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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Pipeline gas pressure reduction with refrigeration generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The high pressure of pipeline gas is reduced to the low pressure of a distribution system with simultaneous generation of refrigeration by passing the gas through two successive centrifugal compressors driven by two turbo-expanders in which the compressed gas is expanded to successively lower pressures. Refrigeration is recovered from the gas as it leaves each turbo-expander. Methanol is injected into the pipeline gas before it is expanded to prevent ice formation. Aqueous methanol condensate separated from the expanded gas is distilled for the recovery and reuse of methanol.

Markbreiter, S. J.; Schorr, H. P.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

2

The Chemistry of Flammable Gas Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The document collects information from field instrumentation, laboratory tests, and analytical models to provide a single source of information on the chemistry of flammable gas generation at the Hanford Site. It considers the 3 mechanisms of formation: radiolysis, chemical reactions, and thermal generation. An assessment of the current models for gas generation is then performed. The results are that the various phenomena are reasonably understood and modeled compared to field data.

ZACH, J.J.

2000-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

3

Biofuels: Bacteria generate propane gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Genetically engineered bacteria could one day be harnessed to make renewable propane fuel. Patrik Jones at Imperial College London, Kalim Akhtar at University College London and ... different species of bacteria into Escherichia coli, so that the microbe could convert glucose into propane gas. With genetic tinkering and by increasing the levels of oxygen to which the ...

2014-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

4

Onboard Plasmatron Generation of Hydrogen rich Gas for Diesel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Onboard Plasmatron Generation of Hydrogen rich Gas for Diesel Aftertreatment and Other Applications Onboard Plasmatron Generation of Hydrogen rich Gas for Diesel Aftertreatment and...

5

NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has conducted a study of Next Generation Gas Turbine Systems that embraces the goals of the DOE's High Efficiency Engines and Turbines and Vision 21 programs. The Siemens Westinghouse Next Generation Gas Turbine (NGGT) Systems program was a 24-month study looking at the feasibility of a NGGT for the emerging deregulated distributed generation market. Initial efforts focused on a modular gas turbine using an innovative blend of proven technologies from the Siemens Westinghouse W501 series of gas turbines and new enabling technologies to serve a wide variety of applications. The flexibility to serve both 50-Hz and 60-Hz applications, use a wide range of fuels and be configured for peaking, intermediate and base load duty cycles was the ultimate goal. As the study progressed the emphasis shifted from a flexible gas turbine system of a specific size to a broader gas turbine technology focus. This shift in direction allowed for greater placement of technology among both the existing fleet and new engine designs, regardless of size, and will ultimately provide for greater public benefit. This report describes the study efforts and provides the resultant conclusions and recommendations for future technology development in collaboration with the DOE.

Benjamin C. Wiant; Ihor S. Diakunchak; Dennis A. Horazak; Harry T. Morehead

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation 10.1073/pnas.1309334111...of unconventional natural gas, particularly shale gas...best-performing coal-fired generation under certain...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

NREL: Energy Analysis - Natural Gas-Fired Generation Results...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

assessments have shown wide-ranging results. To better understand the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from utility-scale, natural gas-fired electricity generation systems (based...

8

Fuel cell generator containing a gas sealing means  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical generator is made, operating with flowing fuel gas and oxidant gas, the generator having a thermal insulation layer, and a sealing means contacting or contained within the insulation, where the sealing means is effective to control the contact of the various gases utilized in the generator.

Makiel, Joseph M. (Monroeville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Fuel cell generator containing a gas sealing means  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical generator is made, operating with flowing fuel gas and oxidant gas, the generator having a thermal insulation layer, and a sealing means contacting or contained within the insulation, where the sealing means is effective to control the contact of the various gases utilized in the generator. 5 figs.

Makiel, J.M.

1987-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

10

All of Hanford's underground waste tanks generate hydrogen gas...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Hanford's underground waste tanks generate hydrogen gas to some degree since the radioactivity in the waste releases hydrogen from basic nuclear reactions. The routine release...

11

Supercontinuum generation versus optical breakdown in CO2 gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Threshold powers for optical breakdown (OB) and supercontinuum (SC) generation in high-pressure CO2 gas have been measured at different focusing conditions. It has been...

Ilkov, F A; Ilkova, L Sh; Chin, S L

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Turbine Drive Gas Generator for Zero Emission Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Vision 21 Program seeks technology development that can reduce energy costs, reduce or eliminate atmospheric pollutants from power plants, provide choices of alternative fuels, and increase the efficiency of generating systems. Clean Energy Systems is developing a gas generator to replace the traditional boiler in steam driven power systems. The gas generator offers the prospects of lower electrical costs, pollution free plant operations, choices of alternative fuels, and eventual net plant efficiencies in excess of 60% with sequestration of carbon dioxide. The technology underlying the gas generator has been developed in the aerospace industry over the past 30 years and is mature in aerospace applications, but it is as yet unused in the power industry. This project modifies and repackages aerospace gas generator technology for power generation applications. The purposes of this project are: (1) design a 10 MW gas generator and ancillary hardware, (2) fabricate the gas generator and supporting equipment, (3) test the gas generator using methane as fuel, (4) submit a final report describing the project and test results. The principal test objectives are: (1) define start-up, shut down and post shutdown control sequences for safe, efficient operation; (2) demonstrate the production of turbine drive gas comprising steam and carbon dioxide in the temperature range 1500 F to 3000 F, at a nominal pressure of 1500 psia; (3) measure and verify the constituents of the drive gas; and (4) examine the critical hardware components for indications of life limitations. The 21 month program is in its 13th month. Design work is completed and fabrication is in process. The gas generator igniter is a torch igniter with sparkplug, which is currently under-going hot fire testing. Fabrication of the injector and body of the gas generator is expected to be completed by year-end, and testing of the full gas generator will begin in early 2002. Several months of testing are anticipated. When demonstrated, this gas generator will be the prototype for use in demonstration power plants planned to be built in Antioch, California and in southern California during 2002. In these plants the gas generator will demonstrate durability and its operational RAM characteristics. In 2003, it is expected that the gas generator will be employed in new operating plants primarily in clean air non-attainment areas, and in possible locations to provide large quantities of high quality carbon dioxide for use in enhanced oil recovery or coal bed methane recovery. Coupled with an emission free coal gasification system, the CES gas generator would enable the operation of high efficiency, non-polluting coal-fueled power plants.

Doyle, Stephen E.; Anderson, Roger E.

2001-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

13

Gas turbine generators from India for Asian and world markets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Bharat Heavy Electricals Ltd. (BHEL), in India, is an important producer of large industrial gas turbines in the Asian area. The company produces both GE frame type industrial gas turbines and Siemens design gas turbines for power generation service. Up to this time, BHEL has manufactured and supplied 68 gas turbine power generation units of GE design, ranging from Frame 1 to Frame 6 sizes, and two Siemens V94.2 gas turbines rated at 150 MW ISO. In addition, 15 gas turbine generating units are currently being manufactured. These include a large Frame 9 unit and a V94.2 gas turbine. This paper describes briefly some of the projects completed by the company.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Gas generation results and venting study for transuranic waste drums  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sixteen waste drums, containing six categories of plutonium-contaminated waste, were monitored for venting and gas generation for six months. The venting devices tested appeared adequate to relieve pressure and prevent hydrogen accumulation. Most of the gas generation, primarily H2 and CO2, was due to radiolytic decomposition of the hydrogenous wastes. Comparison of the gas yields with those obtained previously in laboratory tests showed very reasonable agreement with few exceptions.

Kazanjian, A.R.; Arnold, P.M.; Simmons, W.C.; D'Amico, E.L.

1985-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

15

Natural catalytic activity in a marine shale for generating natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...natural catalytic activity in marine shales. Gas is generated at ambient temperatures...differences are in degree. Mowry shale generates gas compositions that are quite different...probably a major source of natural gas. Mowry shale generates gas at thermodynamic...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Changing the rules of the game – An analysis of EU influence on electricity and gas liberalization, with a focus on the Baltic Sea region, and future challenges to EU energy market regulation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This study analyses the expansion of the EU into energy market regulation. It shows that the limits to EU influence and, thereby, EU energy market… (more)

Khiar, I L

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Activity: Natural Gas Engine and Vehicle Research & Development (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the status of the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) activity, including goals, R&D progress, NGV implementation, and the transition to hydrogen.

Not Available

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown – Dataset  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Excel file with dataset for Fact #844: Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown

19

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) Program Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fact sheet describing U. S. DOE and NREL's development of next generation natural gas vehicles (NGVs) as a key element in its strategy to reduce oil import and vehicle pollutants.

Walkowicz, K.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

A Natural-Gas-Fired Thermoelectric Power Generation System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a combustion-driven thermoelectric power generation system that uses PbSnTe-based thermoelectric modules. The modules were integrated into a gas-fired furnace with a special burner design. The...

K. Qiu; A.C.S. Hayden

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Post-Election Prospects for Natural-Gas-Fired Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The extraordinary growth of gas-fired generation during President Obama's first term has upended power markets across the country. But how will gas-fired power fare during the next four years? And how much will the outcome be impacted by the federal energy and environmental policies that the Administration and Congress can shape? This essay provides some preliminary answers to these questions.

Gregory C. Staple; Patrick Bean

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

NEW APPROACH TO ADDRESSING GAS GENERATION IN RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging (SARP) document why the transportation of radioactive material is safe in Type A(F) and Type B shipping containers. The content evaluation of certain actinide materials require that the gas generation characteristics be addressed. Most packages used to transport actinides impose extremely restrictive limits on moisture content and oxide stabilization to control or prevent flammable gas generation. These requirements prevent some users from using a shipping container even though the material to be shipped is fully compliant with the remaining content envelope including isotopic distribution. To avoid these restrictions, gas generation issues have to be addressed on a case by case basis rather than a one size fits all approach. In addition, SARP applicants and review groups may not have the knowledge and experience with actinide chemistry and other factors affecting gas generation, which facility experts in actinide material processing have obtained in the last sixty years. This paper will address a proposal to create a Gas Generation Evaluation Committee to evaluate gas generation issues associated with Safety Analysis Reports for Packaging material contents. The committee charter could include reviews of both SARP approved contents and new contents not previously evaluated in a SARP.

Watkins, R; Leduc, D; Askew, N

2009-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

23

Efficient gas stream cooling in Second-Generation PFBC plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The coal-fueled Advanced or Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor concept (APFBC) is an efficient combined cycle in which coal is carbonized (partially gasified) to fuel a gas turbine, gas turbine exhaust heats feedwater for the steam cycle, and carbonizer char is used to generate steam for a steam turbine while heating combustion air for the gas turbine. The system can be described as an energy cascade in which chemical energy in solid coal is converted to gaseous form and flows to the gas turbine followed by the steam turbine, where it is converted to electrical power. Likewise, chemical energy in the char flows to both turbines generating electrical power in parallel. The fuel gas and vitiated air (PFBC exhaust) streams must be cleaned of entrained particulates by high-temperature equipment representing significant extensions of current technology. The energy recovery in the APFBC cycle allows these streams to be cooled to lower temperatures without significantly reducing the efficiency of the plant. Cooling these streams would allow the use of lower-temperature gas cleanup equipment that more closely approaches commercially available equipment, reducing cost and technological risk, and providing an earlier path to commercialization. This paper describes the performance effects of cooling the two hottest APFBC process gas streams: carbonizer fuel gas and vitiated air. Each cooling variation is described in terms of energy utilization, cycle efficiency, and cost implications.

White, J.S.; Horazak, D.A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Middle East fuel supply & gas exports for power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Middle East countries that border on, or are near, the Persian Gulf hold over 65% of the world`s estimated proven crude oil reserves and 32% of the world`s estimated proven natural gas reserves. In fact, approximately 5% of the world`s total proven gas reserves are located in Qatar`s offshore North Field. This large natural gas/condensate field is currently under development to supply three LNG export projects, as well as a sub-sea pipeline proposal to export gas to Pakistan. The Middle East will continue to be a major source of crude oil and oil products to world petroleum markets, including fuel for existing and future base load, intermediate cycling and peaking electric generation plants. In addition, as the Persian Gulf countries turn their attention to exploiting their natural gas resources, the fast-growing need for electricity in the Asia-Pacific and east Africa areas offers a potential market for both pipeline and LNG export opportunities to fuel high efficiency, gas-fired combustion turbine power plants. Mr. Mitchell`s portion of this paper will discuss the background, status and timing of several Middle Eastern gas export projects that have been proposed. These large gas export projects are difficult and costly to develop and finance. Consequently, any IPP developers that are considering gas-fired projects which require Mid-East LNG as a fuel source, should understand the numerous sources and timing to securing project debt, loan terms and conditions, and, restrictions/credit rating issues associated with securing financing for these gas export projects. Mr. Newendorp`s section of the paper will cover the financing aspects of these projects, providing IPP developers with additional considerations in selecting the primary fuel supply for an Asian-Pacific or east African electric generation project.

Mitchell, G.K. [Merrimack Energy Co., LTD, Lowell, MA (United States); Newendorp, T. [Taylor-DeJongh, Inc., Washington, DC (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

25

Possible Locations for Gas-Fired Power Generation in Southern Germany  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Gas-fired power generation has not only grown continuously in Europe, ... . Significant transport capacities in a high pressure gas grid are required to guarantee stable generation of gas-fired electricity. The p...

Joachim Müller-Kirchenbauer…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Gas Generation Equations for CRiSP 1.6 April 21, 1998 1 Gas Generation Equations for CRiSP 1.6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Generation Equations for CRiSP 1.6 April 21, 1998 1 Gas Generation Equations for CRiSP 1.6 Theory For CRiSP.1.6 new equations have been implemented for gas production from spill. As a part of the US Army Corps' Gas Abatement study, Waterways Experiment Station (WES) has developed these new

Washington at Seattle, University of

27

Post-accident gas generation from radiolysis of organic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents a methodology for estimating the gas generation rates resulting from radiolysis of organic materials in paints and electrical cable insulation inside a nuclear reactor containment building under design basis accident conditions. The methodology was based on absorption of the radiation energies from the post-accident fission products and the assumed gas yields of the irradiated materials. A sample calculation was made using conservative assumptions, plant-specific data of a nuclear power plant, and a radiation source term which took into account the time-dependent release and physico-chemical behavior of the fission products.

Wing, J.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The motivation and objective of this research is to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions by: (1) applying the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); (2) using the California Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database for commercial buildings; (3) selecting buildings with electric peak loads between 100 kW and 5 MW; (4) considering fuel cells, micro-turbines, internal combustion engines, gas turbines with waste heat utilization, solar thermal, and PV; (5) testing of different policy instruments, e.g. feed-in tariff or investment subsidies.

Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

New Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Generating Technology to Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION 30 TH BIRTHDAY CONFERENCE April 7, 2008 Linda G. Stuntz Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 2 The Target * Energy related emissions of CO2 will increase by about 16% in AEO 2008 Reference Case between 2006 and 2030 (5,890 MM metric tons to 6,859 MM metric tons). (#s from Caruso Senate Energy testimony of 3/4/08). * Last year, emissions from electricity generation were 40% of total energy-related GHG emissions. * Based on projected annual electricity demand growth of 1.1%. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 3 The Target Cont'd * 16.4 GW of new nuclear + 2.7 GW Uprates of existing plants less 4.5 GW of retirements. * Coal responsible for 54% of generation in 2030.

30

Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent expected conditions in an emplacement drift, but nevertheless illustrate the potential for acid-gas generation at moderate temperatures (<150 C).

Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

31

Speaker to Address Impact of Natural Gas Production on Greenhouse Gas Emissions When used for power generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions, but questions have, that using natural gas for electricity generation is better than coal for the long-term healthSpeaker to Address Impact of Natural Gas Production on Greenhouse Gas Emissions When used for power

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

32

Method of generating hydrogen gas from sodium borohydride  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Hecht, Andrew M. (Sandia Park, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bell, Nelson S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

33

Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

From 2002 to 2012, most states have reduced their reliance on coal for electricity generation. The figure below shows the percent change in electricity generated by coal and natural gas for each...

34

Reactive Transport Modeling of Acid Gas Generation and Condensation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pulvirenti et al. (2004) recently conducted a laboratory evaporation/condensation experiment on a synthetic solution of primarily calcium chloride. This solution represents one potential type of evaporated pore water at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a site proposed for geologic storage of high-level nuclear waste. These authors reported that boiling this solution to near dryness (a concentration factor >75,000 relative to actual pore waters) leads to the generation of acid condensate (pH 4.5) presumably due to volatilization of HCl (and minor HF and/or HNO{sub 3}). To investigate the various processes taking place, including boiling, gas transport, and condensation, their experiment was simulated by modifying an existing multicomponent and multiphase reactive transport code (TOUGHREACT). This code was extended with a Pitzer ion-interaction model to deal with high ionic strength. The model of the experiment was set-up to capture the observed increase in boiling temperature (143 C at {approx}1 bar) resulting from high concentrations of dissolved salts (up to 8 m CaCl{sub 2}). The computed HCI fugacity ({approx} 10{sup -4} bars) generated by boiling under these conditions is not sufficient to lower the pH of the condensate (cooled to 80 and 25 C) down to observed values unless the H{sub 2}O mass fraction in gas is reduced below {approx}10%. This is because the condensate becomes progressively diluted by H{sub 2}O gas condensation. However, when the system is modeled to remove water vapor, the computed pH of instantaneous condensates decreases to {approx}1.7, consistent with the experiment (Figure 1). The results also show that the HCl fugacity increases, and calcite, gypsum, sylvite, halite, MgCl{sub 2}4H{sub 2}O and CaCl{sub 2} precipitate sequentially with increasing concentration factors.

G. Zhahg; N. Spycher; E. Sonnenthal; C. Steefel

2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

35

Fuel switching in the electricity sector under the EU ETS: Review and prospective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The European Union has implemented the European Union emission trading scheme (EU ETS) as an instrument to facilitate greenhouse gas (GHG) emission abatement stipulated in the Kyoto protocol. Empirical data show that in the early stages of the EU ETS, the value of a ton of CO{sub 2} has already led to emission abatement through switching from coal to gas in the European electric power sector. In the second part of this paper, an electricity generation simulation model is used to perform simulations on the switching behavior in both the first and the second trading periods of the EU ETS. In 2005, the reduction in GHG emissions in the electric power sector due to EU ETS is estimated close to 88 Mton. For the second trading period, a European Union allowance (EUA) price dependent GHG reduction curve has been determined. The obtained switching potential turns out to be significant, up to 300 Mton/year, at sufficiently high EUA prices.

Delarue, E.; Voorspools, K.; D'haeseleer, W. [Katholieke University of Leuven, Heverlee (Belgium)

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Natural catalytic activity in a marine shale for generating natural gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in a marine shale for generating natural gas Frank D. Mango 1 * Daniel M...be the source of equilibrium in natural gas habitats and in marine shales...palaeoactivity|low-temperature gas|natural gas| 1. Introduction It is broadly...

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Understanding fuel switching under the EU ETS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the creation of the European Union Emission Trading Scheme (EU ETS), European power producers have monitored carbon emissions resulting from the composition of their production. Fuel switching is the main short-term abatement measure under the EU ETS. It consists in substituting combined cycle gas turbines (CCGTs) for hard-coal plants in off-peak power generation. Thereby coal plants run for shorter periods, allowing power producers to reduce their CO2 emissions. The aim of this paper is two-fold. First, we summarise the main characteristics of fuel switching under the EU ETS. Second, we show how differences in the energy/environmental efficiency of power plants impact the marginal cost of fuel switching. We demonstrate that the level of switching effort influences the dependence of the marginal cost of switching on fuel prices. The marginal cost of switching is shown to be increasingly dependent on the gas price as the switching effort increases, whereas the net effect is undetermined for the coal price. All the conclusions are summarised in several illustrative examples.

Vincent Bertrand

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

PROOF-OF-CONCEPT OF A DUAL-FIRED (SOLAR & NATURAL GAS) GENERATOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PROOF-OF-CONCEPT OF A DUAL-FIRED (SOLAR & NATURAL GAS) GENERATOR FOR USE IN A SPACE-COOLING SYSTEM REPORT (FAR) PROOF-OF-CONCEPT OF A DUAL-FIRED (SOLAR & NATURAL GAS) GENERATOR FOR USE IN A SPACE COOLING Technologies · Environmentally-Preferred Advanced Generation · Energy-Related Environmental Research · Energy

39

"1. Mystic Generating Station","Gas","Boston Generating LLC",1968  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts" Massachusetts" "1. Mystic Generating Station","Gas","Boston Generating LLC",1968 "2. Brayton Point","Coal","Dominion Energy New England, LLC",1545 "3. Canal","Petroleum","Mirant Canal LLC",1119 "4. Northfield Mountain","Pumped Storage","FirstLight Power Resources Services LLC",1080 "5. Salem Harbor","Coal","Dominion Energy New England, LLC",744 "6. Fore River Generating Station","Gas","Boston Generating LLC",688 "7. Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station","Nuclear","Entergy Nuclear Generation Co",685 "8. Bear Swamp","Pumped Storage","Brookfield Power New England",600

40

The modelling of biochemical-thermal coupling effect on gas generation and transport in MSW landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The landfill gas generation was investigated based on the theories of the thermodynamics, microbial dynamics and chemical dynamics. The coupling model was developed for describing the gas transport and heat release. And the relationship between the gas generation rate and the temperature was proposed. The parameters in the gas generation model were obtained by bioreactor test in order to evaluate the volume of gas production of the Erfeishan landfill in China. The simulation results shown that the operating life of the landfill will be overestimated if the model does not consider the thermal effect during degradation of the solid substrate.

Liu Lei; Liang Bing; Xue Qiang; Zhao Ying; Yang Chun

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Norway and Emissions Trading: From Global Front-Runner to EU Follower  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A striking convergence has taken place in the design of the Norwegian and EU greenhouse gas emissions trading systems from 1998 to 2004. This article ... the EU trading system and resulted in EU emissions trading

Ingvild Andreassen Sćverud; Jřrgen Wettestad

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Application of PV panels into electricity generation system of compression stations in gas transporting systems.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??  This thesis deals with problems of electricity generation and saving at compression stations of magistral gas transporting pipelines in Russia. Russia is a biggest… (more)

Belyaev, Alexey

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Quality Assurance Program Plan for TRUPACT-II Gas Generation Test Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Generation Test Program (GGTP), referred to as the Program, is designed to establish the concentration of flammable gases and/or gas generation rates in a test category waste container intended for shipment in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II). The phrase "gas generationtesting" shall refer to any activity that establishes the flammable gas concentration or the flammable gas generation rate. This includes, but is not limited to, measurements performed directly on waste containers or during tests performed on waste containers. This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) requirements that apply to the Program. The TRUPACT-II requirements and technical bases for allowable flammable gas concentration and gas generation rates are described in the TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC).

Carlsbad Field Office

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Landfill Gas Generation and Transport In Bioreactor Landfill  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The activation gas and water flow each other in Bioreactor Landfill. Based on the porous media seepage and ... of water and waste components decomposition for describing landfill gas flow have been developed, and...

Qi-Lin Feng; Lei Liu; Qiang Xue; Ying Zhao

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this report period were to complete the development of the Gas Generator design, which was done; fabricate and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive gas Gas Generator, which has been postponed. Focus during this report period has been to complete the brazing and bonding necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continue making preparations for fabricating and testing the Gas Generator, and continuing the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware in preparation for the test program. Fabrication is more than 95% complete and is expected to conclude in early May 2002. the test schedule was affected by relocation of the testing to another test supplier. The target test date for hot fire testing is now not earlier than June 15, 2002.

Unknown

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

Greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generated by offshore wind farms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract For wind power generation offshore sites offer significantly better wind conditions compared to onshore. At the same time, the demand for raw materials and therefore the related environmental impacts increase due to technically more demanding wind energy converters and additional components (e.g. substructure) for the balance of plant. Additionally, due to environmental concerns offshore wind farms will be sited farshore (i.e. in deep water) in the future having a significant impact on the operation and maintenance efforts (O&M). Against this background the goal of this analysis is an assessment of the specific GHG (greenhouse gas) emissions as a function of the site conditions, the wind mill technology and the O&M necessities. Therefore, a representative offshore wind farm is defined and subjected to a detailed LCA (life cycle assessment). Based on parameter variations and modifications within the technical and logistical system, promising configurations regarding GHG emissions are determined for different site conditions. Results show, that all parameters related to the energy yield have a distinctive impact on the specific GHG emissions, whereas the distance to shore and the water depth affect the results marginally. By utilizing the given improvement potentials GHG emissions of electricity from offshore wind farms are comparable to those achieved onshore.

Britta Reimers; Burcu Özdirik; Martin Kaltschmitt

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Gas Generation Testing of Neptunium Oxide Generated Using the HB-Line Phase IIFlowsheet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas generation rate for neptunium dioxide (NpO{sub 2}) samples produced on a laboratory scale using the HB-Line Phase II flowsheet has been measured following exposure to 75% relative humidity (RH). As expected, the observed H{sub 2} generation rates for these samples increase with increasing moisture content. A maximum H{sub 2} generation rate of 1.8 x 10{sup -6} moles per day per kilogram (mol {center_dot} day{sup -1} kg{sup -1}) was observed for NpO{sub 2} samples with approximately one and one-half times (1 1/2 X) the expected specific surface area (SSA) for the HB-Line Phase II product. The SSA of NpO{sub 2} samples calcined at 650 C is similar to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) calcined at 950 C according to the Department of Energy (DOE) standard for packaging and storage of PuO{sub 2}. This low SSA of the HB-Line Phase II product limits moisture uptake to less than 0.2 weight percent (wt %) even with extended exposure to 75% RH.

Duffey, J

2003-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

48

Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell.

Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell. 4 figs.

Singh, P.; George, R.A.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

50

Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Hydrogen Generation in Fuel Cell Applications1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Hydrogen Generation in Fuel Cell Ghosh3 , Huei Peng2 Abstract A fuel processor that reforms natural gas to hydrogen-rich mixture to feed of the hydrogen in the fuel processor is based on catalytic partial oxidation of the methane in the natural gas

Peng, Huei

51

DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this report period was to continue the development of the Gas Generator design, fabrication and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive Gas Generator. Focus during this past report period has been to continue completion the Gas Generator design, completing the brazing and bonding experiments to determine the best method and materials necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continuing to making preparations for fabricating and testing this Gas Generator and commencing with the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware. Designs have been completed sufficiently such that Long Lead Items [LLI] have been ordered and upon arrival will be readied for the fabrication process. The keys to this design are the platelet construction of the injectors that precisely measures/meters the flow of the propellants and water all throughout the steam generating process and the CES patented gas generating cycle. The Igniter Assembly injector platelets fabrication process has been completed and bonded to the Igniter Assembly and final machined. The Igniter Assembly is in final assembly and is being readied for testing in the October 2001 time frame. Test Plan dated August 2001, was revised and finalized, replacing Test Plan dated May 2001.

Unknown

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

52

Natural gas liquifier based on an EGD-generator-expander  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Versions are considered for preparing liquefied natural gas (LNG) in liquefiers with different cold producing units; with a throttle valve, a vortex tube, a turbo-expander. A short analysis is given for their ......

G. I. Bumagin; D. V. Borodin; A. G. Lapkova…

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Steam generators two phase flows numerical simulation with liquid and gas momentum equations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steam generators two phase flows numerical simulation with liquid and gas momentum equations M Abstract This work takes place in steam generators flow studies and we consider here steady state three words: Steam Generator, Two-phase Flow, Finite element Email address: Marc.Grandotto@cea.fr (M

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

54

Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ronald E. Hagen, John R. Moens, and Zdenek D. Nikodem Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy International Atomic Energy Agency Vienna, Austria November 6-9, 2001 iii Energy Information Administration/ Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contents Page I. The Electric Power Industry and the Greenhouse Gas Issue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 II. The Current Role of the U.S. Nuclear Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 III. The Future Role of the U.S. Nuclear Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 IV. Factors That Affect Nuclear Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 V. Conclusion

55

Adapting On-site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Internal combustion reciprocating engine generators (gensets) are regularly deployed at distribution centers, small municipal utilities, and public institutions to provide on-site electricity...

56

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...and conventional gas are not significantly...harmonized estimates of life cycle GHG emissions...unconventional gas used for electricity...combined cycle turbine (NGCC) compared...explanation of the remaining harmonization...evaluated shale gas LCAs: inclusion of missing life cycle stages...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...thermal efficiency, fuel heating value, power plant...natural gas as a bridge fuel . Clim Change 118 : 609...emissions and freshwater consumption of Marcellus shale gas...following Fig. S1) for the fuel cycle of shale gas...water, and/or oil) Vessel and pipeline blowdowns...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

New generation enrichment monitoring technology for gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The continuous enrichment monitor, developed and fielded in the 1990s by the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided a go-no-go capability to distinguish between UF{sub 6} containing low enriched (approximately 4% {sup 235}U) and highly enriched (above 20% {sup 235}U) uranium. This instrument used the 22-keV line from a {sup 109}Cd source as a transmission source to achieve a high sensitivity to the UF{sub 6} gas absorption. The 1.27-yr half-life required that the source be periodically replaced and the instrument recalibrated. The instrument's functionality and accuracy were limited by the fact that measured gas density and gas pressure were treated as confidential facility information. The modern safeguarding of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant producing low-enriched UF{sub 6} product aims toward a more quantitative flow and enrichment monitoring concept that sets new standards for accuracy stability, and confidence. An instrument must be accurate enough to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of material, have virtually zero false alarms, and protect the operator's proprietary process information. We discuss a new concept for advanced gas enrichment assay measurement technology. This design concept eliminates the need for the periodic replacement of a radioactive source as well as the need for maintenance by experts. Some initial experimental results will be presented.

Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexandrov, Boian, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Thomas, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macarthur, Duncan, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marks, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moss, Calvin, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheppard, Gregory, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Performance and emission characteristics of natural gas combined cycle power generation system with steam injection and oxyfuel combustion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Natural gas combined cycle power generation systems are gaining popularity due to their high power generation efficiency and reduced emission. In the present work, combined… (more)

Varia, Nitin

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Interdependence of the Electricity Generation System and the Natural Gas System and Implications for Energy Security  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Lexington Massachusetts This page intentionally left blank. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Concern about energy security on domestic Department of Defense installations has led to the possibility of using natural gas-fired electricity generators to provide power in the event of electric grid failures. As natural gas is an increasingly base-load fuel for electricity generation in the United States, the electricity generation system has become increasingly dependent on the operation of the natural gas system. However, as the natural gas system is also partly dependent on electricity for its ability to deliver natural gas from the well-head to the consumer, the question arises of whether, in the event of an electric grid failure, the natural gas would continue to flow. As the natural gas transmission system largely uses natural gas from the pipelines as a source of power, once the gas has been extracted from the ground, the system is less dependent on the electric grid. However, some of the drilling rigs, processing units, and pipeline compressors do depend on electric power, making the vulnerability to the system to a disruption in the national electricity supply network vary depending on the cause, breadth, and geographic location of the disruption. This is due to the large numbers of players in the natural gas production and

N. Judson; N. Judson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

ADVANCED EXERGY ANALYSIS APPLIED TO THE GAS-TURBINE BASED CO-GENERATION SYSTEM.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The thesis focuses on the evaluation and improvement of a gas-turbine based co-generation system, from an exergetic point of view. A conventional exergy analysis has… (more)

AZZARELLI, GIUSEPPE

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

A new generation of multilateral well enhances small gas field economics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the economic benefits of the new technology in the domain of offshore and small gas fields. This work also shows that this new generation of multilaterals brings new option values to the domain of multilateral technology....

Atse, Jean-Philippe

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

63

Testing of power-generating gas-turbine plants at Russian electric power stations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper cites results of thermal testing of various types and designs of power-generating gas-turbine plants (GTP), which have been placed in service at electric-power stations in Russia in recent years. Therm...

G. G. Ol’khovskii; A. V. Ageev; S. V. Malakhov…

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Modeling the final phase of landfill gas generation from long-term observations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For waste management, methane emissions from landfills and their effect on climate change are of serious concern. Current models for biogas generation that focus on the economic use of the landfill gas are usuall...

Johannes Tintner; Manfred Kühleitner; Erwin Binner; Norbert Brunner…

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Modified landfill gas generation rate model of first-order kinetics and two-stage reaction  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This investigation was carried out to establish a new domestic landfill gas (LFG) generation rate model that takes...L 0), the reaction rate constant in the first stage (K 1), and ...

Jiajun Chen; Hao Wang…

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

A market and engineering study of a 3-kilowatt class gas turbine generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Market and engineering studies were performed for the world's only commercially available 3 kW class gas turbine generator, the IHI Aerospace Dynajet. The objectives of the market study were to determine the competitive ...

Monroe, Mark A. (Mark Alan)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The primary objective of this project is to demonstrate the technical and economic feasibility of generating electricity from non-conventional low temperature (150 to 300ş F) geothermal resources in oil and gas settings.

68

Wood Gas Processing To Generate Pure Hydrogen Suitable for PEM Fuel Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Wood Gas Processing To Generate Pure Hydrogen Suitable for PEM Fuel Cells ... A temperature profile along the three reactors was set, attempting to optimize the overall CO conversion rate. ... Low GHSV, low sulfur loads in the feed gas (see Table 7), and the approach of temperature optimization enabled high overall conversion rates. ...

Silvester Fail; Nicolas Diaz; Florian Benedikt; Michael Kraussler; Julian Hinteregger; Klaus Bosch; Marius Hackel; Reinhard Rauch; Hermann Hofbauer

2014-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

69

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Against the backdrop of increasingly volatile natural gas prices, renewable energy resources, which by their nature are immune to natural gas fuel price risk, provide a real economic benefit. Unlike many contracts for natural gas-fired generation, renewable generation is typically sold under fixed-price contracts. Assuming that electricity consumers value long-term price stability, a utility or other retail electricity supplier that is looking to expand its resource portfolio (or a policymaker interested in evaluating different resource options) should therefore compare the cost of fixed-price renewable generation to the hedged or guaranteed cost of new natural gas-fired generation, rather than to projected costs based on uncertain gas price forecasts. To do otherwise would be to compare apples to oranges: by their nature, renewable resources carry no natural gas fuel price risk, and if the market values that attribute, then the most appropriate comparison is to the hedged cost of natural gas-fired generation. Nonetheless, utilities and others often compare the costs of renewable to gas-fired generation using as their fuel price input long-term gas price forecasts that are inherently uncertain, rather than long-term natural gas forward prices that can actually be locked in. This practice raises the critical question of how these two price streams compare. If they are similar, then one might conclude that forecast-based modeling and planning exercises are in fact approximating an apples-to-apples comparison, and no further consideration is necessary. If, however, natural gas forward prices systematically differ from price forecasts, then the use of such forecasts in planning and modeling exercises will yield results that are biased in favor of either renewable (if forwards < forecasts) or natural gas-fired generation (if forwards > forecasts). In this report we compare the cost of hedging natural gas price risk through traditional gas-based hedging instruments (e.g., futures, swaps, and fixed-price physical supply contracts) to contemporaneous forecasts of spot natural gas prices, with the purpose of identifying any systematic differences between the two. Although our data set is quite limited, we find that over the past three years, forward gas prices for durations of 2-10 years have been considerably higher than most natural gas spot price forecasts, including the reference case forecasts developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This difference is striking, and implies that resource planning and modeling exercises based on these forecasts over the past three years have yielded results that are biased in favor of gas-fired generation (again, presuming that long-term stability is desirable). As discussed later, these findings have important ramifications for resource planners, energy modelers, and policy-makers.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

70

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...rock allow for the release and collection of the natural gas. Fracking can be done in vertical or horizontal wells. Liquids...methods to increase gas flows, such as mechanical or chemical fracking, is often required before the wells are able to produce commercial...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...collection of the natural gas. Fracking can be done in vertical...as mechanical or chemical fracking, is often required...C (2011) The greenhouse impact of unconventional gas...Subgroup of the Operations and Environment Task Group of the National...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysts at NREL have developed and applied a systematic approach to review the LCA literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a procedure called 'harmonization.' Harmonization of the literature provides increased precision and helps clarify the impacts of specific electricity generation choices, producing more robust results.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Estimation of Landfill Gas Generation Rate and Gas Permeability Field of Refuse Using Inverse Modeling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Landfill methane must be captured to reduce emissions of greenhouse gases; moreover it can be used as an alternative energy source. However, despite the widespread use of landfill gas (LFG) collection systems for...

Yoojin Jung; Paul Imhoff; Stefan Finsterle

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

International Natural Gas Prices for Electricity Generation - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 U.S. Dollars per 107 Kilocalories - Gross Calorific Value2 Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Australia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Austria NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Barbados NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium C C C C C C C C C Bolivia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Canada 145.5 144.7 174.9 171.9 225.2 NA NA NA NA Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 244.7 252.1 258.6 281.0 326.2 348.5 400.8 499.3 NA

75

Gas for Balancing of Variable Power Generation; Gas för balansering av varierande elproduktion.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? With the increasing share of variable renewable generation, balancing electric powersystems could become a major concern for system operators because of their variableand hardly… (more)

Bortot, Baptiste

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Electrical Generation Using Non-Salable Low BTU Natural Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High operating costs are a significant problem for independent operators throughout the U.S. Often, decisions to temporarily idle or abandon a well or lease are dictated by these cost considerations, which are often seen as unavoidable. Options for continuing operations on a marginal basis are limited, but must include non-conventional approaches to problem solving, such as the use of alternative sources of lease power, and scrupulous reduction of non-productive operating techniques and costs. The loss of access to marginal oil and gas productive reservoirs is of major concern to the DOE. The twin difficulties of high operating costs and low or marginal hydrocarbon production often force independent operators to temporarily or permanently abandon existing lease facilities, including producing wells. Producing well preservation, through continued economical operation of marginal wells, must be maintained. Reduced well and lease operating costs are expected to improve oil recovery of the Schaben field, in Ness County, Kansas, by several hundred thousands of barrels of oil. Appropriate technology demonstrated by American Warrior, allows the extension of producing well life and has application for many operators throughout the area.

Scott Corsair

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

"1. Hay Road","Gas","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",1130  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware" Delaware" "1. Hay Road","Gas","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",1130 "2. Indian River Operations","Coal","Indian River Operations Inc",795 "3. Edge Moor","Gas","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",723 "5. McKee Run","Gas","NAES Corporation",136 "6. NRG Energy Center Dover","Coal","NRG Energy Center Dover LLC",100 "7. Warren F Sam Beasley Generation Station","Gas","Delaware Municipal Electric Corp",48 "8. Christiana","Petroleum","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",45 "9. Van Sant Station","Gas","NAES Corporation",39

78

GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen-containing materials. Transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials (NM), and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE’s Environmental Management (EM) organization to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a "program level" roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This "program level" roadmapping involves linking technology development (and deployment) efforts to the programs’ needs and requirements for dispositioning the material/waste that generates combustible gas through radiolysis and chemical decomposition. The roadmapping effort focused on needed technical & programmatic support to the baselines (and to alternatives to the baselines) where the probability of success is low (i.e., high uncertainty) and the consequences of failure are relatively high (i.e., high programmatic risk). A second purpose for roadmapping was to provide the basis for coordinating sharing of "lessons learned" from research and development (R&D) efforts across DOE programs to increase efficiency and effectiveness in addressing gas generation issues.

Luke, Dale Elden; Rogers, Adam Zachary; Hamp, S.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Harmonization of initial estimates of shale gas life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for electric power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...production activities to the oil produced from associated...of production in the price environment...for transportation and heating should be...study (51%, higher heating value basis). 1 Olmstead...reductions in natural gas prices for emissions of CO2 from the US power...

Garvin A. Heath; Patrick O’Donoughue; Douglas J. Arent; Morgan Bazilian

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The effect of oxide layers on gas-generating hydride particles during production of aluminium foams  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Melt routes to metallic foam production offer attractions of low cost and the potential for good microstructural control. In situ gas generation may be preferable to external gas injection in terms of the important objective of generating a fine and uniform cell structure. The main difficulty with this approach has been that of ensuring that the gas-generating powder is suitably dispersed throughout the melt before the gas is released and the cells are formed. In the present paper, procedures are outlined for preparation of powders for use in aluminium melts, where gas will be released only after a suitable delay, allowing the powders to first become well-dispersed in the melt and solidification to start. Pre-treatment of the foaming agent also facilitates a flexible production of castings with various porosity at the same processing conditions simply by varying the thickness of a diffusion barrier layer on the gas-releasing agent. The role of the melt viscosity history, as a function of a heat extraction rate from the solidifying melt and an alloy composition, on the final porosity of the castings is also briefly discussed.

Gergely, V.; Clyne, T.W. [Univ. of Cambridge (United Kingdom). Dept. of Materials Science and Metallurgy

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

83

An Advanced Diagnostic and Prognostic System for Gas Turbine Generator Sets with Experimental Validation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diagnostic and Prognostic System for Gas Diagnostic and Prognostic System for Gas Turbine Generator Sets with Experimental Validation Clemson University John R. Wagner, Ph.D., P.E. SCIES Project 03-01-SR108 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (07/01/2003, 36 Month Duration) $319,479 Total Contract Value ($319,479 DOE) Clemson Presentation 10-19-2005 J.W. Gas Turbine Need * The Reliability, Availability, and Maintainability (RAM) technical area within High Efficiency Engines and Turbines (HEET) Program encompasses the design of gas turbine health management systems * The introduction of real-time diagnostic and prognostic capabilities on gas turbines can provide increased reliability, safety, and efficiency

84

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Modeling of gas generation from the Cameo coal zone in the Piceance Basin Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas generative potential of the Cretaceous Cameo coal in the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado, was evaluated quantitatively by sealed gold tube pyrolysis. The H/C and O/C elemental ratios show that pyrolyzed Cameo coal samples follow the Van Krevelen humic coal evolution pathway, reasonably simulating natural coal maturation. Kinetic parameters (activation energy and frequency factor) for gas generation and vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) changes were calculated from pyrolysis data. Experimental R{sub o} results from this study are not adequately predicted by published R{sub o} kinetics and indicate the necessity of deriving basin-specific kinetic parameters when building predictive basin models. Using derived kinetics for R{sub o}, evolution and gas generation, basin modeling was completed for 57 wells across the Piceance Basin, which enabled the mapping of coal-rank and coalbed gas potential. Quantities of methane generated at approximately 1.2% R{sub o} are about 300 standard cubic feet per ton (scf/ton) and more than 2500 scf/ton (in-situ dry-ash-free coal) at R{sub o}, values reaching 1.9%. Gases generated in both low- and high-maturity coals are less wet, whereas the wetter gas is expected where R{sub o} is approximately 1.4-1.5%. As controlled by regional coal rank and net coal thickness, the largest in-place coalbed gas resources are located in the central part of the basin, where predicted volumes exceed 150 bcf/mi, excluding gases in tight sands.

Zhang, E.; Hill, R.J.; Katz, B.J.; Tang, Y.C. [Shell Exploration and Production Co., BTC, Houston, TX (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: • Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas • Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment • Maximizing electrical efficiency • Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill • Maximizing equipment uptime • Minimizing water consumption • Minimizing post-combustion emissions • The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWh’s of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

87

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime (about 40 ps), high frequency (about 5G hz), high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a dielectric barrier discharge and passing a gas to treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases. The invention also includes a reactor for generating the non-thermal plasma.

Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Raridon, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armfield, Jeffrey S. (Upsilanti, MI); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Graves, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

DOE/EA-1624: Environmental Assessment for Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities (December 2008)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities Auburn, New York Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1624 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 2009 INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK AUBURN LANDFILL GAS ELECTRIC GENERATORS AND ANAEROBIC DIGESTER ELECTRIC FACILITIES FINAL EA DOE/EA-1624 i Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 BACKGROUND............................................................................................................................................... 2 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED ...................................................................................................................................... 4

89

Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term (< 6 months) and long-term (> 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Injection of harmonics generated in gas in a free-electron laser providing intense and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-ultraviolet to X-ray region. Recently, injection of a single-pass FEL by the third laser harmonic of a TiLETTERS Injection of harmonics generated in gas in a free-electron laser providing intense-electron lasers promise to extend this down to femtosecond timescales. The process by which free-electron lasers

Loss, Daniel

91

Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This final technical report covers the period October 1, 1995 to February 29, 2008. This chapter begins with an overview of the history of Enhanced Oil Recovery techniques and specifically, CO2 flood. Subsequent chapters conform to the manner consistent with the Activities, Tasks, and Sub-tasks of the project as originally provided in Exhibit C1 in the Project Management Plan dated September 20, 1995. These chapters summarize the objectives, status and conclusions of the major project activities performed during the project period. The report concludes by describing technology transfer activities stemming from the project and providing a reference list of all publications of original research work generated by the project team or by others regarding this project. The overall objective of this project was a final research and development in the United States a technology that was developed at the Institute for Geology and Development of Fossil Fuels in Moscow, Russia. Before the technology can be convincingly adopted by United States oil and gas producers, the laboratory research was conducted at Mew Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experimental studies were conducted to measure the volume and the pressure of the CO{sub 2} gas generated according to the new Russian technology. Two experimental devices were designed, built and used at New Mexico Tech facilities for these purposes. The designed setup allowed initiating and controlling the reaction between the 'gas-yielding' (GY) and 'gas-forming' (GF) agents proposed by Russian technology. The temperature was controlled, and the generated gas pressure and volume were recorded during the reaction process. Additionally, the effect of surfactant addition on the effectiveness of the process was studied. An alternative GY reactant was tested in order to increase the efficiency of the CO2 gas generation process. The slim tube and the core flood experimental studies were conducted to define the sweep efficiency of the in-situ generated CO{sub 2} gas. A set of core flood experiments were conducted to define effect of surfactant on recovery efficiency. The results demonstrated obvious advantages of the foamy system over the brine solution in order to achieve higher sweep efficiency and recovery coefficient. It is shown that a slug injection is not an efficient method for mixing GY and GF solutions and it can't generate considerable gas inside the slim-tube.

Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

92

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To utilize landfill gas for power generation using carbonate fuel cells, the LFG must be cleaned up to remove sulfur and chlorine compounds. This not only benefits the operation of the fuel cell, but also benefits the environment by preventing the emission of these contaminants to the atmosphere. Commercial technologies for gas processing are generally economical in relatively large sizes (3 MMSCFD or larger), and may not achieve the low levels of contaminants required. To address the issue of LFG clean-up for fuel cell application, a process was developed utilizing commercially available technology. A pilot-scale test facility utilizing this process was built at a landfill site in Anoka, Minnesota using the EPRI fuel cell test facility used for coal gas testing. The pilot plant was tested for 1000 hours, processing 970,000 SCF (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of landfill gas. Testing indicated that the process could achieve the following concentrations of contaminants in the clean gas: Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppm (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv if any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm (average) Sulfur Dioxide. The paper describes the LFG composition for bulk and trace compounds; evaluation of various methods to clean landfill gas; design of a LFG cleanup system; field test of pilot-scale gas cleanup process; fuel cell testing on simulated landfill gas; single cell testing on landfill gas contaminants and post test analysis; and design and economic analyses of a full scale gas cleanup system.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Air bottoming cycle: Use of gas turbine waste heat for power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of the Air Bottoming Cycle (ABC) as well as the results of a feasibility study for using the Air Bottoming Cycle for gas turbine waste heat recovery/power generation on oil/gas platforms in the North Sea. The basis for the feasibility study was to utilize the exhaust gas heat from an LM2500PE gas turbine. Installation of the ABC on both a new and an existing platform have been considered. A design reference case is presented, and the recommended ABC is a two-shaft engine with two compressor intercoolers. The compression pressure ratio was found optimal at 8:1. The combined gas turbine and ABC shaft efficiency wa/s calculated to 46.6 percent. The LM2500PE gas turbine contributes with 36.1 percent while the ABC adds 10.5 percent points to the gas turbine efficiency. The ABC shaft power output is 6.6 MW when utilizing the waste heat of an LM2500PE gas turbine. A preliminary thermal and hydraulic design of the ABC main components (compressor, turbine, intercoolers, and recuperator) was carried out. The recuperator is the largest and heaviest component (45 tons). A weight and cost breakdown of the ABC is presented. The total weight of the ABC package was calculated to 154 metric tons, and the ABC package cost to 9.4 million US$. An economical examination for three different cases was carried out. The results show that the ABC alternative (LM2500PE + ABC) is economical, with a rather good margin, compared to the other alternatives. The conclusion is that the Air Bottoming Cycle is an economical alternative for power generation on both new platforms and on existing platforms with demand for more power.

Bolland, O.; Foerde, M. [Norwegian Univ. of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway). Div. of Thermal Energy and Hydropower; Haande, B. [Oil Engineering Consultants, Sandvika (Norway)

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Coproduced Fluids for Oil and Gas Wells Project Description The geothermal organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system will be installed at an oil field operated by Encore Acquisition in western North Dakota where geothermal fluids occur in sedimentary formations at depths of 10,000 feet. The power plant will be operated and monitored for two years to develop engineering and economic models for geothermal ORC energy production. The data and knowledge acquire during the O & M phase can be used to facilitate the installation of similar geothermal ORC systems in other oil and gas settings.

95

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable togas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unlike natural gas-fired generation, renewable generation (e.g., from wind, solar, and geothermal power) is largely immune to fuel price risk. If ratepayers are rational and value long-term price stability, then--contrary to common practice--any comparison of the levelized cost of renewable to gas-fired generation should be based on a hedged gas price input, rather than an uncertain gas price forecast. This paper compares natural gas prices that can be locked in through futures, swaps, and physical supply contracts to contemporaneous long-term forecasts of spot gas prices. We find that from 2000-2003, forward gas prices for terms of 2-10 years have been considerably higher than most contemporaneous long-term gas price forecasts. This difference is striking, and implies that comparisons between renewable and gas-fired generation based on these forecasts over this period have arguably yielded results that are biased in favor of gas-fired generation.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

96

The California Climate Action Registry: Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We find that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Muritshaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Variance Analysis of Wind and Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations Brian Bush, Thomas Jenkin, David Lipowicz, and Douglas J. Arent National Renewable Energy Laboratory Roger Cooke Resources for the Future Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-52790 January 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations Brian Bush, Thomas Jenkin, David Lipowicz,

98

E.U. environmental policies: a document - based qualitative research  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Climate change has become a reality with many consequences in different fields. The European Union (EU) has been at the forefront of international action to combat climate change since 1990, when the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) ... Keywords: EU policy, European legislation, climate change, environment, greenhouse gas emissions, qualitative research

Iuliana Pop; Madalina-Teodora Andrei; Charlotte Valentine Ene; Florin Vartolomei; Petronela-Sonia Nedea; Radita Alexe

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

The EU Foreign Policy.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? This dissertations aims to examine the EU Foreign Policy, and more precisely map the High Representative (HR) and his impact on the Common Foreign… (more)

Petersson, Emmy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Generation risk assessment in volatile conditions with wind, hydro, and natural gas units  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper studies a generating company (GENCO)’s midterm (a few months to a year) scheduling payoffs and risks in volatile operating conditions. The proposed algorithm considers the integration of intermittent wind units into a GENCO’s generation assets and coordinates the GENCO’s hourly wind generation schedule with that of natural gas (NG) units (with volatile gas prices) and hydro units (with water inflow forecast) for maximizing the GENCO’s payoff. The proposed midterm GENCO model applies market price forecasts to the risk-constrained stochastic price-based unit commitment (PBUC) for calculating the GENCO’s risk in energy and ancillary services markets. The proposed PBUC minimizes the cost of (a) NG contracts, storage, startup and shutdown, (b) startup and shutdown of cascaded hydro units, and (c) penalty for defaulting on the scheduled power delivery. Simulation results show that the diversification of generating assets including bilateral contracts (BCs) could enhance the GENCO’s midterm planning by increasing the expected payoff and decreasing the financial risk.

Cem Sahin; Mohammad Shahidehpour; Ismet Erkmen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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101

Development of a dry low-NOx gas turbine combustor for a natural-gas fueled 2MW co-generation system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dry low-NOx gas turbine combustor has been developed for natural-gas fueled co-generation systems in the power range of 1--4MW. The combustor. called the Double Swirler Combustor, uses the lean premixed combustion to reduce NOx emission. The combustor is characterized by two staged lean premixed combustion with two coaxial annular burners and a simple fuel control system without the complex variable geometry. Substantially low NOx level has been achieved to meet the strict NOx regulation to co-generation systems in Japan. High combustion efficiency has been obtained for a wide operating range. In 1994, Tokyo Gas and Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries initiated a collaborative program to develop a natural-gas fueled low NOx gas turbine engine for new 2MW class co-generation system, named IM270. The Double Swirler Combustor, originally developed by Tokyo Gas, was introduced into the natural gas fueled version of the IM270. Engine test of the first production unit was successfully conducted to confirm substantially low NOx level of less than 15 ppm (O{sub 2} = 16%) with the output power of more than 2MW. Test for the durability and the reliability of the system is being conducted at Tokyo Gas Negishi LNG Terminal in Kanagawa, Japan and successful results have been so far obtained.

Mori, Masaaki; Sato, Hiroshi

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Plug-in electric vehicle introduction in the EU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) could significantly reduce gasoline consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the EU's transport sector. However, PEV well-towheel (WTW) emissions depend on improvements in vehicle ...

Sisternes, Fernando J. de $q (Fernando José Sisternes Jiménez)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

EU | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EU EU Dataset Summary Description These datasets include GHG and CO2 emissions statistics for the European Union (EU). The statistics are available from the European Commission. Source European Commission Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels CO2 emissions EU GHG emissions Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Total GHG and CO2 Emissions for EU (xls, 853.5 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon GHG Emissions by Sector, all member countries (xls, 2 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon GHG Emissions from Transport, all member countries (xls, 1.3 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon CO2 emissions by sector, all member countries (xls, 2.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon CO2 emissions by transport, all member countries (xls, 1.5 MiB) Quality Metrics

104

Study on optimization model of energy collection efficiency and its power generation benefit evaluation of landfill gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An optimization model for joint biogas energy collection efficiency that targets the prediction model for landfill gas output dynamics and the optimization model for gas well output has been established. The model was used to comprehensively analyze and evaluate the collection efficiency of a landfill gas well together with the long-term monitoring the gas output of the gas well within Chenjiachong Landfill. The collection efficiency increased by more than 50% than the original collection of landfill biogas and the power generation efficiency increased more than two times after the reservoir area of the landfill was optimized and regulated.

Xue Qiang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Optimization of power generation from a set of low-temperature abandoned gas wells, using organic Rankine cycle  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This research article deals with the employment of organic Rankine cycle (ORC) to generate electricity from a set of low-temperature abandoned gas wells in Iran. At first a thermodynamic analysis was performed to select an appropriate power cycle; consequently organic Rankine cycle was chosen. Then a comprehensive investigation was carried out to find a typical low-temperature abandoned gas reservoir so an abandoned gas reservoir in the central part of Iran was considered. The next step was selecting the working fluid; in this regard a vast range of common organic fluids were studied and R125 was chosen. Finally the gas well and the power plant were simulated and then a parametric optimization of the ORC plant was performed in order to achieve optimum power generation and also to compute generated power at different operational parameters of gas wells and power cycle.

Mahyar Ebrahimi; Seyed Ebrahim Moussavi Torshizi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

A Silicon-Based Micro Gas Turbine Engine for Power Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper reports on our research in developing a micro power generation system based on gas turbine engine and piezoelectric converter. The micro gas turbine engine consists of a micro combustor, a turbine and a centrifugal compressor. Comprehensive simulation has been implemented to optimal the component design. We have successfully demonstrated a silicon-based micro combustor, which consists of seven layers of silicon structures. A hairpin-shaped design is applied to the fuel/air recirculation channel. The micro combustor can sustain a stable combustion with an exit temperature as high as 1600 K. We have also successfully developed a micro turbine device, which is equipped with enhanced micro air-bearings and driven by compressed air. A rotation speed of 15,000 rpm has been demonstrated during lab test. In this paper, we will introduce our research results major in the development of micro combustor and micro turbine test device.

Shan, X -C; Maeda, R; Sun, Y F; Wu, M; Hua, J S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Conversion of Mixed Oxygenates Generated from Synthesis Gas to Fuel Range Hydrocarbon  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The growing dependence in the U.S. on foreign crude oil supplies and increased concerns regarding greenhouse gas emission has generated considerable interest in research to develop renewable and environmentally friendly liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels. One of the strategies for achieving this is to produce intermediate compounds such as alcohols and other simple oxygenates from biomass generated synthesis gas (mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen) and further convert them into liquid hydrocarbons. The focus of this research is to investigate the effects of mixed oxygenates intermediate product compositions on the conversion step to produce hydrocarbon liquids. A typical mixed oxygenate stream is expected to contain water (around 50%), alcohols, such as methanol and ethanol (around 35%), and smaller quantities of oxygenates such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and ethyl acetate. However the ratio and the composition of the mixed oxygenate stream generated from synthesis gas vary significantly depending on the catalyst used and the process conditions. Zeolite catalyzed deoxygenation of methanol accompanied by chain growth is well understood under Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) like reaction conditions using an H-ZSM-5 zeolite as the catalyst6-8. Research has also been conducted to a limited extent in the past with higher alcohols, but not with other oxygenates present9-11. Also there has been little experimental investigation into mixtures containing substantial amounts of water. The latter is of particular interest because water separation from the hydrocarbon product would be less energy intensive than first removing it from the oxygenate intermediate stream prior to hydrocarbon synthesis, potentially reducing overall processing costs.

Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gerber, Mark A.; Lilga, Michael A.; Flake, Matthew D.

2012-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hydordesulfurization of dibenzothiophene using hydrogen generated in situ by the water-gas shift reaction in a trickle bed reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

HYDRODESULFURIZATION OF DIBENZOTHIOPHENE USING HYDROGEN GENERATED IN SITU BY THE WATER ? GAS SHIFT REACTION IN A TRICKLE BED REACTOR A Thesis BRUCE DAVID HOOK Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1984 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering HYDRODESULFURIZATION OF DIBENZOTHIOPHENE USING HYDROGEN GENERATED IN SITU BY THE WATER ? GAS SHIFT REACTION IN A TRICKLE BED REACTOR A Thesis by BRUCE...

Hook, Bruce David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

109

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scheibel (1997) “Current Gas Turbine Developments and Futurefor Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines,” October 2000. Available onlineNext Evolution of the F Gas Turbine,” April 2001. Available

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Nonlinear absorption and harmonic generation of laser in a gas with anharmonic clusters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nonlinear absorption and harmonic generation of intense short pulse laser in a gas embedded with anharmonic clusters are investigated theoretically. When the laser induced excursion of cluster electrons becomes comparable to cluster radius, the restoration force on electrons no longer remains linearly proportional to the excursion. As a consequence, the plasmon resonance is broadened, leading to broadband laser absorption. It also leads to second and third harmonic generations, at much higher level than the one due to ponderomotive nonlinearity. The harmonic yield is resonantly enhanced at the plasmon resonance {omega}={omega}{sub pe}/{radical}(3), where {omega} is the frequency of the laser and {omega}{sub pe} is the plasma frequency of cluster electrons.

Kumar, Manoj; Tripathi, V. K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, New Delhi 110016 (India)

2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

111

PV output smoothing using a battery and natural gas engine-generator.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In some situations involving weak grids or high penetration scenarios, the variability of photovoltaic systems can affect the local electrical grid. In order to mitigate destabilizing effects of power fluctuations, an energy storage device or other controllable generation or load can be used. This paper describes the development of a controller for coordinated operation of a small gas engine-generator set (genset) and a battery for smoothing PV plant output. There are a number of benefits derived from using a traditional generation resource in combination with the battery; the variability of the photovoltaic system can be reduced to a specific level with a smaller battery and Power Conditioning System (PCS) and the lifetime of the battery can be extended. The controller was designed specifically for a PV/energy storage project (Prosperity) and a gas engine-generator (Mesa Del Sol) currently operating on the same feeder in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A number of smoothing simulations of the Prosperity PV were conducted using power data collected from the site. By adjusting the control parameters, tradeoffs between battery use and ramp rates could be tuned. A cost function was created to optimize the control in order to balance, in this example, the need to have low ramp rates with reducing battery size and operation. Simulations were performed for cases with only a genset or battery, and with and without coordinated control between the genset and battery, e.g., without the communication link between sites or during a communication failure. The degree of smoothing without coordinated control did not change significantly because the battery dominated the smoothing response. It is anticipated that this work will be followed by a field demonstration in the near future.

Johnson, Jay; Ellis, Abraham; Denda, Atsushi [Shimizu Corporation; Morino, Kimio [Shimizu Corporation; Shinji, Takao [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.; Ogata, Takao [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.; Tadokoro, Masayuki [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Thermophotovoltaic power generation systems using natural gas-fired radiant burners  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) power generation in gas-fired furnaces is attracting technical attention. Considerable work has been done in the area of low bandgap GaSb cell-based TPV systems as well as silicon solar cell-based TPV systems. Previous investigations have shown that a radiant burner with a high conversion level of fuel to radiation energy must be developed to realize an efficient TPV system. In our work, we investigated different natural gas-fired radiant burners in order to raise the conversion of fuel energy to thermal radiation. These burners were used as radiation sources to establish and test two TPV prototype systems. It was found that for a non-surface combustion radiant burner, the radiation output can be enhanced using a thermal radiator with a porous structure. Also, we developed a cascaded radiant burner that generates two streams of radiation output. One stream illuminates silicon concentrator solar cells while the other drives low bandgap GaSb cells. In this way, useful radiation output and thus TPV system efficiency are significantly increased due to the cascaded utilization of combustion heat and optimized thermal management.

K. Qiu; A.C.S. Hayden

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Electric Power Generation Using Low Bandgap TPV Cells in a Gas?fired Heating Furnace  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Low bandgap TPV cells are preferred for electric power generation in TPV cogeneration systems. Recently significant progress has been made in fabrication of low bandgap semiconductor TPV devices such as InGaAsSb and InGaAs cells. However it appears that only limited data are available in the literature with respect to the performance of these TPV cells in combustion?driven TPV systems. In the research presented in this paper power generation using recently?developed InGaAsSb TPV cells has been investigated in a gas?fired space heating appliance. The combustion performance of the gas burner associated with a broadband radiator was evaluated experimentally. The radiant power density and radiant efficiency of the gas?heated radiator were determined at different degrees of exhaust heat recuperation. Heat recuperation is shown to have a certain effect on the combustion operation and radiant power output. The electric output characteristics of the InGaAsSb TPV devices were investigated under various combustion conditions. It was found that the cell short circuit density was greater than 1 A/cm2 at a radiator temperature of 930°C when an optical filter was used. An electric power density of 0.54 W/cm2 was produced at a radiator temperature of 1190°C. Furthermore modeling calculations were carried out to reveal the influence of TPV cell bandgap and radiator temperature on power output and conversion efficiency. Finally the design aspects of combustion?driven TPV systems were analyzed showing that development of a special combustion device with high conversion level of fuel chemical energy to useful radiant energy is required to improve further the system efficiency.

K. Qiu; A. C. S. Hayden

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Capacity payment impact on gas-fired generation investments under rising renewable feed-in — A real options analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We assess the effect of capacity payments on investments in gas-fired power plants in the presence of different degrees of renewable energy technology (RET) penetration. Low variable cost renewables increasingly make investments in gas-fired generation unprofitable. At the same time, growing feed-in from intermittent \\{RETs\\} amplifies fluctuations in power generation, thus entailing the need for flexible buffer capacity—currently mostly gas-fired power plants. A real options approach is applied to evaluate investment decisions and timing of a single investor in gas-fired power generation. We investigate the necessity and effectiveness of capacity payments. Our model incorporates multiple uncertainties and assesses the effect of capacity payments under different degrees of RET penetration. In a numerical study, we implement stochastic processes for peak-load electricity prices and natural gas prices. We find that capacity payments are an effective measure to promote new gas-fired generation projects. Especially in times of high renewable feed-in, capacity payments are required to incentivize peak-load investments.

Daniel Hach; Stefan Spinler

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Erosion-corrosion modelling of gas turbine materials for coal-fired combined cycle power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The development of coal-fired combined cycle power generation systems is receiving considerable worldwide interest. The successful development and commercialisation of these new systems require that all the component parts are manufactured from appropriate materials and that these materials give predictable in-service performance. Corrosion and erosion-corrosion, resulting from coal derived particulates, deposition and gaseous species, have been identified as potential life limiting factors for these systems. Models to predict these modes of materials degradation are under active development. This paper outlines the development and testing of models suitable for use in gas turbine environments. The complexity of the corrosion processes means that an empirical approach to model development is required whereas a more mechanistic approach can be applied to erosion processes. For hot corrosion conditions, statistically based corrosion models have been produced using laboratory tests for two coatings and a base alloy at typical type I and type II hot corrosion temperatures (900 and 700°C). These models use the parameters of alkali sulphate deposition flux and \\{SOx\\} partial pressure (at each temperature and for set \\{HCl\\} partial pressures), to predict the rate of the most likely localised damage associated with hot corrosion reactions. For erosion-corrosion modelling, a series of laboratory tests have been carried out to investigate erosion behaviour in corrosive conditions appropriate to coal-fired gas turbines. Materials performance data have been obtained from samples located in the hot gas path of the Grimethorpe PFBC pilot plant, under well characterised conditions, for testing the corrosion and erosion-corrosion models. The models successfully predict the materials damage observed in the pilot plant environments.

N.J. Simms; J.E. Oakey; D.J. Stephenson; P.J. Smith; J.R. Nicholls

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Composition, preparation, and gas generation results from simulated wastes of Tank 241-SY-101  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document reviews the preparation and composition of simulants that have been developed to mimic the wastes temporarily stored in Tank 241-SY-101 at Hanford. The kinetics and stoichiometry of gases that are generated using these simulants are also compared, considering the roles of hydroxide, chloride, and transition metal ions; the identities of organic constituents; and the effects of dilution, radiation, and temperature. Work described in this report was conducted for the Flammable Gas Safety Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, (a) whose purpose is to develop information that is necessary to mitigate potential safety hazards associated with waste tanks at the Hanford Site. The goal of this research and of related efforts at the Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), and Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) is to determine the thermal and thermal/radiolytic mechanisms by which flammable and other gases are produced in Hanford wastes, emphasizing those stored in Tank 241-SY-101. A variety of Tank 241-SY-101 simulants have been developed to date. The use of simulants in laboratory testing activities provides a number of advantages, including elimination of radiological risks to researchers, lower costs associated with experimentation, and the ability to systematically alter simulant compositions to study the chemical mechanisms of reactions responsible for gas generation. The earliest simulants contained the principal inorganic components of the actual waste and generally a single complexant such as N-(2-hydroxyethyl) ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (HEDTA) or ethylenediaminetriacetic acid (EDTA). Both homogeneous and heterogeneous compositional forms were developed. Aggressive core sampling and analysis activities conducted during Windows C and E provided information that was used to design new simulants that more accurately reflected major and minor inorganic components.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Study on capacity optimization of PEM fuel cell and hydrogen mixing gas-engine compound generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Development of a small-scale power source not dependent on commercial power may result in various effects. For example, it may eliminate the need for long distance power-transmission lines, and mean that the amount of green energy development is not restricted to the dynamic characteristics of a commercial power grid. Moreover, the distribution of the independent energy source can be optimized with regionality in mind. This paper examines the independent power supply system relating to hydrogen energy. Generally speaking, the power demand of a house tends to fluctuate considerably over the course of a day. Therefore, when introducing fuel cell cogeneration into an apartment house, etc., low-efficiency operations in a low-load region occur frequently in accordance with load fluctuation. Consequently, the hybrid cogeneration system (HCGS) that uses a solid polymer membrane-type fuel cell (PEM-FC) and a hydrogen mixture gas engine (NEG) together to improve power generation efficiency during partial load of fuel cell cogeneration is proposed. However, since facility costs increase, if the HCGS energy cost is not low compared with the conventional method, it is disadvantageous. Therefore, in this paper, HCGS is introduced into 10 household apartments in Tokyo, and the power generation efficiency, carbon dioxide emissions and optimal capacity of a boiler and heat storage tank are investigated through analysis. Moreover, the system characteristics change significantly based on the capacity of PEM-FC and NEG that compose HCGS. Therefore, in this study, the capacity of PEM-FC and that of NEG are investigated, as well as the power generation efficiency, carbon dioxide emissions and the optimal capacity of a boiler and heat storage tank. Analysis revealed that the annual average power generation efficiency when the capacity of PEM-FC and NEG is 5 kW was 27.3%. Meanwhile, the annual average power generation efficiency of HCGS is 1.37 times that of the PEM-FC independent system, and 1.28 times that of the NEG independent system, respectively.

Shin’ya Obara; Itaru Tanno

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

A dual fired downdraft gasifier system to produce cleaner gas for power generation: Design, development and performance analysis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The existing biomass gasifier systems have several technical challenges, which need to be addressed. They are reduction of impurities in the gas, increasing the reliability of the system, easy in operation and maintenance. It is also essential to have a simple design of gasifier system for power generation, which can work even in remote locations. A dual fired downdraft gasifier system was designed to produce clean gas from biomass fuel, used for electricity generation. This system is proposed to overcome a number of technical challenges. The system is equipped with dry gas cleaning and indirect gas cooling equipment. The dry gas cleaning system completely eliminates wet scrubbers that require large quantities of water. It also helps to do away with the disposal issues with the polluted water. With the improved gasifier system, the tar level in the raw gas is less than 100 mg Nm?3.Cold gas efficiency has improved to 89% by complete gasification of biomass and recycling of waste heat into the reactor. Several parameters, which are considered in the design and development of the reactors, are presented in detail with their performance indicators.

P. Raman; N.K. Ram; Ruchi Gupta

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Assessment of the impact of the next generation solvent on DWPF melter off-gas flammability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of replacing the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process with the Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) and blended solvent. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the current solvent in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would both be about 29% higher than their counterparts of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent in the absence of guanidine partitioning. When 6 ppm of guanidine (TiDG) was added to the effluent transfer to DWPF to simulate partitioning for the NGS-MCU and blended solvent cases and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer was controlled below 87 ppm, the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent were still about 12% and 4% lower, respectively, than those of the current solvent. It is, therefore, concluded that as long as the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm, using the current solvent assumption of 105 ppm Isopar{reg_sign} L or 150 ppm solvent in lieu of NGS-MCU or blended solvent in the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 6 ppm of TiDG in the effluent due to guanidine partitioning. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.

Daniel, W. E.

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

A statistical review of the oxygen data from the gas generation tests supporting the revision of the 9975 SARP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chemical and Hydrogen Technology Section (CHT) of the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) has conducted a series of gas generation tests in support of the revision of the safety analysis report for packaging (SARP) for the 9975 container, developed at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Packaging and Transportation Group of SRTC is coordinating the revision to this SARP. A Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan directing this work was issued by CHT in February 1999. Initially, the primary interest in this testing was hydrogen generation. From these ``gas generation tests can be tracked in real-time by measuring the pressure of a sealed container of the materials being studied. Because multiple gas phase reactions are produced in the radiation field of the sample, material pressure measurements do not necessarily define the quantity of H{sub 2} generated. However, the change in total molecules of gas can be calculated using the ideal gas law from the pressure measurement, known container volume and sample temperature. A measurement of the actual headspace gases must be completed to calculate the H{sub 2} generation rate for a particular sample.'' As the results from these tests were reviewed, however, questions arose regarding the oxygen in the headspace gases. Specifically, do the data from some tests indicate that oxygen was generated for those tests? And do the data for other tests indicate that the oxygen was depleted for them? A statistical analysis of the oxygen data derived from these tests is provided in this report to help answer these questions.

Edwards, T.B.

2000-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

122

Microbial gas generation under expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant repository conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository was investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosics (various types of paper) and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, neoprene, hypalon, and leaded hypalon) was examined. The rate of gas production from cellulose biodegradation in inundated samples incubated for 1,228 days at 30 C was biphasic, with an initial rapid rate up to approximately 600 days incubation, followed by a slower rate. The rate of total gas production in anaerobic samples containing mixed inoculum was as follows: 0.002 mL/g cellulose/day without nutrients; 0.004 mL/g cellulose/day with nutrients; and 0.01 mL/g cellulose/day in the presence of excess nitrate. Carbon dioxide production proceeded at a rate of 0.009 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in anaerobic samples without nutrients, 0.05 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in the presence of nutrients, and 0.2 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day with excess nitrate. Adding nutrients and excess nitrate stimulated denitrification, as evidenced by the accumulation of N{sub 2}O in the headspace (200 {micro}mol/g cellulose). The addition of the potential backfill bentonite increased the rate of CO{sub 2} production to 0.3 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in anaerobic samples with excess nitrate. Analysis of the solution showed that lactic, acetic, propionic, butyric, and valeric acids were produced due to cellulose degradation. Samples incubated under anaerobic humid conditions for 415 days produced CO{sub 2} at a rate of 0.2 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in the absence of nutrients, and 1 {micro}mol/g cellulose/day in the presence of bentonite and nutrients. There was no evidence of biodegradation of electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.; Giles, M.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Science

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Landfill Gas Cleanup for Carbonate Fuel Cell Power Generation: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the United States and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Next Generation Pressurized Oxy-Coal Combustion: High Efficiency and No Flue Gas Recirculation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Gas Technology Institute (GTI) has developed a pressurized oxy-coal fired molten bed boiler (MBB) concept, in which coal and oxygen are fired directly into a bed of molten coal slag through burners located on the bottom of the boiler and fired upward. Circulation of heat by the molten slag eliminates the need for a flue gas recirculation loop and provides excellent heat transfer to steam tubes in the boiler walls. Advantages of the MBB technology over other boilers include higher efficiency (from eliminating flue gas recirculation), a smaller and less expensive boiler, modular design leading to direct scalability, decreased fines carryover and handling costs, smaller exhaust duct size, and smaller emissions control equipment sizes. The objective of this project was to conduct techno-economic analyses and an engineering design of the MBB project and to support this work with thermodynamic analyses and oxy-coal burner testing. Techno-economic analyses of GTI’s pressurized oxy-coal fired MBB technology found that the overall plant with compressed CO2 has an efficiency of 31.6%. This is a significant increase over calculated 29.2% efficiency of first generation oxy-coal plants. Cost of electricity (COE) for the pressurized MBB supercritical steam power plant with CO2 capture and compression was calculated to be 134% of the COE for an air-coal supercritical steam power plant with no CO2 capture. This compares positively with a calculated COE for first generation oxy-coal supercritical steam power plants with CO2 capture and compression of 164%. The COE for the MBB power plant is found to meet the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) target of 135%, before any plant optimization. The MBB power plant was also determined to be simpler than other oxy-coal power plants with a 17% lower capital cost. No other known combustion technology can produce higher efficiencies or lower COE when CO2 capture and compression are included. A thermodynamic enthalpy and exergy analysis found a number of modifications and adjustments that could provide higher efficiency and better use of available work. Conclusions from this analysis will help guide the analyses and CFD modeling in future process development. The MBB technology has the potential to be a disruptive technology that will enable coal combustion power plants to be built and operated in a cost effective way, cleanly with no carbon dioxide emissions. A large amount of work is needed to quantify and confirm the great promise of the MBB technology. A Phase 2 proposal was submitted to DOE and other sponsors to address the most critical MBB process technical gaps. The Phase 2 proposal was not accepted for current DOE support.

Rue, David

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

125

3rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct Gas Dosing  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

SCR system provides direct ammonia gas dosing for optimal SCR performance with simplified and flexible exhaust layout.

126

How to quantify uncertainty and variability in life cycle assessment: the case of greenhouse gas emissions of gas power generation in the US  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study quantified the contributions of uncertainty and variability to the range of life-cycle greenhouse gas (LCGHG) emissions associated with conventional gas-fired electricity generation in the US. Whereas uncertainty is defined as lack of knowledge and can potentially be reduced by additional research, variability is an inherent characteristic of supply chains and cannot be reduced without physically modifying the system. The life-cycle included four stages: production, processing, transmission and power generation, and utilized a functional unit of 1 kWh of electricity generated at plant. Technological variability requires analyses of life cycles of individual power plants, e.g. combined cycle plants or boilers. Parameter uncertainty was modeled via Monte Carlo simulation. Our approach reveals that technological differences are the predominant cause for the range of LCGHG emissions associated with gas power, primarily due to variability in plant efficiencies. Uncertainties in model parameters played a minor role for 100 year time horizon. Variability in LCGHG emissions was a factor of 1.4 for combined cycle plants, and a factor of 1.3 for simple cycle plants (95% CI, 100 year horizon). The results can be used to assist decision-makers in assessing factors that contribute to LCGHG emissions despite uncertainties in parameters employed to estimate those emissions.

M Hauck; Z J N Steinmann; I J Laurenzi; R Karuppiah; M A J Huijbregts

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

EU Energy Statistics 2010 (1990 - 2007) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

43 43 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278043 Varnish cache server EU Energy Statistics 2010 (1990 - 2007) Dataset Summary Description These two datasets include energy statistics for the European Union (EU). The statistics are available from the European Commission. The data includes detailed information about: production, net imports, gross inland consumption, and electricity generation for the EU as a whole, as well as the individual member countries, for the period between 1990 and 2007. Also included is annual gross electricity generation from renewables (hydro, pumped storage, wind, biomass, PV, and geothermal) for all EU member countries, 1990 - 2007.

128

Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Toward a less natural gas dependent energy mix in Spain: Crowding-out effects of shifting to biomass power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper estimates the impact of a hypothetical change in Spain's energy mix on a number of productive sectors. The change would be brought about by substituting power generation from natural gas with generation from biomass. The total amount of electricity supplied has been calculated to remain constant so that a crowding-out effect would be derived from the displacement of one technology with another. An input–output (IO) framework has been used to estimate the overall economic impact on 26 productive sectors included on Spain's 2007 IO Table. Based on the available literature, the consideration of net impact improves the analysis. The results show that the overall net impact across all productive sectors of this change in the energy mix would be positive and equal to about 0.5% for the period. Higher impacts were measured for the ‘Electricity power and Electricity Supply’ sector (15.4%) followed by the ‘Agriculture, Hunting, Forestry’ sector (7.1%). Only the ‘Gas generation and Gas supply’ sector showed a negative impact (–2.5%), which is consistent with the reduced use of natural gas. The overall calculated total impact for Spain's productive sector was equal to € 8074.95 million at the 2007-equivalent value.

María J. Colinet; José M. Cansino; José M. González-Limón; Manuel Ordóńez

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Radcalc for windows benchmark study: A comparison of software results with Rocky Flats hydrogen gas generation data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radcalc for Windows Version 2.01 is a user-friendly software program developed by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations for the U.S. Department of Energy (McFadden et al. 1998). It is used for transportation and packaging applications in the shipment of radioactive waste materials. Among its applications are the classification of waste per the US. Department of Transportation regulations, the calculation of decay heat and daughter products, and the calculation of the radiolytic production of hydrogen gas. The Radcalc program has been extensively tested and validated (Green et al. 1995, McFadden et al. 1998) by comparison of each Radcalc algorithm to hand calculations. An opportunity to benchmark Radcalc hydrogen gas generation calculations to experimental data arose when the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) Residue Stabilization Program collected hydrogen gas generation data to determine compliance with requirements for shipment of waste in the TRUPACT-II (Schierloh 1998). The residue/waste drums tested at RFETS contain contaminated, solid, inorganic materials in polyethylene bags. The contamination is predominantly due to plutonium and americium isotopes. The information provided by Schierloh (1 998) of RFETS includes decay heat, hydrogen gas generation rates, calculated G{sub eff} values, and waste material type, making the experimental data ideal for benchmarking Radcalc. The following sections discuss the RFETS data and the Radcalc cases modeled with the data. Results are tabulated and also provided graphically.

MCFADDEN, J.G.

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

131

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the US and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. A pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations: less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide.

Steinfield, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen generation by no more than a factor of three while disodium phosphate increased the corrosion and hydrogen generation rates slightly. U(VI) showed some promise in attenuating hydrogen but only initial testing was completed. Uranium metal corrosion rates also were measured. Under many conditions showing high hydrogen gas attenuation, uranium metal continued to corrode at rates approaching those observed without additives. This combination of high hydrogen attenuation with relatively unabated uranium metal corrosion is significant as it provides a means to eliminate uranium metal by its corrosion in water without the accompanying hazards otherwise presented by hydrogen generation.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

133

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Adapting On-Site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer Gas- Fact Sheet, April 2014  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fact sheet on integrating gasifiers and reciprocating engine generators to utilize biomass-based fuel

135

Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation for the California climate action registry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We fi nd that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Murtishaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Appendix A MIT Joint Program Report 193 1 Appendix A: Sectoral Trading between the EU-ETS and Emerging Countries1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, sectoral trading could be used to extend the European Emission Trading Scheme (EU-ETS) to electricity.5 billion of carbon permits and the EU carbon price decreases by 88% in 2030. Sectoral trading has a small impact on Chinese electricity generation but reverses changes in EU electricity generation driven

137

Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Secretariat of Environment and Sustainable Development (SESD), Secretariat of Industry Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, - Industrial Processes

138

Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment

139

A Path to the Formulation of New Generations of Synthetic Jet Fuel Derived from Natural Gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with industry and academia to study synthetic jet fuels derived from natural gas. These studies are being implemented at its Fuel Characterization Lab where the most advanced testing equipment is used and strict Quality Management and safety systems are followed...

Al-Nuaimi, Ibrahim Awni Omar Hassan

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

140

Method of Generating Hydrocarbon Reagents from Diesel, Natural Gas and Other Logistical Fuels  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a process for producing reagents for a chemical reaction by introducing a fuel containing hydrocarbons into a flash distillation process wherein the fuel is separated into a first component having a lower average molecular weight and a second component having a higher average molecular weight. The first component is then reformed to produce synthesis gas wherein the synthesis gas is reacted catalytically to produce the desire reagent.

Herling, Darrell R (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Aardahl, Chris L. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Rozmiarek, Robert T. (Middleton, WI) [Middleton, WI; Rappe, Kenneth G. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Wang, Yong (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Holladay, Jamelyn D. (Kennewick, WA) [Kennewick, WA

2008-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Elevated Temperature Materials for Power Generation and Propulsion The energy industry is designing higher-efficiency land-based turbines for natural gas-fired  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

higher-efficiency land-based turbines for natural gas-fired power generation systems. The high inletElevated Temperature Materials for Power Generation and Propulsion The energy industry is designing of thermomechanical fatigue life of the next generation's Ni-base superalloys are being developed to enhance life

Li, Mo

142

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. CRADA final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. The technical effort was conducted by EPRI, consultant David Thimsen, Kaltec of Minnesota, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) and Interpoll Laboratories. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) made available two test skids originally used to test an ERC 30 kW carbonate fuel cell at the Destec Coal Gasification Plan in Plaquemine, LA. EPRI`s carbonate fuel cell pilot plant was installed at the Anoka County Regional Landfill in Ramsey, Minnesota. Additional gas cleaning equipment was installed to evaluate a potentially inexpensive, multi-stage gas cleaning process to remove sulfur and chlorine in the gas to levels acceptable for long-term, economical carbonate fuel cell operation. The pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations. Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorined hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide. These were the detection limits of the analytical procedures employed. It is probable that the actual concentrations are below these analytical limits.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

When the gas turbine generator was introduced to the power generation ... fossil-fueled power plant. Twenty years later, gas turbines were established as an important means of ... on utility systems. By the early...

Jeffrey M. Smith

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Electrical Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Co-produced from Oil & Gas  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Project objectives: To validate and realize the potential for the production of low temperature resource geothermal production on oil & gas sites. Test and document the reliability of this new technology.; Gain a better understanding of operational costs associated with this equipment.

145

Heat exchanger design for thermoelectric electricity generation from low temperature flue gas streams .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??An air-to-oil heat exchanger was modeled and optimized for use in a system utilizing a thermoelectric generator to convert low grade waste heat in flue… (more)

Latcham, Jacob G. (Jacob Greco)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Development of Modeling Techniques for A Generation IV Gas Fast Reactor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Worldwide, multiple countries are investing a great deal of time and energy towards developing a new class of technologically advanced nuclear reactors. These new reactors have come to be known as the Generation IV (Gen IV) class of nuclear...

Dercher, Andrew Steven

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

147

Fuel-Slurry Integrated Gasifier/Gas Turbine (FSIG/GT) Alternative for Power Generation Applied to Municipal Solid Waste (MSW)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The gas is cleaned to bring the particle content and size as well alkaline concentration within the acceptable limits for injections into standard gas turbines. ... The proper disposal and use of Municipal Solid Wastes (MSW) for power generation remains among the most pressing problems of medium to large cities. ... Bubble sizes and raising velocities through the gasifier bed (Configuration A). ...

Marcio L. de Souza-Santos; Kevin B. Ceribeli

2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

148

Limited Electricity Generation Supply and Limited Natural Gas Supply Cases (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Development of U.S. energy resources and the permitting and construction of large energy facilities have become increasingly difficult over the past 20 years, and they could become even more difficult in the future. Growing public concern about global warming and CO2 emissions also casts doubt on future consumption of fossil fuels -- particularly coal, which releases the largest amount of CO2 per unit of energy produced. Even without regulations to limit greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, the investment community may already be limiting the future use of some energy options. In addition, there is considerable uncertainty about the future availability of, and access to, both domestic and foreign natural gas resources.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Process for Generation of Hydrogen Gas from Various Feedstocks Using Thermophilic Bacteria  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45 degrees C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

Ooteghem Van, Suellen

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

150

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Next Generation Surfactants for Improved  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology Last Reviewed 12/15/2012 Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology Last Reviewed 12/15/2012 DE-FE0003537 Goal The principle objective of the project is to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focusing on reservoirs in Pennsylvanian age (Penn) sands. Performer Oklahoma University Enhanced Oil Recovery Design Center, Norman, OK Background Primary and secondary methods have produced approximately one-third of the 401 billion barrels of original-oil-in-place in the United States. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods have shown potential to recover a fraction of the remaining oil. Surfactant EOR has seen an increase in activity in recent years due to increased energy demand and higher oil prices. In

151

"1. Beluga","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",344 "2. George M Sullivan Generation Plant 2","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",220  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska" Alaska" "1. Beluga","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",344 "2. George M Sullivan Generation Plant 2","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",220 "3. North Pole","Petroleum","Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc",144 "4. Bradley Lake","Hydroelectric","Homer Electric Assn Inc",126 "5. Anchorage 1","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",88 "6. Snettisham","Hydroelectric","Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",78 "7. Bernice Lake","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",62 "8. Lemon Creek","Petroleum","Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",58

152

Applying Learning Curves to Modeling Future Coal and Gas Power Generation Technologies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Other potential improvements to the model include an expansion to cover competing energy technologies not included in the current model such as nuclear, wind, and solar. ... Given the dominance of power plant emissions of greenhouse gases, and the growing worldwide interest in CO2 capture and storage (CCS) as a potential climate change mitigation option, the expected future cost of power plants with CO2 capture is of significant interest. ... Bergek, A.; Tell, F.; Berggren, C.; Watson, J.Technological Capabilities and Late Shakeouts: Industrial Dynamics in the Advanced Gas Turbine Industry, 1987–2002 Industrial and Corporate Change 2008, 17 ( 2) 335– 392 ...

Chris Ordowich; John Chase; Daniel Steele; Ripudaman Malhotra; Michiaki Harada; Keiji Makino

2011-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

153

Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Proposal for Qualification of Gas-Generating Radioactive Payloads for Transportation within a Type B Package  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Characterization data describing radioactive materials (RAM) in storage are likely those associated with the processes that produced the materials or with the mission for which they were produced. Along with impurity data, often absent or unknown as a result of post-processing storage environment is moisture content. Radiolysis of moisture may lead to a hydrogen flammability hazard within a closed volume such as a storage can or a transportation package. This paper offers a practical means of qualifying payloads of unknown moisture content for shipment within Type B packaging, while supporting the DOE program to maintain radworker dose as low as reasonable achievable (ALARA). Specifically, the paper discusses part of a qualification program carried out at the Savannah River Site for onsite shipment of legacy RAM within the DDF-1 package. The DDF-1 is an onsite-only prototype of the currently certified 9975 package. Measurement of storage-can lid bulge can provide an upper bound for pressure within a storage can. Subsequent belljar testing can measure the rate of gas leakage from a storage can. These actions are shown sufficient to ensure that the performance of the 9975 containment vessels can accommodate the deflagration energy from flammable gas mixtures within Normal Conditions of Transport, and, and the consequences of a detonation shock wave within Hypothetical Accident Conditions.

Houghtaling, T.K.

2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

155

Coupled multiphase flow and closure analysis of repository response to waste-generated gas at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A long-term assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository performance must consider the impact of gas generation resulting from the corrosion and microbial degradation of the emplaced waste. A multiphase fluid flow code, TOUGH2/EOS8, was adapted to model the processes of gas generation, disposal room creep closure, and multiphase (brine and gas) fluid flow, as well as the coupling between the three processes. System response to gas generation was simulated with a single, isolated disposal room surrounded by homogeneous halite containing two anhydrite interbeds, one above and one below the room. The interbeds were assumed to have flow connections to the room through high-permeability, excavation-induced fractures. System behavior was evaluated by tracking four performance measures: (1) peak room pressure; (2) maximum brine volume in the room; (3) total mass of gas expelled from the room; and (4) the maximum gas migration distance in an interbed. Baseline simulations used current best estimates of system parameters, selected through an evaluation of available data, to predict system response to gas generation under best-estimate conditions. Sensitivity simulations quantified the effects of parameter uncertainty by evaluating the change in the performance measures in response to parameter variations. In the sensitivity simulations, a single parameter value was varied to its minimum and maximum values, representative of the extreme expected values, with all other parameters held at best-estimate values. Sensitivity simulations identified the following parameters as important to gas expulsion and migration away from a disposal room: interbed porosity; interbed permeability; gas-generation potential; halite permeability; and interbed threshold pressure. Simulations also showed that the inclusion of interbed fracturing and a disturbed rock zone had a significant impact on system performance.

Freeze, G.A.; Larson, K.W. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Davies, P.B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Danish Energy Authority Poland -Electricity and gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Danish Energy Authority Poland - Electricity and gas market development study and practical guidelines for using EU Funds Electricity sector analyses December 2004 #12;Danish Energy Authority Poland - Electricity and gas market development study and practical guidelines for using EU Funds Electricity sector

157

A policy study examining the use of imported LNG for gas-fired power generation on the southeast coast of China  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since China's energy demand is growing quickly, speeding up the development of natural gas is an important substitute and supplement for coal and oil. The development of the natural gas market in many developing countries has demonstrated that the success of the whole project hinges upon the success of gas-fired power generation. However, under the current energy pricing system in China, the advantages of gas-fired power plants, such as low investment costs and high efficiency, have not been able to offset the low price of coal. The gas-fired power plants, both at downstream of the Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) industry and upstream of the power sector, are faced with a dilemma. In order to solve the problems facing gas-fired power projects while providing policy guidance for the future development of gas-fired power projects, the policy of gas-fired power generation using imported LNG on the southeastern coast of China was examined. This study aims to identify the position of the national energy strategy that China should import some LNG from the other countries, to guide the development of energy policy in this region, and to formulate some clear policy measures.

Yajun Li; Fangfang Bai

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

159

New high-nitrogen energetic materials for gas generators in space ordnance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-nitrogen nitroheterocyclic energetic compounds are used as explosives, propellants, and gas generants when safe, thermally stable, cool-burning energetic materials are desired. A series of compounds are compared for sensitivity properties and calculated burn performance. Thermodynamic equilibrium calculations by NASA/Lewis rocket propellant and Blake gun propellant codes gave flame temperatures, average molecular weight, and identity of the equilibrium burn products for ambient, rocket, and gun pressure environments. These compounds were subjected to calculations both as monopropellants and as 50/50 weight ratio mixtures with ammonium nitrate (AN). Special attention was paid to calculated toxic products such as carbon monoxide and hydrogen cyanide, and how these were affected by the addition of an oxidizer AN. Several compounds were noted for further calculations of a formulation ad experimental evaluation.

Campbell, M.S.; Lee, Kien-Yin; Hiskey, M.A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Hydro Generation Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hydro Generation Ltd Place: Devon, United Kingdom Zip: EX16 9EU Sector: Hydro, Services Product: Micro hydropower company. Provides technical services such as feasibility studies,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EU competition law on electricity sector liberalisation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper aims to study how competition law helps facilitate the process of EU electricity liberalisation and study the use of competition law on the liberalised EU energy market. This paper provides an overview of competition law regarding to purposes of EU competition law and articles 101, 102 and 106 of EC Treaty on the Functioning of the European Union. The paper explores the role of competition law on EU electricity market liberalisation and focuses on the three main directive packages that transform EU electricity market towards competition. It further explores competition law enforcement that facilitates the structural change in EU electricity sector and discusses how the EU Competition Commission utilise the competition law to decrease market barriers in EU electricity sector. Finally the paper focuses on possible issues for competition law on EU electricity sector, especially on merger and acquisition cases. The last part provides conclusion of the paper.

Pornchai Wisuttisak

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle to grave" and facilitate more consistent comparisons of energy technologies. Figure 1. Generalized life cycle stages for energy technologies Source: Sathaye et al. (2011) Life cycle GHG emissions from renewable electricity generation technologies are generally less than those from fossil fuel-based technologies, based on evidence assembled by this project. Further, the proportion of GHG emissions from each life cycle stage differs by technology. For fossil-fueled technologies, fuel combustion during operation of the facility emits the vast majority of GHGs. For nuclear and renewable energy technologies, the majority of GHG emissions occur upstream of operation. LCA of Energy Systems

163

Gas-phase generations and rearrangement of silathiones, R sub 2 Si=S  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three routes are explored for the generation of silathiones: (1) the retroene elimination of propene from allythiodimethylsilane and 1-allythio-1-hydrido-1,2,2,2-tetramethylsilane; (2) the reaction of silylene, Me{sub 2}Di, with carbon disulfide which is thought to form a transient 3-membered ring with CS{sub 2} and the elimination of carbon disulfide to produce diethylsilathione; and (3) the beta-elimination of bis(trimethylsilythio)dimethylsilane. All these methods are explored in some detail. A second example of a silathione-silylene isomerization was observed in the pyrolysis of 1,1-bis(trimethylsilythio)-1,2,2,2-tetramethyldisilane. 89 refs., 5 figs., 10 tab. (BM)

Kim, Chong Bok.

1991-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

164

90-MW single-shaft power generating steam-gas unit based on the GTÉ-65 gas turbine and K-30-60 steam turbine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is an examination of a variant of the monoblock PGU-90 steam-gas unit developed at the “Leningradskii Metallicheskii Zavod” (LMZ) branch of “Silovye mashiny” based on a GTÉ-65 gas turbine unit and a K-30-...

A. S. Lebedev; O. V. Antonyuk; V. A. Mart’yanov…

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Published scientific literature contains many studies estimating life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of residential and utility-scale solar photovoltaics (PVs). Despite the volume of published work, variability in results hinders generalized conclusions. Most variance between studies can be attributed to differences in methods and assumptions. To clarify the published results for use in decision making and other analyses, we conduct a meta-analysis of existing studies, harmonizing key performance characteristics to produce more comparable and consistently derived results. Screening 397 life cycle assessments (LCAs) relevant to PVs yielded 13 studies on crystalline silicon (c-Si) that met minimum standards of quality, transparency, and relevance. Prior to harmonization, the median of 42 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from those 13 LCAs was 57 grams carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with an interquartile range (IQR) of 44 to 73. After harmonizing key performance characteristics, irradiation of 1,700 kilowatt-hours per square meter per year (kWh/m{sup 2}/yr); system lifetime of 30 years; module efficiency of 13.2% or 14.0%, depending on module type; and a performance ratio of 0.75 or 0.80, depending on installation, the median estimate decreased to 45 and the IQR tightened to 39 to 49. The median estimate and variability were reduced compared to published estimates mainly because of higher average assumptions for irradiation and system lifetime. For the sample of studies evaluated, harmonization effectively reduced variability, providing a clearer synopsis of the life cycle GHG emissions from c-Si PVs. The literature used in this harmonization neither covers all possible c-Si installations nor represents the distribution of deployed or manufactured c-Si PVs.

Hsu, D. D.; O'Donoughue, P.; Fthenakis, V.; Heath, G. A.; Kim, H. C.; Sawyer, P.; Choi, J. K.; Turney, D. E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Impact of Siloxane Impurities on the Performance of an Engine Operating on Renewable Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Impact of Siloxane Impurities on the Performance of an Engine Operating on Renewable Natural Gas ... Biogas from sludge biodegradation in wastewater treatment plants (WWTP) and landfill gas (LFG) generated from the decomposition of solid waste in landfills are both promising renewable fuels, as they contain a large fraction of methane, 40–70% by volume, the rest being CO2, together with smaller amounts of other gases like O2, N2, and Ar. ... In these studies two Honda EU2000i gasoline electric generators were utilized. ...

Nitin Nair; Xianwei Zhang; Jorge Gutierrez; Jack Chen; Fokion Egolfopoulos; Theodore Tsotsis

2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

167

Synthesis Gas Generation by Chemical-Looping Reforming of Biomass with Natural Copper Ore as Oxygen Carrier  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical-looping reforming (CLR) of biomass is a ... However, at the cost of synthesis gas combustion for heat, the gas lower heating value...

Lei Guo; Haibo Zhao; Chuguang Zheng

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Hyperfine Structure of EuI  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

14 December 1965 research-article Hyperfine Structure of EuI Y. Bordarier B. R. Judd M. Klapisch A theoretical analysis is made of the hyperfine structure of the twelve levels of Eu I...

1965-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Energy and exergy analyses of an externally fired gas turbine (EFGT) cycle integrated with biomass gasifier for distributed power generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Biomass based decentralized power generation using externally fired gas turbine (EFGT) can be a technically feasible option. In this work, thermal performance and sizing of such plants have been analyzed at different cycle pressure ratio (rp = 2?8), turbine inlet temperature (TIT = 1050–1350 K) and the heat exchanger cold end temperature difference (CETD = 200–300 K). It is found that the thermal efficiency of the EFGT plant reaches a maximum at an optimum pressure ratio depending upon the TIT and heat exchanger CETD. For a particular pressure ratio, thermal efficiency increases either with the increase in TIT or with the decrease in heat exchanger CETD. The specific air flow, associated with the size of the plant equipment, decreases with the increase in pressure ratio. This decrease is rapid at the lower end of the pressure ratio (rp < 4) but levels-off at higher rp values. An increase in the TIT reduces the specific air flow, while a change in the heat exchanger CETD has no influence on it. Based on this comparison, the performance of a 100 kW EFGT plant has been analyzed for three sets of operating parameters and a trade-off in the operating condition is reached.

Amitava Datta; Ranjan Ganguly; Luna Sarkar

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2}: Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the mixed-valent europium(II,III) fluoride sulfide EuF{sub 2}.(EuFS){sub 2}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using the method to synthesize rare-earth metal(III) fluoride sulfides MFS (M=Y, La, Ce-Lu), in some cases we were able to obtain mixed-valent compounds such as Yb{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} instead. With Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} another isotypic representative has now been synthesized. Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} (tetragonal, I4/mmm, a=400.34(2), c=1928.17(9) pm, Z=2) is obtained from the reaction of metallic europium, elemental sulfur, and europium trifluoride in a molar ratio of 5:6:4 within seven days at 850 deg. C in silica-jacketed gas-tightly sealed platinum ampoules. The single-phase product consists of black plate-shaped single crystals with a square cross section, which can be obtained from a flux using equimolar amounts of NaCl as fluxing agent. The crystal structure is best described as an intergrowth structure, in which one layer of CaF{sub 2}-type EuF{sub 2} is followed by two layers of PbFCl-type EuFS when sheeted parallel to the (001) plane. Accordingly there are two chemically and crystallographically different europium cations present. One of them (Eu{sup 2+}) is coordinated by eight fluoride anions in a cubic fashion, the other one (Eu{sup 3+}) exhibits a monocapped square antiprismatic coordination sphere with four F{sup -} and five S{sup 2-} anions. Although the structural ordering of the different charged europium cations is plausible, a certain amount of charge delocalization with some polaron activity has to take place, which is suggested by the black color of the title compound. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements of Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} show Curie-Weiss behavior with an experimental magnetic moment of 8.19(5) mu{sub B} per formula unit and a paramagnetic Curie temperature of 0.3(2) K. No magnetic ordering is observed down to 4.2 K. In accordance with an ionic formula splitting like (Eu{sup II})(Eu{sup III}){sub 2}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} only one third of the europium centers in Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} carry permanent magnetic moments. {sup 151}Eu-Moessbauer spectroscopic experiments at 4.2 K show one signal at an isomer shift of -12.4(1) mm/s and a second one at 0.42(4) mm/s. These signals occur in a ratio of 1:2 and correspond to Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+}, respectively. The spectra at 78 and 298 K are similar, thus no change in the Eu{sup 2+}/Eu{sup 3+} fraction can be detected. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure and {sup 151}Eu-Moessbauer spectra of mixed-valent Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2}.

Grossholz, Hagen; Hartenbach, Ingo [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kotzyba, Gunter [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Poettgen, Rainer, E-mail: pottgen@uni-muenster.d [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Trill, Henning; Mosel, Bernd D. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Schleid, Thomas, E-mail: schleid@iac.uni-stuttgart.d [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

171

Bhutan-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bhutan-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Bhutan-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bhutan-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

172

Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

173

Vietnam-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Vietnam-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

174

Chile-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chile-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Chile-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Chile-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

175

Philippines-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Philippines-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Philippines-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

176

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) (Redirected from UNDP/EC-China-Climate Change Capacity Building Program) Jump to: navigation, search Name EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

177

Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment

178

Ecuador-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecuador-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Ecuador-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecuador-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

179

Egypt-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Egypt-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Egypt-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Egypt-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

180

Colombia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colombia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Colombia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Colombia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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181

Trinidad and Tobago-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trinidad and Tobago-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Trinidad and Tobago-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Trinidad and Tobago-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

182

Uganda-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uganda-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Uganda-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Uganda-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

183

Moldova-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Moldova-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Moldova-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Moldova-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

184

Thailand-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Thailand-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

185

Mexico-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Mexico-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

186

Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

187

Malaysia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Malaysia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Malaysia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Malaysia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

188

Zambia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zambia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Zambia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Zambia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

189

Morocco-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morocco-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Morocco-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Morocco-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

190

Kenya-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Kenya-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

191

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluating the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and preparing an R D plan to develop the concept further. The power generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. Goals have been specified that relate to the efficiency, emissions, costs, and general operation of the system. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800[degrees]F in furnaces fired with coal-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor to about 2400[degrees]F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuel gas is relatively clean, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need to be a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

A summary of volatile impurity measurements and gas generation studies on MISSTD-1, a high-purity plutonium oxide produced by low-temperature calcination of plutonium oxalate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Plutonium dioxide of high specific surface area was subjected to long-term tests of gas generation in sealed containers. The material preparation and the storage conditions were outside the bounds of acceptable parameters defined by DOE-STD-3013-2012 in that the material was stabilized to a lower temperature than required and had higher moisture content than allowed. The data provide useful information for better defining the bounding conditions for safe storage. Net increases in internal pressure and transient increases in H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} were observed, but were well within the bounds of gas compositions previously shown to not threaten integrity of 3013 containers.

Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Narlesky, Joshua E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veirs, Douglas K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

193

EU Energy Wind Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

energy Product: The company will be concentrating initially on bringing an innovative composite wind tower to market. References: EU Energy (Wind) Limited1 This article is a...

194

Pricing mechanisms for offshore wind electricity in EU member states  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of the study was to evaluate the pricing mechanisms for offshore wind electricity in those EU Member States (MS) possessing an important offshore wind resource and, on this basis, to determine the economic scenario faced by potential investors in the sector. The economic and energy policy framework of each MS was reviewed to establish the main factors determining the final price accorded to electricity generated from offshore wind, including feed-in tariffs, green certificates, subsidies, tax incentives and taking into consideration other factors such as costs and obligations related to grid connection and transmission. On the basis of the information collected, an economic analysis was conducted to compare offshore wind electricity prices across the EU, for a 20-year project duration, based on a year 2001 ''snapshot'' for a typical ''first generation'' offshore wind project. The policy review showed a variety of economic frameworks in existence across the EU, with some countries choosing fixed tariff schemes as the primary instrument and others using market-based systems such as green certificates. However, it was clear that several MS are moving away from the system based solely on fixed tariffs to incorporate more market-based schemes. The economic analysis showed that, on the basis of fixed tariffs and assuming uniform investment costs across EU waters, conditions are most favourable in Belgium (proposed legislation) and Germany. It is thought that, in future, market-oriented schemes and predictability tools will play an increasingly important role in determining the economic conditions faced by offshore wind electricity producers. It should be noted that the analyses presented in this paper are based on the economic and legislatory situations in existence at the time of writing, that is, December, 2001.

Geert Palmers; Suzanne Shaw

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Not locked-in? The overlooked impact of new gas-fired generation investment on long-term decarbonisation in the UK  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper contrasts the potential increase in gas-fired power generation in the UK in the period to 2020 with the ambitious decarbonisation goals set forth for this sector. An increase in Combined Cycle Gas Turbine (CCGT) capacity, in particular, only represents a threat to long-term decarbonisation if some ‘lock-in’ exists. It is against this background, and in the interest of challenging the perception of no significant lock-in to gas-fired generation, that this paper identifies investment lock-in as phenomenon of relevance to policy-makers. The paper determines both direct and indirect ways in which investment in significant new CCGT capacity could negatively impact on the likelihood of meeting decarbonisation goals through ‘locking-in’ the existing technological system. It also identifies that the technical lifetime, and not just the capital repayment period, of CCGT assets is relevant in understanding the strength of the lock-in. Finally, a regulatory structure that aligns with the long-term targets in place is identified as providing a clear signal for investors and asset owners that may reduce the risk of ‘investment lock-in’.

Simon Chignell; Robert J.K. Gross

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluate the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and prepare an R D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is leading a team ofcompanies involved in this effort. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800[degrees]F in furnaces fired with cool-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor up to about 2400[degrees]F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuelgas is a relatively clean fuel, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need tobe a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Quantifying the Air Pollution Exposure Consequences of Distributed Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Turbines Inc Olinda Generating Plant Marina Landfill GasSolar Turbines Inc Olinda Generating Plant Marina Landfill Gas

Heath, Garvin A.; Granvold, Patrick W.; Hoats, Abigail S.; Nazaroff, William W

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Generation and characterization of plasma channels in gas puff targets using soft X-ray radiography technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present our recent results of a formation and characterization of plasma channels in elongated krypton and xenon gas puff targets. The study of their formation and temporal expansion was carried out using a combination of a soft X-ray radiography (shadowgraphy) and pinhole camera imaging. Two high-energy short laser pulses were used to produce the channels. When a pumping laser pulse was shaped into a line focus, using cylindrical and spherical lenses, the channels were not produced because much smaller energy density was deposited in the gas puff target. However, when a point focus was obtained, using just a spherical lens, the plasma channels appeared. The channels were up to 9?mm in length, had a quite uniform density profile, and expanded in time with velocities of about 2?cm/?s.

Wachulak, P. W., E-mail: wachulak@gmail.com; Bartnik, A.; Jarocki, R.; Fok, T.; W?grzy?ski, ?.; Kostecki, J.; Szczurek, M.; Jabczy?ski, J.; Fiedorowicz, H. [Institute of Optoelectronics, Military University of Technology, ul. gen. S. Kaliskiego 2, 00-908 Warsaw (Poland)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Lebanon-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lebanon-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Lebanon-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

202

De-Carbonizing California and the EU  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

biofuel Yearly vehicle tax Bio fuel car subsidy EU specific200) subsidy when purchasing a bio fuel car Emission tradingincreasing electric use and bio-fuels . The total fuel use

Berck, Peter; Brannlund, Runar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Reduction of Eu{sup 3+} to Eu{sup 2+} in aluminoborosilicate glasses under ionizing radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3}-doped aluminoborosilicate glasses were prepared by melting in air at high temperature ({approx}1500 {sup o}C). It was shown by luminescence and Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) measurements that both Eu{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 2+} ions can exist simultaneously in the glass matrix studied after glass synthesis as well as after exposure to ionizing radiation. Increase of total Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration leads to the increase of Eu{sup 3+} luminescence intensity while the luminescence intensity of Eu{sup 2+} ions tends to decrease. In contrast the EPR indicates that the amount of Eu{sup 2+} ions in the glass increases with total Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration. The difference in the results of the two spectroscopies is explained in terms of energy transfer from Eu{sup 2+} to Eu{sup 3+} leading to an Eu{sup 2+} luminescence quenching. Irradiation results in the increase of reduced Eu{sup 2+} quantity detected by EPR measurements. It was shown that Eu{sup 2+} ions are located in both high (g {approx} 4.6) and low symmetry ('U' spectrum) sites in the structure of aluminoborosilicate glasses. The increase of Eu{sup 2+} content by the increase of the irradiation dose manifests the strong reduction process Eu{sup 3+} {yields} Eu{sup 2+}.

Malchukova, E., E-mail: genia@poly.polytechnique.fr [Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, UMR 7642 CEA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Boizot, B. [Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, UMR 7642 CEA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)] [Laboratoire des Solides Irradies, UMR 7642 CEA-CNRS-Ecole Polytechnique, 91128 Palaiseau Cedex (France)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

204

The economic impact of the upcoming EU emissions trading system on airlines and EU Member States—an empirical estimation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In February 2009, the European Union’s (EU) Directive for the inclusion of aviation into the EU Emissions Trading Scheme (EU-ETS) for CO2-emissions came into force. From 2012 onwards, the EU-ETS will cover virtua...

Martin Schaefer; Janina Scheelhaase; Wolfgang Grimme…

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Performance analysis of combined humidified gas turbine power generation and multi-effect thermal vapor compression desalination systems: Part 2: The evaporative gas turbine based system and some discussions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This is Part 2 of the paper “Performance analysis of combined humidified gas turbine power generation and multi-effect thermal vapor compression desalination systems — Part 1: The desalination unit and its combination with a steam-injected gas turbine power system”. A combined power and water system based on the evaporative gas turbine (EvGT) is studied, and major features such as the fuel saving, power-to-water ratio, energy and exergy utilization, and approaches to performance improvement, are presented and discussed in comparison with STIG- and EvGT- based systems, to further reveal the characteristics of these two types of combined systems. Some of the main results of the paper are: the fuel consumption of water production in STIG-based combined system is, based on reference-cycle method, about 45% of a water-only unit, and that in an EvGT-based system, it is 31–54%; compared with the individual power-only and water-only units, the fuel savings of the two combined systems are 12%–28% and 10%–21%, respectively; a water production gain of more than 15% can be obtained by using a direct-contact gas-saline water heat exchanger to recover the stack heat; and the combined system are more flexible in its power-to-water ratio than currently used dual-purpose systems. Further studies on aspects such as operation, hardware cost, control complexity, and environmental impact, are needed to determine which configuration is more favorable in practice.

Yongqing Wang; Noam Lior

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Promoting electricity from renewable energy sources -- lessons learned from the EU, U.S. and Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sustainable growth of the renewable energy industry. Thegrowth of QF capacity, which included renewables, was astounding, aided by California’s diverse and abundant renewable energyrenewable generation, the EU has assumed this role since 2002, mostly due to a rapid growth of wind energy.

Haas, Reinhard

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Redox cycle stability of mixed oxides used for hydrogen generation in the cyclic water gas shift process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} modified with CaO, SiO{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was studied in cyclic water gas shift reactor. • For the first time stability of such oxides were tested for 100 redox cycles. • Optimally added oxides significantly improved the activity and the stability of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. • Increased stability was attributed to the impediment of neck formation. - Abstract: Repeated cycles of the reduction of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} with reductive gas, e.g. hydrogen and subsequent oxidation of the reduced iron material with water vapor can be harnessed as a process for the production of pure hydrogen. The redox behavior of iron oxide modified with various amounts of SiO{sub 2}, CaO and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} was investigated in the present study. The total amount of the additional metal oxides was always below 15 wt%. The samples were prepared by co-precipitation using urea hydrolysis method. The influence of various metal oxides on the hydrogen production capacity and the material stability was studied in detail in terms of temperature-programmed reduction (TPR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and BET analysis. Furthermore, the activity and the stability of the samples were tested in repeated reduction with diluted H{sub 2} and re-oxidation cycles with H{sub 2}O. The results indicate that combination of several oxides as promoter increases the stability of the iron oxide material by mitigating the sintering process. The positive influence of the oxides in stabilizing the iron oxide material is attributed to the impediment of neck formation responsible for sintering.

Datta, Pradyot, E-mail: pradyot.datta@gmail.com

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

208

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Trough and Tower Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, this analysis focuses on reducing variability and clarifying the central tendency of published estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emissions estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough (trough) technology and 17 for power tower (tower) technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published estimates for troughs and towers were 83 and 20 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO2-eq/kWh),1 respectively; median estimates were 26 and 38 g CO2-eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. The IQR and median were reduced by 87% and 17%, respectively, for troughs. For towers, the IQR and median decreased by 33% and 38%, respectively. Next, five trough LCAs reporting detailed life cycle inventories were identified. The variability and central tendency of their estimates are reduced by 91% and 81%, respectively, after light harmonization. By harmonizing these five estimates to consistent values for global warming intensities of materials and expanding system boundaries to consistently include electricity and auxiliary natural gas combustion, variability is reduced by an additional 32% while central tendency increases by 8%. These harmonized values provide useful starting points for policy makers in evaluating life cycle GHG emissions from CSP projects without the requirement to conduct a full LCA for each new project.

Burkhardt, J. J.; Heath, G.; Cohen, E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Hetero-epitaxial EuO interfaces studied by analytic electron microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With nearly complete spin polarization, the ferromagnetic semiconductor europium monoxide could enable next-generation spintronic devices by providing efficient ohmic spin injection into silicon. Spin injection is greatly affected by the quality of the interface between the injector and silicon. Here, we use atomic-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy in conjunction with electron energy loss spectroscopy to directly image and chemically characterize a series of EuO|Si and EuO|YAlO{sub 3} interfaces fabricated using different growth conditions. We identify the presence of europium silicides and regions of disorder at the EuO|Si interfaces, imperfections that could significantly reduce spin injection efficiencies via spin-flip scattering.

Mundy, Julia A. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Hodash, Daniel; Melville, Alexander; Held, Rainer [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Mairoser, Thomas; Schmehl, Andreas [Zentrum für Elektronische Korrelationen und Magnetismus, Universität Augsburg, Universitätsstraße 1, D-86159 Augsburg (Germany); Muller, David A.; Kourkoutis, Lena F. [School of Applied and Engineering Physics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Schlom, Darrell G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States)

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

210

Convergence of Regional Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) Prices : A review of regional LNG import prices using Engle Granger’s Cointegration approach.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis investigates the bivariate long term stochastic relationship between the import Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) prices in Japan, USA and EU. The bivariate testing… (more)

Eliston, Anton Jayanand

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Using Backup Generators: Choosing the Right Backup Generator...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

generator's fuel source-Backup generators are typically powered by either diesel fuel or natural gas, and both have associated advantages and disadvantages. Speak with your...

212

Japan, EU reach basic agreement over ITER The Yomiuri Shimbun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Japan, EU reach basic agreement over ITER The Yomiuri Shimbun The government and the European Union to the unsuccessful candidate country. Japan and France, the EU's candidate, have been bidding to host the facility bidder's country. The ITER project participants--Japan, China, the EU, Russia, South Korea and the United

213

EU Verbraucherrechte Apple One-Year Limited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EU Verbraucherrechte Apple One-Year Limited Warranty AppleCare Protection Plan CC Service Pack, Kabel. Zusätzlich bei allen Macs: 1x Time Capsule oder 1x Airport Gerät sowie 1x Apple Display Macs u sowie 1x Apple Display Material- u. Herstellungsfehler. Keine Leistung für Verschlei�teile wie Akku

Fiebig, Peter

214

Sea trials for Eurodyn gas turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Eurodyn gas turbine concept is a collaboration between Ulstein Turbine, Turbomeca and Volvo Aero. It is also supported by the European Community under its high-technology Eureka program (EU 159). A full-size Eurodyn prototype has been running on a test bed in France since October 1992. A complete engine, including a power output gear-box, began parallel test bed trials in Norway in March 1993. Results to date indicate that these test engines have achieved efficiencies of 32.8%. The corresponding output is recorded as being 2.6 MW (ISO) with NO{sub x} emissions stated as being as low as 24 ppm (15% O{sub 2}) running on marine diesel fuel. The Eurodyn gas turbine is designed to provide some 9000 hours of operation between overhauls, effectively giving a typical fast ferry application something like three years of operation. The TBO for power generation applications is 20000 hours, which also means about three years of operation. Of particular significance in this gas turbine package is the incorporation of a dedicated output gearbox. For marine applications the gearbox developed by Ulstein Propeller is a compact and light two-stage epicyclic unit reducing the power turbine output speed of 13000 r/min down to 1000 r/min. 3 figs.

Kunberger, K.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal corrosion rates in water alone and in simulated sludge were near or slightly below the metal-in-water rate while nitrate-free sludge/Aquaset II decreased rates by about a factor of 3. Addition of 1 M nitrate to simulated sludge decreased the corrosion rate by a factor of ~5 while 1 M nitrate in sludge/Aquaset II mixtures decreased the corrosion rate by ~2.5 compared with the nitrate-free analogues. Mixtures of simulated sludge with Aquaset II treated with 1 M nitrate had uranium corrosion rates about a factor of 8 to 10 lower than the water-only rate law. Nitrate was found to provide substantial hydrogen mitigation for immobilized simulant sludge waste forms containing Aquaset II or Aquaset II G clay. Hydrogen attenuation factors of 1000 or greater were determined at 60°C for sludge-clay mixtures at 1 M nitrate. Hydrogen mitigation for tests with PC and Aquaset II H (which contains PC) were inconclusive because of suspected failure to overcome induction times and fully enter into anoxic corrosion. Lessening of hydrogen attenuation at ~80°C and ~95°C for simulated sludge and Aquaset II was observed with attenuation factors around 100 to 200 at 1 M nitrate. Valuable additional information has been obtained on the ability of nitrate to attenuate hydrogen gas generation from solution, simulant K Basin sludge, and simulant sludge with immobilization agents. Details on characteristics of the associated reactions were also obtained. The present testing confirms prior work which indicates that nitrate is an effective agent to attenuate hydrogen from uranium metal corrosion in water and simulated K Basin sludge to show that it is also effective in potential candidate solidified K Basin waste forms for WIPP disposal. The hydrogen mitigation afforded by nitrate appears to be sufficient to meet the hydrogen generation limits for shipping various sludge waste streams based on uranium metal concentrations and assumed waste form loadings.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Gas/Electric Partnership  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The electric and gas industries are each in the process of restructuring and "converging" toward one mission: providing energy. Use of natural gas in generating electric power and use of electricity in transporting natural gas will increase...

Schmeal, W. R.; Royall, D.; Wrenn, K. F. Jr.

217

AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund Jump to: navigation, search Name AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund Place New York, New York Zip 10170 Product AirShares is a commodity pool for exchange-traded futures contracts for EUAs. References AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=AirShares_EU_Carbon_Allowances_Fund&oldid=341942" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

218

Statkraft is Europe's largest generator of renewable energy and is the leading power company in Norway. The company owns, produces and develops hydropower, wind power, gas-fired power and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Norway. The company owns, produces and develops hydropower, wind power, gas-fired power and districtStatkraft is Europe's largest generator of renewable energy and is the leading power company countries. For our office in DĂĽsseldorf we are currently looking to hire a System Manager Renewable Energy

Morik, Katharina

219

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(LECBP) (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment

220

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cost of Natural Gas Generation, p Figure 6. Normalised NetCost of Natural Gas Generation, p Figure 7. Wait InvestCost of Natural Gas Generation (US$/kWh e ), C Figure 8.

Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Quarterly progress report No. 4, October--December 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluating the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and preparing an R&D plan to develop the concept further. The power generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. Goals have been specified that relate to the efficiency, emissions, costs, and general operation of the system. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800{degrees}F in furnaces fired with coal-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor to about 2400{degrees}F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuel gas is relatively clean, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need to be a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only.

Not Available

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Improved solid aerosol generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates. 2 figs.

Prescott, D.S.; Schober, R.K.; Beller, J.

1988-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

223

Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Electric Power Generation from Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells The primary objective of this...

224

The UK's negotiation of its EU budget rebate.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis is an investigation of Britain’s negotiations of its EU budget rebate. It attempts to answer the main question of why Britain decided to… (more)

Lee, Chung Hee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Microsoft Word - EU-US Smart Grid assessment - final report ...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Smart Homes etc.) and provides reliable and sustainable electricity services (demand response, VPP, dispatching, integration of RES etc.). Policy drivers EU The overarching...

226

Rusland-Ukraine-EU Trianglen - strategier og konflikter.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Projektet sřger at belyse hvilke strategier og interesser der ligger bag Rusland og EU's udenrigspolitiske tilgang til Ukraine samt hvordan disse konflikter med hinanden. Dette… (more)

Abild, Kasper

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

CMI hosts EU, Japan discuss global critical materials strategy...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

CMI hosts EU, Japan discuss global critical materials strategy Insider Finding ways to ensure the planet's supply of rare earths and other materials necessary for clean energy...

228

Oil and Gas Research| GE Global Research  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oil & Gas We're balancing the increasing demand for finite resources with technology that ensures access to energy for generations to come. Home > Innovation > Oil & Gas Innovation...

229

Microsoft Word - Global Natural Gas Markets_White Paper_FINAL...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

they are still seeking to reduce reliance on natural gas through increases in renewable energy. Brunei is one such 105 January 23, 2014. "EU targets 40% reduction in GHG...

230

EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Program Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP/EC Climate Change Capacity Building Program Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment Website http://www.lowemissiondevelopm

231

What (Economic) Constitution Does the EU Need ? Janvier 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

What (Economic) Constitution Does the EU Need ? N° 2007-04 Janvier 2007 Eloi Laurent OFCE-FNSP eloi2014 #12;2 What (Economic) Constitution Does the EU Need? * �loi Laurent (OFCE/FNSP)1 Jacques Le in this debate by identifying what is essentially wrong with the economic provisions of the EUT, which we

Boyer, Edmond

232

Japan rejects EU ITER deal 02 February 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

News Japan rejects EU ITER deal 02 February 2005 An offer from the EU for Japan to drop its bid preferential issuance of orders to Japanese companies. Japan had previously proposed to issue about $Y57 authority to issue orders to Japanese firms and a distinct difference between the two proposals. Japan

233

Gasification of Mixed Plastic Wastes in a Moving-Grate Gasifier and Application of the Producer Gas to a Power Generation Engine  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Due to the flame-assisted tar reforming with oxy-combustion of natural gas, the hydrogen content was significantly increased, resulting in an increase in the syngas caloric value and a decrease in the gas cleaning load downstream. ... An auxiliary burner was installed in front of each stage for preheating the inside of the gasifier. ... Such waste products include discarded tires, plastic, glass, steel, burnt foundry sand, and coal combustion byproducts (CCBs). ...

Jeung Woo Lee; Tae U Yu; Jae Wook Lee; Ji Hong Moon; Hyo Jae Jeong; Sang Shin Park; Won Yang; Uen Do Lee

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

234

Electric power generation using a phosphoric acid cell on a municipal solid waste landfill gas stream. Technology verification report, November 1997--July 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report gives results of tests to verify the performance of a landfill gas pretreatment unit (GPU) and a phosphoric acid fuel cell system. The complete system removes contaminants from landfill gas and produces electricity for on-site use or connection to an electric grid. Performance data were collected at two sites determined to be representative of the U.S. landfill market. The Penrose facility, in Los Angeles, CA, was the first test site. The landfill gas at this site represented waste gas recovery from four nearby landfills, consisting primarily of industrial waste material. It produced approximately 3000 scf of gas/minute, and had a higher heating value of 446 Btu/scf at about 44% methane concentration. The second test site, in Groton, CT, was a relatively small landfill, but with greater heat content gas (methane levels were about 57% and the average heating value was 585 Btu/scf). The verification test addressed contaminant removal efficiency, flare destruction efficiency, and the operational capability of the cleanup system, and the power production capability of the fuel cell system.

Masemore, S.; Piccot, S.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

ITER: Japan to assign 20 percent of construction work to EU firms; Proposal for EU official to assume chief executive  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ITER: Japan to assign 20 percent of construction work to EU firms; Proposal for EU official to assume chief executive position MAINICHI (Top Play) (Lead para.) December 7, 2004 Japan and the European Experimental Reactor (ITER). Japan yesterday revealed the details of a proposal to host the project. Tokyo has

236

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Quarterly progress report No. 7, July--September 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluating the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and preparing an R&D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation (FWDC) is leading a team of companies involved in this effort. The power generating system being developed in this project will be an improvement over current coal-fired systems. Goals have been specified that relate to the efficiency, emissions, costs, and general operation of the system. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800{degrees}F in furnaces fired with coal-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor to about 2400{degrees}F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuel gas is relatively clean, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need to be a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown in Figure 1.

Not Available

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Natural Gas Supply in Denmark -A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and power generators of which most are natural gas fired, leads to the natural assumption that the future the consumption of natural gas for heat and power generation is emphasized. General results and threeNatural Gas Supply in Denmark - A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the Liberalized Gas Market

238

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Freshwater Consumption of Marcellus Shale Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Freshwater Consumption of Marcellus Shale Gas ... We present results of a life cycle assessment (LCA) of Marcellus shale gas used for power generation. ... The analysis employs the most extensive data set of any LCA of shale gas to date, encompassing data from actual gas production and power generation operations. ...

Ian J. Laurenzi; Gilbert R. Jersey

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

239

Hydrogen Generator Appliance | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Hydrogen Generator Appliance Hydrogen Generator Appliance Presentation by Gus Block, Nuvera Fuel Cells, at the Natural Gas and Hydrogen Infrastructure Opportunities Workshop held...

240

Integrating Gasifiers and Reciprocating Engine Generators to...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

generation from waste biomass while reducing diesel fuel consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Introduction Internal combustion reciprocating engine generators (gensets)...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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241

Russian energy in the EU market: Bolstered institutionsand their effects  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The article examines institutional changes in EU–Russian energy relations since 2000. The article explores the ability of transformed institutions to limit the politicisation of energy and to reconcile the EU competitive-market approach with Russian state capitalism. More specifically, the article focuses on changes in intergovernmental, transgovernmental and transnational interactions. The article demonstrates that the gradual strengthening of transgovernmental and transnational institutions has inhibited the politicisation of energy relations and facilitated regulative cooperation between the EU and Russia. However, the potential of shared institutions is constrained by internal institutions on both sides. In Russia, these obstacles are insufficient top-down delegation of responsibilities in the government and its great power aspirations. In the EU, key barriers include inter-institutional rivalries, the EU’s propensity to impose its legislation on external partners and the integration of energy policy with foreign policy. The article presents several policy implications. First, it is futile to institutionally impose the regulative paradigm of one partner on the other; rather, mutual dialogue is needed. Thus, institutions should be structured appropriately. Second, current depoliticisation will require the involvement of not only the EU and Russia but also transit countries, such as Ukraine. Third, transgovernmental and transnational cooperation should be nurtured because this is a useful channel for both information exchange and a regulative convergence of policy implementing mechanisms. Finally, this incremental regulative convergence is the only option available today for the EU and Russia; this is also a way to further depoliticise energy relations.

Tatiana Romanova

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Quarterly progress report No. 3, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluate the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and prepare an R & D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is leading a team ofcompanies involved in this effort. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800{degrees}F in furnaces fired with cool-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor up to about 2400{degrees}F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuelgas is a relatively clean fuel, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need tobe a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Shockling, Larry A. (Plum Borough, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Evaluation of stack criteria pollutant gas absorption in the new generation thermoelectric water condenser fitted with laminar impinger type heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 authorized the Environmental Protection Agency to establish an Acid Rain Program to reduce the adverse effects of acidic deposition. The Act specifically stipulated that CEMS (continuous emissions monitoring systems) be used to measure the stack emissions under this program. Along with these rules, comes the task of the Stack Tester (Reference Method) to routinely perform RATA (Relative Accuracy Test Audit) tests on the installed CEMS. This paper presents a laboratory and field test sequence to evaluate the signal attenuation through the gas sample conditioning, water condensation removal process, using laminar flow impinger heat exchangers. This method is compared to the EPA CFR 40, Part 60, Appendix A, Method 6, glass impinger train, commonly used by RATA stack testers. CFR 40, Part 75 revisions as of the CAAA 1990, requires more stringent certification and CEMS performance standards. These standards are summarized and related to gas absorption in both the thermoelectric cooler heat exchanger and the Method 6 glass impinger train system. As an incentive to reduce the frequency of RATA tests required per year, emitters are encouraged to achieve relative accuracies of 7.5% or less compared to the reference method. This incentive requires better reference method test apparatus definition. This paper will explore these alternatives and provide test data for comparison to the currently available apparatus. Also discussed is the theory of Electronic Gas Sample Coolers and their practical application to the removal of water from stack gas.

Baldwin, T. [Baldwin Environmental, Inc., Reno, NV (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

245

Fact #844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

4: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has Declined while Generation from Natural Gas has Grown Fact 844: October 27, 2014 Electricity Generated from Coal has...

246

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

option on natural gas generation, which increases in valueL ABORATORY Distributed Generation Investment by a MicrogridORMMES’06 Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

A multi-level simulation platform of natural gas internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell–gas turbine hybrid generation system – Part II. Balancing units model library and system simulation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Following our integrated hierarchical modeling framework of natural gas internal reforming solid oxide fuel cell (IRSOFC), this paper firstly introduces the model libraries of main balancing units, including some state-of-the-art achievements and our specific work. Based on gPROMS programming code, flexible configuration and modular design are fully realized by specifying graphically all unit models in each level. Via comparison with the steady-state experimental data of Siemens–Westinghouse demonstration system, the in-house multi-level SOFC–gas turbine (GT) simulation platform is validated to be more accurate than the advanced power system analysis tool (APSAT). Moreover, some units of the demonstration system are designed reversely for analysis of a typically part-load transient process. The framework of distributed and dynamic modeling in most of units is significant for the development of control strategies in the future.

Cheng Bao; Ningsheng Cai; Eric Croiset

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Forschung und EU-Hochschulbro, Technologietransfer Februar 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Safety and Radiation Protection ­ neuer Aufruf 9 2.9. Allgemeines zum 7. Forschungsrahmenprogramm 9 2: Reliably Secure Software Systems ­ RS3 (SPP 1496) 21 9. Ingenieurwissenschaften 21 9.1.1. EU: Intelligente

Nejdl, Wolfgang

249

The gas surge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...S. SHALE GAS PRODUCTION SINCE 2007 40...TOTAL U.S. PRODUCTION 47—PERCENT INCREASE IN U.S. ELECTRICITY GENERATED USING...dusty gas drilling site in southwestern Kansas to try an experiment...40% of U.S. production, up from less...

David Malakoff

2014-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

250

The impact of subsidies and carbon pricing on the wood biomass use for energy in the EU  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This study examines how subsidies for wood-fired heat and power plants and wood with coal co-fired power plants influence the use of wood biomass for energy in the short (2020) to medium (2030) term in the EU (European Union). Analysis shows that without subsidies wood-fired electricity will take only a marginal market share due to limited availability of low-cost wood from logging residues. A high CO2 price of 100 €/t without subsidies results in 30 million m3 of industrial wood used for energy production, which is sourced from the reduction of 12 million m3 for wood products, 10 million m3 additional imports and 8 million m3 additional harvest. With a subsidy level of 30 €/MWh in the four EU member countries Denmark, Germany, Netherlands and UK, the total amount of industrial wood used for energy becomes 158 million m3. In the latter case, reduction of wood for wood-based products is 35 million m3, additional harvest in the EU is 21 million m3, and import to the EU is 102 million m3. Subsidies to wood-fired and especially coal with wood co-fired mills substantially increase the use of wood and especially industrial wood for energy. However, even with a high 100 €/tCO2 price and subsidy, mostly gas-fired electricity is projected to be displaced in 2030 by the increasing use of industrial wood, which is not beneficial regarding reducing the high CO2 emission from power production using coal. To a large extent, subsidies for wood co-firing maintain the coal power share, which will otherwise be reduced at high carbon emission price level. In addition, the model results show that the main sources of the growing use of industrial wood for energy are imports from regions outside of the EU, which thus creates considerable carbon leakages.

Alexander Moiseyev; Birger Solberg; A. Maarit I. Kallio

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Natural gas leak mapper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

252

The efficiency of using gas turbine technologies in developing small oil-and-gas-condensate deposits  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The paper considers the technical and economic features of using stream-gas and gas-turbine power generators in developing small oil-and-gas-condensate deposits in Irkutsk oblast under conditions of carrying o...

A. M. Karasevich; A. V. Fedyaev; G. G. Lachkov; O. N. Fedyaeva

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

EIS-0105: Conversion to Coal, Baltimore Gas & Electric Company, Brandon Shores Generating Station Units 1 and 2, Anne Arundel County, Maryland  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The U.S. Department of Energy’s Economic Regulatory Administration Office of Fuels Program, Coal and Electricity Division prepared this statement to assess the potential environmental and socioeconomic impacts associated with prohibiting the use of petroleum products as a primary energy source for Units 1 and 2 of the Brandon Shores Generating Station, located in Anne Arundel County, Maryland.

254

Assessing Options for Electricity Generation from Biomass on a Life Cycle Basis: Environmental and Economic Evaluation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Co-firing biomass with coal is being increasingly seen in the EU ... direct emissions of pollutants generated during combustion of coal, including carbon dioxide, sulphur dioxide and ... cycle approach to evaluat...

Harish Kumar Jeswani; Haruna Gujba; Adisa Azapagic

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

The Natural Gas Advantage  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental think-tank leaders and the new energy secretary are singing the praises of the ever-expanding U.S. natural gas bonanza, but at the same time, they worry about permanent dependence on this fossil fuel. ... This flood of shale-based natural gas finds has been great for U.S. chemical companies because it is a cheap feedstock and fuel source. ... Equally important, it is also revising the greenhouse gas-climate change equation because, when burned to generate electricity, natural gas produces the same electrical output as coal but emits half the amount of carbon dioxide. ...

JEFF JOHNSON

2013-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

256

Capital investment requirements for greenhouse gas emissions mitigation in power generation on near term to century time scales and global to regional spatial scales  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Our paper explores the implication of climate mitigation policy and electricity generation technology performance for capital investment demands by the electric power sector on near term to century time scales. We find that stabilizing GHG emissions will require additional investment in the electricity generation sector over and above investments that would be needed in the absence of climate policy, in the range of 15 to 29 trillion US$ (48–94%) depending on the stringency of climate policy during the period 2015 to 2095 under default technology assumptions. This increase reflects the higher capital intensity of power systems that control emissions as well as increased electrification of the global economy. Limits on the penetration of nuclear and carbon capture and storage technology could increase costs substantially. Energy efficiency improvements can reduce the investment requirement by 18 to 24 trillion US$ (compared to default technology climate policy assumptions), depending on climate policy scenario. We also highlight the implications of different technology evolution scenarios for different regions. Under default technology set, the heaviest investments across scenarios in power generation were observed in China, India, SE Asia and Africa regions with the latter three regions dominating in the second half of the 21st century.

Vaibhav Chaturvedi; Leon Clarke; James Edmonds; Katherine Calvin; Page Kyle

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Energy balance, forecasting of bioelectricity generation and greenhouse gas emission balance in the ethanol production at sugarcane mills in the state of Mato Grosso do Sul  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to present aspects about the energy balance of sugarcane crops and its carbon dioxide emissions. We calculate energy used in agricultural, industrial and distribution sectors by five sugarcane mills of Mato Grosso do Sul and we compare the yield with its energy delivery. The energy balance obtained, with an average 6.8, shows that is advantageous to produce ethanol in the lands of that Brazilian state. We have prepared a forecasting of electricity production from bagasse taking into account two types of technology. Finally, we present the potential value of CO2 emitted by the five mills to evaluate greenhouse gas emissions of the ethanol production valor chain.

Mirko V. Turdera

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

E-Print Network 3.0 - annual landfill gas Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

gas emissions and potential aqueous... Transfer Stations (MTS); Life Cycle Assessment (LCA); Landfill Gas (LFG): Geographic Wormation Systems (GIS... . Landfills generate gas...

259

Application of Spin-Wave Theory to EuS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Magnetization data for EuS powder in zero field and at liquid-helium temperatures has been obtained by nuclear magnetic resonance of both the Eu151 and Eu153 nuclei. These data are considered simultaneously with those for the specific heat of EuS powder obtained by McCollum and Callaway in order to provide a more definitive application of the spin-wave theory to this material. The theory is that given by Holstein and Primakoff and special attention is given to the effects of magnetic dipolar coupling on the spin-wave energy and moment. The calculation was carried out by summation over the exact Brillouin zone. Values of the nearest-neighbor exchange interaction J1 and second-neighbor exchange J2, as well as an effective field H which simultaneously produced reasonable agreement between calculation and experiment are J1=0.20±0.01°K, J2=-0.08?0.02°K and H=4.0±0.2 kOe. These values are fairly consistent with other parameters known for EuS.

S. H. Charap and E. L. Boyd

1964-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

260

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis of Natural Gas Extraction & Delivery in the United Statesy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

delivery to large end-users? 6. How does natural gas power generation compare to coal-fired powerLife Cycle Greenhouse Gas Analysis of Natural Gas Extraction & Delivery in the United Statesy of natural gas in the United States? 3. Who uses natural gas in the U.S.? 4 Wh d t l f ?4. Where does natural

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Grid4EU (Smart Grid Project) (Italy) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grid4EU (Smart Grid Project) (Italy) Grid4EU (Smart Grid Project) (Italy) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Grid4EU Country Italy Coordinates 41.910454°, 12.65625° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.910454,"lon":12.65625,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

262

Ferromagnetic and Paramagnetic Resonance in EuS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ferromagnetic and paramagnetic resonance has been observed in single crystals of EuS. A standard microwave spectrometer, operating near 22 Gc/sec, was used to measure the power absorption at 1.4 and 300°K. The resonance line width, 75 Oe at 1.4°K, was found to be approximately 1200 Oe at room temperature. An upper limit of 30 Oe has been established for the magnitude of the magnetocrystalline anisotropy field, in contrast to the value of - 190 Oe found for EuO. The paramagnetic line width is explained solely on the basis of spin-spin interactions. The anisotropy results are understood in terms of crystal-field perturbations of the magnetic Eu2+ ion.

S. von Molnar and A. W. Lawson

1965-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

263

Optimization Online - Consideration of Gas Supply Contracts with ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nov 18, 2008 ... ... natural gas (NG) providers, who supply gas for electric energy generators. In order to achieve more regularity for NG providers cash flows, ...

Leonardo A. M. Moraes

2008-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

264

Optically induced magnetic polarons in EuTe  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Direct measurements of the photoinduced magnetization in EuTe, using a two color pump-and-probe technique, are presented. The photoinduced effect was pumped using photons of above-the-bandgap energy, and detected by the Faraday rotation of a probe beam of energy below-the-bandgap. The photoinduced Faraday rotation changes sign, as expected from our model for the optically induced magnetic polaron. The EuTe spin-flop transition at low fields is also detected as a sharp step in the photoinduced Faraday rotation, and its observation provides additional supports for the photoinduced polaron model.

Henriques, A. B.; Galgano, G. D. [Instituto de Física, Universidade de Săo Paulo, Caixa Postal 66318, 05315-970, Săo Paulo (Brazil); Abramof, E.; Rappl, P. H. O. [LAS - INPE, Av. Dos Astronautas, 1758, 12227-010, Săo José dos Campos (Brazil)

2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

265

Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

30 May 1974 research-article Natural Gas C. P. Coppack This paper reviews the world's existing natural gas reserves and future expectations, together with natural gas consumption in 1972, by main geographic...

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Energy transfer in Eu3+ doped scheelites: use as thermographic phosphor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper the luminescence of the scheelite-based CaGd2(1-x)Eu2x(WO4)4 solid solutions is investigated as a function of the Eu content...

Meert, Katrien W; Morozov, Vladimir A; Abakumov, Artem M; Hadermann, Joke; Poelman, Dirk; Smet, Philippe F

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Reforming the EU: The Future of European Law and Policy IV CONFERENCE PROGRAMME  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Reforming the EU: The Future of European Law and Policy IV CONFERENCE session "Reforming the EU" Chair: Dr Luca Rubini, Deputy Director Institute Rubini Reforming European competition law: should the European Commission have

Birmingham, University of

268

Mission Impossible !? On the Harmonization of National Allocation Plans under the EU Emissions Trading Directive  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Starting in 2005, the EU will implement a CO2 emissions trading scheme. We show that the outspoken objectives ... adjustments to the current prescriptions of the EU emissions trading system in order to achieve ha...

Christoph Böhringer; Andreas Lange

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

The EU ETS: CO2 prices drivers during the learning experience (2005-2007)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Union Allowances (EUAs), valid for compliance under the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS of the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) is to regulate CO2 emissions from the most energy

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

270

ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL MATERIALS FOR A CLEAN ENERGY FUTURE, SEPTEMBER 8-9, 2014 ANNUAL TRILATERAL U.S. - EU - JAPAN CONFERENCE ON CRITICAL...

271

Fuel option for gas turbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growth in electricity demand is an average of 10% per year. Energy, emission, and economy are importance of critical concerns for generating systems. Therefore, combined cycle power plant is preferred to Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) new power generating capacity. The various option of available fuel for gas turbine are natural gas, liquid fuel and coal fuel. Particularly with the tremendous price increases in imported and domestic fuel supplies, natural gas is an attractive low cost alternative for power generation. EGAT has researched using heavy fuel instead of natural gas since the year 1991. The problems of various corrosion characteristics have been found. In addition, fuel treatment for gas turbine are needed, and along with it, the environmental consideration are options that provide the limitation of environmental regulation.

Tantayakom, S. [Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand, Nonthaburi (Thailand). Chemical and Analysis Dept.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

The future role of renewable energy sources in European electricity supply : A model-based analysis for the EU-15.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Ambitious targets for the use of renewable electricity (RES-E) have been formulated by the EU Commission and the EU Member States. Taking into account technical,… (more)

Rosen, Johannes

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Transatlantic trade and investment partnership: sectoral and macroeconomic perspectives for Germany, the EU and the US  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The EU and the US have started negotiations on a Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership Agreement (TTIP)...

Paul J. J. Welfens; Tony Irawan

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Direct fired absorption machine flue gas recuperator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A recuperator which recovers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine. The recuperator includes a housing with liquid flowing therethrough, the liquid being in direct contact with the combustion gas for increasing the effectiveness of the heat transfer between the gas and the liquid.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Root, Richard A. (Spokane, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Gas Filled Detectors counting & tracking of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Filled Detectors counting & tracking of particles energy loss generation of electron-ion+ pairs #12;Gas Filled Detectors Primary and Total Ionization fast charged particles ionize the atoms of a gas fraction of resulting primary electrons have enough kinetic energy to ionize other atoms #12;Gas Filled

Peletier, Reynier

276

Luminescence properties of a blue-emitting phosphor: (Sr{sub 1?x}Eu{sub x})Si{sub 9}Al{sub 19}ON{sub 31} (0  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Blue-emitting Sr{sub 1?x}Eu{sub x}Si{sub 9}Al{sub 19}ON{sub 31} phosphors were synthesized at 1800 °C for 2 h under 1 MPa N{sub 2} by using the gas-pressure sintering method (GPS). The microstructure, photoluminescence (PL) properties of the prepared phosphors were investigated. Under the 290 nm excitation, broad PL emission bands with peak positions at 448–490 nm were detected. The concentration quenching was not observed owing to the large distance betweenEu{sup 2+} ions that made the nonradiative energy transfer between neighboring Eu{sup 2+} ions difficult. The blue phosphor generally showed a small thermal quenching at low Eu{sup 2+} concentrations. The absorption and external quantum efficiency of the synthesized Sr{sub 0.5}Eu{sub 0.5}Si{sub 9}Al{sub 19}ON{sub 31} were 85% and 62% upon the 365 nm excitation, respectively. The interesting PL results indicate that Sr{sub 1?x}Eu{sub x}Si{sub 9}Al{sub 19}ON{sub 31} has great potentials as a blue phosphor for white LEDs applications. - Graphical abstract: Sr{sub 0.7}Eu{sub 0.3}Si{sub 9}Al{sub 19}ON{sub 31} gives blue-emitting at 471 nm. Excitation spectrum is composed of five bands in the range of 250–450 nm, which are matching well with emission wavelength of UV LEDs. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Blue-emitting Sr{sub 1?x}Eu{sub x}Si{sub 9}Al{sub 19}ON{sub 31} phosphors were synthesized by gas-pressure sintering method. • The concentration quenching was not observed in this phosphor. • This blue phosphor generally showed a small thermal quenching at low Eu{sup 2+} concentrations. • The absorption and external quantum efficiency of the synthesized Sr{sub 0.5}Eu{sub 0.5}Si{sub 9}Al{sub 19}ON{sub 31} were 85% and 62% upon the 365 nm excitation.

Liu, Lihong [Structural and Functional Integration of Ceramics Group, The Division of Functional Materials and Nanodevices, Ningbo Institute of Materials Technology and Engineering, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Ningbo, Zhejiang 315201 (China); Xie, Rong-Jun, E-mail: XIE.Rong-Jun@nims.go.jp [Sialon Group, Sialon Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Hirosaki, Naoto; Dierre, Benjamin [Sialon Group, Sialon Unit, National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Sekiguchi, Takashi [Advanced Electronic Materials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, Namiki 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Revisiting the Long-Term Hedge Value of Wind Power in an Era of Low Natural Gas Prices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

terms. Unlike gas-fired generation, wind power can offerpower generation in 2005 to 42.2% in 2011, while natural gas-firedgases and other pollutants. The corresponding expansion of gas-fired generation in the power

Bolinger, Mark

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Application of IGCC Technology to Power Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Improved efficiency and low cost are two of the objectives in the development and commercialization of power generation cycles. With the advent of today’s commercial advanced gas turbines and high-temperature gas

R. E. Ayala

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Copyright reform on the EU level European Network for Copyright in support of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a copyright reform on the EU level? Rainer Kuhlen University of Konstanz, HumboldtUniversity Berlin, IPR;Copyright reform on the EU level Extension of IPR in time Extension of IPR to living objects and other objects in nature Extension of IPR to software (still controversial, at least in the EU) Introduction

Kuhlen, Rainer

280

EU BIOFUEL USE AND AGRICULTURAL COMMODITY PRICES: A REVIEW OF THE EVIDENCE BASE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EU BIOFUEL USE AND AGRICULTURAL COMMODITY PRICES: A REVIEW OF THE EVIDENCE BASE Report prepared: Kretschmer, B, Bowyer, C and Buckwell, A (2012) EU Biofuel Use and Agricultural Commodity Prices: A Review............................................................................................................. 8 2 EU POLICY DRIVING BIOFUELS DEMAND AND OUTLOOK FOR THIS DEMAND TO 2020. 9 2.1 What is the current

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Oxygen off-stoichiometry and phase separation in EuO thin films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on our study on the influence of the growth conditions on the europium/oxygen stoichiometry, morphology, magnetic properties, and electrical conductivity of EuO thin films. SQUID magnetometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were utilized as complementary techniques to determine the oxygen content of EuO{sub 1{+-}x} thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy with and without the employment of the so-called Eu distillation process. We found indications for phase separation to occur in Eu-rich as well as in over-oxidized EuO for films grown at substrate temperatures below the Eu distillation temperature. Only a fraction of the excess Eu contributes to the metal-insulator transition in Eu-rich films grown under these conditions. We also observed that the surfaces of these films were ill defined and may even contain more Eu excess than the film average. Only EuO films grown under distillation conditions are guaranteed to have the same magnetic and electrical properties as stoichiometric bulk EuO, and to have surfaces with the proper Eu/O stoichiometry and electronic structure.

Altendorf, S. G.; Efimenko, A.; Oliana, V. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, DE-50937 Koeln (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Noethnitzerstr. 40, DE-01187 Dresden (Germany); Kierspel, H. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, DE-50937 Koeln (Germany); Rata, A. D.; Tjeng, L. H. [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Noethnitzerstr. 40, DE-01187 Dresden (Germany)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

MERCOSUR-European Union Trade: How Important is EU Trade Liberalisation for MERCOSUR's  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MERCOSUR-European Union Trade: How Important is EU Trade Liberalisation for MERCOSUR's Exports: + 34 - 964 - 72 86 16 1 #12;MERCOSUR-European Union Trade: How Important is EU Trade Liberalisation's exports' growth potential in a liberalised EU market. A sectoral study is considered indispensable since

Krivobokova, Tatyana

283

Sorption of Eu(III) on Attapulgite Studied by Batch, XPS and EXAFS Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sorption of Eu(III) on Attapulgite Studied by Batch, XPS and EXAFS Techniques Q.H. FAN,, , X.L. TANH, ionic strength and temperature on sorption of Eu(III) on attapulgite were investigated in the presence and absence of fulvic acid (FA) and humic acid (HA). The results indicated that the sorption of Eu

Boyer, Edmond

284

EU STRATEGY AGAINST PROLIFERATION OF WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EU STRATEGY AGAINST PROLIFERATION OF WEAPONS OF MASS DESTRUCTION At Thessaloniki, the European Council adopted a Declaration on non-proliferation of Weapons of Mass Destruction. Member States made. The proliferation of weapons of mass destruction and their means of delivery such as ballistic missiles

Sussex, University of

285

Past and Future EU Water Policy from a German Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/271/EEC concerning urban waste-water treatment -> most expensive EEC-directive ever, but also veryPast and Future EU Water Policy from a German Perspective Dr. Fritz Holzwarth #12;Water Protection Community (EEC) with the focus on economic issues (reduction of trade barriers, free movement of goods

Wehrli, Bernhard

286

Investing in the EU Benelux as a Gateway  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

law - Starting points - The Intellectual Property types · Protection (registration) at the national Investing in the EU: Environmental aspects 3 1 · Introduction to Belgian regional environmental law International investment financing and Project finance 3 1 · Introduction: Origin, definition, why choose

Einmahl, Uwe

287

EU Enlargement and industrial relocation within the CEECs Matthieu Crozet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of economic activity in a country. The problematic lies in the context of the EU enlargement process and of its impact on the location of economic activity inside each of the accessing countries. We develop a new economic geography model based on the original Krugman (1991) model, and show that trade

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

288

EU in the Views of Asia-Pacific Elites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: a comparative study (www.europe.canterbury.ac.nz/ appp). Results of the first two stages of the project from the Atlantic Ocean to the Carpathian Mountains, the European Union (EU) is a new "giant political arena, a skilful international negotiator, a power with a `soft' touch, a model for international

Hickman, Mark

289

Beam-Gas  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gas Gas and Thermal Photon Scattering in the NLC Main Linac as a Source of Beam Halo P. Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0051 12-JAN-2001 Abstract Scattering of primary beam electrons off of residual gas molecules or blackbody radiation photons in the NLC main linac has been identified as a potential source of beam haloes which must be collimated in the beam delivery system. We consider the contributions from four scat- tering mechanisms: inelastic thermal-photon scattering, elastic beam-gas (Coulomb) scattering inelastic beam-gas (Bremsstrahlung) scattering, and atomic-electron scattering. In each case we develop the formalism necessary to estimate the backgrounds generated in the main linac, and determine the expected number of off-energy or large-amplitude particles from each process, assuming a main linac injection energy of 8 GeV and extraction energy of 500 GeV. 1 Introduction The

290

Power generation method including membrane separation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Coproduced from Oil andor Gas Wells Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal...

292

REQUEST BY WESTINGHOUSE POWER GENERATION, A FORMER DIVISION OF...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

position in the power generation field. It is the second largest commercial supplier of power generation gas turbines in the United States and the fourth single largest supplier...

293

Produce synthesis gas by steam reforming natural gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For production of synthesis gas from natural gas the steam reforming process is still the most economical. It generates synthesis gas for ammonia and methanol production as well as hydrogen, oxo gas and town gas. After desulfurization, the natural gas is mixed with steam and fed to the reforming furnace where decomposition of hydrocarbons takes place in the presence of a nickel-containing catalyst. Synthesis gas that must be free of CO and CO/sub 2/ is further treated in a CO shift conversion, a CO/sub 2/ scrubbing unit and a methanation unit. The discussion covers the following topics - reforming furnace; the outlet manifold system; secondary reformer; reformed gas cooling. Many design details of equipment used are given.

Marsch, H.D.; Herbort, H.J.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Diophantine Generation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diophantine Generation, Horizontal and Vertical Problems, and the Weak Vertical Method Alexandra Shlapentokh Diophantine Sets, Definitions and Generation Diophantine Sets Diophantine Generation Properties of Diophantine Generation Diophantine Family of Z Diophantine Family of a Polynomial Ring Going Down Horizontal

Shlapentokh, Alexandra

295

Safe Operation of Backup Power Generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E-395 04/06 Portable generators are useful when temporary or remote electric power is needed, but they can also be deadly. The primary hazards to avoid when us- ing a generator are carbon monoxide (CO) poison- ing from generator exhaust fumes..., electrocution and fire. Carbon monoxide danger Carbon monoxide is an odorless, colorless gas byproduct of incomplete combustion of fuels, such as natural gas, heating oil and diesel. This toxic gas interferes with the blood?s ability to carry oxygen...

Smith, David

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

296

EIA - Natural Gas Pipeline System - Northeast Region  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Northeast Region Northeast Region About U.S. Natural Gas Pipelines - Transporting Natural Gas based on data through 2007/2008 with selected updates Natural Gas Pipelines in the Northeast Region Overview | Domestic Gas | Canadian Imports | Regional Pipeline Companies & Links Overview Twenty interstate natural gas pipeline systems operate within the Northeast Region (Connecticut, Delaware, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Virginia, and West Virginia). These interstate pipelines deliver natural gas to several intrastate natural gas pipelines and at least 50 local distribution companies in the region. In addition, they also serve large industrial concerns and, increasingly, natural gas fired electric power generation facilities.

297

The Reform of Natural Gas Market in Turkey  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Another issue is the interdependence of natural gas and electricity markets. About 62% of gas was sold to power generators in the early 2000s. This amount is ... disruptions. In order to overcome this issue, generators

Izak Atiyas; Tamer Çetin; Gürcan Gülen

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Single YVO4:Eu nanoparticle emission spectra using direct Eu3+ ion excitation with a sum-frequency 465-nm solid-state laser  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report emission spectrum measurements on single YxEu1-xVO4 nanoparticles. The inhomogeneous widths of the emission peaks are identical for single...

Nguyęn, Thanh-Lięm; Castaing, Marc; Gacoin, Thierry; Boilot, Jean-Pierre; Balembois, François; Georges, Patrick; Alexandrou, Antigoni

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

How regulators should use natural gas price forecasts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas prices are critical to a range of regulatory decisions covering both electric and gas utilities. Natural gas prices are often a crucial variable in electric generation capacity planning and in the benefit-cost relationship for energy-efficiency programs. High natural gas prices can make coal generation the most economical new source, while low prices can make natural gas generation the most economical. (author)

Costello, Ken

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

300

Adapting On-Site Electrical Generation Platforms for Producer...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

generation from waste biomass while reducing diesel fuel consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. electricalgenerationplatformsfactsheet.pdf More Documents & Publications...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

History of Gas Lasers, Part 1 - Continuous Wave Gas Lasers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this first of a two-part series, Jeff Hecht relives the excitement that accompanied the development of the first gas lasers to generate continuous-wave beams.

Hecht, Jeff

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Development of Gas Turbine Combustors for Low BTU Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Large-capacity combined cycles with high-temperature gas turbines burning petroleum fuel or LNG have already ... the other hand, as the power generation technology utilizing coal burning the coal gasification com...

I. Fukue; S. Mandai; M. Inada

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Metal valence states in Eu0.7NbO3, EuNbO3, and Eu2Nb5O9 by TB-LMTO-ASA band-structure calculations and resonant photoemission spectroscopy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic structures of Eu2Nb5O9, EuNbO3, and Eu0.7NbO3 have been investigated by photoemission and total-yield spectroscopy with synchrotron radiation, and in the case of Eu2Nb5O9 by tight-binding linear muffin-tin orbital (LMTO) band-structure calculations. A central question for reduced europium niobates is that of the valence of Eu and Nb. Both europium and niobium atoms can appear in different valence states so that various electronic configurations in the title compounds are possible. For this reason, the valence band was studied by the resonant Eu 4d?4f technique to determine the Eu valence. The final-state 4f6 multiplet of divalent Eu is dominant in all spectra. Since there are no 4f density of states at the Fermi level, valence fluctuations are not expected. The niobium valence states were investigated by core-level spectroscopy. We found only one 3d5/23d3/2 doublet for the Nb 3d core level in EuNbO3 and Eu0.7NbO3, while in Eu2Nb5O9, two 3d doublets have been observed, corresponding to two chemically distinct niobium atoms in this compound. The 3d5/2 peak in EuNbO3 is assigned to the +4 nominal valence state at a binding energy of 209.7 eV. The doublet of Eu0.7NbO3 is observed at 0.5 eV higher binding energy (at 210.2 eV), which then corresponds to a nominal Nb+4+? chemical state. In Eu2Nb5O9, the valence of Nb in the NbO6 octahedra is less than +5 and in the Nb6O12 clusters is close to +2 as expected. This is in accordance with the LMTO band-structure calculations.

C. Felser; J. Köhler; A. Simon; O. Jepsen; G. Svensson; S. Cramm; W. Eberhardt

1998-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

304

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",25548,15 "..Electric Utilities",16661,18 "..IPP & CHP",8887,13 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",103407706,15...

305

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",15404,29 "..Electric Utilities",12691,21 "..IPP & CHP",2713,33 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",54584295,28...

306

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",10,51 "Electric Utilities",, "IPP & CHP",10,51 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",71787,51 "Electric...

307

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",4491,43 "..Electric Utilities",19,49 "..IPP & CHP",4472,22 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",14428596,44...

308

Gas turbine noise control  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The use of gas turbine powered generators and pumping stations are likely to increase over the next two decades. Alternative fuel systems utilizing fluidized coal beds are likely in the near future and direct combustion of pulverized coal is also a possibility. The primary problem of generally unacceptable noise levels from gas turbine powered equipment affects both community noise and hearing conservation alike. The noise criteria of such plant remain a significant design factor. The paper looks at the technical and historical aspects associated with the noise generation process and examines past present and possible future approaches to the problem of silencing gas turbine units; adequately specifying the acoustical criteria and ratings; evaluates the techniques by which these criteria should be measured; and correlates these with the typical results achieved in the field.

Louis A. Challis and Associates Pty. Ltd.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Extensive regularization of the coupled cluster methods based on the generating functional formalism: application to gas-phase benchmarks and to the S(N)2 reaction of CHCl3 and OH- in water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recently introduced energy expansion based on the use of generating functional (GF) [K. Kowalski, P.D. Fan, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 084112 (2009)] provides a way of constructing size-consistent non-iterative coupled-cluster (CC) corrections in terms of moments of the CC equations. To take advantage of this expansion in a strongly interacting regime, the regularization of the cluster amplitudes is required in order to counteract the effect of excessive growth of the norm of the CC wavefunction. Although proven to be effcient, the previously discussed form of the regularization does not lead to rigorously size-consistent corrections. In this paper we address the issue of size-consistent regularization of the GF expansion by redefning the equations for the cluster amplitudes. The performance and basic features of proposed methodology is illustrated on several gas-phase benchmark systems. Moreover, the regularized GF approaches are combined with QM/MM module and applied to describe the SN2 reaction of CHCl3 and OH- in aqueous solution.

Kowalski, Karol; Valiev, Marat

2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

310

Gas concentration cells for utilizing energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method are disclosed for utilizing energy, in which the apparatus may be used for generating electricity or as a heat pump. When used as an electrical generator, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first gas concentration cell is heated and generates electricity. The second gas concentration cell repressurizes the gas which travels between the cells. The electrical energy which is generated by the first cell drives the second cell as well as an electrical load. When used as a heat pump, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first cell is supplied with electrical energy from a direct current source and releases heat. The second cell absorbs heat. The apparatus has no moving parts and thus approximates a heat engine. 4 figs.

Salomon, R.E.

1987-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

311

Gas concentration cells for utilizing energy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for utilizing energy, in which the apparatus may be used for generating electricity or as a heat pump. When used as an electrical generator, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first gas concentration cell is heated and generates electricity. The second gas concentration cell repressurizes the gas which travels between the cells. The electrical energy which is generated by the first cell drives the second cell as well as an electrical load. When used as a heat pump, two gas concentration cells are connected in a closed gas circuit. The first cell is supplied with electrical energy from a direct current source and releases heat. The second cell absorbs heat. The apparatus has no moving parts and thus approximates a heat engine.

Salomon, Robert E. (Philadelphia, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Eu-doped Y2O3 nanosheets and nanotubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A hydrothermal method was used to synthesize Eu-doped Y2O3 nanosheets and nanotubes. High Resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and synchrotron x-ray diffraction were used to characterize these nanomaterials. The nanosheets were obtained using a slightly lower pH value and they were partly crystalline and partly amorphous. Using a pH value of about 10, fully crystalline nanotubes were obtained. It is anticipated that nanosheets folded themselves to form stable nanotubes.

Sun, Hongtao [Texas Tech University, Lubbock; Chaudhari, Jharna [Texas Tech University, Lubbock; Kenik, Edward A [ORNL; Zhu, H [Texas Tech University, Lubbock; Ma, Y [Texas Tech University, Lubbock

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Radioactive contamination of SrI2(Eu) crystal scintillator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A strontium iodide crystal doped by europium (SrI2(Eu)) was produced by using the Stockbarger growth technique. The crystal was subjected to characterisation that included relative photoelectron output and energy resolution for gamma quanta. The intrinsic radioactivity of SrI2(Eu) crystal scintillator was tested both in scintillation mode and by using ultra-low background HPGe gamma spectrometry deep underground. The response of the SrI2(Eu) detector to alpha particles (alpha/beta ratio and pulse shape) was estimated by analysing the 226Ra trace contamination internal to the crystal. We have found alpha/beta=0.55 and no difference in scintillation decay for alpha particles and gamma quanta. The application of the obtained results in the search for the double electron capture and electron capture with positron emission in 84Sr has been investigated at a level of sensitivity T_1/2 \\sim 10^15-10^16 yr. The results of these studies demonstrate the potentiality of this material for a variety of scintillation appli...

Belli, P; Cerulli, R; Danevich, F A; Galenin, E; Gektin, A; Incicchitti, A; Isaienko, V; Kobychev, V V; Laubenstein, M; Nagorny, S S; Podviyanuk, R B; Tkachenko, S; Tretyak, V I

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Gas Turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... the time to separate out the essentials and the irrelevancies in a text-book. The gas ...gasturbine ...

H. CONSTANT

1950-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

315

GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

317

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

318

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

319

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

320

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

322

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

323

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

324

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

325

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

326

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

327

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

328

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

329

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

330

October 11, 2011 Wind Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

years. #12;Reading on ESRP 285 Website #12;The Competition: Gas-Fired Generation from a Combined CycleESRP 285 October 11, 2011 Wind Generation · Videos · Power Point Lecture #12;Wind Videos Wind (CC) Power Plant #12;Wind Investors Face These Costs #12;Fixed Costs #12;Variable Costs #12;Bottom

Ford, Andrew

331

Power Generation and the Environment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...such as hydro and gas tur- bines. It...these increases in power costs will be a...aspects of power generation: the exploration...residual fuels for power plants, as well...concepts of oil-fired power generation plants for the...

Rolf Eliassen

1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

1. Generation 1 1. Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Generation 1 _________________________________________________________________________ 1. Generation Sound and vibrations or, in more general terms, oscillations of matter (solids or fluids) are generated in many different dynamic processes. The basic mechanisms which underlie these oscillations

Berlin,Technische Universität

333

Combined-Cycle Power Generation — A Promising Alternative for the Generation of Electric Power from Coal  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The classic concept of generating electric power from a fossil energy source (coal, oil, gas) comprises the following essential process steps (Fig. 1): Combustion of coal and g...

Eberhard Nitschke

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Chapter 1 - Natural Gas Fundamentals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural gas is the most energy-efficient fossil fuel; it offers important energy-saving benefits when it is used instead of oil or coal. Although the primary use of natural gas is as a fuel, it is also a source of hydrocarbons for petrochemical feedstocks and a major source of elemental sulfur, an important industrial chemical. Its popularity as an energy source is expected to grow substantially in the future because natural gas can help achieve two important energy goals for the twenty-first century: providing the sustainable energy supplies and services needed for social and economic development and reducing adverse impacts on global climate and the environment in general. Natural gas consumption and trade have been growing steadily over the past two decades, and natural gas has strengthened its position in the world energy mix. Although natural gas demand declined in 2009, as a result of the economic slowdown, it is expected to resume growth in both emerging and traditional markets in the coming decades. Such increase in the near future will be driven because of additional demand in current uses, primarily power generation. There is yet little overlap between the use of natural gas and oil in all large markets. However, there are certain moves in the horizon, including the electrifying of transportation, that will push natural gas use to ever higher levels. This book gives the reader an introduction to natural gas by describing the origin and composition of natural gas, gas sources, phase behavior and properties, and transportation methods. Keywords: Absolute Open Flow, bulk modulus of elasticity, coal-bed methane, cricondenbar, cricondentherm, Expected Ultimate Recovery, gas deviation factor, higher heating value, Inflow Performance Relationship, kerogen, laminar flow, liquefied natural gas, primary thermogenic gas, pyrobitumen, secondary thermogenic gas, super-compressibility factor, thiol, Tubing Performance Curve, turbulent flow, unconventional gas resources, Wobbe Index, Wobbe Number.

Saeid Mokhatab; William A. Poe

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Landfill Gas | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas Landfill Gas Dataset Summary Description The UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) publishes annual renewable energy generation and capacity by region (9 regions in England, plus Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland). Data available 2003 to 2009. Data is included in the DECC Energy Trends: September 2010 Report (available: http://www.decc.gov.uk/assets/decc/Statistics/publications/trends/558-tr...) Source UK Department of Energy and Climate Change (DECC) Date Released September 30th, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords Energy Generation Hydro Landfill Gas Other Biofuels Renewable Energy Consumption Sewage Gas wind Data application/zip icon 2 Excel files, 1 for generation, 1 for capacity (zip, 24.9 KiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed

336

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created - the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of January1, 2007 through March 31, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: {lg_bullet} Drafting and distributing the 2007 RFP; {lg_bullet} Identifying and securing a meeting site for the GSTC 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; {lg_bullet} Scheduling and participating in two (2) project mentoring conference calls; {lg_bullet} Conducting elections for four Executive Council seats; {lg_bullet} Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC Final Project Reports; and {lg_bullet} Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

337

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is crucial in meeting the needs of these new markets. To address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance the operational flexibility and deliverability of the nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost-effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of April 1, 2007 through June 30, 2007. Key activities during this time period included: (1) Organizing and hosting the 2007 GSTC Spring Meeting; (2) Identifying the 2007 GSTC projects, issuing award or declination letters, and begin drafting subcontracts; (3) 2007 project mentoring teams identified; (4) New NETL Project Manager; (5) Preliminary planning for the 2007 GSTC Fall Meeting; (6) Collecting and compiling the 2005 GSTC project final reports; and (7) Outreach and communications.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2007-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

338

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty++++ Afzal Siddiqui  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty++++ Afzal Siddiqui University's decision to invest in a distributed generation (DG) unit fuelled by natural gas. While the long. KEYWORDS. OR in Energy; Distributed Generation; Real Options; Optimal Investment. 1. INTRODUCTION

Guillas, Serge

339

Privilegierte europäische Nachbarschaft mit der Ukraine als Instrument der externalisierten EU-Grenz- und Migrationspolitik.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Diese Arbeit untersucht die externalisierte EU-Grenz- und Migrationspolitik in der Ukraine. In diesem Rahmen wird in einem ersten Teil versucht einen Überblick über internationale Migration… (more)

Diedrich, Sabrina

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Influence of Eu doping on the microstructure and photoluminescence of CdS nanocrystals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The CdS:Eu nanocrystals with a strong white emission have been synthesized by solvothemal method using ethylene glycol as solvents. From X-ray diffraction (XRD) and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) analysis it was observed that the average diameter of the CdS:Eu nanocrystals is about 5 nm. The traces of groups adsorbed on CdS:Eu nanocrystals were confirmed via FT-IR spectra. UV–visible spectroscopy study was carried out to determine the band gap of the nanocrystals and the absorbance peaks showed blue shift with respect to the bulk CdS. From photoluminescence (PL) studies at ?ex = 398 nm, the PL emission intensity of CdS:Eu nanocrystals enhanced by doping Eu3+ ions. In addition, the synthesis parameters including the concentration of doped Eu3+ ions, the reaction time, and the reaction temperature have influence on the optical properties of CdS:Eu nanocrystals. The charge compensation agent is a decisive factor for PL emission intensity of CdS:Eu nanocrystals. Furthermore, the storage time and condition on the fluorescence of CdS:Eu nanocrystals were also investigated.

Kexin Zhang; Yaxin Yu; Shuqing Sun

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Economic and social rights within EU-Russia relations: a missed opportunity?.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??In recent years the EU’s strategy towards promoting human rights in Russia has been the focus of considerable internal and external attention, much of it… (more)

Bindman, Eleanor Frances

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Optical and structural stability of blue SrO:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical stability of 6-coodinated SrO is a fundamental problem when this is used for various applications. In this study, optical and chemical stabilities of 8-coordinated SrO:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor were investigated. SrO:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor was synthesized from thermal treatment of SrO:Eu powder located on a single crystalline MgO at 1500° C under reduction atmosphere. Obtained 8-coordinated SrO:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor exhibit strong blue luminescence and chemical stability in distilled water for 3 days. Our findings prove that obtained 8-coordinated SrO:Eu{sup 2+} possesses relative optical and chemical stabilities in water. - Graphical abstract: Obtained 8-coordinated SrO:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor exhibit strong blue luminescence in distilled water. Highlights: • We investigated optical and chemical stabilities of 8-coordinated SrO:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor in water. • Obtained 8-coordinated SrO:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor exhibit strong blue luminescence and chemical stability in distilled water for 3 days. • We found that the 8-coodrodinated SrO crystal structure changed to SrCO{sub 3} crystal structure after the 5 days immersion. • The obtained SrO:Eu{sup 2+} phosphor possesses high chemical stability under water, compared with commercial (6-coordinated) SrO.

Komatsu, Keiji, E-mail: Keiji_Komatsu@mst.nagaokaut.ac.jp [Department of Material Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Nakamura, Atsushi [Department of Material Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan); Chubu Chelest Co. Ltd., 3-3-3 Hinagahigashi, Yokkaichi, Mie 510-0886 (Japan); Ohshio, Shigeo; Toda, Ikumi; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Saitoh, Hidetoshi [Department of Material Science and Technology, Nagaoka University of Technology, 1603-1 Kamitomioka, Nagaoka, Niigata 940-2188 (Japan)

2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

E-Print Network 3.0 - augu eu degvielu Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

doluptat... num dolortinit dolor sum nullaoreet vel dolobore dolore eugue vullan vullan eui blan velessit eu Source: MacMillan, Andrew - Department of Biochemistry, University of...

344

Sorption of Eu(III) on Attapulgite Studied by Batch, XPS and EXAFS Techniques  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The effects of pH, ionic strength and temperature on sorption of Eu(III) on attapulgite were investigated in the presence and absence of fulvic acid (FA) and humic acid (HA). The results indicated that the sorption of Eu(III) on attapulgite was strongly dependent on pH and ionic strength, and independent of temperature. In the presence of FA/HA, Eu(III) sorption was enhanced at pH 7. The X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis suggested that the sorption of Eu(III) might be expressed as ?X3Eu0 ?SwOHEu3+ and ?SOEu-OOC-/HA in the ternary Eu/HA/attapulgite system. The extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) analysis of Eu-HA complexes indicated that the distances of d(Eu-O) decreased from 2.451 to 2.360 {\\AA} with increasing pH from 1.76 to 9.50, whereas the coordination number (N) decreased from ~9.94 to ~8.56. Different complexation species were also found for the different addition sequences of HA and Eu(III) to attapulgite suspension. The results are important to understand the influence of...

Fan, Q H; Li, J X; Wang, X K; Wu, W S; Montavon, Gilles

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Gas export from Russia to the E.U. and Ukraine and its pricing dynamics.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Russland ist mit seinen Gasexporten stark abhängig von den Umsätzen in den europäischen Märkten. Umgekehrt ist vor allem die Europäische Union abhängig von Gaslieferungen aus… (more)

Hochreiner, Bernhard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Enhancing landfill gas recovery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The landfilling of municipal solid waste (MSW) may cause potential environmental impacts like global warming (GW), soil contaminations, and groundwater pollution. The degradation of MSW in anaerobic circumstances generates methane emissions, and can hence contribute the GW. As the GW is nowadays considered as one of the most serious environmental threats, the mitigation of methane emissions should obviously be aimed at on every landfill site where methane generation occurs. In this study, the treatment and utilization options for the generated LFG at case landfills which are located next to each other are examined. The yearly GHG emission balances are estimated for three different gas management scenarios. The first scenario is the combined heat and power (CHP) production with a gas engine. The second scenario is the combination of heat generation for the asphalt production process in the summer and district heat production by a water boiler in the winter. The third scenario is the LFG upgrading to biomethane. The estimation results illustrate that the LFG collection efficiency affects strongly on the magnitudes of GHG emissions. According to the results, the CHP production gives the highest GHG emission savings and is hence recommended as a gas utilization option for case landfills. Furthermore, aspects related to the case landfills' extraction are discussed.

Antti Niskanen; Hanna Värri; Jouni Havukainen; Ville Uusitalo; Mika Horttanainen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Flammable gas project topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The flammable gas safety issue was recognized in 1990 with the declaration of an unreviewed safety question (USQ) by the U. S. Department of Energy as a result of the behavior of the Hanford Site high-level waste tank 241-SY-101. This tank exhibited episodic releases of flammable gas that on a couple of occasions exceeded the lower flammability limit of hydrogen in air. Over the past six years there has been a considerable amount of knowledge gained about the chemical and physical processes that govern the behavior of tank 241-SY-1 01 and other tanks associated with the flammable gas safety issue. This report was prepared to provide an overview of that knowledge and to provide a description of the key information still needed to resolve the issue. Items covered by this report include summaries of the understanding of gas generation, retention and release mechanisms, the composition and flammability behavior of the gas mixture, the amounts of stored gas, and estimated gas release fractions for spontaneous releases. `Me report also discusses methods being developed for evaluating the 177 tanks at the Hanford Site and the problems associated with these methods. Means for measuring the gases emitted from the waste are described along with laboratory experiments designed to gain more information regarding rates of generation, species of gases emitted and modes of gas storage and release. Finally, the process for closing the USQ is outlined as are the information requirements to understand and resolve the flammable gas issue.

Johnson, G.D.

1997-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

Economics of natural gas upgrading  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas could be an important alternative energy source in meeting some of the market demand presently met by liquid products from crude oil. This study was initiated to analyze three energy markets to determine if greater use could be made of natural gas or natural gas derived products and if those products could be provided on an economically competitive basis. The three markets targeted for possible increases in gas use were motor fuels, power generation, and the chemical feedstocks market. The economics of processes to convert natural gas to transportation fuels, chemical products, and power were analyzed. The economic analysis was accomplished by drawing on a variety of detailed economic studies, updating them and bringing the results to a common basis. The processes analyzed included production of methanol, MTBE, higher alcohols, gasoline, CNG, and LNG for the transportation market. Production and use of methanol and ammonia in the chemical feedstock market and use of natural gas for power generation were also assessed. Use of both high and low quality gas as a process feed stream was evaluated. The analysis also explored the impact of various gas price growth rates and process facility locations, including remote gas areas. In assessing the transportation fuels market the analysis examined production and use of both conventional and new alternative motor fuels.

Hackworth, J.H.; Koch, R.W.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Generation -IV Reactor Concepts  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Generation-IV Reactor Concepts Thomas H. Fanning Argonne National Laboratory 9700 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA The Generation-IV International Forum (GIF) is a multi-national research and development (R&D) collaboration. The GIF pursues the development of advanced, next generation reactor technology with goals to improve: a) sustainability (effective fuel utilization and minimization of waste) b) economics (competitiveness with respect to other energy sources) c) safety and reliability (e.g., no need for offsite emergency response), and d) proliferation resistance and physical protection The GIF Technology Roadmap exercise selected six generic systems for further study: the Gas- cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), the Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), the Molten Salt Reactor (MSR),

350

Distributed Generation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Untapped Value of Backup Generation Untapped Value of Backup Generation While new guidelines and regulations such as IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) 1547 have come a long way in addressing interconnection standards for distributed generation, utilities have largely overlooked the untapped potential of these resources. Under certain conditions, these units (primarily backup generators) represent a significant source of power that can deliver utility services at lower costs than traditional centralized solutions. These backup generators exist today in large numbers and provide utilities with another option to reduce peak load, relieve transmission congestion, and improve power reliability. Backup generation is widely deployed across the United States. Carnegie Mellon's Electricity

351

Siemens Power Generation, Inc.  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2005 Pittsburgh Coal Conference 2005 Pittsburgh Coal Conference Siemens Power Generation, Inc. Page 1 of 10 © Siemens Power Generation, Inc., All Rights Reserved Development of a Catalytic Combustor for Fuel Flexible Turbines W. R. Laster Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation Abstract Siemens has been working on a catalytic combustor for natural gas operation for several years using the Rich Catalytic Lean (RCL TM ) design. The design has been shown to produce low NOx emissions on natural gas operation. By operating the catalyst section fuel rich, the design shows considerable promise for robust operation over a wide range of fuel compositions including syngas. Under the sponsorship of the U. S. Department of Energy' s National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse is conducting a three year

352

AVESTAR® - Shale Gas Processing (SGP)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Shale Gas Processing (SGP) Shale Gas Processing (SGP) SPG The shale gas revolution is transforming America's energy landscape and economy. The shale gas boom, including the Marcellus play in Appalachia, is driving job creation and investment in the energy sector and is also helping to revive other struggling sectors of the economy like manufacturing. Continued growth in domestic shale gas processing requires that energy companies maximize the efficiency and profitability from their operations through excellent control and drive maximum business value from all their plant assets, all while reducing negative environmental impact and improving safety. Changing demographics and rapidly evolving plant automation and control technologies also necessitate training and empowering the next-generation of shale gas process engineering and

353

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel price forecast Coal prices follow AEO 2007 referencecoal- and natural gas-based electricity generation analyzed here include decreased natural gas prices,

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Strategies for Mitigating the Reduction in Economic Value of Variable Generation with Increasing Penetration Levels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Puga. The importance of combined cycle generating plants inthe assumption that new combined cycle gas turbines (CCGTs)Ancillary services Combined cycle gas turbine Concentrating

Mills, Andrew

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Preliminary Estimates of Combined Heat and Power Greenhouse Gas Abatement Potential for California in 2020  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

natural-gas- fired combined cycle generation, and the othernatural-gas-fired combined cycle plants. This assumptionplants were efficient combined cycle plants. The four

Firestone, Ryan; Ling, Frank; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

1 - Introduction to gas turbines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract: This chapter provides an overview of the importance of gas turbines for the power generation and oil and gas sector and – in less detail – the aviation sector. Worldwide trends in power generation and electricity conversion processes and the role of gas turbines to minimise CO2 emissions are addressed. Gas turbines are essential and crucial to reduce emissions both in aviation and in power production. Technologies for improving gas turbine and system efficiency, through higher turbine inlet temperatures, improved materials, cooling methods and thermal barrier coatings are described. New thermodynamic approaches, including intercooling, water and steam injection and hybrid cycles are addressed. Major issues are also fuel and operational flexibility, reliability and availability, cost reduction and power density, especially for the offshore sector. Market trends have been sketched. In the coming decades, gas turbines will be one of the major technologies for CO2 emission reductions in the power generation, aviation, oil and gas exploration and transport sectors. This prognosis is based on their high current efficiency and further efficiency improvement potential, both for simple cycle as for combined-cycle applications.

A.J.A. Mom

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

,366 ,366 95,493 1.08 0 0.00 1 0.03 29,406 0.56 1,206 0.04 20,328 0.64 146,434 0.73 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: South Carolina South Carolina 88. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ...........................................

358

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0,216 0,216 50,022 0.56 135 0.00 49 1.67 85,533 1.63 8,455 0.31 45,842 1.45 189,901 0.95 - Natural Gas 1996 Million Percent of Million Percent of Cu. Feet National Total Cu. Feet National Total Net Interstate Movements: Industrial: Marketed Production: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: M a r y l a n d Maryland 68. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Maryland, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 9 7 7 7 8 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 33 28 26 22 135 From Oil Wells ...........................................

359

Journal of Peasant Studies 37(4), 2010, forthcoming [version that was sent to the journal for production] Franco et al_EU biofuels_JPS_prodn-corr, 21/07/2010 Assumptions in the European Union biofuels policy:  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The biofuel project is an agro-industrial development and politically contested policy process where governments increasingly become global actors. European Union (EU) biofuels policy rests upon arguments about societal benefits of three main kinds – namely, environmental protection (especially greenhouse gas savings), energy security and rural development, especially in the global South. Each argument involves optimistic assumptions about what the putative benefits mean and how they can be fulfilled. After examining those assumptions, we

unknown authors

360

Chapter 10 - Coal and Coalbed Gas: Outlook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The future of coal and coalbed gas future is intertwined as source and reservoir rocks. Coal generates coalbed gas during coalification (e.g. thermogenic gas) and methanogenesis (biogenic gas). These gas types occur as singular and mixed accumulations. Accumulation of biogenic coalbed gas has received worldwide research and development interests on sustaining production. The new coal-to-biogenic coalbed gas technology centers on stimulating indigenous microbes in coal and associated groundwater with bioengineered nutrients and amendments to “farm” gas from abandoned wells and non-gas-producing coals. Coal mainly as a basic fuel for electric power generation since the Industrial Revolution continues to be utilized despite environmental concerns. The outlook of coal is dimmed in the United States where natural gas has replaced power generation. However, in Asia and Europe continued economic growth is going to be fueled by coal and coalbed gas as liquefied natural gas will rely on combustion from more efficient, high-temperature power plants in the future.

Romeo M. Flores

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Gas-driven microturbine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper describes an invention which relates to microtechnology and the fabrication process for developing microelectrical systems. It describes a means for fabricating a gas-driven microturbine capable of providing autonomous propulsion in which the rapidly moving gases are directed through a micromachined turbine to power devices by direct linkage or turbo-electric generators components in a domain ranging from tenths of micrometers to thousands of micrometers.

Sniegowski, J.J.; Rodgers, M.S.; McWhorter, P.J.; Aeschliman, D.P.; Miller, W.M.

1996-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

362

ASTRONOMY TO INSPIRE AND EDUCATE YOUNG CHILDREN EU-UNAWE Lorentz Center Workshop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ASTRONOMY TO INSPIRE AND EDUCATE YOUNG CHILDREN EU-UNAWE Lorentz Center Workshop Official Opening. Mitchell, MEP, Chair, EU Parliamentary Committee on Development Astronomy Research and Education in South Committee for Education, Culture and Science Video messages (5 min) Astronomy and Space collaborations

Galis, Frietson

363

Call for expression of interest EU-Brazil Technology and Innovation Forum  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Brazilian SMEs, Technological Parks and other innovation actors for cooperation with Europe (Tour of BrazilCall for expression of interest EU-Brazil Technology and Innovation Forum Participation to B2B targeting research and innovation actors. Among them, this year the EU-Brazil Technology and Innovation

364

An EIE/Altener project Co-funded by the EU Commission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Biogas for Electricity and Heat Production in EU countries. Economic and Environmental Benefits of Biogas is to assess the economic, environmental and energy aspects of the biogas production by centralised co-digestion in selected areas of six EU countries, which have been slow to implement biogas technology. The assessment

365

Re-dispersible Li+ and Eu3+ co-doped CdS nanoparticles: Luminescence studies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Re-dispersible CdS, 5 at.% Eu3+-doped CdS, 2 at.% Li+ and 5 at.% Eu3+ co-doped CdS nanoparticles in organic solvent are prepared by ... at a low temperature of 170°C. CdS nanoparticles have spherical shape with a...

N. S. Gajbhiye; Raghumani Singh Ningthoujam; Asar Ahmed; D. K. Panda…

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Political and Economic Integration in the EU: The Case of Failed Tax Harmonization*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Political and Economic Integration in the EU: The Case of Failed Tax Harmonization* FABIO. That there was only a limited transfer of tax authority to the EU exemplifies the failure of political and fiscal integration. Using a political economy framework, this article analyzes why the heads of state rejected tax

Wolfe, Patrick J.

367

STYRIAN ACADEMY for Sustainable Energies | http://styrianacademy.eu Graz University of Technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STYRIAN ACADEMY for Sustainable Energies | http://styrianacademy.eu Graz University of Technology sustainable energy systems. The STYRIAN ACADEMY taps into the know how of top-class scientists and entrepreneurs from the European Sustainable Energy Innovation Alliance (eseia) (www.eseia.eu). The 2011 STYRIAN

368

Sourcing seafood for the three major markets: The EU, Japan and the USA Wilf Swartz n  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sourcing seafood for the three major markets: The EU, Japan and the USA Wilf Swartz n , U. Rashid Accepted 27 June 2010 Keywords: Seafood consumption Global fisheries International trade Sustainability a b's major seafood markets (the EU, Japan and the USA) using a series of global maps indicating the likely

Pauly, Daniel

369

Complexation of Eu3+ with a macrocyclic lactam receptor: Experimental and theoretical study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

From extraction experiments and ?-activity measurements, the extraction constant corresponding to the equilibrium Eu3+(aq) + 3A?(aq) + 1 (nb) ? 1·Eu3+(nb) + 3A?(nb) taking place in the two-phase water–nitrobenzene system ( A - = CF 3 SO 3 - ; 1 = macrocyclic lactam receptor – see Scheme 1; aq = aqueous phase, nb = nitrobenzene phase) was evaluated as log Kex (1·Eu3+, 3A?) = ?4.1 ± 0.1. Further, the stability constant of the 1·Eu3+ cationic complex in nitrobenzene saturated with water was calculated for a temperature of 25 °C: log ?nb (1·Eu3+) = 9.0 ± 0.1. Finally, by using DFT calculations, the most probable structure of the cationic complex species 1·Eu3+ was derived. In the resulting 1·Eu3+ complex, the “central” cation Eu3+ is bound by five bond interactions to two ethereal oxygen atoms and two carbonyl oxygens, as well as to one carbon atom of the corresponding benzene ring of the parent macrocyclic lactam receptor 1 via cation–? interaction.

Emanuel Makrlík; Stanislav Záliš; Zde?ka Sedláková; Petr Va?ura

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Selective separation of Eu{sup 3+} using polymer-enhanced ultrafiltration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process to selectively remove {sup 241}Am from liquid radioactive waste was investigated as an actinide separation method applicable to Hanford and other waste sites. The experimental procedures involved removal of Eu, a nonradioactive surrogate for Am, from aqueous solutions at pH 5 using organic polymers in conjunction with ultrafiltration. Commercially available polyacrylic acid (60,000 MW) and Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s (PNL) synthesized E3 copolymer ({approximately}10,000 MW) were tested. Test solutions containing 10 {mu}g/mL of Eu were dosed vath each polymer at various concentrations in order to bind Eu (i.e., by complexation and/or cation exchange) for subsequent rejection by an ultrafiltration coupon. Test solutions were filtered with and without polymer to determine if enhanced Eu separation could be achieved from polymer treatment. Both polymers significantly increased Eu removal. Optimum concentrations were 20 {mu}g/mL of polyacrylic acid and 100 {mu}g/mL of E3 for 100% Eu rejection by the Amicon PM10 membrane at 55 psi. In addition to enhancement of removal, the polymers selectively bound Eu over Na, suggesting that selective separation of Eu was possible. This suggests that polymer-enhanced ultrafiltration is a potential process for separation of {sup 241}Am from Hanford tank waste, further investigation of binding agents and membranes effective under very alkaline and high ionic strength is warranted. This process also has potential applications for selective separation of toxic metals from industrial process streams.

Norton, M.V.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Cross Border Trading and Borrowing in the EU ETS A. Denny Ellerman* and Raphael Trotignon**  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

multi- national trading system, the European Union's CO2 Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) provides** This paper exploits a little used data resource within the central registry of the European Union's Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) to analyze cross border trading and inter-year borrowing during the first trading

372

-News Home Help EU to go it alone on nuclear project, if no deal with Japan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-News Home Help EU to go it alone on nuclear project, if no deal with Japan 1 hour, 30 minutes ago of a pioneering nuclear energy project in France if talks with Japan, which also wants to host the facility, fail by the EU commission, which is holding talks with the five other partners in the project -- China, Japan

373

Generation Planning (pbl/generation)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Generation Hydro Power Wind Power Monthly GSP BPA White Book Dry Year Tools Firstgov Generation Planning Thumbnail image of BPA White Book BPA White Book (1998 - 2011) Draft Dry...

374

Power Generation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Solar energy from a parabolic trough integrated in...16.25 shows the layout of this integrated solar combined cycle system. The heat from the ... in addition to the heat supplied from the gas turbine

Dwarkadas Kothari Prof.…

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Annex A -Potential threats in EU Organism(s) Means of spread Control measures Control approaches being used in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Annex A - Potential threats in EU Organism(s) Means of spread Control measures Control approaches options Potential threats in EU keep out, knowledge of trade routes, awareness on nurseries, foresters

376

,"Missouri Natural Gas Summary"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)","Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas (Million Cubic Feet)","Missouri Natural...

377

Fast Generators of Direct Photons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three fast generators of direct photons in the central rapidity region of high-energy heavy-ion collisions have been presented The generator of prompt photons is based on a tabulation of $p+p(\\bar p)$ data and binary scaling. Two generators of thermal direct photons, for hot hadron gas (HHG) and quark-gluon plasma (QGP) scenarios, assume the 1+1 Bjorken hydrodynamics. SPS and RHIC data can be fitted better by scenario with QGP. Predictions for the LHC energy have been made. The generators have been realized as macros for the ROOT analysis package.

S. M. Kiselev

2008-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

378

DRAFT DRAFT Electricity and Natural Gas Sector Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DRAFT DRAFT Electricity and Natural Gas Sector Description For Public Distribution AB 32 Scoping of electricity and natural gas; including electricity generation, combined heat and power, and electricity and natural gas end uses for residential and commercial purposes. Use of electricity and/or gas for industrial

379

Natural gas strategic plan and program crosscut plans  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The natural gas strategic plan recognizes the challenges and opportunities facing increased U.S. natural gas use. Focus areas of research include natural gas supply, delivery, and storage, power generation, industrial, residential and commercial, natural gas vehicles, and the environment. Historical aspects, mission, situation analysis, technology trends, strategic issues, performance indicators, technology program overviews, and forecasting in the above areas are described.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Changing Prospects for Natural Gas in the United States  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...doubling ofoil life to 4000 hours...application of gas-fired combined-cycle...gas-fueled combustion turbine combined with...generation from the gas turbine part ofa facility...38, 39) and life cycle cost advantages...Steam-injected gas turbines represent a...

W. M. BURNET; T S. D. BAN

1989-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Plant Integrated to Capture Plant ... A natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) power plant with capacity of about 430 MW integrated to a chemical solvent absorber/stripping capture plant is investigated. ... The natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) is an advanced power generation technology that improves the fuel efficiency of natural gas. ...

Mehdi Karimi; Magne Hillestad; Hallvard F. Svendsen

2012-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

382

The Role of Domestic Factors in the Formation of Trade Unions: A Look at Turkey/EU Relations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

studied Turkey and the European Union (EU). Turkey was officially admitted as a candidate country to the EU in 1997. Despite efforts to meet EU demands, Turkey’s admittance has been blocked. As recently as 2007 Turkey was denied membership, while...

Youngblood, Kristina Lynne

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

383

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

68,747 68,747 34,577 0.39 0 0.00 34 1.16 14,941 0.29 0 0.00 11,506 0.36 61,058 0.31 I d a h o Idaho 60. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Idaho, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented

384

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 0 0.00 0 0.00 0 0.00 540 0.01 0 0.00 2,132 0.07 2,672 0.01 H a w a i i Hawaii 59. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Hawaii, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared

385

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

483,052 483,052 136,722 1.54 6,006 0.03 88 3.00 16,293 0.31 283,557 10.38 41,810 1.32 478,471 2.39 F l o r i d a Florida 57. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Florida, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 47 50 98 92 96 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

386

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

291,898 291,898 113,995 1.29 0 0.00 4 0.14 88,078 1.68 3,491 0.13 54,571 1.73 260,140 1.30 I o w a Iowa 63. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Iowa, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation.......................... 0 0 0

387

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Vehicle Fuel: Vehicle Fuel: Deliveries to Consumers: Electric Residential: Utilities: Commercial: Total: New England New England 36. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New England, 1992-1996 Table 691,089 167,354 1.89 0 0.00 40 1.36 187,469 3.58 80,592 2.95 160,761 5.09 596,215 2.98 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................

388

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

29,693 29,693 0 0.00 0 0.00 6 0.20 17,290 0.33 0 0.00 16,347 0.52 33,644 0.17 District of Columbia District of Columbia 56. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas District of Columbia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

389

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

42,980 42,980 14,164 0.16 0 0.00 1 0.03 9,791 0.19 23,370 0.86 6,694 0.21 54,020 0.27 D e l a w a r e Delaware 55. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Delaware, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

390

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-49,536 -49,536 7,911 0.09 49,674 0.25 15 0.51 12,591 0.24 3 0.00 12,150 0.38 32,670 0.16 North Dakota North Dakota 82. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Dakota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 496 525 507 463 462 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 104 101 104 99 108 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 12,461 18,892 19,592 16,914 16,810 From Oil Wells ........................................... 47,518 46,059 43,640 39,760 38,906 Total.............................................................. 59,979 64,951 63,232 56,674 55,716 Repressuring ................................................

391

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

21,547 21,547 4,916 0.06 0 0.00 0 0.00 7,012 0.13 3 0.00 7,099 0.22 19,031 0.10 N e w H a m p s h i r e New Hampshire 77. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New Hampshire, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

392

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

139,881 139,881 26,979 0.30 463 0.00 115 3.92 27,709 0.53 19,248 0.70 28,987 0.92 103,037 0.52 A r i z o n a Arizona 50. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arizona, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 6 6 6 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 721 508 711 470 417 From Oil Wells ........................................... 72 110 48 88 47 Total.............................................................. 794 618 759 558 464 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease

393

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Middle Middle Atlantic Middle Atlantic 37. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Middle Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,857 1,981 2,042 1,679 1,928 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 36,906 36,857 26,180 37,159 38,000 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 161,372 152,717 140,444 128,677 152,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 162,196 153,327 140,982 129,400 153,134 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

394

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

386,690 386,690 102,471 1.16 0 0.00 43 1.47 142,319 2.72 5,301 0.19 98,537 3.12 348,671 1.74 M i n n e s o t a Minnesota 71. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Minnesota, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

395

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,108,583 1,108,583 322,275 3.63 298 0.00 32 1.09 538,749 10.28 25,863 0.95 218,054 6.90 1,104,972 5.52 I l l i n o i s Illinois 61. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Illinois, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 382 385 390 372 370 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 337 330 323 325 289 From Oil Wells ........................................... 10 10 10 10 9 Total.............................................................. 347 340 333 335 298 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ...............

396

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

286,485 286,485 71,533 0.81 25 0.00 31 1.06 137,225 2.62 5,223 0.19 72,802 2.31 286,814 1.43 M i s s o u r i Missouri 73. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Missouri, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... NA NA NA NA NA Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5 8 12 15 24 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 27 14 8 16 25 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 27 14 8 16 25 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

397

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

411,951 411,951 100,015 1.13 0 0.00 5 0.17 114,365 2.18 45,037 1.65 96,187 3.05 355,609 1.78 Massachusetts Massachusetts 69. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Massachusetts, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

398

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...in the suspending water, of concentration...MPa and balances the atmospheric pressure. Note that...versely, liquid water could not form by condensation inside the gas vesicle...presumably surrounded by water on all sides. At...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

226,798 226,798 104,124 1.17 0 0.00 0 0.00 58,812 1.12 2,381 0.09 40,467 1.28 205,783 1.03 North Carolina North Carolina 81. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas North Carolina, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ............... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation..........................

400

Efficiently generate steam from cogeneration plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As cogeneration gets more popular, some plants have two choices of equipment for generating steam. Plant engineers need to have a decision chart to split the duty efficiently between (oil-fired or gas-fired) steam generators (SGs) and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) using the exhaust from gas turbines. Underlying the dilemma is that the load-versus-efficiency characteristics of both types of equipment are different. When the limitations of each type of equipment and its capability are considered, analysis can come up with several selection possibilities. It is almost always more efficient to generate steam in an HRSG (designed for firing) as compared with conventional steam generators. However, other aspects, such as maintenance, availability of personnel, equipment limitations and operating costs, should also be considered before making a final decision. Loading each type of equipment differently also affects the overall efficiency or the fuel consumption. This article describes the performance aspects of representative steam generators and gas turbine HRSGs and suggests how plant engineers can generate steam efficiently. It also illustrates how to construct a decision chart for a typical installation. The equipment was picked arbitrarily to show the method. The natural gas fired steam generator has a maximum capacity of 100,000 lb/h, 400-psig saturated steam, and the gas-turbine-exhaust HRSG has the same capacity. It is designed for supplementary firing with natural gas.

Ganapathy, V. [ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and is scheduled for completion on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project includes the creation of the GSTC structure, development of constitution (by-laws) for the consortium, and development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with the second 3-months of the project and encompasses the period December 31, 2003, through March 31, 2003. During this 3-month, the dialogue of individuals representing the storage industry, universities and the Department of energy was continued and resulted in a constitution for the operation of the consortium and a draft of the initial Request for Proposals (RFP).

Robert W. Watson

2004-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

402

Gas Storage Technology Consortium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created-the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. This report addresses the activities for the quarterly period of July 1, 2006 to September 30, 2006. Key activities during this time period include: {lg_bullet} Subaward contracts for all 2006 GSTC projects completed; {lg_bullet} Implement a formal project mentoring process by a mentor team; {lg_bullet} Upcoming Technology Transfer meetings: {sm_bullet} Finalize agenda for the American Gas Association Fall Underground Storage Committee/GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting in San Francisco, CA. on October 4, 2006; {sm_bullet} Identify projects and finalize agenda for the Fall GSTC Technology Transfer Meeting, Pittsburgh, PA on November 8, 2006; {lg_bullet} Draft and compile an electronic newsletter, the GSTC Insider; and {lg_bullet} New members update.

Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

403

GAS STORAGE TECHNOLOGY CONSORTIUM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas storage is a critical element in the natural gas industry. Producers, transmission and distribution companies, marketers, and end users all benefit directly from the load balancing function of storage. The unbundling process has fundamentally changed the way storage is used and valued. As an unbundled service, the value of storage is being recovered at rates that reflect its value. Moreover, the marketplace has differentiated between various types of storage services, and has increasingly rewarded flexibility, safety, and reliability. The size of the natural gas market has increased and is projected to continue to increase towards 30 trillion cubic feet (TCF) over the next 10 to 15 years. Much of this increase is projected to come from electric generation, particularly peaking units. Gas storage, particularly the flexible services that are most suited to electric loads, is critical in meeting the needs of these new markets. In order to address the gas storage needs of the natural gas industry, an industry-driven consortium was created--the Gas Storage Technology Consortium (GSTC). The objective of the GSTC is to provide a means to accomplish industry-driven research and development designed to enhance operational flexibility and deliverability of the Nation's gas storage system, and provide a cost effective, safe, and reliable supply of natural gas to meet domestic demand. To accomplish this objective, the project is divided into three phases that are managed and directed by the GSTC Coordinator. Base funding for the consortium is provided by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, funding is anticipated from the Gas Technology Institute (GTI). The first phase, Phase 1A, was initiated on September 30, 2003, and was completed on March 31, 2004. Phase 1A of the project included the creation of the GSTC structure, development and refinement of a technical approach (work plan) for deliverability enhancement and reservoir management. This report deals with Phase 1B and encompasses the period April 1, 2004, through June 30, 2004. During this 3-month period, a Request for Proposals (RFP) was made. A total of 17 proposals were submitted to the GSTC. A proposal selection meeting was held June 9-10, 2004 in Morgantown, West Virginia. Of the 17 proposals, 6 were selected for funding.

Robert W. Watson

2004-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

EcoGrid EU (Smart Grid Project) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Smart Grid Project) (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name EcoGrid EU Country Denmark Headquarters Location Bornholm, Denmark Coordinates 55.160427°, 14.866884° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":55.160427,"lon":14.866884,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

405

EU in the struggle for global governance: geopolitical ethics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This article argues in favour of a coherent and active European Union foreign policy based on the idea of 'geopolitical ethics'. In the first part of the article, the situation of the international system since 1990 is outlined. It seems that after the financial crisis of 2008 the world has lost its global governor - the USA - and thus plunged into a non-polar structure. The second part of the article will present the concept of 'geopolitical ethics'. Namely, analogical to the personalistic 'ethics of responsibility', in which an individual is the primary focus, 'geopolitical ethics' considers the nation as the constituent unit in the international system. In the final section, two case studies, both involving the internal (policy making) and external (policy implementation) dimensions of the EU's grand strategy - 'geopolitical ethics', are presented.

Igor KovaÄŤ

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Russia's perceptions and misperceptions of the EU Eastern Partnership  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This article is devoted to the problem of the reaction to the Eastern Partnership by Russia's both the political establishment and the expert community. The question of reactions to the Eastern Partnership in the target countries has been extensively posed in academic literature. However, the question of Russia's reaction to the Eastern Partnership, one of the most important actors of the region, has been rarely raised by the academic community. A wide array of factors impacted Russian elites' perception of the Eastern Partnership – from problematic issues in the EU-Russia relations to the post-Soviet states' political and economic transformation. Studying the dynamics and peculiarities of Russia's perspective on the Eastern Partnership makes it possible to draw meaningful conclusions on the nature of Russia's phobias that fuel its domestic and foreign policy.

Igor Gretskiy; Evgeny Treshchenkov; Konstantin Golubev

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Short rise time intense electron beam generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A generator for producing an intense relativisitc electron beam having a subnanosecond current rise time includes a conventional generator of intense relativistic electrons feeding into a short electrically conductive drift tube including a cavity containing a working gas at a low enough pressure to prevent the input beam from significantly ionizing the working gas. Ionizing means such as a laser simultaneously ionize the entire volume of working gas in the cavity to generate an output beam having a rise time less than one nanosecond.

Olson, C.L.

1984-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

408

Chapter 4 - Natural Gas–fired Gas Turbines and Combined Cycle Power Plants  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Gas turbines can burn a range of liquid and gaseous fuels but most burn natural gas. Power plants based on gas turbines are one of the cheapest types of plant to build, but the cost of their electricity depends heavily on the cost of their fuel. Two types of gas turbine are used for power generation: aero-derivative gas turbines and heavy-duty gas turbines. The former are used to provide power to the grid at times of peak demand. The latter are most often found in combined cycle power stations. These are capable of more than 60% efficiency. There are a number of ways of modifying the gas turbine cycle to improve efficiency, including reheating and intercooling. Micro-turbines have been developed for very small-scale generation of both electricity and heat. The main atmospheric emissions from gas turbines are carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxide.

Paul Breeze

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants,natural gas plants, and combined cycle natural gas plants.generated largely from combined-cycle Capacity (GW) yd r as

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Assessment of sustainable development in the EU 27 using aggregated SD index  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the European Union the sustainable development is a fundamental and overarchingobjective enshrined in the Treaty and measuring progress towards sustainable development is an integral part of the EU Sustainable Development Strategy. Eurostat produce a monitoring report every two years based on the EU set of sustainable development indicators (SDIs). The main objective of this paper is to create an aggregated index of the sustainable development from EU set of \\{SDIs\\} for each 27 EU country based on the PCA. The headline indicator economic growth was not involved because its increase is not expressly followed by positive change in other \\{SDIs\\} from social, economic and environmental fields. The aggregated SD index enables to get an overall picture about the position of each of the 27 EU countries and its development in terms of the sustainability over time as assumed in the EU Sustainable Development Strategy. Sweden, Denmark, Netherland, and Great Britain have repeatedly reached the highest value of aggregated SD index. The highest positive change in the aggregated SD index has occurred in countries with the lowest value of aggregated SD index. Moreover, we put this new aggregated index in relation with economic growth and found that there is a negative correlation between aggregated SD index and the economic growth for most of the 27 EU countries.

Paula Bolcárová; Stanislav Kološta

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

3rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct Gas Dosing 3rd Generation SCR System Using Solid Ammonia Storage and Direct Gas Dosing SCR system provides direct...

412

E-Print Network 3.0 - advanced generation inter-cross Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Materials for ARES Engines Phil Maziasz ORNL April 17, 2003 12;UT... Generation Waukesha Natural Gas Reciprocating Engine - Electric Generator Sets 12;UT-BATTELLE Oak ... Source:...

413

Stability of natural gas in the deep subsurface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural gas is becoming increasingly important as a fuel because of its widespread occurrence and because it has a less significant environmental impact than oil. Many of the known gas accumulations were discovered by accident during exploration for oil, but with increasing demand for gas, successful exploration will require a clearer understanding of the factors that control gas distribution and gas composition. Natural gas is generated by three main processes. In oxygen-deficient, sulfate-free, shallow (few thousand feet) environments bacteria generate biogenic gas that is essentially pure methane with no higher hydrocarbons ({open_quotes}dry gas{close_quotes}). Gas is also formed from organic matter ({open_quotes}kerogen{close_quotes}), either as the initial product from the thermal breakdown of Type III, woody kerogens, or as the final hydrocarbon product from all kerogen types. In addition, gas can be formed by the thermal cracking of crude oil in the deep subsurface. The generation of gas from kerogen requires higher temperatures than the generation of oil. Also, the cracking of oil to gas requires high temperatures, so that there is a general trend from oil to gas with increasing depth. This produces a well-defined {open_quotes}floor for oil{close_quotes}, below which crude oil is not thermally stable. The possibility of a {open_quotes}floor for gas{close_quotes} is less well documented and understanding the limits on natural gas occurrence was one of the main objectives of this research.

Barker, C.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Itinerant and local-moment magnetism in EuCr2As2 single crystals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We report on the crystal structure, physical properties, and electronic structure calculations for the ternary pnictide compound EuCr2As2. X-ray diffraction studies confirmed that EuCr2As2 crystalizes in the ThCr2Si2-type tetragonal structure (space group I4/mmm). The Eu ions are in a stable divalent state in this compound. Eu moments in EuCr2As2 order magnetically below Tm = 21 K. A sharp increase in the magnetic susceptibility below Tm and the positive value of the paramagnetic Curie temperature obtained from the Curie-Weiss fit suggest dominant ferromagnetic interactions. The heat capacity exhibits a sharp ?-shape anomaly at Tm, confirming the bulk nature of the magnetic transition. The extracted magnetic entropy at the magnetic transition temperature is consistent with the theoretical value Rln(2S+1) for S=7/2 of the Eu2+ ion. The temperature dependence of the electrical resistivity ?(T) shows metallic behavior along with an anomaly at 21 K. In addition, we observe a reasonably large negative magnetoresistance (??24%) at lower temperature. Electronic structure calculations for EuCr2As2 reveal a moderately high density of states of Cr-3d orbitals at the Fermi energy, indicating that the nonmagnetic state of Cr is unstable against magnetic order. Our density functional calculations for EuCr2As2 predict a G-type AFM order in the Cr sublattice. The electronic structure calculations suggest a weak interlayer coupling of the Eu moments.

U. B. Paramanik; R. Prasad; C. Geibel; Z. Hossain

2014-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

415

Demonstration of a Low-NOx Heavy-Duty Natural Gas Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Results of a Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle engine research project: A Caterpillar C-12 natural gas engine with Clean Air Power Dual-Fuel technology and exhaust gas recirculation demonstrated low NOx and PM emissions.

Not Available

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Energy and Greenhouse Gas Emissions in China: Growth, Transition, and Institutional Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that support more load following and peaking generation withfor natural gas- fired load following and peaking generationneeded less load- following and peaking generation. Growth

Kahrl, Fredrich James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Analysis of a pilot-scale constructed wetland treatment system for flue gas desulfurization wastewater.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Coal-fired generation accounts for 45% of the United States electricity and generates harmful emissions, such as sulfur dioxide. With the implementation of Flue Gas Desulfurization… (more)

Talley, Mary Katherine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Phase diagram of EuI{sub 2}-KI binary system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phase diagram of the EuI{sub 2}-KI binary system was studied by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD). The phase diagram of the EuI{sub 2}-KI system shows the existence of one congruently melting compound, KEu{sub 2}I{sub 5}, and one incongruently melting compound, K{sub 4}EuI{sub 6}. There are two eutectic points located at 465 C, 20 mol% KI and 439 C, 60 mol% KI, respectively.

Sun, Y. [Beijing Normal Univ. (China). Dept. of Chemistry] [Beijing Normal Univ. (China). Dept. of Chemistry; [Univ. of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Physical Chemistry; Wang, S.; Wang, M. [Beijing Normal Univ. (China). Dept. of Chemistry] [Beijing Normal Univ. (China). Dept. of Chemistry; Qiao, Z. [Univ. of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Physical Chemistry] [Univ. of Science and Technology, Beijing (China). Dept. of Physical Chemistry

1998-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

419

Use of Combusted Natural Gas to Cultivate the Anaerobic Bacterial Flora from the Cecum Contents of Mice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...of an inert gas generator, the gas-to-air...of the inert gas generator. A small compressor...pressure of 250 mm water gauge (WG). By...of changes in the atmospheric pressure. With...temperature ofthe cooling water in the cooling jacket...of the inert gas generator. Parts: 1, stopcock...

J. P. Koopman; J. P. Van Oeveren; F. G. J. Janssen

1973-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Ground Gas Handbook  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...pathways of least resistance to gas transport, and applications are discussed, such as migrating landfill gas emissions, also from leaking landfill gas collection systems, as well as natural gas and oil-field gas leakage from abandoned production...

Allen W Hatheway

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Gas Delivered  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

. Average . Average Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers, 1980-1996 Figure 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1990 1992 1994 1996 0 2 4 6 8 10 0 40 80 120 160 200 240 280 320 Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet Dollars per Thousand Cubic Meters Nominal Dollars Constant Dollars Sources: Nominal dollars: Energy Information Administration (EIA), Form EIA-176, "Annual Report of Natural and Supplemental Gas Supply and Disposition." Constant dollars: Prices were converted to 1995 dollars using the chain-type price indexes for Gross Domestic Product (1992 = 1.0) as published by the U. S. Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis. Residential: Prices in this publication for the residential sector cover nearly all of the volumes of gas delivered. Commercial and Industrial: Prices for the commercial and industrial sectors are often associated with

422

Thermoelectric Generators 1. Thermoelectric generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Cold Hot I - -- - - - - -- Figure 1 Electron concentration in a thermoelectric material. #12;2 A large1 Thermoelectric Generators HoSung Lee 1. Thermoelectric generator 1.1 Basic Equations In 1821 on the direction of current and material [3]. This is called the Thomson effect (or Thomson heat). These three

Lee, Ho Sung

423

Buildings Energy Data Book: 6.2 Electricity Generation, Transmission...  

Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

Summer Net Winter Plant Fuel Type Generators Capacity Capacity Capacity Coal Petroleum Natural Gas Other Gases Nuclear Hydroelectric Conventional Wind Solar Thermal and...

424

NREL: Energy Analysis - Coal-Fired Electricity Generation Results...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

assessments have shown wide-ranging results. To better understand the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from utility-scale, coal-fired electricity generation systems (based on...

425

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KM. Distributed generation investment and upgrade underin gas fired power plant investments. Review of Financial13] Dixit AK, Pindyck RS. Investment under uncertainty.

Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Anaerobic Digestion in California Dairies: Electricty Generation or Biomethane Upgrading.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??California is worldwide one of the major Green House Gas emitter due to a large use of fossil fuels in power generation and transportation. The… (more)

Bandini, Francesco

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Chena Hot Springs Resort - Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Office 2013 Peer Review Electric Power Generation Using Geothermal Fluid Coproduced from Oil andor Gas Wells PI - Bernie Karl Chena Hot Springs Resort Track 1 Project Officer:...

428

Low pressure combustor for generating steam downhole  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A compact catalytic combustor for generating steam downhole in an oil reservoir has steam generating tubes that are attached to a metal catalyst support. The metal support comprises sheets of metal that are spaced apart and transverse to the tubes. Heat from combustion is generated on the metal sheets and is conducted to the steam generating tubes. The steam is injected into the oil reservoir. The combustion gas is vented to ground level.

Retallick, W.B.

1983-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

429

EIS-0345: Plymouth Generating Facility Project  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes BPA's decision to approve Plymouth Energy, L.L.C. proposed 307-megawatt (MW), natural gas-fired, combined cycle power generation facility to interconnect into BPA’s regional transmission system.

430

Quasiseparable Generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It is clear from the preceding chapter that any matrix has quasiseparable representations. By padding given quasiseparable generators with zero matrices of large sizes one ... large orders. However, one is lookin...

Yuli Eidelman; Israel Gohberg…

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Coal Liquefaction Product Gas Analysis with an Automated Gas Chromatograph  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......similar gas streams. For example, it has been easily extended for analyzing gases generated in coal gasification and oil shale retorting by other Gulf researchers. Conclusions It is clear from the above discussion that the Carle TCD/FID GC performed......

Ajay Sood; Richard B. Pannell

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Microsoft Word - DOE QER meeting on Gas-Electric interdependency...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

purchase agreements with coal and lignite fired generation plants, as well as a hydroelectric facility. Brazos, as well as ERCOT, is heavily dependent upon natural gas for...

433

Tapping Landfill Gas to Provide Significant Energy Savings and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Two Large Landfill Projects BroadRock Renewables, LLC built two high efficiency electricity generating facilities that utilize landfill gas in California and Rhode Island. The...

434

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

generation has increased substantially in Mexico, while the national petroleum company PEMEX has reported declines in natural gas production. Spot Prices NYMEX price declines were...

435

Natural Gas Weekly Update  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. 9, 2011 at 2:00 P.M. Next Release: Thursday, October 6, 2011 Overview Prices Storage Other Market Trends Overview (For the Week Ending Wednesday, September 28, 2011) Natural gas spot prices at most market locations across the country this past week initially declined and then began to creep upwards as natural gas use for power generation increased. The upward trend was halted yesterday, as prices at nearly all points retreated, possibly due to forecasts for considerably colder weather. After declining from $3.78 per million British thermal units (MMBtu) last Wednesday to $3.72 per MMbtu on Thursday, the Henry Hub spot price increased to $3.92 per MMBtu on Tuesday and closed at $3.88 per MMBtu yesterday. At the New York Mercantile Exchange (NYMEX), the October 2011

436

Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine) | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine) Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine) Cost of Gas Adjustment for Gas Utilities (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Maine Program Type Generation Disclosure Provider Public Utilities Commission This rule, applicable to gas utilities, establishes rules for calculation of gas cost adjustments, procedures to be followed in establishing gas cost adjustments and refunds, and describes reports required to be filed with

437

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

73,669 73,669 141,300 1.59 221,822 1.12 3 0.10 46,289 0.88 33,988 1.24 31,006 0.98 252,585 1.26 A r k a n s a s Arkansas 51. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Arkansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,750 1,552 1,607 1,563 1,470 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,500 3,500 3,500 3,988 4,020 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 171,543 166,273 161,967 161,390 182,895 From Oil Wells ........................................... 39,364 38,279 33,446 33,979 41,551 Total.............................................................. 210,906 204,552 195,413 195,369 224,446 Repressuring ................................................

438

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-1,080,240 -1,080,240 201,024 2.27 1,734,887 8.78 133 4.54 76,629 1.46 136,436 4.99 46,152 1.46 460,373 2.30 O k l a h o m a Oklahoma 84. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Oklahoma, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 13,926 13,289 13,487 13,438 13,074 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 28,902 29,118 29,121 29,733 29,733 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 1,674,405 1,732,997 1,626,858 1,521,857 1,467,695 From Oil Wells ........................................... 342,950 316,945 308,006 289,877 267,192 Total.............................................................. 2,017,356 2,049,942 1,934,864

439

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7,038,115 7,038,115 3,528,911 39.78 13,646,477 69.09 183 6.24 408,861 7.80 1,461,718 53.49 281,452 8.91 5,681,125 28.40 West South Central West South Central 42. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West South Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 87,198 84,777 88,034 88,734 62,357 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 92,212 95,288 94,233 102,525 102,864 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 11,599,913 11,749,649 11,959,444 11,824,788 12,116,665 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,313,831 2,368,395 2,308,634 2,217,752 2,151,247 Total..............................................................

440

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

77,379 77,379 94,481 1.07 81,435 0.41 8 0.27 70,232 1.34 1,836 0.07 40,972 1.30 207,529 1.04 K e n t u c k y Kentucky 65. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kentucky, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,084 1,003 969 1,044 983 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 12,483 12,836 13,036 13,311 13,501 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. 79,690 86,966 73,081 74,754 81,435 Repressuring ................................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,720 0.32 31,767 1.16 29,447 0.93 153,549 0.77 Pacific Noncontiguous Pacific Noncontiguous 45. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Noncontiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341

442

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-310,913 -310,913 110,294 1.24 712,796 3.61 2 0.07 85,376 1.63 22,607 0.83 57,229 1.81 275,508 1.38 K a n s a s Kansas 64. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Kansas, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,681 9,348 9,156 8,571 7,694 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,400 19,472 19,365 22,020 21,388 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 580,572 605,578 628,900 636,582 629,755 From Oil Wells ........................................... 79,169 82,579 85,759 86,807 85,876 Total.............................................................. 659,741 688,157 714,659 723,389 715,631 Repressuring ................................................

443

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

819,046 819,046 347,043 3.91 245,740 1.24 40 1.36 399,522 7.62 32,559 1.19 201,390 6.38 980,555 4.90 M i c h i g a n Michigan 70. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Michigan, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 1,223 1,160 1,323 1,294 2,061 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,257 5,500 6,000 5,258 5,826 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 120,287 126,179 136,989 146,320 201,123 From Oil Wells ........................................... 80,192 84,119 91,332 97,547 50,281 Total.............................................................. 200,479 210,299 228,321 243,867 251,404 Repressuring ................................................

444

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

W W y o m i n g -775,410 50,253 0.57 666,036 3.37 14 0.48 13,534 0.26 87 0.00 9,721 0.31 73,609 0.37 Wyoming 98. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Wyoming, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,826 10,933 10,879 12,166 12,320 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 3,111 3,615 3,942 4,196 4,510 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 751,693 880,596 949,343 988,671 981,115 From Oil Wells ........................................... 285,125 142,006 121,519 111,442 109,434 Total.............................................................. 1,036,817 1,022,602 1,070,862 1,100,113 1,090,549 Repressuring

445

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-67,648 -67,648 75,616 0.85 480,828 2.43 0 0.00 16,179 0.31 31,767 1.16 27,315 0.86 150,877 0.75 A l a s k a Alaska 49. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Alaska, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 9,638 9,907 9,733 9,497 9,294 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 112 113 104 100 102 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 198,603 190,139 180,639 179,470 183,747 From Oil Wells ........................................... 2,427,110 2,588,202 2,905,261 3,190,433 3,189,837 Total.............................................................. 2,625,713 2,778,341 3,085,900 3,369,904 3,373,584 Repressuring

446

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

628,189 628,189 449,511 5.07 765,699 3.88 100 3.41 528,662 10.09 39,700 1.45 347,721 11.01 1,365,694 6.83 West North Central West North Central 39. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West North Central, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 10,177 9,873 9,663 9,034 8,156 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 18,569 19,687 19,623 22,277 21,669 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 594,551 626,728 651,594 655,917 648,822 From Oil Wells ........................................... 133,335 135,565 136,468 134,776 133,390 Total.............................................................. 727,886 762,293

447

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,048,760 1,048,760 322,661 3.64 18,131 0.09 54 1.84 403,264 7.69 142,688 5.22 253,075 8.01 1,121,742 5.61 N e w Y o r k New York 80. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas New York, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 329 264 242 197 232 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 5,906 5,757 5,884 6,134 6,208 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 22,697 20,587 19,937 17,677 17,494 From Oil Wells ........................................... 824 610 539 723 641 Total.............................................................. 23,521 21,197 20,476 18,400 18,134 Repressuring ................................................

448

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,554,530 1,554,530 311,229 3.51 3,094,431 15.67 442 15.08 299,923 5.72 105,479 3.86 210,381 6.66 927,454 4.64 Mountain Mountain 43. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Mountain, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 38,711 38,987 37,366 39,275 38,944 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 30,965 34,975 38,539 38,775 41,236 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 2,352,729 2,723,393 3,046,159 3,131,205 3,166,689 From Oil Wells ........................................... 677,771 535,884 472,397 503,986 505,903 Total.............................................................. 3,030,499 3,259,277 3,518,556

449

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,592,465 1,592,465 716,648 8.08 239,415 1.21 182 6.21 457,792 8.73 334,123 12.23 320,153 10.14 1,828,898 9.14 South Atlantic South Atlantic 40. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas South Atlantic, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,307 3,811 4,496 4,427 4,729 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 39,412 35,149 41,307 37,822 36,827 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 206,766 208,892 234,058 236,072 233,409 From Oil Wells ........................................... 7,584 8,011 8,468 7,133 6,706 Total.............................................................. 214,349 216,903 242,526 243,204 240,115

450

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1,999,161 1,999,161 895,529 10.10 287,933 1.46 1,402 47.82 569,235 10.86 338,640 12.39 308,804 9.78 2,113,610 10.57 Pacific Contiguous Pacific Contiguous 44. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas Pacific Contiguous, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 3,896 3,781 3,572 3,508 2,082 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 1,142 1,110 1,280 1,014 996 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... 156,635 124,207 117,725 96,329 88,173 From Oil Wells ........................................... 294,800 285,162 282,227 289,430 313,581 Total.............................................................. 451,435 409,370

451

Natural Gas  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

-122,394 -122,394 49,997 0.56 178,984 0.91 5 0.17 37,390 0.71 205 0.01 28,025 0.89 115,622 0.58 West Virginia West Virginia 96. Summary Statistics for Natural Gas West Virginia, 1992-1996 Table 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 Reserves (billion cubic feet) Estimated Proved Reserves (dry) as of December 31 ....................................... 2,356 2,439 2,565 2,499 2,703 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.............................. 38,250 33,716 39,830 36,144 35,148 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ......................................... E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 From Oil Wells ........................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Total.............................................................. E 182,000 171,024 183,773 186,231 178,984 Repressuring ................................................

452

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the gas vesicles simply reduce their sinking rates and...remaining suspended in the water column. A microorganism...phenomena as stratification, water- bloom formation, and...the many proteins that make up the phycobilisome (73...flagellate bacteria in natural waters. The natural selection...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Gas vesicles.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...these costs can be compared is in units of energy expenditure per time (joules per second...requires 7.24 x 10-18 kg of Gvp. The energy cost of making this protein, Eg, is...Eg = 2.84 x 101- o J. The rate of energy expenditure in gas vesicle synthesis then...

A E Walsby

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Gas sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

455

Advanced Natural Gas Reciprocating Engines (ARES)  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

: Pune, India GTA8.3SLB QSV91 6 Measure of Success CO2 Production and Comparison of Natural Gas and Diesel Power Generation Applications The combination of high...

456

Saudi Aramco Gas Operations Energy Efficiency Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Saudi Aramco Gas Operations (GO) created energy efficiency strategies for its 5-year business plan (2011-2015), supported by a unique energy efficiency program, to reduce GO energy intensity by 26% by 2015. The program generated an energy savings...

Al-Dossary, F. S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",15404,29 "..Electric Utilities",12691,21 "..IPP & CHP",2713,33 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",54584295,28 "..Electric Utilities",41844010,2...

458

Natural Gas Year-in-Review  

Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

rose to 66.0 Bcf per day, with large increases coming from additional natural gas-fired power generation. Net imports decreased by 0.2 Bcf per day to 7.1 Bcf per day, the...

459

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",2119,48 "Electric Utilities",1946,39 "IPP & CHP",172,50 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",6946419,49 "Electric...

460

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",23485,17 "Electric Utilities",17148,17 "IPP & CHP",6337,17 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",77896588,19 "Electric...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",14321,31 "Electric Utilities",991,42 "IPP & CHP",13330,7 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",36198121,36 "Electric...

462

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",38488,7 "Electric Utilities",29293,3 "IPP & CHP",9195,10 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",122306364,9 "Electric...

463

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",1781,49 "Electric Utilities",8,50 "IPP & CHP",1773,38 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",8309036,48 "Electric...

464

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",32547,9 "Electric Utilities",23615,7 "IPP & CHP",8933,11 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",152878688,6 "Electric...

465

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",39520,6 "Electric Utilities",10739,26 "IPP & CHP",28781,5 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",135768251,7 "Electric...

466

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",10476,34 "Electric Utilities",7807,30 "IPP & CHP",2669,34 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",35173263,39 "Electric...

467

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",59139,3 "Electric Utilities",51373,1 "IPP & CHP",7766,15 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",221096136,3 "Electric...

468

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",71329,2 "Electric Utilities",30294,2 "IPP & CHP",41035,3 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",199518567,4 "Electric...

469

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",3357,46 "Electric Utilities",98,47 "IPP & CHP",3259,29 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",8633694,47 "Electric...

470

"Primary Energy Source","Natural Gas"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Energy Source","Natural Gas" "Net Summer Capacity (megawatts)",109568,1 "Electric Utilities",28463,4 "IPP & CHP",81106,1 "Net Generation (megawatthours)",429812510,1 "Electric...

471

Site and local structure of activator Eu{sup 2+} in phosphor Ca{sub 10?x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}Cl{sub 2}:xEu{sup 2+}  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The site and local structure of activator Eu{sup 2+} in phosphor Ca{sub 10?x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}Cl{sub 2}:xEu{sup 2+} is investigated by experiment measurements, first-principle calculations and XAFS simulations. From first-principle calculations, the “local” structure [bond length L(M–O)?R(M{sup 2+})+R(O{sup 2?})] of host shows a significant deformation (expansion) when Ca{sup 2+} is substituted by Eu{sup 2+}, and Eu{sup 2+} should prefer 6h site to 4f site in the host. The d?f emission of Eu{sup 2+} at 4f site should show a longer wavelength than that of Eu{sup 2+} at 6h site. The XAFS measurement and simulations suggest that the Eu{sup 2+} in our Ca{sub 9.9}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}Cl{sub 2}:0.1Eu{sup 2+} sample mainly locates at 6h site. In the emission spectrum, two emission profiles of Ca{sub 9.9}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}Cl{sub 2}:0.1Eu{sup 2+} sample are obtained and assigned. The major one (2.71 eV?456 nm) should be the emission of Eu{sup 2+} at 6h site. The minor one (2.61 eV?465 nm) should be that of Eu{sup 2+} at 4f site. - Graphical abstract: The d?f emission of Eu{sup 2+} in Ca{sub 9.9}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}Cl{sub 2}:0.1Eu{sup 2+} can be assigned as: emission profile at 2.71 eV and 2.61 eV are Eu{sup 2+} at 6h and 4f site, respectively. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Eu{sup 2+} in Ca{sub 10?x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 6}Cl{sub 2}:xEu{sup 2+} causes deformation to “local” structure. • Eu{sup 2+} should prefer 6h site to 4f site in the host from energy aspect. • Emission at 2.71 eV and 2.61 eV should be Eu{sup 2+} at 6h and 4f site.

Wang, Chun-Hai, E-mail: chwang81@gmail.com [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Gui, Dong-Yun; Qin, Rui [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Yang, Feng-Li [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Jing, Xi-Ping, E-mail: xpjing@pku.edu.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, State Key Laboratory of Rare Earth Materials Chemistry and Applications, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Tian, Guang-Shan [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhu, Wenjun [National Key Laboratory of Shock Wave and Detonation Physics, Institute of Fluid Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

472

U.S. and EU Unite to Strengthen Economic Integration and Boost Jobs, Growth  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EU Unite to Strengthen Economic Integration and Boost EU Unite to Strengthen Economic Integration and Boost Jobs, Growth and Competitiveness U.S. and EU Unite to Strengthen Economic Integration and Boost Jobs, Growth and Competitiveness November 9, 2006 - 9:25am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - Today, the Bush Administration hosted the second informal U.S.-EU economic ministerial meeting to discuss transatlantic economic integration and shared economic challenges. Commerce Secretary Carlos M. Gutierrez and Energy Secretary Samuel W. Bodman met with European Union Commission Vice President GĂĽnter Verheugen and Finnish Minister for Trade and Industry Mauri Pekkarinen to review joint progress in the most significant areas of the transatlantic economy, including innovation, intellectual property rights (IPR), regulatory cooperation, and energy

473

Microsoft Word - EU-US Smart Grid assessment - final report -online version.docx  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

JRC 73070 JRC 73070 EUR 25522 EN Assessing Smart Grid Benefits and Impacts: EU and U.S. Initiatives Joint Report EC JRC - US DOE Vincenzo Giordano Steven Bossart European Commission US Department of Energy-DOE Joint Research Centre (JRC) Office of Electricity and Energy Reliability Institute for Energy and Transport 2012 2 European Commission Joint Research Centre (JRC) Institute for Energy and Transport (IET) Contact information Gianluca Fulli Address: Joint Research Centre, Westerduinweg 3, NL-1755 LE Petten E-mail: gianluca. fulli@ec.europa.eu Tel.: +00312245266 http://iet.jrc.ec.europa.eu/ http://www.jrc.ec.europa.eu/ Steven Bossart Address: US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory,

474

Brussels, 29 April 2005 EU-JAPAN Summit -2 May 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Luxembourg on 2 May 2005. Alongside European Commission President José Manuel Durão Barroso and European. President Barroso said: "I am looking forward to my first Summit meeting with Prime Minister Koizumi. EU

475

Options introduction and volatility in the EU ETS1 Julien Chevallier 2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS), the European Climate Exchange (ECX) has introduced option the introduction of options has increased or decreased volatility in the European Union Emissions Trading Sc

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

476

CO2 Abatement in the UK Power Sector: Evidence from the EU ETS Trial Period  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper provides an empirical assessment of CO2 emissions abatement in the UK power sector during the trial period of the EU ETS. Using an econometrically estimated model of fuel switching, it separates the impacts of ...

Ellerman, A. Denny

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Solar Thermal Energy Use in EU-27 Countries: Evolution and Promotion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Growth in the use of renewable energies in the 27 European Union (EU-27 ... past decade has been remarkable. Among these energies is solar thermal energy (STE). The average annual growth rate ... has reached almo...

María P. del Pablo-Romero; Antonio Sánchez-Braza; Enrique Lerma

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Nuclear-quadrupole optical hole burning in the stoichiometric material EuP5O14  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Hole burning, which is attributed to optical pumping of nuclear-quadrupole levels, has been observed in the stoichiometric rare-earth compound, EuP5O14. The long...

Macfarlane, R M; Genack, A Z; Weitz, D A; Shelby, R M

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

GCFR steam generator conceptual design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) steam generators are large once-through heat exchangers with helically coiled tube bundles. In the GCFR demonstration plant, hot helium from the reactor core is passed through these units to produce superheated steam, which is used by the turbine generators to produce electrical power. The paper describes the conceptual design of the steam generator. The major components and functions of the design are addressed. The topics discussed are the configuration, operating conditions, design criteria, and the design verification and support programs.

Holm, R.A.; Elliott, J.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Micro-generation for UK Households: Thermodynamic and Related Analysis.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Micro- generation is the small-scale and localised provision of heat or electricity. Micro-generators have the potential to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions and enhance energy security by… (more)

Allen, Stephen R

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Energy Generation by State and Technology (2009) - Datasets ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Generation by State and Technology (2009) Provides annual energy generation for all states by fuel source (e.g. coal, gas, solar, wind) in 2009, reported in MWh. Also...

482

Gas Emissions FLOODING THE LAND,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

signif- icant sources of emissions of the greenhouse gases carbon dioxide and, in particular, methane to bacteria breaking down organic matter in the water. Methane, a much more powerful greenhouse gas than coal plants generating the same amounts of power. Dams and their associated reservoirs are globally

Batiste, Oriol

483

Discharge cell for ozone generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A discharge cell for use in an ozone generator is provided which can suppress a time-related reduction in ozone concentration without adding a catalytic gas such as nitrogen gas to oxygen gas as a raw material gas. The discharge cell includes a pair of electrodes disposed in an opposed spaced relation with a discharge space therebetween, and a dielectric layer of a three-layer structure consisting of three ceramic dielectric layers successively stacked on at least one of the electrodes, wherein a first dielectric layer of the dielectric layer contacting the one electrode contains no titanium dioxide, wherein a second dielectric layer of the dielectric layer exposed to the discharge space contains titanium dioxide in a metal element ratio of not lower than 10 wt %.

Nakatsuka, Suguru (Amagasaki, JP)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Liquid Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Liquid Natural Gas ... IN A new technique for storing natural gas at the East Ohio Gas Co. plant, Cleveland, Ohio, the gas is liquefied before passing to the gas holders. ... Natural gas contains moisture and carbon dioxide, both of which liquefy before the natural gas and are somewhat of a nuisance because upon solidification they clog the pipes. ...

W. F. SCHAPHORST

1941-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

485

STAFF REPORT 2012 NATURAL GAS RESEARCH,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

STAFF REPORT 2012 NATURAL GAS RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT, AND DEMONSTRATION REPORT CALIFORNIA Public Utilities Commission to impose a surcharge on all natural gas consumed in California to fund Technologies and Advanced Generation · EnergyRelated Transportation For more information about the Energy

486

Investigation of metal binding sites on soil fulvic acid using Eu(III) luminescence spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The [sup 7]F[sub 0] [yields] [sup 5]D[sub 0] excitation spectra of Eu(III) complexed with soil fulvic acid (FA) were acquired over a range of solution pH (2.9-7.8) and FA concentrations (800-3200 mg L[sup [minus]1]) using a pulsed tunable dye laser system. The broad asymmetric excitation spectra were well-fitted to a sum of two conventional Lorentzian-shaped curves, revealing the existence of two types of carboxylate moieties for the binding of metal ions on FA which formed 1:1 (EuL[sup 2+]; L = carboxylate) and 1:2 complexes (EuL[sub 2][sup +]). The weaker binding species, EuL[sup 2+], seemed to be quite abundant and showed a rapid increase as the pH was raised from 2.9 to 6.3, but it was susceptible to hydrolysis at pH higher than 7 while the stronger binding species, EuL[sub 2][sup +], showed only a modest growth with an increase in pH. By contrast, on a more flexible synthetic linear polymer, poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) and poly(vinylbenzoic acid) (PVBA) as model polymers, EuL[sub 2][sup +] was seen as the dominant species except in acidic media.