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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Battery control strategy Diesel generator Fuel consumption Hybrid system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standalone diesel generators (DGs) are widely utilized in remote areas in Indonesia. Some areas use microhydro (MH) systems with DGs backup. However, highly diesel fuel price makes such systems become uneconomical. This paper introduces hybrid photovoltaic (PV)/MH/DG/battery systems with a battery control strategy to minimize the diesel fuel consumption. The method is applied to control the state of charge (SOC) level of the battery based on its previous level and the demand load condition to optimize the DG operation. Simulation results show that operations of the hybrid PV/MH/DG/battery with the battery control strategy needs less fuel consumption than PV/MH/DG and MH/DG systems.

Ayong Hiendro; Yohannes M. Simanjuntak

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors Fuel Consumption for Electricity Generation, All Sectors United States Coal (thousand st/d) .................... 2,361 2,207 2,586 2,287 2,421 2,237 2,720 2,365 2,391 2,174 2,622 2,286 2,361 2,437 2,369 Natural Gas (million cf/d) ............. 20,952 21,902 28,751 21,535 20,291 22,193 28,174 20,227 20,829 22,857 29,506 21,248 23,302 22,736 23,627 Petroleum (thousand b/d) ........... 128 127 144 127 135 128 135 119 131 124 134 117 131 129 127 Residual Fuel Oil ...................... 38 28 36 29 30 31 33 29 31 30 34 27 33 31 30 Distillate Fuel Oil ....................... 26 24 27 28 35 30 30 26 31 26 28 25 26 30 28 Petroleum Coke (a) .................. 59 72 78 66 63 63 66 59 62 63 67 60 69 63 63 Other Petroleum Liquids (b) ..... 5 3 4 4 7 5 5 5 7 5 5 5 4 6 6 Northeast Census Region Coal (thousand st/d) ....................

3

Fuel Consumption - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration, Residential Energy Consumption Survey(RTECS), 1994 Fuel Consumption

4

Fuel Consumption | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions, And A Simple Connection To the Vehicle Fuel Consumption, CO2 Emissions, And A Simple Connection To the Vehicle Road Load Equation Jan 15 2014 11:30 AM - 12:30 PM Glen E. Johnson Tennessee Tech University, Cookeville Energy and Transportation Science Division Seminar National Transportation Research Center, Room C-04 CONTACT : Email: Andreas Malikopoulos Phone:865.382.7827 Add to Calendar SHARE Ambitious goals have been set to reduce fuel consumption and CO2 emissions over the next generation. Starting from first principles, we will derive relations to connect fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions to a vehicle's road load equation. The model suggests approaches to facilitate achievement of future fuel and emissions targets. About the speaker: Dr. Johnson is a 1973 Mechanical Engineering graduate of Worcester

5

Amtrak fuel consumption study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents a study of fuel consumption on National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) trains and is part of an effort to determine effective ways of conserving fuel on the Amtrak system. The study was performed by the Transportation Systems Center (TSC). A series of 26 test runs were conducted on Amtrak trains operating between Boston, Massachusetts, and New Haven, Connecticut, to measure fuel consumption, trip time and other fuel-use-related parameters. The test data were analyzed and compared with results of the TSC Train Performance Simulator replicating the same operations.

Hitz, J.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Reducing Greenhouse Emissions and Fuel Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Emissions and Fuel Consumption Impacts of IntelligentTravel Time, Fuel Consumption and Weigh Station Efficiency.EMISSIONS AND FUEL CONSUMPTION - Sustainable Approaches for

Shaheen, Susan; Lipman, Timothy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Railroad fuel-oil consumption in 1928  

SciTech Connect

Data are presented, by districts, covering the consumption of fuel oil for various uses by railroads.

Redfield, A.H.

1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Argonne TTRDC - TransForum v10n1 - Fuel Consumption vs. Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Great Debate: Fuel Consumption versus Fuel Economy Graphs for Fuel Consumption vs. Fuel Economy What is the difference between fuel consumption and fuel economy? In Europe,...

9

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Agency/Company /Organization: Natural Resources Canada Focus Area: Fuels & Efficiency Topics: Analysis Tools Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/fuel-consumption-guide/fuel-consu Natural Resources Canada has compiled fuel consumption ratings for passenger cars and light-duty pickup trucks, vans, and special purpose vehicles sold in Canada. The website links to the Fuel Consumption Guide and allows users to search for vehicles from current and past model years. It also provides information about vehicle maintenance and other practices to reduce fuel consumption. How to Use This Tool This tool is most helpful when using these strategies:

10

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

11

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991--Combined Consumption and Fuel  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

< < Welcome to the U.S. Energy Information Administration's Manufacturing Web Site. If you are having trouble, call 202-586-8800 for help. Return to Energy Information Administration Home Page. Home > Energy Users > Manufacturing > Consumption and Fuel Switching Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1991 (Combined Consumption and Fuel Switching) Overview Full Report Tables & Spreadsheets This report presents national-level estimates about energy use and consumption in the manufacturing sector as well as manufacturers' fuel-switching capability. Contact: Stephanie.battle@eia.doe.gov Stephanie Battle Director, Energy Consumption Division Phone: (202) 586-7237 Fax: (202) 586-0018 URL: http://www.eia.gov/emeu/mecs/mecs91/consumption/mecs1a.html File Last Modified: May 25, 1996

12

Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption and Expenditures  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures Chapter 4. Fuel Economy, Consumption, and Expenditures This chapter analyzes trends in fuel economy, fuel consumption, and fuel expenditures, using data unique to the Residential Transportation Energy Consumption Survey, as well as selected data from other sources. Analysis topics include the following: Following the oil supply and price disruptions caused by the Arab oil embargo of 1973-1974, motor gasoline price increases, the introduction of corporate average fuel economy standards, and environmental quality initiatives helped to spur major changes in vehicle technology. But have the many advances in vehicle technology resulted in measurable gains in the fuel economy of the residential vehicle fleet?

13

,"Utah Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","52013" ,"Release Date:","7...

14

,"Ohio Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Ohio Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release Date:","9...

15

,"Wisconsin Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wisconsin Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

16

,"Michigan Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

17

,"California Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

18

,"Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","72013" ,"Release...

19

,"Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

20

,"Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

,"Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","52013" ,"Release Date:","7...

22

"Table A10. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" 0. Total Consumption of LPG, Distillate Fuel Oil, and Residual Fuel" " Oil for Selected Purposes by Census Region and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991" " (Estimates in Barrels per Day)" ,,,," Inputs for Heat",,," Primary Consumption" " "," Primary Consumption for all Purposes",,," Power, and Generation of Electricity",,," for Nonfuel Purposes",,,"RSE" ," ------------------------------------",,," ------------------------------------",,," -------------------------------",,,"Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","LPG","Distillate(b)","Residual","Factors"

23

Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

24

Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

25

South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption...

26

South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...

27

,"Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:31:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570STX2" "Date","Texas...

28

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of ...

29

Table 8.7a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of ...

30

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 ...

31

Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table ...

32

Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.5c Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation: Electric Power Sector by Plant Type, 1989-2011 (Breakout of Table 8.5b)

33

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020 Source: EIA, International Energy Outlook 2000 Previous slide Next slide Back to first slide View graphic version Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by

34

Fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

High temperature solid oxide electrolyte fuel cell generators which allow controlled leakage among plural chambers in a sealed housing. Depleted oxidant and fuel are directly reacted in one chamber to combust remaining fuel and preheat incoming reactants. The cells are preferably electrically arranged in a series-parallel configuration.

Isenberg, Arnold O. (Forest Hills, PA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Table 3.1 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Net Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 75,407 2 4 563 1 8 * 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 16,479 * * 118 * 6 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,467 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 1,218 * * 15 * 2 * 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 9,203

36

Table E7.1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit:...

37

Fuel cell generator energy dissipator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method are disclosed for eliminating the chemical energy of fuel remaining in a fuel cell generator when the electrical power output of the fuel cell generator is terminated. During a generator shut down condition, electrically resistive elements are automatically connected across the fuel cell generator terminals in order to draw current, thereby depleting the fuel

Veyo, Stephen Emery (Murrysville, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey Todd (Valencia, PA); Gordon, John Thomas (Ambridge, PA); Shockling, Larry Anthony (Pittsburgh, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

South Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

View History: Annual Download Data (XLS File) South Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) South Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel...

39

Utah Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

40

Utah Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

California Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

42

California Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

43

California Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) California Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

44

Ohio Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

45

Ohio Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

46

Michigan Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

47

Michigan Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

48

Idaho Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Idaho Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

49

Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

50

Colorado Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

51

Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

52

The individual contribution of automotive components to vehicle fuel consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel consumption has grown to become a major point of interest as oil reserves are depleted. The purpose of this study is to determine the key components that cause variation in the instantaneous fuel consumption of vehicles ...

Napier, Parhys L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Illinois Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Illinois Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2010 25 23 25...

54

New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

55

New Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8...

56

Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9...

57

Chapter 2. Consumption of Fossil Fuels - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

48 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 Chapter 2. Consumption of Fossil Fuels

58

Table 6.2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" 2 Consumption Ratios of Fuel, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy-Consumption Ratios;" " Unit: Varies." ,,,"Consumption" " ",,"Consumption","per Dollar"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","RSE" "Economic","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Row" "Characteristic(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","Factors"

59

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial...

60

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream 1 and spent fuel stream 2. Spent fuel stream 1 is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream 1 and exhaust stream 2, and exhaust stream 1 is vented. Exhaust stream 2 is mixed with spent fuel stream 2 to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells. 1 fig.

Grimble, R.E.

1988-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

Grimble, Ralph E. (Finleyville, PA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Table 3.3 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 3 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Economic Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke and Characteristic(a) Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal Breeze Other(f) Total United States Value of Shipments and Receipts (million dollars) Under 20 1,148 314 6 53 446 14 25 Q 291 20-49 1,018 297 13 22 381 18 97 5 185 50-99 1,095 305 7 13 440 6 130 9 186 100-249 1,728 411 16 11 793 7 131 7 353 250-499 1,916 391 16 11 583 3 185 5 722 500 and Over 7,323 720 21 21 2,569 21 300 348 3,323 Total 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 376 5,059 Employment Size Under 50 1,149 305 12 45 565 21 31

63

Table 3.2 Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. NAICS Net Residual Distillate LPG and Coke Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) Total United States 311 Food 1,158 257 12 22 579 6 182 2 99 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 350 56 * 1 121 * 126 0 45 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 25 * * 53 * 110 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 107 4 1 1 15 * 49 2 36 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 143 31 1 Q 100 1 2 0 4 3115 Dairy Products 105 33 2 2 66 1 * 0 2 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 212 69 5 3 125 2 Q 0 8 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 86 29 1 1 38 1 10 0 7 3121 Beverages

64

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

State Plan to Reduce State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type State Plan to Reduce Petroleum Consumption

65

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: August 9, 5: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #635: August 9, 2010 Fuel Consumption from Lawn and Garden Equipment on

66

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Canada's Fuel Consumption Guide Website Focus Area: Fuel Efficiency Topics: Market Analysis Website: oee.nrcan.gc.ca/transportation/tools/fuelratings/ratings-search.cfm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/canadas-fuel-consumption-guide-websit Language: English Policies: Regulations Regulations: Fuel Efficiency Standards This website provides a compilation of fuel consumption ratings for passenger cars and light-duty pickup trucks, vans and special purpose vehicles sold in Canada. The website links to the Fuel Consumption Guide and allows users to search for vehicles from current and past model years. It also provides information about vehicle maintenance and other practices

67

The impact of residential density on vehicle usage and fuel consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on vehicle usage and energy consumption. Journal of Urbanon vehicle usage and fuel consumption Jinwon Kim and Davidon vehicle usage and fuel consumption* Jinwon Kim and David

Kim, Jinwon; Brownstone, David

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

How much of world energy consumption and electricity generation is ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much of world energy consumption and electricity generation is from renewable energy? EIA estimates that about 10% of world marketed energy consumption is from ...

69

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008,...

70

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

5: December 12, 5: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705: December 12, 2011 Fuel Consumption Standards for Combination Tractors on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #705:

71

Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.7b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity Generation and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.7a) ...

72

Solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row. 5 figures.

Di Croce, A.M.; Draper, R.

1993-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

73

Solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plenum containing at least two rows of spaced apart, annular, axially elongated fuel cells. An electrical conductor extending between adjacent rows of fuel cells connects the fuel cells of one row in parallel with each other and in series with the fuel cells of the adjacent row.

Di Croce, A. Michael (Murrysville, PA); Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA)

1993-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

74

UK Availability and Consumption of Primary and Secondary Fuels...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Availability and Consumption of Primary and Secondary Fuels (1974) The then UK Department of Energy, in conjunction with the UK Government Statistical Service published statistics...

75

Consumption of alternative transportation fuels held steady in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The consumption of propane in heavy duty vehicles has ... Many fleets have replaced their light duty vehicles with flexible fueled and gasoline hybrid vehicles ...

76

Figure 64. Industrial energy consumption by fuel, 2011, 2025, and ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 64. Industrial energy consumption by fuel, 2011, 2025, and 2040 (quadrillion Btu) Natural Gas Petroleum and other liquids

77

,"U.S. Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","10312013"...

78

,"U.S. Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

79

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

80

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2011 ,"Release Date:","1031...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",1998 ,"Release...

82

Figure 6. Transportation energy consumption by fuel, 1990-2040 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 6. Transportation energy consumption by fuel, 1990-2040 (quadrillion Btu) Motor Gasoline, no E85 Pipeline Other E85 Jet Fuel

83

Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. ... Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy, 1949-2010:

84

Table E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" E3.1. Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,"Net","Residual","Distillate",,"LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Natural Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

85

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Values of Shipments and Employment Sizes;" " Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," "," " " "," ",," "," ",," "," ",," ","RSE" "Economic",,,"Residual","Distillate","Natural ","LPG and",,"Coke and"," ","Row" "Characteristic(a)","Total","Electricity(b)","Fuel Oil","Fuel Oil(c)","Gas(d)","NGL(e)","Coal","Breeze","Other(f)","Factors"

86

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Resale and Generation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuel Fuel Resale and Generation Regulations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Resale and Generation Regulations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Resale and Generation Regulations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Resale and Generation Regulations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Resale and Generation Regulations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Resale and Generation Regulations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Alternative Fuel Resale and Generation Regulations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type

87

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke","Waste","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

88

Amtrak fuel consumption study. Final report May-Sep 80  

SciTech Connect

This report documents a study of fuel consumption on National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) trains and is part of an effort to determine effective ways of conserving fuel on the Amtrak system. The study was performed by the Transportation Systems Center (TSC) under the sponsorship of the Federal Railroad Administration and in cooperation with Amtrak. A series of 26 test runs were conducted on Amtrak trains operating between Boston, Massachusetts, and New Haven, Connecticut, to measure fuel consumption, trip time and other fuel-use-related parameters. The test data were analyzed and compared with results of the TSC Train Performance Simulator replicating the same operations. Results of the tests showed that the average fuel consumption for the 157.7 mile trip was 368 gallons and that the average fuel use efficiency was 277 ton-miles per gallon. Fuel consumption and fuel use efficiency were found to increase consistently with increasing train tonnage. One locomotive was also found to consume about 12 percent more fuel than the other locomotive tested. The fuel consumption and trip time results for individual runs varied between +8.0 to -9.5 and +5.4 and -10.7 percent, respectively, of the Train Performance Simulator results. However, when averaged over the ten test runs analyzed, the fuel consumption and trip time results were within 1.04 and 0.03 percent, respectively, of the simulator. Throttle notch settings and train speed profiles also agreed well with simulated results.

Hitz, J.S.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Energy Information Administration - Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 2 Page Last Modified: June 2010 Table 2. End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years Iron and Steel Mills (NAICS1 331111) 1998 2002 2006 Total 2 1,672 1,455 1,147 Net Electricity 3 158 184 175 Natural Gas 456 388 326 Coal 48 36 14 Boiler Fuel -- -- -- Coal 8 W 1 Residual Fuel Oil 10 * 4 Natural Gas 52 39 27 Process Heating -- -- -- Net Electricity 74 79 76 Residual Fuel Oil 19 * 11 Natural Gas 369 329 272 Machine Drive -- -- -- Net Electricity 68 86 77 Notes 1. The North American Industry Classification System (NAICS) has replaced the Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) system. NAICS 331111 includes steel works, blast furnaces (including coke ovens), and rolling mills. 2. 'Total' is the sum of all energy sources listed below, including net steam (the sum of purchases, generation from renewable resources, and net transfers), and other energy that respondents indicated was used to produce heat and power. It is the fuel quantities across all end-uses.

90

Table 5.7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 7 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) for Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million End Use (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 845,727 13 22 5,064 18 39 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 12,979 7 3 2,074 3 26 Conventional Boiler Use 12,979 3 1 712 1 3 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 4 3 1,362 2 23 Direct Uses-Total Process 675,152 4 9 2,549 7 13 Process Heating

91

Table 5.5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(c) LPG and Coke and Breeze) Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) (billion NGL(d) (million Other(e) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 4 3 1,362 2 23 -- Direct Uses-Total Process

92

Table 5.6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 6 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: End Uses; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal End Use Total Electricity(a) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(b) Natural Gas(c) NGL(d) Coke and Breeze) Other(e) Total United States TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280 -- Process Cooling and Refrigeration -- 182 * Q 25

93

Table 5.4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 4 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Demand Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use for Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 2,886 79 130 5,211 69 868 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel 44 46 19 2,134 10 572 Conventional Boiler Use 44 20 4 733 3 72 CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 26 15 1,401 7 500 Direct Uses-Total Process 2,304 26 54 2,623 29 289 Process Heating 318 25 14 2,362 24 280 Process Cooling and Refrigeration

94

Table 5.2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 2 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Trillion Btu. Distillate Fuel Oil Coal NAICS Net Residual and LPG and (excluding Coal Code(a) End Use Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coke and Breeze) Other(f) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 2,437 79 130 5,211 69 868 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 27 46 19 2,134 10 572 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 27 20 4 733 3 72 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process -- 0 26 15 1,401 7 500 -- Direct Uses-Total Process -- 1,912 26 54 2,623 29 289 -- Process Heating -- 297 25 14 2,362 24 280

95

Table 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5.1 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National Data; Row: End Uses within NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources, including Net Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and Breeze) NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel(c) (billion NGL(e) (million Other(f) Code(a) End Use (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 - 339 ALL MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES TOTAL FUEL CONSUMPTION 14,228 714,166 13 22 5,064 18 39 5,435 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel -- 7,788 7 3 2,074 3 26 -- Conventional Boiler Use -- 7,788 3 1 712 1 3 -- CHP and/or Cogeneration Process

96

Biogas-fueled Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a case study of the use of digester gas produced at two wastewater treatment plants in Omaha, NE to fuel electric power generators.

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

97

Solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Shockling, Larry A. (Plum Borough, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Development of a Heavy-Duty Diesel Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model 2. Brown, S. ,Modal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model Clark, N. N. andModal Emissions and Fuel Consumption Model 4.6. E XHAUST A

Barth, Matthew; Younglove, Theodore; Scora, George

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

100

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential BuildingsŽ  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Draft Environmental Assessment for Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings" and 10 CFR Part 435 "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings" (DOE/EA-1778) 2 SUMMARY The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA) for DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, "Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

New Zealand Energy Data: Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to oil and other...

102

Michigan Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Michigan Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec; 2010: 22: 20: 22: 21: 22: 21: 22: 22: 21: 22 ...

103

,"U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:27:42 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3025US2" "Date","U.S....

104

,"U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:27:42 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3025US2" "Date","U.S. Natural...

105

South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

View History: Monthly Annual Download Data (XLS File) No chart available. South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul...

106

,"New Mexico Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10312013 3:31:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570SNM2" "Date","New...

107

Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 29,750 31,237 31,121 29,705 35,751 40,508 38,392 1990's 39,249 42,166 39,700 39,211 35,432 34,900 35,236 30,370 26,034 25,055 2000's 25,934 28,266 25,525 26,276 27,818 27,380 28,435 28,213 27,161 24,089 2010's 23,238 24,938 27,809 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

108

Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 1,225 1,736 1,807 1,582 4,278 2,390 2,537 1990's 27,720 36,088 36,741 35,503 37,347 39,116 40,334 40,706 39,601 41,149 2000's 42,519 42,243 44,008 44,762 44,016 43,386 38,938 41,197 40,286 39,447 2010's 37,316 35,339 37,397 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

109

Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 121,848 123,993 104,292 102,185 123,008 121,936 134,132 1990's 82,828 83,733 86,623 74,925 66,600 75,845 69,235 71,155 63,368 68,393 2000's 69,174 63,137 63,031 56,018 55,970 45,837 46,205 51,499 42,957 39,002 2010's 40,814 42,633 42,123 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Louisiana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

110

Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 12,572 16,185 17,090 13,633 16,249 17,446 19,820 1990's 12,182 14,154 13,217 13,051 13,939 14,896 15,409 15,597 16,524 19,272 2000's 20,602 20,991 25,767 28,829 24,053 24,408 23,868 25,276 23,574 25,282 2010's 27,104 28,582 29,157 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption Wyoming Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

111

Vehicle Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated ... Gas volumes delivered for use as vehicle fuel are included in the State annual totals through 2010 but not in ...

112

Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January 2011 ...

113

Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 2.8 Motor Vehicle Mileage, Fuel Consumption, and Fuel Economy, 1949-2010: Year: Light-Duty Vehicles, Short Wheelbase 1: Light-Duty Vehicles, Long Wheelbase 2:

114

Recent world fossil-fuel and primary energy production and consumption trends  

SciTech Connect

Worldwide fossil fuel and primary electric power production figures since 1973 show a recent drop in oil production similar to the 1975 decline after recession. Crude oil consumption has declined since 1978, while production has increased. Natural gas production and consumption continue to increase as does power generation from all energy sources. Differences are noted between data sources and comparisons made of the validity of the data. 13 references, 7 figures, 12 tables. (DCK)

Parent, J.D.

1982-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

115

Electricity Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Generation and Consumption by State (2008 ) Dataset Summary Description Provides total annual electricity consumption by sector (residential, commercial and industrial) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh, and total electricity generation by sector (e.g. wind, solar, nuclear, coal) for all states in 2008, reported in GWh. Source NREL Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords EIA Electricity Consumption Electricity Generation States Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon 2008 State Electricity Generation and Consumption (format: xls) (xlsx, 56.7 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below

116

Comparing Pathways Projected fuel consumption and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(all-electric 10-20 miles, 40-60 miles) · Fuel cells (hybrid with batteries) #12;Mid-size passenger car Vehicles by UC Davis, DOE, and MIT #12;Mid-size Passenger car Year Electric range mi Charge depleting mpg capability #12;Vehicle types and advanced technologies considered Vehicle types · Mid-size passenger cars

California at Davis, University of

117

Alaska Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 96,603 109,333 62,341 71,104 112,404 151,280 189,702 1990's 166,155 187,106 197,975 202,199 200,809 253,695 255,500 230,578 242,271 224,355 2000's 226,659 229,206 241,469 255,701 237,530 259,829 218,153 227,374 211,878 219,161 2010's 211,918 208,531 214,335 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease

118

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,270 1,530 1,924 1970's 2,251 2,419 2,847 2,725 1,649 1,760 3,043 3,210 2,134 2,889 1980's 1,320 1,580 3,278 3,543 5,236 4,575 4,715 5,799 4,983 4,767 1990's 6,031 3,502 3,381 4,145 3,252 3,069 3,299 2,275 1,706 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Pennsylvania Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

119

Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 183,870 204,390 193,822 189,173 229,053 200,239 163,218 1990's 228,485 125,198 123,111 130,916 139,427 178,827 177,508 144,787 176,262 136,708 2000's 141,785 135,786 114,919 123,585 129,825 134,434 138,558 154,323 166,500 169,631 2010's 157,751 147,268 163,325 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption Texas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease

120

Mississippi Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Mississippi Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 8,582 9,158 8,521 1970's 7,893 5,840 9,153 6,152 5,357 7,894 4,836 4,979 5,421 8,645 1980's 4,428 4,028 7,236 6,632 7,202 6,296 6,562 8,091 7,100 5,021 1990's 7,257 4,585 4,945 4,829 3,632 3,507 3,584 3,652 3,710 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Mississippi Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Table 4.1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; 1 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Coke Residual Distillate Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coal and Breeze NAICS Total Electricity(b) Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) (billion NGL(e) (million (million Other(f) Code(a) Subsector and Industry (trillion Btu) (million kWh) (million bbl) (million bbl) cu ft) (million bbl) short tons) short tons) (trillion Btu) Total United States 311 Food 1,113 75,673 2 4 563 1 8 * 54 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 346 16,620 * * 118 * 6 0 41 311221 Wet Corn Milling 214 7,481 * * 51 * 5 0 25 31131 Sugar Manufacturing 72 1,264 * * 15 * 2 * * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 142 9,258 * Q 97

122

Nonresidential buildings energy consumption survey: 1979 consumption and expenditures. Part 2. Steam, fuel oil, LPG, and all fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents data on square footage and on total energy consumption and expenditures for commercial buildings in the contiguous United States. Also included are detailed consumption and expenditures tables for fuel oil or kerosene, liquid petroleum gas (LPG), and purchased steam. Commercial buildings include all nonresidential buildings with the exception of those where industrial activities occupy more of the total square footage than any other type of activity. 7 figures, 23 tables.

Patinkin, L.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Table 2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expeditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Oil Consumption and Expeditures in U.S. Households ... Space Heating - Main or Secondary ... Forms EIA-457 A-G of the 2001 Residential Energy Consumption

124

Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vermont Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2010 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2011 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0...

125

Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Annual Energy Outlook 2013 projections to 2040 Growth in energy production outstrips consumption growth Crude oil production rises sharply over the next decade Motor gasoline consumption reflects more stringent fuel economy standards The U.S. becomes a net exporter of natural gas in the early 2020s U.S. energy-related carbon dioxide emissions remain below their 2005 level through 2040

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski; Adam Sieminski

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Table WH3. Total Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table WH3. Total Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units Electricity (billion kWh) Natural Gas (billion cf) Fuel Oil

127

Table WH10. Consumption Intensity by Main Water Heating Fuel Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Main Water Heating Fuel Used (physical units/number of household members) Electricity Table WH10. Consumption Intensity by Main Water Heating Fuel Used, 2005

128

Table SH3. Total Consumption for Space Heating by Major Fuels Used ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural Gas (billion cf) Major Fuels Used 4 (physical units) Table SH3. Total Consumption for Space Heating by Major Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units

129

Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3...

130

Table WH6. Average Consumption for Water Heating by Major Fuels ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Major Fuels Used 5 (physical units of consumption per household using the fuel as a water heating source) Electricity (kWh) Table WH6. Average Consumption for Water ...

131

Utilization of Fuel Consumption Data in an Ecodriving Incentive System for Heavy-Duty Vehicle Drivers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Driver behavior is one of the greatest factors determining fuel consumption and, thus, carbon dioxide emissions from a heavy-duty vehicle. The difference in fuel consumption can be up to 30%, depending on the driver. Education, monitoring, and feedback ...

Heikki Liimatainen

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Renewable Energy Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Use  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electricity Generation by Energy Use Electricity Generation by Energy Use Sector and Energy Source, 2004 - 2008 Dataset Summary Description Provides annual renewable energy consumption (in quadrillion btu) for electricity generation in the United States by energy use sector (commercial, industrial and electric power) and by energy source (e.g. biomass, geothermal, etc.) This data was compiled and published by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords biomass Commercial Electric Power Electricity Generation geothermal Industrial PV Renewable Energy Consumption solar wind Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon 2008_RE.Consumption.for_.Elec_.Gen_EIA.Aug_.2010.xls (xls, 19.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review

133

Table 3.5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; 5 Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Blast Pulping Liquor NAICS Furnace/Coke Petroleum or Wood Chips, Code(a) Subsector and Industry Total Oven Gases Waste Gas Coke Black Liquor Bark Total United States 311 Food 11 0 7 0 0 1 3112 Grain and Oilseed Milling 5 0 2 0 0 * 311221 Wet Corn Milling * 0 * 0 0 0 31131 Sugar Manufacturing * 0 * 0 0 * 3114 Fruit and Vegetable Preserving and Specialty Foods 1 0 1 0 0 0 3115 Dairy Products 1 0 1 0 0 0 3116 Animal Slaughtering and Processing 4 0 4 0 0 * 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 3 0 2 0 0 1 3121 Beverages 3 0 2 0 0 1 3122 Tobacco 0 0 0 0 0 0 313 Textile Mills 0 0 0 0 0 0 314 Textile Product Mills

134

Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

47 47 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142281847 Varnish cache server Industrial Biomass Energy Consumption and Electricity Net Generation by Industry and Energy Source, 2008 Dataset Summary Description Biomass energy consumption and electricity net generation in the industrial sector by industry and energy source in 2008. This data is published and compiled by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA). Source EIA Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords 2008 biomass consumption industrial sector Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon industrial_biomass_energy_consumption_and_electricity_2008.xls (xls, 27.6 KiB)

135

Development of a predictive system for car fuel consumption using an artificial neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A predictive system for car fuel consumption using a back-propagation neural network is proposed in this paper. The proposed system is constituted of three parts: information acquisition system, fuel consumption forecasting algorithm and performance ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Back-propagation algorithm, Fuel consumption

Jian-Da Wu; Jun-Ching Liu

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A forecasting system for car fuel consumption using a radial basis function neural network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A predictive system for car fuel consumption using a radial basis function (RBF) neural network is proposed in this paper. The proposed work consists of three parts: information acquisition, fuel consumption forecasting algorithm and performance evaluation. ... Keywords: Artificial neural network, Car fuel consumption, Radial basis function algorithm

Jian-Da Wu; Jun-Ching Liu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Fuel consumption: Industrial, residential, and general studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect

The bibliography contains citations concerning fuel consumption in industrial and residential sectors. General studies of fuel supply, demand, policy, forecasts, and consumption models are presented. Citations examine fuel information and forecasting systems, fuel production, international economic and energy activities, heating oils, and pollution control. Fuel consumption in the transportation sector is covered in a separate bibliography. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

World Energy Consumption by Fuel Type, 1970-2020  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 Notes: Natural gas is projected to be the fastest-growing component of primary world energy consumption, more than doubling between 1997 and 2020. Gas accounts for the largest increment in electricity generation (41 percent of the total increment of energy used for electricity generation). Combined-cycle gas turbine power plants offer some of the highest commercially available plant efficiencies, and natural gas is environmentally attractive because it emits less sulfur dioxide, carbon dioxide, and particulate matter than does oil or coal. In the IEO2000 projection, world natural gas consumption reaches the level of coal by 2005, and by 2020 gas use exceeds coal by 29 percent. Oil currently provides a larger share of world energy consumption than any other energy source and is expected to remain in that position

139

RECENT TRENDS IN EMERGING TRANSPORTATION FUELS AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abundance of energy can be improved both by developing new sources of fuel and by improving efficiency of energy utilization, although we really need to pursue both paths to improve energy accessibility in the future. Currently, 2.7 billion people or 38% of the world s population do not have access to modern cooking fuel and depend on wood or dung and 1.4 billion people or 20% do not have access to electricity. It is estimated that correcting these deficiencies will require an investment of $36 billion dollars annually through 2030. In growing economies, energy use and economic growth are strongly linked, but energy use generally grows at a lower rate due to increased access to modern fuels and adaptation of modern, more efficient technology. Reducing environmental impacts of increased energy consumption such as global warming or regional emissions will require improved technology, renewable fuels, and CO2 reuse or sequestration. The increase in energy utilization will probably result in increased transportation fuel diversity as fuels are shaped by availability of local resources, world trade, and governmental, environmental, and economic policies. The purpose of this paper is to outline some of the recently emerging trends, but not to suggest winners. This paper will focus on liquid transportation fuels, which provide the highest energy density and best match with existing vehicles and infrastructure. Data is taken from a variety of US, European, and other sources without an attempt to normalize or combine the various data sources. Liquid transportation fuels can be derived from conventional hydrocarbon resources (crude oil), unconventional hydrocarbon resources (oil sands or oil shale), and biological feedstocks through a variety of biochemical or thermo chemical processes, or by converting natural gas or coal to liquids.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Hybrid solar-fossil fuel power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this thesis, a literature review of hybrid solar-fossil fuel power generation is first given with an emphasis on system integration and evaluation. Hybrid systems are defined as those which use solar energy and fuel ...

Sheu, Elysia J. (Elysia Ja-Zeng)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Table US8. Average Consumption by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Wood (cords) Energy Information Administration 2005 Residential Energy Consumption Survey: Energy Consumption and Expenditures Tables. Table US8.

142

GENERATION FUEL SYNTHESIS - Home - Energy Innovation Portal  

Direct coal liquefaction Oil refining reactions The next generation of fuel cell synthesis points towards growing trend in these workhorse catalysts

143

Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Commercial and ...

144

Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 ...

145

Figure 102. U.S. motor gasoline and diesel fuel consumption ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 102. U.S. motor gasoline and diesel fuel consumption, 2000-2040 (million barrels per day) Motor Gasoline Petroleum Portion ...

146

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Linked Data Search Share this page on Facebook icon Twitter icon Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Dataset Summary...

147

Factors Affecting the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Primary Factors that Impact the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles RICHARD BARNEY CARLSON, MATTHEW G. SHIRK Idaho National Laboratory 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83415, USA richard.carlson@inl.gov Abstract Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles (PHEV) have proven to significantly reduce petroleum consumption as compared to conventional internal combustion engine vehicles (ICE) by utilizing electrical energy for propulsion. Through extensive testing of PHEVs, analysis has shown that the fuel consumption of PHEVs is more significantly affected than conventional vehicles by either the drivers input or by the environmental inputs around the vehicle. Six primary factors have been identified that significantly affect the fuel consumption of PHEVs. In this paper, these primary factors are analyzed from on-road driving and charging data from over 200 PHEVs throughout North America that include Hymotion Prius conversions and Hybrids Plus Escape conversions. The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) tests plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) vehicles as part of its conduct of DOEs Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity (AVTA). In collaboration with its 75 testing partners located in 23 states and Canada, INL has collected data on 191 PHEVs, comprised of 12 different PHEV models (by battery manufacturer). With more than 1 million PHEV test miles accumulated to date, the PHEVs are fleet, track, and dynamometer tested. Six Primary Factors The six primary factors that significantly impact PHEV fuel consumption are listed below. Some of the factors are unique to plug-in vehicles while others are common for all types of vehicles. 1. Usable Electrical Energy is dictated by battery capacity, rate of depletion as well as when the vehicle was last plugged-in. With less electrical energy available the powertrain must use more petroleum to generate the required power output. 2. Driver Aggressiveness impacts the fuel consumption of nearly all vehicles but this impact is greater for high efficiency powertrains. 3. Accessory Utilization like air conditioner systems or defroster systems can use a significant amount of additional energy that is not contributing to the propulsion of the vehicle. 4. Route Type such as city, highway or mountainous driving can affect the fuel consumption since it can involve stop and go driving or ascending a step grade. 5. Cold Start / Key On includes control strategies to improve cold start emissions as well as control routines to quickly supply cabin heat. These control strategies are necessary for consumer acceptance even though fuel consumption is negatively impacted. 6. Ambient Temperature can reduce the efficiency of many powertrain components by significantly increasing fluid viscosity. For vehicles that utilize battery energy storage systems, the temperature of the battery system can greatly affect the power output capability therefore reducing its system effectiveness. The analysis of the six primary factors that impact fuel economy of PHEVs helped to identify areas of potential further development as well as may assist in informing drivers of these effects in an effort to modify driving behavior to reduce petroleum consumption.

Richard "Barney" Carlson; Matthew G. Shirk; Benjamin M. Geller

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Neutron Generators for Spent Fuel Assay  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Safeguards Initiative (NGSI) of the U.S. DOE has initiated a multi-lab/university collaboration to quantify the plutonium (Pu) mass in, and detect the diversion of pins from, spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies with non-destructive assay (NDA). The 14 NDA techniques being studied include several that require an external neutron source: Delayed Neutrons (DN), Differential Die-Away (DDA), Delayed Gammas (DG), and Lead Slowing-Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This report provides a survey of currently available neutron sources and their underlying technology that may be suitable for NDA of SNF assemblies. The neutron sources considered here fall into two broad categories. The term 'neutron generator' is commonly used for sealed devices that operate at relatively low acceleration voltages of less than 150 kV. Systems that employ an acceleration structure to produce ion beam energies from hundreds of keV to several MeV, and that are pumped down to vacuum during operation, rather than being sealed units, are usually referred to as 'accelerator-driven neutron sources.' Currently available neutron sources and future options are evaluated within the parameter space of the neutron generator/source requirements as currently understood and summarized in section 2. Applicable neutron source technologies are described in section 3. Commercially available neutron generators and other source options that could be made available in the near future with some further development and customization are discussed in sections 4 and 5, respectively. The pros and cons of the various options and possible ways forward are discussed in section 6. Selection of the best approach must take a number of parameters into account including cost, size, lifetime, and power consumption, as well as neutron flux, neutron energy spectrum, and pulse structure that satisfy the requirements of the NDA instrument to be built.

Ludewigt, Bernhard A

2010-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 101, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel midwest Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council / West- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

150

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Texas Regional Entity |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Texas Regional Entity Texas Regional Entity Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 98, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Texas Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Texas Regional Entity- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

151

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East East Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 100, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel midwest Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Midwest Reliability Council / East- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

152

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Florida Reliability  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Florida Reliability Florida Reliability Coordinating Council Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 99, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released July 20th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Florida Fuel Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Florida Reliability Coordinating Council- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

153

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NYC-Westchester NYC-Westchester Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 103, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Fuel Westchester Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / NYC-Westchester- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

154

Table N5.1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 1. Selected Byproducts in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National Data and Regional Totals; " " Row: NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." " "," "," "," "," "," "," "," ","Waste"," ",," " " "," "," ","Blast"," "," ","Pulping Liquor"," ","Oils/Tars","RSE" "NAICS"," "," ","Furnace/Coke"," ","Petroleum","or","Wood Chips,","and Waste","Row"

155

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Power Generation Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An increasing worldwide demand for premium power, emerging trend towards electric utility deregulation and distributed power generation, global environmental concerns and regulatory controls have accelerated the development of advanced fuel cell based power generation systems. Fuel cells convert chemical energy to electrical energy through electrochemical oxidation of gaseous and/or liquid fuels ranging from hydrogen to hydrocarbons. Electrochemical oxidation of fuels prevents the formation of Nox, while the higher efficiency of the systems reduces carbon dioxide emissions (kg/kWh). Among various fuel cell power generation systems currently being developed for stationary and mobile applications, solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) offer higher efficiency (up to 80% overall efficiency in hybrid configurations), fuel flexibility, tolerance to CO poisoning, modularity, and use of non-noble construction materials of low strategic value. Tubular, planar, and monolithic cell and stack configurations are currently being developed for stationary and military applications. The current generation of fuel cells uses doped zirconia electrolyte, nickel cermet anode, doped Perovskite cathode electrodes and predominantly ceramic interconnection materials. Fuel cells and cell stacks operate in a temperature range of 800-1000 *C. Low cost ($400/kWe), modular (3-10kWe) SOFC technology development approach of the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative of the USDOE will be presented and discussed. SOFC technology will be reviewed and future technology development needs will be addressed.

Singh, Prabhakar; Pederson, Larry R.; Simner, Steve P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Viswanathan, Vish V.

2001-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

156

New Zealand Energy Data: Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector Oil Consumption by Fuel and Sector Dataset Summary Description The New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to oil and other petroleum products. Included here are two oil consumption datasets: quarterly petrol consumption by sector (agriculture, forestry and fishing; industrial; commercial; residential; transport industry; and international transport), from 1974 to 2010; and oil consumption by fuel type (petrol, diesel, fuel oil, aviation fuels, LPG, and other), also for the years 1974 through 2010. The full 2010 Energy Data File is available: http://www.med.govt.nz/upload/73585/EDF%202010.pdf. Source New Zealand Ministry of Economic Development Date Released Unknown Date Updated July 02nd, 2010 (4 years ago)

157

The mix of fuels used for electricity generation in the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ... ...

158

Developing a tool to estimate water withdrawal and consumption in electricity generation in the United States.  

SciTech Connect

Freshwater consumption for electricity generation is projected to increase dramatically in the next couple of decades in the United States. The increased demand is likely to further strain freshwater resources in regions where water has already become scarce. Meanwhile, the automotive industry has stepped up its research, development, and deployment efforts on electric vehicles (EVs) and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs). Large-scale, escalated production of EVs and PHEVs nationwide would require increased electricity production, and so meeting the water demand becomes an even greater challenge. The goal of this study is to provide a baseline assessment of freshwater use in electricity generation in the United States and at the state level. Freshwater withdrawal and consumption requirements for power generated from fossil, nonfossil, and renewable sources via various technologies and by use of different cooling systems are examined. A data inventory has been developed that compiles data from government statistics, reports, and literature issued by major research institutes. A spreadsheet-based model has been developed to conduct the estimates by means of a transparent and interactive process. The model further allows us to project future water withdrawal and consumption in electricity production under the forecasted increases in demand. This tool is intended to provide decision makers with the means to make a quick comparison among various fuel, technology, and cooling system options. The model output can be used to address water resource sustainability when considering new projects or expansion of existing plants.

Wu, M.; Peng, J. (Energy Systems); ( NE)

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

159

Generator configuration for solid oxide fuel cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are improvements in a solid oxide fuel cell generator 1 having a multiplicity of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells 2, where a fuel gas is passed over one side of said cells and an oxygen-containing gas is passed over the other side of said cells resulting in the generation of heat and electricity. The improvements comprise arranging the cells in the configuration of a circle, a spiral, or folded rows within a cylindrical generator, and modifying the flow rate, oxygen concentration, and/or temperature of the oxygen-containing gases that flow to those cells that are at the periphery of the generator relative to those cells that are at the center of the generator. In these ways, a more uniform temperature is obtained throughout the generator.

Reichner, Philip (Plum Boro, PA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Cost and energy consumption estimates for the aluminum-air battery anode fuel cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

At the request of DOE's Office of Energy Storage and Distribution (OESD), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted a study to generate estimates of the energy use and costs associated with the aluminum anode fuel cycle of the aluminum-air (Al-air) battery. The results of this analysis indicate that the cost and energy consumption characteristics of the mechanically rechargeable Al-air battery system are not as attractive as some other electrically rechargeable electric vehicle battery systems being developed by OESD. However, there are distinct advantages to mechanically rechargeable batteries, which may make the Al-air battery (or other mechanically rechargeable batteries) attractive for other uses, such as stand-alone applications. Fuel cells, such as the proton exchange membrane (PEM), and advanced secondary batteries may be better suited to electric vehicle applications. 26 refs., 3 figs., 25 tabs.

Humphreys, K.K.; Brown, D.R.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Monthly 2008 Utility and Nonutility Fuel Receipts and Fuel Quality...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tags fossil fuel receipts, coal receipts, oil receipts, gas receipts, fossil fuel consumption, electricity generating fuel Dataset Ratings Overall 0 No votes yet Data...

162

Fuel cell generator with fuel electrodes that control on-cell fuel reformation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fuel cell for a fuel cell generator including a housing including a gas flow path for receiving a fuel from a fuel source and directing the fuel across the fuel cell. The fuel cell includes an elongate member including opposing first and second ends and defining an interior cathode portion and an exterior anode portion. The interior cathode portion includes an electrode in contact with an oxidant flow path. The exterior anode portion includes an electrode in contact with the fuel in the gas flow path. The anode portion includes a catalyst material for effecting fuel reformation along the fuel cell between the opposing ends. A fuel reformation control layer is applied over the catalyst material for reducing a rate of fuel reformation on the fuel cell. The control layer effects a variable reformation rate along the length of the fuel cell.

Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Basel, Richard A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Zhang, Gong (Murrysville, PA)

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

163

Solid oxide fuel cell distributed power generation  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that oxidize fuel without combustion to convert directly the fuel`s chemical energy into electricity. The solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is distinguished from other fuel cell types by its all solid state structure and its high operating temperature (1,000 C). The Westinghouse tubular SOFC stack is process air cooled and has integrated thermally and hydraulically within its structure a natural gas reformer that requires no fuel combustion and no externally supplied water. In addition, since the SOFC stack delivers high temperature exhaust gas and can be operated at elevated pressure, it can supplant the combustor in a gas turbine generator set yielding a dry (no steam) combined cycle power system of unprecedented electrical generation efficiency (greater 70% ac/LHV). Most remarkably, analysis indicates that efficiencies of 60 percent can be achieved at power plant capacities as low as 250 kWe, and that the 70 percent efficiency level should be achievable at the two MW capacity level. This paper describes the individual SOFC, the stack, and the power generation system and its suitability for distributed generation.

Veyo, S.E.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

164

,"Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Alaska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sak_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sak_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:46 PM"

165

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1840_sky_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1840_sky_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:39 PM"

166

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Arkansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sar_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sar_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:47 PM"

167

,"Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Nebraska Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sne_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sne_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:51 PM"

168

,"California Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","California Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sca_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sca_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:47 PM"

169

,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Oklahoma Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sok_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sok_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:52 PM"

170

,"Michigan Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Michigan Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_smi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_smi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

171

,"Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Mississippi Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sms_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sms_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:50 PM"

172

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Louisiana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sla_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sla_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

173

,"Florida Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Florida Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sfl_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sfl_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:48 PM"

174

,"Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Wyoming Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_swy_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_swy_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:54 PM"

175

,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_spa_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_spa_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:52 PM"

176

,"Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kentucky Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sky_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sky_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

177

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","South Dakota Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1840_ssd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1840_ssd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:44 PM"

178

,"Illinois Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Illinois Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sil_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sil_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:21 PM"

179

,"Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Colorado Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sco_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sco_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:48 PM"

180

,"Utah Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Utah Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sut_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sut_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:53 PM"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

,"Kansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Kansas Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_sks_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_sks_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:49 PM"

182

,"Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Tennessee Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_stn_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_stn_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:52 PM"

183

,"Montana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","Montana Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1850_smt_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1850_smt_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:52:50 PM"

184

TRENDS IN ELECTRICITY CONSUMPTION, PEAK DEMAND, AND GENERATING CAPACITY IN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

relative to increases in its consumption at a higher rate than all but two states (in part because California is the lowest user of electricity per capita and per dollar of gross state product in the west). Annual WSCC consumption increased 64% from 1977 to 1998, but California's consumption grew by only 44

California at Berkeley. University of

185

Table 4.3 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

EIA-846, '2010 Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey,' and Office of Petroleum and Biofuels Statistics, Form EIA-810, 'Monthly Refinery Report' for 2010, and the Bureau of the...

186

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northwest Power Pool Area Northwest Power Pool Area Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is Table 118, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. This dataset contains data for the northwest power pool area of the U.S. Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC). Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Northwest Power Pool Area Renewable Energy Generation WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Northwest Power Pool Area - Reference (xls, 119.3 KiB)

187

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Long Island Long Island Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 104, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Long Island Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Long Island- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

188

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Upstate New York Upstate New York Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 105, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Upstate New York Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Upstate New York- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

189

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Delta Delta Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 109, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Delta EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Delta- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

190

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Northeast Northeast Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 102, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Energy Generation Northeast Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council / Northeast- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

191

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Virginia-Carolina Virginia-Carolina Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 113, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO Carolina EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Virginia Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Virginia-Carolina- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics

192

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southeastern Southeastern Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 111, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation SERC Reliability Corporation Southeastern Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Southeastern- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

193

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

East East Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 106, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released July 25th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO East EIA Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / East- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

194

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Southwest Southwest Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 116, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Southwest Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Southwest (xls, 119.1 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

195

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Michigan Michigan Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 107, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Michigan Reliability First Corporation Renewable Energy Generation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / Michigan- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

196

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

West West Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 108, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Reliability First Corporation Renewable Energy Generation West Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Reliability First Corporation / West- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment

197

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rockies Rockies Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 119, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. The dataset contains data for the Rockies region of WECC. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation Rockies WECC Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / Rockies- Reference Case (xls, 119 KiB)

198

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

California California Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 117, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO California EIA Renewable Energy Generation Western Electricity Coordinating Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council / California (xls, 119.2 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

199

Solid fuel fired oil field steam generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The increased shortages being experienced in the domestic crude oil supply have forced attention on the production of heavy crude oils from proven reserves to supplement requirements for petroleum products. Since most heavy crudes require heat to facilitate their extraction, oil field steam generators appear to represent a key component in any heavy crude oil production program. Typical oil field steam generator experience in California indicates that approx. one out of every 3 bbl of crude oil produced by steam stimulation must be consumed as fuel in the steam generators to produce the injection steam. The scarcity and price of crude oil makes it desirable to substitute more readily available and less expensive solid fuels for the crude oil which is presently serving as the primary steam generator fuel. Solid fuel firing capability also is of importance because of the substantial amounts of high heating value and low cost petroleum coke available from the processing of heavy crude oil and suitable for use as a steam generator fuel.

Young, W.W.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Renewable Hydrogen Generation and Fueling Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In its efforts to promote hydrogen as an alternative transportation fuel, the New York Power Authority (NYPA) is implementing a renewable hydrogen fueling demonstration project. The project involves hydrogen production by electrolysis using NYPA's large renewable hydropower generating resources. An earlier EPRI report (1014383) provides background and results from a preliminary engineering and feasibility study. This report provides an update on the project and the refueling station bid and procurement p...

2008-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Table 8.6b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.6b Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Electric Power Sector, 1989-2011 (Subset of ...

202

Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.6a Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful Thermal Output at Combined-Heat-and-Power Plants: Total (All Sectors), 1989-2011 (Sum of ...

203

U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9; 1990's: 8,328: 9,341 ...

204

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. The dataset contains data for the Rockies region...

205

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency.

206

EA-1778: Proposed Rule, 10 CFR 433 and 435, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of DOE's Proposed Rule, 10 CFR Part 433, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Commercial and Multi-Family High-Rise Residential Buildings and 10 CFR Part 435, Energy Conservation and Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction Standards for the Design and Construction of New Federal Low-Rise Residential Buildings.

207

High Efficiency Direct Carbon and Hydrogen Fuel Cells for Fossil Fuel Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen he1 cells have been under development for a number of years and are now nearing commercial applications. Direct carbon fuel cells, heretofore, have not reached practical stages of development because of problems in fuel reactivity and cell configuration. The carbon/air fuel cell reaction (C + O{sub 2} = CO{sub 2}) has the advantage of having a nearly zero entropy change. This allows a theoretical efficiency of 100 % at 700-800 C. The activities of the C fuel and CO{sub 2} product do not change during consumption of the fuel. Consequently, the EMF is invariant; this raises the possibility of 100% fuel utilization in a single pass. (In contrast, the high-temperature hydrogen fuel cell has a theoretical efficiency of and changes in fuel activity limit practical utilizations to 75-85%.) A direct carbon fuel cell is currently being developed that utilizes reactive carbon particulates wetted by a molten carbonate electrolyte. Pure COZ is evolved at the anode and oxygen from air is consumed at the cathode. Electrochemical data is reported here for the carbon/air cell utilizing carbons derived from he1 oil pyrolysis, purified coal, purified bio-char and petroleum coke. At 800 O C, a voltage efficiency of 80% was measured at power densities of 0.5-1 kW/m2. Carbon and hydrogen fuels may be produced simultaneously at lugh efficiency from: (1) natural gas, by thermal decomposition, (2) petroleum, by coking or pyrolysis of distillates, (3) coal, by sequential hydrogasification to methane and thermal pyrolysis of the methane, with recycle of the hydrogen, and (4) biomass, similarly by sequential hydrogenation and thermal pyrolysis. Fuel production data may be combined with direct C and H2 fuel cell operating data for power cycle estimates. Thermal to electric efficiencies indicate 80% HHV [85% LHV] for petroleum, 75.5% HHV [83.4% LHV] for natural gas and 68.3% HHV [70.8% LHV] for lignite coal. Possible benefits of integrated carbon and hydrogen fuel cell power generation cycles are: (1) increased efficiency by a factor of up to 2 over many conventional fossil fuel steam plants, (2) reduced power generation cost, especially for increasing fossil fuel cost, (3) reduced CO2 emission per kWh, and (4) direct sequestration or reuse (e.g., in enhanced oil or NG recovery) of the CO{sub 2} product.

Steinberg, M; Cooper, J F; Cherepy, N

2002-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

208

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Central Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 112, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords undefined Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Central- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period 2008-2035

209

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gateway Gateway Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 110, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Gateway Reliability First Corporation SERC Reliability Corporation Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011:Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - SERC Reliability Corporation / Gateway- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

210

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Second Generation Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Plant Depreciation Deduction Allowance on AddThis.com...

211

Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.4c Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Commercial and Industrial Sectors, 1989-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion ...

212

Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table 8.4b Consumption for Electricity Generation by Energy Source: Electric Power Sector, 1949-2011 (Subset of Table 8.4a; Trillion Btu)

213

How much U.S. energy consumption and electricity generation comes ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

In 2012, renewable sources of energy accounted for about 9% of total U.S. energy consumption and 12% of electricity generation. 1. Learn more:

214

U.S. Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 383,077 389,525 367,572 348,731 408,115 398,180 429,269 1990's 428,657 456,954 460,571 448,822 423,878 427,853 450,033 426,873 401,314 399,509 2000's 404,059 371,141 382,503 363,903 366,341 355,193 358,985 365,323 355,590 362,009 2010's 368,830 384,248 408,316 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Plant Fuel Consumption U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)

215

Table 8.5d Consumption of Combustible Fuels for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

biomass. Through 2000, also includes non-renewable waste ... (CHP) and commercial electricity-only plants. 4 Jet fuel, kerosene, other petroleum ...

216

Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption of Natural Gas (Summary)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power price data are for regulated electric ... Gas volumes delivered for vehicle fuel are included in the State monthly totals from January 2011 ...

217

Microbial Fuel Cells Generate Energy While Clearing Biowaste ...  

Microbial Fuel Cells Generate Energy While Clearing Biowaste from Water Technology Summary ... from fossil fuels is both expensive and environmentally harmful.

218

Table 4.2 Offsite-Produced Fuel Consumption, 2010  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Fuel Oil Fuel Oil(c) Natural Gas(d) NGL(e) Coal and Breeze Other(f) 327993 Mineral Wool 39 12 0 * 24 * 0 3 * 331 Primary Metals 1,328 412 1 9 537 3 23 291 53 331111 Iron and...

219

Generation of electricity with fuel cell using alcohol fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a method for generating electricity in a fuel cell, the fuel cell comprising a cathode, an electrolyte, an anode comprising a first, fluid-permeable face and a second face in contact with the electrolyte, and an external circuit connecting the cathode and the anode. It comprises bringing a lower primary alcohol into contact with the first fluid-permeable face of the anode, thereby permitting the lower primary alcohol to penetrate into the cross-section of the anode toward the second face; oxidizing the lower primary alcohol essentially to carbon dioxide and water at the second face of the anode, reducing a reducible gas at the cathode, and obtaining electricity from the fuel cell.

Reddy, N.R.K.V.; Taylor, E.J.

1992-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

220

Farm scale biogas-fueled engine/induction generator system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 3.6 liter spark ignition engine coupled to an induction generator produced 21 kW of electric power at 1260 rpm operating on biogas (55% methane, 45% carbon dioxide). Power output increased by 3.55 kW for a 10 rpm increase in shaft speed. Operating at over 16 kW output, power factor was greater than .8 and generator efficiency was greater than 85%. Engine operation is insensitive to small changes in spark advance. Recommended spark advance for a biogas engine is about 45/sup 0/. Minimum brake specific fuel consumption of 270 g CH/sub 4//kWh occurs at a manifold vacuum of 5 cmHg and an equivalence ratio in the range of .6 to .8.

Stahl, T.; Fischer, J.R.; Harris, F.D.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Table 5.3 End Uses of Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Sources, including Net Demand for Electricity; Unit: Physical Units or Btu. Distillate Coal Fuel Oil (excluding Coal Net Demand Residual and Natural Gas(d) LPG and Coke and...

222

Evaluations of 1997 Fuel Consumption Patterns of Heavy Duty Trucks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proposed 21st Century Truck program selected three truck classes for focused analysis. On the basis of gross vehicle weight (GVW) classification, these were Class 8 (representing heavy), Class 6 (representing medium), and Class 2b (representing light). To develop and verify these selections, an evaluation of fuel use of commercial trucks was conducted, using data from the 1997 Vehicle Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS). Truck fuel use was analyzed by registered GVW class, and by body type.

Santini, Danilo

2001-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

223

Microsoft Word - EVS25_Primary Factors Impact Fuel Consumption of PHEV_FINAL.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EVS-25 Shenzhen, China, Nov. 5-9, 2010 EVS-25 Shenzhen, China, Nov. 5-9, 2010 The 25th World Battery, Hybrid and Fuel Cell Electric Vehicle Symposium & Exhibition Factors Affecting the Fuel Consumption of Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles Richard 'Barney' Carlson, Matthew G. Shirk, and Benjamin M. Geller Energy Storage and Transportation Systems Department, Idaho National Laboratory 2525 N. Fremont Ave., Idaho Falls, ID 83401, USA E-mail: richard.carlson@inl.gov Abstract- Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHEVs) have proven to significantly reduce petroleum consumption when compared to conventional internal combustion engine vehicles by utilizing onboard electrical energy storage for propulsion. Through extensive testing of PHEVs, analysis has shown that fuel consumption of PHEVs is more

224

Consumption of Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coal for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, January 2011 and 2010 This dataset contains state by state comparisons of coal for electricity generation in the United States....

225

Consumption of Natural Gas for Electricity Generation by State...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Gas for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, January 2011 and 2010 This dataset contains state by state comparisons of natural gas for electricity generation in the...

226

Michigan Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Michigan Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,798 2,012 2,074 1970's 3,440 2,145 2,143 2,551 3,194 8,420 7,647 8,022 11,076 14,695 1980's 6,494 3,461 9,699 8,130 8,710 8,195 7,609 9,616 8,250 8,003 1990's 9,094 9,595 7,274 8,171 9,766 9,535 8,489 12,060 9,233 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Michigan Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

227

Kansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 7,842 15,867 17,587 1970's 20,841 27,972 28,183 32,663 35,350 27,212 31,044 29,142 30,491 48,663 1980's 24,521 19,665 41,392 37,901 40,105 42,457 38,885 44,505 45,928 43,630 1990's 40,914 44,614 43,736 56,657 44,611 47,282 49,196 46,846 33,989 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Kansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

228

Oklahoma Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Oklahoma Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 65,167 84,259 103,361 1970's 98,417 101,126 98,784 80,233 80,780 79,728 84,025 77,631 82,046 128,475 1980's 59,934 56,785 91,465 79,230 91,707 88,185 84,200 104,415 100,926 90,225 1990's 111,567 88,366 92,978 99,869 91,039 80,846 73,039 81,412 61,543 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Oklahoma Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

229

Alaska Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Alaska Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,659 2,240 6,864 1970's 4,748 8,459 16,056 15,217 14,402 17,842 15,972 17,336 15,895 12,153 1980's 30,250 15,249 94,232 97,828 111,069 64,148 72,686 116,682 153,670 192,239 1990's 193,875 223,194 234,716 237,702 238,156 292,811 295,834 271,284 281,872 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Alaska Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

230

Arkansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Arkansas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 10,267 4,027 6,268 1970's 9,184 6,433 4,740 3,000 4,246 4,200 4,049 4,032 3,760 7,661 1980's 1,949 2,549 5,096 5,384 5,922 12,439 9,062 11,990 12,115 11,586 1990's 7,101 1,406 5,838 6,405 4,750 5,551 5,575 6,857 8,385 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Arkansas Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

231

New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) New Mexico Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 46,793 46,331 45,309 1970's 47,998 46,114 48,803 52,553 43,452 38,604 49,160 43,751 37,880 50,798 1980's 36,859 22,685 55,722 47,630 50,662 46,709 35,615 48,138 41,706 42,224 1990's 65,889 44,766 53,697 49,658 54,786 52,589 81,751 64,458 59,654 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption New Mexico Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

232

Utah Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Utah Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,956 1,503 2,113 1970's 633 2,115 1,978 2,435 4,193 7,240 9,150 7,585 8,325 14,123 1980's 7,594 511 5,965 4,538 8,375 9,001 13,289 17,671 16,889 16,211 1990's 19,719 13,738 12,611 12,526 13,273 27,012 27,119 24,619 27,466 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Utah Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

233

West Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) West Virginia Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,052 2,276 0 1970's 2,551 3,043 3,808 2,160 1,909 1,791 1,490 1,527 1,233 1,218 1980's 2,482 2,515 6,426 5,826 7,232 7,190 6,658 8,835 8,343 7,882 1990's 9,631 7,744 8,097 7,065 8,087 8,045 6,554 7,210 6,893 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption West Virginia Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

234

Colorado Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Colorado Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,668 2,361 2,604 1970's 2,726 3,231 4,676 7,202 5,822 7,673 7,739 9,124 10,619 21,610 1980's 7,041 7,093 13,673 10,000 10,560 10,829 9,397 12,095 11,622 12,221 1990's 17,343 23,883 21,169 24,832 24,347 25,130 27,492 29,585 31,074 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Colorado Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

235

Kentucky Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Kentucky Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 1,828 1,992 2,277 1970's 2,317 2,212 1,509 1,238 1,206 1,218 1,040 1,107 1,160 1,214 1980's 989 1,040 9,772 8,361 9,038 9,095 6,335 3,254 2,942 2,345 1990's 3,149 2,432 2,812 3,262 2,773 2,647 2,426 2,457 2,325 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Kentucky Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

236

North Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) North Dakota Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 17,133 16,163 14,691 1970's 14,067 13,990 12,773 12,462 11,483 12,008 15,998 13,697 12,218 3,950 1980's 1,017 13,759 3,514 4,100 4,563 4,710 3,974 5,194 4,014 3,388 1990's 6,939 11,583 8,462 8,256 11,306 11,342 11,603 8,572 8,309 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption North Dakota Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

237

U.S. Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) U.S. Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 595,172 687,356 598,475 573,793 741,268 697,703 640,633 1990's 807,735 672,314 710,250 723,118 699,842 792,315 799,629 776,306 771,366 679,480 2000's 746,889 747,411 730,579 758,380 731,563 756,324 782,992 861,063 864,113 913,229 2010's 916,797 938,340 987,957 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 1/7/2014 Next Release Date: 1/31/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease Fuel Consumption U.S. Natural Gas Consumption by End Use

238

Montana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Montana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 5,904 5,188 6,183 1970's 5,091 6,148 5,924 4,281 3,683 2,315 2,754 2,972 2,792 4,796 1980's 3,425 1,832 2,012 1,970 2,069 2,138 1,808 2,088 1,994 1,766 1990's 2,262 1,680 1,871 2,379 2,243 2,238 2,401 2,277 2,000 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Montana Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

239

Ohio Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Ohio Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 2,656 3,505 2,879 1970's 3,140 4,302 3,397 3,548 2,957 2,925 2,742 2,814 3,477 22,094 1980's 1,941 1,776 3,671 4,377 5,741 5,442 5,243 5,802 4,869 3,876 1990's 5,129 1,476 1,450 1,366 1,332 1,283 1,230 1,201 1,125 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption Ohio Natural Gas Consumption by End Use Lease and Plant

240

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" 6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2002;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Table N5.2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" 2. Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 1998;" " Level: National and Regional Data; " " Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources;" " Unit: Trillion Btu." ,,"S e l e c t e d","W o o d","a n d","W o o d -","R e l a t e d","P r o d u c t s" ,,,,,"B i o m a s s" ,,,,,,"Wood Residues" ,,,,,,"and","Wood-Related" " "," ","Pulping Liquor"," "," ","Wood","Byproducts","and","RSE",," " "NAICS"," ","or","Biomass","Agricultural","Harvested Directly","from Mill","Paper-Related","Row"

242

Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines available data, develops a strategy and presents a monthly, global time series of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions for the years 1950 2006. This monthly time series was constructed from detailed study of monthly data from the 21 countries that account for approximately 80% of global total emissions. These data were then used in a Monte Carlo approach to proxy for all remaining countries. The proportional-proxy methodology estimates by fuel group the fraction of annual emissions emitted in each country and month. Emissions from solid, liquid and gas fuels are explicitly modelled by the proportional-proxy method. The primary conclusion from this study is the global monthly time series is statistically significantly different from a uniform distribution throughout the year. Uncertainty analysis of the data presented show that the proportional-proxy method used faithfully reproduces monthly patterns in the data and the global monthly pattern of emissions is relatively insensitive to the exact proxy assignments used. The data and results presented here should lead to a better understanding of global and regional carbon cycles, especially when the mass data are combined with the stable carbon isotope data in atmospheric transport models.

Andres, Robert Joseph [ORNL; Gregg, JS [Riso National Laboratory, Roskilde, Denmark; Losey, London M [ORNL; Marland, Gregg [ORNL; Boden, Thomas A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

An Overview of Energy Consumption and Waste Generation in the ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Solid State Thermoelectric Power Generator Prototype Designed to Recover Radiant Waste ... Global Primary Aluminium Industry 2010 Life Cycle Inventory.

244

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption.
2011-07-25T20:15:39Z...

245

Consumption & Efficiency - Data - U.S. Energy Information Administration  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Find statistics on energy consumption and efficiency across all fuel sources. + EXPAND ALL Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Household characteristics Release Date: March 28, 2011 Survey data for occupied primary housing units. Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS)

246

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Second Generation Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Second Generation Biofuel Producer Tax Credit

247

Texas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Texas Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 645,058 711,720 741,902 1970's 769,500 784,773 802,112 828,139 817,194 763,107 729,946 732,428 757,853 717,462 1980's 536,766 505,322 347,846 307,717 326,662 307,759 302,266 355,765 318,922 291,977 1990's 394,605 297,233 293,845 296,423 298,253 333,548 330,547 301,800 330,228 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption

248

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Light-Duty Vehicle Energy Consumption by Fuel Type from EIA AEO 2011 Early Release Supplemental Table 47 of EIA AEO 2011 Early Release
2011-02-23T16:04:28Z 2011-03-31T19:33:44Z...

249

Louisiana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Louisiana Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (Million Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1960's 195,990 212,134 273,213 1970's 287,222 292,589 312,145 336,832 347,098 301,816 556,772 591,292 558,877 305,181 1980's 196,033 180,687 337,398 275,698 303,284 258,069 243,283 301,279 272,455 256,123 1990's 258,267 195,526 220,711 222,813 207,171 209,670 213,721 227,542 194,963 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption

250

Table 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per 4b. Relative Standard Errors for Total Fuel Oil Consumption per Effective Occupied Square Foot, 1992 Building Characteristics All Buildings Using Fuel Oil (thousand) Total Fuel Oil Consumption (trillion Btu) Fuel Oil Intensities (thousand Btu) Per Square Foot Per Effective Occupied Square Foot All Buildings 10 14 13 13 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 10 16 11 11 5,001 to 10,000 15 22 18 18 10,001 to 25,000 15 24 19 19 25,001 to 50,000 13 25 29 29 50,001 to 100,000 14 27 21 22 100,001 to 200,000 13 36 34 34 200,001 to 500,000 13 37 33 33 Over 500,000 17 51 50 50 Principal Building Activity Education 17 17 16 17 Food Sales and Service 25 36 16 16 Health Care 29 48 47 47 Lodging 27 37 32 32 Mercantile and Service 14 25 26 26 Office 14 19 21 21 Public Assembly 23 46 35 34 Public Order and Safety 28 48 46 46 Religious Worship

251

Generating Potable Water from Fuel Cell Technology Juan E. Tibaquir  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generating Potable Water from Fuel Cell Technology Juan E. Tibaquirá Associate Professor Electricity Heat Water #12;Second Forum on Energy & Water Sustainability April 10th /09 6 PEM Fuel Cells for research 2. Fuel-cell fundamentals 3. Implications of using water from fuel cells in a society

Keller, Arturo A.

252

Single module pressurized fuel cell turbine generator system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pressurized fuel cell system (10), operates within a common pressure vessel (12) where the system contains fuel cells (22), a turbine (26) and a generator (98) where preferably, associated oxidant inlet valve (52), fuel inlet valve (56) and fuel cell exhaust valve (42) are outside the pressure vessel.

George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Veyo, Stephen E. (Murrysville, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

FUEL CONSUMPTION AND COST SAVINGS OF CLASS 8 HEAVY-DUTY TRUCKS POWERED BY NATURAL GAS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We compare the fuel consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of natural gas and diesel heavy-duty (HD) class 8 trucks under consistent simulated drive cycle conditions. Our study included both conventional and hybrid HD trucks operating with either natural gas or diesel engines, and we compare the resulting simulated fuel efficiencies, fuel costs, and payback periods. While trucks powered by natural gas engines have lower fuel economy, their CO2 emissions and costs are lower than comparable diesel trucks. Both diesel and natural gas powered hybrid trucks have significantly improved fuel economy, reasonable cost savings and payback time, and lower CO2 emissions under city driving conditions. However, under freeway-dominant driving conditions, the overall benefits of hybridization are considerably less. Based on payback period alone, non-hybrid natural gas trucks appear to be the most economic option for both urban and freeway driving environments.

Gao, Zhiming [ORNL; LaClair, Tim J [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; Smith, David E [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Table 5.1. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

. U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption . U.S. Number of Vehicles, Vehicle-Miles, Motor Fuel Consumption and Expenditures, 1994 1993 Household and 1994 Vehicle Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Number of Vehicles Vehicle-Miles Traveled Motor Fuel Consumption Motor Fuel Expenditures RSE Row Factor: (million) (percent) (billion) (percent) (billion gallons) (gallon percent) (quadril- lion Btu) (billion dollars) (percent) 0.9 0.8 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.0 1.1 1.1 1.0 Household Characteristics Total .................................................... 156.8 100.0 1,793 100.0 90.6 100.0 11.2 104.7 100.0 2.8 Census Region and Division Northeast ........................................... 26.6 17.0 299 16.7 14.5 16.0 1.8 17.2 16.4 5.7 New England ................................... 7.6 4.8 84 4.7 4.1 4.5 0.5 4.8 4.6 13.8 Middle Atlantic

255

Proposed New Hydrogen Fuel Quality Specification and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... An electrochemical energy conversion device in which fuel and an oxidant react to generate electricity without any consumption, physically or ...

2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

256

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Energy Tips: Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

You are here Home Buildings & Plants Energy Tips: Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login...

258

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Western Electricity Coordinating Council Northwest Power Pool Area This...

259

Fuel Use in Electricity Generation - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fuel Use in Electricity Generation ... Cost of coal and natural gas delivered to electric power plants in the Mid-Atlantic and Southeast, Jan 2007- April 2012 . 2

260

Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Fuel Cell Research Center, points out the tri-generation facility that uses biogas from Orange County Sanitation Districts wastewater treatment plant to produce...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Figure 29. Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in five cases, 2011 ... Natural gas combined cycle Natural gas combustion turbine Nuclear Renewable/other Reference

262

Competition among fuels for power generation driven by changes ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Fossil fuelscoal, natural gas, and petroleumsupplied 70% of total electric power generation in 1950, with that share rising to 82% in 1970, ...

263

Chapter 3. Fossil-Fuel Stocks for Electricity Generation  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 69 Chapter 3. Fossil-Fuel Stocks for Electricity Generation

264

Figure 77. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 77. Electricity generation capacity additions by fuel type, including combined heat and power, 2012-2040 (gigawatts) Coal

265

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_ssd_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_ssd_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:58 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SSD_2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,0 40224,0 40252,0 40283,0 40313,0

266

,"Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sid_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sid_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SID_2" "Date","Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,10 34880,19

267

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010;  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Table 3.6 Selected Wood and Wood-Related Products in Fuel Consumption, 2010; Level: National and Regional Data; Row: Selected NAICS Codes; Column: Energy Sources; Unit: Trillion Btu. Wood Residues and Wood-Related Pulping Liquor Wood Byproducts and NAICS or Biomass Agricultural Harvested Directly from Mill Paper-Related Code(a) Subsector and Industry Black Liquor Total(b) Waste(c) from Trees(d) Processing(e) Refuse(f) Total United States 311 Food 0 44 43 * * 1 311221 Wet Corn Milling 0 1 1 0 0 0 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 0 1 0 0 1 0 321 Wood Products 0 218 * 13 199 6 321113 Sawmills 0 100 * 5 94 1 3212 Veneer, Plywood, and Engineered Woods 0 95 * 6 87 2 321219 Reconstituted Wood Products 0 52 0 6 46 1 3219 Other Wood Products

268

,"Indiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sin_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sin_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SIN_2" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,4 40224,4 40252,4 40283,4 40313,4 40344,4

269

,"Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_shi_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_shi_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SHI_2" "Date","Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,0 40224,0 40252,0 40283,0 40313,0 40344,0

270

,"Colorado Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sco_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sco_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SCO_2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,21 40224,19 40252,21 40283,20 40313,21

271

,"Arizona Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_saz_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_saz_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAZ_2" "Date","Arizona Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,37 33785,46 34150,44 34515,61 34880,118

272

,"Georgia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sga_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sga_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Georgia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SGA_2" "Date","Georgia Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,78 40224,70 40252,78 40283,75 40313,78

273

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sar_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sar_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAR_2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,3 34880,2

274

,"Delaware Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sde_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sde_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Delaware Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SDE_2" "Date","Delaware Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,1 34880,1

275

,"Alaska Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sak_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sak_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:04 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAK_2" "Date","Alaska Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,2 40224,2 40252,2 40283,2 40313,2 40344,2

276

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sla_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sla_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SLA_2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,34 33419,9 33785,9 34150,8 34515,22

277

,"Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sfl_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sfl_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SFL_2" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,7 33785,9 34150,27 34515,68 34880,75

278

,"Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sid_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sid_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SID_2" "Date","Idaho Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,6 40224,5 40252,6 40283,6 40313,6 40344,6 40374,6

279

,"Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sal_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sal_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:04 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAL_2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,3 33419,0 33785,3 34150,4 34515,3 34880,4

280

,"California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sca_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sca_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SCA_2" "Date","California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,4 33419,9 33785,27 34150,255 34515,550

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

,"California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sca_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sca_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SCA_2" "Date","California Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1153 40224,1041 40252,1153 40283,1116

282

,"Massachusetts Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sma_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sma_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:28 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Massachusetts Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SMA_2" "Date","Massachusetts Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,1 33785,2 34150,2

283

,"Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sar_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sar_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAR_2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1 40313,1 40344,1

284

,"Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sal_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sal_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SAL_2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,9 40224,8 40252,9 40283,9 40313,9 40344,9

285

,"Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sct_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sct_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SCT_2" "Date","Connecticut Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,2

286

,"South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_ssd_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_ssd_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:57 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SSD_2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,2 33785,5 34150,7 34515,5

287

,"Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sks_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sks_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SKS_2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 32324,0 32689,0 33054,0 33419,0 33785,0 34150,0 34515,10 34880,2

288

,"Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sfl_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sfl_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SFL_2" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,5 40224,5 40252,5 40283,5 40313,5 40344,5

289

,"Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_shi_2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_shi_2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SHI_2" "Date","Hawaii Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 35611,284 35976,0 36341,380 36707,0 37072,0 37437,0 37802,0 38168,0

290

,"Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sla_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sla_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SLA_2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1 40313,1

291

,"South Carolina Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_ssc_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_ssc_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:56 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Carolina Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SSC_2" "Date","South Carolina Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1

292

,"Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1570_sks_2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1570_sks_2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:51:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NA1570_SKS_2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 40193,1 40224,1 40252,1 40283,1 40313,1 40344,1

293

Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack.

Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Zafred, Paolo R. (Pittsburgh, PA); Collie, Jeffrey C. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack. 8 figs.

Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.; Collie, J.C.

1998-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

295

Roadmap for Development of Natural Gas Vehicle Fueling Infrastructructure and Analysis of Vehicular Natural Gas Consumption by Niche Sector  

SciTech Connect

Vehicular natural gas consumption is on the rise, totaling nearly 200 million GGEs in 2005, despite declines in total NGV inventory in recent years. This may be attributed to greater deployment of higher fuel use medium- and heavy-duty NGVs as compared to the low fuel use of the natural gas-powered LDVs that exited the market through attrition, many of which were bi-fuel. Natural gas station counts are down to about 1100 from their peak of about 1300. Many of the stations that closed were under-utilized or not used at all while most new stations were developed with greater attention to critical business fundamentals such as site selection, projected customer counts, peak and off-peak fueling capacity needs and total station throughput. Essentially, the nation's NGV fueling infrastructure has been--and will continue--going through a 'market correction'. While current economic fundamentals have shortened payback and improved life-cycle savings for investment in NGVs and fueling infrastructure, a combination of grants and other financial incentives will still be needed to overcome general fleet market inertia to maintain status quo. Also imperative to the market's adoption of NGVs and other alternative fueled vehicle and fueling technologies is a clear statement of long-term federal government commitment to diversifying our nation's transportation fuel use portfolio and, more specifically, the role of natural gas in that policy. Based on the current NGV market there, and the continued promulgation of clean air and transportation policies, the Western Region is--and will continue to be--the dominant region for vehicular natural gas use and growth. In other regions, especially the Northeast, Mid-Atlantic states and Texas, increased awareness and attention to air quality and energy security concerns by the public and - more important, elected officials--are spurring policies and programs that facilitate deployment of NGVs and fueling infrastructure. Because of their high per-vehicle fuel use, central fueling and sensitivity to fuel costs, fleets will continue to be the primary target for NGV deployment and station development efforts. The transit sector is projected to continue to account for the greatest vehicular natural gas use and for new volume growth. New tax incentives and improved life-cycle economics also create opportunities to deploy additional vehicles and install related vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure in the refuse, airport and short-haul sectors. Focusing on fleets generates the highest vehicular natural gas throughout but it doesn't necessarily facilitate public fueling infrastructure because, generally, fleet operators prefer not to allow public access due to liability concerns and revenue and tax administrative burdens. While there are ways to overcome this reluctance, including ''outside the fence'' retail dispensers and/or co-location of public and ''anchor'' fleet dispensing capability at a mutually convenient existing or new retail location, each has challenges that complicate an already complex business transaction. Partnering with independent retail fuel station companies, especially operators of large ''truck stops'' on the major interstates, to include natural gas at their facilities may build public fueling infrastructure and demand enough to entice the major oil companies to once again engage. Garnering national mass media coverage of success in California and Utah where vehicular natural gas fueling infrastructure is more established will help pave the way for similar consumer market growth and inclusion of public accessibility at stations in other regions. There isn't one ''right'' business model for growing the nation's NGV inventory and fueling infrastructure. Different types of station development and ownership-operation strategies will continue to be warranted for different customers in different markets. Factors affecting NGV deployment and station development include: regional air quality compliance status and the state and/or local political climate regarding mandates and/or in

Stephen C. Yborra

2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Fuel cycle comparison of distributed power generation technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The fuel-cycle energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions associated with the application of fuel cells to distributed power generation were evaluated and compared with the combustion technologies of microturbines and internal combustion engines, as well as the various technologies associated with grid-electricity generation in the United States and California. The results were primarily impacted by the net electrical efficiency of the power generation technologies and the type of employed fuels. The energy use and GHG emissions associated with the electric power generation represented the majority of the total energy use of the fuel cycle and emissions for all generation pathways. Fuel cell technologies exhibited lower GHG emissions than those associated with the U.S. grid electricity and other combustion technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than those for combustion generators. The dependence of all natural-gas-based technologies on petroleum oil was lower than that of internal combustion engines using petroleum fuels. Most fuel cell technologies approaching or exceeding the DOE target efficiency of 40% offered significant reduction in energy use and GHG emissions.

Elgowainy, A.; Wang, M. Q.; Energy Systems

2008-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

297

DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program: Fueling the Next Generation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

California, is currently posted on the Energy Department's blog. The facility uses biogas from the Orange County Sanitation District's wastewater treatment plant and a fuel...

298

Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology February 6, 2013 - 11:20am Addthis Professor Jack Brouwer, Associate Director and Chief Technology Officer of the National Fuel Cell Research Center, points out the tri-generation facility that uses biogas from Orange County Sanitation District’s wastewater treatment plant to produce hydrogen, heat and power. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department. Professor Jack Brouwer, Associate Director and Chief Technology Officer of the National Fuel Cell Research Center, points out the tri-generation facility that uses biogas from Orange County Sanitation District's wastewater treatment plant to produce hydrogen, heat and power. | Photo courtesy of the Energy Department.

299

Fuel consumption: industrial, residential, and general studies. Volume 2. 1977-October, 1979 (a bibliography with abstracts). Report for 1977-October 1979  

SciTech Connect

Citations of research on fuel supply, demand, shortages, and conservation through effective utilization are presented. A few abstracts pertain to energy consumption in the agricultural sector, fuel substitution, economic studies, and environmental concerns relating to energy consumption. Bibliographies on electric power consumption and fuel consumption by transportation also are available. (This updated bibliography contains 159 abstracts, 29 of which are new entries to the previous edition.)

Hundemann, A.S.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Impact of Solar Control PVB Glass on Vehicle Interior Temperatures, Air-Conditioning Capacity, Fuel Consumption, and Vehicle Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the study was to assess the impact of Saflex1 S-series Solar Control PVB (polyvinyl butyral) configurations on conventional vehicle fuel economy and electric vehicle (EV) range. The approach included outdoor vehicle thermal soak testing, RadTherm cool-down analysis, and vehicle simulations. Thermal soak tests were conducted at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility in Golden, Colorado. The test results quantified interior temperature reductions and were used to generate initial conditions for the RadTherm cool-down analysis. The RadTherm model determined the potential reduction in air-conditioning (A/C) capacity, which was used to calculate the A/C load for the vehicle simulations. The vehicle simulation tool identified the potential reduction in fuel consumption or improvement in EV range between a baseline and modified configurations for the city and highway drive cycles. The thermal analysis determined a potential 4.0% reduction in A/C power for the Saflex Solar PVB solar control configuration. The reduction in A/C power improved the vehicle range of EVs and fuel economy of conventional vehicles and plug-in hybrid electric vehicles.

Rugh, J.; Chaney, L.; Venson, T.; Ramroth, L.; Rose, M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey (MECS) - U.S. Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ...

302

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency. Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ...

303

EIA Average Energy Consumption 2005  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Table US8. Average Consumption by Fuels Used, 2005 Physical Units per Household Fuels Used (physical units of consumption per household using the fuel)

304

IV. Uniform Regulations G. Uniform Engine Fuels and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... An electrochemical energy conversion device in which fuel and an oxidant react to generate electricity without consumption, physically or ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

305

Renewable & Alternative Fuels - Analysis & Projections - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency. ... Biomass; Geothermal; Hydropower; Solar ...

306

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on benchmarking the fuel cost of steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Effects of Village Power Quality on Fuel Consumption and Operating Expenses  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alaska's rural village electric utilities are isolated from the Alaska railbelt electrical grid intertie and from each other. Different strategies have been developed for providing power to meet demand in each of these rural communities. Many of these communities rely on diesel electric generators (DEGs) for power. Some villages have also installed renewable power sources and automated generation systems for controlling the DEGs and other sources of power. For example, Lime Village has installed a diesel battery photovoltaic hybrid system, Kotzebue and Wales have wind-diesel hybrid systems, and McGrath has installed a highly automated system for controlling diesel generators. Poor power quality and diesel engine efficiency in village power systems increases the cost of meeting the load. Power quality problems may consist of poor power factor (PF) or waveform disturbances, while diesel engine efficiency depends primarily on loading, the fuel type, the engine temperature, and the use of waste heat for nearby buildings. These costs take the form of increased fuel use, increased generator maintenance, and decreased reliability. With the cost of bulk fuel in some villages approaching $1.32/liter ($5.00/gallon) a modest 5% decrease in fuel use can result in substantial savings with short payback periods depending on the village's load profile and the cost of corrective measures. This project over its five year history has investigated approaches to improving power quality and implementing fuel savings measures through the use of performance assessment software tools developed in MATLAB{reg_sign} Simulink{reg_sign} and the implementation of remote monitoring, automated generation control, and the addition of renewable energy sources in select villages. The results have shown how many of these communities would benefit from the use of automated generation control by implementing a simple economic dispatch scheme and the integration of renewable energy sources such as wind generation.

Richard Wies; Ron Johnson

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

308

Sustainable Power Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Power Generation in Microbial Fuel Cells Using Bicarbonate Buffer and Proton Transfer) isolation and selection of electricity- generating bacteria (3­5), (ii) selection and modification studies (11­21) to maintain a suitable pH for electricity- generating bacteria and/or to increase

Tullos, Desiree

309

Fuel cell generator containing a gas sealing means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical generator is made, operating with flowing fuel gas and oxidant gas, the generator having a thermal insulation layer, and a sealing means contacting or contained within the insulation, where the sealing means is effective to control the contact of the various gases utilized in the generator.

Makiel, Joseph M. (Monroeville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Fuel cell generator containing a gas sealing means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical generator is made, operating with flowing fuel gas and oxidant gas, the generator having a thermal insulation layer, and a sealing means contacting or contained within the insulation, where the sealing means is effective to control the contact of the various gases utilized in the generator. 5 figs.

Makiel, J.M.

1987-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

311

Second Generation Renewable Fuels Blue-Green Seminar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract Second Generation Renewable Fuels Blue-Green Seminar at University of Michigan by Michael Ladisch Laboratory of Renewable Resources Engineering Purdue University Potter Engineering Center 500 footprint will require commercialization of industrial processes that transform renewable lignocellulosic

Eustice, Ryan

312

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council NYC-Westchester This dataset comes...

313

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool South This dataset comes from the Energy Information...

314

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council Northeast This dataset comes from...

315

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council Long Island This dataset comes from...

316

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Northeast Power Coordinating Council Upstate New York This dataset comes...

317

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool North This dataset comes from the Energy Information...

318

Doing better with less energy [fuel-efficient power generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors describe how many fuel-efficient coal-fired power generation technologies can be adopted at reduced net cost, but argue that, unless barriers to innovation are removed, their adoption will be far from automatic

J. Sathbye; J. Sinton; T. Heller

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

A new generation of renewable fuels is on the horizon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The lead inventor of a suite of technologies that can be used to convert triglyceride oils from camelina and other plants into renewable fuels and chemicals discusses two process schemes that are nearing commercialization. A new generation of renewable fue

320

POWER GENERATION FROM LIQUID METAL NUCLEAR FUEL  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nuclear reactor system is described wherein the reactor is the type using a liquid metal fuel, such as a dispersion of fissile material in bismuth. The reactor is designed ln the form of a closed loop having a core sectlon and heat exchanger sections. The liquid fuel is clrculated through the loop undergoing flssion in the core section to produce heat energy and transferrlng this heat energy to secondary fluids in the heat exchanger sections. The fission in the core may be produced by a separate neutron source or by a selfsustained chain reaction of the liquid fuel present in the core section. Additional auxiliary heat exchangers are used in the system to convert water into steam which drives a turbine.

Dwyer, O.E.

1958-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports An Assessment of EIA's Building Consumption Data Background image of CNSTAT logo The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) routinely uses feedback from customers and outside experts to help improve its programs and products. As part of an assessment of its consumption

322

The effects of driving style and vehicle performance on the real-world fuel consumption of U.S. light-duty vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Even with advances in vehicle technology, both conservation and methods for reducing the fuel consumption of existing vehicles are needed to decrease the petroleum consumption and greenhouse gas emissions of the U.S. ...

Berry, Irene Michelle

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. content has been downloaded from IOPscience. Please scroll down to see the full text. Download details: IP Address: 192.174.37.50 This content was downloaded on 04/11/2013 at 23:01 Please note that terms and conditions apply. Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies: a review of existing literature View the table of contents for this issue, or go to the journal homepage for more 2012 Environ. Res. Lett. 7 045802 (http://iopscience.iop.org/1748-9326/7/4/045802) Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 7 (2012) 045802 (10pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/7/4/045802 Operational water consumption and withdrawal factors for electricity generating technologies:

324

EA-0510: High-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (Sofc) Generator...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

510: High-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (Sofc) Generator Development Project (METC), Churchill, Pennsylvania EA-0510: High-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (Sofc) Generator...

325

Power Generation from Solid Fuels in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

J. Gorte vohs@seas.upenn.edu, 215-898-6318 Abstract In this study we demonstrate the generation of electricity at high power densities, >300 mWcm 2 at 973 K, from a solid...

326

NETL Publications: Generation, Fuels and Environment Membership Advisory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Generation, Fuels and Environment Membership Advisory Group Generation, Fuels and Environment Membership Advisory Group June 15-16, 2010 Table of Contents Disclaimer Presentations PRESENTATIONS Welcome [PDF-1.1MB] Dan Cicero, Senior Management & Technical Advisor, Strategic Center for Coal, NETL Dale Bradshaw, Senior Program Manager, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association IGCC [PDF-3.1MB] Timeline [PDF-511KB] Jenny Tennant, Technology Manager, Gasification Status of Area 1 - ICCS [PDF-763KB] Nelson Rekos, Project Financing & Technology Deployment Division Status of Area 2 - ICCS [PDF-235KB] Elaine Everitt, Fuels Division Turbines [PDF-971KB] Robin Ames, Project Manager, Power Systems Division, Turbines Fuel Cells [PDF-2.4MB] Travis Shultz, Acting Technology Manager, Fuel Cells Coal to Synfuels Projects/Polygeneration Projects

327

U.S. Distributed Generation Fuel Cell Program  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is the largest funder of fuel cell technology in the U.S. The DOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE) is developing high temperature fuel cells for distributed generation. It has funded the development of tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power systems operating at up to 60% efficiency on natural gas. The remarkable environmental performance of these fuel cells makes them likely candidates to help mitigate pollution. DOE is now pursuing more widely applicable solid oxide fuel cells for 2010 and beyond. DOE estimates that a 5 kW solid oxide fuel cell system can reach $400/kW at reasonable manufacturing volumes. SECA - the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance - was formed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to accelerate the commercial readiness of planar and other solid oxide fuel cell systems utilizing 3-10 kW size modules by taking advantage of the projected economies of production from a mass customization approach. In addition, if the modular 3-10 kW size units can be ganged or scaled up to larger sizes with no increase in cost, then commercial, microgrid and other distributed generation markets will become attainable. Further scale-up and hybridization of SECA SOFCs with gas turbines could result in penetration of the bulk power market. This paper reviews the current status of the solid oxide and molten carbonate fuel cells in the U.S.

Williams, Mark C.; Strakey, Joseph P.; Singhal, Subhash C.

2004-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

328

Fossil fuel combined cycle power generation method  

SciTech Connect

A method for converting fuel energy to electricity includes the steps of converting a higher molecular weight gas into at least one mixed gas stream of lower average molecular weight including at least a first lower molecular weight gas and a second gas, the first and second gases being different gases, wherein the first lower molecular weight gas comprises H.sub.2 and the second gas comprises CO. The mixed gas is supplied to at least one turbine to produce electricity. The mixed gas stream is divided after the turbine into a first gas stream mainly comprising H.sub.2 and a second gas stream mainly comprising CO. The first and second gas streams are then electrochemically oxidized in separate fuel cells to produce electricity. A nuclear reactor can be used to supply at least a portion of the heat the required for the chemical conversion process.

Labinov, Solomon D. (Knoxville, TN); Armstrong, Timothy R. (Clinton, TN); Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN)

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

329

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7) 7) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 September 1997 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Contacts Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1997 ii The Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report is prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration. Questions and comments concerning the contents of the report may be directed to:

330

Energy Tips: Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Type (sales unit) Type (sales unit) Energy Content Combustion (Btu/sales unit) Efficiency (%) Natural Gas (therm) 100,000 81.7 Natural Gas (cubic foot) 1,030 81.7 Distillate/No. 2 Oil (gallon) 138,700 84.6 Residual/No. 6 Oil (gallon) 149,700 86.1 Coal (ton) 27,000,000 87.6 Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation Benchmarking the fuel cost of steam generation ($/1000 lbs of steam) is an effective way to assess the efficiency of your steam system. This cost is dependent upon fuel type, unit fuel cost, boiler efficiency, feedwater temperature, and steam pressure. This calculation provides a good first approximation for the cost of generating steam and serves as a tracking device to allow for boiler performance monitoring. Table 1 shows the heat input required to produce one pound of saturated

331

A plot study of the potential for Navy utilization of solid waste derived fuels to offset fossil fuels consumption. Final report  

SciTech Connect

A brief study was made to define problems that would be encountered in estimating potential Navy markets for various forms of waste derived fuels. Fossil fuel consumption estimates for boiler plants at several Navy activities were converted to waste derived fuel (WDF) estimates using a set of assumed rules judged technically feasible regarding boiler conversions and confirming fossil fuels and WDF. The results of this first study are presented indicating Navy boilers might represent a significant market for all the WDF a region could produce if the WDF were available in liquid as well as solid forms. The economic feasibility of conversions and WDF production are not addressed in this brief paper.

Capps, A.G.; Duffey-Armstrong, M.; Freeman, R.E.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / South  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South South Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 115, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation South Southwest Power Pool Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / South- Reference Case (xls, 118.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

333

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / North  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

North North Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 114, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA North Renewable Energy Generation Southwest Power Pool Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - Southwest Power Pool / North- Reference Case (xls, 118.8 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage

334

AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United States United States Dataset Summary Description This dataset comes from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), and is part of the 2011 Annual Energy Outlook Report (AEO2011). This dataset is table 120, and contains only the reference case. The dataset uses gigawatts, billion kilowatthours and quadrillion Btu. The data is broken down into generating capacity, electricity generation and energy consumption. Source EIA Date Released April 26th, 2011 (3 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords 2011 AEO EIA Renewable Energy Generation United States Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon AEO2011: Renewable Energy Generation by Fuel - United States- Reference Case (xls, 119.5 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually

335

Electrochemical fuel cell generator having an internal and leak tight hydrocarbon fuel reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical fuel cell generator configuration is made having a generator section which contains a plurality of axially elongated fuel cells, each cell containing a fuel electrode, air electrode, and solid oxide electrolyte between the electrodes, in which axially elongated dividers separate portions of the fuel cells from each other, and where at least one divider also reforms a reformable fuel gas mixture prior to electricity generation reactions, the at least one reformer-divider is hollow having a closed end and an open end entrance for a reformable fuel mixture to pass to the closed end of the divider and then reverse flow and pass back along the hollowed walls to be reformed, and then finally to pass as reformed fuel out of the open end of the divider to contact the fuel cells, and further where the reformer-divider is a composite structure having a gas diffusion barrier of metallic foil surrounding the external walls of the reformer-divider except at the entrance to prevent diffusion of the reformable gas mixture through the divider, and further housed in an outer insulating jacket except at the entrance to prevent short-circuiting of the fuel cells by the gas diffusion barrier. 10 figs.

Dederer, J.T.; Hager, C.A.

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Electrochemical fuel cell generator having an internal and leak tight hydrocarbon fuel reformer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrochemical fuel cell generator configuration is made having a generator section which contains a plurality of axially elongated fuel cells, each cell containing a fuel electrode, air electrode, and solid oxide electrolyte between the electrodes, in which axially elongated dividers separate portions of the fuel cells from each other, and where at least one divider also reforms a reformable fuel gas mixture prior to electricity generation reactions, the at least one reformer-divider is hollow having a closed end and an open end entrance for a reformable fuel mixture to pass to the closed end of the divider and then reverse flow and pass back along the hollowed walls to be reformed, and then finally to pass as reformed fuel out of the open end of the divider to contact the fuel cells, and further where the reformer-divider is a composite structure having a gas diffusion barrier of metallic foil surrounding the external walls of the reformer-divider except at the entrance to prevent diffusion of the reformable gas mixture through the divider, and further housed in an outer insulating jacket except at the entrance to prevent short-circuiting of the fuel cells by the gas diffusion barrier.

Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Hager, Charles A. (Mars, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

6) 6) Distribution Category UC-950 Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 October 1996 Energy Information Administration Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 This report was prepared by the Energy Information Administration, the independent statistical and analytical agency within the Department of Energy. The information contained herein should not be construed as advocating or reflecting any policy position of the Department of Energy or of any other organization. Energy Information Administration/ Nuclear Power Generation and Fuel Cycle Report 1996 ii Contacts This report was prepared in the Office of Coal, Nuclear, report should be addressed to the following staff Electric and Alternate Fuels by the Analysis and Systems

338

Approach to Assessing Fuel Flexibility for Improved Generating Plant Profitability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of an EPRI study of fuel flexibility, a strategy that can increase a power plant's financial performance by matching choices regarding the type of coal burned at a generating station to fluctuations in the market price of electricity. The report presents detailed analytical information as well as conclusions drawn from the study, and includes a checklist utilities can use in evaluating the potential for a plant to benefit by adopting fuel flexibility.

1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

339

PEM fuel cells for transportation and stationary power generation applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe recent activities at LANL devoted to polymer electrolyte fuel cells in the contexts of stationary power generation and transportation applications. A low cost/high performance hydrogen or reformate/air stack technology is being developed based on ultralow Pt loadings and on non-machined, inexpensive elements for flow-fields and bipolar plates. On board methanol reforming is compared to the option of direct methanol fuel cells because of recent significant power density increases demonstrated in the latter.

Cleghorn, S.J.; Ren, X.; Springer, T.E.; Wilson, M.S.; Zawodzinski, C.; Zawodzinski, T.A. Jr.; Gottesfeld, S.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Estimating Monthly 1989-2000 Data for Generation, Consumption, and Stocks  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly Energy Review, Section 7: Monthly Energy Review, Section 7: Estimating Monthly 1989-2000 Data for Generation, Consumption, and Stocks For 1989-2000, monthly and annual data were collected for electric utilities; however, during this time period, only annual data were collected for independent power producers, commercial plants, and industrial plants. To obtain 1989-2000 monthly estimates for the Electric Power, Commercial, and Industrial Sectors, electric utility patterns were used for each energy source (MonthX = MonthUtility * AnnualX / AnnualUtility). For example, to estimate "Electricity Net Generation From Coal: Electric Power Sector" in Table 7.2b, the monthly pattern for "Electricity Net Generation From Coal: Electric Utilities" was used. To estimate the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Evaluation of fuel consumption potential of medium and heavy duty vehicles through modeling and simulation.  

SciTech Connect

The main objective of this report is to provide quantitative data to support the Committee in its task of establishing a report to support rulemaking on medium- and heavy-duty fuel efficiency improvement. In particular, it is of paramount importance for the Committee to base or illustrate their conclusions on established models and actual state-of-the art data. The simulations studies presented in the report have been defined and requested by the members of the National Academy committee to provide quantitative inputs to support their recommendations. As such, various technologies and usage scenarios were considered for several applications. One of the objective is to provide the results along with their associated assumptions (both vehicle and drive cycles), information generally missing from public discussions on literature search. Finally, the advantages and limitations of using simulation will be summarized. The study addresses several of the committee tasks, including: (1) Discussion of the implication of metric selection; (2) Assessing the impact of existing technologies on fuel consumption through energy balance analysis (both steady-state and standard cycles) as well as real world drive cycles; and (3) Impact of future technologies, both individually and collectively.

Delorme, A.; Karbowski, D.; Sharer, P.; Energy Systems

2010-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the April to October 2004 reporting period in Task 2.3 (SOFC Scaleup for Hybrid and Fuel Cell Systems) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems for central power generation application based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by natural gas. The main objective of this task is to develop credible scale up strategies for large solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems. System concepts that integrate a SOFC with a gas turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 20 MW. A 25 MW plant configuration was selected with projected system efficiency of over 65% and a factory cost of under $400/kW. The plant design is modular and can be scaled to both higher and lower plant power ratings. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

David Deangelis; Rich Depuy; Debashis Dey; Georgia Karvountzi; Nguyen Minh; Max Peter; Faress Rahman; Pavel Sokolov; Deliang Yang

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

343

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the April to October 2004 reporting period in Task 2.3 (SOFC Scaleup for Hybrid and Fuel Cell Systems) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems for central power generation application based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by natural gas. The main objective of this task is to develop credible scale up strategies for large solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems. System concepts that integrate a SOFC with a gas turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 20 MW. A 25 MW plant configuration was selected with projected system efficiency of over 65% and a factory cost of under $400/kW. The plant design is modular and can be scaled to both higher and lower plant power ratings. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

David Deangelis; Rich Depuy; Debashis Dey; Georgia Karvountzi; Nguyen Minh; Max Peter; Faress Rahman; Pavel Sokolov; Deliang Yang

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

SULFUR REMOVAL FROM PIPE LINE NATURAL GAS FUEL: APPLICATION TO FUEL CELL POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pipeline natural gas is being considered as the fuel of choice for utilization in fuel cell-based distributed generation systems because of its abundant supply and the existing supply infrastructure (1). For effective utilization in fuel cells, pipeline gas requires efficient removal of sulfur impurities (naturally occurring sulfur compounds or sulfur bearing odorants) to prevent the electrical performance degradation of the fuel cell system. Sulfur odorants such as thiols and sulfides are added to pipeline natural gas and to LPG to ensure safe handling during transportation and utilization. The odorants allow the detection of minute gas line leaks, thereby minimizing the potential for explosions or fires.

King, David L.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Singh, Prabhakar

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

345

Market Assessment of Retrofit Dual-Fuel Diesel Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reciprocating engines have long played an important role in the distributed resources market and should continue to provide end-use customers and energy companies benefits in both on-site and grid-connected power generation service. This report presents results of collaborative technical and economic market analyses with a major engine manufacturer to examine the prospects for conversion of existing diesel generators in the 500-2000 kW size range to dual-fuel (natural gas and diesel fuel) operation. Thes...

2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

346

Drive Cycle Analysis, Measurement of Emissions and Fuel Consumption of a PHEV School Bus: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) collected and analyzed real-world school bus drive cycle data and selected similar standard drive cycles for testing on a chassis dynamometer. NREL tested a first-generation plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) school bus equipped with a 6.4L engine and an Enova PHEV drive system comprising a 25-kW/80 kW (continuous/peak) motor and a 370-volt lithium ion battery pack. A Bluebird 7.2L conventional school bus was also tested. Both vehicles were tested over three different drive cycles to capture a range of driving activity. PHEV fuel savings in charge-depleting (CD) mode ranged from slightly more than 30% to a little over 50%. However, the larger fuel savings lasted over a shorter driving distance, as the fully charged PHEV school bus would initially operate in CD mode for some distance, then in a transitional mode, and finally in a charge-sustaining (CS) mode for continued driving. The test results indicate that a PHEV school bus can achieve significant fuel savings during CD operation relative to a conventional bus. In CS mode, the tested bus showed small fuel savings and somewhat higher nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions than the baseline comparison bus.

Barnitt, R.; Gonder, J.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Table C1. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for Non-Mall ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Plumbing System Upgrade ... Building Newer than 1980 ... 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: ...

348

Demonstration of a nitrogen based carburizing atmosphere (energy consumption of the endothermic generator). First quarterly report, 1 October 1978--30 December 1978  

SciTech Connect

This first quarterly report details the energy consumption of an endothermic generator. Two different sized generators were studied and found to have basically the same energy usage characteristics. The energy consumption was found to be dependent on generator output, with less energy consumption per unit volume at higher outputs.

Peartree, R.J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Handbook for Utility Participation in Biogas-Fueled Electric Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas is a methane-rich gas produced from the controlled biological degradation of organic wastes. Biogas is produced as part of the treatment of four general classes of wet waste streams: Wastewater Treatment Plant Sludge Animal Manure Industrial Wastes Municipal Solid Waste in Sealed Landfills. The high methane content of biogas makes it suitable for fueling electric power generation. As energy prices increase, generation of electric power form biogas becomes increasingly attractive and the number of ...

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

350

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the January to June 2004 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

Nguyen Minh

2004-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

351

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the July 2003 to December 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

352

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the January to June 2004 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

Nguyen Minh

2004-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

353

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the July 2003 to December 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

2004-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

354

Zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews the design and operation of the high temperature solid oxide fuel cells based on yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte. The functional requirements of the various cell components are presented; and the materials and fabrication processes used for different cell components are described. Finally, the recent progress made toward commercialization of these cells for clean and efficient power generation is discussed.

Singhal, S.C.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reviews the design and operation of the high temperature solid oxide fuel cells based on yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte. The functional requirements of the various cell components are presented; and the materials and fabrication processes used for different cell components are described. Finally, the recent progress made toward commercialization of these cells for clean and efficient power generation is discussed.

Singhal, S.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Role of solid oxide fuel cell distributed generation for stationary power application.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Based on an availabe fuel cell dyanmical model, an inportant concept feasible operating area is introduced. Fuel cell based distributed generator is studied to solve (more)

Li, Yonghui.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first phase was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most three) for further detailed consideration. During Phase 1, an exhaustive literature search was performed to locate all cycles previously proposed. The cycles located were screened using objective criteria to determine which could

BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

OAK B202 HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS USING NUCLEAR POWER. Combustion of fossil fuels, used to power transportation, generate electricity, heat homes and fuel industry provides 86% of the world's energy. Drawbacks to fossil fuel utilization include limited supply, pollution, and carbon dioxide emissions. Carbon dioxide emissions, thought to be responsible for global warming, are now the subject of international treaties. Together, these drawbacks argue for the replacement of fossil fuels with a less-polluting potentially renewable primary energy such as nuclear energy. Conventional nuclear plants readily generate electric power but fossil fuels are firmly entrenched in the transportation sector. Hydrogen is an environmentally attractive transportation fuel that has the potential to displace fossil fuels. Hydrogen will be particularly advantageous when coupled with fuel cells. Fuel cells have higher efficiency than conventional battery/internal combustion engine combinations and do not produce nitrogen oxides during low-temperature operation. Contemporary hydrogen production is primarily based on fossil fuels and most specifically on natural gas. When hydrogen is produced using energy derived from fossil fuels, there is little or no environmental advantage. There is currently no large scale, cost-effective, environmentally attractive hydrogen production process available for commercialization, nor has such a process been identified. The objective of this work is to find an economically feasible process for the production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high-temperature nuclear reactor as the primary energy source. Hydrogen production by thermochemical water-splitting (Appendix A), a chemical process that accomplishes the decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen using only heat or, in the case of a hybrid thermochemical process, by a combination of heat and electrolysis, could meet these goals. Hydrogen produced from fossil fuels has trace contaminants (primarily carbon monoxide) that are detrimental to precious metal catalyzed fuel cells, as is now recognized by many of the world's largest automobile companies. Thermochemical hydrogen will not contain carbon monoxide as an impurity at any level. Electrolysis, the alternative process for producing hydrogen using nuclear energy, suffers from thermodynamic inefficiencies in both the production of electricity and in electrolytic parts of the process. The efficiency of electrolysis (electricity to hydrogen) is currently about 80%. Electric power generation efficiency would have to exceed 65% (thermal to electrical) for the combined efficiency to exceed the 52% (thermal to hydrogen) calculated for one thermochemical cycle. Thermochemical water-splitting cycles have been studied, at various levels of effort, for the past 35 years. They were extensively studied in the late 70s and early 80s but have received little attention in the past 10 years, particularly in the U.S. While there is no question about the technical feasibility and the potential for high efficiency, cycles with proven low cost and high efficiency have yet to be developed commercially. Over 100 cycles have been proposed, but substantial research has been executed on only a few. This report describes work accomplished during a three-year project whose objective is to ''define an economically feasible concept for production of hydrogen, by nuclear means, using an advanced high temperature nuclear reactor as the energy source.'' The emphasis of the first phase was to evaluate thermochemical processes which offer the potential for efficient, cost-effective, large-scale production of hydrogen from water in which the primary energy input is high temperature heat from an advanced nuclear reactor and to select one (or, at most three) for further detailed consideration. During Phase 1, an exhaustive literature search was performed to locate all cycles previously proposed. The cycles located were screened using objective criteria to determine which could benefit, in terms of efficien

BROWN,LC; BESENBRUCH,GE; LENTSCH,RD; SCHULTZ,KR; FUNK,JF; PICKARD,PS; MARSHALL,AC; SHOWALTER,SK

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Evaluation of Hydrogen Generation from Radiolysis from Breached Spent Fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ionizing radiation from spent nuclear fuel (SNF) can cause radiolytic decomposition of water and generation of hydrogen. Factors affecting hydrogen production include the type of radiation (alpha, gamma, and neutron), the radiation (alpha, gamma, and neutron), the linear energy transfer (LET) rates from the radiation, the water chemistry and dissolved gases, and physical conditions such as temperature and pressure. A review of the mechanisms for the radiolytic generation of hydrogen applicable to breached SNF has been performed. A qualitative evaluation of the potential for generation of hydrogen in the pure water used in water-filled shipping casks at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is made.

Vinson, D.W.

2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

360

Assessment of Fuel Gas Cleanup Systems for Waste Gas Fueled Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many industrial operations that have waste gas streams that are combustible. Chief among these is biogas produced by anaerobic digestion of organic wastes to produce a methane-rich biogas in landfills and anaerobic digesters. These gas streams are increasingly being used to fuel local power generators. The biogas streams, however, contain traces of a wide variety of contaminants. Removal of these contaminants may be required to either meet the manufacturer's requirements for fuel gas quality to...

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 2b. Primary Fuel Consumption for Selected  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 2b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Primary 1 Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,468 1,572 1,665 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 156 156 166 313 Textile Mills 457 375 304 314 Textile Product Mills 85 94 110 315 Apparel 84 54 27 316 Leather and Allied Products 14 11 5 321 Wood Products 647 518 619 322 Paper 3,221 2,803 2,833 323 Printing and Related Support 199 197 171 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,873 3,454 3,657 325 Chemicals 4,851 4,803 4,181 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 691 707 683 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 1,235 1,331 1,385 331 Primary Metals 3,660 3,100 2,617 332 Fabricated Metal Products 791 706 670 333 Machinery 404 341 416 334 Computer and Electronic Products

362

EIA Energy Efficiency-Table 1b. Fuel Consumption for Selected Industries,  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

b b Page Last Modified: May 2010 Table 1b. End Uses of Fuel Consumption (Site Energy) for Selected Industries, 1998, 2002, and 2006 (Trillion Btu) MECS Survey Years NAICS Subsector and Industry 1998 2002 2006 311 Food 1,044 1,116 1,186 312 Beverage and Tobacco Products 108 104 109 313 Textile Mills 254 205 178 314 Textile Product Mills 49 60 72 315 Apparel 48 30 14 316 Leather and Allied Products 8 7 3 321 Wood Products 504 375 445 322 Paper 2,744 2,361 2,354 323 Printing and Related Support 98 98 85 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,622 3,202 3,396 325 Chemicals 3,704 3,769 3,195 326 Plastics and Rubber Products 327 348 336 327 Nonmetallic Mineral Products 969 1,052 1,105 331 Primary Metals 2,576 2,123 1,744 332 Fabricated Metal Products 441 387 397

363

Table 2.1c Commercial Sector Energy Consumption Estimates, 1949 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 See "Primary Energy Consumption" in Glossary. 9 Wind electricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil-fuels heat ratesee Table A6).

364

Table 2.1f Electric Power Sector Energy Consumption, 1949-2011 ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 See "Primary Energy Consumption" in Glossary. 9 Wind electricity net generation (converted to Btu using the fossil-fuels heat ratesee Table A6).

365

Japans use of thermal generation is up since March 2011 due ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, ... Total post-Fukushima fossil fuel consumption peaked at about 500 trillion British thermal units in January 2012 ...

366

Consumption & Efficiency - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Technical Workshop on Behavior Economics Presentations Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Graph showing Cost of Natural Gas Used in Manufacturing Sector Has Fallen Source: U.S. Energy Information Administration, Manufacturing Energy

367

Water consumption footprint and land requirements of alternative diesel and jet fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Renewable Fuels Standard 2 (RFS2) is an important component of alternative transportation fuels policy in the United States (US). By mandating the production of alternative fuels, RFS2 attempts to address a number of ...

Staples, Mark Douglas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

X-ray Imaging of Shock Waves Generated by High-Pressure Fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-ray Imaging of Shock Waves Generated by High-Pressure Fuel Sprays High-pressure, high-speed fuel sprays are a critical technology for many applications including fuel injection...

369

Table 7.4b Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

and Useful Thermal Output: Electric Power Sector (Subset of Table 7.4a) Coala Petroleum Natural Gasf Other Gasesg Biomass Otherj Distillate Fuel Oilb Residual Fuel Oilc

370

Table 2. Fuel Oil Consumption and Expenditures in U.S. Households ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

1 A small amount of fuel oil used for appliances is included in "Fuel Oil" under "All Uses." NF = No applicable RSE row factor.

371

SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC during the January 2003 to June 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. This report summarizes the results obtained to date on: System performance analysis and model optimization; Reliability and cost model development; System control including dynamic model development; Heat exchanger material tests and life analysis; Pressurized SOFC evaluation; and Pre-baseline system definition for coal gasification fuel cell system concept.

Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

The next generation of oxy-fuel boiler systems  

SciTech Connect

Research in the area of oxy-fuel combustion which is being pioneered by Jupiter Oxygen Corporation combined with boiler research conducted by the USDOE/Albany Research Center has been applied to designing the next generation of oxy-fuel combustion systems. The new systems will enhance control of boiler systems during turn-down and improve response time while improving boiler efficiency. These next generation boiler systems produce a combustion product that has been shown to be well suited for integrated pollutant removal. These systems have the promise of reducing boiler foot-print and boiler construction costs. The modularity of the system opens the possibility of using this design for replacement of boilers for retrofit on existing systems.

Ochs, Thomas L.; Gross, Alex (Jupiter Oxygen Corp.); Patrick, Brian (Jupiter Oxygen Corp.); Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Summers, Cathy A.; Turner, Paul C.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Crop residues as a fuel for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Crop residues could serve as an alternative energy source for producing electric power and heat in agricultural regions of the United States. Nearly 2 quads of residues are estimated to be available as a sustainable annual yield. These can substitute for up to one quad of conventional fuels used to generate electricity and up to an additional quad of petroleum and natural gas currently used for producing heat. The most promising routes to residue conversion appear to be regional generators sized in the megawatt range, and the mixing of residues with coal for burning in coal power plants. Costing farmers from $0.70 to $1.25 per million Btu, to harvest and prepare for use as a fuel, residues can be a competitive renewable energy supply.

Bhagat, N.; Davitian, H.; Pouder, R.

1979-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC during the October 2002 to December 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. The following activities have been carried out during this reporting period: {lg_bullet} Conceptual system design trade studies were performed {lg_bullet} Part-load performance analysis was conducted {lg_bullet} Primary system concept was down-selected {lg_bullet} Dynamic control model has been developed {lg_bullet} Preliminary heat exchanger designs were prepared {lg_bullet} Pressurized SOFC endurance testing was performed

Nguyen Minh; Faress Rahman

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Emissions of CO/sub 2/ to the atmosphere due to U. S. A. fossil fuel consumption  

SciTech Connect

Analysis and projection of carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere are estimated based on the Brookhaven reference energy system. Some new results are given on carbon dioxide contribution to the atmosphere from US fossil fuel consumption by different sectors including residential, commercial, industrial and transportation. The total weight of carbon as carbon dioxide emitted to the atmosphere and the additional CO/sub 2/ concentration over background by different subsectors in the years 1977, 1980, 1985, 1990, 2000 and 2020 are presented.

Dang, V.D.; Steinberg, M.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

A Bio-Based Fuel Cell for Distributed Energy Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technology we propose consists primarily of an improved design for increasing the energy density of a certain class of bio-fuel cell (BFC). The BFCs we consider are those which harvest electrons produced by microorganisms during their metabolism of organic substrates (e.g. glucose, acetate). We estimate that our technology will significantly enhance power production (per unit volume) of these BFCs, to the point where they could be employed as stand-alone systems for distributed energy generation.

Anthony Terrinoni; Sean Gifford

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

377

Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft Using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the potential for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to provide electrical generation on-board commercial aircraft. Unlike a turbine-based auxiliary power unit (APU) a solid oxide fuel cell power unit (SOFCPU) would be more efficient than using the main engine generators to generate electricity and would operate continuously during flight. The focus of this study is on more-electric aircraft which minimize bleed air extraction from the engines and instead use electrical power obtained from generators driven by the main engines to satisfy all major loads. The increased electrical generation increases the potential fuel savings obtainable through more efficient electrical generation using a SOFCPU. However, the weight added to the aircraft by the SOFCPU impacts the main engine fuel consumption which reduces the potential fuel savings. To investigate these relationships the Boeing 7878 was used as a case study. The potential performance of the SOFCPU was determined by coupling flowsheet modeling using ChemCAD software with a stack performance algorithm. For a given stack operating condition (cell voltage, anode utilization, stack pressure, target cell exit temperature), ChemCAD software was used to determine the cathode air rate to provide stack thermal balance, the heat exchanger duties, the gross power output for a given fuel rate, the parasitic power for the anode recycle blower and net power obtained from (or required by) the compressor/expander. The SOFC is based on the Gen4 Delphi planar SOFC with assumed modifications to tailor it to this application. The size of the stack needed to satisfy the specified condition was assessed using an empirically-based algorithm. The algorithm predicts stack power density based on the pressure, inlet temperature, cell voltage and anode and cathode inlet flows and compositions. The algorithm was developed by enhancing a model for a well-established material set operating at atmospheric pressure to reflect the effect of elevated pressure and to represent the expected enhancement obtained using a promising cell material set which has been tested in button cells but not yet used to produce full-scale stacks. The predictions for the effect of pressure on stack performance were based on literature. As part of this study, additional data were obtained on button cells at elevated pressure to confirm the validity of the predictions. The impact of adding weight to the 787-8 fuel consumption was determined as a function of flight distance using a PianoX model. A conceptual design for a SOFC power system for the Boeing 787 is developed and the weight estimated. The results indicate that the power density of the stacks must increase by at least a factor of 2 to begin saving fuel on the 787 aircraft. However, the conceptual design of the power system may still be useful for other applications which are less weight sensitive.

Whyatt, Greg A.; Chick, Lawrence A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Consumption & Efficiency - Analysis & Projections - U.S. Energy Information  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Consumption & Efficiency Consumption & Efficiency Glossary › FAQS › Overview Data Residential Energy Consumption Survey Data Commercial Energy Consumption Survey Data Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey Data Vehicle Energy Consumption Survey Data Energy Intensity Consumption Summaries Average cost of fossil-fuels for electricity generation All Consumption & Efficiency Data Reports Analysis & Projections All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports All Sectors Change category... All Sectors Commercial Buildings Efficiency Manufacturing Projections Residential Transportation All Reports Filter by: All Data Analysis Projections Today in Energy - Commercial Consumption & Efficiency Short, timely articles with graphs about recent commercial consumption and

379

Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group Generation-IV Roadmap Report of the Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group The Charter of the Generation IV Roadmap Fuel Cycle Crosscut Group (FCCG) is to (1) examine the fuel cycle implications for alternative nuclear power scenarios in terms of Generation IV goals and (2) identify key fuel cycle issues associated with Generation IV goals. This included examination of "fuel resource inputs and waste outputs for the range of potential Generation IV fuel cycles, consistent with projected energy demand scenarios." This report summarizes the results of the studies. The membership of the FCCG comprised 8 US members and 7 members from Generation IV International Forum (GIF) countries including members from

380

Ohio's fuel mix for power generation is changing - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Although coal remains the dominant fuel for Ohio's electric power generation, accounting for 81% of total statewide generation during the first 9 months of 2011, the ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Downhole steam generator using low pressure fuel and air supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for generation of steam in a borehole for penetration into an earth formation wherein a spiral, tubular heat exchanger is used in the combustion chamber to isolate the combustion process from the water being superheated for conversion into steam. The isolation allows combustion of a relatively low pressure oxidant and fuel mixture for generating high enthalpy steam. The fuel is preheated by feedback of combustion gases from the top of the combustion chamber through a fuel preheater chamber. The hot exhaust gases of combustion at the bottom of the combustion chamber, after flowing over the heat exchanger enter an exhaust passage and pipe. The exhaust pipe is mounted inside the water supply line heating the water flowing into the heat exchanger. After being superheated in the heat exchanger, the water is ejected through an expansion nozzle and converts into steam prior to penetration into the earth formation. Pressure responsive doors are provided at a steam outlet downstream of the nozzle and close when the steam pressure is lost due to flameout.

Fox, Ronald L. (Albuquerque, NM)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Fuel Cell Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

technologies. The higher-efficiency fuel cells, such as the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC), exhibited lower energy requirements than...

383

Heavy Duty Diesel Particulate Matter and Fuel Consumption Modeling for Transportation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel use. Mesoscale Modeling Data Set and Mesoscale Modelobserved, quantified in the data set, and modeled to improveerrors for the validation data set are less than 2% for fuel

Scora, George Alexander

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

RSEs for Table C1A. Total Energy Consumption by Major Fuel for ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Number of Buildings Floorspace Sum of Major Fuels Electricity Natural Gas Fuel Oil District Heat All Buildings ..... 3.8 1 4.5 4. 5.0 16.4 32

385

Residual fuel consumption in the U.S. continues to decline - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Crude oil , gasoline, heating ... in the late 1970s, demand for residual fuel oil in the United ... Changes on both the residual fuel supply and demand side of the ...

386

Waste generation process modeling and analysis for fuel reprocessing technologies  

SciTech Connect

Estimates of electric power generation requirements for the next century, even when taking the most conservative tack, indicate that the United States will have to increase its production capacity significantly. If the country determines that nuclear power will not be a significant component of this production capacity, the nuclear industry will have to die, as maintaining a small nuclear component will not be justifiable. However, if nuclear power is to be a significant component, it will probably require some form of reprocessing technology. The once-through fuel cycle is only feasible for a relatively small number of nuclear power plants. If we are maintaining several hundred reactors, the once-through fuel cycle is more expensive and ethically questionable.

Kornreich, D. E. (Drew E.); Koehler, A. C. (Andrew C.); Farman, Richard F.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the January 2002 to March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. For this reporting period the following activities have been carried out: {lg_bullet} Conceptual system design trade studies were performed {lg_bullet} System-level performance model was created {lg_bullet} Dynamic control models are being developed {lg_bullet} Mechanical properties of candidate heat exchanger materials were investigated {lg_bullet} SOFC performance mapping as a function of flow rate and pressure was completed

Nguyen Minh

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the October 2001 to December 2001 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. The conceptual and demonstration system designs were proposed and analyzed, and these systems have been modeled in Aspen Plus. Work has also started on the assembly of dynamic component models and the development of the top-level controls requirements for the system. SOFC stacks have been fabricated and performance mapping initiated.

Kurt Montgomery; Nguyen Minh

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the July 2001 to September 2001 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. An internal program kickoff was held at Honeywell in Torrance, CA. The program structure was outlined and the overall technical approach for the program was presented to the team members. Detail program schedules were developed and detailed objectives were defined. Initial work has begun on the system design and pressurized SOFC operation.

Unknown

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation Project Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

Many obvious and significant concerns arise when considering the concept of small-scale biodiesel production. Does the fuel produced meet the stringent requirements set by the commercial biodiesel industry? Is the process safe? How are small-scale producers collecting and transporting waste vegetable oil? How is waste from the biodiesel production process handled by small-scale producers? These concerns and many others were the focus of the research preformed in the Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation project over the last three years. This project was a unique research program in which undergraduate engineering students at Messiah College set out to research the feasibility of small-biodiesel production for application on a campus of approximately 3000 students. This Department of Energy (DOE) funded research program developed out of almost a decade of small-scale biodiesel research and development work performed by students at Messiah College. Over the course of the last three years the research team focused on four key areas related to small-scale biodiesel production: Quality Testing and Assurance, Process and Processor Research, Process and Processor Development, and Community Education. The objectives for the Messiah College Biodiesel Fuel Generation Project included the following: 1. Preparing a laboratory facility for the development and optimization of processors and processes, ASTM quality assurance, and performance testing of biodiesel fuels. 2. Developing scalable processor and process designs suitable for ASTM certifiable small-scale biodiesel production, with the goals of cost reduction and increased quality. 3. Conduct research into biodiesel process improvement and cost optimization using various biodiesel feedstocks and production ingredients.

Zummo, Michael M; Munson, J; Derr, A; Zemple, T; Bray, S; Studer, B; Miller, J; Beckler, J; Hahn, A; Martinez, P; Herndon, B; Lee, T; Newswanger, T; Wassall, M

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

391

PRODCOST: an electric utility generation simulation code  

SciTech Connect

The PRODCOST computer code simulates the operation of an electric utility generation system. Through a probabilistic simulation the expected energy production, fuel consumption, and cost of operation for each plant are determined. Total system fuel consumption, energy generation by type, total generation costs, as well as system loss of load probability and expected unserved energy are also calculated.

Hudson, II, C. R.; Reynolds, T. M.; Smolen, G. R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Plutonium Consumption Program, CANDU Reactor Project: Feasibility of BNFP Site as MOX Fuel Supply Facility. Final report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation was made of the technical feasibility, cost, and schedule for converting the existing unused Barnwell Nuclear Fuel Facility (BNFP) into a Mixed Oxide (MOX) CANDU fuel fabrication plant for disposition of excess weapons plutonium. This MOX fuel would be transported to Ontario where it would generate electricity in the Bruce CANDU reactors. Because CANDU MOX fuel operates at lower thermal load than natural uranium fuel, the MOX program can be licensed by AECB within 4.5 years, and actual Pu disposition in the Bruce reactors can begin in 2001. Ontario Hydro will have to be involved in the entire program. Cost is compared between BNFP and FMEF at Hanford for converting to a CANDU MOX facility.

1995-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

393

Coal-fueled diesels for modular power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Interest in coal-fueled heat engines revived after the sharp increase in the prices of natural gas and petroleum in the 1970`s. Based on the success of micronized coal water slurry combustion tests in an engine in the 1980`s, Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) of the US Department of Energy. initiated several programs for the development of advanced coal-fueled diesel and gas turbine engines for use in cogeneration, small utilities, industrial applications and transportation. Cooper-Bessemer and Arthur D. Little have been developing technology since 1985, under the sponsor of METC, to enable coal water slurry (CWS) to be utilized in large bore, medium-speed diesel engines. Modular power generation applications in the 10--100 MW size (each plant typically using from two to eight engines) are the target applications for the late 1990`s and beyond when, according to the US DOE and other projections, oil and natural gas prices are expected to escalate much more rapidly compared to the price of coal. As part of this program over 7.50 hours of prototype engine operation has been achieved on coal water slurry (CWS), including over 100 hours operation of a six-cylinder full scale engine with Integrated Emissions Control System in 1993. In this paper, the authors described the project cost of the CWS fuel used, the heat rate of the engine operating on CWS, the projected maintenance cost for various engine components, and the demonstrated low emissions characteristics of the coal diesel system.

Wilson, R.P. [Little (Arthur D.), Inc., Cambridge, MA (United States); Rao, A.K. [Cooper-Bessemer Reciprocating, Grove City, PA (United States); Smith, W.C. [Department of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States). Morgantown Energy Technology Center

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

A STUDY OF THE DISCREPANCY BETWEEN FEDERAL AND STATE MEASUREMENTS OF ON-HIGHWAY FUEL CONSUMPTION  

SciTech Connect

Annual highway fuel taxes are collected by the Treasury Department and placed in the Highway Trust Fund (HTF). There is, however, no direct connection between the taxes collected by the Treasury Department and the gallons of on-highway fuel use, which can lead to a discrepancy between these totals. This study was conducted to determine how much of a discrepancy exists between the total fuel usages estimated based on highway revenue funds as reported by the Treasury Department and the total fuel usages used in the apportionment of the HTF to the States. The analysis was conducted using data from Highway Statistics Tables MF-27 and FE-9 for the years 1991-2001. It was found that the overall discrepancy is relatively small, mostly within 5% difference. The amount of the discrepancy varies from year to year and varies among the three fuel types (gasoline, gasohol, special fuels). Several potential explanations for these discrepancies were identified, including issues on data, tax measurement, gallon measurement, HTF receipts, and timing. Data anomalies caused by outside forces, such as deferment of tax payments from one fiscal year to the next, can skew fuel tax data. Fuel tax evasion can lead to differences between actual fuel use and fuel taxes collected. Furthermore, differences in data collection and reporting among States can impact fuel use data. Refunds, credits, and transfers from the HTF can impact the total fuel tax receipt data. Timing issues, such as calendar year vs. fiscal year, can also cause some discrepancy between the two data sources.

Hwang, HL

2003-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

395

Heavy Fuel Oil Prices for Electricity Generation - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Heavy Fuel Oil Prices for Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 Heavy Fuel Oil Prices for Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 U.S. Dollars per Metric Ton2 Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Australia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Austria 83.0 96.4 146.4 153.3 182.2 226.1 220.3 342.3 248.3 Barbados NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium 155.1 160.4 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - Bolivia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Canada 115.7 117.8 180.4 141.5 198.4 222.4 NA NA NA Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Colombia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Cuba NA NA NA 183.4 NA NA NA NA NA

396

Table 8.5a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

For 19491979, data are for gas turbine and internal combustion plant use of petroleum. For 19802000, ... 8 Wood and wood-derived fuels.

397

Table 8.6c Estimated Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Useful ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

11 Commercial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants. 4 Jet fuel, kerosene, other petroleum liquids, and waste oil. 12 Industrial combined-heat-and-power (CHP) plants.

398

Fuel Savings and Emission Reductions from Next-Generation Mobile Air Conditioning Technology in India  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Up to 19.4% of vehicle fuel consumption in India is devoted to air conditioning (A/C). Indian A/C fuel consumption is almost four times the fuel penalty in the United States and close to six times that in the European Union because India's temperature and humidity are higher and because road congestion forces vehicles to operate inefficiently. Car A/C efficiency in India is an issue worthy of national attention considering the rate of increase of A/C penetration into the new car market, India's hot climatic conditions and high fuel costs. Car A/C systems originally posed an ozone layer depletion concern. Now that industrialized and many developing countries have moved away from ozone-depleting substances per Montreal Protocol obligations, car A/C impact on climate has captured the attention of policy makers and corporate leaders. Car A/C systems have a climate impact from potent global warming potential gas emissions and from fuel used to power the car A/Cs. This paper focuses on car A/C fuel consumption in the context of the rapidly expanding Indian car market and how new technological improvements can result in significant fuel savings and consequently, emission reductions. A 19.4% fuel penalty is associated with A/C use in the typical Indian passenger car. Car A/C fuel use and associated tailpipe emissions are strong functions of vehicle design, vehicle use, and climate conditions. Several techniques: reducing thermal load, improving vehicle design, improving occupants thermal comfort design, improving equipment, educating consumers on impacts of driver behaviour on MAC fuel use, and others - can lead to reduced A/C fuel consumption.

Chaney, L.; Thundiyil, K.; Andersen, S.; Chidambaram, S.; Abbi, Y. P.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Catalysts and materials development for fuel cell power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Catalytic processing of fuels was explored in this thesis for both low-temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell as well as high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) applications. Novel catalysts were ...

Weiss, Steven E

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H2 from Biogas  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Fuel Cell Research Center, 2012 1/22 National Fuel Cell Research Center, 2012 1/22 High Temperature Fuel Cell Tri-Generation of Power, Heat & H 2 from Biogas Jack Brouwer, Ph.D. June 19, 2012 DOE/ NREL Biogas Workshop - Golden, CO © National Fuel Cell Research Center, 2012 2/22 Outline * Introduction and Background * Tri-Generation/Poly-Generation Analyses * OCSD Project Introduction © National Fuel Cell Research Center, 2012 3/22 Introduction and Background * Hydrogen fuel cell vehicle performance is outstanding * Energy density of H 2 is much greater than batteries * Rapid fueling, long range ZEV * H 2 must be produced * energy intensive, may have emissions, fossil fuels, economies of scale * Low volumetric energy density of H 2 compared to current infrastructure fuels (@ STP)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

ROBUST CONTROL ANALYSIS USING REAL-TIME IMPLEMENTATION OF A HYBRID FUEL CELL POWER GENERATION SYSTEM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is performed for a hybrid Fuel Cell/Supercapacitor generation system with power management, realized through converters interfacing the Fuel Cell (FC) and the Supercapacitor (SC) with the system electrical load

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

402

Direct Carbon Fuel Cells: Assessment of their Potential as Solid Carbon Fuel Based Power Generation Systems  

SciTech Connect

Small-scale experimental work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has confirmed that a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) containing a molten carbonate electrolyte completely reacts solid elemental carbon with atmospheric oxygen contained in ambient air at a temperature of 650-800 C. The efficiency of conversion of the chemical energy in the fuel to DC electricity is 75-80% and is a result of zero entropy change for this reaction and the fixed chemical potentials of C and CO{sub 2}. This is about twice as efficient as other forms power production processes that utilize solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal. These range from 30-40% for coal fired conventional subcritical or supercritical boilers to 38-42% for IGCC plants. A wide range of carbon-rich solids including activated carbons derived from natural gas, petroleum coke, raw coal, and deeply de-ashed coal have been evaluated with similar conversion results. The rate of electricity production has been shown to correlate with disorder in the carbon structure. This report provides a preliminary independent assessment of the economic potential of DCFC for competitive power generation. This assessment was conducted as part of a Director's Research Committee Review of DCFC held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on April 9, 2004. The key question that this assessment addresses is whether this technology, which appears to be very promising from a scientific standpoint, has the potential to be successfully scaled up to a system that can compete with currently available power generation systems that serve existing electricity markets. These markets span a wide spectrum in terms of the amount of power to be delivered and the competitive cost in that market. For example, DCFC technology can be used for the personal power market where the current competition for delivery of kilowatts of electricity is storage batteries, for the distributed generation market where the competition for on-site power generation in the range of 0.5 to 50 MW is small engines fueled with natural gas or liquid fuels or in the bulk power markets supplied usually by remote central station power plants with capacities of 250-1250 MW that deliver electricity to customers via the transmission and distribution grid. New power generation technology must be able to offer a significant cost advantage over existing technologies serving the same market to attract the interest of investors that are needed to provide funding for the development, demonstration, and commercialization of the technology. That path is both lengthy and expensive. One of the key drivers for any new power generation technology is the relative amount of pollutant emissions of all types, particularly those that are currently regulated or may soon be regulated. The new focus on greenhouse gas emissions offers a window of opportunity to DCFC technology because of its much higher conversion efficiency and the production of a very concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} in the product gas. This should offer a major competitive advantage if CO{sub 2} emissions are constrained by regulation in the future. The cost of CO{sub 2} capture, liquefaction, and pressurization has the potential to be much less costly with DCFC technology compared to other currently available forms of fossil fuel power generation.

Wolk, R

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

403

Direct Carbon Fuel Cells: Assessment of their Potential as Solid Carbon Fuel Based Power Generation Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Small-scale experimental work at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has confirmed that a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) containing a molten carbonate electrolyte completely reacts solid elemental carbon with atmospheric oxygen contained in ambient air at a temperature of 650-800 C. The efficiency of conversion of the chemical energy in the fuel to DC electricity is 75-80% and is a result of zero entropy change for this reaction and the fixed chemical potentials of C and CO{sub 2}. This is about twice as efficient as other forms power production processes that utilize solid fuels such as petroleum coke or coal. These range from 30-40% for coal fired conventional subcritical or supercritical boilers to 38-42% for IGCC plants. A wide range of carbon-rich solids including activated carbons derived from natural gas, petroleum coke, raw coal, and deeply de-ashed coal have been evaluated with similar conversion results. The rate of electricity production has been shown to correlate with disorder in the carbon structure. This report provides a preliminary independent assessment of the economic potential of DCFC for competitive power generation. This assessment was conducted as part of a Director's Research Committee Review of DCFC held at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on April 9, 2004. The key question that this assessment addresses is whether this technology, which appears to be very promising from a scientific standpoint, has the potential to be successfully scaled up to a system that can compete with currently available power generation systems that serve existing electricity markets. These markets span a wide spectrum in terms of the amount of power to be delivered and the competitive cost in that market. For example, DCFC technology can be used for the personal power market where the current competition for delivery of kilowatts of electricity is storage batteries, for the distributed generation market where the competition for on-site power generation in the range of 0.5 to 50 MW is small engines fueled with natural gas or liquid fuels or in the bulk power markets supplied usually by remote central station power plants with capacities of 250-1250 MW that deliver electricity to customers via the transmission and distribution grid. New power generation technology must be able to offer a significant cost advantage over existing technologies serving the same market to attract the interest of investors that are needed to provide funding for the development, demonstration, and commercialization of the technology. That path is both lengthy and expensive. One of the key drivers for any new power generation technology is the relative amount of pollutant emissions of all types, particularly those that are currently regulated or may soon be regulated. The new focus on greenhouse gas emissions offers a window of opportunity to DCFC technology because of its much higher conversion efficiency and the production of a very concentrated stream of CO{sub 2} in the product gas. This should offer a major competitive advantage if CO{sub 2} emissions are constrained by regulation in the future. The cost of CO{sub 2} capture, liquefaction, and pressurization has the potential to be much less costly with DCFC technology compared to other currently available forms of fossil fuel power generation.

Wolk, R

2004-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

404

Generating capacity of the united power system of Russia and conditions of fuel supply to electric power plants for the period up to 2020  

SciTech Connect

Prospects of development of the energy economy in Russia are considered up to 2020. The proportion of thermal power plants (TPP) in the structure of the generating capacity of Russia amounts to about 70% (147 mln kW). The proportion of gas in the structure of fuel consumed by TPP amounts to 64%. It is predicted that the fraction of high-quality kinds of fuel (gas and fuel oil) will decrease in the considered period due to maximum involvement of coal in the fuel balance and wider use of combined-cycle and gas-turbine technologies that provide a lower specific consumption of fuel. It is planned to resort to advanced technologies both for reconstructing existing plants and erecting new ones. This paper deals with problems of fuel supply of fossil-fuel-fired thermal power plants in the light of the evolution of the energy economy of Russia. The demand of TPP for different kinds of fossil fuel, i.e., gas, coal, and fuel oil, is estimated for the whole of the country and for its regions according to two variants of development of the generating capacity with planned commissioning of combined-cycle plants with a total output of 32 mln kW and gas-turbine plants with a total output of 61 mln kW in the period of up to 2020. The tasks of the fuel policy to be solved in the considered period are presented.

V.I. Chemodanov; N.V. Bobyleva; N.G. Chelnokova; N.Yu. Sokolova [Energoset'proekt Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation)

2002-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

Fuel Examination and Crud Analysis from Columbia Generating Station EOC20  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Columbia Generating Station end of cycle-20 (EOC-20) refueling outage, 2- and 3-cycle ATRIUM-10 fuel assemblies were examined to assess the impact of reduced Cycle 20 feedwater iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) transport on crud loadings of fuel and fuel performance in general.BackgroundCrud spallation was observed on 2- and 3-cycle fuel at Columbia Generating Station (CGS) during EOC19. This observation was linked to moderate feedwater (FW) zinc (Zn) and iron ...

2013-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

406

TAX EXPENDITURES RELATED TO THE PRODUCTION AND CONSUMPTION OF MOTOR FUELS AND MOTOR VEHICLES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-miles of travel RECS = Residential Energy Consumption Survey SIC = standard industrial classification SOx = sulfur industries, or oil over other energy industries: virtually all major energy sources require large investments.......................24 18.5.1 Corporate income-tax expenditures for the oil industry

Delucchi, Mark

407

Table 8.7a Consumption of Combustible Fuels for Electricity ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total 5: Wood 8: Waste 9: Thousand ... electric utility data also include a small amount of fuel oil no. 4. 10 ... and other manufactured and waste gases derived from ...

408

Fossil fuel potential of Turkey: A statistical evaluation of reserves, production, and consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since Turkey is a developing country with tremendous economic growth, its energy demand is also getting increased. Of this energy, about 70% is supplied from fossil fuels and the remaining 30% is from renewable sources. Among the fossil fuels, 90% of oil, natural gas, and coal are imported, and only 10% is from domestic sources. All the lignite is supplied from domestic sources. The total share of renewable sources and lignite in the total energy production is 45%. In order for Turkey to have sufficient and reliable energy sources, first the renewable energy sources must be developed, and energy production from fossil fuels, except for lignite, must be minimized. Particularly, scarcity of fossil fuels and increasing oil prices have a strong effect on economic growth of the country.

Korkmaz, S.; Kara-Gulbay, R.; Turan, M. [Karadeniz Technical University, Trabzon (Turkey)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Residential Energy Consumption Survey (RECS) - Energy Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Consumption Survey (RECS) - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) U.S. Energy Information Administration - EIA - Independent Statistics and Analysis Sources & Uses Petroleum & Other Liquids Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, prices, sales. Electricity Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. Consumption & Efficiency Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, manufacturing, and transportation. Coal Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. Renewable & Alternative Fuels

410

Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC2601NT40779 for the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DoE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a gas turbine. A conceptual hybrid system design was selected for analysis and evaluation. The selected system is estimated to have over 65% system efficiency, a first cost of approximately $650/kW, and a cost of electricity of 8.4 cents/kW-hr. A control strategy and conceptual control design have been developed for the system. A number of SOFC module tests have been completed to evaluate the pressure impact to performance stability. The results show that the operating pressure accelerates the performance degradation. Several experiments were conducted to explore the effects of pressure on carbon formation. Experimental observations on a functioning cell have verified that carbon deposition does not occur in the cell at steam-to-carbon ratios lower than the steady-state design point for hybrid systems. Heat exchanger design, fabrication and performance testing as well as oxidation testing to support heat exchanger life analysis were also conducted. Performance tests of the prototype heat exchanger yielded heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics consistent with the heat exchanger specification. Multicell stacks have been tested and performance maps were obtained under hybrid operating conditions. Successful and repeatable fabrication of large (>12-inch diameter) planar SOFC cells was demonstrated using the tape calendering process. A number of large area cells and stacks were successfully performance tested at ambient and pressurized conditions. A 25 MW plant configuration was selected with projected system efficiency of over 65% and a factory cost of under $400/kW. The plant design is modular and can be scaled to both higher and lower plant power ratings. Integrated gasification fuel cell systems or IGFCs were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 200 MW. Two alternative integration configurations were selected with projected system efficiency of over 53% on a HHV basis, or about 10 percentage points higher than that of the state-of-the-art Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) systems.

Nguyen Minh

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Fuel used in electricity generation is projected to shift over the ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Projected fuel prices and economic growth are key factors influencing the future electricity generation mix. The price of natural gas, coal's chief competitor, ...

412

Ohio's fuel mix for power generation is changing - Today in Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Today in Energy. Glossary FAQS ... The CEMS data includes information for fossil fuel-fired and nuclear generators that are 25 megawatts or greater. Summer ...

413

High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors  

SciTech Connect

The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

2006-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

414

A Supply Chain Network Perspective for Electric Power Generation, Supply, Transmission, and Consumption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and less costly than older coal-fired power plants. In addition, technological advances in electricity, supply, trans- mission, and consumption is developed. The model is sufficiently general to handle the economics of power production. For example, new gas-fired combined cycle power plants are more effi- cient

Nagurney, Anna

415

Non-pollutant fuel generator and fuel burner with a non-pollutant exhaust and supplementary dc generator. [for use in MHD generator, steam turbine, gas turbine, or fuel cell  

SciTech Connect

A system for generating non-polluting fuel and a burner for using such fuel to produce energy in the form of heat with a non-polluting exhaust, together with means for utilizing such exhaust to produce supplementary direct current power is disclosed. An electrolyzer is operated to produce hydrogen and oxygen in gaseous form which is then stored in suitable fuel tanks. As needed, the fuel is combined with air and supplied under pressure to a combustion chamber where the mixture is burned, producing heat and a pollution free exhaust. The heat so produced may be used as a conventional heat source to generate steam, drive a turbine, or the like, while the combustion gases are directed to a magnetohydrodynamic generator to produce an electrical current which is usable in any desired manner.

Barros, M.J.

1976-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

416

A fuzzy diagnosis and advice system for optimization of emissions and fuel consumption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, a fuzzy expert system has been developed, which is used for defining possible fuel system faults, ignition system faults, intake valve and exhaust valve faults and refers solution advice for these faults, which uses measurements of CO, ... Keywords: Diagnosis software, Emissions, Fuzzy expert systems, Spark ignition engine

Yavuz Kilagiz; Ahmet Baran; Zerrin Yildiz; Murat etin

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Factor of two : halving the fuel consumption of new U.S. Automobiles by 2035  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the vehicle design and sales mix changes necessary to double the average fuel economy of new U.S. cars and light-trucks by model year 2035. To achieve this factor of two target, three technology options ...

Cheah, Lynette W

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Analysis of Technology Options to Reduce the Fuel Consumption of Idling Trucks  

SciTech Connect

Long-haul trucks idling overnight consume more than 838 million gallons (20 million barrels) of fuel annually. Idling also emits pollutants. Truck drivers idle their engines primarily to (1) heat or cool the cab and/or sleeper, (2) keep the fuel warm in winter, and (3) keep the engine warm in the winter so that the engine is easier to start. Alternatives to overnight idling could save much of this fuel, reduce emissions, and cut operating costs. Several fuel-efficient alternatives to idling are available to provide heating and cooling: (1) direct-fired heater for cab/sleeper heating, with or without storage cooling; (2) auxiliary power units; and (3) truck stop electrification. Many of these technologies have drawbacks that limit market acceptance. Options that supply electricity are economically viable for trucks that are idled for 1,000-3,000 or more hours a year, while heater units could be used across the board. Payback times for fleets, which would receive quantity discounts on the prices, would be somewhat shorter.

F. Stodolsky; L. Gaines; A. Vyas

2000-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Next Generation Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a successful U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) funded two-year $2.9 MM program lead by GrafTech International Inc. (GrafTech) are reported and summarized. The program goal was to develop the next generation of high temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell bipolar plates for use in transportation fuel cell applications operating at temperatures up to 120 C. The bipolar plate composite developed during the program is based on GrafTechs GRAFCELL? resin impregnated flexible graphite technology and makes use of a high temperature Huntsman Advanced Materials resin system which extends the upper use temperature of the composite to the DoE target. High temperature performance of the new composite is achieved with the added benefit of improvements in strength, modulus, and dimensional stability over the incumbent resin systems. Other physical properties, including thermal and electrical conductivity of the new composite are identical to or not adversely affected by the new resin system. Using the new bipolar plate composite system, machined plates were fabricated and tested in high temperature single-cell fuel cells operating at 120 C for over 1100 hours by Case Western Reserve University. Final verification of performance was done on embossed full-size plates which were fabricated and glued into bipolar plates by GrafTech. Stack testing was done on a 10-cell full-sized stack under a simulated drive cycle protocol by Ballard Power Systems. Freeze-thaw performance was conducted by Ballard on a separate 5-cell stack and shown to be within specification. A third stack was assembled and shipped to Argonne National Laboratory for independent performance verification. Manufacturing cost estimate for the production of the new bipolar plate composite at current and high volume production scenarios was performed by Directed Technologies Inc. (DTI). The production cost estimates were consistent with previous DoE cost estimates performed by DTI for the DoE on metal plates. The final result of DTIs analysis for the high volume manufacturing scenario ($6.85 /kW) came in slightly above the DoE target of $3 to $5/kW. This estimate was derived using a Best Case Scenario for many of the production process steps and raw material costs with projections to high volumes. Some of the process improvements assumed in this Best Case Scenario including high speed high impact forming and solvent-less resins, have not yet been implemented, but have a high probability of potential success.

Orest Adrianowycz; Julian Norley; David J. Stuart; David Flaherty; Ryan Wayne; Warren Williams; Roger Tietze; Yen-Loan H. Nguyen; Tom Zawodzinski; Patrick Pietrasz

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

420

Improving the performance and fuel consumption of dual chamber stratified charge spark ignition engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A combined experimental and theoretical investigation of the nature of the combustion processes in a dual chamber stratified charge spark ignition engine is described. This work concentrated on understanding the mixing process in the main chamber gases. A specially constructed single cylinder engine was used to both conduct experiments to study mixing effects and to obtain experimental data for the validation of the computer model which was constructed in the theoretical portion of the study. The test procedures are described. Studies were conducted on the effect of fuel injection timing on performance and emissions using the combination of orifice size and prechamber to main chamber flow rate ratio which gave the best overall compromise between emissions and performance. In general, fuel injection gave slightly higher oxides of nitrogen, but considerably lower hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions than the carbureted form of the engine. Experiments with engine intake port redesign to promote swirl mixing indicated a substantial increase in the power output from the engine and, that an equivalent power levels, the nitric oxide emissions are approximately 30% lower with swirl in the main chamber than without swirl. The development of a computer simulation of the combustion process showed that a one-dimensional combustion model can be used to accurately predict trends in engine operation conditions and nitric oxide emissions even though the actual flame in the engine is not completely one-dimensional, and that a simple model for mixing of the main chamber and prechamber intake gases at the start of compression proved adequate to explain the effects of swirl, ignition timing, overall fuel air ratio, volumetric efficiency, and variations in prechamber air fuel ratio and fuel rate percentage on engine power and nitric oxide emissions. (LCL)

Sorenson, S.C.; Pan, S.S.; Bruckbauer, J.J.; Gehrke, G.R.

1979-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

COMBINED FUEL AND AIR STAGED POWER GENERATION SYSTEM - Energy ...  

Electricity Transmission; Energy Analysis; Energy Storage; Geothermal; Hydrogen and Fuel Cell; Hydropower, Wave and Tidal; Industrial Technologies; Solar Photovoltaic;

422

Strategic Analysis of Biomass and Waste Fuels for Electric Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass, waste fuels, and power technologies based on advanced combustion and gasification show promise for renewable baseload generation. Utilities can use the results of this study to evaluate the potential performance and cost of biomass and waste fuel-fired power plants in their systems and examine fuel use in integrated resource plans.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

FUEL CELL SYSTEM ECONOMICS: COMPARING THE COSTS OF GENERATING POWER WITH STATIONARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during many months of the year). * Similarly, use of PEM fuel cell waste heat for hot water heating wouldFUEL CELL SYSTEM ECONOMICS: COMPARING THE COSTS OF GENERATING POWER WITH STATIONARY AND MOTOR VEHICLE PEM FUEL CELL SYSTEMS UCD-ITS-RP-04-21 April 2004 by Timothy Lipman University of California

Kammen, Daniel M.

424

Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Hydrogen Generation in Fuel Cell Applications1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Hydrogen Generation in Fuel Cell Ghosh3 , Huei Peng2 Abstract A fuel processor that reforms natural gas to hydrogen-rich mixture to feed of the hydrogen in the fuel processor is based on catalytic partial oxidation of the methane in the natural gas

Peng, Huei

425

Fuel Management for Competitive Power Generation: Selected Papers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fuel management is increasingly recognized as a vital competitive function in an electric utility. Drawing on a recent industry conference, this report summarizes new thinking and recommendations on fuel management from electric utility fuel managers, consultants, law firms, and a coal supplier.

1997-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

426

Japans fossil-fueled generation remains high because of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Japan's use of fossil-fueled generationthe combined amount of electricity generated from natural gas, oil, and coalwas up 21% in 2012, compared to the level in ...

427

A Study of the Discrepancy Between Federal and State Measurements of On-Highway Motor Fuel Consumption  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

TM TM -2003/171 A Study of the Discrepancy Between Federal and State Measurements of On-Highway Motor Fuel Consumption July 2003 Ho-Ling Hwang Lorena F. Truett Stacy C. Davis DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge. Web site http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the followi ng source. National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847) TDD 703-487-4639 Fax 703-605-6900 E-mail info@ntis.fedworld.gov Web site http://www.ntis.gov/support/ordernowabout.htm Reports are available to DOE employees, DOE contractors, Energy Technology Data Exchange

428

Field Evaluation of Fumigation Bi-Fuel Systems Installed on Diesel Engine-Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thousands of megawatts of emergency generation provide backup power to industry and businesses in the United States and Canada. Typically, individual size is relatively small, ranging from 100 kW to 2000 kW. Most are diesel-fueled generators. Diesel generators are generally the low-cost option. Their application also allows compliance with regulatory requirements for on-site fuel storage. Use of these generators other than for emergency power is coming under increased scrutiny by environmental regulatory...

2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

429

Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell.

Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell. 4 figs.

Singh, P.; George, R.A.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

431

Internal natural gas reformer-dividers for a solid oxide fuel cell generator configuration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a fuel cell generator configuration. It comprises electrically connected, axially elongated, fuel cells, each cell having an outer and inner electrode with solid oxide electrolyte therebetween; where elongated dividers separate and are positioned between fuel cells, and where at least one of the elongated dividers is hollow, the hollow divider having solid elongated walls, a reformable fuel mixture entrance, and an exit allowing passage of reformed fuel to the fuel cells, and where the cross-section of the divider contains a catalytic reforming material.

Reichner, P.

1992-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

432

Review of Operational Water Consumption and Withdrawal Factors for Electricity Generating Technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Various studies have attempted to consolidate published estimates of water use impacts of electricity generating technologies, resulting in a wide range of technologies and values based on different primary sources of literature. The goal of this work is to consolidate the various primary literature estimates of water use during the generation of electricity by conventional and renewable electricity generating technologies in the United States to more completely convey the variability and uncertainty associated with water use in electricity generating technologies.

Macknick, J.; Newmark, R.; Heath, G.; Hallett, K. C.

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

State of California BOARD OF EQUALIZATION USE FUEL TAX REGULATIONS Regulation 1322. CONSUMPTION OF LIQUEFIED PETROLEUM GAS IN VEHICLES FUELED  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Users who operate motor vehicles powered by liquefied petroleum gas supplied directly to the engine from the cargo tank of the motor vehicle are authorized for the purpose of making tax returns to compute the gallons used on a mileper-gallon basis. The mile-per-gallon basis will be determined by tests. The tests will be made by the user and will be subject to review by the Board. All detail and test data should be retained for inspection by the Board. This method of computing use is authorized only for the purpose of making tax returns. Determinations may be imposed or refunds granted, if the Board upon audit of the users accounts and records, or upon the basis of tests made or other information determines that the return did not disclose the proper amount of tax due. See Regulation 1332 with respect to records on those motor vehicles powered by fuel not supplied directly to the

unknown authors

1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

DESIGNING AN OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the period January 1, 2001-March 31, 2001, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) finalized the engineering of the Willow Island cofiring project, completed the fuel characterizations for both the Willow Island and Albright Generating Station projects, and initiated construction of both projects. Allegheny and its contractor, Foster Wheeler, selected appropriate fuel blends and issued purchase orders for all processing and mechanical equipment to be installed at both sites. This report summarizes the activities associated with the Designer Opportunity Fuel program, and demonstrations at Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations. The third quarter of the project involved completing the detailed designs for the Willow Island Designer Fuel project. It also included complete characterization of the coal and biomass fuels being burned, focusing upon the following characteristics: proximate and ultimate analysis; higher heating value; carbon 13 nuclear magnetic resonance testing for aromaticity, number of aromatic carbons per cluster, and the structural characteristics of oxygen in the fuel; drop tube reactor testing for high temperature devolatilization kinetics and generation of fuel chars; thermogravimetric analyses (TGA) for char oxidation kinetics; and related testing. The construction at both sites commenced during this quarter, and was largely completed at the Albright Generating Station site.

K. Payette; D. Tillman

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Proceedings: Conference on Coal Gasification Systems and Synthetic Fuels for Power Generation, Volumes 1 and 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The international effort to develop synthetic fuels and advanced power systems for the commercial generation of electric power from coal, oil shale, and tar sands has been an outstanding technical success. This conference highlighted the work that brought new fuels and power generation systems to reality.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

EA-0510: High-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (Sofc) Generator  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

510: High-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (Sofc) Generator 510: High-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (Sofc) Generator Development Project (METC), Churchill, Pennsylvania EA-0510: High-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (Sofc) Generator Development Project (METC), Churchill, Pennsylvania SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a proposal to enter into a 5-year cooperative agreement with the Westinghouse Electric Corporation for the development of high-temperature solid oxide fuel cell generators near Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD August 1, 1991 EA-0510: Final Environmental Assessment High-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (Sofc) Generator Development Project (METC) August 1, 1991 EA-0510: Finding of No Significant Impact

437

Development of an energy consumption and cost data base for fuel cell total energy systems and conventional building energy systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the procedures and data sources used to develop an energy-consumption and system-cost data base for use in predicting the market penetration of phosphoric acid fuel cell total-energy systems in the nonindustrial building market. A computer program was used to simulate the hourly energy requirements of six types of buildings - office buildings, retail stores, hotels and motels, schools, hospitals, and multifamily residences. The simulations were done by using hourly weather tapes for one city in each of the ten Department of Energy administrative regions. Two types of building construction were considered, one for existing buildings and one for new buildings. A fuel cell system combined with electrically driven heat pumps and one combined with a gas boiler and an electrically driven chiller were compared with similar conventional systems. The methods of system simulation, component sizing, and system cost estimation are described for each system. The systems were simulated for a single building size for each building type. Methods were developed to extrapolate the system cost and performance data to other building sizes.

Pine, G.D.; Christian, J.E.; Mixon, W.R.; Jackson, W.L.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Next-generation nuclear fuel withstands high-temperature accident...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(more than 200 degrees Celsius greater than postulated accident conditions) most fission products remained inside the fuel particles, which each boast their own primary...

439

New Catalyst Opens Way to Next-Generation Fuel Cells  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

A new highly stable catalyst developed at Brookhaven Lab lowers barriers to commercial use of fuel cells in vehicles and stationary applications.

Snyder, Kendra

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

440

SYNGAS FROM BIOMASS GASIFICATION AS FUEL FOR GENERATOR.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The emergence of biomass based energy warrants the evaluation of syngas from biomass gasification as a fuel for personal power systems. The objectives of this (more)

Shah, Ajay

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

An electrical modeling and fuzzy logic control of a fuel cell generation system  

SciTech Connect

Fuel cell generation system consists of a stack, a reformer, and converters. The stack generates DC power by electrochemical reaction. For system design and analysis, it is necessary to obtain electrical models. Simplified electrical models of a fuel cell generation system for system control are proposed. Then using the electrical models, system performance of a fuel cell generation system in which power is boosted by step-up choppers is analyzed. A fuzzy controller is designed for improved system performance. Simulation and experimental results confirmed the high performance capability of the designed system.

Kim, Y.H.; Kim, S.S. [Chung-Ang Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Electrical Engineering

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Modeling Water Withdrawal and Consumption for Electricity Generation in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water withdrawals for thermoelectric cooling account for a significant portion of total water use in the United States. Any change in electrical energy generation policy and technologies has the potential to have a major ...

Strzepek, Kenneth M.

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

A9. A9. Total Inputs of Energy for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Fuel Type, Census Region, and End Use, 1994: Part 1 (Estimates in Btu or Physical Units) See footnotes at end of table. Energy Information Administration/Manufacturing Consumption of Energy 1994 166 End-Use Categories (trillion Btu) kWh) (1000 bbl) (1000 bbl) cu ft) (1000 bbl) tons) (trillion Btu) Total (million Fuel Oil Diesel Fuel (billion LPG (1000 short Other Net Distillate Natural and Electricity Residual Fuel Oil and Gas Breeze) a b c Coal (excluding Coal Coke d RSE Row Factors Total United States RSE Column Factors: NF 0.5 1.3 1.4 0.8 1.2 1.2 NF TOTAL INPUTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16,515 778,335 70,111 26,107 5,962 25,949 54,143 5,828 2.7 Indirect Uses-Boiler Fuel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . --

444

Variable fuel tax models. [Revenue generated via 4 models for Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Four variable fuel tax models are investigated with respect to Alabama Highway Department operations. The Fixed Percentage Fuel Tax Model establishes the state gasoline tax as a constant percentage of the wholesale price of gasoline. The Price Index Economic Model pegs state fuel taxes to a ratio of price indexes. The Fuel Efficiency Tax Model relates the gasoline tax to the variables of Consumer Price Index and vehicle efficiency. The Sales Tax Model establishes a sales tax on the purchase of gasoline and motor fuel sold in the state. Estimates of the amount of revenue expected to be generated by each model are made. Advantages and disadvantages of each model are presented.

Vecellio, R.L.; Moore, R.K.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Thermodynamic analysis and comparison on oxy-fuel power generation process - article no. 053001  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, pressurized oxy-fuel combustion power generation processes are modeled and analyzed based on a 350 MW subcritical reheat boiler associated with a condensing steam turbine. The performance results are obtained. Furthermore, the influences of slurry concentration and coal properties on power plant performance are investigated. An oxy-fuel configuration operating at ambient pressure is studied to compare the performance with pressurized oxy-fuel configuration. Thermodynamic analysis reveals the true potentials of the pressurized oxy-fuel process. Based on the system integration, an improved configuration is proposed in which plant efficiency of pressurized oxy-fuel process is increased by 1.36%.

Deng, S.M.; Hynes, R. [Hatch Energy, Oakville, ON (Canada)

2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

446

Competition among fuels for power generation driven by changes ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Most recently, a number of factors have led to a continuing electric power industry trend of substituting coal-fired generation with natural gas-fired generation: ...

447

How much ethanol is in gasoline and how does it affect fuel ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How many alternative fuel and hybrid vehicles are there in the U.S.? How much U.S. energy consumption and electricity generation comes from renewable sources?

448

Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

XXXXX XXXXX Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Electrical Generation for More-Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells GA Whyatt LA Chick April 2012 PNNL-XXXXX Electrical Generation for More- Electric Aircraft using Solid Oxide Fuel Cells GA Whyatt LA Chick April 2012 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract DE-AC05-76RL01830 Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington 99352 iii Summary This report examines the potential for Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC) to provide electrical generation on-board commercial aircraft. Unlike a turbine-based auxiliary power unit (APU) a solid oxide fuel cell power unit (SOFCPU) would be more efficient than using the main engine generators to generate

449

DESIGNING AN OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION AND COFIRING SAWDUST WITH COAL AT ALBRIGHT GENERATING STATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the period July 1, 2001--September 30, 2001, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) continued construction of the Willow Island cofiring project, completed the installation of the fuel storage facility, the fuel receiving facility, and the processing building. All mechanical equipment has been installed and electrical construction has proceeded. During this time period significant short term testing of the Albright Generating Station cofiring facility was completed, and the 100-hour test was planned for early October. The testing demonstrated that cofiring at the Albright Generating Station could contribute to a ''4P Strategy''--reduction of SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x}, mercury, and greenhouse gas emissions. This report summarizes the activities associated with the Designer Opportunity Fuel program, and demonstrations at Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations. It details the construction activities at both sites along with the combustion modeling at the Willow Island site.

K. Payette; D. Tillman

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Chemical simulation of hydrogen generation in a plasma fuel reformer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model for a plasma fuel reformer or plasmatron has been developed. The model was based in a series of experiments realized at the Plasma Science and Fusion Center with such a plasmatron. The device is set up to produce ...

Margarit Bel, Nuria, 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Fueling the Next Generation of Vehicle Technology | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and technologies like the tri-gen facility are going to play a vital role in our nation's future energy and transportation economies. And because FCEVs can boast rapid fueling,...

452

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Consumption and Efficiency Consumption and Efficiency All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 13 results Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1ox6tpc Average Annual Fuel Use of Major Vehicle Categories Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1ox6tpc Comparison of fuel use, miles traveled, and fuel economy among vehicle types Last update April 2013 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-ufdolp Average Annual Vehicle Miles Traveled of Major Vehicle Categories

453

Can I generate and sell electricity to an electric utility? - FAQ ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How many alternative fuel and hybrid vehicles are there in the U.S.? How much U.S. energy consumption and electricity generation comes from renewable sources?

454

Consumption patterns and household hazardous solid waste generation in an urban settlement in Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Mexico is currently facing a crisis in the waste management field. Some efforts have just commenced in urban and in rural settlements, e.g., conversion of open dumps into landfills, a relatively small composting culture, and implementation of source separation and plastic recycling strategies. Nonetheless, the high heterogeneity of components in the waste, many of these with hazardous properties, present the municipal collection services with serious problems, due to the risks to the health of the workers and to the impacts to the environment as a result of the inadequate disposition of these wastes. A generation study in the domestic sector was undertaken with the aim of finding out the composition and the generation rate of household hazardous waste (HHW) produced at residences. Simultaneously to the generation study, a socioeconomic survey was applied to determine the influence of income level on the production of HHW. Results from the solid waste generation analysis indicated that approximately 1.6% of the waste stream consists of HHW. Correspondingly, it was estimated that in Morelia, a total amount of 442 ton/day of domestic waste are produced, including 7.1 ton of HHW per day. Furthermore, the overall amount of HHW is not directly related to income level, although particular byproducts do correlate. However, an important difference was observed, as the brands and the presentation sizes of goods and products used in each socioeconomic stratum varied.

Delgado Otoniel, Buenrostro [Instituto De Investigaciones Agricolas y Forestales, Universidad Michoacana De San Nicolas De Hidalgo, Av. San Juanito Itzicuaro S/N, Col. San Juanito Itzicuaro, C.P. 58330, Morelia-Aeropuerto, Michoacan (Mexico)], E-mail: otonielb@zeus.umich.mx; Liliana, Marquez-Benavides; Gaona Francelia, Pinette [Instituto De Investigaciones Agricolas y Forestales, Universidad Michoacana De San Nicolas De Hidalgo, Av. San Juanito Itzicuaro S/N, Col. San Juanito Itzicuaro, C.P. 58330, Morelia-Aeropuerto, Michoacan (Mexico)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation at high ionic strength in microbial fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL BIOTECHNOLOGY Electricity generation at high ionic strength in microbial fuel cell organic matter using elec- trochemically active bacteria as catalysts to generate electrical energy of the most exciting applications of MFCs is their use as benthic unattended generators to power electrical

Sun, Baolin

456

Fueled viking generator S/N 106 acceptance vibration test report  

SciTech Connect

The Viking Generator S/N 106 was vibrated to the Teledyne Isotope Flight Acceptance Schedule (Random Only) with no deviation from normal generator functional output. Radiographic analysis and power tests before and after the vibration test indicated no change in the condition of the generator. The work was conducted in the Alpha Fuels Environmental Test Facility at Mound Laboratory.

Anderson, C.; Brewer, C.O.; Abrahamson, S.G.

1976-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

457

Trends in the size distribution, highway use, and consumption of gasoline and diesel fuels of the U.S. Commercial Truck Fleet, 1977-2002.  

SciTech Connect

This paper focuses on various major long-range (1977-2002, 1982-2002) U.S. commercial trucking trends by using U.S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of the Census Vehicle/Truck Inventory and Use Survey (VIUS/TIUS) data from this period, as well as selected 1977-2002 data from the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the U.S. Department of Transportation, Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Highway Statistics. Analyses are made of (1) overall passenger vehicle versus truck consumption patterns of gasoline and diesel fuel and (2) the population growth and fuels used by all commercial truck classes and selected truck types (single unit and combination). Selected vehicle miles traveled, gallons per vehicle miles traveled, and gallons per cargo ton-miles traveled trends, as well as the effect of cargo tons per truck on fuel consumption, are also assessed. In addition, long-range trends of related factors (such as long-haul mileages driven by heavy trucks) and their impacts on both reducing fuel consumption per cargo-ton-mile and the relative shares of total commercial fuel use among truck classes were examined. Results of these trends on U.S. petroleum consumption are identified. The effects of basic engineering design and performance, national Interstate highway construction legislation, national demographic trends (such as suburbanization), and changes in U.S. corporate operational requirements are discussed. Their impacts on both the long-distance hauling and shorter-distance urban and suburban delivery markets of the commercial trucking industry are highlighted.

Bertram, K. M.; Santini, D. J.; Anderson, J. L.; Vyas, A. D.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Impacts of Wind and Solar on Fossil-Fueled Generators: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Impacts of Wind and Solar on Fossil-Fueled Generators Preprint D. Lew and G. Brinkman National Renewable Energy Laboratory N. Kumar, P. Besuner, D. Agan, and S. Lefton Intertek...

459

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Maps and Data  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Fuels & Infrastructure Fuels & Infrastructure All Categories Vehicles AFVs and HEVs Fuel Consumption and Efficiency Vehicle Market Driving Patterns Fuels & Infrastructure Fuel Trends Emissions Alternative Fueling Stations Idle Reduction Transportation Infrastructure Biofuels Production Laws & Incentives Regulated Fleets Federal Fleets State & Alt Fuel Providers Clean Cities Vehicles Petroleum Use Reduction Program OR Go Sort by: Category Most Recent Most Popular 49 results Fuel Trends - Generated_thumb20131212-30432-1q2ycmx Average Retail Fuel Prices in the U.S. Generated_thumb20131212-30432-1q2ycmx Trend of alternative and traditional motor fuel prices from 2000-2013 Last update December 2013 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-eaiva6 Consumption of Natural Gas in the U.S.

460

Co-generation and Co-production Opportunities with Biomass and Waste Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes a status update on the use of gasification technologies for biomass and waste fuels, either in dedicated plants or as partial feedstocks in larger fossil fuel plants. Some specific projects that have used gasification and combustion of biomass and waste for power generation and the co-generation of power and district heat or process steam, particularly in Europe, are reviewed in more detail. Regulatory and tax incentives for renewable and biomass projects have been in place in most W...

2000-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Downhole steam generator using low-pressure fuel and air supply  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

For tertiary oil recovery, an apparatus for downhole steam generation is designed in which water is not injected directly onto the flame in the combustor, the combustion process is isolated from the reservoir pressure, the fuel and oxidant are supplied to the combustor at relatively low pressures, and the hot exhaust gases is prevented from entering the earth formation but is used to preheat the fuel and oxidant and water. The combustion process is isolated from the steam generation process. (DLC)

Fox, R.L.

1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

462

DESIGNING AN OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION AND COFIRING SAWDUST WITH COAL AT ALBRIGHT GENERATING STATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the period January 1, 2003--March 31, 2003, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) proceeded with improvements to both the Willow Island and Albright Generating Station cofiring systems. These improvements were designed to increase the resource base for the projects, and to address issues that came up during the first year of operations. This report summarizes the activities associated with the Designer Opportunity Fuel program, and demonstrations at Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations.

K. Payette; D. Tillman

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

463

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Generation by Fuel Type...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

South Island and New Zealand (2009). The fuel types include: hydro, geothermal, biogas, wind, oil, coal, and gas.
2011-01-26T00:20:13Z 2011-01-27T19:47:20Z http:...

464

Self-cooling mono-container fuel cell generators and power plants using an array of such generators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mono-container fuel cell generator (10) contains a layer of interior insulation (14), a layer of exterior insulation (16) and a single housing (20) between the insulation layers, where fuel cells, containing electrodes and electrolyte, are surrounded by the interior insulation (14) in the interior (12) of the generator, and the generator is capable of operating at temperatures over about 650.degree. C., where the combination of interior and exterior insulation layers have the ability to control the temperature in the housing (20) below the degradation temperature of the housing material. The housing can also contain integral cooling ducts, and a plurality of these generators can be positioned next to each other to provide a power block array with interior cooling.

Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Zafred, Paolo R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Self-cooling mono-container fuel cell generators and power plants using an array of such generators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A mono-container fuel cell generator contains a layer of interior insulation, a layer of exterior insulation and a single housing between the insulation layers, where fuel cells, containing electrodes and electrolyte, are surrounded by the interior insulation in the interior of the generator, and the generator is capable of operating at temperatures over about 650 C, where the combination of interior and exterior insulation layers have the ability to control the temperature in the housing below the degradation temperature of the housing material. The housing can also contain integral cooling ducts, and a plurality of these generators can be positioned next to each other to provide a power block array with interior cooling. 7 figs.

Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

466

Generation and Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Carbon Sequestration in Northwest Indiana  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to develop the technology capable of capturing all carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide from natural gas fueled Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) system. In addition, the technology to electrochemically oxidize any remaining carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide will be developed. Success of this R&D program would allow for the generation of electrical power and thermal power from a fossil fuel driven SOFC system without the carbon emissions resulting from any other fossil fueled power generationg system.

Kevin Peavey; Norm Bessette

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

467

Air feed tube support system for a solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell generator (12), containing tubular fuel cells (36) with interior air electrodes (18), where a supporting member (82) containing a plurality of holes (26) supports oxidant feed tubes (51), which pass from an oxidant plenum (52") into the center of the fuel cells, through the holes (26) in the supporting member (82), where a compliant gasket (86) around the top of the oxidant feed tubes and on top (28) of the supporting member (82) helps support the oxidant feed tubes and center them within the fuel cells, and loosen the tolerance for centering the air feed tubes.

Doshi, Vinod B. (Monroeville, PA); Ruka, Roswell J. (Pittsburgh, PA); Hager, Charles A. (Zelienople, PA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Hydrogen & Fuel Cells | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydrogen & Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Meet Brian Larsen, a materials scientist who is helping lower fuel cell costs by developing the next generation of fuel cell catalysts. Meet Brian Larsen, a materials scientist who is helping lower fuel cell costs by developing the next generation of fuel cell catalysts. Fuel cells produce electricity from a number of domestic fuels, including hydrogen and renewables, and can provide power for virtually any application -- from cars and buses to commercial buildings. This technology, which is similar to a battery, has the potential to revolutionize the way we power the nation while reducing carbon pollution and oil consumption.

469

New Zealand Energy Data: Electricity Generating Capacity by Fuel...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Economic Development publishes energy data including many datasets related to electricity. Included here are three electricity generating capacity datasets: annual...

470

Alternative Fuels Data Center  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

biodiesel Go biodiesel Go Generated_thumb20130810-31804-kwxulv U.S. Biodiesel Production, Exports, and Consumption Generated_thumb20130810-31804-kwxulv Trend of U.S. biodiesel production, exports, and consumption from 2001-2011 Last update August 2012 View Graph Graph Download Data Generated_thumb20130810-31804-s6una1 U.S. Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Biofuels Generated_thumb20130810-31804-s6una1 Comparison of greenhouse gas emissions from biofuels, developed by the EPA for Renewable Fuel Standard 2 rule Last update February 2010 View Graph Graph Download Data Biodiesel-stations Biodiesel Fueling Station Locations by State Biodiesel-stations View Map Graph Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1ngbjor Biomass-Based Diesel RFS2 Mandates and Consumption Generated_thumb20130810-31804-1ngbjor

471

Fuel Cycle Comparison of Distributed Power Generation Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, as well as for coal and natural gas grid-generation technologies, are provided as baseline cases Cycle Power Plants 14.9 33.1 Natural Gas Turbine, Combined Cycle Power Plants 18.3 46.0 Coal comparable to the total energy use associated with the natural gas and coal grid-generation technologies

Argonne National Laboratory

472

DESIGNING AN OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION AND COFIRING SAWDUST WITH COAL AT ALBRIGHT GENERATING STATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the period October 1, 2003-December 31, 2003, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) continued with demonstration operations at the Willow Island Generating Station and improvements to the Albright Generating Station cofiring systems. The demonstration operations at Willow Island were designed to document integration of biomass cofiring into commercial operations, including evaluating new sources of biomass supply. The Albright improvements were designed to increase the resource base for the projects, and to address issues that came up during the first year of operations. This report summarizes the activities associated with the Designer Opportunity Fuel program, and demonstrations at Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations.

K. Payette; D. Tillman

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

DESIGNING AN OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION AND COFIRING SAWDUST WITH COAL AT ALBRIGHT GENERATING STATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the period April 1, 2003--June 30, 2003, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) proceeded with demonstration operations at the Willow Island Generating Station and improvements to the Albright Generating Station cofiring systems. The demonstration operations at Willow Island were designed to document integration of biomass cofiring into commercial operations. The Albright improvements were designed to increase the resource base for the projects, and to address issues that came up during the first year of operations. This report summarizes the activities associated with the Designer Opportunity Fuel program, and demonstrations at Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations.

K. Payette; D. Tillman

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Performance of hybrid quad generation system consisting of solid oxide fuel cell system and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or tri-generation systems. Specifically, it suits better for applications, such food industry, where.1 Background The existing cogeneration (e.g. heat and power) and trigeneration (e.g. heating, cooling and power to decrease the primary energy consumption [1]. The trigeneration systems derive from those for cogeneration

Liso, Vincenzo

476

Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption and Expenditures 1992...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1992 Consumption and Expenditures 1992 Consumption & Expenditures Overview Full Report Tables National estimates of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat...

477

FINAL SAFETY ANALYSIS REPORT--SNAP 1A RADIOISOTOPE FUELED THERMOELECTRIC GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The safety aspects involved in utilizing the Task 2 radioisotope-powered thermoelectric generator in a terrestrial satellite are described. It is based upon a generalized satellite mission having a 600-day orbital lifetime. A description of the basic design of the generator is presented in order to establish the analytical model. This includes the generator design, radiocerium fuel properties, and the fuel core. The transport of the generator to the launch site is examined, including the shipping cask, shipping procedures, and shipping hazards. A description of ground handling and vehicle integration is presented including preparation for fuel transfer, transfer, mating of generators to final stage, mating final stage to booster, and auxiliary support equipment. The flight vehicle is presented to complete the analytical model. Contained in this chapter are descriptions of the booster-sustainer, final stage, propellants, and built-in safety systems. The typical missile range is examined with respect to the launch complex and range safety characteristics. The shielding of the fuel is discussed and includes both dose rates and shield thicknesses required. The bare core, shielded generator, fuel transfer operation and dose rates for accidental conditions are treated. mechanism of re-entry from the successful mission is covered. Radiocerium inventories with respect to time and the chronology of re-entry are specifically treated. The multiplicity of conditions for aborted missions is set forth. The definition of aborted missions is treated first in order to present the initial conditions. Following this, a definition of the forces imposed upon the generator is presented. The aborted missions is presented. A large number of initial vehicle failure cases is narrowed down into categories of consequences. Since stratospheric injection of fuel results in cases where the fuel is not contained after re-entry, an extensive discussion of the fall-out mechanism is presented. (auth)

Dix, G.P.

1960-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

478

Recent progress in zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High temperature solid oxide fuel cells based upon yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte offer a clean, pollution-free technology to electrochemically generate electricity at high efficiencies. This paper reviews the designs, materials and fabrication processes used for such fuel cells. Most progress to date has been achieved with tubular geometry cells. A large number of tubular cells have been electrically tested, some to times up to 30,000 hours; these cells have shown excellent performance and performance stability. In addition, successively larger size electric generators utilizing these cells have been designed, built and operated since 1984. Two 25 kW power generation field test units have recently been fabricated; these units represent a major milestone in the commercialization of zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation.

Singhal, S.C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Recent progress in zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High temperature solid oxide fuel cells based upon yttria-stabilized zirconia electrolyte offer a clean, pollution-free technology to electrochemically generate electricity at high efficiencies. This paper reviews the designs, materials and fabrication processes used for such fuel cells. Most progress to date has been achieved with tubular geometry cells. A large number of tubular cells have been electrically tested, some to times up to 30,000 hours; these cells have shown excellent performance and performance stability. In addition, successively larger size electric generators utilizing these cells have been designed, built and operated since 1984. Two 25 kW power generation field test units have recently been fabricated; these units represent a major milestone in the commercialization of zirconia-based fuel cells for power generation.

Singhal, S.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

"Table A15. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Economic Characteristics(a)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation fuel consumption" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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481

"Table A45. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" 5. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Value of Shipment Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

482

"Table A46. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption" " for Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Employment Size Categories, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

483

"Table A48. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 8. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1994" ,,,"Consumption","Major" " "," ","Consumption","per Dollar","Byproducts(b)","Fuel Oil(c)"," " " ","Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" " ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row"

484

"Table A51. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 1. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region and Economic" " Characteristics of the Establishment, 1991 " ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percent)","(percent)","Factors"

485

"Table A47. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 7. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Census Region, Census Division, Industry Group, and" " Selected Industries, 1994" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,,"Consumption","Byproducts(b)" ,,,"Consumption","per Dollar","as a","Fuel Oil(c) as" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","of Value","Percent of","a Percent of","RSE" "SIC"," ","per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","Consumption","Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Industry Group and Industry","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(percents)","(percents)","Factors"

486

"Table A50. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" 0. Selected Energy Operating Ratios for Total Energy Consumption for" " Heat, Power, and Electricity Generation by Industry Group," " Selected Industries, and Economic Characteristics of the" " Establishment, 1991 (Continued)" ,,,,,"Major" ,,,"Consumption","Consumption per","Byproducts(c)","Fuel Oil(d)" ,,"Consumption","per Dollar","Dollar of Value","as a Percent of","as a Percent","RSE" "SIC",,"per Employee","of Value Added","of Shipments","of Consumption","of Natural Gas","Row" "Code(a)","Economic Characteristics(b)","(million Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(thousand Btu)","(Percent)","(percent)","Factors"

487

Table 2.9 Commercial Buildings Consumption by Energy Source ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

parking garages. Web Page: For related information, ... "Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey." 6 Distillate fuel oil, residual fuel oil, ...

488

In situ Gas Conditioning in Fuel Reforming for Hydrogen Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The production of hydrogen for fuel cell applications requires cost and energy efficient technologies. The Absorption Enhanced Reforming (AER), developed at ZSW with industrial partners, is aimed to simplify the process by using a high temperature in situ CO2 absorption. The in situ CO2 removal results in shifting the steam reforming reaction equilibrium towards increased hydrogen concentration (up to 95 vol%). The key part of the process is the high temperature CO2 absorbent. In this contribution results of Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) investigations on natural minerals, dolomites, silicates and synthetic absorbent materials in regard of their CO2 absorption capacity and absorption/desorption cyclic stability are presented and discussed. It has been found that the inert parts of the absorbent materials have a structure stabilizing effect, leading to an improved cyclic stability of the materials.

Bandi, A.; Specht, M.; Sichler, P.; Nicoloso, N.

2002-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

489

DESIGNING AN OPPORTUNITY FUEL WITH BIOMASS AND TIRE-DERIVED FUEL FOR COFIRING AT WILLOW ISLAND GENERATING STATION AND COFIRING SAWDUST WITH COAL AT ALBRIGHT GENERATING STATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the period October 1, 2002--December 31, 2002, Allegheny Energy Supply Co., LLC (Allegheny) completed the first year of testing at the Willow Island cofiring project. This included data acquisition and analysis associated with certain operating parameters and environmental results. Over 2000 hours of cofiring operation were logged at Willow Island, and about 4,000 tons of sawdust were burned along with slightly more tire-derived fuel (TDF). The results were generally favorable. During this period, also, a new grinder was ordered for the Albright Generating Station to handle oversized material rejected by the disc screen. This report summarizes the activities associated with the Designer Opportunity Fuel program, and demonstrations at Willow Island and Albright Generating Stations. It details the test results at Willow Island and summarizes the grinder program at Albright.

K. Payette; D. Tillman

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Biogas-Fueled Distributed Generation: Three Manure Digester Case Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biogas produced from the anaerobic digestion of livestock waste can provide electrical and thermal energy while solving environmental challenges, including waste management and greenhouse gas reduction. The three manure digester gas projects described in this report demonstrate the potential of such systems to provide co-generated power and heat.

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

491

Parallel Operation of Wind Turbine, Fuel Cell, and Diesel Generation Sources: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated a small isolated hybrid power system that used a parallel combination of dispatchable and non-dispatchable power generation sources. The non-dispatchable generation came from a nature-dependent wind turbine, and the dispatchable generations were a fuel cell and a diesel generator. On the load side, the non-dispatchable portion was the village load, and the dispatchable portion was the energy storage, which could be in many different forms (e.g., space/water heater, electrolysis, battery charger, etc.) The interaction among different generation sources and the loads was investigated. Simulation results showed the effect of the proposed system on voltage and frequency fluctuations.

Muljadi, E.; Wang, C.; Nehrir, M. H.

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z