Network for Manufacturing Innovation," a report issued by the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC).

  10. CO2 CAPTURE PROJECT-AN INTEGRATED, COLLABORATIVE TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT PROJECT FOR NEXT GENERATION CO2 SEPARATION, CAPTURE AND GEOLOGIC SEQUESTRATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helen Kerr

    2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) is a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, Eni, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union (DG Res & DG Tren), Norway (Klimatek) and the U.S.A. (Department of Energy)). The project objective is to develop new technologies, which could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies are to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. The project budget is approximately $24 million over 3 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: (1) Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. (2) Capture Technology, Post Combustion--technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. (3) Capture Technology, Oxyfuel--where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with wet high concentrations of CO{sub 2} for storage. (4) Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion--in which, natural gas and petroleum coke are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. (5) Common Economic Model/Technology Screening--analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. (6) New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. (7) Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV)--providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. (8) Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Technology development work dominated the past six months of the project. Numerous studies have completed their 2003 stagegate review and are reported here. Some will proceed to the next stagegate review in 2004. Some technologies are emerging as preferred over others. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies are showing excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. The workscopes planned for the next key stagegates are under review before work begins based on the current economic assessment of their performance. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. As expected, post-combustion technologies are emerging as higher cost options but even so some significant potential reductions in cost have been identified and will continue to be explored. Storage, measurement, and verification studies are moving rapidly forward and suggest that geologic sequestration can be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Hyper-spectral geo-botanical measurements may be an inexpensive and non-intrusive method for long-term monitoring. Modeling studies suggest that primary leakage routes from CO{sub 2} storage sites may be along old wellbores in areas disturbed by earlier oil and gas operations. This is good news because old wells are usually mapped and can be repaired during the site preparation process. Wells are also easy to monitor and intervention is possible if needed. The project will continue to evaluate and bring in novel studies and ideas within the project scope as requested by the DOE. The results to date are summarized in the attached report and presented in detail in the attached appendices.

  11. CO2 Capture Project-An Integrated, Collaborative Technology Development Project for Next Generation CO2 Separation, Capture and Geologic Sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helen Kerr; Linda M. Curran

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The CO{sub 2} Capture Project (CCP) was a joint industry project, funded by eight energy companies (BP, ChevronTexaco, EnCana, ENI, Norsk Hydro, Shell, Statoil, and Suncor) and three government agencies (European Union [DG RES & DG TREN], the Norwegian Research Council [Klimatek Program] and the U.S. Department of Energy [NETL]). The project objective was to develop new technologies that could reduce the cost of CO{sub 2} capture and geologic storage by 50% for retrofit to existing plants and 75% for new-build plants. Technologies were to be developed to ''proof of concept'' stage by the end of 2003. Certain promising technology areas were increased in scope and the studies extended through 2004. The project budget was approximately $26.4 million over 4 years and the work program is divided into eight major activity areas: Baseline Design and Cost Estimation--defined the uncontrolled emissions from each facility and estimate the cost of abatement in $/tonne CO{sub 2}. Capture Technology, Post Combustion: technologies, which can remove CO{sub 2} from exhaust gases after combustion. Capture Technology, Oxyfuel: where oxygen is separated from the air and then burned with hydrocarbons to produce an exhaust with high CO{sub 2} for storage. Capture Technology, Pre-Combustion: in which, natural gas and petroleum cokes are converted to hydrogen and CO{sub 2} in a reformer/gasifier. Common Economic Model/Technology Screening: analysis and evaluation of each technology applied to the scenarios to provide meaningful and consistent comparison. New Technology Cost Estimation: on a consistent basis with the baseline above, to demonstrate cost reductions. Geologic Storage, Monitoring and Verification (SMV): providing assurance that CO{sub 2} can be safely stored in geologic formations over the long term. Non-Technical: project management, communication of results and a review of current policies and incentives governing CO{sub 2} capture and storage. Pre-combustion De-carbonization (hydrogen fuel) technologies showed excellent results and may be able to meet the CCP's aggressive cost reduction targets for new-build plants. Chemical looping to produce oxygen for oxyfuel combustion shows real promise. Post-combustion technologies emerged as higher cost options that may only have niche roles. Storage, measurement, and verification studies suggest that geologic sequestration will be a safe form of long-term CO{sub 2} storage. Economic modeling shows that options to reduce costs by 50% exist. A rigorous methodology for technology evaluation was developed. Public acceptance and awareness were enhanced through extensive communication of results to the stakeholder community (scientific, NGO, policy, and general public). Two volumes of results have been published and are available to all. Well over 150 technical papers were produced. All funded studies for this phase of the CCP are complete. The results are summarized in this report and all final reports are presented in the attached appendices.

  12. The preparation for and survival of an EPA Title IV and Title V facility audit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Facca, G.L.; Faler, M.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendments, major facilities are required to obtain federally enforceable operating permits (Title V). In a separate permitting action, the electric utilities with units generating more then 25 megawatts are required to obtain permits for NO{sub x} and SO{sub x}, the emissions which contribute to acid rain (Title IV). The Title IV permit is included as part of the Title V permit. This paper will use an actual audit experience at a coal fired generation facility as a case study for the preparation for and outcome of an EPA Title IV Level 3 audit. The paper will document the procedures for preparation, the audit process, and the outcome. The audit is part of the EPA's process for review of the record keeping and instrument calibration methods outlined in Title IV. Both types of permits have many different record keeping and monitoring requirements as well as separate reporting requirements which are submitted to both federal; state and local regulatory agencies for review and evaluation. Title IV units include very specific instrument calibration/audit requirements, and Title V has compliance testing and monitoring requirements. Alliant Power was notified in August 1998 of the intent of EPA Region VII to conduct a Level 3 audit at the Lansing Generation Station. The US EPA and the State of Iowa intended to review all Title IV record keeping (Level 1), continuous emission monitoring calibrations and linearity testing (Level 2) and observe the annual Relative Accuracy Testing Audit performed by an outside contractor. In addition, during this facility site visit, the compliance with Title V permit requirements was also audited.

  13. Administration of IV Tylenol (Glass Bottle) IV Acetaminophen ( Tylenol) is clinically appropriate when an antipyretic is indicated or in cases where

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Administration of IV Tylenol (Glass Bottle) IV Acetaminophen ( Tylenol) is clinically appropriate and rectal suppositories for most patients. Since the manufacturer provided bottle of IV Tylenol (OFIRMEV

  14. ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY Engineering Technology Program The Bachelor of Science in Engineering Technology (BSET) is a hands-on program based upon engineering technology fundamentals, engineering for employment or further education. The focus is on current engineering technology issues and applications used

  15. Current Status of Concentrator Photovoltaic (CPV) Technology

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (CPV) technology has recently entered the market as a utility- scale option for the generation of solar electricity. This report explores the current status of CPV technology...

  16. 3866 JOURNAL OF LIGHTWAVE TECHNOLOGY, VOL. 26, NO. 24, DECEMBER 15, 2008 Room-Temperature Stable Generation of 19 Watts of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Byer, Robert L.

    sources possessing excellent beam quality with overall optical efficiencies well over 10%. However, high-damage Generation of 19 Watts of Single-Frequency 532-nm Radiation in a Periodically Poled Lithium Tantalate Crystal, IEEE, Fellow, OSA Abstract--We report on a system that produces 19 W of diffrac- tion-limited radiation

  17. STOCHASTIC FLOW SEQUENCE GENERATION AND ASPINALL UNIT OPERATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to incorporate paleo #12;iv reconstructed data. The selected methods are then employed to generate syntheticSTOCHASTIC FLOW SEQUENCE GENERATION AND ASPINALL UNIT OPERATIONS By KENNETH C NOWAK B Flow Sequence Generation and Aspinall Unit Operations written by Kenneth C Nowak has been approved

  18. Incommensurate Structure of Phosphorus Phase IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujihisa, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yoshito; Yamawaki, Hiroshi; Sakashita, Mami; Takeya, Satoshi; Honda, Kazumasa [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST Tsukuba Central 5, 1-1-1 Higashi, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8565 (Japan); Akahama, Yuichi; Kawamura, Haruki [Graduate School of Material Science, University of Hyogo, 3-2-1 Kouto, Kamigori, Ako-gun, Hyogo 678-1297 (Japan); Ohishi, Yasuo [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute (JASRI), 1-1-1 Kouto, Mikazuki, Sayo-gun, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    There are six known phases for phosphorus at room temperature under high pressure. Only the structure of phase IV, which exists from 107 GPa to 137 GPa, remains unsolved. We performed a powder x-ray diffraction experiment and a Rietveld analysis and successfully determined its structure to be an incommensurately modulated structure by only 1 site of atomic position. High-pressure phases of halogens and chalcogens have previously been shown to have a similar modulated structure; however, phosphorus phase IV is different from them and was shown to be the third case.

  19. AISI/DOE Technology Roadmap Program: Characterization of Fatigue and Crash Performance of New Generation High Strength Steels for Automotive Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brenda Yan; Dennis Urban

    2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A 2-year project (2001-2002) to generate fatigue and high strain data for a new generation of high strength steels (HSS) has been completed in December 2002. The project tested eleven steel grades, including Dual Phase (DP) steels, Transformation-Induced Plasticity (TRIP) steels, Bake Hardenable (BH) steels, and conventional High Strength Low Alloy (HSLA) steels. All of these steels are of great interest in automotive industry due to the potential benefit in weight reduction, improved fuel economy, enhanced crash energy management and total system cost savings. Fatigue behavior includes strain controlled fatigue data notch sensitivity for high strength steels. High strain rate behavior includes stress-strain data for strain rates from 0.001/s to 1000/s, which are considered the important strain rate ranges for crash event. The steels were tested in two phases, seven were tested in Phase 1 and the remaining steels were tested in Phase. In a addition to the fatigue data and high st rain rate data generated for the steels studied in the project, analyses of the testing results revealed that Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) exhibit significantly higher fatigue strength and crash energy absorption capability than conventional HSS. TRIP steels exhibit exceptionally better fatigue strength than steels of similar tensile strength but different microstructure, for conditions both with or without notches present

  20. Microscale Technologies for Tissue Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khademhosseini, Ali

    Microscale technologies are emerging as enabling tools for tissue engineering and biology. Here, we present our experience in developing microscale technologies to regulate cell-microenvironment interactions and generate ...

  1. Neurons and Neural Transmission Part I / IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of neurons Classification of neurons Neuron Doctrine "Father of modern neuroscience" #12;Ramon y CajalNeurons and Neural Transmission Part I / IV Anton Kapliy February 24, 2009 #12;Nervous system of optical nerve #12;Ramon y Cajal's neurons Information in neurons flows in one direction: "from dendrites

  2. Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactors (MSRs) Fast-Gas Cooled Fast Reactors (GFRs) Fast-Sodium Cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) Fast-Lead Cooled Fast Reactors (LFRs) Source: Generation IV

  3. Industrial innovations for tomorrow: Advances in industrial energy-efficiency technologies. Commercial power plant tests blend of refuse-derived fuel and coal to generate electricity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MSW can be converted to energy in two ways. One involves the direct burning of MSW to produce steam and electricity. The second converts MSW into refuse-derived fuel (RDF) by reducing the size of the MSW and separating metals, glass, and other inorganic materials. RDF can be densified or mixed with binders to form fuel pellets. As part of a program sponsored by DOE`s Office of Industrial Technologies, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory participated in a cooperative research and development agreement to examine combustion of binder-enhanced, densified refuse-derived fuel (b-d RDF) pellets with coal. Pelletized b-d RDF has been burned in coal combustors, but only in quantities of less than 3% in large utility systems. The DOE project involved the use of b-d RDF in quantities up to 20%. A major goal was to quantify the pollutants released during combustion and measure combustion performance.

  4. Clean Coal Technology (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A public utility may not use clean coal technology at a new or existing electric generating facility without first applying for and obtaining from the Utility Regulatory Commission a certificate...

  5. APD IV, 22-25 April 2013, NIST Bill David,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magee, Joseph W.

    APD IV, 22-25 April 2013, NIST Bill David, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK, 22-25 April 2013, NIST , but... RAL: Diamond & ISIS ISIS TSII Oxford Chemistry Oxford #12;APD IV, 22-ray diffractometer CMS @ CERN CMS @ CERN (II) WISH detectors PILATUS ISIS electronics PILATUS electronics #12;APD IV

  6. Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2007. DOE Operations at The Boeing Company, Santa Susana Field Laboratory, Area IV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Annual Site Environmental Report (ASER) for 2007 describes the environmental conditions related to work performed for the Department of Energy (DOE) at Area IV of Boeings Santa Susana Field Laboratory (SSFL). The Energy Technology Engineering Center (ETEC), a government-owned, company-operated test facility, was located in Area IV. The operations in Area IV included development, fabrication, and disassembly of nuclear reactors, reactor fuel, and other radioactive materials. Other activities in the area involved the operation of large-scale liquid metal facilities that were used for testing non-nuclear liquid metal fast breeder components. All nuclear work was terminated in 1988; all subsequent radiological work has been directed toward decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the former nuclear facilities and their associated sites. In May 2007, the D&D operations in Area IV were suspended until DOE completes the SSFL Area IV Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). The environmental monitoring programs were continued throughout the year. Results of the radiological monitoring program for the calendar year 2007 continue to indicate that there are no significant releases of radioactive material from Area IV of SSFL. All potential exposure pathways are sampled and/or monitored, including air, soil, surface water, groundwater, direct radiation, transfer of property (land, structures, waste), and recycling. All radioactive wastes are processed for disposal at DOE disposal sites and/or other licensed sites approved by DOE for radioactive waste disposal. No liquid radioactive wastes were released into the environment in 2007.

  7. The Fourth Generation of Nuclear Power

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lake, James Alan

    2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The outlook for nuclear power in the U.S. is currently very bright. The economics, operations and safety performance of U.S. nuclear power plants is excellent. In addition, both the safety and economic regulation of nuclear power are being changed to produce better economic parameters for future nuclear plant operations and the licenses for plant operations are being extended to 60 years. There is further a growing awareness of the value of clean, emissions-free nuclear power. These parameters combine to form a firm foundation for continued successful U.S. nuclear plant operations, and even the potential In order to realize a bright future for nuclear power, we must respond successfully to five challenges: Nuclear power must remain economically competitive, The public must remain confident in the safety of the plants and the fuel cycle. Nuclear wastes and spent fuel must be managed and the ultimate disposition pathways for nuclear wastes must be politically settled. The proliferation potential of the commercial nuclear fuel cycle must continue to be minimized, and We must assure a sustained manpower supply for the future and preserve the critical nuclear technology infrastructure. The Generation IV program is conceived to focus the efforts of the international nuclear community on responding to these challenges.

  8. INTERNATIONAL ENERGY AGENCY AGENCE INTERNATIONALE DE L'ENERGIE International Energy Conference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TechnologiesHydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles Zero Net Emission Buildings Nuclear Power Generation IV Zero

  9. Selection of materials for sodium fast reactor steam generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubiez-Le Goff, S.; Garnier, S.; Gelineau, O. [AREVA (France); Dalle, F. [Commissariat a l'energie atomique et aux energies alternatives - CEA (France); Blat-Yrieix, M.; Augem, J. M. [Electricite de France - EDF (France)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR) is considered in France as the most mature technology of the different Generation IV systems. In the short-term the designing work is focused on the identification of the potential tracks to demonstrate licensing capability, availability, in-service inspection capability and economical performance. In that frame materials selection for the major components, as the steam generator, is a particularly key point managed within a French Research and Development program launched by AREVA, CEA and EDF. The choice of the material for the steam generator is indeed complex because various aspects shall be considered like mechanical and thermal properties at high temperature, interaction with sodium on one side and water and steam on the other side, resistance to wastage, procurement, fabrication, weldability and ability for inspection and in-situ intervention. The following relevant options are evaluated: the modified 9Cr1Mo ferritic-martensitic grade and the Alloy 800 austenitic grade. The objective of this paper is to assess for both candidates their abilities to reach the current SFR needs regarding material design data, from AFCEN RCC-MRx Code in particular, compatibility with environments and manufacturability. (authors)

  10. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas August 2004 Volume IV Number 6 Texas Rice Bacterial and Fungal Endophytes in Rice Endophytes are plant-associ- ated organisms that often form... plant/endophyte associations, may infer resistance to insects such as aphids and armyworms. The following is a laymans review of research conducted by scientists worldwide on endophytic continued on page 4 associations that pertain to rice pro- duction...

  11. Power losses in PV arrays due to variations in the I-V characteristics of PV modules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinemann, Detlev

    Power losses in PV arrays due to variations in the I-V characteristics of PV modules Wolfgang Damm-V characteristics of the 36 individual modules of a PV generator at the University of Oldenburg were measured the basis for the calculations of the mismatch losses due to series and parallel connection of PV modules

  12. Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets Using PBI Membrane Technology Demonstration of Next Generation PEM CHP Systems for Global Markets Using PBI...

  13. Next Generation Library Systems Convenient, Connected, User-Centric, Ubiquitous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    & Engineering Library; Digital Library Technologies Group 5 Barb Sagraves, Head Next Generation Library Systems Convenient, Connected, User-Centric, Ubiquitous Next Generation Library Taskforce

  14. Engaging the Next Generation of Automotive Engineers through...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engaging the Next Generation of Automotive Engineers through Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition Engaging the Next Generation of Automotive Engineers through Advanced Vehicle...

  15. Generating Resources Advisory Committee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Generating Resources Advisory Committee May 28, 2014 Steve Simmons Gillian Charles #12;2 9:30 AM plants 10:45 AM Break 11:00 AM Peaking Technologies Continued... 11:30 AM Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine and Utility Scale Solar PV Reference plant updates Levelized cost of energy 12:00 PM Lunch

  16. Technology disrupted

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Papatheodorou, Y. [CH2M Hill (United States)

    2007-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three years ago, the author presented a report on power generation technologies which in summary said 'no technology available today has the potential of becoming transformational or disruptive in the next five to ten years'. In 2006 the company completed another strategic view research report covering the electric power, oil, gas and unconventional energy industries and manufacturing industry. This article summarises the strategic view findings and then revisits some of the scenarios presented in 2003. The cost per megawatt-hour of the alternatives is given for plants ordered in 2005 and then in 2025. The issue of greenhouse gas regulation is dealt with through carbon sequestration and carbon allowances or an equivalent carbon tax. Results reveal substantial variability through nuclear power, hydro, wind, geothermal and biomass remain competitive through every scenario. Greenhouse gas scenario analysis shows coal still be viable, albeit less competitive against nuclear and renewable technologies. A carbon tax or allowance at $24 per metric ton has the same effect on IGCC cost as a sequestration mandate. However, the latter would hurt gas plants much more than a tax or allowance. Sequestering CO{sub 2} from a gas plant is almost as costly per megawatt-hour as for coal. 5 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Integration of Demand Side Management, Distributed Generation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    integration of energy efficiency, distributed generation, renewable energy resources and energy storage technologies, both locally and globally, to maximize the value of the...

  18. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Geothermal Power Generation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Power Generation - A Primer on Low-Temperature, Small-Scale Applications Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us HomeBasic Search About...

  19. Faience Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Paul

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Joanne Hodges. Faience Technology, Nicholson, UEE 2009Egyptian materials and technology, ed. Paul T. Nicholson,Nicholson, 2009, Faience Technology. UEE. Full Citation:

  20. Gen IV Materials Handbook Functionalities and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ren, Weiju [ORNL

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is prepared for navigation and operation of the Gen IV Materials Handbook, with architecture description and new user access initiation instructions. Development rationale and history of the Handbook is summarized. The major development aspects, architecture, and design principles of the Handbook are briefly introduced to provide an overview of its past evolution and future prospects. Detailed instructions are given with examples for navigating the constructed Handbook components and using the main functionalities. Procedures are provided in a step-by-step fashion for Data Upload Managers to upload reports and data files, as well as for new users to initiate Handbook access.

  1. Texas Rice, Volume IV, Number 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    have from 1-8 markers multiplexed. Last year they produced 1.3 million data points using 3 machines, about 25,000 data points a week or about 8,333 data points per machine per week. RiceTec continued... continued on next page seed from parent lines...Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas September 2004 Volume IV Number 7 Texas Rice Hybrid Rice: Another Tool in Varietal Improvement The breeding method in which crosses are made between...

  2. Pomeroy IV Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation,Pillar Group BV Jump to: navigation, searchPocatelloIII Wind Farm Jump to:IV Wind

  3. Cours-IV/Clavin2015.key

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration would likeConstitution AndControllingCoolCorrectiveCosts ofCountingIV

  4. Meadow Lake IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend <StevensMcClellan,II Jump to: navigation,MeadIII Jump to:IV

  5. Mountain View IV | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose BendMiasole IncMinutemanVistaZephyr)Mountain Air JumpIV Jump to:

  6. SECTION IV: ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection245C Unlimited Release PrintedDEVIATIONS F OSuperallowedProjectileIV:

  7. Part IV Council on Environmental Quality

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    at http:www.gao.govproductsGAO-13- 242; see also the International Center for Technology Assessment, Natural Resources Defense Council, and Sierra Club Petition...

  8. Innovation and Threshold Effects in Technology Responses to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    of Non-Carbon Technologies Relative to Fossil Fuels 36 VIII. Conclusions and Next Steps 40 is emerging, though their costs are generally high relative to those of fossil fuels. However, costs are also of Abatement 10 IV. A More General Model 12 a) Energy Demand Equation 13 b) Investment in New Technology 15 c

  9. ARIES-IV Nested Shell Blanket Design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wong, C.P.C.; Redler, K.; Reis, E.E.; Will, R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Cheng, E. [TSI Research, Inc. (United States); Hasan, C.M.; Sharafat, S. [California Univ., Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ARIES-IV Nested Shell Blanket (NSB) Design is an alternate blanket concept of the ARIES-IV low activation helium-cooled reactor design. The reference design has the coolant routed in the poloidal direction and the inlet and outlet plena are located at the top and bottom of the torus. The NSB design has the high velocity coolant routed in the toroidal direction and the plena are located behind the blanket. This is of significance since the selected structural material is SiC-composite. The NSB is designed to have key high performance components with characteristic dimensions of no larger than 2 m. These components can be brazed to form the blanket module. For the diverter design, we eliminated the use of W as the divertor coating material by relying on the successful development of the gaseous divertor concept. The neutronics and thermal-hydraulic performance of both blanket concepts are similar. The selected blanket and divertor configurations can also meet all the projected structural, neutronics and thermal-hydraulics design limits and requirements. With the selected blanket and divertor materials, the design has a level of safety assurance rate of I (LSA-1), which indicates an inherently safe design.

  10. Environmental effects of marine energy development around the world. Annex IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea; Hanna, Luke; Whiting, Johnathan; Geerlofs, Simon; Grear, Molly; Blake, Kara (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)); Coffey, Anna; Massaua, Meghan; Brown-Saracino, Jocelyn; Battey, Hoyt (US Dept. of Energy, Washington, DC (United States))

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Annex IV is an international collaborative project to examine the environmental effects of marine energy devices among countries through the International Energy Agencys Ocean Energy Systems Initiative (OES). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) serves as the Operating Agent for the Annex, in partnership with the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM; formerly the Minerals Management Service), the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). Numerous ocean energy technologies and devices are being developed around the world, and the few data that exist about the environmental effects of these technologies are dispersed among countries and developers. The purpose of Annex IV is to facilitate efficient government oversight of the development of ocean energy systems by compiling and disseminating information about the potential environmental effects of marine energy technologies and to identify methods of monitoring for these effects. Beginning in 2010, this three-year effort produced a publicly available searchable online database of environmental effects information (Tethys). It houses scientific literature pertaining to the environmental effects of marine energy systems, as well as metadata on international ocean energy projects and research studies. Two experts workshops were held in Dublin, Ireland (September 2010 and October 2012) to engage with international researchers, developers, and regulators on the scope and outcomes of the Annex IV project. Metadata and information stored in the Tethys database and feedback obtained from the two experts workshops were used as resources in the development of this report. This Annex IV final report contains three case studies of specific interactions of marine energy devices with the marine environment that survey, compile, and analyze the best available information in one coherent location. These case studies address 1) the physical interactions between animals and tidal turbines; 2) the acoustic impact of marine energy devices on marine animals; and 3) the effects of energy removal on physical systems. Each case study contains a description of environmental monitoring efforts and research studies, lessons learned, and analysis of remaining information gaps. The information collected through the Annex IV effort and referenced in this report, can be accessed on the Tethys database at http://mhk.pnnl.gov/wiki/index.php/Tethys_ Home.

  11. Energy modeling IV--planning for energy disruptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feingold, B.W.; Courtney, L. (eds.)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On May 10-12, 1982, the Institute of Gas Technology held the symposium ''Energy Modeling IV: Planning for Energy Disruptions,'' the fourth in a series of energy modeling symposia. Although all four of the energy modeling symposia presented by IGT emphasized new modeling techniques, each had a specific theme. This symposium addressed the role of modeling in dealing with the problems of disruptions in the supply and price of energy. The symposium brought together modelers and planners from federal and state governmental agencies, utilities, management and consulting organizations, and academic institutions. The participants discussed the complex planning problems presented by both gradual and sudden fluctuations in energy supply or price, whether caused by political, physical, economic, or natural events, and the resultant threats to the stability of businesses and the security of nations. A separate abstract was pepared for each paper for the Energy Data Base (EDB); on paper is included in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA) and 22 for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA).

  12. Power Generation Asset Management Technology Roadmap M

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    be done to determine optimal sensor deployment to address these criteria. TC8 Incorporate turbine layouts, make efforts and operational status within wind power plants to have more...

  13. Heat Transfer Enhancement: Second Generation Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bergles, A. E.; Webb, R. L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    substantial benefits for the process and electric utility industries. Most process fluid, particularly water, have higher surface tension' than the fluorocarbon refrigerants. Thus, the closely spaced fins used by the refrigeration in~us? try (748-1378 fins... of refrigerants. A variety of structured surfaces are applied to the outside to enhance shell-side boiling of refrigerants (Fig. 5). These include various formed surfaces (a,b,c,d) and a porous metal lic matrix (e). These surfaces operate primarily...

  14. OpenEI Community - Power Generation Technologies

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcernsCompany Oil and GasOff thedriving data

  15. Quadrennial Technology Review's Alternative Generation Workshop Slides |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014, an OHASeptember 2010In addition to analysis3 News7:

  16. Other Distributed Generation Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorthOlympia GreenThesource HistoryOsram

  17. The Industrialization of Thermoelectric Power Generation Technology |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| DepartmentDepartmentTheEnergyDepartment of Energy The

  18. Distributed Generation Technologies DGT | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling Farm <Site

  19. A New Generation of Parabolic Trough Technology

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613Portsmouth SitePresentations | Department ofCouncil OfficialsA

  20. Articles about Next-Generation Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform is alwaysISOSource Heat 1PowerofSystems | DepartmentArticle1 Articles

  1. WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas Lynch

    2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead previously by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC). The project is now under the leadership of ConocoPhillips Company (COP) after it acquired GEC and the E-Gas{trademark} gasification technology from Global Energy in July 2003. The Phase I of this project was supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, while the Phase II is supported by Gas Technology Institute, TDA Research, Inc., and Nucon International, Inc. The two project phases planned for execution include: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at Global Energy's existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. The WREL facility was designed, constructed, and operated under a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now acquired and offered commercially by COP as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC, and now COP and the industrial partners are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry.

  2. Federal/Industry Development of Energy-Conserving Technologies for the Chemical and Petroleum Refining Industries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alston, T. G.; Humphrey, J. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The search for RD&D projects is currently focusing in the following technology categories: (i) reduction of fouling in cooling water systems, (ii) alternatives to conventional distillation and separation, (iii) low level waste heat recovery, (iv) advanced...

  3. Modcomp MAX IV System Processors reference guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cummings, J.

    1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A user almost always faces a big problem when having to learn to use a new computer system. The information necessary to use the system is often scattered throughout many different manuals. The user also faces the problem of extracting the information really needed from each manual. Very few computer vendors supply a single Users Guide or even a manual to help the new user locate the necessary manuals. Modcomp is no exception to this, Modcomp MAX IV requires that the user be familiar with the system file usage which adds to the problem. At General Atomics there is an ever increasing need for new users to learn how to use the Modcomp computers. This paper was written to provide a condensed Users Reference Guide'' for Modcomp computer users. This manual should be of value not only to new users but any users that are not Modcomp computer systems experts. This Users Reference Guide'' is intended to provided the basic information for the use of the various Modcomp System Processors necessary to, create, compile, link-edit, and catalog a program. Only the information necessary to provide the user with a basic understanding of the Systems Processors is included. This document provides enough information for the majority of programmers to use the Modcomp computers without having to refer to any other manuals. A lot of emphasis has been placed on the file description and usage for each of the System Processors. This allows the user to understand how Modcomp MAX IV does things rather than just learning the system commands.

  4. CMAD IV 11/14/96 Information Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    utilities, power pools, vendors etc.. #12;CMAD IV 11/14/96 #12; #12; GridCo LineCo PoolCo Energy Merchant INFO INFO INFO $ $ $ PWR PWR PWR #12;CMAD IV 11/14/96 "Future" Is At Hand · Federal Energy Regulatory protection and audit practices inadequate. · Internal priorities limiting attention to security concerns

  5. MOOS-IvP Autonomy Tools Users Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Michael R.

    2008-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes seven common MOOS-IvP autonomy tools. The uHelmScope application provides a run-time scoping window into the state of an active IvP Helm executing its mission. The pMarineViewer application is a ...

  6. MOOS-IvP Autonomy Tools Users Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Michael R.

    2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes fifteen MOOS-IvP autonomy tools. uHelmScope provides a run-time scoping window into the state of an active IvP Helm executing its mission. pMarineViewer is a geo-based GUI tool for rendering marine ...

  7. GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

  8. This Page Intentionally Left Blank Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lincoln #12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;#12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic iv#12;This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE Arctic This Page Intentionally Left Blank #12;Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments--Arctic Contents v CONTENTS

  9. Subunit IV-PetL chimeras in cytochrome b6f complex Chimeric fusions of subunit IV and PetL in the b6 f complex of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subunit IV-PetL chimeras in cytochrome b6f complex - 1 - Chimeric fusions of subunit IV and Pet IV-PetL chimeras in cytochrome b6 f complex Additional keywords : PetG, PetM, PetN, transmembrane topology, mass spectrometry, State Transitions, protein phosphorylation. #12;Subunit IV-PetL chimeras

  10. COPPER CABLE RECYCLING TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chelsea Hubbard

    2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE) continually seeks safer and more cost-effective technologies for use in deactivation and decommissioning (D&D) of nuclear facilities. The Deactivation and Decommissioning Focus Area (DDFA) of the DOE's Office of Science and Technology (OST) sponsors large-scale demonstration and deployment projects (LSDDPs). At these LSDDPs, developers and vendors of improved or innovative technologies showcase products that are potentially beneficial to the DOE's projects and to others in the D&D community. Benefits sought include decreased health and safety risks to personnel and the environment, increased productivity, and decreased costs of operation. The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) generated a list of statements defining specific needs and problems where improved technology could be incorporated into ongoing D&D tasks. One such need is to reduce the volume of waste copper wire and cable generated by D&D. Deactivation and decommissioning activities of nuclear facilities generates hundreds of tons of contaminated copper cable, which are sent to radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology separates the clean copper from contaminated insulation and dust materials in these cables. The recovered copper can then be reclaimed and, more importantly, landfill disposal volumes can be reduced. The existing baseline technology for disposing radioactively contaminated cables is to package the cables in wooden storage boxes and dispose of the cables in radioactive waste disposal sites. The Copper Cable Recycling Technology is applicable to facility decommissioning projects at many Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities and commercial nuclear power plants undergoing decommissioning activities. The INEEL Copper Cable Recycling Technology Demonstration investigated the effectiveness and efficiency to recycle 13.5 tons of copper cable. To determine the effectiveness of separating out radioactive contamination, the copper cable was coated with a surrogate contaminant. The demonstration took place at the Bonneville County Technology Center in Idaho Falls, Idaho.

  11. New venture commercialization of clean energy technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, David S. (David Seth)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Clean energy technologies lower harmful emissions associated with the generation and use of power (e.g. CO2) and many of these technologies have been shown to be cost effective and to provide significant benefits to adopters. ...

  12. Actinide Corroles: Synthesis and Characterization of Thorium(IV) and Uranium(IV) bis(-chloride) Dimers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, Ashleigh L.; Buckley, Heather L.; Gryko, Daniel T.; Lukens, Wayne W.; Arnold, John

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first synthesis and structural characterization of actinide corroles is presented. Thorium(IV) and uranium(IV) macrocycles of Mes2(p-OMePh)corrole were synthesised and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, UV-Visible spectroscopy, variable-temperature 1H NMR, ESI mass spectrometry and cyclic voltammetry.

  13. Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Develop Thermoelectric Technology for Automotive Waste Heat Recovery Cost-Competitive Advanced Thermoelectric Generators for Direct...

  14. Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mills, Andrew

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    demand, more flexible thermal generation, and lower costof VG technologies), more flexible thermal generation, pricedemand, more flexible thermal generation, and low-cost bulk-

  15. New mono-organotin (IV) dithiocarbamate complexes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Muthalib, Amirah Faizah Abdul; Baba, Ibrahim [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi (Malaysia)

    2014-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighteen new mono-organotin dithiocarbamate compounds derived each nine from methyltin(IV) and phenyltin(IV) reacted using in-situ method with various type of N-dialkylamine together with carbon disulphide with the ratio of 1:3:3. Elemental and gravimetric analysis showed that the general formula of these compounds were RSnCl[S{sub 2}CNR?R?]{sub 2} (R= Ph, CH{sub 3}, R? = CH{sub 3}, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, C{sub 7}H{sub 7} and R? = C{sub 2}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 11}, iC{sub 3}H{sub 7}, C{sub 7}H{sub 7}). These compounds had been characterized by infrared spectroscopy, ultraviolet spectroscopy, {sup 1}H, {sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy and single crystal X-ray crystallography. The infrared spectra of these compounds showed three important peaks indicating the formation of dithiocarbamate compounds, ?(CN), ?(CS) and ?(Sn-S) band which present in the region of 14441519, 9541098 and 318349 cm{sup ?1} respectively. The ultraviolet-visible spectra showed an absorption band for the ? - ?* transition of NCS group in the range of 253 259 nm due to the intramolecular charge transfer of the ligand. The {sup 13}C NMR spectra showed an important shift for ?(N{sup 13}CS{sub 2}) in the range of 196.8 201.9 ppm.. Single crystal X-ray diffraction studies showed three new structures with the general formula of PhSnCl[S{sub 2}CN(Et)(i?Pr)]{sub 2}, MeSnCl[S{sub 2}CN(Me)(Cy)]{sub 2} and MeSnCl[S{sub 2}CN(i?Pr)(CH{sub 2}Ph)]{sub 2}. All structures having a distorted octahedral geometry set by CClS{sub 4} donor atom from the two chelating dithiocarbamate ligands.

  16. Emerging energy-efficient industrial technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microturbines: What is a Microturbine? OITs Industrial1999c. Summary of the Microturbine Technology Summit:s Emerging Companies; Microturbine Firm Hopes IPO Generates

  17. Thermoelectric Generators 1. Thermoelectric generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Ho Sung

    1 Thermoelectric Generators HoSung Lee 1. Thermoelectric generator 1.1 Basic Equations In 1821 effects are called the thermoelectric effects. The mechanisms of thermoelectricity were not understood. Cold Hot I - -- - - - - -- Figure 1 Electron concentration in a thermoelectric material. #12;2 A large

  18. R and D of On-line Reprocessing Technology for Molten-Salt Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uhlir, Jan; Tulackova, Radka; Chuchvalcova Bimova, Karolina [Nuclear Research Institute Rez plc CZ-250 68 Husinec - Rez 130 (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Molten Salt Reactor (MSR) represents one of promising future nuclear reactor concept included in the Generation IV reactors family. The reactor can be operated as the thorium breeder or as the actinide transmuter. However, the future deployment of Molten-Salt Reactors will be significantly dependent on the successful mastering of advanced reprocessing technologies dedicated to their fuel cycle. Here the on-line reprocessing technology connected with the fuel circuit of MSR is of special importance because the reactor cannot be operated for a long run without the fuel salt clean-up. Generally, main MSR reprocessing technologies are pyrochemical, majority of them are fluoride technologies. The proposed flow-sheets of MSR on-line reprocessing are based on a combination of molten-salt / liquid metal extraction and electro-separation processes, which can be added to the gas extraction process already verified during the MSRE project in ORNL. The crucial separation method proposed for partitioning of actinides from fission products is based on successive Anodic dissolution and Cathodic deposition processes in molten fluoride media. (authors)

  19. Estimate of the allowable dimensions of diagnosed defects in category III and IV welded pipeline joints{sup 1}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grin', E. A.; Bochkarev, V. I. [JSC 'All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute' (JSC 'VTI') (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'All-Russia Thermal Engineering Institute' (JSC 'VTI') (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An approach for estimating the permissible dimensions of technological defects in butt welded joints in category III and IV pipelines is described. The allowable size of a welding defect is determined from the condition of compliance with the specifications on strength for a reference cross section (damaged joint) of the pipeline taking into account its weakening by a given defect.With regard to the fairly widespread discovery of technological defects in butt welded joints during diagnostics of auxiliary pipelines for thermal electric power plants, the proposed approach can be used in practice by repair and consulting organizations.

  20. CONNECTICUT BIOFUELS TECHNOLOGY PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARTONE, ERIK

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    DBS Energy Inc. (DBS) intends on using the Connecticut Biofuels Technology Project for the purpose of developing a small-scale electric generating systems that are located on a distributed basis and utilize biodiesel as its principle fuel source. This project will include research and analysis on the quality and applied use of biodiesel for use in electricity production, 2) develop dispatch center for testing and analysis of the reliability of dispatching remote generators operating on a blend of biodiesel and traditional fossil fuels, and 3) analysis and engineering research on fuel storage options for biodiesel of fuels for electric generation.

  1. Nuclear Energy Governance and the Politics of Social Justice: Technology, Public Goods, and Redistribution in Russia and France

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grigoriadis, Theocharis N

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic Energy Agency. Nuclear Technology Review 2008. Vienna1: Generations of Nuclear Technology Time 53 1945-1965 -the expansion of their nuclear technology potential. 3 The

  2. President's Corner Technology Corner

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Richard R.

    at Albany Peak oil, growing energy demand in India and China, global warming, and ter- rorism are slowly technologies that are end usespecific and tech- nologies that generate electricity, a "universal" energy). In the former category, one finds domestic and industrial hot water production; space heating, including both

  3. Technology Validation Sig Gronich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and validate integrated hydrogen and fuel cell technologies in a systems context under real operating in quantity that is powered by a wind turbine. By 2008, validate hydrogen vehicles with greater than 250. . Distributed Generation TransportationBiomass Hydro Wind Solar Coal Nuclear Natural Gas Oil With

  4. Forschungsberichte der Fakultt IV Elektrotechnik und Informatik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wichmann, Felix

    . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 22 3.1.5 SAP R/3 Model Example . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 3.2 Relational Database Systems for describing software system inter- faces which can be used during software or data integration processes. The report is part of the BIZYCLE project, which examines applicability of model-based methods, technologies

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - ARM Airborne Carbon Measurements IV (ARM-ACME IV)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del(ANL-IN-03-032)8Li (59AJ76)ARM2, 2006Observations of the Madden(ARM-ACME III)IV

  6. Energy 101: Fuel Cell Technology

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2014-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn how fuel cell technology generates clean electricity from hydrogen to power our buildings and transportation-while emitting nothing but water. This video illustrates the fundamentals of fuel cell technology and its potential to supply our homes, offices, industries, and vehicles with sustainable, reliable energy.

  7. Energy 101: Fuel Cell Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2014-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Learn how fuel cell technology generates clean electricity from hydrogen to power our buildings and transportation-while emitting nothing but water. This video illustrates the fundamentals of fuel cell technology and its potential to supply our homes, offices, industries, and vehicles with sustainable, reliable energy.

  8. WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary Harmond; Albert Tsang

    2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), a company of Global Energy Inc., and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution over a three year period, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. During the reporting period, various methods to remove low-level contaminants for the synthesis gas were reviewed. In addition, there was a transition of the project personnel for GEC which has slowed the production of the outstanding project reports.

  9. Cotton responses to mepiquat chloride and PGR-IV treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biles, Stephen Paul

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant growth regulators (PGRS) are applied to cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) to control vegetative growth, increase yields and hasten maturity. Two of these PGRS, mepiquat chloride (MC) and PGR-IV, affect plant growth in different ways. MC inhibits...

  10. actinide iv borohydrides: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Na(H3 Girolami, Gregory S. 8 Influence of addition order and contact time on thorium (IV) retention by hematite in the presence Physics Websites Summary: 1 Influence of...

  11. action phase iv: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on all fields of N4 vector multiplet. We also consider the derivation of leading low-enrgy effective action at two loops. I. L. Buchbinder 2004-02-12 256 Painleve IV and...

  12. Cotton responses to mepiquat chloride and PGR-IV treatments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biles, Stephen Paul

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plant growth regulators (PGRS) are applied to cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) to control vegetative growth, increase yields and hasten maturity. Two of these PGRS, mepiquat chloride (MC) and PGR-IV, affect plant growth in ...

  13. Synthesis, Characterization, and Cytotoxicity of Platinum(IV) Carbamate Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Justin Jeff

    The synthesis, characterization, and cytotoxicity of eight new platinum(IV) complexes having the general formula cis,cis,trans-[Pt(NH[subscript 3)[subscript 2]Cl[subscript 2](O[subscript 2]CNHR)[subscript 2

  14. Dilute Oxygen Combustion Phase IV Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riley, M.F.

    2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel furnace designs based on Dilute Oxygen Combustion (DOC) technology were developed under subcontract by Techint Technologies, Coraopolis, PA, to fully exploit the energy and environmental capabilities of DOC technology and to provide a competitive offering for new furnace construction opportunities. Capital cost, fuel, oxygen and utility costs, NOx emissions, oxide scaling performance, and maintenance requirements were compared for five DOC-based designs and three conventional air5-fired designs using a 10-year net present value calculation. A furnace direct completely with DOC burners offers low capital cost, low fuel rate, and minimal NOx emissions. However, these benefits do not offset the cost of oxygen and a full DOC-fired furnace is projected to cost $1.30 per ton more to operate than a conventional air-fired furnace. The incremental cost of the improved NOx performance is roughly $6/lb NOx, compared with an estimated $3/lb. NOx for equ8pping a conventional furnace with selective catalytic reduction (SCCR) technology. A furnace fired with DOC burners in the heating zone and ambient temperature (cold) air-fired burners in the soak zone offers low capital cost with less oxygen consumption. However, the improvement in fuel rate is not as great as the full DOC-fired design, and the DOC-cold soak design is also projected to cost $1.30 per ton more to operate than a conventional air-fired furnace. The NOx improvement with the DOC-cold soak design is also not as great as the full DOC fired design, and the incremental cost of the improved NOx performance is nearly $9/lb NOx. These results indicate that a DOC-based furnace design will not be generally competitive with conventional technology for new furnace construction under current market conditions. Fuel prices of $7/MMBtu or oxygen prices of $23/ton are needed to make the DOC furnace economics favorable. Niche applications may exist, particularly where access to capital is limited or floor space limitations are critical. DOC technology will continue to have a highly competitive role in retrofit applications requiring increases in furnace productivity.

  15. Rational Ligand Design for U(VI) and Pu(IV)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szigethy, Geza

    2009-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear power is an attractive alternative to hydrocarbon-based energy production at a time when moving away from carbon-producing processes is widely accepted as a significant developmental need. Hence, the radioactive actinide power sources for this industry are necessarily becoming more widespread, which is accompanied by the increased risk of exposure to both biological and environmental systems. This, in turn, requires the development of technology designed to remove such radioactive threats efficiently and selectively from contaminated material, whether that be contained nuclear waste streams or the human body. Raymond and coworkers (University of California, Berkeley) have for decades investigated the interaction of biologically-inspired, hard Lewis-base ligands with high-valent, early-actinide cations. It has been established that such ligands bind strongly to the hard Lewis-acidic early actinides, and many poly-bidentate ligands have been developed and shown to be effective chelators of actinide contaminants in vivo. Work reported herein explores the effect of ligand geometry on the linear U(IV) dioxo dication (uranyl, UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}). The goal is to utilize rational ligand design to develop ligands that exhibit shape selectivity towards linear dioxo cations and provides thermodynamically favorable binding interactions. The uranyl complexes with a series of tetradentate 3-hydroxy-pyridin-2-one (3,2-HOPO) ligands were studied in both the crystalline state as well as in solution. Despite significant geometric differences, the uranyl affinities of these ligands vary only slightly but are better than DTPA, the only FDA-approved chelation therapy for actinide contamination. The terepthalamide (TAM) moiety was combined into tris-beidentate ligands with 1,2- and 3,2-HOPO moieties were combined into hexadentate ligands whose structural preferences and solution thermodynamics were measured with the uranyl cation. In addition to achieving coordinative saturation, these ligands exhibited increased uranyl affinity compared to bis-Me-3,2-HOPO ligands. This result is due in part to their increased denticity, but is primarily the result of the presence of the TAM moiety. In an effort to explore the relatively unexplored coordination chemistry of Pu(IV) with bidentate moieties, a series of Pu(IV) complexes were also crystallized using bidentate hydroxypyridinone and hydroxypyrone ligands. The geometries of these complexes are compared to that of the analogous Ce(IV) complexes. While in some cases these showed the expected structural similarities, some ligand systems led to significant coordination changes. A series of crystal structure analyses with Ce(IV) indicated that these differences are most likely the result of crystallization condition differences and solvent inclusion effects.

  16. Human health benefits of ambient sulfate aerosol reductions under Title IV of the 1990 Clean Air Act amendments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chestnut, L.G. [Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc., Boulder, CO (United States); Watkins, A.M. [Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Acid Rain Provisions (Title IV) of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 call for about a 10 million ton reduction in annual SO{sub 2} emissions in the United States by the year 2010. Although the provisions apply nationwide, most of the reduction will take place in the eastern half of the United States, where use of high sulfur coal for electricity generation is most common. One potentially large benefit of Title IV is the expected reduction in adverse human health effects associated with exposure to ambient sulfate aerosols, a secondary pollutant formed in the atmosphere when SO{sub 2} is present. Sulfate aerosols are a significant constituent of fine particulate (PM{sub 2.5}). This paper combines available epidemiologic evidence of health effects associated with sulfate aerosols and economic estimates of willingness to pay for reductions in risks or incidence of health effects with available estimates of the difference between expected ambient sulfate concentrations in the eastern United States and southeastern Canada with and without Title IV to estimate the expected health benefits of Title IV. The results suggest a mean annual benefit in the eastern United States of $10.6 billion (in 1994 dollars) in 1997 and $40.0 billion in 2010, with an additional $1 billion benefit each year in Ontario and Quebec provinces.

  17. Power conversion technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Newton, M. A.

    1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Power Conversion Technologies thrust area identifies and sponsors development activities that enhance the capabilities of engineering at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in the area of solid- state power electronics. Our primary objective is to be a resource to existing and emerging LLNL programs that require advanced solid-state power electronic technologies.. Our focus is on developing and integrating technologies that will significantly impact the capability, size, cost, and reliability of future power electronic systems. During FY-96, we concentrated our research efforts on the areas of (1) Micropower Impulse Radar (MIR); (2) novel solid-state opening switches; (3) advanced modulator technology for accelerators; (4) compact accelerators; and (5) compact pulse generators.

  18. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR EXPOSURE UNITS Z2-24, Z2-31, Z2-32, AND Z2-36 IN ZONE 2 OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management selected Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, to perform independent verification (IV) at Zone 2 of the East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. ORAU has concluded IV surveys, per the project-specific plan (PSP) (ORAU 2013a) covering exposure units (EUs) Z2-24, -31, -32, and -36. The objective of this effort was to verify the following. Target EUs comply with requirements in the Zone 2 Record of Decision (ROD) (DOE 2005), as implemented by using the dynamic verification strategy presented in the dynamic work plan (DWP) (BJC 2007) Commitments in the DWP were adequately implemented, as verified via IV surveys and soil sampling The Zone 2 ROD establishes maximum remediation level (RLmax) values and average RL (RLavg) values for the primary contaminants of concern (COCs) U-234, U-235, U-238, Cs-137, Np-237, Ra-226, Th-232, arsenic, mercury, and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Table 1.1 lists Zone 2 COCs with associated RLs. Additional radiological and chemical contaminants were also identified during past characterization and monitoring actions, though the ROD does not present RLs for these potential contaminants. IV activities focused on the identification and quantification of ROD-specific COCs in surface soils, but also generated data for other analytes to support future decisions. ORAU personnel also reviewed EU-specific phased construction completion reports (PCCRs) to focus IV activities and identify potential judgmental sample locations, if any.

  19. Selenium(IV) and (VI) sorption by soils surrounding fly ash management facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hyun, S.; Burns, P.E.; Murarka, I.; Lee, L.S. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN (United States)

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Leachate derived from unlined coal ash disposal facilities is one of the most significant anthropogenic sources of selenium to the environment. To establish a practical framework for predicting transport of selenium in ash leachate, sorption of Se(IV) and Se(VI) from 1 mM CaSO{sub 4} was measured for 18 soils obtained down-gradient from three ash landfill sites and evaluated with respect to several soil properties. Furthermore, soil attenuation from lab-generated ash leachate and the effect of Ca{sup 2+} and SO{sub 4}{sup 2-} concentrations as well as pH on both Se(IV) and Se(VI) was quantified for a subset of soils. For both Se(IV) and Se(VI), pH combined with either percentage clay or dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB)-extractable Fe described {gt} 80% of the differences in sorption across all soils, yielding an easy approach for making initial predictions regarding site-specific selenium transport to sensitive water bodies. Se(IV) consistently exhibited an order of magnitude greater sorption than Se(VI). Selenium sorption was highest at lower pH values, with Se(IV) sorption decreasing at pH values above 6, whereas Se(VI) decreased over the entire pH range (2.5-10). Using these pH adsorption envelopes, the likely effect of ash leachate-induced changes in soil pore water pH with time on selenium attenuation by down gradient soils can be predicted. Selenium sorption increased with increasing Ca{sup 2+} concentrations while SO{sub 4}2- suppressed sorption well above enhancements by Ca{sup 2+}. Soil attenuation of selenium from ash leachates agreed well with sorption measured from 1 mM CaSO{sub 4}, indicating that 1 mM CaSO{sub 4} is a reasonable synthetic leachate for assessing selenium behavior at ash landfill sites.

  20. Remote Handling Experiments with the MASCOT IV Servomanipulator at JET and Prospects of Enhancements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Remote Handling Experiments with the MASCOT IV Servomanipulator at JET and Prospects of Enhancements

  1. Digital Actuator Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ken Thomas; Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are significant developments underway in new types of actuators for power plant active components. Many of these make use of digital technology to provide a wide array of benefits in performance of the actuators and in reduced burden to maintain them. These new product offerings have gained considerable acceptance in use in process plants. In addition, they have been used in conventional power generation very successfully. This technology has been proven to deliver the benefits promised and substantiate the claims of improved performance. The nuclear industry has been reluctant to incorporate digital actuator technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns due to a number of concerns. These could be summarized as cost, regulatory uncertainty, and a certain comfort factor with legacy analog technology. The replacement opportunity for these types of components represents a decision point for whether to invest in more modern technology that would provide superior operational and maintenance benefits. Yet, the application of digital technology has been problematic for the nuclear industry, due to qualification and regulatory issues. With some notable exceptions, the result has been a continuing reluctance to undertake the risks and uncertainties of implementing digital actuator technology when replacement opportunities present themselves. Rather, utilities would typically prefer to accept the performance limitations of the legacy analog actuator technologies to avoid impacts to project costs and schedules. The purpose of this report is to demonstrate that the benefits of digital actuator technology can be significant in terms of plant performance and that it is worthwhile to address the barriers currently holding back the widespread development and use of this technology. It addresses two important objectives in pursuit of the beneficial use of digital actuator technology for nuclear power plants: 1. To demonstrate the benefits of digital actuator technology over legacy analog sensor technology in both quantitative and qualitative ways. 2. To recognize and address the added difficulty of digital technology qualification, especially in regard to software common cause failure (SCCF), that is introduced by the use of digital actuator technology.

  2. Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    DOEs Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database provides up-to-date information on marine and hydrokinetic renewable energy, both in the U.S. and around the world. The database includes wave, tidal, current, and ocean thermal energy, and contains information on the various energy conversion technologies, companies active in the field, and development of projects in the water. Depending on the needs of the user, the database can present a snapshot of projects in a given region, assess the progress of a certain technology type, or provide a comprehensive view of the entire marine and hydrokinetic energy industry. Results are displayed as a list of technologies, companies, or projects. Data can be filtered by a number of criteria, including country/region, technology type, generation capacity, and technology or project stage. The database was updated in 2009 to include ocean thermal energy technologies, companies, and projects.

  3. Department of Engineering Technology Technology Education

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bieber, Michael

    Department of Engineering Technology Technology Education A Teacher Education Program New Jersey Institute of Technology #12;WHAT WILL YOU LEARN? Technology teachers teach problem-based learning utilizing math, science and technology principles. Technological studies involve students: Designing

  4. Complications Associated with Long-Term Disposition of Newly-Generated Transuranic Waste: A National Laboratory Perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.J. Orchard; L.A. Harvego; T.L. Carlson; R.P. Grant

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is a multipurpose national laboratory delivering specialized science and engineering solutions for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Sponsorship of INL was formally transferred to the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, Science and Technology (NE) by Secretary Spencer Abraham in July 2002. The move to NE, and designation as the DOE lead nuclear energy laboratory for reactor technology, supports the nations expanding nuclear energy initiatives, placing INL at the center of work to develop advanced Generation IV nuclear energy systems; nuclear energy/hydrogen coproduction technology; advanced nuclear energy fuel cycle technologies; and providing national security answers to national infrastructure needs. As a result of the Laboratorys NE mission, INL generates both contact-handled and remote-handled transuranic (TRU) waste from ongoing operations. Generation rates are relatively small and fluctuate based on specific programs and project activities being conducted; however, the Laboratory will continue to generate TRU waste well into the future in association with the NE mission. Currently, plans and capabilities are being established to transfer INLs contact-handled TRU waste to the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Plant (AMWTP) for certification and disposal to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Remote-handled TRU waste is currently placed in storage at the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC). In an effort to minimize future liabilities associated with the INL NE mission, INL is evaluating and assessing options for the management and disposition of all its TRU waste on a real-time basis at time of generation. This paper summarizes near-term activities to minimize future re handling of INLs TRU waste, as well as, potential complications associated with the long-term disposition of newly-generated TRU waste. Potential complications impacting the disposition of INL newly-generated TRU waste include, but are not limited to: 1) required remote-handled TRU packaging configuration(s) vs. current facility capabilities, 2) long-term NE mission activities, 3) WIPP certification requirements, and 4) budget considerations.

  5. A Density Functional Theory Study of the Mechanism of Free Radical Generation in the System Vanadate/PCA/H2O2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bell, Alexis T.

    with H2O2 releases HOO· free radicals and generates V(IV) species, which are capable of generating HOA Density Functional Theory Study of the Mechanism of Free Radical Generation in the System for HOO· generation. It is also found that species containing two pca ligands and an H2O2 molecule do

  6. Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization (Desiccant Technologies), January 2004 Distributed Energy Technology Characterization (Desiccant Technologies), January 2004 The purpose of this report is to...

  7. Wind Generation Feasibility Study in Bethel, AK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom Humphrey, YKHC; Lance Kincaid, EMCOR Energy & Technologies

    2004-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report studies the wind resources in the Yukon-Kuskokwim Health Corporation (YKHC) region, located in southwestern Alaska, and the applicability of wind generation technologies to YKHC facilities.

  8. Hardware model of a shipboard generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkins, Gregory L. (Gregory Lewis)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hardware model of the Gas Turbine Generator (GTG) in use on the US Navy's DDG-51 Class Destroyer is constructed for use as a lab apparatus at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology's Laboratory for Electromagnetic and ...

  9. Next-generation information systems for genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mungall, Christopher

    2011-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The advent of next-generation sequencing technologies is transforming biology by enabling individual researchers to sequence the genomes of individual organisms or cells on a massive scale. In order to realize the ...

  10. Coal Gasification for Power Generation, 3. edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The report provides a concise look at the challenges faced by coal-fired generation, the ability of coal gasification to address these challenges, and the current state of IGCC power generation. Topics covered include: an overview of Coal Generation including its history, the current market environment, and the status of coal gasification; a description of gasification technology including processes and systems; an analysis of the key business factors that are driving increased interest in coal gasification; an analysis of the barriers that are hindering the implementation of coal gasification projects; a discussion of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) technology; an evaluation of IGCC versus other generation technologies; a discussion of IGCC project development options; a discussion of the key government initiatives supporting IGCC development; profiles of the key gasification technology companies participating in the IGCC market; and, a detailed description of existing and planned coal IGCC projects.

  11. Solar thermoelectrics for small scale power generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amatya, Reja

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past two decades, there has been a surge in the research of new thermoelectric (TE) materials, driven party by the need for clean and sustainable power generation technology. Utilizing the Seebeck effect, the ...

  12. RESERVES IN WESTERN BASINS PART IV: WIND RIVER BASIN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Caldwell

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Vast quantities of natural gas are entrapped within various tight formations in the Rocky Mountain area. This report seeks to quantify what proportion of that resource can be considered recoverable under today's technological and economic conditions and discusses factors controlling recovery. The ultimate goal of this project is to encourage development of tight gas reserves by industry through reducing the technical and economic risks of locating, drilling and completing commercial tight gas wells. This report is the fourth in a series and focuses on the Wind River Basin located in west central Wyoming. The first three reports presented analyses of the tight gas reserves and resources in the Greater Green River Basin (Scotia, 1993), Piceance Basin (Scotia, 1995) and the Uinta Basin (Scotia, 1995). Since each report is a stand-alone document, duplication of language will exist where common aspects are discussed. This study, and the previous three, describe basin-centered gas deposits (Masters, 1979) which contain vast quantities of natural gas entrapped in low permeability (tight), overpressured sandstones occupying a central basin location. Such deposits are generally continuous and are not conventionally trapped by a structural or stratigraphic seal. Rather, the tight character of the reservoirs prevents rapid migration of the gas, and where rates of gas generation exceed rates of escape, an overpressured basin-centered gas deposit results (Spencer, 1987). Since the temperature is a primary controlling factor for the onset and rate of gas generation, these deposits exist in the deeper, central parts of a basin where temperatures generally exceed 200 F and drill depths exceed 8,000 feet. The abbreviation OPT (overpressured tight) is used when referring to sandstone reservoirs that comprise the basin-centered gas deposit. Because the gas resources trapped in this setting are so large, they represent an important source of future gas supply, prompting studies to understand and quantify the resource itself and to develop technologies that will permit commercial exploitation. This study is a contribution to that process.

  13. HEMISPHERIC CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.A. Ebadian

    1999-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deactivation and Decommissioning (D&D) Technology Assessment Program (TAP) was developed to provide detailed, comparable data for environmental technologies and to disseminate this data to D&D professionals in a manner that will facilitate the review and selection of technologies to perform decontamination and decommissioning. The objectives for this project include the following: Determine technology needs through review of the Site Technology Coordination Group (STCG) information and other applicable websites and needs databases; Perform a detailed review of industries that perform similar activities as those required in D&D operations to identify additional technologies; Define the technology assessment program for characterization and waste management problem sets; Define the data management program for characterization, dismantlement, and waste management problem sets; Evaluate baseline and innovative technologies under standard test conditions at Florida International University's Hemispheric Center for Environmental Technology (FIU-HCET) and other locations and collect data in the areas of performance, cost, health and safety, operations and maintenance, and primary and secondary waste generation; Continue to locate, verify, and incorporate technology performance data from other sources into the multimedia information system; and Develop the conceptual design for a dismantlement technology decision analysis tool for dismantlement technologies.

  14. The Solar Photovoltaics Technology Conflict between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutch, John

    A Duel in the Sun The Solar Photovoltaics Technology Conflict between China and the United States A Duel in the Sun The Solar Photovoltaics Technology Conflict between China and the United States1 John domestically, and selling interna- tionally solar photovoltaic (PV) electricity- generating technology. Over

  15. Power Technologies Energy Data Book - Fourth Edition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aabakken, J.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report, prepared by NREL's Strategic Energy Analysis Center, includes up-to-date information on power technologies, including complete technology profiles. The data book also contains charts on electricity restructuring, power technology forecasts, electricity supply, electricity capability, electricity generation, electricity demand, prices, economic indicators, environmental indicators, and conversion factors.

  16. Information technology equipment cooling system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, Mark D.

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    According to one embodiment, a system for removing heat from a rack of information technology equipment may include a sidecar indoor air to liquid heat exchanger that cools warm air generated by the rack of information technology equipment. The system may also include a liquid to liquid heat exchanger and an outdoor heat exchanger. The system may further include configurable pathways to connect and control fluid flow through the sidecar heat exchanger, the liquid to liquid heat exchanger, the rack of information technology equipment, and the outdoor heat exchanger based upon ambient temperature and/or ambient humidity to remove heat from the rack of information technology equipment.

  17. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2014 Electric Drive Technologies Annual Progress Report The Electric Drive Technologies research and...

  18. Multi-fluid Modeling of Transient a Case Study in the Generation and Guiding of Light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eindhoven, Technische Universiteit

    Multi-fluid Modeling of Transient Plasmas: a Case Study in the Generation and Guiding of Light, B.H.P. Multi-fluid Modeling of Transient Plasmas: a Case Study in the Generation and Guid- ing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 2.3.1 The multi-fluid description in PLASIMO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38 iii #12;iv

  19. Commentary & Feedback on Draft I of the Next Generation Science Standards

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, John M.

    Commentary & Feedback on Draft I of the Next Generation Science Standards June 20, 2012 By Paul R. Alignment with the Common Core Mathematics Standards........................17 IV. Recommended Improvements for a new set of "next generation" standards (NGSS) for primary- secondary school science in the United

  20. FARM NET INCOME IMPACT OF SWITCHGRASS PRODUCTION AND CORN STOVER COLLECTION FOR HEAT AND POWER GENERATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    GENERATION by Mitchell A. Myhre A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree and Corn Stover Collection for Heat and Power Generation Mitchell A. Myhre Advisor: Associate Professor. Last but not least I would like to thank my wife Lisa for her love and support. #12;iv Table

  1. arc generated carbon: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    as a single storage endpoint and a pool of distributed computing nodes. The next generation ARC middleware with its several new technologies provides new possibilities in...

  2. A Monte Carlo Approach To Generator Portfolio Planning And Carbon...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    providing positive net annual energy generation. These technologies may include demand response, vehicle-to-grid systems, and large-scale energy storage. Authors Elaine...

  3. Bush Administration Moves Forward to Develop Next Generation...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    identified six next generation technologies for development including: the Gas Cooled Fast Reactor; the Sodium Fast Reactor; the Lead-Cooled Fast Reactor; the Molten Salt...

  4. Establishing Thermo-Electric Generator (TEG) Design Targets for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for Hybrid Vehicles Establishing Thermo-Electric Generator (TEG) Design Targets for Hybrid Vehicles 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program...

  5. Establishing Thermo-Electric Generator (TEG) Design Targets for...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Establishing Thermo-Electric Generator (TEG) Design Targets for Hybrid Vehicles 2013 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Annual Merit Review May 15th, 2013 R.Vijayagopal,...

  6. Energy Department Invests $60 Million to Train Next Generation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    generation of leaders in America's nuclear industry as well as support new and advanced nuclear technologies from reactor materials to innovative sensors and instruments to more...

  7. Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Outlook (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Renewable Energy for Electricity Generation in Latin America: Market, Technologies, and...

  8. Secretary Chu Announces $45 Million to Support Next Generation...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    energy technology by supporting the testing of next-generation wind turbine designs. "Wind power holds tremendous potential to help create new jobs and reduce carbon...

  9. Design of Radiation-Tolerant Structural Alloys for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Todd R. Allen

    2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This project will use proton irradiation to further understand the microstructural stability of ceramics being considered as matrix material for advanced nuclear fuels.

  10. Advanced Corrosion-Resistant Zr Alloys for High Burnup and Generation IV Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur Motta; Yong Hwan Jeong; R.J. Comstock; G.S. Was; Y.S. Kim

    2006-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this collaboration between four institutions in the US and Korea is to demonstrate a technical basis for the improvement of the corrosion resistance of zirconium-based alloys in more extreme operating environments (such as those present in severe fuel duty,cycles (high burnup, boiling, aggressive chemistry) andto investigate the feasibility (from the point of view of corrosion rate) of using advanced zirconium-based alloys in a supercritical water environment.

  11. Development of Modeling Techniques for A Generation IV Gas Fast Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dercher, Andrew Steven

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    necessity of invention upon all those who seek to clarify design criteria for the US DOE GFR. Furthermore, resulting temperature profiles for the fuel, cladding and coolant give rise to the possibility of the design of a system, based on thermionic...

  12. China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum | Department

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1. Feedstock & ProductionChapterChimneys: Warm andof

  13. China and Russia to Join the Generation IV International Forum | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO OverviewAttachments4 Chairs Meeting - April 2014 DOE-HDBK-1139/1-2006Department|

  14. Generation IV International Forum 39th Policy Group Meeting | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAMGeneral Guidance on NEPA General Guidance

  15. Submersible Generator for Marine Hydrokinetics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert S. Cinq-Mars; Timothy Burke; Dr. James Irish; Brian Gustafson; Dr. James Kirtley; Dr. Aiman Alawa

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A submersible generator was designed as a distinct and critical subassembly of marine hydrokinetics systems, specifically tidal and stream energy conversion. The generator is designed to work with both vertical and horizontal axis turbines. The final product is a high-pole-count, radial-flux, permanent magnet, rim mounted generator, initially rated at twenty kilowatts in a two-meter-per-second flow, and designed to leverage established and simple manufacturing processes. The generator was designed to work with a 3 meter by 7 meter Gorlov Helical Turbine or a marine hydrokinetic version of the FloDesign wind turbine. The team consisted of experienced motor/generator design engineers with cooperation from major US component suppliers (magnetics, coil winding and electrical steel laminations). Support for this effort was provided by Lucid Energy Technologies and FloDesign, Inc. The following tasks were completed: â?¢ Identified the conditions and requirements for MHK generators. â?¢ Defined a methodology for sizing and rating MHK systems. â?¢ Selected an MHK generator topology and form factor. â?¢ Completed electromechanical design of submersible generator capable of coupling to multiple turbine styles. â?¢ Investigated MHK generator manufacturing requirements. â?¢ Reviewed cost implications and financial viability. â?¢ Completed final reporting and deliverables

  16. Adaptive Control of Third Harmonic Generation via Genetic Algorithm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Xia

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    with selection, to improve the population as the evolution progresses from generation to generation. Femtosecond laser pulse tailoring, with the use of a pulse shaper, has become an important technology which enables applications in femtochemistry, micromachining...

  17. Technology '90

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories have a long history of excellence in performing research and development in a number of areas, including the basic sciences, applied-energy technology, and weapons-related technology. Although technology transfer has always been an element of DOE and laboratory activities, it has received increasing emphasis in recent years as US industrial competitiveness has eroded and efforts have increased to better utilize the research and development resources the laboratories provide. This document, Technology '90, is the latest in a series that is intended to communicate some of the many opportunities available for US industry and universities to work with the DOE and its laboratories in the vital activity of improving technology transfer to meet national needs. Technology '90 is divided into three sections: Overview, Technologies, and Laboratories. The Overview section describes the activities and accomplishments of the DOE research and development program offices. The Technologies section provides descriptions of new technologies developed at the DOE laboratories. The Laboratories section presents information on the missions, programs, and facilities of each laboratory, along with a name and telephone number of a technology transfer contact for additional information. Separate papers were prepared for appropriate sections of this report.

  18. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William H. Day

    2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

  19. Tethys and Annex IV Progress Report for FY 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System, dubbed Tethys after the mythical Greek titaness of the seas, is being developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support the U.S. Department of Energys Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP). Functioning as a smart database, Tethys enables its users to identify key words or terms to help gather, organize and make available information and data pertaining to the environmental effects of MHK and offshore wind (OSW) energy development. By providing and categorizing relevant publications within a simple and searchable database, Tethys acts as a dissemination channel for information and data which can be utilized by regulators, project developers and researchers to minimize the environmental risks associated with offshore renewable energy developments and attempt to streamline the permitting process. Tethys also houses a separate content-related Annex IV data base with identical functionality to the Tethys knowledge base. Annex IV is a collaborative project among member nations of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Ocean Energy Systems Implementing Agreement (OES-IA) that examines the environmental effects of ocean energy devices and projects. The U.S. Department of Energy leads the Annex IV working with federal partners such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). While the Annex IV database contains technical reports and journal articles, it is primarily focused on the collection of project site and research study metadata forms (completed by MHK researchers and developers around the world, and collected by PNNL) which provide information on environmental studies and the current progress of the various international MHK developments in the Annex IV member nations. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the content, accessibility and functionality enhancements made to the Annex IV and Tethys knowledge bases in FY12.

  20. Evaluation of three analytical techniques used to determine high levels of volatile organic compounds in type IV sludge from Rocky Flats Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, K.J.; Applegate, D.V.; Tsai, Y. [and others

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Before disposal, radioactive sludge (Type IV) from Rocky Flats Plant (RFP) must be evaluated for volatile organic compound (VOC) content. The Type IV sludge consists of organic solvents, degreasers, cutting oils, and transuranic (TRU) waste mixed with calcium silicate (MicroCel E{reg_sign}) and Oil Dri{reg_sign} to form a grease or paste-like material. For laboratory testing, a simulated Type IV RFP sludge (nonradioactive) was prepared at Argonne National Laboratory-East. This sludge has a composition similar to that expected from field samples. On the basis of historical information, a typical Type IV sludge is expected to contain approximately 1-10 percent of three target VOCs. The objective of this work is to evaluate three proposed methods for the determination of high levels of these three VOCs in Type IV sludge. The three methods are (1) static headspace gas analysis, (2) methanol extraction, and (3) ethylene glycol extraction. All three methods employ gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). They were evaluated regarding general method performance criteria, ease of operation, and amounts of secondary mixed waste generated.

  1. Decay Heat Removal in GEN IV Gas-Cooled Fast Reactors

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cheng, Lap-Yan; Wei, Thomas Y. C.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The safety goal of the current designs of advanced high-temperature thermal gas-cooled reactors (HTRs) is that no core meltdown would occur in a depressurization event with a combination of concurrent safety system failures. This study focused on the analysis of passive decay heat removal (DHR) in a GEN IV direct-cycle gas-cooled fast reactor (GFR) which is based on the technology developments of the HTRs. Given the different criteria and design characteristics of the GFR, an approach different from that taken for the HTRs for passive DHR would have to be explored. Different design options based on maintaining core flow weremoreevaluated by performing transient analysis of a depressurization accident using the system code RELAP5-3D. The study also reviewed the conceptual design of autonomous systems for shutdown decay heat removal and recommends that future work in this area should be focused on the potential for Brayton cycle DHRs.less

  2. Generation Planning (pbl/generation)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.Newof EnergyFundingGene ControlsCounselGeneral User Generation

  3. Fuel Cells as an Emerging Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewell, D. M.

    FUEL CELLS AS AN EMERGING TECHNOLOGY Douglas M. Jewell, Morgantown Energy Technology Center, Morgantown, West Virginia Introduction The United States Department of Energy (DOE) has been directing a fuel cell research and develop ment... the technology base required to enable private sector commercialization of this new energy option for power generation to take place. Under sponsorship of DOE and other Government and private agencies, fuel cell technology has evolved from limited...

  4. Surface plasmon resonance shows that type IV pili are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckling, Angus

    REPORT Surface plasmon resonance shows that type IV pili are important in surface attachment. Here, using the surface analytical technique, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we follow the attachment; pili; surface plasmon resonance; biofilm formation 1. INTRODUCTION Bacterial attachment is a critical

  5. Economic Impact Report BInghamton UnIvERsIty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Economic Impact Report 2007 #12;BInghamton UnIvERsIty 8:1 return on investment The term "return will be returned to the state economy and $6 to the local economy -- delivering an economic impact of $8.65 billion as an engine of economic growth that improves the financial health of our region and state. EconomIc Impact

  6. Appendix IV. Risks Associated with Conventional Uranium Milling Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ", uranium is removed from the processed ore with sulfuric acid. Sodium chlorate is also addedAppendix IV. Risks Associated with Conventional Uranium Milling Operations Introduction Although uranium mill tailings are considered byproduct materials under the AEA and not TENORM, EPA's Science

  7. Constraints to Stop Deforestation FB IV Informatik, Universitat Trier,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidl, Helmut

    Constraints to Stop Deforestation H. Seidl FB IV ­ Informatik, Universit¨at Trier, D­54286 Trier, Universitetsparken 1, DK­2100 Copenhagen ?, Denmark. rambo@diku.dk Abstract Wadler's deforestation algorithm, deforestation must terminate on all programs. Several techniques exist to ensure termination of de­ forestation

  8. Constraints to Stop HigherOrder Deforestation FB IV Informatik

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seidl, Helmut

    Constraints to Stop Higher­Order Deforestation H. Seidl FB IV ­ Informatik Universit¨at Trier, D of Copenhagen Universitetsparken 1, DK­2100 Copenhagen ?, Denmark rambo@diku.dk Abstract Wadler's deforestation in a compiler, it must terminate on all programs. Several techniques to ensure termi­ nation of deforestation

  9. 221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murayama, Hitoshi

    221B Lecture Notes Quantum Field Theory IV (Radiation Field) 1 Quantization of Radiation Field was quantized: photons. Now that we have gone through quantization of a classical field (Schrodinger field so far), we can proceed to quantize the Maxwell field. The basic idea is pretty much the same, except

  10. UNIVERSITE MONTESQUIEU BORDEAUX IV ECOLE DOCTORALE de SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES, GESTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    PLANIFICATION URBAINE SUR LES PRIX IMMOBILIERS ET FONCIERS EN ZONE LITTORALE : LE CAS DU BASSIN D'ARCACHON ThseUNIVERSITE MONTESQUIEU BORDEAUX IV ECOLE DOCTORALE de SCIENCES ECONOMIQUES, GESTION ET professionnalisme dans la gestion administrative. Un grand merci Sbastien Lavaud pour son norme patience face

  11. Oxidative Reforming of Biodiesel Over Molybdenum (IV) Oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Collins, Gary S.

    Oxidative Reforming of Biodiesel Over Molybdenum (IV) Oxide Jessica Whalen, Oscar Marin Flores, Su University INTRODUCTION Energy consumption continues to skyrocket worldwide. Biodiesel is a renewable fuel as potential feedstock in solid oxide fuel cells. Petroleum based fuels become scarcer daily, and biodiesel

  12. Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Conocophillips

    2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project was established to evaluate integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project was under the leadership of ConocoPhillips Company (COP), after it acquired Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC) and the E-Gas gasification technology from Global Energy Inc. in July 2003. The project has completed both Phase 1 and Phase 2 of development. The two project phases include the following: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility at SG Solutions LLC (SGS), previously the Wabash River Energy Limited, Gasification Facility located in West Terre Haute, Indiana, and for a fence-line commercial embodiment plant (CEP) operated at the Dow Chemical Company or Dow Corning Corporation chemical plant locations. (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues. Phase 1 of this project was supported by a multi-industry team consisting of Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., The Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation, while Phase 2 was supported by Gas Technology Institute, TDA Research Inc., and Nucon International, Inc. The SGS integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) facility was designed, constructed, and operated under a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other carbonaceous fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas (syngas) is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now acquired and offered commercially by COP as the E-Gas technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC, and later COP and the industrial partners investigated the use of syngas produced by the E-Gas technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort were to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from syngas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The intended result of the project was to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that would be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. The EECP study conducted in Phase 1 of the IMPPCCT Project confirmed that the concept for the integration of gasification-based (E-Gas) electricity generation from coal and/or petroleum coke and methanol production (Liquid Phase Methanol or LPMEOH{trademark}) processes was feasible for the coproduction of power and chemicals. The results indicated that while there were minimal integration issues that impact the deployment of an IMPPCCT CEP, the major concern was the removal of sulfur and other trace contaminants, which are known methanol catalyst poisons, from the syngas. However, economic concerns in the domestic methanol market which is driven by periodic low natural gas prices and cheap offshore supplies limit the commercial viability of this more capital intensive concept. The objective of Phase 2 was to conduct RD&T as outlined in the Phase 1 RD&T Plan to enhance the development and commercial acceptance of coproduction technology. Studies were designed to address the technical concerns that would mak

  13. Yes, your ideas and our technologies can contribute to economic, social and environmental progress. Alstom is a global leader in the world of power generation and rail infrastructure and sets the benchmark for innovative and environmentally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Alstom is a global leader in the world of power generation and rail infrastructure and sets the benchmark capacity automated metros in the world, and provides integrated power plant solutions and associated services for a wide variety of energy sources, including wind, solar, hydro, geothermal, ocean (wave), gas

  14. FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and fuel cells offer great promise for our energy future. Fuel cell vehicles are not yet commercially, such as a hydrogen fueling station or hydrogen fuel cell vehicle. Technology validation does not certify, and the Federal Government to evaluate hydrogen fuel cell vehicle and infrastructure technologies together in real

  15. Evidence That the [beta] Subunit of Chlamydia trachomatis Ribonucleotide Reductase Is Active with the Manganese Ion of Its Manganese(IV)/Iron(III) Cofactor in Site 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dassama, Laura M.K.; Boal, Amie K.; Krebs, Carsten; Rosenzweig, Amy C.; Bollinger, Jr., J. Martin (NWU); (Penn)

    2014-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The reaction of a class I ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) begins when a cofactor in the {beta} subunit oxidizes a cysteine residue {approx}35 {angstrom} away in the {alpha} subunit, generating a thiyl radical. In the class Ic enzyme from Chlamydia trachomatis (Ct), the cysteine oxidant is the Mn{sup IV} ion of a Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} cluster, which assembles in a reaction between O{sub 2} and the Mn{sup II}/Fe{sup II} complex of {beta}. The heterodinuclear nature of the cofactor raises the question of which site, 1 or 2, contains the Mn{sup IV} ion. Because site 1 is closer to the conserved location of the cysteine-oxidizing tyrosyl radical of class Ia and Ib RNRs, we suggested that the Mn{sup IV} ion most likely resides in this site (i.e., {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}), but a subsequent computational study favored its occupation of site 2 ({sup 1}Fe{sup III}/{sup 2}Mn{sup IV}). In this work, we have sought to resolve the location of the Mn{sup IV} ion in Ct RNR-{beta} by correlating X-ray crystallographic anomalous scattering intensities with catalytic activity for samples of the protein reconstituted in vitro by two different procedures. In samples containing primarily Mn{sup IV}/Fe{sup III} clusters, Mn preferentially occupies site 1, but some anomalous scattering from site 2 is observed, implying that both {sup 1}Mn{sup II}/{sup 2}Fe{sup II} and {sup 1}Fe{sup II}/{sup 2}Mn{sup II} complexes are competent to react with O{sub 2} to produce the corresponding oxidized states. However, with diminished Mn{sup II} loading in the reconstitution, there is no evidence for Mn occupancy of site 2, and the greater activity of these 'low-Mn' samples on a per-Mn basis implies that the {sup 1}Mn{sup IV}/{sup 2}Fe{sup III}-{beta} is at least the more active of the two oxidized forms and may be the only active form.

  16. COMPUTATIONS OF NUCLEAR RESPONSE FUNCTIONS WITH MACK-IV M. A. Abdou and Y. Gohar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    COMPUTATIONS OF NUCLEAR RESPONSE FUNCTIONS WITH MACK-IV M. A. Abdou and Y. Gohar Ttm ttpait * i OF NUCLEAR RESPONSE FUNCTIONS WITH MACK-IV M. A. Abdou and Y. Gohar APPLIED PHYSICS DIVISION, ARGONNE

  17. A Tetrapositive Metal Ion in the Gas Phase: Thorium(IV) Coordinated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tetrapositive Metal Ion in the Gas Phase: Thorium(IV) Coordinated by Neutral Tridentate Ligands. A Tetrapositive Metal Ion in the Gas Phase: Thorium(IV) Coordinated by Neutral...

  18. Structures of Domains I and IV from YbbR are representative of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Domains I and IV from YbbR are representative of a widely distributed protein family. Structures of Domains I and IV from YbbR are representative of a widely distributed protein...

  19. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Effects of Energy Removal on Physical Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please mark your calendars for the next Annex IV Environmental webinar titled: Effects of Energy Removal on Physical Systems. Held under the auspices of the Annex IV initiative to the IEA Ocean...

  20. Edinburgh Research Explorer Europium-IV: An Incommensurately Modulated Crystal Structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Europium-IV: An Incommensurately Modulated Crystal Structure 2012, 'Europium-IV: An Incommensurately Modulated Crystal Structure in the Lanthanides' Physical Review to the work immediately and investigate your claim. Download date: 27. Jun. 2014 #12;Europium

  1. Hybrid Fuel Cell Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None available

    2001-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    For the purpose of this STI product and unless otherwise stated, hybrid fuel cell systems are power generation systems in which a high temperature fuel cell is combined with another power generating technology. The resulting system exhibits a synergism in which the combination performs with an efficiency far greater than can be provided by either system alone. Hybrid fuel cell designs under development include fuel cell with gas turbine, fuel cell with reciprocating (piston) engine, and designs that combine different fuel cell technologies. Hybrid systems have been extensively analyzed and studied over the past five years by the Department of Energy (DOE), industry, and others. These efforts have revealed that this combination is capable of providing remarkably high efficiencies. This attribute, combined with an inherent low level of pollutant emission, suggests that hybrid systems are likely to serve as the next generation of advanced power generation systems.

  2. Insertion of Distributed Generation into Rural Feeders , R. MORENO+

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    -generating technologies with new technologies that pollute less. Therefore, the use of renewable energies in the worldwide of renewable energy distributed generators (DG) to radial feeders is assessed. Often, the long distance between, however, are not usually designed to receive energy at the consumer end. This problem intensifies

  3. Hydrogen, Fuel Cells, and Infrastructure Technologies FY 2002 Progress Report IV.E Air Management Subsystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    VNT7 variable nozzle turbine inlet geometry to improve performance across the desired flow range of the turbocompressor with a mixed flow compressor and VNT7 variable nozzle turbine. Completed the analysis, design of the turbocompressor VNT7 variable nozzle turbine. Complete analysis, design, fabrication, and testing of a reduced

  4. Influence of addition order and contact time on thorium (IV) retention by hematite in the presence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    1 Influence of addition order and contact time on thorium (IV) retention by hematite.reiller@cea.fr The influence of addition order and contact time in the system hematite (-Fe2O3) humic acid (HA) thorium (IV) was studied in batch experiments. Thorium (IV) is considered here as a chemical analogue of other actinides

  5. A COMPARISON OF BKY-FTN4 AND VAX-FORTRAN IV-PLUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horne, Christopher

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    a statement label. name block sn lJ VAX-FORTRAN IV-Plus sneestat fn type 'L~ VAX-FORTRAN IV-Plus the label of anskip a line- Separator VAX-FORTRAN IV-Plus 4.0 Description

  6. Study of Low Energy Electron Anti-neutrinos at Super-Kamiokande IV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    Study of Low Energy Electron Anti-neutrinos at Super-Kamiokande IV Dissertation Submitted neutrino physics. A forced trigger scheme has been implemented in Super-Kamiokande IV to search for the 2 the Sun. No events are found for both signals in 960 days of Super-Kamiokande IV data. The 90% CL upper

  7. Biosynthesis and SupramolecularAssemblyof ProcollagenIV in Neonatal Lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blumberg, Bruce

    Biosynthesis and SupramolecularAssemblyof ProcollagenIV in Neonatal Lung Bruce Blumberg, and the concentration of specific RNAs coding for pro- collagen IV were measured in neonatal rat lungs. Both decreased IV was followed in neonatal rat, mouse, and chick lungs, which actively elaborate endothelial

  8. Biomass Support for the China Renewable Energy Law: International Biomass Energy Technology Review Report, January 2006

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subcontractor report giving an overview of the biomass power generation technologies used in China, the U.S., and Europe.

  9. Pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion for power generation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimer, R.F.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Second-generation Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (PCFBC) is the culmination of years of effort in the development of a new generation of power plants which can operate on lower-quality fuels with substantially improved efficiencies, meet environmental requirements, and provide a lower cost of electricity. Air Products was selected in the DOE Clean Coal Technology Round V program to build, own, and operate the first commercial power plant using second-generation PCFBC technology, to be located at an Air Products chemicals manufacturing facility in Calvert City, Kentucky. This paper describes the second-generation PCFBC concept and its critical technology components.

  10. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. David A. Petti

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a demonstration of the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology for the production of process heat, electricity, and hydrogen. This nuclear- based technology can provide high-temperature process heat (up to 950C) that can be used as a substitute for the burning of fossil fuels for a wide range of commercial applications (see Figure 1). The substitution of the HTGR for burning fossil fuels conserves these hydrocarbon resources for other uses, reduces uncertainty in the cost and supply of natural gas and oil, and eliminates the emissions of greenhouse gases attendant with the burning of these fuels. The HTGR is a passively safe nuclear reactor concept with an easily understood safety basis that permits substantially reduced emergency planning requirements and improved siting flexibility compared to other nuclear technologies.

  11. ST ATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    conditioning (Carrier) and power generation (UTC Power). UTRC works directly with the UTC business units and outside partners to develop technology solutions that transition into...

  12. National Wind Technology Center to Debut New Dynamometer (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    New test facility will be used to accelerate the development and deployment of next-generation offshore and land-based wind energy technologies.

  13. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: Silicon Nanowire...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Generation Energy Storage Presentation given by Amprius, Inc. at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation...

  14. Backup Power Cost of Ownership Analysis and Incumbent Technology...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    backup power and presents the estimated annualized cost of ownership for fuel cell backup power systems compared with the incumbent technologies of battery and diesel generator...

  15. Advanced Vehicle Technology Competition: Challenge-X 2008 DOE...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications EcoCAR the Next Generation IN-VEHICLE, HIGH-POWER ENERGY STORAGE SYSTEMS PENN STATE DOE GRADUATE AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION (GATE) PROGRAM FOR...

  16. ENERGY EFFICIENCY TECHNOLOGY ROADMAP VOLUME 8: COMBINED HEAT...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    See "Technology Area Definitions" section No Explicit Systems Integration Renewable power generation creates income stream to support management of waste streams Very high...

  17. Metallicity of the intergalactic medium using pixel statistics: IV. Oxygen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anthony Aguirre; Corey Dow-Hygelund; Joop Schaye; Tom Theuns

    2008-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the abundance of oxygen in the IGM by analyzing OVI, CIV, SiIV, and HI pixel optical depths derived from a set of high-quality VLT and Keck spectra of 17 QSOs at 2.1 ~ 0.2. Consistent results are obtained by similarly comparing OVI to HI or OVI to SiIV optical depth ratios to simulation values, and also by directly ionization-correcting OVI optical depths as function of HI optical depths into [O/H] as a function of density. Subdividing the sample reveals no evidence for evolution, but low- and high-density samples are inconsistent, suggesting either density-dependence of [O/C] or -- more likely -- prevalence of collisionally-ionized gas at high density.

  18. Technology Application Centers: Facilitating Technology Transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuhel, G. J.

    's approach to technology deployment seeks to blend an industrial customer's priorities with the utility's marketing and customer service objectives. A&C Enercom sees technology deployment as the sum of an equation: technology deployment equals technology...

  19. Chem. Rev. 1994, 94, 107-125 107 Optical Second Harmonic Generation as a Probe of Surface Chemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chem. Rev. 1994, 94, 107-125 107 Optical Second Harmonic Generation as a Probe of Surface Chemistry 109 IV. SHG Measurements of Surface Chemistry 109 VI. Acknowledgments 122 V II.References 122 V. Other Surface SHG Experiments and Future 122 Directions I. Introduction Optical second harmonic generation (SHG

  20. Networking and Information Technology Research and Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program, as required by the High-Performance Computing Act of 1991 (P.L. 102-194), the Next Generation Internet Research Act of...

  1. Method of synthesis of anhydrous thorium(IV) complexes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Cantat, Thibault

    2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Method of producing anhydrous thorium(IV) tetrahalide complexes, utilizing Th(NO.sub.3).sub.4(H.sub.2O).sub.x, where x is at least 4, as a reagent; method of producing thorium-containing complexes utilizing ThCl.sub.4(DME).sub.2 as a precursor; method of producing purified ThCl.sub.4(ligand).sub.x compounds, where x is from 2 to 9; and novel compounds having the structures: ##STR00001##

  2. Understanding and Managing Generation Y

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallace, Kevin

    2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There are four generations in the workplace today; they consist of the Silent Generation, Baby Boom Generation, Generation X, and Generation Y. Generation Y, being the newest generation, is the least understood generation although marketers...

  3. 2007 gasification technologies conference papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sessions covered: gasification industry roundtable; the gasification market in China; gasification for power generation; the gasification challenge: carbon capture and use storage; industrial and polygeneration applications; gasification advantage in refinery applications; addressing plant performance; reliability and availability; gasification's contribution to supplementing gaseous and liquid fuels supplies; biomass gasification for fuel and power markets; and advances in technology-research and development

  4. FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FEMP/NTDP Technology Focus New Technology Demonstration Program Technology Focus FEMPFederal Energy Management Program Trends in Energy Management Technology: BCS Integration Technologies Open Communications into a complete EMCIS. The first article [1] covered enabling technologies for emerging energy management systems

  5. C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV drives XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to chromatin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Sicheng; Liu, Xunyue; Kamdar, Radhika Pankaj; Wanotayan, Rujira; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors and Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)] [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors and Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Adachi, Noritaka [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Nanobioscience, Yokohama City University, Yokohama 236-0027 (Japan); Matsumoto, Yoshihisa, E-mail: yoshim@nr.titech.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors and Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)] [Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors and Department of Nuclear Engineering, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: Chromatin binding of XRCC4 is dependent on the presence of DNA ligase IV. C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV alone can recruit itself and XRCC4 to chromatin. Two BRCT domains of DNA ligase IV are essential for the chromatin binding of XRCC4. -- Abstract: DNA ligase IV (LIG4) and XRCC4 form a complex to ligate two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). It is not fully understood how these proteins are recruited to DSBs. We recently demonstrated radiation-induced chromatin binding of XRCC4 by biochemical fractionation using detergent Nonidet P-40. In the present study, we examined the role of LIG4 in the recruitment of XRCC4/LIG4 complex to chromatin. The chromatin binding of XRCC4 was dependent on the presence of LIG4. The mutations in two BRCT domains (W725R and W893R, respectively) of LIG4 reduced the chromatin binding of LIG4 and XRCC4. The C-terminal fragment of LIG4 (LIG4-CT) without N-terminal catalytic domains could bind to chromatin with XRCC4. LIG4-CT with W725R or W893R mutation could bind to chromatin but could not support the chromatin binding of XRCC4. The ability of C-terminal region of LIG4 to interact with chromatin might provide us with an insight into the mechanisms of DSB repair through NHEJ.

  6. Oakland Operations Office, Oakland, California: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    DOE`s Office of Technology Development manages an aggressive national program for applied research, development, demonstration, testing, and evaluation. This program develops high, payoff technologies to clean up the inventory of DOE nuclear component manufacturing sites and to manage DOE-generated waste faster, safer, and cheaper than current environmental cleanup technologies. OTD programs are designed to make new, innovative, and more effective technologies available for transfer to users through progressive development. Projects are demonstrated, tested, and evaluated to produce solutions to current problems. Transition of technologies into more advanced stages of development is based upon technological, regulatory, economic, and institutional criteria. New technologies are made available for use in eliminating radioactive, hazardous, and other wastes in compliance with regulatory mandates. The primary goal is to protect human health and prevent further contamination. OTD technologies address three specific problem areas: (1) groundwater and soils cleanup; (2) waste retrieval and processing; and (3) pollution prevention.

  7. WABASH RIVER INTEGRATED METHANOL AND POWER PRODUCTION FROM CLEAN COAL TECHNOLOGIES (IMPPCCT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Albert Tsang

    2003-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wabash River Integrated Methanol and Power Production from Clean Coal Technologies (IMPPCCT) project is evaluating integrated electrical power generation and methanol production through clean coal technologies. The project is conducted by a multi-industry team lead by Gasification Engineering Corporation (GEC), and supported by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc., Dow Chemical Company, Dow Corning Corporation, Methanex Corporation, and Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation. Three project phases are planned for execution, including: (1) Feasibility study and conceptual design for an integrated demonstration facility, and for fence-line commercial embodiment plants (CEP) operated at Dow Chemical or Dow Corning chemical plant locations (2) Research, development, and testing (RD&T) to define any technology gaps or critical design and integration issues (3) Engineering design and financing plan to install an integrated commercial demonstration facility at the existing Wabash River Energy Limited (WREL) plant in West Terre Haute, Indiana. The WREL facility is a project selected and co-funded under the Round IV of the United States Department of Energy's (DOE's) Clean Coal Technology Program. In this project, coal and/or other solid fuel feedstocks are gasified in an oxygen-blown, entrained-flow gasifier with continuous slag removal and a dry particulate removal system. The resulting product synthesis gas is used to fuel a combustion turbine generator whose exhaust is integrated with a heat recovery steam generator to drive a refurbished steam turbine generator. The gasifier uses technology initially developed by The Dow Chemical Company (the Destec Gasification Process), and now offered commercially by Global Energy, Inc., parent company of GEC and WREL, as the E-GAS{trademark} technology. In a joint effort with the DOE, a Cooperative Agreement was awarded under the Early Entrance Coproduction Plant (EECP) solicitation. GEC and an Industrial Consortium are investigating the use of synthesis gas produced by the E-GAS{trademark} technology in a coproduction environment to enhance the efficiency and productivity of solid fuel gasification combined cycle power plants. The objectives of this effort are to determine the feasibility of an EECP located at a specific site which produces some combination of electric power (or heat), fuels, and/or chemicals from synthesis gas derived from coal, or, coal in combination with some other carbonaceous feedstock. The project's intended result is to provide the necessary technical, economic, and environmental information that will be needed to move the EECP forward to detailed design, construction, and operation by industry. During the reporting period, effort continues on identifying potential technologies for removing contaminants from synthesis gas to the level required by methanol synthesis. A liquid phase Claus process and a direct sulfur oxidation process were evaluated. Preliminary discussion was held with interested parties on cooperating on RD&T in Phase II of the project. Also, significant progress was made during the period in the submission of project deliverables. A meeting was held at DOE's National Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown between GEC and the DOE IMPPCCT Project Manager on the status of the project, and reached an agreement on the best way to wrap up Phase I and transition into the Phase II RD&T. Potential projects for the Phase II, cost, and fund availability were also discussed.

  8. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY REPORT FOR ZONE 1 OF THE EAST TENNESSEE TECHNOLOGY PARK IN OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    King, David A.

    2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU) conducted in-process inspections and independent verification (IV) surveys in support of DOE's remedial efforts in Zone 1 of East Tennessee Technology Park (ETTP) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee. Inspections concluded that the remediation contractor's soil removal and survey objectives were satisfied and the dynamic verification strategy (DVS) was implemented as designed. Independent verification (IV) activities included gamma walkover surveys and soil sample collection/analysis over multiple exposure units (EUs).

  9. (Environmental technology)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boston, H.L.

    1990-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The traveler participated in a conference on environmental technology in Paris, sponsored by the US Embassy-Paris, US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the French Environmental Ministry, and others. The traveler sat on a panel for environmental aspects of energy technology and made a presentation on the potential contributions of Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to a planned French-American Environmental Technologies Institute in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Evry, France. This institute would provide opportunities for international cooperation on environmental issues and technology transfer related to environmental protection, monitoring, and restoration at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The traveler also attended the Fourth International Conference on Environmental Contamination in Barcelona. Conference topics included environmental chemistry, land disposal of wastes, treatment of toxic wastes, micropollutants, trace organics, artificial radionuclides in the environment, and the use biomonitoring and biosystems for environmental assessment. The traveler presented a paper on The Fate of Radionuclides in Sewage Sludge Applied to Land.'' Those findings corresponded well with results from studies addressing the fate of fallout radionuclides from the Chernobyl nuclear accident. There was an exchange of new information on a number of topics of interest to DOE waste management and environmental restoration needs.

  10. SELECTING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    April 2004 SELECTING INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SECURITY PRODUCTS Shirley Radack, Editor Computer Security Division Information Technology Laboratory National Institute of Standards and Technology Information technology security prod ucts are essential to better secure infor mation technology (IT) systems

  11. International Conference on Mechanical Engineering, December 26-28, 2001, Dhaka, Bangladesh/pp. IV 37-40 Section IV: Fluid Mechanics 37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossain, M. Enamul

    on gas wells, asserted that field measurements of the time it takes for a pressure disturbance at one/pp. IV 37-40 Section IV: Fluid Mechanics 37 ROLES OF PRESSURE AND FLOW RATE IN DEFINING THE RADIUS through the well bore, pressure changes occur everywhere within certain region around the well bore

  12. Alternative Fuel Sources for Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Trevor Drake

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    configurations and materials would ideally be examined as well. Possible fuel assembly designs have been hypothesized by Ambrosi at the Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space Conference (2012) [4]. Preliminary research has shown that Am-241, Cm-242, Po.... AMBROSI, et al., Development and Testing of Americium-241 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator: Concept Designs and Breadboard System, Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space, (2012). 5. M. RAGHEB, Radioisotopes Power Production, mragheb...

  13. Alternaive Fuel Sources For Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzalez, Evan Sebastain

    2015-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    configurations and materials would ideally be examined as well. Possible fuel assembly designs have been hypothesized by Ambrosi at the Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space Conference (2012) [4]. Preliminary research has shown that Am-241, Cm-242, Po.... AMBROSI, et al., Development and Testing of Americium-241 Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator: Concept Designs and Breadboard System, Nuclear and Emerging Technologies for Space, (2012). 5. M. RAGHEB, Radioisotopes Power Production, mragheb...

  14. Hydrogen Technology Park DTE Energy -Company Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gas Production Detroit Edison Power Generation Energy Services* Energy Trading Biomass Energy Coal billion · 2.6 million customers · 11,000 MW of generation · 600 BCF natural gas delivery · 11,000 employees #12;3 Diversified Energy and Energy Technology Company * Energy Services: Coal Based Fuels

  15. AALBORGUNIVERSITY DEPARTMENTOFENERGY TECHNOLOGY Transformer in series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, Filipe Faria Da

    AALBORGUNIVERSITY DEPARTMENTOFENERGY TECHNOLOGY Transformer in series Filipe Miguel Faria Da that corresponds to a neighbour transformer. Both loads are 3-phase loads, which can be unbalanced to generated. The harmonics are generated inside the farm, thus, the current source is grounded at the transformer's neutral

  16. NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin C. Wiant; Ihor S. Diakunchak; Dennis A. Horazak; Harry T. Morehead

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has conducted a study of Next Generation Gas Turbine Systems that embraces the goals of the DOE's High Efficiency Engines and Turbines and Vision 21 programs. The Siemens Westinghouse Next Generation Gas Turbine (NGGT) Systems program was a 24-month study looking at the feasibility of a NGGT for the emerging deregulated distributed generation market. Initial efforts focused on a modular gas turbine using an innovative blend of proven technologies from the Siemens Westinghouse W501 series of gas turbines and new enabling technologies to serve a wide variety of applications. The flexibility to serve both 50-Hz and 60-Hz applications, use a wide range of fuels and be configured for peaking, intermediate and base load duty cycles was the ultimate goal. As the study progressed the emphasis shifted from a flexible gas turbine system of a specific size to a broader gas turbine technology focus. This shift in direction allowed for greater placement of technology among both the existing fleet and new engine designs, regardless of size, and will ultimately provide for greater public benefit. This report describes the study efforts and provides the resultant conclusions and recommendations for future technology development in collaboration with the DOE.

  17. Next-Generation Solar Collectors for CSP

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This fact sheet on Next-Generation Collectors for CSP highlights a solar energy program awarded through the 2012 SunShot Concentrating Solar Power R&D awards. The team is developing new solar collector base technologies for next-generation heliostats used in power tower systems. If successful, this project will result in a 50% reduction in solar field equipment cost and a 30% reduction in field installation cost compared to existing heliostat designs.

  18. EIS-0416: Ivanpah Solar Electric Generating System, San Bernardino County, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to support a proposal from Solar Partners I, II, IV, and VIII, limited liability corporations formed by BrightSource Energy (BrightSource), to construct and operate a solar thermal electric generating facility in San Bernardino County, California on BLM Land.

  19. Emerging technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu, Shin-yee

    1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Emerging Technologies thrust area at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is to help individuals establish technology areas that have national and commercial impact, and are outside the scope of the existing thrust areas. We continue to encourage innovative ideas that bring quality results to existing programs. We also take as our mission the encouragement of investment in new technology areas that are important to the economic competitiveness of this nation. In fiscal year 1992, we have focused on nine projects, summarized in this report: (1) Tire, Accident, Handling, and Roadway Safety; (2) EXTRANSYT: An Expert System for Advanced Traffic Management; (3) Odin: A High-Power, Underwater, Acoustic Transmitter for Surveillance Applications; (4) Passive Seismic Reservoir Monitoring: Signal Processing Innovations; (5) Paste Extrudable Explosive Aft Charge for Multi-Stage Munitions; (6) A Continuum Model for Reinforced Concrete at High Pressures and Strain Rates: Interim Report; (7) Benchmarking of the Criticality Evaluation Code COG; (8) Fast Algorithm for Large-Scale Consensus DNA Sequence Assembly; and (9) Using Electrical Heating to Enhance the Extraction of Volatile Organic Compounds from Soil.

  20. Venus Technology Plan Venus Technology Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rathbun, Julie A.

    Venus Technology Plan May 2014 #12; ii Venus Technology Plan At the Venus Exploration Survey priorities, and (3) develop a Technology Plan for future Venus missions (after a Technology Forum at VEXAG Meeting 11 in November 2013). Here, we present the 2014 Venus Technology Plan

  1. From Conflict to Concord: Copyeditors, Composition, and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chrisman Jacques, Kelly

    2009-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    on Past and Future Technologies 71 Chapter 4: Conclusion 100 Appendix A: Questionnaire 109 Appendix B: Fayes Copyediting Checklist 113 Appendix C: Additional Information on Copyeditors 115 Bibliography 116 iv Abstract The traditional.... Scholarly publishers, for example, rely on The Chicago Manual of Style to mandate a consistent set of standards; journalists, however, rely on the Associated Press (AP) Stylebook. Though each style manual may have a different interpretation of correct...

  2. Foote Creek Rim IV Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualPropertyd8c-a9ae-f8521cbb8489Information HydroFontana, California: Energy ResourcesIV Wind

  3. HNUtHUl I IV1-30 I

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal HeatonHEP/NERSC/ASCRJuneSave84047HNUtHUl I IV1-30

  4. Salton Sea IV Geothermal Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f < RAPID‎ |Rippey Jump to:WY)Project Jump to: navigation,Salton SeaIV

  5. Table IV: Technical Targets for Membranes: Stationary | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| Department of EnergyFOREnergy IV: Technical Targets for

  6. Generation gaps in engineering?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, David J. (David Jinwoo)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is much enthusiastic debate on the topic of generation gaps in the workplace today; what the generational differences are, how to address the apparent challenges, and if the generations themselves are even real. ...

  7. Fuel Cell Technologies Office Science and Technology Policy Fellowship...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cell Technologies Office Science and Technology Policy Fellowship Opportunities Available Fuel Cell Technologies Office Science and Technology Policy Fellowship Opportunities...

  8. Clean coal technologies market potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drazga, B. (ed.)

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Looking at the growing popularity of these technologies and of this industry, the report presents an in-depth analysis of all the various technologies involved in cleaning coal and protecting the environment. It analyzes upcoming and present day technologies such as gasification, combustion, and others. It looks at the various technological aspects, economic aspects, and the various programs involved in promoting these emerging green technologies. Contents: Industry background; What is coal?; Historical background of coal; Composition of coal; Types of coal; Environmental effects of coal; Managing wastes from coal; Introduction to clean coal; What is clean coal?; Byproducts of clean coal; Uses of clean coal; Support and opposition; Price of clean coal; Examining clean coal technologies; Coal washing; Advanced pollution control systems; Advanced power generating systems; Pulverized coal combustion (PCC); Carbon capture and storage; Capture and separation of carbon dioxide; Storage and sequestration of carbon dioxide; Economics and research and development; Industry initiatives; Clean Coal Power Initiative; Clean Coal Technology Program; Coal21; Outlook; Case Studies.

  9. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; R. Bratton

    2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This technology development plan is designed to provide a clear understanding of the research and development direction necessary for the qualification of nuclear grade graphite for use within the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) reactor. The NGNP will be a helium gas cooled Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Considerable effort will be required to ensure that the graphite performance is not compromised during operation. Based upon the perceived requirements the major data needs are outlined and justified from the perspective of reactor design, reatcor performance, or the reactor safety case. The path forward for technology development can then be easily determined for each data need. How the data will be obtained and the inter-relationships between the experimental and modeling activities will define the technology development for graphite R&D. Finally, the variables affecting this R&D program are discussed from a general perspective. Factors that can significantly affect the R&D program such as funding, schedules, available resources, multiple reactor designs, and graphite acquisition are analyzed.

  10. Small Generator Aggregation (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section establishes requirements for electricity providers to purchase electricity from small generators, with the goal of ensuring that small electricity generators (those with a nameplate...

  11. GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, Tonya

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OITs Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the waste water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the waste water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

  12. Technology and the Box

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maitland, Padma

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    its explorations of technology in partnership with radicalPadma Maitland Technology and the Box The room is thedisciplines. The theme of Technology and the Box emerged

  13. Hydrogen Technologies Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hydrogen Technologies Group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory advances the Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center's mission by researching a variety of hydrogen technologies.

  14. Innovation and Transportation's Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garrison, William L.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    decision making. Innovation and technology lock-in hasStage 1 imagine the innovation and technology developmentof emphasizing innovation and technology development. Pull

  15. NEXT GENERATION TURBINE SYSTEM STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frank Macri

    2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Rolls-Royce has completed a preliminary design and marketing study under a Department of Energy (DOE) cost shared contract (DE-AC26-00NT40852) to analyze the feasibility of developing a clean, high efficiency, and flexible Next Generation Turbine (NGT) system to meet the power generation market needs of the year 2007 and beyond. Rolls-Royce evaluated the full range of its most advanced commercial aerospace and aeroderivative engines alongside the special technologies necessary to achieve the aggressive efficiency, performance, emissions, economic, and flexibility targets desired by the DOE. Heavy emphasis was placed on evaluating the technical risks and the economic viability of various concept and technology options available. This was necessary to ensure the resulting advanced NGT system would provide extensive public benefits and significant customer benefits without introducing unacceptable levels of technical and operational risk that would impair the market acceptance of the resulting product. Two advanced cycle configurations were identified as offering significant advantages over current combined cycle products available in the market. In addition, balance of plant (BOP) technologies, as well as capabilities to improve the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of industrial gas turbine engines, have been identified. A customer focused survey and economic analysis of a proposed Rolls-Royce NGT product configuration was also accomplished as a part of this research study. The proposed Rolls-Royce NGT solution could offer customers clean, flexible power generation systems with very high efficiencies, similar to combined cycle plants, but at a much lower specific cost, similar to those of simple cycle plants.

  16. TECHNOLOGY FORUM

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| Department of Energy 51:Cross-Site66 -Topic Groups TECHNOLOGY

  17. Marine & Hydrokinetic Technologies (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program. The program supports the development of advanced water power devices that capture energy from waves, tides, ocean currents, rivers, streams, and ocean thermal gradients. The program works to promote the development and deployment of these new technologies, known as marine and hydrokinetic technologies, to assess the potential extractable energy from rivers, estuaries, and coastal waters, and to help industry harness this renewable, emissions-free resource to generate environmentally sustainable and cost-effective electricity.

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2009 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Well-to-Wheels Analysis of Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology Analysis...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle Technology...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Vehicle Technology Analysis and Evaluation Activities and Heavy Vehicle Systems Optimization Program Annual Progress Report Vehicle Technologies Office: 2008 Advanced Vehicle...

  20. CRYSTAL AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF HYDRIDOTIS (BIS(TRIMETHYLSILYL)AMIDO]URANIUM(IV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Richard A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry CRYSTAL AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF HYDRIDOTRIS[BIS(TRIMETHYLSILYL)AMIDO]URANIUM(Chemistry University of California Berkeley, California 94720 New hydride derivatives of thorium (IV) and uranium (

  1. E-Print Network 3.0 - annual iv zoledronic Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Corporation Prostate Cancer Summary: to treatment with zoledronic acid (4 mg) IV infusion or placebo every 3 months. BMD of the lumbar spine, left... randomly assigned to...

  2. Technical Session IV Talks | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    IV Talks Scientific User Facilities (SUF) Division SUF Home About User Facilities Projects Accelerator & Detector Research Science Highlights Principal Investigators' Meetings BES...

  3. CRYSTAL AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF HYDRIDOTIS (BIS(TRIMETHYLSILYL)AMIDO]URANIUM(IV)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andersen, Richard A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemistry University of California Berkeley, California 94720 New hydride derivatives of thorium (IV) and uranium (Chemistry CRYSTAL AND MOLECULAR STRUCTURE OF HYDRIDOTRIS[BIS(TRIMETHYLSILYL)AMIDO]URANIUM(

  4. RESEARCH RESULTS FORUM FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY AND RESOURCE ASSESSMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Renewable Energy Center Technical Assessment of Small Hydro Power Technologies #12;California Renewable Energy Center Technical Assessment of In-conduit Small Hydro Power Technologies The goal of this study is to investigate and assess available small hydro power generation technologies and associated operating

  5. Licensing and Deployment of Advanced Reactors Andrew C. Kadak, Ph.D.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of advanced reactors of the type proposed for Generation IV will require a new strategy for licensing since many of the proposed Generation IV technologies include concepts such as high temperature gas

  6. Advances in Materials Science for Environmental and Energy Technologies II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matyas, Dr Josef [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Ohji, Tatsuki [Advanced Manufacturing Research Institute, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Tec; Liu, Xingbo [West Virginia University, Morgantown; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans [ORNL; Devanathan, Ram [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Fox, Kevin [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Singh, Mrityunjay [NASA-Glenn Research Center, Cleveland; Wong-ng, Winnie [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), Gaithersburg, MD

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Materials Science and Technology 2012 Conference and Exhibition (MS&T'12) was held October 7-11, 2012, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. One of the major themes of the conference was Environmental and Energy Issues. Papers from five of the symposia held under that theme are invluded in this volume. These symposia included Materials Issues in Nuclear Waste Management for the 21st Century; Green Technologies for Materials Manufacturing and Processing IV; Energy Storage: Materials, Systems and Applications; Energy Conversion-Photovoltaic, Concentraing Solar Power and Thermoelectric; and Materials Development for Nuclear Applications and Extreme Environments.

  7. Dezincing Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Energy Service Div.; Morgan, W.A. [Metal Recovery Technologies, Inc., East Chicago, IN (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Half of the steel produced in the US is derived from scrap. With zinc-coated prompt scrap increasing fivefold since 1980, steel-makers are feeling the effect of increased contaminant loads on their operations. The greatest concern is the cost of treatment before disposal of waste dusts and water that arise from remelting zinc-coated scrap. An economic process is needed to strip and recover the zinc from scrap to provide a low residual scrap for steel- and iron-making. Metal Recovery Technologies, Inc., with the assistance of Argonne National Laboratory, have been developing a caustic leach dezincing process for upgrading galvanized stamping plant scrap into clean scrap with recovery of the zinc. With further development the technology could also process galvanized scrap from obsolete automobiles. This paper will review: (1) the status of recent pilot plant operations and plans for a commercial demonstration facility with a dezincing capacity of up to 250,000 tons/year, (2) the economics of caustic dezincing, and (3) benefits of decreased cost of environmental compliance, raw material savings, and improved operations with use of dezinced scrap.

  8. Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    11/17/2014 1 Generating Resources Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Utility Scale Solar PV Steven doing recently around two key supply-side resource technologies 1. Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine #12;11/17/2014 4 Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine Background Primary Components Gas-fired combustion

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    WAVE GENERATIONS FROM CONFINED EXPLOSIONS IN ROCKS C. L. Liu and Thomas J. Ahrens Seismological Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 In order to record P- and S-waves on the interactions between incident P- and SV-waves and free-surfaces of rocks. The relations between particle

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation B.E. Logan Department accomplishing wastewater treatment in processes based on microbial fuel cell technologies. When bacteria oxidize.4 106 L of wastewater, a wastewater treatment plant has the potential to become a 2.3 MW power plant

  11. Resources and capabilities in high-tech enterpreneurship : a study of two generations of Chinese startups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Lin, 1964 May 1-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By examining the origin and growth dynamics of two generations of high-tech startups in China's information technology sectors, this study presents empirical research on how Chinese technology startup companies, despite ...

  12. General com Technology community

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrara, Katherine W.

    Campus IT General com m unity Technology community ITsystem owners Campus Council for Information Technology (CCFIT) ~30 members Advisory evaluation and review role Input from faculty, staff, students formal representation on steering team and subcommittees Technology Support Program Technology support

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayaram, Bhyravabotla

    CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS - 2013 GUIDELINES & PROFORMAE FOR NOMINATIONS Planning and Performance 2013 #12;CSIR TECHNOLOGY AWARDS BRIEF DETAILS ,,CSIR Technology Awards were instituted in 1990 to encourage multi-disciplinary in- house team efforts and external interaction for technology development

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Northwest Regional Technology Center for Homeland Security The Northwest Regional Technology Center and deployment of technologies that are effective homeland security solutions for the region, and accelerate technology transfer to the national user community. Foster a collaborative spirit across agencies

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winter, Robin O

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ageism in the Workplace. Generations Spring, 5. Westman,of caring for multiple generations simultaneously. StronglyGeneration to Generation: The Heart of Family Medicine

  16. First Generation Advanced High-Strength Steels Deformation Fundamental...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting lm067sun2012o.pdf More Documents & Publications Coherent Research Plan for the 3rd Generation...

  17. Generation of Web Service Descriptions and Web Service

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Generation of Web Service Descriptions and Web Service Module Implementation for Concept University of Science and Technology Software Systems Institute (STS) #12;Abstract Nowadays web services in order to initiate the communication. A web services endpoint communication interface utilizes

  18. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricant Additives for Next-Generation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricant Additives for Next-Generation Fuel-Efficient Engines May 15 2015 10:00 AM - 11:00 AM Jun Qu, Materials Science and Technology Division ORNL...

  19. Modeling of thin-film solar thermoelectric generators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weinstein, Lee Adragon

    Recent advances in solar thermoelectric generator (STEG) performance have raised their prospect as a potential technology to convert solar energy into electricity. This paper presents an analysis of thin-film STEGs. ...

  20. User-generated censorship : manipulating the maps of social media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Christopher E., S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The last decade has seen the rise of new technologies for making information more broadly available and accessible. Variously called 'user-generated content,' 'social media,''social news,' 'crowd-curation,' and so on, these ...