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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

EU Gas Supply Security: Unfinished Business  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

country in Europe for shale gas production. Exploration work was suspended after hydraulic fracturing-induced seismic activity was reported but the government allowed companies to resume work in late 2012. The UK enjoys a relatively wide political... of factors: rapid growth in Europe’s natural gas consumption until 2005; even more rapid growth of imports as European production declined; Europe’s reliance on a very small number of external suppliers; dominance of long- term, bilateral contracts between...

Noël, Pierre

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Wind driven gas generator  

SciTech Connect

A means is provided to convert wind energy into electrical energy which, through electrolysis, forms gases to be stored under pressure, giving a form of stored energy for use at some future time by the use of a high torque, low speed vertical axis wind machine connected by direct drive to homopolar direct current generators so as to create direct current for the electrolysis of water, resulting in the breakdown of water into its basic components of hydrogen and oxygen, which are then stored under pressure until necessary for use as a source of energy.

Crehore, R.

1980-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

3

Combustion gas turbine/steam generator plant  

SciTech Connect

A fired steam generator is described that is interconnected with a gas turbine/steam generator plant having at least one gas turbine group followed by an exhaust-gas steam generator. The exhaust-gas steam generator has a preheater and an evaporator. The inlet of the preheater is connected to a feedwater distribution line which also feeds a preheater in the fired steam generator. The outlet of the preheater is connected to the evaporator of the fired steam generator. The evaporator outlet of the exhaust-gas steam generator is connected to the input of a superheater in the fired steam generator.

Aguet, E.

1975-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

4

Polish plant beats the odds to become model EU generator  

SciTech Connect

Once a Soviet satellite, Poland is now transforming into a thoroughly modern nation. To support its growing economy, this recent European Union member country is modernizing its power industry. Exemplifying the advances in the Polish electricity generation market is the 460 MW Patnow II power plant - the largest, most efficient (supercritical cycle) and environmentally cleanest lignite-fired unit in the country. 3 photos.

Neville, A.

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

5

WIPP Gas-Generation Experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental investigation was conducted for gas generation in contact-handled transuranic (CH TRU) wastes subjected for several years to conditions similar to those expected to occur at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) should the repository eventually become inundated with brine. Various types of actual CH TRU wastes were placed into 12 corrosion-resistant vessels. The vessels were loosely filled with the wastes, which were submerged in synthetic brine having the same chemical composition as that in the WIPP vicinity. The vessels were also inoculated with microbes found in the Salado Formation at WIPP. The vessels were sealed, purged, and the approximately 750 ml headspace in each vessel was pressurized with nitrogen gas to approximately 146 atmospheres to create anoxic conditions at the lithostatic pressure estimated in the repository were it to be inundated. The temperature was maintained at the expected 30°C. The test program objective was to measure the quantities and species of gases generated by metal corrosion, radiolysis, and microbial activity. These data will assist in the specification of the rates at which gases are produced under inundated repository conditions for use in the WIPP Performance Assessment computer models. These experiments were very carefully designed, constructed, instrumented, and performed. Approximately 6 1/2 years of continuous, undisturbed testing were accumulated. Several of the vessels showed significantly elevated levels of generated gases, virtually all of which was hydrogen. Up to 4.2% hydrogen, by volume, was measured. Only small quantities of other gases, principally carbon dioxide, were detected. Gas generation was found to depend strongly on the waste composition. The maximum hydrogen generation occurred in vessels containing carbon steel. Visual examination of carbon-steel coupons confirmed the correspondence between the extent of observable corrosion and hydrogen generation. Average corrosion penetration rates in carbon-steel of up to 2.3 microns per year were deduced. Conversion of carbon to carbon dioxide was calculated to be as high as 4.7 µg mol/yr/g carbon. Carbon monoxide was detected in only two waste compositions, and methane was detected in only one. In all three of these cases, the concentrations of these lesser gases detected were barely above the detection limits. No hydrogen sulfide was ever detected. Initial rates of hydrogen generation measured in the carbon-steel-bearing wastes during the first year of testing did not always correspond to rates measured over the longer term. Compared to the long-term trends, the initial gas-generation rates for some waste types were higher, for some lower, and for others remained constant. Although carbon-steel corrosion was clearly the dominant hydrogen generator, the rates of generation were found to be reduced in test vessels where the same quantity of carbon steel was co-mingled with other waste types. This is a beneficial phenomenon relative to performance of the WIPP repository. Statistical analyses of the results were made to quantify these negative interaction effects. Electron microscopy analyses of the carbon-steel coupons revealed that corrosion products were predominantly iron chlorides and oxides. Iron, chlorine, oxygen, uranium, magnesium, calcium, aluminum, silicon were all present in the corrosion products. No americium nor neptunium, both present in the wastes, were detected in any of the corrosion products. All

Frank S. Felicione; Steven M. Frank; Dennis D. Keiser

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Gas generator and turbine unit  

SciTech Connect

A gas turbine power unit is disclosed in which the arrangement and configuration of parts is such as to save space and weight in order to provide a compact and self-contained assembly. An air-intake casing supports the upstream end of a gas generator, the down-stream end of which is integral with a power turbine. The stator casing of the turbine is connected to a cone thermally insulated and completely inserted into any exhaust casing having a vertical outlet, wherein the turbine exhaust is conveyed into the exhaust casing by an annular diffusing cone. The turbine casing is supported on four legs. In addition, the turbine rotor and thus the turbine shaft are overhangingly supported by an independent structure, the weight of which bears on the machine base outside the exhaust casing and away of the power turbine space.

Vinciguerra, C.

1984-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

7

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California’sGAS ABATEMENT WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA’Sthe role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California'sGas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California scommercial buildings, distributed generation, microgrids

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

IMPACTS OF MARKET LIBERALISATION ON THE EU GAS INDUSTRY Paper for the 1 st Austrian-Czech-German Conference on Energy Market Liberalisation in Central and Eastern Europe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper presents an analysis of the effects of the EU Gas Directive on the EU gas industry in the next ten years. First, it briefly reviews the current driving factors for increasing competition in the EU gas markets. Second, the different directions of implementation of EU Gas Directive are discussed. Finally we give an assessment of impacts of the different directions of implementation of the Gas Directive, thereby focusing on structural changes of the gas industry and the scope for reduction of consumer gas prices. Note that our assessment of the impacts is partly based on an analysis of recent trends in the EU gas market and partly on calculations with a recently developed model of the EU gas market on company level. The paper summarises the main observations of a study conducted by ECN last year in the framework of a larger scenario study for the EC, DG17, in the Shared Analysis Project, ‘Economic Foundations for Energy Policy in Europe to 2020 ’ managed by FhG-ISI. For the complete results of the ECN study, see report ‘Impacts of Market Liberalisation on the EU Gas Industry’, September 1999, forthcoming. Note that the analysis is limited to the gas market and does not include other impacts, i.e. on energy conservation, emissions, etc. Acknowledgement

F. Van Oostvoorn; M. G. Boots Abstract

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Gas Generation Testing of Plutonium Dioxide  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen and oxygen gas generation rates were measured for purified plutonium oxide (PuO2) powder as a function of water content, specific surface area (SSA), dose rate, and initial fill gas composition. Gas generation rates were found to increase with water content and dose rate and to decrease with specific surface area for given water content. Hydrogen generation rates were similar in air, nitrogen and argon, but oxygen generation rates were greater in nitrogen and argon than in air. The potential for reaching a steady state container pressure for PuO2 of given calcination temperature (i.e., SSA) and water content was evaluated by adding hydrogen to some test vessels and monitoring the effect on container pressure over time

Duffey, J.M.

2002-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

11

Consumption of Natural Gas for Electricity Generation by State...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Gas for Electricity Generation by State by Sector, January 2011 and 2010 This dataset contains state by state comparisons of natural gas for electricity generation in the...

12

Understanding landfill gas generation and migration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas research in the US Department of Energy (DOE) from Municipal Waste (EMW) Program is focusing on two major areas of investigation: (1) Landfill gas migration processes; and (2) Landfill gas generation. With regard to gas migration, a field investigation is examining bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials by processes of pressure and diffusional flow. The overall purpose of the study is to quantify gas loss from the landfill reservoir by natural venting and air influx due to pumping on recovery wells. Two field sites--a humid site with clay cover and a semiarid site with sand cover--have been instrumented to examine vertical gas movement through cover materials. Results from the humid site indicate that: (1) concentrations of methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen and nitrogen in soil gas vary seasonally with soil moisture; (2) based on average methane gradients in soil gas and a simple diffusion model, up to 10E5 g methane m/sup /minus /2/ yr/sup /minus/1/ are vented through the cover materials at the humid site (area of 17 ht); and (3) during prolonged wet weather, pressure gradients of more than 2 kPa may develop between the cover materials and top of refuse, indicating that pressure flow is periodically an important mechanism for gas transport. The second project is addressing landfill gas generation. The major goal is to develop simple assay techniques to examine the gas production potential of landfilled refuse. Refuse samples extracted from various depths in a landfill are being leached by three different methods to separate microbial mass and substrate. The leachates are being subjected to Biochemical Methane Production (BMP) assays with periodic qualitative examination of microbial populations using fluorescence microscopy of live cultures and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

Bogner, J.; Rose, C.; Vogt, M.; Gartman, D.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS STUDY  

SciTech Connect

Under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has conducted a study of Next Generation Gas Turbine Systems that embraces the goals of the DOE's High Efficiency Engines and Turbines and Vision 21 programs. The Siemens Westinghouse Next Generation Gas Turbine (NGGT) Systems program was a 24-month study looking at the feasibility of a NGGT for the emerging deregulated distributed generation market. Initial efforts focused on a modular gas turbine using an innovative blend of proven technologies from the Siemens Westinghouse W501 series of gas turbines and new enabling technologies to serve a wide variety of applications. The flexibility to serve both 50-Hz and 60-Hz applications, use a wide range of fuels and be configured for peaking, intermediate and base load duty cycles was the ultimate goal. As the study progressed the emphasis shifted from a flexible gas turbine system of a specific size to a broader gas turbine technology focus. This shift in direction allowed for greater placement of technology among both the existing fleet and new engine designs, regardless of size, and will ultimately provide for greater public benefit. This report describes the study efforts and provides the resultant conclusions and recommendations for future technology development in collaboration with the DOE.

Benjamin C. Wiant; Ihor S. Diakunchak; Dennis A. Horazak; Harry T. Morehead

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS STUDY  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under sponsorship of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation has conducted a study of Next Generation Gas Turbine Systems that embraces the goals of the DOE's High Efficiency Engines and Turbines and Vision 21 programs. The Siemens Westinghouse Next Generation Gas Turbine (NGGT) Systems program was a 24-month study looking at the feasibility of a NGGT for the emerging deregulated distributed generation market. Initial efforts focused on a modular gas turbine using an innovative blend of proven technologies from the Siemens Westinghouse W501 series of gas turbines and new enabling technologies to serve a wide variety of applications. The flexibility to serve both 50-Hz and 60-Hz applications, use a wide range of fuels and be configured for peaking, intermediate and base load duty cycles was the ultimate goal. As the study progressed the emphasis shifted from a flexible gas turbine system of a specific size to a broader gas turbine technology focus. This shift in direction allowed for greater placement of technology among both the existing fleet and new engine designs, regardless of size, and will ultimately provide for greater public benefit. This report describes the study efforts and provides the resultant conclusions and recommendations for future technology development in collaboration with the DOE.

Benjamin C. Wiant; Ihor S. Diakunchak; Dennis A. Horazak; Harry T. Morehead

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Framing Scenarios of Electricity Generation and Gas Use: EPRI Report Series on Gas Demands for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a systematic appraisal of trends in electric generation and demands for gas for power generation. Gas-fired generation is the leading driver of forecasted growth in demand for natural gas in the United States, and natural gas is a leading fuel for planned new generating capacity. The report goes behind the numbers and forecasts to quantify key drivers and uncertainties.

1996-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

16

Pennsylvania's use of natural gas for power generation has grown ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Changes in relative fuel prices. Prices of coal and natural gas are key input costs at electric power ... Pennsylvania coal and natural gas generation additions were ...

17

Gas generation from the irradiation of mortar  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A mortar formulation capable of immobilizing chloride salts with high levels of radioactivity is being developed. As part of the developmental effort, radiation effects are being investigated. The radiolytic generation of gas(es) from irradiated mortar formulations was determined for several formulations with variable salt loadings at several test temperatures. The irradiation of a mortar formulation consisting of cement, slag, fly ash, water and 0 to 10 wt % salt led to the generation of hydrogen. The rate of generation was approximately constant, steady state pressures were not attained and final pressures were comparatively high. Higher salt concentrations were correlated with higher hydrogen generation rates for experiments at ambient temperature while lower rates were observed at 120/degree/C. The irradiation of a mortar consisting of cement, fly ash, water and salt led to the radiolytic generation of both oxygen and hydrogen. The addition of 2 wt % FeS or CaS inhibited oxygen generation and changed the hydrogen production rate. 10 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Lewis, M.A.; Warren, D.W.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Electricity generation from coal and natural gas both increased ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Historically, the average fuel cost of operating a combined-cycle natural gas generator exceeded that for a coal-fired generator. Until 2010, ...

19

Electricity generation from coal and natural gas both increased ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Coal generation shares declined in some regions ... the share of natural gas-fired power generation is most influenced by the availability of hydroelectric power, ...

20

Pipelines to Power Lines: Gas Transportation for Electricity Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas-fired power generation represents a major growth market for the natural gas industry; but the large, high pressure, highly variable loads required for individual power generators can be difficult to serve. This report, cosponsored by the Gas Research Institute and EPRI, is a design stage assessment of the engineering and costs of the pipelines needed to handle these types of loads.

1995-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Fuel cell generator containing a gas sealing means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical generator is made, operating with flowing fuel gas and oxidant gas, the generator having a thermal insulation layer, and a sealing means contacting or contained within the insulation, where the sealing means is effective to control the contact of the various gases utilized in the generator.

Makiel, Joseph M. (Monroeville, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Fuel cell generator containing a gas sealing means  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high temperature solid electrolyte electrochemical generator is made, operating with flowing fuel gas and oxidant gas, the generator having a thermal insulation layer, and a sealing means contacting or contained within the insulation, where the sealing means is effective to control the contact of the various gases utilized in the generator. 5 figs.

Makiel, J.M.

1987-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

23

Gas Turbine and Generator Procurement Guidelines: Best Practices and Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a specification in the style used by engineering, procurement, and construction (EPC) firms for procuring gas turbines and associated generators and accessories, as well as guidelines that describe best practices for defining the functional design requirements for such equipment. BackgroundGas turbines, fired by readily available natural gas, provide the majority of new power generation worldwide. Changes in the mix of generation ...

2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

24

Figure 17. Electricity generation from natural gas in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 17. Electricity generation from natural gas in three cases, 2005-2040 (billion kilowatthours) Extended Policies No Sunset

25

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Next Generation Surfactants...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oil & Natural Gas Projects Exploration and Production Technologies Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology Last Reviewed 12152012 DE-FE0003537 Goal...

26

Cheaper natural gas alters generation dispatch in Southeast ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

While coal-fired power plants continue to generate more than half of electricity in the region, ... and production from natural gas-fired plants has increased.

27

Electricity generation from coal and natural gas both ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy use in homes, commercial buildings, ... the share of natural gas-fired power generation is most influenced by the availability of hydroelectric power, ...

28

Gas generation results and venting study for transuranic waste drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sixteen waste drums, containing six categories of plutonium-contaminated waste, were monitored for venting and gas generation for six months. The venting devices tested appeared adequate to relieve pressure and prevent hydrogen accumulation. Most of the gas generation, primarily H2 and CO2, was due to radiolytic decomposition of the hydrogenous wastes. Comparison of the gas yields with those obtained previously in laboratory tests showed very reasonable agreement with few exceptions.

Kazanjian, A.R.; Arnold, P.M.; Simmons, W.C.; D'Amico, E.L.

1985-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

29

Gas generation from Tank 241-SY-103 waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress made in evaluating mechanisms by which flammable gases are generated in Hanford double-shell tank wastes, based on the results of laboratory tests using actual waste from Tank 241-SY-103. The objective of this work is to establish the identity and stoichiometry of degradation products formed in actual tank wastes by thermal and radiolytic processes as a function of temperature. The focus of the gas generation tests on Tank 241-SY-103 samples is first the effect of temperature on gas generation (volume and composition). Secondly, gas generation from irradiation of Tank 241-SY-103 samples at the corresponding temperatures as the thermal-only treatments will be measured in the presence of an external radiation source (using a {sup 137}Cs capsule). The organic content will be measured on a representative sample prior to gas generation experiments and again at the termination of heating and irradiation. The gas generation will be related to the extent of organic species consumption during heating. Described in this report are experimental methods used for producing and measuring gases generated at various temperatures from highly radioactive actual tank waste, and results of gas generation from Tank 241-SY-103 waste taken from its convective layer. The accurate measurement of gas generation rates from actual waste from highly radioactive waste tanks is needed to assess the potential for producing and storing flammable gases within the waste tanks. This report addresses the gas generation capacity of the waste from the convective layer of Tank 241-SY-103, a waste tank listed on the Flammable Gas Watch List due to its potential for flammable gas accumulation above the flammability limit.

Bryan, S.A.; King, C.M.; Pederson, L.R.; Forbes, S.V.; Sell, R.L.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

NEXT GENERATION GAS TURBINE (NGGT) SYSTEMS STUDY  

SciTech Connect

Building upon the 1999 AD Little Study, an expanded market analysis was performed by GE Power Systems in 2001 to quantify the potential demand for an NGGT product. This analysis concluded that improvements to the US energy situation might be best served in the near/mid term (2002-2009) by a ''Technology-Focused'' program rather than a specific ''Product-Focused'' program. Within this new program focus, GEPS performed a parametric screening study of options in the three broad candidate categories of gas turbines: aero-derivative, heavy duty, and a potential hybrid combining components of the other two categories. GEPS's goal was to determine the best candidate systems that could achieve the DOE PRDA expectations and GEPS's internal design criteria in the period specified for initial product introduction, circa 2005. Performance feasibility studies were conducted on candidate systems selected in the screening task, and critical technology areas were identified where further development would be required to meet the program goals. DOE PRDA operating parameters were found to be achievable by 2005 through evolutionary technology. As a result, the study was re-directed toward technology enhancements for interim product introductions and advanced/revolutionary technology for potential NGGT product configurations. Candidate technologies were identified, both evolutionary and revolutionary, with a potential for possible development products via growth step improvements. Benefits were analyzed from two perspectives: (1) What would be the attributes of the top candidate system assuming the relevant technologies were developed and available for an NGGT market opportunity in 2009/2010; and (2) What would be the expected level of public benefit, assuming relevant technologies were incorporated into existing new and current field products as they became available. Candidate systems incorporating these technologies were assessed as to how they could serve multiple applications, both in terms of incorporation of technology into current products, as well as to an NGGT product. In summary, potential program costs are shown for development of the candidate systems along with the importance of future DOE enabling participation. Three main conclusions have been established via this study: (1) Rapid recent changes within the power generation regulatory environment and the resulting ''bubble'' of gas turbine orders has altered the timing and relative significance associated with the conclusions of the ADL study upon which the original DOE NGGT solicitation was based. (2) Assuming that the relevant technologies were developed and available for an NGGT market opportunity circa 2010, the top candidate system that meets or exceeds the DOE PRDA requirements was determined to be a hybrid aero-derivative/heavy duty concept. (3) An investment by DOE of approximately $23MM/year to develop NGGT technologies near/mid term for validation and migration into a reasonable fraction of the installed base of GE F-class products could be leveraged into $1.2B Public Benefit, with greatest benefits resulting from RAM improvements. In addition to the monetary Public Benefit, there is also significant benefit in terms of reduced energy consumption, and reduced power plant land usage.

Unknown

2001-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

31

Gas Market Transition: Impacts of Power Generation on Gas Pricing Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The power sector is beginning to influence the natural gas market, affecting both total natural gas demand and aspects of natural gas price behavior. This report offers a single source that quantifies these influences. With the addition of new gas-fired generating capacity, the use of gas generation in the power sector has grown steadily. However, this progression was arrested after 2002 when the brunt of overbuilding was felt, and gas use in the power sector migrated to ever more efficient units. While ...

2005-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

32

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Activity: Natural Gas Engine and Vehicle Research & Development (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This fact sheet describes the status of the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) activity, including goals, R&D progress, NGV implementation, and the transition to hydrogen.

Not Available

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) Program Fact Sheet  

SciTech Connect

Fact sheet describing U. S. DOE and NREL's development of next generation natural gas vehicles (NGVs) as a key element in its strategy to reduce oil import and vehicle pollutants.

Walkowicz, K.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focused on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report will present results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge.

Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2001-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

35

Natural gas generation lower than last year because of differences ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Total natural gas use for power generation in the United States was down 14% during the first seven months of 2013 compared to the same period in 2012 (see chart ...

36

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) Program Brochure  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy's Office of Transportation Technologies is initiating the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NGNGV) Program to develop commercially viable medium- and heavy-duty natural gas vehicles. These new vehicles will incorporate advanced alternative fuel vehicle technologies that were developed by DOE and others.

Elling, J.

2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

37

Matrix Effects on Radiolytic Gas Generation in Plutonium Residues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Transportation of plutonium bearing materials requires a shipping package that has been rigorously tested to withstand normal and accident conditions. Plutonium bearing materials can contribute to package internal pressure by producing heat and gases from chemical and radiochemical reactions. Of particular concern is the production of hydrogen gas from the radiolysis of moisture, which can result in flammable gas mixtures within the shipping package. Estimating the gas generation rates for plutonium residues is complicated by the large variability of material composition and process origin. In February 1999, the Savannah River Technology Center established a gas generation test program to support transportation of plutonium residue materials. The initial efforts of this program have focused on evaluation of residues identified as Sand, Slag, and Crucible (SS and C) generated as a byproduct of plutonium metal production.

Livingston, R.

1999-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

38

Efficient gas stream cooling in Second-Generation PFBC plants  

SciTech Connect

The coal-fueled Advanced or Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor concept (APFBC) is an efficient combined cycle in which coal is carbonized (partially gasified) to fuel a gas turbine, gas turbine exhaust heats feedwater for the steam cycle, and carbonizer char is used to generate steam for a steam turbine while heating combustion air for the gas turbine. The system can be described as an energy cascade in which chemical energy in solid coal is converted to gaseous form and flows to the gas turbine followed by the steam turbine, where it is converted to electrical power. Likewise, chemical energy in the char flows to both turbines generating electrical power in parallel. The fuel gas and vitiated air (PFBC exhaust) streams must be cleaned of entrained particulates by high-temperature equipment representing significant extensions of current technology. The energy recovery in the APFBC cycle allows these streams to be cooled to lower temperatures without significantly reducing the efficiency of the plant. Cooling these streams would allow the use of lower-temperature gas cleanup equipment that more closely approaches commercially available equipment, reducing cost and technological risk, and providing an earlier path to commercialization. This paper describes the performance effects of cooling the two hottest APFBC process gas streams: carbonizer fuel gas and vitiated air. Each cooling variation is described in terms of energy utilization, cycle efficiency, and cost implications.

White, J.S.; Horazak, D.A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States)

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Radiolytic gas generation in plutonium contaminated waste materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Many plutonium contaminated waste materials decompose into gaseous products because of exposure to alpha radiation. The gases generated (usually hydrogen) over long-storage periods may create hazardous conditions. To determine the extent of such hazards, knowing the gas generation yields is necessary. These yields were measured by contacting some common Rocky Flats Plant waste materials with plutonium and monitoring the enclosed atmospheres for extensive periods of time. The materials were Plexiglas, polyvinyl chloride, glove-box gloves, machining oil, carbon tetrachloride, chlorothene VG solvent, Kimwipes (dry and wet), polyethylene, Dowex-1 resin, and surgeon's gloves. Both /sup 239/Pu oxide and /sup 238/Pu oxide were used as radiation sources. The gas analyses were made by mass spectrometry and the results obtained were the total gas generation, the hydrogen generation, the oxygen consumption rate, and the gas composition over the entire storage period. Hydrogen was the major gas produced in most of the materials. The total gas yields varied from 0.71 to 16 cm/sup 3/ (standard temperature pressure) per day per curie of plutonium. The oxygen consumption rates varied from 0.0088 to 0.070 millimoles per day per gram of plutonium oxide-239 and from 0.0014 to 0.0051 millimoles per day per milligram /sup 238/Pu.

Kazanjian, A.R.

1976-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

40

STEAM GENERATORS FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE GAS-COOLED REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

An analytical approach and an IBM machine code were prepared for the design of gas-cooled reactor once-through steam generators for both axial-flow and cross-flow tube matrices. The codes were applied to investigate the effects of steam generator configuration, tube diameter, extended surface, type of cooling gas, steam and gas temperature and pressure conditions, and the pumping power-to-heat removal ratio on the size, weight, and cost of steam generators. The results indicate that the least expensive and most promising unit for high- temperature high-pressure gascooled reactor plants employs axial-gas flow over 0.5-in.dia bare U-tubes arranged with their axes parallel to that of the shell. The proposed design is readily adaptable to the installation of a reheater and is suited to conventional fabrication techniques. Charts are presented to facilitate tlie design of both axial-flow and cross-flow steam generators for gas- cooled reactor applications. (auth)

Fraas, A.P.; Ozisik, M.N.

1963-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assessment of Fuel Gas Cleanup Systems for Waste Gas Fueled Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There are many industrial operations that have waste gas streams that are combustible. Chief among these is biogas produced by anaerobic digestion of organic wastes to produce a methane-rich biogas in landfills and anaerobic digesters. These gas streams are increasingly being used to fuel local power generators. The biogas streams, however, contain traces of a wide variety of contaminants. Removal of these contaminants may be required to either meet the manufacturer's requirements for fuel gas quality to...

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

42

Gas Generation from K East Basin Sludges - Series II Testing  

SciTech Connect

This report describes work to examine the gas generation behavior of actual K East (KE) Basin floor, pit and canister sludge. Mixed and unmixed and fractionated KE canister sludge were tested, along with floor and pit sludges from areas in the KE Basin not previously sampled. The first report in this series focuses on gas generation from KE floor and canister sludge collected using a consolidated sampling technique. The third report presents results of gas generation testing of irradiated uranium fuel fragments with and without sludge addition. The path forward for management of the K Basin Sludge is to retrieve, ship, and store the sludge at T Plant until final processing at some future date. Gas generation will impact the designs and costs of systems associated with retrieval, transportation and storage of sludge. This report was originally published in March 2001. In January 2004, a transcription error was discovered in the value reported for the uranium metal content of KE North Loadout Pit sample FE-3. This revision of the report corrects the U metal content of FE-3 from 0.0013 wt% to 0.013 wt%.

Bryan, Samuel A.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Silvers, Kurt L.; Gano, Susan R.; Thornton, Brenda M.

2004-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

43

GE power generation technology challenges for advanced gas turbines  

SciTech Connect

The GE Utility ATS is a large gas turbine, derived from proven GEPG designs and integrated GEAE technology, that utilizes a new turbine cooling system and incorporates advanced materials. This system has the potential to achieve ATS objectives for a utility sized machine. Combined with use of advanced Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBC`s), the new cooling system will allow higher firing temperatures and improved cycle efficiency that represents a significant improvement over currently available machines. Developing advances in gas turbine efficiency and emissions is an ongoing process at GEPG. The third generation, ``F`` class, of utility gas turbines offers net combined cycle efficiencies in the 55% range, with NO{sub x} programs in place to reduce emissions to less than 10 ppM. The gas turbines have firing temperatures of 2350{degree}F, and pressure ratios of 15 to 1. The turbine components are cooled by air extracted from the cycle at various stages of the compressor. The heat recovery cycle is a three pressure steam system, with reheat. Throttle conditions are nominally 1400 psi and 1000{degree}F reheat. As part of GEPG`s ongoing advanced power generation system development program, it is expected that a gas fired advanced turbine system providing 300 MW power output greater than 58% net efficiency and < 10 ppM NO{sub x} will be defined. The new turbine cooling system developed with technology support from the ATS program will achieve system net efficiency levels in excess of 60%.

Cook, C.S.; Nourse, J.G.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Landfill gas generation and migration: Review of current research  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With regard to gas migration, a field investigation is examining bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials by processes of pressure and diffusional flow. The purpose of the study is to quantify gas loss from the landfill reservoir by natural venting and air influx due to pumping on recovery wells. Two field sites - a humid site with clay cover and a semiarid site with sand cover - have been instrumented to examine vertical gas movement through cover materials. Results from the humid site indicate that concentrations of methane, carbon dioxide, oxygen and nitrogen in soil gas vary seasonally with soil moisture; up to 10E5 g methane m/sup -2/ yr/sup -1/ are vented through the cover materials at the humid site (area of 17 ht); and during prolonged wet weather, pressure gradients of more than 2 kPa may develop between the cover materials and top of refuse, indicating that pressure flow is periodically an important mechanism for gas transport. Addressing landfill gas generation, the goal is to develop simple assay techniques to examined the gas production potential of landfilled refuse. Refuse samples extracted from various depths in a landfill are being leached by three different methods to separate microbial mass and substrate. The leachates are being subjected to Biochemical Methane Production (BMP) assays with periodic qualitative examination of microbial populations using fluorescence microscopy of live cultures and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Triplicate assays of the leachates that produce insignificant quantities of biogas after 90 days incubation are being amended with sucrose, a nutrient broth, or a bacterial seed. Response of gas production to each of the three amendments was similar across all samples, regardless of the leaching method originally employed, with nutrient addition producing the most stable long-term biogas production with the highest methane content. 23 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs.

Bogner, J.; Rose, C.; Vogt, M.; Gartman, D.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The motivation and objective of this research is to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions by: (1) applying the Distributed Energy Resources Customer Adoption Model (DER-CAM); (2) using the California Commercial End-Use Survey (CEUS) database for commercial buildings; (3) selecting buildings with electric peak loads between 100 kW and 5 MW; (4) considering fuel cells, micro-turbines, internal combustion engines, gas turbines with waste heat utilization, solar thermal, and PV; (5) testing of different policy instruments, e.g. feed-in tariff or investment subsidies.

Marnay, Chris; Stadler, Michael; Lipman, Tim; Lai, Judy; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program`s maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model`s predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

Jerrell, J.W.

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Revisions to the hydrogen gas generation computer model  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste Management Technology has requested SRTC to maintain and extend a previously developed computer model, TRUGAS, which calculates hydrogen gas concentrations within the transuranic (TRU) waste drums. TRUGAS was written by Frank G. Smith using the BASIC language and is described in the report A Computer Model of gas Generation and Transport within TRU Waste Drums (DP- 1754). The computer model has been partially validated by yielding results similar to experimental data collected at SRL and LANL over a wide range of conditions. The model was created to provide the capability of predicting conditions that could potentially lead to the formation of flammable gas concentrations within drums, and to assess proposed drum venting methods. The model has served as a tool in determining how gas concentrations are affected by parameters such as filter vent sizes, waste composition, gas generation values, the number and types of enclosures, water instrusion into the drum, and curie loading. The success of the TRUGAS model has prompted an interest in the program's maintenance and enhancement. Experimental data continues to be collected at various sites on such parameters as permeability values, packaging arrangements, filter designs, and waste contents. Information provided by this data is used to improve the accuracy of the model's predictions. Also, several modifications to the model have been made to enlarge the scope of problems which can be analyzed. For instance, the model has been used to calculate hydrogen concentrations inside steel cabinets containing retired glove boxes (WSRC-RP-89-762). The revised TRUGAS computer model, H2GAS, is described in this report. This report summarizes all modifications made to the TRUGAS computer model and provides documentation useful for making future updates to H2GAS.

Jerrell, J.W.

1992-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

New Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Generating Technology to Generating Technology to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions ENERGY INFORMATION ADMINISTRATION 30 TH BIRTHDAY CONFERENCE April 7, 2008 Linda G. Stuntz Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 2 The Target * Energy related emissions of CO2 will increase by about 16% in AEO 2008 Reference Case between 2006 and 2030 (5,890 MM metric tons to 6,859 MM metric tons). (#s from Caruso Senate Energy testimony of 3/4/08). * Last year, emissions from electricity generation were 40% of total energy-related GHG emissions. * Based on projected annual electricity demand growth of 1.1%. Stuntz, Davis & Staffier, P.C. 3 The Target Cont'd * 16.4 GW of new nuclear + 2.7 GW Uprates of existing plants less 4.5 GW of retirements. * Coal responsible for 54% of generation in 2030.

49

Modeling acid-gas generation from boiling chloride brines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates the generation of HCl and other acid gases from boiling calcium chloride dominated waters at atmospheric pressure, primarily using numerical modeling. The main focus of this investigation relates to the long-term geologic disposal of nuclear waste at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, where pore waters around waste-emplacement tunnels are expected to undergo boiling and evaporative concentration as a result of the heat released by spent nuclear fuel. Processes that are modeled include boiling of highly concentrated solutions, gas transport, and gas condensation accompanied by the dissociation of acid gases, causing low-pH condensate. Simple calculations are first carried out to evaluate condensate pH as a function of HCl gas fugacity and condensed water fraction for a vapor equilibrated with saturated calcium chloride brine at 50-150 C and 1 bar. The distillation of a calcium-chloride-dominated brine is then simulated with a reactive transport model using a brine composition representative of partially evaporated calcium-rich pore waters at Yucca Mountain. Results show a significant increase in boiling temperature from evaporative concentration, as well as low pH in condensates, particularly for dynamic systems where partial condensation takes place, which result in enrichment of HCl in condensates. These results are in qualitative agreement with experimental data from other studies. The combination of reactive transport with multicomponent brine chemistry to study evaporation, boiling, and the potential for acid gas generation at the proposed Yucca Mountain repository is seen as an improvement relative to previously applied simpler batch evaporation models. This approach allows the evaluation of thermal, hydrological, and chemical (THC) processes in a coupled manner, and modeling of settings much more relevant to actual field conditions than the distillation experiment considered. The actual and modeled distillation experiments do not represent expected conditions in an emplacement drift, but nevertheless illustrate the potential for acid-gas generation at moderate temperatures (<150 C).

Zhang, Guoxiang; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric; Steefel, Carl

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

50

Year-to-date natural gas use for electric power generation is down ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas used to generate electricity so far this year is below the high level during the comparable 2012 period, when low natural gas prices led to significant ...

51

Landfill gas generation and migration: Review of current research II  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With regard to gas migration, a field investigation is examining bidirectional gas movement through landfill cover materials by processes of pressure and diffusional flow. The overall purpose of the study is to quantify gas loss from the landfill reservoir by natural venting and air influx due to pumping on recovery wells. Two field sites--a humid site, with vegetated clay cover and a semiarid site with unvegetated sandy silt cover--have been instrumented to examine vertical gas movement through cover materials. Results from the past year's work at the semiarid site indicates that rates of CH/sub 4/ flux out of the landfill surface may be as high as 2 /times/ 10/sup /minus/6/ g cm/sup /minus/2/ sec/sup /minus/1/ (6.3 /times/ 10/sup 2/ Kg m/sup /minus/1/ yr/sup /minus/1/) during dry soil conditions. Such high rates represent both the loss of an energy resource and a significance factor in global warming trends since atmospheric CH/sub 4/ contributes to the greenhouse effect. An independent estimate has suggested that 8--15% of global atmospheric CH/sub 4/ is attributable to landfill sources. The second project is addressing landfill gas generation. The major goal is to develop simple assay techniques to examine the gas production potential of landfilled refuse. Refuse samples extracted from various depths in a landfill are being subjected to Biochemical Methane Production (BMP) assays with periodic qualitative examination of microbial populations. Triplicate assays of unamended refuse (controls) are compared to assays with added moisture, nutrients, and bacterial seed. To date, moisture addition is the single most important variable in stimulating gas production, particularly in samples with visible soil content. 56 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Bogner, J.; Vogt, M.; Piorkowski, R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of gas-fired and renewable generation Mark Bolinger and Ryannatural gas prices, renewable energy resources – which bygas-fired generation, renewable generation, such as wind or

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

TRU Waste Sampling Program: Volume II. Gas generation studies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Volume II of the TRU Waste Sampling Program report contains the data generated from evaluating the adequacy of venting/filtering devices for maintaining safe hydrogen levels in plutonium contaminated waste drums. Additional studies reported in this volume include gas generation rates, selected waste form monitoring, and evaluation of hydrogen migration from sealed 90-mil rigid polyethylene drum liners containing /sup 238/Pu-contaminated wastes. All wastes used in the studies were newly-generated, and the waste drums were under controlled, experimental conditions. Studies using /sup 239/Pu-contaminated wastes were conducted at the Rocky Flats Plant. Studies using /sup 238/Pu-contaminated wastes were conducted at the Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Clements, T.L. Jr.; Kudera, D.E.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Effects of oxygen cover gas and NaOH dilution on gas generation in tank 241-SY-101 waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Laboratory studies are reported of gas generation in heated waste from tank 241-SY-101. The rates of gas generation and the compositions of product gas were measured. Three types of tests are compared. The tests use: undiluted waste, waste diluted by a 54% addition of 2.5 M NaOH, and undiluted waste with a reactive cover gas of 30% Oxygen in He. The gas generation rate is reduced by dilution, increased by higher temperatures (which determines activation energies), and increased by reactions of Oxygen (these primarily produce H{sub 2}). Gases are generated as reduction products oxidation of organic carbon species by nitrite and oxygen.

Person, J.C.

1996-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

55

Method of generating hydrogen gas from sodium borohydride  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compact solid source of hydrogen gas, where the gas is generated by contacting water with micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in the presence of a catalyst, such as cobalt or ruthenium. The micro-disperse particles can have a substantially uniform diameter of 1-10 microns, and preferably about 3-5 microns. Ruthenium or cobalt catalytic nanoparticles can be incorporated in the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride, which allows a rapid and complete reaction to occur without the problems associated with caking and scaling of the surface by the reactant product sodium metaborate. A closed loop water management system can be used to recycle wastewater from a PEM fuel cell to supply water for reacting with the micro-disperse particles of sodium borohydride in a compact hydrogen gas generator. Capillary forces can wick water from a water reservoir into a packed bed of micro-disperse fuel particles, eliminating the need for using an active pump.

Kravitz, Stanley H. (Placitas, NM); Hecht, Andrew M. (Sandia Park, NM); Sylwester, Alan P. (Albuquerque, NM); Bell, Nelson S. (Albuquerque, NM)

2007-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

56

Life extension of gas turbines used for power generation  

SciTech Connect

Gas turbines have traditionally been used by electric utilities to supplement generating capacity during peak demand periods. As they age, the utility is faced with the decision of either replacing the units to maintain a reliable source of generating capacity, or extending the life of the units through the use of improved maintenance and monitoring techniques. This paper discusses some of the considerations for extended life operation of gas turbines. To perform this study, actual operating and failure data for 50 Pratt Whitney FT-4 gas turbines were collected from a cooperating utility and analyzed to identify predominant failure causes and components most frequently failed. Failure rates for individual engine modules were calculated as a function of engine age to identify time-dependent trends and their effect on engine reliability. Mean time between failures and engine availability were also determined and are presented. Based on the results of the analysis, potential improvements to operation and maintenance methods were identified and are discussed. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Lofaro, R.; Villaran, M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

THE EFFECTS OF FLAME TEMPERATURE, PARTICLE SIZE AND EUROPIUM DOPING CONCENTRATION ON THE PROPERTIES OF Y2O3:EU PARTICLES FORMED IN A FLAME AEROSOL PROCESS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Y2O3:Eu particles are phosphors that have found wide applications. Flamesynthesized Y2O3:Eu particles may have either the cubic or the monoclinic structure. The effects of particle size and Eu doping concentration on crystal structure and the surface elemental composition of the flame-synthesized Y2O3:Eu particles had not been previously reported. In this study, a flame aerosol process was used to generate polydisperse Y2O3:Eu particle. H2 was used as the fuel gas, with either air or O2 gas as the oxidizer. The precursor was aqueous solutions of the metal nitrates, atomized using a 1.7-MHz ultrasonic atomizer. The product particles were analyzed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), Selected area electron diffraction (SAED), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), fluorescence spectrophotometer, and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometer (ICP-MS). The Y2O3:Eu particles generated in H2/O2 flames were spherical and fully dense, with diameters in the range of 10~3000 nm. In particle samples with lower Eu doping concentrations, a critical particle diameter was found, whose value increased with increasing Eu doping concentration. Particles well below the critical diameter had the monoclinic structure; those well above the critical diameter had the cubic structure. At sufficiently high Eu doping concentrations, all Y2O3:Eu generated in H2/O2 flames had the monoclinic structure. On the other hand, all particles generated in the H2/air flames had the cubic structure. For the Y2O3:Eu particles generated in H2/O2 flames, XPS results showed that the surface Eu concentration was several times higher than the doping concentration. For Y2O3:Eu particles generated in H2/air flames, the surface Eu concentration was equal to the doping concentration. For both types of particles, the photoluminescence intensity reached a maximum corresponding to a surface Eu concentration 40~50%. The photoluminescence intensity then decreased rapidly with higher Eu doping concentration. The effect of particle size and Eu doping concentration on crystal structure may be explained by the interplay between surface energy and polymorphism. A mechanism for this surface enrichment phenomenon was proposed based on the binary Eu2O3-Y2O3 phase diagram.

Yim, Hoon

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Speaker to Address Impact of Natural Gas Production on Greenhouse Gas Emissions When used for power generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation, Marcellus Shale natural gas can significantly reduce carbon dioxide emissions, but questions have been raised whether development of shale gas resources results in an overall lower greenhouse gas, "Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Marcellus Shale Gas," appeared in Environmental Research Letters

Boyer, Elizabeth W.

59

Relativistic high harmonic generation in gas jet targets  

SciTech Connect

We experimentally demonstrate a new regime of high-order harmonic generation by relativistic-irradiance lasers in gas jet targets. Bright harmonics with both odd and even orders, generated by linearly as well as circularly polarized pulses, are emitted in the forward direction, while the base harmonic frequency is downshifted. A 9 TW laser generates harmonics up to 360 eV, within the 'water window' spectral region. With a 120 TW laser producing 40 uJ/sr per harmonic at 120 eV, we demonstrate the photon number scalability. The observed harmonics cannot be explained by previously suggested scenarios. A novel high-order harmonics generation mechanism [T. Zh. Esirkepov et al., AIP Proceedings, this volume], which explains our experimental findings, is based on the phenomena inherent in the relativistic laser - underdense plasma interactions (self-focusing, cavity evacuation, and bow wave generation), mathematical catastrophe theory which explains formation of electron density singularities (cusps), and collective radiation due to nonlinear oscillations of a compact charge.

Pirozhkov, A.S.; Kando, M.; Esirkepov, T.Zh.; and others

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

60

Advanced Combustion Systems for Next Generation Gas Turbines  

SciTech Connect

Next generation turbine power plants will require high efficiency gas turbines with higher pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures than currently available. These increases in gas turbine cycle conditions will tend to increase NOx emissions. As the desire for higher efficiency drives pressure ratios and turbine inlet temperatures ever higher, gas turbines equipped with both lean premixed combustors and selective catalytic reduction after treatment eventually will be unable to meet the new emission goals of sub-3 ppm NOx. New gas turbine combustors are needed with lower emissions than the current state-of-the-art lean premixed combustors. In this program an advanced combustion system for the next generation of gas turbines is being developed with the goal of reducing combustor NOx emissions by 50% below the state-of-the-art. Dry Low NOx (DLN) technology is the current leader in NOx emission technology, guaranteeing 9 ppm NOx emissions for heavy duty F class gas turbines. This development program is directed at exploring advanced concepts which hold promise for meeting the low emissions targets. The trapped vortex combustor is an advanced concept in combustor design. It has been studied widely for aircraft engine applications because it has demonstrated the ability to maintain a stable flame over a wide range of fuel flow rates. Additionally, it has shown significantly lower NOx emission than a typical aircraft engine combustor and with low CO at the same time. The rapid CO burnout and low NOx production of this combustor made it a strong candidate for investigation. Incremental improvements to the DLN technology have not brought the dramatic improvements that are targeted in this program. A revolutionary combustor design is being explored because it captures many of the critical features needed to significantly reduce emissions. Experimental measurements of the combustor performance at atmospheric conditions were completed in the first phase of the program. Emissions measurements were obtained over a variety of operating conditions. A kinetics model is formulated to describe the emissions performance. The model is a tool for determining the conditions for low emission performance. The flow field was also modeled using CFD. A first prototype was developed for low emission performance on natural gas. The design utilized the tools anchored to the atmospheric prototype performance. The 1/6 scale combustor was designed for low emission performance in GE's FA+e gas turbine. A second prototype was developed to evaluate changes in the design approach. The prototype was developed at a 1/10 scale for low emission performance in GE's FA+e gas turbine. The performance of the first two prototypes gave a strong indication of the best design approach. Review of the emission results led to the development of a 3rd prototype to further reduce the combustor emissions. The original plan to produce a scaled-up prototype was pushed out beyond the scope of the current program. The 3rd prototype was designed at 1/10 scale and targeted further reductions in the full-speed full-load emissions.

Joel Haynes; Jonathan Janssen; Craig Russell; Marcus Huffman

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Study of physical properties, gas generation and gas retention in simulated Hanford waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this study was to establish the chemical and physical processes responsible for the generation and retention of gases within high-level waste from Tank 101-SY on the Hanford Site. This research, conducted using simulated waste on a laboratory scale, supports the development of mitigation/remediation strategies for Tank 101-SY. Simulated waste formulations are based on actual waste compositions. Selected physical properties of the simulated waste are compared to properties of actual Tank 101-SY waste samples. Laboratory studies using aged simulated waste show that significant gas generation occurs thermally at current tank temperatures ({approximately}60{degrees}C). Gas compositions include the same gases produced in actual tank waste, primarily N{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, and H{sub 2}. Gas stoichiometries have been shown to be greatly influenced by several organic and inorganic constituents within the simulated waste. Retention of gases in the simulated waste is in the form of bubble attachment to solid particles. This attachment phenomenon is related to the presence of organic constituents (HEDTA, EDTA, and citrate) of the simulated waste. A mechanism is discussed that relates the gas bubble/particle interactions to the partially hydrophobic surface produced on the solids by the organic constituents.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Scheele, R.D.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

EU Metric Directive  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... View EU Metric Directive Commission Services Working Document PDF ... of European Union (EU) Meeting on Metric Directives (2005); Packaging ...

2012-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

63

Removal of Dioxin Contamination for Gas Turbine Generator Set Repair  

SciTech Connect

Decontamination projects are typically undertaken in the interest of reducing disposal costs. This goal can be achieved because decontamination concentrates the contaminant into a smaller volume or changes its form so that a lower cost disposal technology becomes available. Less frequently, decontamination adds value back to the fouled structure or contaminated piece of equipment. This removal of dioxins from a gas turbine generator set is one of the latter cases. A multi-million dollar piece of equipment could have been destined for the scrap pile. Instead, an innovative, non-destructive decontamination technology, developed under EPA and DOE demonstration programs has was employed so that the set could repaired and put back into service. The TechXtractchemical decontamination technology reduced surface dioxin / furan concentrations from as high as 24,000 ng / m2 to less than 25 ng / m2 and below detection limits.

Fay, W. S.; Borah, R.E.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

64

Natural gas generation lower than last year because of differences ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

65

BIOMASS GASIFICATION AND POWER GENERATION USING ADVANCED GAS TURBINE SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multidisciplined team led by the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) and consisting of Pratt & Whitney Power Systems (PWPS), the University of North Dakota Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC), KraftWork Systems, Inc. (kWS), and the Connecticut Resource Recovery Authority (CRRA) has evaluated a variety of gasified biomass fuels, integrated into advanced gas turbine-based power systems. The team has concluded that a biomass integrated gasification combined-cycle (BIGCC) plant with an overall integrated system efficiency of 45% (HHV) at emission levels of less than half of New Source Performance Standards (NSPS) is technically and economically feasible. The higher process efficiency in itself reduces consumption of premium fuels currently used for power generation including those from foreign sources. In addition, the advanced gasification process can be used to generate fuels and chemicals, such as low-cost hydrogen and syngas for chemical synthesis, as well as baseload power. The conceptual design of the plant consists of an air-blown circulating fluidized-bed Advanced Transport Gasifier and a PWPS FT8 TwinPac{trademark} aeroderivative gas turbine operated in combined cycle to produce {approx}80 MWe. This system uses advanced technology commercial products in combination with components in advanced development or demonstration stages, thereby maximizing the opportunity for early implementation. The biofueled power system was found to have a levelized cost of electricity competitive with other new power system alternatives including larger scale natural gas combined cycles. The key elements are: (1) An Advanced Transport Gasifier (ATG) circulating fluid-bed gasifier having wide fuel flexibility and high gasification efficiency; (2) An FT8 TwinPac{trademark}-based combined cycle of approximately 80 MWe; (3) Sustainable biomass primary fuel source at low cost and potentially widespread availability-refuse-derived fuel (RDF); (4) An overall integrated system that exceeds the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) goal of 40% (HHV) efficiency at emission levels well below the DOE suggested limits; and (5) An advanced biofueled power system whose levelized cost of electricity can be competitive with other new power system alternatives.

David Liscinsky

2002-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

66

"1. Mystic Generating Station","Gas","Boston Generating LLC",1968  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Massachusetts" Massachusetts" "1. Mystic Generating Station","Gas","Boston Generating LLC",1968 "2. Brayton Point","Coal","Dominion Energy New England, LLC",1545 "3. Canal","Petroleum","Mirant Canal LLC",1119 "4. Northfield Mountain","Pumped Storage","FirstLight Power Resources Services LLC",1080 "5. Salem Harbor","Coal","Dominion Energy New England, LLC",744 "6. Fore River Generating Station","Gas","Boston Generating LLC",688 "7. Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station","Nuclear","Entergy Nuclear Generation Co",685 "8. Bear Swamp","Pumped Storage","Brookfield Power New England",600

67

Next Generation * Natural Gas (NG)2 Information Requirements--Executive Summary  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The Energy Information Administration (EIA) has initiated the Next Generation * Natural Gas (NG)2 project to design and implement a new and comprehensive information program for natural gas to meet customer requirements in the post-2000 time frame.

Information Center

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the role of distributed generation (DG) in greenhouse gas reductions. The impact of DG on large industrial sites is well known, and mostly, the potentials are already harvested. In contrast, little is known about the impact of DG on commercial buildings with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how DG with combined heat and power (CHP) may be implemented within the context of a cost minimizing microgrid that is able to adopt and operate various smart energy technologies, such as thermal and photovoltaic (PV) on-site generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We use a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that has the minimization of a site's annual energy costs as objective. Using 138 representative commercial sites in California (CA) with existing tariff rates and technology data, we find the greenhouse gas reduction potential for California's commercial sector. This paper shows results from the ongoing research project and finished work from a two year U.S. Department of Energy research project. To show the impact of the different technologies on CO2 emissions, several sensitivity runs for different climate zones within CA with different technology performance expectations for 2020 were performed. The considered sites can contribute between 1 Mt/a and 1.8 Mt/a to the California Air Resources Board (CARB) goal of 6.7Mt/a CO2 abatement potential in 2020. Also, with lower PV and storage costs as well as consideration of a CO2 pricing scheme, our results indicate that PV and electric storage adoption can compete rather than supplement each other when the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply have been taken into consideration. To satisfy the site's objective of minimizing energy costs, the batteries will be charged also by CHP systems during off-peak and mid-peak hours and not only by PV during sunny on-peak hours.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Megel, Olivier; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

Gas Generation Testing of Neptunium Oxide Generated Using the HB-Line Phase IIFlowsheet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The hydrogen (H{sub 2}) gas generation rate for neptunium dioxide (NpO{sub 2}) samples produced on a laboratory scale using the HB-Line Phase II flowsheet has been measured following exposure to 75% relative humidity (RH). As expected, the observed H{sub 2} generation rates for these samples increase with increasing moisture content. A maximum H{sub 2} generation rate of 1.8 x 10{sup -6} moles per day per kilogram (mol {center_dot} day{sup -1} kg{sup -1}) was observed for NpO{sub 2} samples with approximately one and one-half times (1 1/2 X) the expected specific surface area (SSA) for the HB-Line Phase II product. The SSA of NpO{sub 2} samples calcined at 650 C is similar to plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) calcined at 950 C according to the Department of Energy (DOE) standard for packaging and storage of PuO{sub 2}. This low SSA of the HB-Line Phase II product limits moisture uptake to less than 0.2 weight percent (wt %) even with extended exposure to 75% RH.

Duffey, J

2003-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

70

Monthly coal- and natural gas-fired generation equal for first ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Recently published electric power data show that, for the first time since EIA began collecting the data, generation from natural gas-fired plants is ...

71

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

year normalized weather sample; containing simulated hourly estimates of end-use electricity and natural gas consumption

Marnay, Chris

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Quality Assurance Program Plan for TRUPACT-II Gas Generation Test Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gas Generation Test Program (GGTP), referred to as the Program, is designed to establish the concentration of flammable gases and/or gas generation rates in a test category waste container intended for shipment in the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II). The phrase "gas generationtesting" shall refer to any activity that establishes the flammable gas concentration or the flammable gas generation rate. This includes, but is not limited to, measurements performed directly on waste containers or during tests performed on waste containers. This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) documents the quality assurance (QA) and quality control (QC) requirements that apply to the Program. The TRUPACT-II requirements and technical bases for allowable flammable gas concentration and gas generation rates are described in the TRUPACT-II Authorized Methods for Payload Control (TRAMPAC).

Carlsbad Field Office

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

How much coal, natural gas, or petroleum is used to generate a ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much coal, natural gas, or petroleum is used to generate a kilowatt-hour of electricity? The amount of fuel used to generate electricity depends on the efficiency ...

74

STM Stirling Engine-Generator at a Hog Manure Digester Gas Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stirling engines have recently been introduced to the distributed generation market. This report summarizes the results of three projects that used Stirling engine-generators from one manufacturer in applications where they were fueled with digester gas.

2007-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report period were to complete the development of the Gas Generator design, which was done; fabricate and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive gas Gas Generator, which has been postponed. Focus during this report period has been to complete the brazing and bonding necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continue making preparations for fabricating and testing the Gas Generator, and continuing the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware in preparation for the test program. Fabrication is more than 95% complete and is expected to conclude in early May 2002. the test schedule was affected by relocation of the testing to another test supplier. The target test date for hot fire testing is now not earlier than June 15, 2002.

Unknown

2002-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

76

Rise in gas-fired power generation tracks gains in turbine efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas-fueled gas turbines--in both simple and combined-cycle configurations--will account for most power generation capacity additions through 2000. It is widely agreed that gas turbines will remain the dominant form of technology for power generation for the next decade or two, making them the power generation technology of choice for today and the future. The pre-eminent stature of gas turbines can be attributed to their low capital costs, high efficiency, low emissions, short permitting and construction lead times, and proven reliability. The versatility of gas turbines also makes them unique among power generation technologies, as they can economically serve a wide spectrum of applications and sizes--from distributed generation to industrial cogeneration and central station generation. Three primary factors contribute to the growing interest in gas turbine-based power generation and the role gas turbines will play in the future power generation market: An optimistic outlook for the supply and price of natural gas; technology advances that have produced substantial improvements in efficiency and emissions; and emissions regulations that may favor the use of gas turbines over traditional fossil-fueled steam turbines. These three factors are discussed.

Bautista, P. [Gas Research Inst., Chicago, IL (United States)

1996-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

77

Small Gas Turbines for Distributed Generation Markets: Technology, Products, and Business Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Small gas turbines (300 kW to 5 MW) offer an attractive way for utilities and energy service companies to generate electric power within distribution grids and for consumers to generate their own power. Distributed generation also benefits utilities by deferring or avoiding costly expansion of the power transmission and distribution system, which could allow them to offer customers lower cost power. Gas turbines process more power-generation cycle air per unit size and weight of machine than do reciproca...

2000-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

78

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more volatile than the price of coal. Price regulation incoal-fired generation could reduce wholesale electricity pricecoal is found to be more negative than the beta of gas, given that the price

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell.

Singh, Prabhakar (Export, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Cover and startup gas supply system for solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cover and startup gas supply system for a solid oxide fuel cell power generator is disclosed. Hydrocarbon fuel, such as natural gas or diesel fuel, and oxygen-containing gas are supplied to a burner. Combustion gas exiting the burner is cooled prior to delivery to the solid oxide fuel cell. The system mixes the combusted hydrocarbon fuel constituents with hydrogen which is preferably stored in solid form to obtain a non-explosive gas mixture. The system may be used to provide both non-explosive cover gas and hydrogen-rich startup gas to the fuel cell. 4 figs.

Singh, P.; George, R.A.

1999-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Today in Energy - Natural gas use for power generation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... (through November), relative to the same time period in 2012. ... given the large cost advantage of natural gas.

82

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilities, the electricity tariff has time- of-use (TOU)energy loads, 4 electricity and natural gas tariff structurewhen the tariff structure and costs of electricity supply

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J.L. Edwards, (2003), “Distributed Energy Resources CustomerGas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations”,Energy Reliability, Distributed Energy Program of the U.S.

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Steam generators two phase flows numerical simulation with liquid and gas momentum equations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steam generators two phase flows numerical simulation with liquid and gas momentum equations M dimensional two-phase (liquid and gas) flows. The main goal is to improve the mod- eling of kinetic imbalance between the phases. We present a method that solves the mix- ture (liquid-gas) mass and enthalpy equations

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

85

Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Hydrogen Generation in Fuel Cell Applications1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Control of Natural Gas Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Hydrogen Generation in Fuel Cell Ghosh3 , Huei Peng2 Abstract A fuel processor that reforms natural gas to hydrogen-rich mixture to feed of the hydrogen in the fuel processor is based on catalytic partial oxidation of the methane in the natural gas

Peng, Huei

86

Aero-engine derivative gas turbines for power generation: Thermodynamic and economic perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aero-engine technology has played a major part in the development of both the industrial gas turbine and, more recently, the combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) plant. A distinction may be drawn between the direct use of developed aero-engine hardware in power generation (and in marine applications), and the more indirect influence of aero-engine technology, particularly in design of heavy-duty gas turbines. Both the direct use of aero-engine hardware, in gas turbines for power generation, and the indirect influence of aero-engine technology, in the design of more conventional heavy-duty plants (including combined cycle gas turbines, CCGTs), are reviewed.

Horlock, J.H. [Whittle Lab., Cambridge (United Kingdom)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Winter natural gas price spikes in New England spur generation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum is rarely used for power generation (only 0.3% of total annual generation in 2012 for New England) because it typically is more expensive than other fuels.

88

Natural gas and renewable shares of electricity generation ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Includes hydropower, solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium. Uranium fuel, nuclear reactors, generation, spent fuel. ...

89

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Against the backdrop of increasingly volatile natural gas prices, renewable energy resources, which by their nature are immune to natural gas fuel price risk, provide a real economic benefit. Unlike many contracts for natural gas-fired generation, renewable generation is typically sold under fixed-price contracts. Assuming that electricity consumers value long-term price stability, a utility or other retail electricity supplier that is looking to expand its resource portfolio (or a policymaker interested in evaluating different resource options) should therefore compare the cost of fixed-price renewable generation to the hedged or guaranteed cost of new natural gas-fired generation, rather than to projected costs based on uncertain gas price forecasts. To do otherwise would be to compare apples to oranges: by their nature, renewable resources carry no natural gas fuel price risk, and if the market values that attribute, then the most appropriate comparison is to the hedged cost of natural gas-fired generation. Nonetheless, utilities and others often compare the costs of renewable to gas-fired generation using as their fuel price input long-term gas price forecasts that are inherently uncertain, rather than long-term natural gas forward prices that can actually be locked in. This practice raises the critical question of how these two price streams compare. If they are similar, then one might conclude that forecast-based modeling and planning exercises are in fact approximating an apples-to-apples comparison, and no further consideration is necessary. If, however, natural gas forward prices systematically differ from price forecasts, then the use of such forecasts in planning and modeling exercises will yield results that are biased in favor of either renewable (if forwards forecasts). In this report we compare the cost of hedging natural gas price risk through traditional gas-based hedging instruments (e.g., futures, swaps, and fixed-price physical supply contracts) to contemporaneous forecasts of spot natural gas prices, with the purpose of identifying any systematic differences between the two. Although our data set is quite limited, we find that over the past three years, forward gas prices for durations of 2-10 years have been considerably higher than most natural gas spot price forecasts, including the reference case forecasts developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This difference is striking, and implies that resource planning and modeling exercises based on these forecasts over the past three years have yielded results that are biased in favor of gas-fired generation (again, presuming that long-term stability is desirable). As discussed later, these findings have important ramifications for resource planners, energy modelers, and policy-makers.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

90

DESIGN, FABRICATION, AND TESTING OF AN ADVANCED, NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this report period was to continue the development of the Gas Generator design, fabrication and test of the non-polluting unique power turbine drive Gas Generator. Focus during this past report period has been to continue completion the Gas Generator design, completing the brazing and bonding experiments to determine the best method and materials necessary to fabricate the Gas Generator hardware, continuing to making preparations for fabricating and testing this Gas Generator and commencing with the fabrication of the Gas Generator hardware and ancillary hardware. Designs have been completed sufficiently such that Long Lead Items [LLI] have been ordered and upon arrival will be readied for the fabrication process. The keys to this design are the platelet construction of the injectors that precisely measures/meters the flow of the propellants and water all throughout the steam generating process and the CES patented gas generating cycle. The Igniter Assembly injector platelets fabrication process has been completed and bonded to the Igniter Assembly and final machined. The Igniter Assembly is in final assembly and is being readied for testing in the October 2001 time frame. Test Plan dated August 2001, was revised and finalized, replacing Test Plan dated May 2001.

Unknown

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Abstract The natural gas price surged in 2004. As a result, the marginal cost of some generators burning gas also rose sharply.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract ­ The natural gas price surged in 2004. As a result, the marginal cost of some generators marginal cost, which is closely related to the natural gas price. Since gas units are usually the marginal the sensitivity of Var benefit with respect to generation cost. The U.S. natural gas industry has been

Tolbert, Leon M.

92

Future power market shares of coal, natural gas generators depend ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Natural gas combined-cycle capacity represented only 7% of total capacity in the region in 2011, but is projected to rise to 11% in 2040 in the Reference Case.

93

Large heavy-duty gas turbines for base-load power generation and heat cogeneration  

SciTech Connect

The predominant role of large gas turbines has shifted from peaking-load duty to midrange and base-load electric power generation, especially within combined-cycle plants. Such applications require heavy-duty industrial gas turbines to ensure the same high reliability and availability for continuous service as the associated steam turbines. It is also important that the gas turbines be designed for low maintenance to minimize the necessary outage times and costs for component repair and replacement. The basic design principles and applications of Model V94 gas turbines are discussed with special reference to highly reliable and economic bulk power generation.

Joyce, J.S.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Gas generation and bubble formation model for crystalline silicotitanate ion exchange columns  

SciTech Connect

The authors developed a transient model to describe the process of gas generation due to radiolysis and bubble formation in crystalline silicotitanate (CST) ion exchange (IX) columns using the Aspen Custom Modeler (ACM) software package. The model calculates gas concentrations and onset of bubble formation for large CST IX columns. The calculations include cesium loading as a function of time, gas generation as a function of cesium loading, and bubble formation as a function of gas solubility. This report summarizes the model development and predictions.

Hang, T.

2000-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

95

New generation enrichment monitoring technology for gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

SciTech Connect

The continuous enrichment monitor, developed and fielded in the 1990s by the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided a go-no-go capability to distinguish between UF{sub 6} containing low enriched (approximately 4% {sup 235}U) and highly enriched (above 20% {sup 235}U) uranium. This instrument used the 22-keV line from a {sup 109}Cd source as a transmission source to achieve a high sensitivity to the UF{sub 6} gas absorption. The 1.27-yr half-life required that the source be periodically replaced and the instrument recalibrated. The instrument's functionality and accuracy were limited by the fact that measured gas density and gas pressure were treated as confidential facility information. The modern safeguarding of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant producing low-enriched UF{sub 6} product aims toward a more quantitative flow and enrichment monitoring concept that sets new standards for accuracy stability, and confidence. An instrument must be accurate enough to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of material, have virtually zero false alarms, and protect the operator's proprietary process information. We discuss a new concept for advanced gas enrichment assay measurement technology. This design concept eliminates the need for the periodic replacement of a radioactive source as well as the need for maintenance by experts. Some initial experimental results will be presented.

Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexandrov, Boian, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian, D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Thomas, R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macarthur, Duncan, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marks, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moss, Calvin, E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheppard, Gregory, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn, T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Ronald E. Hagen, John R. Moens, and Zdenek D. Nikodem Energy Information Administration U.S. Department of Energy International Atomic Energy Agency Vienna, Austria November 6-9, 2001 iii Energy Information Administration/ Impact of U.S. Nuclear Generation on Greenhouse Gas Emissions Contents Page I. The Electric Power Industry and the Greenhouse Gas Issue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 II. The Current Role of the U.S. Nuclear Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 III. The Future Role of the U.S. Nuclear Industry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 IV. Factors That Affect Nuclear Expansion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 V. Conclusion

97

Thermal and radiolytic gas generation from Tank 241-S-102 waste  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes progress in evaluating thermal and radiolytic rate parameters for flammable gas generation in Hanford single-shell tank wastes based on the results of laboratory tests using actual waste from Tank 241-S-102 (S-102). Work described in this report was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, whose purpose is to develop information to support Fluor Daniel Hanford (FDH) and its Project Management Hanford Contract (PHMC) subcontractors in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies being performed at Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT) under subcontract to PNNL, using simulated wastes, and to studies being performed at Numatec Hanford Corporation (formerly Westinghouse Hanford Company) using actual wastes. The results of gas generation from Tank S-102 waste under thermal and radiolytic conditions are described in this report. The accurate measurement of gas generation rates in actual waste from highly radioactive waste tanks is needed to assess the potential for producing and storing flammable gases within the waste tanks. This report addresses the gas generation capacity of the waste from Tank S-102, a waste tank listed as high priority by the Flammable Gas Safety Program due to its potential for flammable gas accumulation above the flammability limit.

King, C.M.; Pederson, L.R.; Bryan, S.A.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Interdependence of the Electricity Generation System and the Natural Gas System and Implications for Energy Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Lexington Massachusetts This page intentionally left blank. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Concern about energy security on domestic Department of Defense installations has led to the possibility of using natural gas-fired electricity generators to provide power in the event of electric grid failures. As natural gas is an increasingly base-load fuel for electricity generation in the United States, the electricity generation system has become increasingly dependent on the operation of the natural gas system. However, as the natural gas system is also partly dependent on electricity for its ability to deliver natural gas from the well-head to the consumer, the question arises of whether, in the event of an electric grid failure, the natural gas would continue to flow. As the natural gas transmission system largely uses natural gas from the pipelines as a source of power, once the gas has been extracted from the ground, the system is less dependent on the electric grid. However, some of the drilling rigs, processing units, and pipeline compressors do depend on electric power, making the vulnerability to the system to a disruption in the national electricity supply network vary depending on the cause, breadth, and geographic location of the disruption. This is due to the large numbers of players in the natural gas production and

N. Judson; N. Judson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term ( 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Effects of Globally Waste Disturbing Activities on Gas Generation, Retention, and Release in Hanford Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect

Various operations are authorized in Hanford single- and double-shell tanks that disturb all or a large fraction of the waste. These globally waste-disturbing activities have the potential to release a large fraction of the retained flammable gas and to affect future gas generation, retention, and release behavior. This report presents analyses of the expected flammable gas release mechanisms and the potential release rates and volumes resulting from these activities. The background of the flammable gas safety issue at Hanford is summarized, as is the current understanding of gas generation, retention, and release phenomena. Considerations for gas monitoring and assessment of the potential for changes in tank classification and steady-state flammability are given.

Stewart, Charles W.; Fountain, Matthew S.; Huckaby, James L.; Mahoney, Lenna A.; Meyer, Perry A.; Wells, Beric E.

2005-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

What's New with the NGNGV Program? Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program Newsletter, June 2002  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A newsletter about what's new with the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program (NGNGV). This June 2002 update includes Phase II RFPs, Phase I update, and near-term engine development projects.

Not Available

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A market and engineering study of a 3-kilowatt class gas turbine generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Market and engineering studies were performed for the world's only commercially available 3 kW class gas turbine generator, the IHI Aerospace Dynajet. The objectives of the market study were to determine the competitive ...

Monroe, Mark A. (Mark Alan)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Heat exchanger design for thermoelectric electricity generation from low temperature flue gas streams  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An air-to-oil heat exchanger was modeled and optimized for use in a system utilizing a thermoelectric generator to convert low grade waste heat in flue gas streams to electricity. The NTU-effectiveness method, exergy, and ...

Latcham, Jacob G. (Jacob Greco)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Quantification of Regional Green House Gas Emission Impacts and Benefits for Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power generation sector contributes about one-third of all green house gas (GHG) emissions in the United States. To curb green house gas emissions, all options in the electric power value chain must be considered and evaluated. More effective use of distributed photovoltaic (PV) systems and efficient use of natural gas via use in distributed combined heat, power (CHP), and cooling systems in the end-use sector may be options to mitigating GHG emissions. This research project quantitatively e...

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

105

Small-Scale, Biomass-Fired Gas Turbine Plants Suitable for Distributed and Mobile Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluated the cost-effectiveness of small-scale, biomass-fired gas turbine plants that use an indirectly-fired gas turbine cycle. Such plants were originally thought to have several advantages for distributed generation, including portability. However, detailed analysis of two designs revealed several problems that would have to be resolved to make the plants feasible and also determined that a steam turbine cycle with the same net output was more economic than the gas turbine cycle. The incre...

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

106

Greenhouse Gas Abatement with Distributed Generation in California's Commercial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the very qualities that attract people to live there. Notes From the Chair C lean energy has been a hot, hydroelectric, geothermal electric, anaerobic digestion, and fuel cells using renewable fuels. Renewable, fuel cell, or internal combustion engine, and you can generate on-demand power with zero pollution

107

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Analysts at NREL have developed and applied a systematic approach to review the LCA literature, identify primary sources of variability and, where possible, reduce variability in GHG emissions estimates through a procedure called 'harmonization.' Harmonization of the literature provides increased precision and helps clarify the impacts of specific electricity generation choices, producing more robust results.

Not Available

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

FABRICATE AND TEST AN ADVANCED NON-POLLUTING TURBINE DRIVE GAS GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

In September 2000 the Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) contracted with Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) of Sacramento, California to design, fabricate, and test a 20 MW{sub t} (10 MW{sub e}) gas generator. Program goals were to demonstrate a non-polluting gas generator at temperatures up to 3000 F at 1500 psi, and to demonstrate resulting drive gas composition, comprising steam and carbon dioxide substantially free of pollutants. Following hardware design and fabrication, testing, originally planned to begin in the summer of 2001, was delayed by unavailability of the contracted test facility. CES designed, fabricated, and tested the proposed gas generator as originally agreed. The CES process for producing near-zero-emissions power from fossil fuels is based on the near-stoichiometric combustion of a clean gaseous fuel with oxygen in the presence of recycled water, to produce a high-temperature, high-pressure turbine drive fluid comprising steam and carbon dioxide. Tests demonstrated igniter operation over the prescribed ranges of pressure and mixture ratios. Ignition was repeatable and reliable through more than 100 ignitions. Injector design ''A'' was operated successfully at both low power ({approx}20% of rated power) and at rated power ({approx}20 MW{sub t}) in more than 95 tests. The uncooled gas generator configuration (no diluent injectors or cooldown chambers installed) produced drive gases at temperatures approaching 3000 F and at pressures greater than 1550 psia. The fully cooled gas generator configuration, with cooldown chambers and injector ''A'', operated consistently at pressures from 1100 to 1540 psia and produced high pressure, steam-rich turbine drive gases at temperatures ranging from {approx}3000 to as low as 600 F. This report includes description of the intended next steps in the gas generator technology demonstration and traces the anticipated pathway to commercialization for the gas generator technology developed in this program.

Eugene Baxter; Roger E. Anderson; Stephen E. Doyle

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Against the backdrop of increasingly volatile natural gas prices, renewable energy resources, which by their nature are immune to natural gas fuel price risk, provide a real economic benefit. Unlike many contracts for natural gas-fired generation, renewable generation is typically sold under fixed-price contracts. Assuming that electricity consumers value long-term price stability, a utility or other retail electricity supplier that is looking to expand its resource portfolio (or a policymaker interested in evaluating different resource options) should therefore compare the cost of fixed-price renewable generation to the hedged or guaranteed cost of new natural gas-fired generation, rather than to projected costs based on uncertain gas price forecasts. To do otherwise would be to compare apples to oranges: by their nature, renewable resources carry no natural gas fuel price risk, and if the market values that attribute, then the most appropriate comparison is to the hedged cost of natural gas-fired generation. Nonetheless, utilities and others often compare the costs of renewable to gas-fired generation using as their fuel price input long-term gas price forecasts that are inherently uncertain, rather than long-term natural gas forward prices that can actually be locked in. This practice raises the critical question of how these two price streams compare. If they are similar, then one might conclude that forecast-based modeling and planning exercises are in fact approximating an apples-to-apples comparison, and no further consideration is necessary. If, however, natural gas forward prices systematically differ from price forecasts, then the use of such forecasts in planning and modeling exercises will yield results that are biased in favor of either renewable (if forwards < forecasts) or natural gas-fired generation (if forwards > forecasts). In this report we compare the cost of hedging natural gas price risk through traditional gas-based hedging instruments (e.g., futures, swaps, and fixed-price physical supply contracts) to contemporaneous forecasts of spot natural gas prices, with the purpose of identifying any systematic differences between the two. Although our data set is quite limited, we find that over the past three years, forward gas prices for durations of 2-10 years have been considerably higher than most natural gas spot price forecasts, including the reference case forecasts developed by the Energy Information Administration (EIA). This difference is striking, and implies that resource planning and modeling exercises based on these forecasts over the past three years have yielded results that are biased in favor of gas-fired generation (again, presuming that long-term stability is desirable). As discussed later, these findings have important ramifications for resource planners, energy modelers, and policy-makers.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

110

Radiolytic gas generation in concrete made with incinerator ash containing transuranium nuclides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of various factors on H/sub 2/ generation by alpha radiolysis of concrete containing TRU incinerator ash were studied. Methods for reducing H/sub 2/ generation were investigated. Samples of Portland and high-alumina cement containing up to 30% calcined ash (dry basis) were doped with /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/. Gas pressures were measured as a function of radiation dose; gas compositions were determined. Gas yields were calculated in terms of G values (molecules produced per 100 eV of alpha energy absorbed). These yields were used to estimate pressures in containers of radioactive concrete waste during storage. 4 figures.

Bibler, N.E.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

SULFUR REMOVAL FROM PIPE LINE NATURAL GAS FUEL: APPLICATION TO FUEL CELL POWER GENERATION SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pipeline natural gas is being considered as the fuel of choice for utilization in fuel cell-based distributed generation systems because of its abundant supply and the existing supply infrastructure (1). For effective utilization in fuel cells, pipeline gas requires efficient removal of sulfur impurities (naturally occurring sulfur compounds or sulfur bearing odorants) to prevent the electrical performance degradation of the fuel cell system. Sulfur odorants such as thiols and sulfides are added to pipeline natural gas and to LPG to ensure safe handling during transportation and utilization. The odorants allow the detection of minute gas line leaks, thereby minimizing the potential for explosions or fires.

King, David L.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Singh, Prabhakar

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

112

Economic Modeling of Mid-Term Gas Demand and Electric Generation Capacity Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. power sector natural gas use over the next 10 to 20 years is a topic of significant uncertainty and debate. The industry expects the power sector to be the principal source of growth in national gas demand in the short run; and the manner in which it drives demand and affects the market over the "mid term," to 2020-2030, is an important consideration for planners in both the electric and gas industries. With abundant, relatively low-priced supplies, gas-fired generation can be a strong competito...

2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

113

Design and construction of a thermophotovoltaic generator using turbine combustion gas  

SciTech Connect

This US Naval Academy project involves the development of a prototype thermophotovoltaic (TPV) generator that uses a General Electric T-58 helicopter gas turbine as the heat source. The goals of this project were to demonstrate the viability of using TPV and external combustion gases to generate electricity, and develop a system which could also be used for materials testing. The generator was modularly designed so that different materials could be tested at a later date. The combustion gas was tapped from the T-58`s combustor through one of the two igniter ports and extracted through a silicon carbide matrix ceramic composite tube into a similarly constructed ceramic composite radiant emitter. The ceramic radiant emitters is heated by the combustion gas via convection, and then serves the TPV generator by radiating the heat outwards where it can be absorbed by thermophotovoltaic cells and converted directly into electricity. The gas turbine and generator module are monitored by a data acquisition system that performs both data collection and control functions. This paper details the design of the TPV generator. It also gives results of initial tests with the gas turbine.

Erickson, T.A.; Lindler, K.W.; Harper, M.J. [Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States). Dept. of Naval Architecture, Ocean, and Marine Engineering

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Performance and Economics of Catalytic Glow Plugs and Shields in Direct Injection Natural Gas Engines for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report details work done by TIAX and Westport to test and perform cost analysis for catalytic glow plugs and shields for direct-injection natural gas engines for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program.

Mello, J. P.; Bezaire, D.; Sriramulu, S.; Weber, R.

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Gas use for power generation leads increase in natural gas use in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... Louisiana led the nation in per-capita natural gas consumption overall due to a combination of its modest population of 4.5 million and the size of its ...

116

International Natural Gas Prices for Electricity Generation - EIA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 Electricity Generation for Selected Countries1 U.S. Dollars per 107 Kilocalories - Gross Calorific Value2 Country 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 Argentina NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Australia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Austria NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Barbados NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Belgium C C C C C C C C C Bolivia NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Brazil NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Canada 145.5 144.7 174.9 171.9 225.2 NA NA NA NA Chile NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA China NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA Chinese Taipei (Taiwan) 244.7 252.1 258.6 281.0 326.2 348.5 400.8 499.3 NA

117

The Potential of Plug-in Hybrid and Battery Electric Vehicles as Grid Resources: the Case of a Gas and Petroleum Oriented Elecricity Generation System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the case of a gas - and petroleum –oriented electricityon natural gas and petroleum-fired combustion turbineon natural gas and petroleum for electricity generation than

Greer, Mark R

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen-containing materials. Transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials (NM), and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE’s Environmental Management (EM) organization to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a "program level" roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This "program level" roadmapping involves linking technology development (and deployment) efforts to the programs’ needs and requirements for dispositioning the material/waste that generates combustible gas through radiolysis and chemical decomposition. The roadmapping effort focused on needed technical & programmatic support to the baselines (and to alternatives to the baselines) where the probability of success is low (i.e., high uncertainty) and the consequences of failure are relatively high (i.e., high programmatic risk). A second purpose for roadmapping was to provide the basis for coordinating sharing of "lessons learned" from research and development (R&D) efforts across DOE programs to increase efficiency and effectiveness in addressing gas generation issues.

Luke, Dale Elden; Rogers, Adam Zachary; Hamp, S.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

"1. Hay Road","Gas","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",1130  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Delaware" Delaware" "1. Hay Road","Gas","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",1130 "2. Indian River Operations","Coal","Indian River Operations Inc",795 "3. Edge Moor","Gas","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",723 "5. McKee Run","Gas","NAES Corporation",136 "6. NRG Energy Center Dover","Coal","NRG Energy Center Dover LLC",100 "7. Warren F Sam Beasley Generation Station","Gas","Delaware Municipal Electric Corp",48 "8. Christiana","Petroleum","Calpine Mid-Atlantic Generation LLC",45 "9. Van Sant Station","Gas","NAES Corporation",39

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Stresa, Italy, 26-28 April 2006 A SILICON-BASED MICRO GAS TURBINE ENGINE FOR POWER GENERATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stresa, Italy, 26-28 April 2006 A SILICON-BASED MICRO GAS TURBINE ENGINE FOR POWER GENERATION X. C in developing a micro power generation system based on gas turbine engine and piezoelectric converter. The micro gas turbine engine consists of a micro combustor, a turbine and a centrifugal compressor

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

122

Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

123

Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

An approach to generating summaries of time series data in the gas turbine domain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose an approach to generating summaries of time series data in the gas turbine domain using AI techniques. Through the think-aloud method with the aid of visualization of temporal data using time series workbench (TSW), both domain knowledge from experts about how to solve problems in the gas turbine and information about how domain experts analyze the archived temporal data are gotten. An algorithm to select interesting events is proposed and a prototype knowledge-based system is designed to generate summary of temporal data for interesting events in the gas turbine domain. Some further research works also are pointed. Key words: knowledge acquisition, knowledge-based system, gas turbine. 1

Jin Yu; Jim Hunter; Ehud Reiter; Somayajulu Sripada

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Quality Assurance Project Plan for the Gas Generation Testing Program at the INEL  

SciTech Connect

The data quality objectives (DQOs) for the Program are to evaluate compliance with the limits on total gas generation rates, establish the concentrations of hydrogen and methane in the total gas flow, determine the headspace concentration of VOCs in each drum prior to the start of the test, and obtain estimates of the concentrations of several compounds for mass balance purposes. Criteria for the selection of waste containers at the INEL and the parameters that must be characterized prior to and during the tests are described. Collection of gaseous samples from 55-gallon drums of contact-handled transuranic waste for the gas generation testing is discussed. Analytical methods and calibrations are summarized. Administrative quality control measures described in this QAPjP include the generation, review, and approval of project documentation; control and retention of records; measures to ensure that personnel, subcontractors or vendors, and equipment meet the specifications necessary to achieve the required data quality for the project.

NONE

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

CALCULATION OF DEMONSTRATION BULK VITRIFICATION SYSTEM MELTER INLEAKAGE AND OFF-GAS GENERATION RATE  

SciTech Connect

The River Protection Project (RPP) mission is to safely store, retrieve, treat, immobilize, and dispose of the Hanford Site tank waste. The Demonstration Bulk Vitrification System (DBVS) is a research and development project whose objective is to demonstrate the suitability of Bulk Vitrification treatment technology waste form for disposing of low-activity waste from the Tank Farms. The objective of this calculation is to determine the DBVS melter inleakage and off-gas generation rate based on full scale testing data from 38D. This calculation estimates the DBVS melter in leakage and gas generation rate based on test data. Inleakage is estimated before the melt was initiated, at one point during the melt, and at the end of the melt. Maximum gas generation rate is also estimated.

MAY TH

2008-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

127

Benchmarking Distributed Generation Cost of Electricity and Characterization of Green House Gas Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the economic competitiveness and green house gas (GHG) footprint of all energy supply-side options has been identified by EPRI advisors as a key priority. This project benchmarks the cost of electricity and characterizes the GHG footprint of distributed generation (DG) options in various applications. DG technologies include small gas turbines, spark-ignited and diesel internal combustion engines, micro turbines, several types of fuel cells, Stirling engines, and photovoltaic systems.

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

128

Status and integration of the gas generation studies performed for the Hydrogen Safety Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste in Tank 241-SY-101 on the Hanford Site generates and periodically releases hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen gases. Studies have been conducted at several laboratories to determine the chemical mechanisms for the gas generation and release. Results from these studies are presented and integrated in an attempt to describe current understanding of the physical properties of the waste and the mechanisms of gas generation and retention. Existing tank data are consistent with the interpretation that gases are uniformly generated in the tank, released continuously from the convecting layer, and stored in the nonconvecting layer. Tank temperature measurements suggest that the waste consists of gobs'' of material that reach neutral buoyancy at different times. The activation energy of the rate limiting step of the gas generating process was calculated to be about 7 kJ/mol but measured in the laboratory at 80 to 100 kJ/mol. Based on observed temperature changes in the tank the activation energy is probably not higher than about 20 kJ/mol. Several simulated waste compositions have been devised for use in laboratory studies in the place of actual waste from Tank 241-SY-101. Data from these studies can be used to predict how the actual waste might behave when heated or diluted. Density evaluations do not confirm that heating waste at the bottom of the tank would induce circulation within the waste; however, heating may release gas bubbles by dissolving the solids to which the bubbles adhere. Gas generation studies on simulated wastes indicated that nitrous oxide and hydrogen yields are not particularly coupled. Solubility studies of nitrous oxide, the most soluble of the principal gaseous products, indicate it is unlikely that dissolved gases contribute substantially to the quantity of gas released during periodic events.

Pederson, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Corrosion-induced gas generation in a nuclear waste repository: Reactive geochemistry and multiphase flow effect  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion of steel canisters, stored in a repository for spent fuel and high-level nuclear wastes, leads to the generation and accumulation of hydrogen gas in the backfilled emplacement tunnels, which may significantly affect long-term repository safety. Previous studies used H{sub 2} generation rates based on the volume of the waste or canister material and the stoichiometry of the corrosion reaction. However, iron corrosion and H{sub 2} generation rates vary with time, depending on factors such as amount of iron, water availability, water contact area, and aqueous and solid chemistry. To account for these factors and feedback mechanisms, we developed a chemistry model related to iron corrosion, coupled with two-phase (liquid and gas) flow phenomena that are driven by gas-pressure buildup associated with H{sub 2} generation and water consumption. Results indicate that by dynamically calculating H{sub 2} generation rates based on a simple model of corrosion chemistry, and by coupling this corrosion reaction with two-phase flow processes, the degree and extent of gas pressure buildup could be much smaller compared to a model that neglects the coupling between flow and reactive transport mechanisms. By considering the feedback of corrosion chemistry, the gas pressure increases initially at the canister, but later decreases and eventually returns to a stabilized pressure that is slightly higher than the background pressure. The current study focuses on corrosion under anaerobic conditions for which the coupled hydrogeochemical model was used to examine the role of selected physical parameters on the H{sub 2} gas generation and corresponding pressure buildup in a nuclear waste repository. The developed model can be applied to evaluate the effect of water and mineral chemistry of the buffer and host rock on the corrosion reaction for future site-specific studies.

Xu, T.; Senger, R.; Finsterle, S.

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

A computer model of gas generation and transport within TRU waste drums  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer model has been developed to predict radiolytic gas generation and transport within Transuranic (TRU) waste drums and surrounding enclosures. Gas generation from the radiolytic decomposition of organic material contaminated with plutonium is modeled and the concentrations of gas throughout the waste drum and enclosures are determined using a diffusional transport model. The model accurately reproduces experimentally measured gas concentrations. With polyethylene waste in unvented drums, the model predicts that the concentration of hydrogen gas can exceed 4 mole percent (lower flammable limit) with only about 5 curies of plutonium. If the drum liner is punctured and an unrestricted 0.75-in. carbon composite filter vent is installed in the drum lid, the plutonium loading can be increased to 240 Ci without generating flammable gas mixtures. Larger diameter filters can be used to increase the curie loading. The model has been used to show that shipments of 1000 Ci of plutonium-238 contaminated waste from Savannah River to the WIPP site are feasible using the TRUPACT shipping container. 10 refs., 17 figs., 6 tabs.

Smith, F.G. III

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Gas generation from low-level radioactive waste: Concerns for disposal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste (ACNW) has urged the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to reexamine the topic of hydrogen gas generation from low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in closed spaces to ensure that the slow buildup of hydrogen from water-bearing wastes in sealed containers does not become a problem for long-term safe disposal. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has prepared a report, summarized in this paper, for the NRC to respond to these concerns. The paper discusses the range of values for G(H{sub 2}) reported for materials of relevance to LLW disposal; most of these values are in the range of 0.1 to 0.6. Most studies of radiolytic hydrogen generation indicate a leveling off of pressurization, probably because of chemical kinetics involving, in many cases, the radiolysis of water within the waste. Even if no leveling off occurs, realistic gas leakage rates (indicating poor closure by gaskets on drums and liners) will result in adequate relief of pressure for radiolytic gas generation from the majority of commercial sector LLW packages. Biodegradative gas generation, however, could pose a pressurization hazard even at realistic gas leakage rates. Recommendations include passive vents on LLW containers (as already specified for high integrity containers) and upper limits to the G values and/or the specific activity of the LLW.

Siskind, B.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Gas generation from low-level radioactive waste: Concerns for disposal  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advisory Committee on Nuclear Waste (ACNW) has urged the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to reexamine the topic of hydrogen gas generation from low-level radioactive waste (LLW) in closed spaces to ensure that the slow buildup of hydrogen from water-bearing wastes in sealed containers does not become a problem for long-term safe disposal. Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has prepared a report, summarized in this paper, for the NRC to respond to these concerns. The paper discusses the range of values for G(H{sub 2}) reported for materials of relevance to LLW disposal; most of these values are in the range of 0.1 to 0.6. Most studies of radiolytic hydrogen generation indicate a leveling off of pressurization, probably because of chemical kinetics involving, in many cases, the radiolysis of water within the waste. Even if no leveling off occurs, realistic gas leakage rates (indicating poor closure by gaskets on drums and liners) will result in adequate relief of pressure for radiolytic gas generation from the majority of commercial sector LLW packages. Biodegradative gas generation, however, could pose a pressurization hazard even at realistic gas leakage rates. Recommendations include passive vents on LLW containers (as already specified for high integrity containers) and upper limits to the G values and/or the specific activity of the LLW.

Siskind, B.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

An Advanced Diagnostic and Prognostic System for Gas Turbine Generator Sets with Experimental Validation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diagnostic and Prognostic System for Gas Diagnostic and Prognostic System for Gas Turbine Generator Sets with Experimental Validation Clemson University John R. Wagner, Ph.D., P.E. SCIES Project 03-01-SR108 DOE COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT DE-FC26-02NT41431 Tom J. George, Program Manager, DOE/NETL Richard Wenglarz, Manager of Research, SCIES Project Awarded (07/01/2003, 36 Month Duration) $319,479 Total Contract Value ($319,479 DOE) Clemson Presentation 10-19-2005 J.W. Gas Turbine Need * The Reliability, Availability, and Maintainability (RAM) technical area within High Efficiency Engines and Turbines (HEET) Program encompasses the design of gas turbine health management systems * The introduction of real-time diagnostic and prognostic capabilities on gas turbines can provide increased reliability, safety, and efficiency

134

Gas Generation Testing of Uranium Metal in Simulated K Basins Sludge and Grouted Sludge Waste Forms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The evolving plan for most of the KE and KW Basin sludges is disposition to WIPP as remote handled (RH) TRU. Because the hydrogen gas concentration in the sealed transportation cask destined for WIPP is limited by flammability safety, the number of containers and shipments to WIPP likely will be driven by the rate of hydrogen generated by the contained uranium metals reaction with water. Therefore, gas generation testing with uranium metal particles of known surface area and immobilized in candidate (grout) solidification matrices was used to identify the effectiveness of various candidate solidification matrices to inhibit the rate of the uranium metal-water reaction.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Bryan, Samuel A.

2004-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

135

Life Cycle GHG Emissions from Conventional Natural Gas Power Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect

This research provides a systematic review and harmonization of the life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of electricity generated from conventionally produced natural gas. We focus on estimates of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emitted in the life cycle of electricity generation from conventionally produced natural gas in combustion turbines (NGCT) and combined-cycle (NGCC) systems. A process we term "harmonization" was employed to align several common system performance parameters and assumptions to better allow for cross-study comparisons, with the goal of clarifying central tendency and reducing variability in estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. This presentation summarizes preliminary results.

Heath, G.; O'Donoughue, P.; Whitaker, M.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Renewable and Natural Gas Electricity Contracts: Afor Fuel Price Risk: Using Forward Natural Gas PricesInstead of Gas Price Forecasts to Compare Renewable to Gas-

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Procurement Specification for Horizontal Gas Path Heat Recovery Steam Generator: Avoiding Thermal-Mechanical Fatigue Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs), particularly those equipped with F-class gas turbines that are also subjected to periods of frequent cyclic operation, have experienced premature pressure part failures because of excessive thermal-mechanical fatigue (TMF) damage. The very competitive power generation marketplace has resulted in lowest installed cost often taking precedence over medium- and long-term durability and operating costs.

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

138

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime (about 40 ps), high frequency (about 5G hz), high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a dielectric barrier discharge and passing a gas to treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases. The invention also includes a reactor for generating the non-thermal plasma.

Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Raridon, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armfield, Jeffrey S. (Upsilanti, MI); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Graves, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Modeling of gas generation from the Cameo coal zone in the Piceance Basin Colorado  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gas generative potential of the Cretaceous Cameo coal in the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado, was evaluated quantitatively by sealed gold tube pyrolysis. The H/C and O/C elemental ratios show that pyrolyzed Cameo coal samples follow the Van Krevelen humic coal evolution pathway, reasonably simulating natural coal maturation. Kinetic parameters (activation energy and frequency factor) for gas generation and vitrinite reflectance (R{sub o}) changes were calculated from pyrolysis data. Experimental R{sub o} results from this study are not adequately predicted by published R{sub o} kinetics and indicate the necessity of deriving basin-specific kinetic parameters when building predictive basin models. Using derived kinetics for R{sub o}, evolution and gas generation, basin modeling was completed for 57 wells across the Piceance Basin, which enabled the mapping of coal-rank and coalbed gas potential. Quantities of methane generated at approximately 1.2% R{sub o} are about 300 standard cubic feet per ton (scf/ton) and more than 2500 scf/ton (in-situ dry-ash-free coal) at R{sub o}, values reaching 1.9%. Gases generated in both low- and high-maturity coals are less wet, whereas the wetter gas is expected where R{sub o} is approximately 1.4-1.5%. As controlled by regional coal rank and net coal thickness, the largest in-place coalbed gas resources are located in the central part of the basin, where predicted volumes exceed 150 bcf/mi, excluding gases in tight sands.

Zhang, E.; Hill, R.J.; Katz, B.J.; Tang, Y.C. [Shell Exploration and Production Co., BTC, Houston, TX (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

DOE/EA-1624: Environmental Assessment for Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities (December 2008)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Auburn Landfill Gas Electric Generators and Anaerobic Digester Energy Facilities Auburn, New York Final Environmental Assessment DOE/EA-1624 Prepared for: U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory January 2009 INTENTIONALLY LEFT BLANK AUBURN LANDFILL GAS ELECTRIC GENERATORS AND ANAEROBIC DIGESTER ELECTRIC FACILITIES FINAL EA DOE/EA-1624 i Table of Contents 1.0 INTRODUCTION .......................................................................................................................................... 1 1.1 BACKGROUND............................................................................................................................................... 2 1.2 PURPOSE AND NEED ...................................................................................................................................... 4

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Effects of microbial processes on gas generation under expected WIPP repository conditions: Annual report through 1992  

SciTech Connect

Microbial processes involved in gas generation from degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic waste under conditions expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository are being investigated at Brookhaven National Laboratory. These laboratory studies are part of the Sandia National Laboratories -- WIPP Gas Generation Program. Gas generation due to microbial degradation of representative cellulosic waste was investigated in short-term (< 6 months) and long-term (> 6 months) experiments by incubating representative paper (filter paper, paper towels, and tissue) in WIPP brine under initially aerobic (air) and anaerobic (nitrogen) conditions. Samples from the WIPP surficial environment and underground workings harbor gas-producing halophilic microorganisms, the activities of which were studied in short-term experiments. The microorganisms metabolized a variety of organic compounds including cellulose under aerobic, anaerobic, and denitrifying conditions. In long-term experiments, the effects of added nutrients (trace amounts of ammonium nitrate, phosphate, and yeast extract), no nutrients, and nutrients plus excess nitrate on gas production from cellulose degradation.

Francis, A.J.; Gillow, J.B.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Implications of Lower Natural Gas Prices for Electric Generators in the Southeast, The  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This supplement to the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) May 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook (STEO) focuses on changes in the utilization of coal- and natural-gas-fired generation capacity in the electric utility sector as the differential between delivered fuel prices narrows.

Information Center

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

143

Technology on In-Situ Gas Generation to Recover Residual Oil Reserves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This final technical report covers the period October 1, 1995 to February 29, 2008. This chapter begins with an overview of the history of Enhanced Oil Recovery techniques and specifically, CO2 flood. Subsequent chapters conform to the manner consistent with the Activities, Tasks, and Sub-tasks of the project as originally provided in Exhibit C1 in the Project Management Plan dated September 20, 1995. These chapters summarize the objectives, status and conclusions of the major project activities performed during the project period. The report concludes by describing technology transfer activities stemming from the project and providing a reference list of all publications of original research work generated by the project team or by others regarding this project. The overall objective of this project was a final research and development in the United States a technology that was developed at the Institute for Geology and Development of Fossil Fuels in Moscow, Russia. Before the technology can be convincingly adopted by United States oil and gas producers, the laboratory research was conducted at Mew Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology. The experimental studies were conducted to measure the volume and the pressure of the CO{sub 2} gas generated according to the new Russian technology. Two experimental devices were designed, built and used at New Mexico Tech facilities for these purposes. The designed setup allowed initiating and controlling the reaction between the 'gas-yielding' (GY) and 'gas-forming' (GF) agents proposed by Russian technology. The temperature was controlled, and the generated gas pressure and volume were recorded during the reaction process. Additionally, the effect of surfactant addition on the effectiveness of the process was studied. An alternative GY reactant was tested in order to increase the efficiency of the CO2 gas generation process. The slim tube and the core flood experimental studies were conducted to define the sweep efficiency of the in-situ generated CO{sub 2} gas. A set of core flood experiments were conducted to define effect of surfactant on recovery efficiency. The results demonstrated obvious advantages of the foamy system over the brine solution in order to achieve higher sweep efficiency and recovery coefficient. It is shown that a slug injection is not an efficient method for mixing GY and GF solutions and it can't generate considerable gas inside the slim-tube.

Sayavur Bakhtiyarov

2008-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

144

Advanced gas turbines: The choice for low-cost, environmentally superior electric power generation  

SciTech Connect

In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated an ambitious 8-year program to advance state-of-the-art gas turbine technology for land-based electric power generation. The program, known as the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Program, is a joint government/industry program with the objective to demonstrate advanced industrial and utility gas turbine systems by the year 2000. The goals of the ATS Program are to develop gas turbine systems capable of providing low-cost electric power, while maintaining environmental superiority over competing power generation options. A progress report on the ATS Program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. The technical challenges, advanced critical technology requirements, and systems designs meeting the goals of the program will be described and discussed.

Zeh, C.M.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

E.U. environmental policies: a document - based qualitative research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Climate change has become a reality with many consequences in different fields. The European Union (EU) has been at the forefront of international action to combat climate change since 1990, when the UN Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change's (IPCC) ... Keywords: EU policy, European legislation, climate change, environment, greenhouse gas emissions, qualitative research

Iuliana Pop; Madalina-Teodora Andrei; Charlotte Valentine Ene; Florin Vartolomei; Petronela-Sonia Nedea; Radita Alexe

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Prediction of gas pressurization and hydrogen generation for shipping hazard analysis : Six unstabilized PU 02 samples  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radiolysis of water to form hydrogen gas is a safety concern for safe storage and transport of plutonium-bearing materials. Hydrogen gas is considered a safety hazard if its concentration in the container exceeds five percent hydrogen by volume, DOE Docket No. 00-1 1-9965. Unfortunately, water cannot be entirely avoided in a processing environment and these samples contain a range of water inherently. Thermodynamic, chemical, and radiolysis modeling was used to predict gas generation and changes in gas composition as a function of time within sealed containers containing plutonium bearing materials. The results are used in support of safety analysis for shipping six unstabilized (i.e. uncalcined) samples from Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Sits (RFETS) to the Material Identification and Surveillance (MIS) program at Los Alamos National Lab (LANL). The intent of this work is to establish a time window in which safe shipping can occur.

Moody, E. W. (Eddie W.); Veirs, D. K. (Douglas Kirk); Lyman, J. L. (John L.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion: Small gas turbine induustrial plant study  

SciTech Connect

Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) plants provide a coal-fired, high-efficiency, combined-cycle system for the generation of electricity and steam. The plants use lime-based sorbents in PFB combustors to meet environmental air standards without back-end gas desulfurization equipment. The second-generation system is an improvement over earlier PFBC concepts because it can achieve gas temperatures of 2100[degrees]F and higher for improved cycle efficiency while maintaining the fluidized beds at 1600[degrees]F for enhanced sulfur capture and minimum alkali release. Second-generation PFBC systems are capable of supplying the electric and steam process needs of industrial plants. The basic second-generation system can be applied in different ways to meet a variety of process steam and electrical requirements. To evaluate the potential of these systems in the industrial market, conceptual designs have been developed for six second-generation PFBC plants. These plants cover a range of electrical outputs from 6.3 to 41.5 MWe and steam flows from 46,067 to 442,337 lb/h. Capital and operating costs have been estimated for these six plants and for equivalent (in size) conventional, coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion cogeneration plants. Economic analyses were conducted to compare the cost of steam for both the second-generation plants and the conventional plants.

Shenker, J.; Garland, R.; Horazak, D.; Seifert, F.; Wenglarz, R.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion: Small gas turbine industrial plant study  

SciTech Connect

Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) plants provide a coal-fired, high-efficiency, combined-cycle system for the generation of electricity and steam. The plants use lime-based sorbents in PFB combustors to meet environmental air standards without back-end gas desulfurization equipment. The second-generation system is an improvement over earlier PFBC concepts because it can achieve gas temperatures of 2100{degrees}F and higher for improved cycle efficiency while maintaining the fluidized beds at 1600{degrees}F for enhanced sulfur capture and minimum alkali release. Second-generation PFBC systems are capable of supplying the electric and steam process needs of industrial plants. The basic second-generation system can be applied in different ways to meet a variety of process steam and electrical requirements. To evaluate the potential of these systems in the industrial market, conceptual designs have been developed for six second-generation PFBC plants. These plants cover a range of electrical outputs from 6.3 to 41.5 MWe and steam flows from 46,067 to 442,337 lb/h. Capital and operating costs have been estimated for these six plants and for equivalent (in size) conventional, coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion cogeneration plants. Economic analyses were conducted to compare the cost of steam for both the second-generation plants and the conventional plants.

Shenker, J.; Garland, R.; Horazak, D.; Seifert, F.; Wenglarz, R.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To utilize landfill gas for power generation using carbonate fuel cells, the LFG must be cleaned up to remove sulfur and chlorine compounds. This not only benefits the operation of the fuel cell, but also benefits the environment by preventing the emission of these contaminants to the atmosphere. Commercial technologies for gas processing are generally economical in relatively large sizes (3 MMSCFD or larger), and may not achieve the low levels of contaminants required. To address the issue of LFG clean-up for fuel cell application, a process was developed utilizing commercially available technology. A pilot-scale test facility utilizing this process was built at a landfill site in Anoka, Minnesota using the EPRI fuel cell test facility used for coal gas testing. The pilot plant was tested for 1000 hours, processing 970,000 SCF (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of landfill gas. Testing indicated that the process could achieve the following concentrations of contaminants in the clean gas: Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppm (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv if any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm (average) Sulfur Dioxide. The paper describes the LFG composition for bulk and trace compounds; evaluation of various methods to clean landfill gas; design of a LFG cleanup system; field test of pilot-scale gas cleanup process; fuel cell testing on simulated landfill gas; single cell testing on landfill gas contaminants and post test analysis; and design and economic analyses of a full scale gas cleanup system.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Transition metal catalysis in the generation of petroleum and natural gas. Progress report, [1992--1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new hypothesis is introduced for the generation of petroleum and natural gas. The transition metals, activated under the reducing conditions of diagenesis, are proposed as catalysts in the generation of light hydrocarbons. The objective of this proposal is to test that hypothesis. Transition metals (Ni, V, Ti, Co, Fe), in kerogen, porphyrins, and as pure compounds, will be tested under catagenic conditions for catalytic activity in the conversion of normal paraffins and hydrogen into light hydrocarbons. If the hypothesis is correct, kerogenous transition metals should become catalytically active under the reducing conditions of diagenesis and catalyze the conversion of paraffins into the light hydrocarbons seen in petroleum. Moreover, the C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} hydrocarbons generated catalytically should be similar in molecular and isotopic compositions to natural gas.

Mango, F.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

EU | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EU EU Dataset Summary Description These datasets include GHG and CO2 emissions statistics for the European Union (EU). The statistics are available from the European Commission. Source European Commission Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords Biofuels CO2 emissions EU GHG emissions Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon Total GHG and CO2 Emissions for EU (xls, 853.5 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon GHG Emissions by Sector, all member countries (xls, 2 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon GHG Emissions from Transport, all member countries (xls, 1.3 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon CO2 emissions by sector, all member countries (xls, 2.1 MiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon CO2 emissions by transport, all member countries (xls, 1.5 MiB) Quality Metrics

152

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

W. Golove (2003). Accounting for Fuel Price Risk: UsingForward Natural Gas Prices Insteadof Gas Price Forecasts to Compare Renewable to Gas-Fired

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Does large scale penetration of renewable generation such as wind and solar power pose economic and operational burdens on the electricity system? A number of studies have pointed to the potential benefits of renewable generation as a hedge against the volatility and potential escalation of fossil fuel prices. Research also suggests that the lack of correlation of renewable energy costs with fossil fuel prices means that adding large amounts of wind or solar generation may also reduce the volatility of system-wide electricity costs. Such variance reduction of system costs may be of significant value to consumers due to risk aversion. The analysis in this report recognizes that the potential value of risk mitigation associated with wind generation and natural gas generation may depend on whether one considers the consumer's perspective or the investor's perspective and whether the market is regulated or deregulated. We analyze the risk and return trade-offs for wind and natural gas generation for deregulated markets based on hourly prices and load over a 10-year period using historical data in the PJM Interconnection (PJM) from 1999 to 2008. Similar analysis is then simulated and evaluated for regulated markets under certain assumptions.

Bush, B.; Jenkin, T.; Lipowicz, D.; Arent, D. J.; Cooke, R.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Radiolytic gas generation from cement-based waste hosts for DOE low-level radioactive wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Using cement-based immobilization binders with simulated radioactive waste containing sulfate, nitrate, nitrite, phosphate, and fluoride anions, the gamma- and alpha-radiolytic gas generation factors (G/sub t/, molecules/100 eV) and gas compositions were measured on specimens of cured grouts. These tests studied the effects of; (1) waste composition; (2) the sample surface-to-volume ratio; (3) the waste slurry particle size; and (4) the water content of the waste host formula. The radiolysis test vessels were designed to minimize the ''dead'' volume and to simulate the configuration of waste packages.

Dole, L.R.; Friedman, H.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Climate Change Commitment Task Force Charter To advise the President on strategies to reduce greenhouse gas emissions generated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reduce greenhouse gas emissions generated by the campus community, to engage the campus community in efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and to promote and support instruction and research on the impact of greenhouse gas emissions. Background: In August, President Hrabowski signed the American

Maryland, Baltimore County, University of

156

Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Electric Power Generation from Co-Produced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act: Geothermal Technologies Program Project Type / Topic 2 Geothermal Energy Production from Low Temperature Resources, Coproduced Fluids from Oil and Gas Wells, and Geopressured Resources Project Type / Topic 3 Coproduced Fluids for Oil and Gas Wells Project Description The geothermal organic Rankine cycle (ORC) system will be installed at an oil field operated by Encore Acquisition in western North Dakota where geothermal fluids occur in sedimentary formations at depths of 10,000 feet. The power plant will be operated and monitored for two years to develop engineering and economic models for geothermal ORC energy production. The data and knowledge acquire during the O & M phase can be used to facilitate the installation of similar geothermal ORC systems in other oil and gas settings.

157

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Profiles of Renewable and Natural Gas Electricity Contracts:Price Risk: Using Forward Natural Gas Prices Instead of Gas2001). “Which way the natural gas price: an attempt to

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Risk: Using Forward Natural Gas Prices Instead of Gas Price2001). “Which way the natural gas price: an attempt toThe Role of Forward Natural Gas Prices Mark Bolinger, Ryan

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel Price Risk: Using Forward Natural Gas Prices Insteadof Gas Price Forecasts to Compare Renewable to Gas-FiredWhich way the natural gas price: an attempt to predict the

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Plug-in electric vehicle introduction in the EU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) could significantly reduce gasoline consumption and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the EU's transport sector. However, PEV well-towheel (WTW) emissions depend on improvements in vehicle ...

Sisternes, Fernando J. de $q (Fernando José Sisternes Jiménez)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

GAS-GENERATION EXPERIMENTS FOR LONG-TERM STORAGE OF TRU WASTES AT WIPP  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental investigation was conducted for gas generation in contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes subjected for several years to conditions similar to those expected to occur at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) should the repository eventually become inundated with brine. Various types of actual CH-TRU wastes were placed into 12 corrosion-resistant vessels. The vessels were loosely filled with the wastes, which were submerged in synthetic brine having the same chemical composition as that in the WIPP vicinity. The vessels were also inoculated with microbes found in the Salado Formation at WIPP. The vessels were sealed, purged, and the approximately 750-ml headspace was pressurized with nitrogen gas to approximately 146 atmospheres to create anoxic conditions at the lithostatic pressure expected in the repository were it inundated. The temperature was maintained at the expected 30 C. The test program objective was to measure the quantities and species of gases generate d by metal corrosion, radiolysis, and microbial activity. These data will assist in the specification of the rates at which gases are produced under inundated repository conditions for use in the WIPP Performance Assessment computer models. These experiments were very carefully designed, constructed, instrumented, and performed. Approximately 6-1/2 years of continuous, undisturbed testing were accumulated. Several of the vessels showed significantly elevated levels of generated gases, virtually all of which was hydrogen. One vessel measured over 4.2% hydrogen, by volume. Two other vessels generated well over 1% hydrogen, and another was at nearly 1%. Only small quantities of other gases, principally carbon dioxide, were detected. Gas generation was found to depend strongly on the waste composition. The maximum hydrogen generation occurred in tests containing carbon steel. Average corrosion penetration rates in carbon-steel of up to 2.3 microns per year were deduced. Conversion of carbon to carbon dioxide was calculated to be up to 4.7 {micro}g-mol/yr/g-carbon.

Felicione, F.S.; Carney, K.P.; Dwight, C.C.; Cummings, D.G.; Foulkrod, L.E.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

162

The California Climate Action Registry: Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We find that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Muritshaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable togas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

SciTech Connect

Unlike natural gas-fired generation, renewable generation (e.g., from wind, solar, and geothermal power) is largely immune to fuel price risk. If ratepayers are rational and value long-term price stability, then--contrary to common practice--any comparison of the levelized cost of renewable to gas-fired generation should be based on a hedged gas price input, rather than an uncertain gas price forecast. This paper compares natural gas prices that can be locked in through futures, swaps, and physical supply contracts to contemporaneous long-term forecasts of spot gas prices. We find that from 2000-2003, forward gas prices for terms of 2-10 years have been considerably higher than most contemporaneous long-term gas price forecasts. This difference is striking, and implies that comparisons between renewable and gas-fired generation based on these forecasts over this period have arguably yielded results that are biased in favor of gas-fired generation.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

164

The DOE/NREL Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program - An Overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle (NG-NGV) Program that is led by the U.S. Department Of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Heavy Vehicle Technologies (OHVT) through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL). The goal of this program is to develop and implement one Class 3-6 compressed natural gas (CNG) prototype vehicle and one Class 7-8 liquefied natural gas (LNG) prototype vehicle in the 2004 to 2007 timeframe. OHVT intends for these vehicles to have 0.5 g/bhp-hr or lower emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) by 2004 and 0.2 g/bhp-hr or lower NOx by 2007. These vehicles will also have particulate matter (PM) emissions of 0.01 g/bhp-hr or lower by 2004. In addition to ambitious emissions goals, these vehicles will target life-cycle economics that are compatible with their conventionally fueled counterparts.

Kevin Walkowicz; Denny Stephens; Kevin Stork

2001-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

165

Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Variance Analysis of Wind and Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations Brian Bush, Thomas Jenkin, David Lipowicz, and Douglas J. Arent National Renewable Energy Laboratory Roger Cooke Resources for the Future Technical Report NREL/TP-6A20-52790 January 2012 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Variance Analysis of Wind and Natural Gas Generation under Different Market Structures: Some Observations Brian Bush, Thomas Jenkin, David Lipowicz,

166

Hydrogen Gas Generation Model for Fuel Based Remote Handled TRU Waste Stored at INEEL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) initiated efforts to calculate the hydrogen gas generation in remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) containers in order to evaluate continued storage of unvented RH-TRU containers in vaults and to identify any potential problems during retrieval and aboveground storage. A computer code is developed to calculate the hydrogen concentration in the stored RH-TRU waste drums for known configuration, waste matrix, and radionuclide inventories as a function of time.

Soli T. Khericha; Rajiv N. Bhatt; Kevin Liekhus

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Gas Generation Measurements of Scrap Pu/U Materials Using a Bell Jar  

SciTech Connect

A bell jar is used to determine containment vessel pressurization due to gas generation from plutonium/uranium materials. Seventy eight food pack cans containing plutonium and uranium oxide bearing materials have been tested to date. Minimal change in pressure (increase or decrease) occurred in fifty one cases, depressurization occurred in seventeen cases, and pressurization occurred in ten cases. Pressurization is considered to be linked to the presence of certain impurities such as magnesium oxide.

Kies, J.

2003-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

168

Rapid hydrogen gas generation using reactive thermal decomposition of uranium hydride.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Oxygen gas injection has been studied as one method for rapidly generating hydrogen gas from a uranium hydride storage system. Small scale reactors, 2.9 g UH{sub 3}, were used to study the process experimentally. Complimentary numerical simulations were used to better characterize and understand the strongly coupled chemical and thermal transport processes controlling hydrogen gas liberation. The results indicate that UH{sub 3} and O{sub 2} are sufficiently reactive to enable a well designed system to release gram quantities of hydrogen in {approx} 2 seconds over a broad temperature range. The major system-design challenge appears to be heat management. In addition to the oxidation tests, H/D isotope exchange experiments were performed. The rate limiting step in the overall gas-to-particle exchange process was found to be hydrogen diffusion in the {approx}0.5 {mu}m hydride particles. The experiments generated a set of high quality experimental data; from which effective intra-particle diffusion coefficients can be inferred.

Kanouff, Michael P.; Van Blarigan, Peter; Robinson, David B.; Shugard, Andrew D.; Gharagozloo, Patricia E.; Buffleben, George M.; James, Scott Carlton; Mills, Bernice E.

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Steam generator materials performance in high temperature gas-cooled reactors  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the materials technology aspects of steam generators for HTGRs which feature a graphite-moderated, uranium-thorium, all-ceramic core and utilizes high-pressure helium as the primary coolant. The steam generators are exposed to gas-side temperatures approaching 760/sup 0/C and produce superheated steam at 538/sup 0/C and 16.5 MPa (2400 psi). The prototype Peach Bottom I 40-MW(e) HTGR was operated for 1349 EFPD over 7 years. Examination after decommissioning of the U-tube steam generators and other components showed the steam generators to be in very satisfactory condition. The 330-MW(e) Fort St. Vrain HTGR, now in the final stages of startup, has achieved 70% power and generated more than 1.5 x 10/sup 6/ MWh of electricity. The steam generators in this reactor are once-through units of helical configuration, requiring a number of new materials factors including creep-fatigue and water chemistry control. Current designs of larger HTGRs also feature steam generators of helical once-through design. Materials issues that are important in these designs include detailed consideration of time-dependent behavior of both base metals and welds, as required by current American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code rules, evaluation of bimetallic weld behavior, evaluation of the properties of large forgings, etc.

Chafey, J.E.; Roberts, D.I.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Slurry growth, gas retention, and flammable gas generation by Hanford radioactive waste tanks: Synthetic waste studies, FY 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Of 177 high-level waste storage tanks on the Hanford Site, 23 have been placed on a safety watch list because they are suspected of producing flammable gases in flammable or explosive concentrate. One tankin particular, Tank 241-SY-101 (Tank 101-SY), has exhibited slow increases in waste volume followed by a rapid decrease accompanied by venting of large quantities of gases. The purpose of this study is to help determine the processes by which flammable gases are produced, retained, and eventually released from Tank 101-SY. Waste composition data for single- and double-shell waste tanks on the flammable gas watch listare critically reviewed. The results of laboratory studies using synthetic double-shell wastes are summarized, including physical and chemical properties of crusts that are formed, the stoichiometry and rate ofgas generation, and mechanisms responsible for formation of a floating crust.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.; Ryan, J.L.; Scheele, R.D.; Tingey, J.M.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Modeling natural gas prices as a random walk: The advantages for generation planning  

SciTech Connect

Random walk modeling allows decision makers to evaluate risk mitigation strategies. Easily constructed, the random walk provides probability information that long-term fuel forecasts do not. This is vital to meeting the ratepayers` need for low-cost power, the shareholders` financial objectives, and the regulators` desire for straightforward information. Power generation planning depends heavily on long-term fuel price forecasts. This is particularly true for natural gas-fired plants, because fuel expenses are a significant portion of busbar costs and are subject to considerable uncertainty. Accurate forecasts, then, are critical - especially if electric utilities are to take advantage of the current low cost of natural gas technologies and their relatively clean burning characteristics, without becoming overdependent on a fuel that might significantly increase in price. Moreover, the transition to a more competitive generation market requires a more market-driven planning process. Current planning techniques use several long-term fuel forecasts - one serving as an expected case and others for sensitivity analysis - as inputs for modeling production costs. These forecasts are deterministic: For every time interval there is one, and only one projected fuel price - a serious limitation. Further, past natural gas price predictions have been erroneous and may be susceptible to bias. Today, deregulation of the natural gas production industry allows for a new approach in long-term fuel forecasting. Using NYMEX information, a random walk model of natural gas prices can be constructed. A random walk assumes that prices move randomly, and in modeling prices in this context one would be sure to include this all-important price volatility.

Felder, F.A.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Support and control system of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant gas generation experiment glovebox  

SciTech Connect

A glovebox was designed and fabricated to house test containers loaded with contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste. The test containers were designed to simulate the environmental characteristics of the caverns at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The support and control systems used to operate and maintain the Gas Generation Experiment (GGE) include the following: glovebox atmosphere and pressure control, test container support, glovebox operation support, and gas supply and exhaust systems. The glovebox atmosphere and pressure control systems consist of various components used to control both the pressure and quality of the argon atmosphere inside the glovebox. The glovebox pressure is maintained by three separate pressure control systems. The primary pressure control system is designed to maintain the glovebox at a negative pressure with the other two control systems serving as redundant safety backups. The quality of the argon atmosphere is controlled using a purifying bed system that removes oxygen and moisture. Glovebox atmosphere contaminants that are monitored on a continuous or periodic basis include moisture, oxygen, and nitrogen. The gas generation experiment requires the test containers to be filled with brine, leak tested, maintained at a constant temperature, and the gas head space of the test container sampled on a periodic basis. Test container support systems consisting of a brine addition system, leak test system, heating system, and gas sampling system were designed and implemented. A rupture disk system was constructed to provide pressure relief to the test containers. Operational requirements stipulated that test container temperature and pressure be monitored and collected on a continuous basis. A data acquisition system (DAS) was specifically designed to meet these requirements.

Benjamin, W.W.; Knight, C.J.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Rosenberg, K.E.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas combined-cycle and combustion turbine power plantsnatural gas has become the fuel of choice for new power plantspower plants (Awerbuch 1993, 1994; Kahn & Stoft 1993). Specifically, in the context of natural gas-

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EIA), natural gas combined-cycle and combustion turbineof energy from a new combined cycle gas turbine, and moregas needed to fuel an 85 MW combined-cycle gas turbine (heat

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Which way the natural gas price: an attempt to predict theas a Hedge Against Gas Price Movement. ” Public UtilitiesHedge Against Natural Gas Price Movements. ” http://

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Essential elements of modeling gas generation from well defined plutonium materials  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Processing of excess plutonium oxide (and related) materials intended for long-term storage is addressed in DOE standard 3013-2000. The essential elements addressed by this standard are eliminating or reducing to an acceptable level the entities that lead to gas evolution and consequent pressurization of the intended storage container system. Based upon the need to adequately understand and quantify these relevant parameters we briefly describe the current scientific knowledge of gas evolution from such systems. These associated research efforts have included fundamental kinetic and thermodynamic studies of water interactions at actinide oxide surfaces, radiolytic reactions of adsorbed water, interfacial reactions of hydrogen and oxygen, and radiolytic helium production. Utilizing, where possible, experimental parameters for many of the aforementioned processes we have developed a mathematical model with a minimum number of essential components that successfully models gas generation from well-defined PuO{sub 2} materials with known amounts of deliberately added water. In this work we verify this model against real pressure versus time data (described at greater length in another manuscript in these conference proceedings) and subsequently assure the safety envelope of design criteria for both short- and long-term storage and transportation of these material classes. These modeling results predict pressures and gas phase mole fractions over well-defined DOE 3013 container test cases well in advance of actual long-term surveillance information and provide confidence in safe storage of plutonium oxide material classes.

Paffett, M. T. (Mark T.); Kelly, D. (Daniel)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program Phase I: Clean Air Partners 0.5 g/hp-h NOx Engine Concept; Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Subcontractor report details work done by Clean Air Partners to develop 0.5 g/hp-h NOx natural gas engine exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) technology for the Next Generation Natural Gas Vehicle Program.

Wong, H. C.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A Silicon-Based Micro Gas Turbine Engine for Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports on our research in developing a micro power generation system based on gas turbine engine and piezoelectric converter. The micro gas turbine engine consists of a micro combustor, a turbine and a centrifugal compressor. Comprehensive simulation has been implemented to optimal the component design. We have successfully demonstrated a silicon-based micro combustor, which consists of seven layers of silicon structures. A hairpin-shaped design is applied to the fuel/air recirculation channel. The micro combustor can sustain a stable combustion with an exit temperature as high as 1600 K. We have also successfully developed a micro turbine device, which is equipped with enhanced micro air-bearings and driven by compressed air. A rotation speed of 15,000 rpm has been demonstrated during lab test. In this paper, we will introduce our research results major in the development of micro combustor and micro turbine test device.

Shan, X -C; Maeda, R; Sun, Y F; Wu, M; Hua, J S

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Corrosive gas generation potential from chloride salt radiolysis in plutonium environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The specific goal of this project was to evaluate the magnitude and practical significance of radiation effects involving mixtures of chloride salts and plutonium dioxide (PuO{sub 2}) sealed in stainless steel containers and stored for up to 50 yr, after stabilization at 950 C and packaging according to US Department of Energy (DOE) standards. The potential for generating chemically aggressive molecular chlorine (and hydrogen chloride by interaction with adsorbed water or hydrogen gas) by radiolysis of chloride ions was studied. To evaluate the risks, an annotated bibliography on chloride salt radiolysis was created with emphasis on effects of plutonium alpha radiation. The authors present data from the material identification and surveillance (MIS) project obtained from examination and analysis of representative PuO{sub 2} items from various DOE sites, including the headspace gas analysis data of sealed mixtures of PuO{sub 2} and chloride salts following long-term storage.

Tandon, L.; Allen, T.H.; Mason, R.E.; Penneman, R.A.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CEC). 2002. Natural Gas Supply and Infrastructureincluded a long-term natural gas supply deal for years 2004fixed-price gas supply contracts and natural gas storage. As

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supply contracts and natural gas storage. As shown below insupply contracts and natural gas storage. As shown below in

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Conversion of Mixed Oxygenates Generated from Synthesis Gas to Fuel Range Hydrocarbon  

SciTech Connect

The growing dependence in the U.S. on foreign crude oil supplies and increased concerns regarding greenhouse gas emission has generated considerable interest in research to develop renewable and environmentally friendly liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuels. One of the strategies for achieving this is to produce intermediate compounds such as alcohols and other simple oxygenates from biomass generated synthesis gas (mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen) and further convert them into liquid hydrocarbons. The focus of this research is to investigate the effects of mixed oxygenates intermediate product compositions on the conversion step to produce hydrocarbon liquids. A typical mixed oxygenate stream is expected to contain water (around 50%), alcohols, such as methanol and ethanol (around 35%), and smaller quantities of oxygenates such as acetaldehyde, acetic acid and ethyl acetate. However the ratio and the composition of the mixed oxygenate stream generated from synthesis gas vary significantly depending on the catalyst used and the process conditions. Zeolite catalyzed deoxygenation of methanol accompanied by chain growth is well understood under Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) like reaction conditions using an H-ZSM-5 zeolite as the catalyst6-8. Research has also been conducted to a limited extent in the past with higher alcohols, but not with other oxygenates present9-11. Also there has been little experimental investigation into mixtures containing substantial amounts of water. The latter is of particular interest because water separation from the hydrocarbon product would be less energy intensive than first removing it from the oxygenate intermediate stream prior to hydrocarbon synthesis, potentially reducing overall processing costs.

Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Gerber, Mark A.; Lilga, Michael A.; Flake, Matthew D.

2012-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

183

Plant power : the cost of using biomass for power generation and potential for decreased greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To date, biomass has not been a large source of power generation in the United States, despite the potential for greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits from displacing coal with carbon neutral biomass. In this thesis, the fuel cycle ...

Cuellar, Amanda Dulcinea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Method of making compost and spawned compost, mushroom spawn and generating methane gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Newly designed ribbon-type mixers provide an improved method for making composts, aerating composts, growing mushroom spawn, generating methane gas, and filling conveyors in the mushroom-growing industry. The mixers may be the double-ribbon type for purely mixing operations or the single-ribbon type for moving the material from one place to another. Both types can operate under pressure. In preparing compost for mushroom growing, operators can first use the airtight mixers for a preliminary anaerobic fermentation to produce methane, then by changing the atmosphere to an oxidizing one, complete the compost preparation under the necessary aerobic conditions.

Stoller, B.B.

1981-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

185

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Raridon, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armfield, Jeffrey S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Graves, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

A new generation of multilateral well enhances small gas field economics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main objective of this study is to investigate the applicability of a new multilateral well architecture in the domain of small size and offshore gas fields. The new architecture completely reverses the current multilateral technology. The innovative concept suggests that laterals can be achieved like any conventional wells. They could be drilled from the surface and tied back to a common wellbore referred to as the mother well. Production would go through the toe of laterals into the mother well. The mother well could be as simple as a large diameter casing equipped with prepared connections to tie in feeder wells. This study looked past the mechanical challenge of achieving the new architecture. I demonstrated important benefits in terms of cost reduction, well completion and operations, and reservoir drainage. I looked at a typical field case, Phoenix, located in West Africa. Its actual development plan targets an ultimate recovery of 600 BCF with a total of four sub-vertical wells. I implemented a new development scenario with the innovative multilateral architecture. For comparison purposes, I achieved a reservoir simulation and a production forecast with both scenarios. The only simulation variable was the well architecture definition. As a main result, the new multilateral structure could produce as many as four vertical wells with three slim-hole laterals. I achieved a quantitative risk analysis on both development plans. I assessed the development cost of each scenario and performed a Monte Carlo simulation to account for cost uncertainties. In addition to the actual 70 MMSCFD gas contract, I simulated a progressive gas demand increase of 20 MMSCFD every five years and a 150 MMSCFD gas market. The study demonstrates the economic benefits of the new technology in the domain of offshore and small gas fields. This work also shows that this new generation of multilaterals brings new option values to the domain of multilateral technology.

Atse, Jean-Philippe

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Scheibel (1997) “Current Gas Turbine Developments and Futurefor Heavy-Duty Gas Turbines,” October 2000. Available onlineNext Evolution of the F Gas Turbine,” April 2001. Available

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

PV output smoothing using a battery and natural gas engine-generator.  

SciTech Connect

In some situations involving weak grids or high penetration scenarios, the variability of photovoltaic systems can affect the local electrical grid. In order to mitigate destabilizing effects of power fluctuations, an energy storage device or other controllable generation or load can be used. This paper describes the development of a controller for coordinated operation of a small gas engine-generator set (genset) and a battery for smoothing PV plant output. There are a number of benefits derived from using a traditional generation resource in combination with the battery; the variability of the photovoltaic system can be reduced to a specific level with a smaller battery and Power Conditioning System (PCS) and the lifetime of the battery can be extended. The controller was designed specifically for a PV/energy storage project (Prosperity) and a gas engine-generator (Mesa Del Sol) currently operating on the same feeder in Albuquerque, New Mexico. A number of smoothing simulations of the Prosperity PV were conducted using power data collected from the site. By adjusting the control parameters, tradeoffs between battery use and ramp rates could be tuned. A cost function was created to optimize the control in order to balance, in this example, the need to have low ramp rates with reducing battery size and operation. Simulations were performed for cases with only a genset or battery, and with and without coordinated control between the genset and battery, e.g., without the communication link between sites or during a communication failure. The degree of smoothing without coordinated control did not change significantly because the battery dominated the smoothing response. It is anticipated that this work will be followed by a field demonstration in the near future.

Johnson, Jay; Ellis, Abraham; Denda, Atsushi [Shimizu Corporation; Morino, Kimio [Shimizu Corporation; Shinji, Takao [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.; Ogata, Takao [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.; Tadokoro, Masayuki [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd.

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Waste drum gas generation sampling program at Rocky Flats during FY 1988  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rocky Flats Plant Transuranic Waste Drums were sampled for gas composition. Combustibles, plastics, Raschig rings, solidified organic sludge, and solidified inorganic sludge transuranic waste forms were sampled. Plastic bag material and waste samples were also taken from some solidified sludge waste drums. A vacuum system was used to sample each layer of containment inside a waste drum, including individual waste bags. G values (gas generation) were calculated for the waste drums. Analytical results indicate that very low concentrations of potentially flammable or corrosive gas mixtures will be found in vented drums. G(H{sub 2}) was usually below 1.6, while G(Total) was below 4.0. Hydrogen permeability tests on different types of plastic waste bags used at Rocky Flats were also conducted. Polyvinylchloride was slightly more permeable to hydrogen than polyethylene for new or creased material. Permeability of aged material to hydrogen was slightly higher than for new material. Solidified organic and inorganic sludges were sampled for volatile organics. The analytical results from two drums of solidified organic sludges showed concentrations were above detection limits for four of the 36 volatile organics analyzed. The analytical results for four of the five solidified inorganic sludges show that concentrations were below detection limits for all volatile organics analyzed. 3 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

Roggenthen, D.K.; McFeeters, T.L.; Nieweg, R.G.

1991-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

190

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For better or worse, natural gas has become the fuel of choice for new power plants being built across the United States. According to the US Energy Information Administration (EIA), natural gas combined-cycle and combustion turbine power plants accounted for 96% of the total generating capacity added in the US between 1999 and 2002--138 GW out of a total of 144 GW. Looking ahead, the EIA expects that gas-fired technology will account for 61% of the 355 GW new generating capacity projected to come on-line in the US up to 2025, increasing the nationwide market share of gas-fired generation from 18% in 2002 to 22% in 2025. While the data are specific to the US, natural gas-fired generation is making similar advances in other countries as well. Regardless of the explanation for (or interpretation of) the empirical findings, however, the basic implications remain the same: one should not blindly rely on gas price forecasts when comparing fixed-price renewable with variable-price gas-fired generation contracts. If there is a cost to hedging, gas price forecasts do not capture and account for it. Alternatively, if the forecasts are at risk of being biased or out of tune with the market, then one certainly would not want to use them as the basis for resource comparisons or investment decisions if a more certain source of data (forwards) existed. Accordingly, assuming that long-term price stability is valued, the most appropriate way to compare the levelized cost of these resources in both cases would be to use forward natural gas price data--i.e. prices that can be locked in to create price certainty--as opposed to uncertain natural gas price forecasts. This article suggests that had utilities and analysts in the US done so over the sample period from November 2000 to November 2003, they would have found gas-fired generation to be at least 0.3-0.6 cents/kWh more expensive (on a levelized cost basis) than otherwise thought. With some renewable resources, in particular wind power, now largely competitive with gas-fired generation in the US (including the impact of the federal production tax credit and current high gas prices), a margin of 0.3-0.6 cents/kWh may in some cases be enough to sway resource decisions in favor of renewables.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

191

Test container design/fabrication/function for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant gas generation experiment glovebox  

SciTech Connect

The gas generation experiments (GGE) are being conducted at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL0W) with contact handled transuranic (CH-TRU) waste in support of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) in Carlsbad, New Mexico. The purpose of the GGE is to determine the different quantities and types of gases that would be produced and the gas-generation rates that would develop if brine were introduced to CH-TRU waste under post-closure WIPP disposal room conditions. The experiment requires that a prescribed matrix of CH-TRU waste be placed in a 7.5 liter test container. After loaded with the CH-TRU waste, brine and inoculum mixtures (consisting of salt and microbes indigenous to the Carlsbad, New Mexico region) are added to the waste. The test will run for an anticipated time period of three to five years. The test container itself is an ASME rated pressure vessel constructed from Hastelloy C276 to eliminate corrosion that might contaminate the experimental results. The test container is required to maintain a maximum 10% head space with a maximum working pressure of 17.25 MPa (2,500 psia). The test container is designed to provide a gas sample of the head space without the removal of brine. Assembly of the test container lid and process valves is performed inside an inert atmosphere glovebox. Glovebox mockup activities were utilized from the beginning of the design phase to ensure the test container and associated process valves were designed for remote handling. In addition, test container processes (including brine addition, sparging, leak detection, and test container pressurization) are conducted inside the glovebox.

Knight, C.J.; Russell, N.E.; Benjamin, W.W.; Rosenberg, K.E.; Michelbacher, J.A.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas is generally perceived to be much more volatile than the price of coal. Price regulation

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history nevertheless does not lend ready support to the view that the EIA’s reference case natural gas

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

R&D Programs for Hydrogen: US and EU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The possibility of a future economy based on H2 and fuel cells is both promising and uncertain. As a consequence, in the US and in the EU significant actions, with similarities as well as differences, related to hydrogen R&D are being undertaken. Efforts are focused in both cases primarily on applied research, development and demonstration. Some striking differences result from the leading role of the Department of Energy (DOE) in the US, as opposed to the more unstructured, nation-based approach in the EU. R&D activities conducted both in America and Europe are reviewed and compared, and some tentative conclusions are advanced. The case for hydrogen Hydrogen (H2) is, among other things, an energy carrier very abundant in nature in combination with other chemical elements. Molecular hydrogen (H2) can be synthesized by energy intensive processes. H2 must then be stored, distributed and finally utilised for energy generation. Internal combustion engines (ICE), in the form of reciprocating machines or gas turbines (GT), as well as electrochemical devices, known as fuel cells

Steven Stoft; Cesar Dopazo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Steam Generating Units (duct burners) 40 CFR Part 60 Subpart GG- Standards of Performance for Stationary Gas Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For nitrogen oxides has been determined to be selective catalytic reduction. l As authorized by the Northwest Clean Air Agency Regulation Section 300, this order is issued subject to the following restrictions and conditions: 1) The gas turbines shall burn either pipeline natural gas, or number 2 distillate oil with a sulfur content not to exceed 0.05 weight percent. The HRSG duct burners shall burn only pipeline natural gas. 2) Pollutant concentrations for each gas turbinelheat recovery steam generator stack shall not exceed the following:

unknown authors

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Associates, citing NYMEX natural gas bid-offer spreadAnalysis of the Market for Natural Gas Futures. ” The EnergyProfiles of Renewable and Natural Gas Electricity Contracts:

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas combined-cycle and combustion turbine power plantsnatural gas combined-cycle and combustion turbine power plantsnatural gas has become the fuel of choice for new power plants

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supply contracts and natural gas storage. As shown below insupply contracts and natural gas storage. As shown below inWe find that natural gas options and storage are not

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hedge Against Natural Gas Price Movements. ” http://Downward Pressure on Natural Gas Prices: The Impact ofTheis. 2001. “Which way the natural gas price: an attempt to

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Regional Gas Infrastructure -- Is It Ready for the Power Boom?: How Changes in Gas and Electric Industries Affect Reliability an d Competitiveness of Gas-Fired Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The boom in gas-fired capacity additions, coupled with today's overheated gas market, make questions of gas supply a top priority for gas and electric industry planners. The relationships between the gas and electric industries are changing -- with the latter becoming a premium customer of the former. While the commodity market is national in scope, many of the impacts and planning challenges are best understood on a regional basis. This report examines five regions where gas-fired capacity additions are...

2001-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

supercritical coal-?red steam generators. Additionally, thecost of heat recovery steam generator(s) (HSRG) necessarythe primary generator is used to drive a secondary steam

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Tritium generation and neutron measurements in Pd-Si under high deuterium gas pressure  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes some of the methods applicable for low level tritium detection needed in the search for anomalous fusion in metal hydrides. It is also intended to further detail our tritium and neutron results that have been obtained with the Pd-Si-D system, originally presented at earlier workshops. A measure of reproducibility that was not evident in our previous work has been achieved partially due to the better detection sensitivity afforded by the use of low tritium deuterium and partially from the fact that the foil-wafer cells can be made with nearly identical electrical characteristics. This reproducibility has allowed us to narrow the optimum conditions for the experiment. While this experiment is rather different from the standard'' electrolytic cell or the Ti gas hydride experiment, similarities exist in that non equilibrium conditions are sought and the tritium generation levels are low and neutron emission is extremely weak. In contrast to many electrochemical cell experiments, the system used in these experiments is completely sealed during operation and uses no electrolyte. The major improvements to the experiment have been the use of vary low tritium deuterium for the hydriding and the replacement of the aluminum neutron counter tubes with ones of stainless steel. These changes have resulted in pronounced improvements to the detection systems since the background tritium level in the gas has been reduced by a factor of 300 and the neutron background has been decreased by a factor of 14. 16 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

Claytor, T.N.; Tuggle, D.G.; Menlove, H.O.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conjunction with falling natural gas prices, has spurred thesigni?cant fall in natural gas prices in 1985. Furthermore,attributable to a bump in natural gas prices during 1993. 29

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with falling natural gas prices, has spurred the developmentsigni?cant fall in natural gas prices in 1985. Furthermore,to a bump in natural gas prices during 1993. 29 In contrast,

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Low NO{sub x} turbine power generation utilizing low Btu GOB gas. Final report, June--August 1995  

SciTech Connect

Methane, a potent greenhouse gas, is second only to carbon dioxide as a contributor to potential global warming. Methane liberated by coal mines represents one of the most promising under exploited areas for profitably reducing these methane emissions. Furthermore, there is a need for apparatus and processes that reduce the nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) emissions from gas turbines in power generation. Consequently, this project aims to demonstrate a technology which utilizes low grade fuel (CMM) in a combustion air stream to reduce NO{sub x} emissions in the operation of a gas turbine. This technology is superior to other existing technologies because it can directly use the varying methane content gases from various streams of the mining operation. The simplicity of the process makes it useful for both new gas turbines and retrofitting existing gas turbines. This report evaluates the feasibility of using gob gas from the 11,000 acre abandoned Gateway Mine near Waynesburg, Pennsylvania as a fuel source for power generation applying low NO{sub x} gas turbine technology at a site which is currently capable of producing low grade GOB gas ({approx_equal} 600 BTU) from abandoned GOB areas.

Ortiz, I.; Anthony, R.V.; Gabrielson, J.; Glickert, R.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

An Approach to Generating Summaries of Time Series Data in the Gas Turbine Domain Jin Yu and Jim Hunter and Ehud Reiter and Somayajulu Sripada  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An Approach to Generating Summaries of Time Series Data in the Gas Turbine Domain Jin Yu and Jim an approach to generating summaries of time series data in the gas turbine domain using AI techniques. Through), both domain knowledge from experts about how to solve problems in the gas turbine and information about

Sripada, Yaji

207

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials - A Status Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen-containing material. Since transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together, it was decided that hydrogen generation was a problem that warranted the execution of a high-level roadmapping effort. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE's Environmental Management (EM) organizations to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a ''program level'' roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This paper also presents the status of the roadmap and follow-up activities.

Luke, D.E. (INEEL); Hamp, S. (DOE-Albuquerque Operations Office)

2002-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

208

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials - A Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen-containing material. Since transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together, it was decided that hydrogen generation was a problem that warranted the execution of a high-level roadmapping effort. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE's Environmental Management (EM) organizations to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a ''program level'' roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This paper also presents the status of the roadmap and follow-up activities.

Luke, D.E. (INEEL); Hamp, S. (DOE-Albuquerque Operations Office)

2002-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

209

Roadmapping the Resolution of Gas Generation Issues in Packages Containing Radioactive Waste/Materials - A Status Report  

SciTech Connect

Gas generation issues, particularly hydrogen, have been an area of concern for the transport and storage of radioactive materials and waste in the Department of Energy (DOE) Complex. Potentially combustible gases can be generated through a variety of reactions, including chemical reactions and radiolytic decomposition of hydrogen- containing material. Since transportation regulations prohibit shipment of explosives and radioactive materials together, it was decided that hydrogen generation was a problem that warranted the execution of a high-level roadmapping effort. This paper discusses the major gas generation issues within the DOE Complex and the research that has been and is being conducted by the transuranic (TRU) waste, nuclear materials, and spent nuclear fuels (SNF) programs within DOE’s Environmental Management (EM) organizations to address gas generation concerns. This paper presents a "program level" roadmap that links technology development to program needs and identifies the probability of success in an effort to understand the programmatic risk associated with the issue of gas generation. This paper also presents the status of the roadmap and follow-up activities.

Luke, Dale Elden; Hamp, S.

2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

MOX and MOX with 237Np/241Am Inert Fission Gas Generation Comparison in ATR  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The treatment of spent fuel produced in nuclear power generation is one of the most important issues to both the nuclear community and the general public. One of the viable options to long-term geological disposal of spent fuel is to extract plutonium, minor actinides (MA), and potentially long-lived fission products from the spent fuel and transmute them into short-lived or stable radionuclides in currently operating light-water reactors (LWR), thus reducing the radiological toxicity of the nuclear waste stream. One of the challenges is to demonstrate that the burnup-dependent characteristic differences between Reactor-Grade Mixed Oxide (RG-MOX) fuel and RG-MOX fuel with MA Np-237 and Am 241 are minimal, particularly, the inert gas generation rate, such that the commercial MOX fuel experience base is applicable. Under the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), developmental fuel specimens in experimental assembly LWR-2 are being tested in the northwest (NW) I-24 irradiation position of the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR). The experiment uses MOX fuel test hardware, and contains capsules with MOX fuel consisting of mixed oxide manufactured fuel using reactor grade plutonium (RG-Pu) and mixed oxide manufactured fuel using RG-Pu with added Np/Am. This study will compare the fuel neutronics depletion characteristics of Case-1 RG-MOX and Case-2 RG-MOX with Np/Am.

G. S. Chang; M. Robel; W. J. Carmack; D. J. Utterbeck

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Coal-Fired Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessments (LCAs) of utility-scale coal-fired electricity generation systems focuses on reducing variability and clarifying central tendencies in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. Screening 270 references for quality LCA methods, transparency, and completeness yielded 53 that reported 164 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions. These estimates for subcritical pulverized, integrated gasification combined cycle, fluidized bed, and supercritical pulverized coal combustion technologies vary from 675 to 1,689 grams CO{sub 2}-equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh) (interquartile range [IQR]= 890-1,130 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh; median = 1,001) leading to confusion over reasonable estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from coal-fired electricity generation. By adjusting published estimates to common gross system boundaries and consistent values for key operational input parameters (most importantly, combustion carbon dioxide emission factor [CEF]), the meta-analytical process called harmonization clarifies the existing literature in ways useful for decision makers and analysts by significantly reducing the variability of estimates ({approx}53% in IQR magnitude) while maintaining a nearly constant central tendency ({approx}2.2% in median). Life cycle GHG emissions of a specific power plant depend on many factors and can differ from the generic estimates generated by the harmonization approach, but the tightness of distribution of harmonized estimates across several key coal combustion technologies implies, for some purposes, first-order estimates of life cycle GHG emissions could be based on knowledge of the technology type, coal mine emissions, thermal efficiency, and CEF alone without requiring full LCAs. Areas where new research is necessary to ensure accuracy are also discussed.

Whitaker, M.; Heath, G. A.; O'Donoughue, P.; Vorum, M.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

EU Energy Statistics 2010 (1990 - 2007) | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

43 43 Varnish cache server Browse Upload data GDR 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation: XID: 2142278043 Varnish cache server EU Energy Statistics 2010 (1990 - 2007) Dataset Summary Description These two datasets include energy statistics for the European Union (EU). The statistics are available from the European Commission. The data includes detailed information about: production, net imports, gross inland consumption, and electricity generation for the EU as a whole, as well as the individual member countries, for the period between 1990 and 2007. Also included is annual gross electricity generation from renewables (hydro, pumped storage, wind, biomass, PV, and geothermal) for all EU member countries, 1990 - 2007.

213

Status and integration of the gas generation studies performed for the Hydrogen Safety Program. FY-1992 Annual report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Waste in Tank 241-SY-101 on the Hanford Site generates and periodically releases hydrogen, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen gases. Studies have been conducted at several laboratories to determine the chemical mechanisms for the gas generation and release. Results from these studies are presented and integrated in an attempt to describe current understanding of the physical properties of the waste and the mechanisms of gas generation and retention. Existing tank data are consistent with the interpretation that gases are uniformly generated in the tank, released continuously from the convecting layer, and stored in the nonconvecting layer. Tank temperature measurements suggest that the waste consists of ``gobs`` of material that reach neutral buoyancy at different times. The activation energy of the rate limiting step of the gas generating process was calculated to be about 7 kJ/mol but measured in the laboratory at 80 to 100 kJ/mol. Based on observed temperature changes in the tank the activation energy is probably not higher than about 20 kJ/mol. Several simulated waste compositions have been devised for use in laboratory studies in the place of actual waste from Tank 241-SY-101. Data from these studies can be used to predict how the actual waste might behave when heated or diluted. Density evaluations do not confirm that heating waste at the bottom of the tank would induce circulation within the waste; however, heating may release gas bubbles by dissolving the solids to which the bubbles adhere. Gas generation studies on simulated wastes indicated that nitrous oxide and hydrogen yields are not particularly coupled. Solubility studies of nitrous oxide, the most soluble of the principal gaseous products, indicate it is unlikely that dissolved gases contribute substantially to the quantity of gas released during periodic events.

Pederson, L.R.; Strachan, D.M.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

A literature review of radiolytic gas generation as a result of the decomposition of sodium nitrate wastes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this literature review is to determine expected chemical reactions and the gas generation associated with radiolytic decomposition of radioactive sodium nitrate wastes such as the wastes stored in the Melton Valley Storage Tanks (MVST) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The literature survey summarizes expected chemical reactions and identifies the gases expected to be generated as a result of the radiolytic decomposition. The literature survey also identifies G values, which are the expression for radiation chemical yields as molecules of gas formed per 100 eV of absorbed energy, obtained from experimental studies of the radiolytic decomposition of water and sodium nitrate. 2 tabs., 32 refs.

Kasten, J.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Policy Options of California’s Reliance on Natural Gas. ”policy is often formulated with ratepayers in mind. 2) Second, long-term fixed-price natural gas

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

history nevertheless does not lend ready support to the view that the EIA’s reference case natural gas

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Accounting for fuel price risk when comparing renewable to gas-fired generation: the role of forward natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determining the Real Cost: Why Renewable Power is More Cost-Previously Believed. ” Renewable Energy World, 6(2), March-the Risk Profiles of Renewable and Natural Gas Electricity

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Assessment of the impact of the next generation solvent on DWPF melter off-gas flammability  

SciTech Connect

An assessment has been made to evaluate the impact on the DWPF melter off-gas flammability of replacing the current solvent used in the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Process Unit (MCU) process with the Next Generation Solvent (NGS-MCU) and blended solvent. The results of this study showed that the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the current solvent in the Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product would both be about 29% higher than their counterparts of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent in the absence of guanidine partitioning. When 6 ppm of guanidine (TiDG) was added to the effluent transfer to DWPF to simulate partitioning for the NGS-MCU and blended solvent cases and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer was controlled below 87 ppm, the concentrations of nonvolatile carbon and hydrogen of the NGS-MCU and blended solvent were still about 12% and 4% lower, respectively, than those of the current solvent. It is, therefore, concluded that as long as the volume of MCU effluent transfer to DWPF is limited to 15,000 gallons per Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT)/SME cycle and the concentration of Isopar{reg_sign} L in the effluent transfer is controlled below 87 ppm, using the current solvent assumption of 105 ppm Isopar{reg_sign} L or 150 ppm solvent in lieu of NGS-MCU or blended solvent in the DWPF melter off-gas flammability assessment is conservative for up to an additional 6 ppm of TiDG in the effluent due to guanidine partitioning. This report documents the calculations performed to reach this conclusion.

Daniel, W. E.

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

219

Combined cycle electric power plant having a control system which enables dry steam generator operation during gas turbine operation  

SciTech Connect

A control system for a combined cycle electric power plant is described. It contains: at least one gas turbine including an exit through which heated exhaust gases pass; means for generating steam coupled to said gas turbine exit for transferring heat from the exhaust gases to a fluid passing through the steam generator; a steam turbine coupled to the steam generator and driven by the steam supplied thereby; means for generating electric power by the driving power of the turbines; condenser means for receiving and converting the spent steam from the steam turbine into condensate; and steam generating means comprising a low pressure storage tank, a first heat exchange tube, a boiler feedwater pump for directing fluid from a low pressure storage tank through the first heat exchange tube, a main storage drum, a second heat exchange tube, and a high pressure recirculation pump for directing fluid from the main storage pump through the second heat exchange tube. The control system monitors the temperature of the exhaust gas turbine gases as directed to the steam generator and deactuates the steam turbine when a predetermined temperature is exceeded.

Martz, L.F.; Plotnick, R.J.

1974-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

220

Thermal and Radiolytic Gas Generation Tests on Material from Tanks 241-U-103, 241-AW-101, 241-S-106, and 241-S-102: Status Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress in evaluating thermal and radiolytic flammable gas generation in actual Hanford single-shell tank wastes. The work described was conducted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, whose purpose is to develop information to support DE&S Hanford (DESH) and Project Management Hanford Contract (PHMC) subcontractors in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies performed by Numatec Hanford Corporation (formerly Westinghouse Hanford Company). This report describes the results of laboratory tests of gas generation from actual convective layer wastes from Tank 241-U-103 under thermal and radiolytic conditions. Accurate measurements of gas generation rates from highly radioactive tank wastes are needed to assess the potential for producing and storing flammable gases within the tanks. The gas generation capacity of the waste in Tank 241-U-103 is a high priority for the Flammable Gas Safety Program due to its potential for accumulating gases above the flammability limit (Johnson et al, 1997). The objective of this work was to establish the composition of gaseous degradation products formed in actual tank wastes by thermal and radiolytic processes as a function of temperature. The gas generation tests on Tank 241-U-103 samples focused first on the effect of temperature on the composition and rate of gas generation Generation rates of nitrogen, nitrous oxide, methane, and hydrogen increased with temperature, and the composition of the product gas mixture varied with temperature.

King, C.M.; Bryan, S.A.

1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

French Vote on EU Constitution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

compensate the losers of liberalisation by regional help,aversion to economic liberalisation which rhymes badly withdirective on services liberalisation, on limiting the EU

Deubner, Christian

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Life Cycle Assessment of a Natural Gas Combined Cycle Power Generation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

% of total from natural gas production & distribution % of total from ammonia production & distribution Natural gas (in ground) 169.2 97.6% 0.0% 99.9% 0.1% Coal (in ground) 1.8...

223

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of U.S. regulation and high natural gas prices. The returnregulation (PIFUA), motivated by foreign policy concerns surrounding the “Oil Crisis,” severely limited the use of natural gas

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost of natural gas and the enactment of the Power Plant &Power Plant & Industrial Fuel Use Act and the natural gaspower plant emissions, created a premium for “clean-burning” technologies. With natural gas

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Onboard Plasmatron Generation of Hydrogen rich Gas for Diesel Engine Exhaust Aftertreatment and Other Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Plasmatron reformers can provide attractive means for conversion of diesel fuel into hydrogen rich gas. The hydrogen rich gas can be used for improved NOx trap technology and other aftertreatment applications.

Bromberg, L.; Cohn, D.R.; Heywood,J.; Rabinovich, A.

2002-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

226

Landfill Gas Cleanup for Carbonate Fuel Cell Power Generation: Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the United States and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Survey of Landfill Gas Generation Potential: 2-MW Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molten carbonate fuel cells can operate almost as efficiently on landfill gas as on natural gas. This study identified 749 landfills in the United States having the potential to support a total of nearly 3000 2-MW fuel cells.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ionization and absorption effects in high-order harmonic generation in gas-filled hollow fibers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and dkq n ~u! qdKn ~u! being the phase-mismatch compo- nents due to the dispersion of the gas, waveguide! involved in Eq. ~10! depends not only on gas dispersion, but also on the dispersion of waveguide modes by the dispersion and absorption of a gas medium rather than by the parameters of the fiber itself. In other words

von der Linde, D.

229

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar, and hydro power are often sold on a fixed-pricesolar, and hydro power, which by their nature are immune to natural gas fuel price

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Gas Storage for Power Generation -- Critical New Bridge Between Power Demand and Gas Supply: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Natural gas storage is a "sleeper" issue for the power industry that will demand a great deal of attention very soon as the building boom of gas-fired capacity draws to a close and these plants begin to operate. While an entire industry has emerged in recent years to develop high-deliverability gas storage, the new facilities are likely the tip of an iceberg. Pipelines will be taxed to meet fluctuating requirements of new units, and companies will turn to gas storage for reliability at an affordable cost...

2002-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

231

EU obiective of 120g CO2/km emission for new cars, a challenge for tribology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Passenger cars produce about 12 % of overall EU greenhouse gas -GHG- emissions (CO2) and transport sector with about 20 % is the second biggest emitter of GHG among all sources. Since 1990, EU has reduced transport emissions by 5 % but the contribution ... Keywords: GHG emissions, friction modifiers, fuel efficiency, structured surfaces, surface treatment

Ivan Iliuc

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Well blowout rates in California Oil and Gas District 4--Update and Trends  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experience from the natural gas storage industry. In: Rokkeof the underground natural gas storage wells in operation inof the underground natural gas storage wells in the EU. The

Benson, Sally M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Utilizing the heat content of gas-to-liquids by-product streams for commercial power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gas-to-liquids (GTL) processes produce a large fraction of by-products whose disposal or handling ordinarily becomes a cost rather than benefit. As an alternative strategy to market stranded gas reserves, GTL provides middle distillates to an unsaturated global market and offers opportunities to generate power for commercial purposes from waste by-product streams, which normally are associated with increased expenses incurred from additional handling cost. The key concept investigated in this work is the possibility of integrating the GTL process with power generation using conventional waste by-product steam streams. Simulation of the integrated process was conducted with the aim of identifying the critical operating conditions for successful integration of the GTL and power generation processes. About 500 MW of electric power can be generated from 70% of the exit steam streams, with around 20 to 25% steam plant thermal efficiency. A detailed economic analysis on the LNG, stand-alone GTL, and Integrated GTL Power-Generation plants indicates that the integrated system is more profitable than the other options considered. Justifying the technology and economics involved in the use of the by-product streams to generate power could increase the net revenue and overall profitability of GTL projects. This technology may be transferable to GTL projects in the world, wherever a market for generated power exists.

Adegoke, Adesola Ayodeji

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Implements a gas based on the ideal gas law. It should be noted that this model of gases is niave (from many perspectives). ...

235

Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment

236

Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Argentina-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Secretariat of Environment and Sustainable Development (SESD), Secretariat of Industry Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, - Industrial Processes

237

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas supply contracts and natural gas storage. As is shown inor Storage Cost Gas Price Falls Gas Price Rises Natural Gas

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Landfill gas represents a significant fuel resource both in the US and worldwide. The emissions of landfill gas from existing landfills has become an environmental liability contributing to global warming and causing odor problems. Landfill gas has been used to fuel reciprocating engines and gas turbines, and may also be used to fuel carbonate fuel cells. Carbonate fuel cells have high conversion efficiencies and use the carbon dioxide present in landfill gas as an oxidant. There are, however, a number of trace contaminants in landfill gas that contain chlorine and sulfur which are deleterious to fuel cell operation. Long-term economical operation of fuel cells fueled with landfill gas will, therefore, require cleanup of the gas to remove these contaminants. The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. A pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations: less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorinated hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide.

Steinfield, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Comparative life-cycle air emissions of coal, domestic natural gas, LNG, and SNG for electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) estimates that in the coming decades the United States' natural gas (NG) demand for electricity generation will increase. Estimates also suggest that NG supply will increasingly come from imported liquefied natural gas (LNG). Additional supplies of NG could come domestically from the production of synthetic natural gas (SNG) via coal gasification-methanation. The objective of this study is to compare greenhouse gas (GHG), SOx, and NOx life-cycle emissions of electricity generated with NG/LNG/SNG and coal. This life-cycle comparison of air emissions from different fuels can help us better understand the advantages and disadvantages of using coal versus globally sourced NG for electricity generation. Our estimates suggest that with the current fleet of power plants, a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have lower GHG emissions than coal. If advanced technologies with carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) are used, however, coal and a mix of domestic NG, LNG, and SNG would have very similar life-cycle GHG emissions. For SOx and NOx we find there are significant emissions in the upstream stages of the NG/LNG life-cycles, which contribute to a larger range in SOx and NOx emissions for NG/LNG than for coal and SNG. 38 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

Paulina Jaramillo; W. Michael Griffin; H. Scott Matthews [Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Civil and Environmental Engineering Department

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

240

Radcalc for windows benchmark study: A comparison of software results with Rocky Flats hydrogen gas generation data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radcalc for Windows Version 2.01 is a user-friendly software program developed by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations for the U.S. Department of Energy (McFadden et al. 1998). It is used for transportation and packaging applications in the shipment of radioactive waste materials. Among its applications are the classification of waste per the US. Department of Transportation regulations, the calculation of decay heat and daughter products, and the calculation of the radiolytic production of hydrogen gas. The Radcalc program has been extensively tested and validated (Green et al. 1995, McFadden et al. 1998) by comparison of each Radcalc algorithm to hand calculations. An opportunity to benchmark Radcalc hydrogen gas generation calculations to experimental data arose when the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) Residue Stabilization Program collected hydrogen gas generation data to determine compliance with requirements for shipment of waste in the TRUPACT-II (Schierloh 1998). The residue/waste drums tested at RFETS contain contaminated, solid, inorganic materials in polyethylene bags. The contamination is predominantly due to plutonium and americium isotopes. The information provided by Schierloh (1 998) of RFETS includes decay heat, hydrogen gas generation rates, calculated G{sub eff} values, and waste material type, making the experimental data ideal for benchmarking Radcalc. The following sections discuss the RFETS data and the Radcalc cases modeled with the data. Results are tabulated and also provided graphically.

MCFADDEN, J.G.

1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Water with Uranium Metal in K Basins Sludge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Means to decrease the rate of hydrogen gas generation from the chemical reaction of uranium metal with water were identified by surveying the technical literature. The underlying chemistry and potential side reactions were explored by conducting 61 principal experiments. Several methods achieved significant hydrogen gas generation rate mitigation. Gas-generating side reactions from interactions of organics or sludge constituents with mitigating agents were observed. Further testing is recommended to develop deeper knowledge of the underlying chemistry and to advance the technology aturation level. Uranium metal reacts with water in K Basin sludge to form uranium hydride (UH3), uranium dioxide or uraninite (UO2), and diatomic hydrogen (H2). Mechanistic studies show that hydrogen radicals (H·) and UH3 serve as intermediates in the reaction of uranium metal with water to produce H2 and UO2. Because H2 is flammable, its release into the gas phase above K Basin sludge during sludge storage, processing, immobilization, shipment, and disposal is a concern to the safety of those operations. Findings from the technical literature and from experimental investigations with simple chemical systems (including uranium metal in water), in the presence of individual sludge simulant components, with complete sludge simulants, and with actual K Basin sludge are presented in this report. Based on the literature review and intermediate lab test results, sodium nitrate, sodium nitrite, Nochar Acid Bond N960, disodium hydrogen phosphate, and hexavalent uranium [U(VI)] were tested for their effects in decreasing the rate of hydrogen generation from the reaction of uranium metal with water. Nitrate and nitrite each were effective, decreasing hydrogen generation rates in actual sludge by factors of about 100 to 1000 when used at 0.5 molar (M) concentrations. Higher attenuation factors were achieved in tests with aqueous solutions alone. Nochar N960, a water sorbent, decreased hydrogen generation by no more than a factor of three while disodium phosphate increased the corrosion and hydrogen generation rates slightly. U(VI) showed some promise in attenuating hydrogen but only initial testing was completed. Uranium metal corrosion rates also were measured. Under many conditions showing high hydrogen gas attenuation, uranium metal continued to corrode at rates approaching those observed without additives. This combination of high hydrogen attenuation with relatively unabated uranium metal corrosion is significant as it provides a means to eliminate uranium metal by its corrosion in water without the accompanying hazards otherwise presented by hydrogen generation.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

242

Gas generation and migration studies involving recently generated /sup 238/Pu-contaminated waste for the TRU Waste Sampling Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study is part of the multicontractor TRU Waste Sampling Program. Radiolytically generated gases were vented through a filtering device to determine its effectiveness in maintaining hydrogen concentrations within acceptably safe levels. In the second part of the study measurements were made to determine the ability of these gases, particularly hydrogen, to migrate through a sealed rigid polyethylene drum liner. Void volumes in these drums were found to be generally in excess of 90%. The carbon composite filter was found to satisfactorily vent hydrogen up to moderately high levels of alpha activity in the waste substrate. The sealed 90-mil liner was found to inhibit, but not prevent, the migration of hydrogen and other radiolytically generated gases.

Zerwekh, A.; Warren, J.L.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Nuclear data uncertainty analysis for the generation IV gas-cooled fast reactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the European 2400 MW Gas-cooled Fast Reactor (GoFastR), this paper summarizes a priori uncertainties, i.e. without any integral experiment assessment, of the main neutronic parameters which were obtained on the basis of the deterministic code system ERANOS (Edition 2.2-N). JEFF-3.1 cross-sections were used in conjunction with the newest ENDF/B-VII.0 based covariance library (COMMARA-2.0) resulting from a recent cooperation of the Brookhaven and Los Alamos National Laboratories within the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative. The basis for the analysis is the original GoFastR concept with carbide fuel pins and silicon-carbide ceramic cladding, which was developed and proposed in the first quarter of 2009 by the 'French alternative energies and Atomic Energy Commission', CEA. The main conclusions from the current study are that nuclear data uncertainties of neutronic parameters may still be too large for this Generation IV reactor, especially concerning the multiplication factor, despite the fact that the new covariance library is quite complete; These uncertainties, in relative terms, do not show the a priori expected increase with bum-up as a result of the minor actinide and fission product build-up. Indeed, they are found almost independent of the fuel depletion, since the uncertainty associated with {sup 238}U inelastic scattering results largely dominating. This finding clearly supports the activities of Subgroup 33 of the Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC), i.e. Methods and issues for the combined use of integral experiments and covariance data, attempting to reduce the present unbiased uncertainties on nuclear data through adjustments based on available experimental data. (authors)

Pelloni, S.; Mikityuk, K. [Paul Scherrer Inst., 5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Development of Modeling Techniques for A Generation IV Gas Fast Reactor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Worldwide, multiple countries are investing a great deal of time and energy towards developing a new class of technologically advanced nuclear reactors. These new reactors have come to be known as the Generation IV (Gen IV) class of nuclear reactors. Similarly to the other designs, the Gas Fast Reactor (GFR) has many advantages, such as electricity production at high efficiency, hydrogen production, minor actinide burning capabilities, etc. However, there are currently no immediate plans to build a GFR due to uncertainties regarding safety issues. The study conducted herein contains input techniques for the development of new neutronic and thermal hydraulic input decks for the United States (US) Department of Energy (DOE) GFR design. The Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) and MELCOR codes are used to model neutronic and thermal hydraulic characteristics, respectively. These codes are used with the intention of gaining further insight into GFR design and steady state operating characteristics of the US DOE GFR. Descriptions of inputs for all input decks, along with the results of the execution of both input decks can be found in this thesis. Although many alterations are made to original design specifications, results found in this thesis support the design modifications that have been made. Results suggest that steady-state operation of the GFR is a plausible possibility, given the right conditions. The lack of design criteria for both the reflector and borated shield regions imposes a necessity of invention upon all those who seek to clarify design criteria for the US DOE GFR. Furthermore, resulting temperature profiles for the fuel, cladding and coolant give rise to the possibility of the design of a system, based on thermionic principles, that converts core thermal energy directly to electricity. Such a system is envisioned to provide electricity to a decay heat removal system and possibly increase plant efficiency.

Dercher, Andrew Steven

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Nuclear Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

A systematic review and harmonization of life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of nuclear electricity generation technologies was performed to determine causes of and, where possible, reduce variability in estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to clarify the state of knowledge and inform decision making. LCA literature indicates that life cycle GHG emissions from nuclear power are a fraction of traditional fossil sources, but the conditions and assumptions under which nuclear power are deployed can have a significant impact on the magnitude of life cycle GHG emissions relative to renewable technologies. Screening 274 references yielded 27 that reported 99 independent estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from light water reactors (LWRs). The published median, interquartile range (IQR), and range for the pool of LWR life cycle GHG emission estimates were 13, 23, and 220 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), respectively. After harmonizing methods to use consistent gross system boundaries and values for several important system parameters, the same statistics were 12, 17, and 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh, respectively. Harmonization (especially of performance characteristics) clarifies the estimation of central tendency and variability. To explain the remaining variability, several additional, highly influential consequential factors were examined using other methods. These factors included the primary source energy mix, uranium ore grade, and the selected LCA method. For example, a scenario analysis of future global nuclear development examined the effects of a decreasing global uranium market-average ore grade on life cycle GHG emissions. Depending on conditions, median life cycle GHG emissions could be 9 to 110 g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh by 2050.

Warner, E. S.; Heath, G. A.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Bremsstrahlung {gamma}-ray generation by electrons from gas jets irradiated by laser pulses for radiographic testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electron generation from a gas jet irradiated by low energy femtosecond laser pulses is studied experimentally as a promising source of radiation for radioisotope-free {gamma}-ray imaging systems. The calculated yield of {gamma}-rays in the 0.5-2 MeV range, produced by low-average-power lasers and gas targets, exceeds the yields from solid tape targets up to 60 times. In addition, an effect of quasi-mono energetic electrons on {gamma}-ray imaging is also discussed.

Oishi, Yuji; Nayuki, Takuya; Zhidkov, Alexei; Fujii, Takashi; Nemoto, Koshichi [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196 (Japan); Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196, Japan and Photon Pioneers Center in Osaka University, Yamadaoka 2-1, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Yokosuka, Kanagawa 240-0196 (Japan)

2012-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

247

ENDWALL SHAPE MODIFICATION USING VORTEX GENERATORS AND FENCES TO IMPROVE GAS TURBINE COOLING AND EFFECTIVENESS.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The gas turbine is one of the most important parts of the air-breathing jet engine. Hence, improving its efficiency and rendering it operable under high… (more)

Gokce, Zeki

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

How much coal, natural gas, or petroleum is used to generate a ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, stocks, imports and exports. ... How much does it cost to produce crude oil and natural gas?

249

A Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Periodic Flow Gas Turbine for Distributed Energy Generation  

SciTech Connect

The proposed effort served as a feasibility study for an innovative, low-cost periodic flow gas turbine capable of realizing efficiencies in the 39-48% range.

Dr. Adam London

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

250

ESTIMATION OF RADIOLYTIC GAS GENERATION RATE FOR CYLINDRICAL RADIOACTIVE WASTE PACKAGES - APPLICATION TO SPENT ION EXCHANGE RESIN CONTAINERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Radioactive waste packages containing water and/or organic substances have the potential to radiolytically generate hydrogen and other combustible gases. Typically, the radiolytic gas generation rate is estimated from the energy deposition rate and the radiolytic gas yield. Estimation of the energy deposition rate must take into account the contributions from all radionuclides. While the contributions from non-gamma emitting radionuclides are relatively easy to estimate, an average geometry factor must be computed to determine the contribution from gamma emitters. Hitherto, no satisfactory method existed for estimating the geometry factors for a cylindrical package. In the present study, a formulation was developed taking into account the effect of photon buildup. A prototype code, called PC-CAGE, was developed to numerically solve the integrals involved. Based on the selected dimensions for a cylinder, the specified waste material, the photon energy of interest and a value for either the absorption or attenuation coefficient, the code outputs values for point and average geometry factors. These can then be used to estimate the internal dose rate to the material in the cylinder and hence to calculate the radiolytic gas generation rate. Besides the ability to estimate the rates of radiolytic gas generation, PC-CAGE can also estimate the dose received by the container material. This is based on values for the point geometry factors at the surface of the cylinder. PC-CAGE was used to calculate geometry factors for a number of cylindrical geometries. Estimates for the absorbed dose rate in container material were also obtained. The results for Ontario Power Generation's 3 m3 resin containers indicate that about 80% of the source gamma energy is deposited internally. In general, the fraction of gamma energy deposited internally depends on the dimensions of the cylinder, the material within it and the photon energy; the fraction deposited increases with increasing dimensions of the cylinder and decreases with increasing photon energy.

Husain, A.; Lewis, Brent J.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

251

Impact of Natural Gas Market Conditions on Fuel Flexibility Needs for Existing and New Power Generation: Report Series on Natural Ga s and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ongoing surge in new gas-fired capacity is changing the landscape of how natural gas will be used for power generation, leading to some surprising effects. While the new machines bring greater efficiency, the exit of dual-fuel units leads to a loss in fuel flexibility, greater natural gas price volatility, and less reliability of natural gas-fired generation. This report explores these effects systematically, bringing fresh insight on gas use in the electric sector, its market effects, and the ever-c...

2002-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

252

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy resources such as wind power carry no natural gas fuel priceenergy resources such as wind, geothermal, biomass, solar, and hydro power are often sold on a fixed-price

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Accounting for fuel price risk: Using forward natural gas prices instead of gas price forecasts to compare renewable to natural gas-fired generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

biomass in particular – are subject to fuel price risks ofbiomass, solar, and hydro power are often sold on a fixed-pricebiomass, solar, and hydro power, which by their nature are immune to natural gas fuel price

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Development of methodologies for calculating greenhouse gas emissions from electricity generation for the California climate action registry  

SciTech Connect

The California Climate Action Registry, which will begin operation in Fall 2002, is a voluntary registry for California businesses and organizations to record annual greenhouse gas emissions. Reporting of emissions in the Registry by a participant involves documentation of both ''direct'' emissions from sources that are under the entity's control and ''indirect'' emissions controlled by others. Electricity generated by an off-site power source is considered to be an indirect emission and must be included in the entity's report. Published electricity emissions factors for the State of California vary considerably due to differences in whether utility-owned out-of-state generation, non-utility generation, and electricity imports from other states are included. This paper describes the development of three methods for estimating electricity emissions factors for calculating the combined net carbon dioxide emissions from all generating facilities that provide electricity to Californians. We fi nd that use of a statewide average electricity emissions factor could drastically under- or over-estimate an entity's emissions due to the differences in generating resources among the utility service areas and seasonal variations. In addition, differentiating between marginal and average emissions is essential to accurately estimate the carbon dioxide savings from reducing electricity use. Results of this work will be taken into consideration by the Registry when finalizing its guidance for use of electricity emissions factors in calculating an entity's greenhouse gas emissions.

Price, Lynn; Marnay, Chris; Sathaye, Jayant; Murtishaw, Scott; Fisher, Diane; Phadke, Amol; Franco, Guido

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Generation of hydrogen gas as a result of percussion drilling within an unconfined aquifer, south-central Washington  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A 240-m deep borehole (Yakima Barricade borehole), located on the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Hanford Site, was drilled as part of a DOE research program to investigate microbial processes in deep subsurface environments and to evaluate geochemical and geohydrological controls on subsurface microorganisms. A combustible gas was detected during drilling of the Yakima Barricade borehole (YBB). Once it was established that the major combustible gas was H{sub 2}, a series of tests were performed to evaluate the process by which H{sub 2} occurred within the borehole. This paper presents evidence for the generation of H{sub 2} in boreholes during percussion drilling below the water table and discusses mechanism of H{sub 2} generation and their implications for subsurface microbial processes.

Bjornstad, B.N.; Stevens, T.O.; Fredrickson, J.K.; McKinley, J.P.; Rawson, S.A.; Long, P.E.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

How Competitive Market Dynamics Affect Coal, Nuclear and Gas Generation and Fuel Use -- A 10-Year Look Ahead  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report, the fourth in a series by EPRI and GRI addressing power industry deregulation, examines how restructuring is unleashing a new wave of merchant gas-fired plants. This phenomenon can lead to substantial regional changes in generation and fuel use, energy prices, and profitability-changes that have eluded analysts to date. Focusing on several regions in depth, this report breaks new ground in understanding the effects of turbulent, competitive market dynamics.

1999-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

257

Hydrogen Gas Generation Model for Fuel-Based Remote-Handled Transuranic Waste Stored at the INEEL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) initiated efforts to calculate the hydrogen gas generation in remote-handled transuranic (RH-TRU) containers in order to evaluate continued storage of unvented RH-TRU containers in vaults and to identify any potential problems during retrieval and aboveground storage. A computer code is developed to calculate the hydrogen concentration in the stored RH-TRU waste drums for known configuration, waste matrix, and radionuclide inventories as a function of time.

Khericha, S.; Bhatt, R.; Liekhus, K.

2003-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

258

Repowering Fossil Steam Plants with Gas Turbines and Heat Recovery Steam Generators: Design Considerations, Economics, and Lessons L earned  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes repowering fossil steam plants using gas turbines (GTs) and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) in combined-cycle mode. Design considerations and guidance, comparative economics, and lessons learned in the development of such projects are included. Various other methods of fossil plant repowering with GTs are also briefly discussed. The detailed results and comparisons that are provided relate specifically to a generic GT/HRSG repowering. Design parameters, limitations, schedulin...

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

259

Meeting the challenges of the new energy industry: The driving forces facing electric power generators and the natural gas industry  

SciTech Connect

The proceedings of the IGT national conference on meeting the challenges of the New Energy Industry: The driving forces facing Electric Power Generators and the Natural Gas Industry are presented. The conference was held June 19-21, 1995 at the Ambassador West Hotel in Downtown Chicago, Illinois. A separate abstract and indexing for each of the 18 papers presented for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

considering that natural gas prices (and gas pricein the market, allowing natural gas price volatility to flowincreasingly volatile natural gas prices, renewable energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas after treatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent application describes a method and apparatus of exhaust gas remediation that enhance the reactivity of the material catalysts found within catalytic converters of cars, trucks, and power stations.

Whealton, John H.; Hanson, Gregory R.; Storey, John M.; Raridon, Richard J.; Armfield, Jeffrey S.; Bigelow, Timothy S.; Graves, Ronald L.

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

feet (assuming the stable coal price of $1 per million Btu),for coal plants given current relative fuel prices (ranginga relative price of gas roughly twice that of coal, a modern

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Generation Maintenance Application Center: Fuel Gas System for Combustion Turbine Combined Cycle Plant Maintenance Guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide provides information to assist personnel involved with the maintenance of the fuel gas system at a gas turbine combined cycle facility, including good maintenance practices, preventive maintenance techniques and troubleshooting guidance. BackgroundCombustion turbine combined cycle (CTCC) facilities utilize various components that can be unique to this particular type of power plant. As such, owners and operators of CTCC facilities may find ...

2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

264

EU approves food labeling rules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New food-labeling regulations are in place in the European Union after the European Parliament (EP) approved rules aimed at helping consumers make “better informed, healthier [sic] choices.” EU approves food labeling rules Inform Magazine Inform Archives

265

An Investigation of the Application of the Gas Generator-Free Turbine Cycle to a Nuclear Powered Aircraft  

SciTech Connect

This study has investigated the feasibility of installing a gas generator-free turbine type power plant in the R3Y aircraft, using a circulating fuel reactor as a power source. Two variations of the cycle were considered. The split flow cycle bleeds high temperature, high pressure air from the gas generator directly to the free turbine in the wing. The through flow cycle partially expands the high temperature, high pressure air through the compressor turbine of the gas generator then directs the compressor-turbine exhaust air to the free turbine in the wing. Design parameters of pressure ratio, radiator depth, radiation flow density, and hot gas duct size were optimized to give minimum weight per shaft horsepower of the complete power plant. The weight of a split flow power plant capable of supplying 22,000 shaft horsepower was found to be 116,600 pounds. The weight of a similar through flow power plant was found to be 119,900 pounds. The reactor power required in both cases was 70 megawatts. The nominal gross weight of the R3Y airplane is 175,000 pounds. With pay loads of approximately 20,000 pounds, either nuclear conversion will have a gross weight of 200,000 pounds. It was found that either cycle could be installed in the R3Y aircraft; however, the installation of either would require major structural redesign. The split flow cycle with its smaller hot air ducts required the least amount of redesign. A comparison of existing aircraft engines with a preliminary design of the split flow turbo-components indicated that the compressor and possibly the free turbine could be adapted from current engine components.

Alvis, J. H.; Chessman, S. R.

1957-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

High-order-harmonic generation in gas with a flat-top laser beam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present experimental and numerical results on high-order-harmonic generation with a flat-top laser beam. We show that a simple binary tunable phase plate, made of two concentric glass plates, can produce a flat-top profile at the focus of a Gaussian infrared beam. Both experiments and numerical calculations show that there is a scaling law between the harmonic generation efficiency and the increase of the generation volume.

Boutu, W.; Auguste, T.; Binazon, L.; Gobert, O.; Carre, B. [Service des Photons, Atomes et Molecules, CEA-Saclay, FR-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Boyko, O.; Valentin, C. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, UMR 7639 ENSTA/CNRS/Ecole Polytechnique, FR-91761 Palaiseau (France); Sola, I.; Constant, E.; Mevel, E. [Universite de Bordeaux, CEA, CNRS UMR 5107, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), FR-33400 Talence (France); Balcou, Ph. [Laboratoire d'Optique Appliquee, UMR 7639 ENSTA/CNRS/Ecole Polytechnique, FR-91761 Palaiseau (France); Universite de Bordeaux, CEA, CNRS UMR 5107, CELIA (Centre Lasers Intenses et Applications), FR-33400 Talence (France); Merdji, H. [Service des Photons, Atomes et Molecules, CEA-Saclay, FR-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); PULSE Institute for Ultrafast Energy Science, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Stanford University, 2575 Sand Hill Road, Menlo Park, California 94025 (United States)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

267

202-328-5000 www.rff.orgEU-ETS and Nordic Electricity: A CVAR Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A cointegrated vector autoregressive (CVAR) model is estimated to determine the dynamic relationship between Nordic wholesale electricity prices and EU emissions trading scheme (EU-ETS) CO2 allowance prices. An impulse response analysis reveals that electricity prices have large short-term responses to CO2 price shocks, but that this response dampens over time. Using hourly Nordic electricity spot market prices, I find that the value of short-term response of electricity prices to a shock in CO2 prices in off-peak hours is consistent with expected values for near complete pass-through of CO2 emission costs when coal-generated power is at the margin. Likewise, the estimates reveal that peak hour electricity price responses to CO2 price shocks are as expected for a market that has near complete passthrough of CO2 emission costs when natural gas-generated power is at the margin. These results further suggest the Nordic electricity market is pricing as a competitive market.

A Cvar Analysis; Harrison Fell

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

How much coal, natural gas, or petroleum is used to generate a ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power plant efficiencies (heat rates) vary by types of generators, power plant emission controls, and other factors. Fuel heat contents also vary.

269

NO-assisted molecular-beam epitaxial growth of nitrogen substituted EuO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have investigated a method for substituting oxygen with nitrogen in EuO thin films, which is based on molecular beam epitaxy distillation with NO gas as the oxidizer. By varying the NO gas pressure, we produce crystalline, epitaxial EuO{sub 1-x}N{sub x} films with good control over the films' nitrogen concentration. In situ x-ray photoemission spectroscopy reveals that nitrogen substitution is connected to the formation Eu{sup 3+}4f{sup 6} and a corresponding decrease in the number of Eu{sup 2+}4f{sup 7}, indicating that nitrogen is being incorporated in its 3{sup -} oxidation state. While small amounts of Eu{sup 3+} in over-oxidized Eu{sub 1-{delta}}O thin films lead to a drastic suppression of the ferromagnetism, the formation of Eu{sup 3+} in EuO{sub 1-x}N{sub x} still allows the ferromagnetic phase to exist with an unaffected T{sub c}, thus providing an ideal model system to study the interplay between the magnetic f{sup 7} (J = 7/2) and the non-magnetic f{sup 6} (J = 0) states close to the Fermi level.

Wicks, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Altendorf, S. G.; Caspers, C.; Kierspel, H.; Sutarto, R. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Tjeng, L. H. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, 50937 Koeln (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, 01187 Dresden (Germany); Damascelli, A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Quantum Matter Institute, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z4 (Canada)

2012-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

270

Landfill gas cleanup for carbonate fuel cell power generation. CRADA final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objective of the work reported here was to evaluate the extent to which conventional contaminant removal processes could be combined to economically reduce contaminant levels to the specifications for carbonate fuel cells. The technical effort was conducted by EPRI, consultant David Thimsen, Kaltec of Minnesota, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) and Interpoll Laboratories. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) made available two test skids originally used to test an ERC 30 kW carbonate fuel cell at the Destec Coal Gasification Plan in Plaquemine, LA. EPRI`s carbonate fuel cell pilot plant was installed at the Anoka County Regional Landfill in Ramsey, Minnesota. Additional gas cleaning equipment was installed to evaluate a potentially inexpensive, multi-stage gas cleaning process to remove sulfur and chlorine in the gas to levels acceptable for long-term, economical carbonate fuel cell operation. The pilot plant cleaned approximately 970,000 scf (27,500 Nm{sup 3}) of gas over 1,000 hours of operation. The testing showed that the process could achieve the following polished gas concentrations. Less than 80 ppbv hydrogen sulfide; less than 1 ppmv (the detection limit) organic sulfur; less than 300 ppbv hydrogen chloride; less than 20--80 ppbv of any individual chlorined hydrocarbon; and 1.5 ppm sulfur dioxide. These were the detection limits of the analytical procedures employed. It is probable that the actual concentrations are below these analytical limits.

Steinfeld, G.; Sanderson, R.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan  

SciTech Connect

With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.

Tegen, S.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Comparing Statewide Economic Impacts of New Generation from Wind, Coal, and Natural Gas in Arizona, Colorado, and Michigan: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

With increasing concerns about energy independence, job outsourcing, and risks of global climate change, it is important for policy makers to understand all impacts from their decisions about energy resources. This paper assesses one aspect of the impacts: direct economic effects. The paper compares impacts to states from equivalent new electrical generation from wind, natural gas, and coal. Economic impacts include materials and labor for construction, operations, maintenance, fuel extraction, and fuel transport, as well as project financing, property tax, and landowner revenues. We examine spending on plant construction during construction years, in addition to all other operational expenditures over a 20-year span. Initial results indicate that adding new wind power can be more economically effective than adding new gas or coal power, and that a higher percentage of dollars spent on coal and gas will leave the state. For this report, we interviewed industry representatives and energy experts, in addition to consulting government documents, models, and existing literature. The methodology for this research can be adapted to other contexts for determining economic effects of new power generation in other states and regions.

Tegen, S.

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Outlook for Regional Generation Capacity Balances: Report Series on Natural Gas and Power Reliability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The United States is in the midst of a power plant expansion boom, achieving record additions of natural gas-fired combustion turbines and combined-cycle units over the past two years, with 68,000 MW already added since 1998 and 17,000 MW more slated for completion by the end of 2001. This report provides a region-by-region accounting of how this new capacity -- plus hundreds of megawatts of possible additional natural gas and coal capacity -- may change reserve margins and result in many other impacts a...

2002-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

274

Modeling EU electricity market competition using the residual supply index  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An econometric approach to related hourly Residual Supply Index to price-cost margins in the major EU electricity generation markets suggests that market structure, as measured by the RSI, is a significant explanatory factor for markups, even when scarcity and other explanatory variables are included. (author)

Swinand, Gregory; Scully, Derek; Ffoulkes, Stuart; Kessler, Brian

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Impact study on the use of biomass-derived fuels in gas turbines for power generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report evaluates the properties of fuels derived from biomass, both gaseous and liquid, against the fuel requirements of gas turbine systems for gernating electrical power. The report attempts to be quantitative rather than merely qualitative to establish the significant variations in the properties of biomass fuels from those of conventional fuels. Three general categories are covered: performance, durability, and storage and handling.

Moses, C.A.; Bernstein, H. [Southwest Research Inst., San Antonio, TX (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Final Report - Gas Generation Testing of Uranium Metal in Simulated K Basin Sludge and in Grouted Sludge Waste Forms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is being considered for the disposal of K Basin sludge as RH-TRU. Because the hydrogen gas concentration in the 55-gallon RH-TRU sealed drums to be transported to WIPP is limited by flammability safety, the number of containers and shipments likely will be driven by the rate of hydrogen generated by the uranium metal-water reaction (U + 2 H{sub 2}O {yields} UO{sub 2} + 2 H{sub 2}) in combination with the hydrogen generated from water and organic radiolysis. Gas generation testing was conducted with uranium metal particles of known surface area, in simulated K West (KW) Basin canister sludge and immobilized in candidate grout solidification matrices. This study evaluated potential for Portland cement and magnesium phosphate grouts to inhibit the reaction of water with uranium metal in the sludge and thereby permit higher sludge loading to the disposed waste form. The best of the grouted waste forms decreased the uranium metal-water reaction by a factor of four.

Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Sell, Rachel L.; Sinkov, Sergei I.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Gano, Sue; Thornton, Brenda M.

2004-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

277

Greenhouse Gas–induced Climate Change Simulated with the CCC Second-Generation General Circulation Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Canadian Climate Centre second-generation atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a mixed-layer ocean incorporating thermodynamic sea ice is used to simulate the equilibrium climate response to a doubling of C02. Features of the ...

G. J. Boer; N. A. McFarlane; M. Lazare

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Technology Adoption and Regulatory Regimes: Gas Turbines Electricity Generators from 1980 to 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

suited for combined cycle, baseload applications. This sug-for the provision of baseload power in a combined cycle set-generators: provision of baseload power using a combined

Ishii, Jun

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

The EU's external energy security policy : A comparative analysis of the EU's external energy relations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis analyses the EU´s external energy security policy through a comparative analysis of the energy relations between the EU and important producers of natural… (more)

Cook, Hanne

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Elevated Temperature Materials for Power Generation and Propulsion The energy industry is designing higher-efficiency land-based turbines for natural gas-fired  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

higher-efficiency land-based turbines for natural gas-fired power generation systems. The high inlet is significant for modeling cyclic deformation in directionally solidified and single crystal turbine blades

Li, Mo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Light-induced torque for the generation of persistent current flow in atomic gas Bose-Einstein condensates  

SciTech Connect

We show that a persistent current flow in an atomic gas Bose-Einstein condensate could be realized when the system is subject to two counterpropagating Laguerre-Gaussian so-called doughnut beams, creating a toroidal trap. The theory is developed involving a two-photon process within three atomic levels leading to a quantized light-induced torque which rotates the atoms, generating an atomic current flow in the ring. We also show that it is possible for the torque to be controlled and even switched on and off by varying the frequencies of the incident light, thereby allowing a mechanism for the control of the current flow.

Lembessis, V. E. [New York College, 38 Amalias Avenue, GR-105 58, Athens (Greece); Babiker, M. [Department of Physics, University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

282

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fixed-price gas supply contracts and natural gas storage. Asnatural gas prices, rather than on prices that can be locked in through futures, swap, or fixed- price physical supplySupply, Renewable Energy Gas Options, Gas Storage Option Premium or Storage Cost Gas Price Falls Gas Price Rises Natural

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Development of the next generation medium-duty natural gas engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes the work done under this subcontract in the areas of System Design, System Fabrication, and Experimental Program. The report contains the details of the engine development process for achieving throttleless stratified charge spark ignition (SI) engine operation as well as advanced turbocharging strategies. Engine test results showing the potential of the direct-injection stratified charge combustion strategy for increasing part-load engine efficiency on a John Deere 8.1-liter natural gas engine are also included in this report. In addition, steady state and step transient engine data are presented that quantify the performance of a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT) as well as a modified waste-gated turbocharger on the engine. The benefits of the technologies investigated during this project will be realized in the form of increased drive-cycle efficiency to diesel-like levels, while retaining the low emissions characteristics of a lean-burn natural gas engine.

Podnar, D.J.; Kubesh, J.T.

2000-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

284

Limited Electricity Generation Supply and Limited Natural Gas Supply Cases (released in AEO2008)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Development of U.S. energy resources and the permitting and construction of large energy facilities have become increasingly difficult over the past 20 years, and they could become even more difficult in the future. Growing public concern about global warming and CO2 emissions also casts doubt on future consumption of fossil fuelsparticularly coal, which releases the largest amount of CO2 per unit of energy produced. Even without regulations to limit greenhouse gas emissions in the United States, the investment community may already be limiting the future use of some energy options. In addition, there is considerable uncertainty about the future availability of, and access to, both domestic and foreign natural gas resources.

Information Center

2008-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

285

Process for Generation of Hydrogen Gas from Various Feedstocks Using Thermophilic Bacteria  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45 degrees C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

Ooteghem Van, Suellen

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

286

Process for generation of hydrogen gas from various feedstocks using thermophilic bacteria  

SciTech Connect

A method for producing hydrogen gas is provided comprising selecting a bacteria from the Order Thermotogales, subjecting the bacteria to a feedstock and to a suitable growth environment having an oxygen concentration below the oxygen concentration of water in equilibrium with air; and maintaining the environment at a predetermined pH and at a temperature of at least approximately 45.degree. C. for a time sufficient to allow the bacteria to metabolize the feedstock.

Ooteghem, Suellen Van (Morgantown, WV)

2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

287

VUV generation by adiabatically expanded and excited by a DC electrical discharge Argon gas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigate the emission of Argon (Ar) gas which is adiabatically expanded through a nozzle and excited using a DC electrical discharge. Because of the expansion and the electronic excitation, Ar dimers and clusters are formed, which give radiation in the second (2nd) and in the third (3rd) continua of Ar, centered at about 126 and 254 nm respectively. We particularly focus our study on the 2nd continuum, in order to develop a laser at this wavelength.

Pipergias, K.; Yasemidis, D.; Reppa, E.; Pentaris, D.; Efthimiopoulos, T. [Laser, Non linear and Quantum Optics Labs, Physics Department University of Patras, Patras, Greece 26500 (Greece); Merlemis, N. [Laser, Non linear and Quantum Optics Labs, Physics Department University of Patras, Patras, Greece 26500 (Greece); TEI of Athens, Phys. Chem. and Mater. Tech. Department, Athens, Greece, 12 210 (Greece); Giannetas, V. [Physics Department, University of Patras, Patras, Greece 26500 (Greece)

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

288

Bench-Scale Electrochemical System for Generation of CO and Syn-Gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A bench-scale system for the electrochemical reduction of CO2 has been developed which produces CO and H2 (syn-gas) mixtures. The system is equipped with a gas-diffusion electrode which partially alleviates some of the mass-transport issues associated with CO2 delivery to the cathode. The positive effect of temperature was discovered where at 70°C a reduction in cell voltage of 1.57 V (compared to ambient) was observed at 70 mA cm-2. Controlling the flow of CO2 made it possible to maintain set H2:CO ratios with CO accounting for 25-90% of the product and H2 accounting for 10-75%. The cell, after an initial stabilization period of 40 min, displays reproducible, stable behavior. The current cell design brings the current densities for CO2 reduction closer to what is currently achieved in industrial alkaline electrolysis cells. This report discusses the electrolyte, electrode materials and variables which have been found to be significant in the production of CO and syn-gas mixtures.

Eric J. Dufek; Tedd E. Lister; Michael E. McIlwain

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Design and operation of an inert gas facility for thermoelectric generator storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

While the flight hardware is protected by design from the harsh environments of space, its in-air storage often requires special protection from contaminants such as dust, moisture and other gases. One of these components, the radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) which powers the missions, was deemed particularly vulnerable to pre-launch aging because the generators remain operational at core temperatures in excess of 1000 degrees centigrade throughout the storage period. Any oxygen permitted to enter the devices will react with thermally hot components, preferentially with molybdenum in the insulating foils, and with graphites to form CO/CO{sub 2} gases which are corrosive to the thermopile. It was important therefore to minimize the amount of oxygen which could enter, by either limiting the effective in-leakage areas on the generators themselves, or by reducing the relative amount of oxygen within the environment around the generators, or both. With the generators already assembled and procedures in place to assure minimal in-leakage in handling, the approach of choice was to provide a storage environment which contains significantly less oxygen than normal air. 2 refs.

Goebel, C.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the market, allowing natural gas price volatility to flowClearly, the variability of gas prices poses a major risk toincreasingly volatile natural gas prices, renewable energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

NETL: Oil & Natural Gas Projects: Next Generation Surfactants for Improved  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology Last Reviewed 12/15/2012 Next Generation Surfactants for Improved Chemical Flooding Technology Last Reviewed 12/15/2012 DE-FE0003537 Goal The principle objective of the project is to characterize and test current and next generation high performance surfactants for improved chemical flooding technology, focusing on reservoirs in Pennsylvanian age (Penn) sands. Performer Oklahoma University Enhanced Oil Recovery Design Center, Norman, OK Background Primary and secondary methods have produced approximately one-third of the 401 billion barrels of original-oil-in-place in the United States. Enhanced oil recovery (EOR) methods have shown potential to recover a fraction of the remaining oil. Surfactant EOR has seen an increase in activity in recent years due to increased energy demand and higher oil prices. In

292

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

common practice of using gas price forecasts in long-rangeit is likely that gas prices in the US will continue to bethat natural gas prices (and gas price volatility) have a

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

EU Energy Shriram EPC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search Name EU Energy - Shriram EPC Place United Kingdom Sector Wind energy Product Joint venture set up for the acquisition of DeWind GmbH from FKI. References EU Energy -...

294

A survey of available information on gas generation in tank 241-SY-101  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As a result of a concerted effort to determine the chemical and physical mechanisms underlying the generation and episodic release of gases from tank 241-SY-101, more commonly known as tank 101-SY, the Tank Waste Science Panel has been established at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Four of the members of this panel met to screen the available information on tank 101-SY and provide to the remaining members a shortened list of references that could be used to assess the mechanisms underlying the generation and episodic release of gases from tank 101-SY. This document is the result of this preliminary screening of information for the Tank Waste Science Panel and was provided to the Panel members at their first meeting. 14 refs., 3 tabs.

Strachan, D.M. (comp.) (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA)); Reynolds, D.A. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Siemer, D.D. (Westinghouse Idaho National Engineering Co., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Wallace, R.W. (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (USA))

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Gas Turbine Condition Monitoring and Predictive Maintenance Capability Analysis Between Aviation and Power Generation Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study compares and contrasts aviation and power generation condition monitoring and fault diagnosis. The report provides an overview of the technology, process, sensor suite and decision-making processes for both industries. The study highlights the level of decision automation and the structure to automatically initiate a maintenance process in aviation as one of the key differences between the two industries. This automation has important potential cost and operational benefits for the power gener...

2007-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

296

The radiolytic and radiolytically induced gas generation in Hanford waste tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A task force operating in ANL/CHM has been developing a mechanistic understanding of the radiolytic processes that lead to the generation and retention of gases within tanks of radioactive waste at the Hanford site. This chemistry is one of the important factors that must be considered in devising remediation procedures to eliminate the great potential hazard of these tanks. A quantitative description of much of the chemistry involved in the production of H{sub 2} and, to a lesser extent, in the production of N{sub 2}O has been achieved. Direct radiolytic generation was experimentally quantified and this new information was utilized in computer modeling to provide predictive capabilities so that changes of chemical composition of various waste tanks under different remediation procedures could be assessed. Oxygen in the waste solutions is effectively consumed upon irradiation and thus is of no concern. The mechanism of the radiolytic degradation of the chelators was established. The end products are simple organic molecules, in particularly, formaldehyde and glyoxylate, that are very efficient in the thermal generation of H{sub 2}

Jonah, C.D.; Meisel, D.; Sauer, M.C. Jr.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

"1. Beluga","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",344 "2. George M Sullivan Generation Plant 2","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",220  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Alaska" Alaska" "1. Beluga","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",344 "2. George M Sullivan Generation Plant 2","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",220 "3. North Pole","Petroleum","Golden Valley Elec Assn Inc",144 "4. Bradley Lake","Hydroelectric","Homer Electric Assn Inc",126 "5. Anchorage 1","Gas","Anchorage Municipal Light and Power",88 "6. Snettisham","Hydroelectric","Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",78 "7. Bernice Lake","Gas","Chugach Electric Assn Inc",62 "8. Lemon Creek","Petroleum","Alaska Electric Light&Power Co",58

298

Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Danish Energy Authority Poland -Electricity and gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Danish Energy Authority Poland - Electricity and gas market development study and practical guidelines for using EU Funds Electricity sector analyses December 2004 #12;Danish Energy Authority Poland - Electricity and gas market development study and practical guidelines for using EU Funds Electricity sector

300

Updated greenhouse gas and criteria air pollutant emission factors and their probability distribution functions for electricity generating units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Greenhouse gas (CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O, hereinafter GHG) and criteria air pollutant (CO, NO{sub x}, VOC, PM{sub 10}, PM{sub 2.5} and SO{sub x}, hereinafter CAP) emission factors for various types of power plants burning various fuels with different technologies are important upstream parameters for estimating life-cycle emissions associated with alternative vehicle/fuel systems in the transportation sector, especially electric vehicles. The emission factors are typically expressed in grams of GHG or CAP per kWh of electricity generated by a specific power generation technology. This document describes our approach for updating and expanding GHG and CAP emission factors in the GREET (Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation) model developed at Argonne National Laboratory (see Wang 1999 and the GREET website at http://greet.es.anl.gov/main) for various power generation technologies. These GHG and CAP emissions are used to estimate the impact of electricity use by stationary and transportation applications on their fuel-cycle emissions. The electricity generation mixes and the fuel shares attributable to various combustion technologies at the national, regional and state levels are also updated in this document. The energy conversion efficiencies of electric generating units (EGUs) by fuel type and combustion technology are calculated on the basis of the lower heating values of each fuel, to be consistent with the basis used in GREET for transportation fuels. On the basis of the updated GHG and CAP emission factors and energy efficiencies of EGUs, the probability distribution functions (PDFs), which are functions that describe the relative likelihood for the emission factors and energy efficiencies as random variables to take on a given value by the integral of their own probability distributions, are updated using best-fit statistical curves to characterize the uncertainties associated with GHG and CAP emissions in life-cycle modeling with GREET.

Cai, H.; Wang, M.; Elgowainy, A.; Han, J. (Energy Systems)

2012-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Internal natural gas reformer-dividers for a solid oxide fuel cell generator configuration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This patent describes a fuel cell generator configuration. It comprises electrically connected, axially elongated, fuel cells, each cell having an outer and inner electrode with solid oxide electrolyte therebetween; where elongated dividers separate and are positioned between fuel cells, and where at least one of the elongated dividers is hollow, the hollow divider having solid elongated walls, a reformable fuel mixture entrance, and an exit allowing passage of reformed fuel to the fuel cells, and where the cross-section of the divider contains a catalytic reforming material.

Reichner, P.

1992-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

302

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Electricity Generation (Fact Sheet), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle LCA can help determine environmental burdens from "cradle to grave" and facilitate more consistent comparisons of energy technologies. Figure 1. Generalized life cycle stages for energy technologies Source: Sathaye et al. (2011) Life cycle GHG emissions from renewable electricity generation technologies are generally less than those from fossil fuel-based technologies, based on evidence assembled by this project. Further, the proportion of GHG emissions from each life cycle stage differs by technology. For fossil-fueled technologies, fuel combustion during operation of the facility emits the vast majority of GHGs. For nuclear and renewable energy technologies, the majority of GHG emissions occur upstream of operation. LCA of Energy Systems

303

Design Configurations for a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Designed to Generate Electricity and Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor is being envisioned that will generate not just electricity, but also hydrogen to charge up fuel cells for cars, trucks and other mobile energy uses. INL engineers studied various heat-transfer working fluids—including helium and liquid salts—in seven different configurations. In computer simulations, serial configurations diverted some energy from the heated fluid flowing to the electric plant and hydrogen production plant. In anticipation of the design, development and procurement of an advanced power conversion system for HTGR, this study was initiated to identify the major design and technology options and their tradeoffs in the evaluation of power conversion system (PCS) coupled to hydrogen plant. In this study, we investigated a number of design configurations and performed thermal hydraulic analyses using various working fluids and various conditions (Oh, 2005). This paper includes a portion of thermal hydraulic results based on a direct cycle and a parallel intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) configuration option.

Conference preceedings

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Crystalline Silicon Photovoltaic Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Published scientific literature contains many studies estimating life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of residential and utility-scale solar photovoltaics (PVs). Despite the volume of published work, variability in results hinders generalized conclusions. Most variance between studies can be attributed to differences in methods and assumptions. To clarify the published results for use in decision making and other analyses, we conduct a meta-analysis of existing studies, harmonizing key performance characteristics to produce more comparable and consistently derived results. Screening 397 life cycle assessments (LCAs) relevant to PVs yielded 13 studies on crystalline silicon (c-Si) that met minimum standards of quality, transparency, and relevance. Prior to harmonization, the median of 42 estimates of life cycle GHG emissions from those 13 LCAs was 57 grams carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO{sub 2}-eq/kWh), with an interquartile range (IQR) of 44 to 73. After harmonizing key performance characteristics, irradiation of 1,700 kilowatt-hours per square meter per year (kWh/m{sup 2}/yr); system lifetime of 30 years; module efficiency of 13.2% or 14.0%, depending on module type; and a performance ratio of 0.75 or 0.80, depending on installation, the median estimate decreased to 45 and the IQR tightened to 39 to 49. The median estimate and variability were reduced compared to published estimates mainly because of higher average assumptions for irradiation and system lifetime. For the sample of studies evaluated, harmonization effectively reduced variability, providing a clearer synopsis of the life cycle GHG emissions from c-Si PVs. The literature used in this harmonization neither covers all possible c-Si installations nor represents the distribution of deployed or manufactured c-Si PVs.

Hsu, D. D.; O'Donoughue, P.; Fthenakis, V.; Heath, G. A.; Kim, H. C.; Sawyer, P.; Choi, J. K.; Turney, D. E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Evaluation of wear resistant ceramic valve seats in gas-fueled power generation engines. Topical report, December 1991-April 1994  

SciTech Connect

This project is directed at the reduction of valve recession in natural gas-fueled engines. Ceramic valve seat inserts have been procured, installed in a Caterpillar G3516 natural gas generator set, and tested for 1000 hours. Two different silicon nitride materials are being utilized for the valve seats in addition to stock Eatonite metallic inserts. Three valve face materials are being tested. These include stock Caterpillar stellite 1 faced, stellite 6 faced, and unfaced valves. A test matrix was used to allow comparison of all three valve face materials in combination with all three insert materials. The testing is scheduled to continue for an additional 7000 hours. No problems have been encountered with the test materials. In general, it has been shown that two types of silicon nitride materials have at least short term durability in engine operation. Neither material has exhibited any deficiencies thus far. An economic analysis spreadsheet has been created to calculate potential cost savings potential using ceramic valve seat inserts. Valve recession data for the first 1000 hours shows expected trends. Exhaust valve positions are wearing more than intake valve positions. If the intake positions and all positions with unfaced valve are ignored, then ceramic inserts paired with Stellite 1 valves show the most wear.

Burrahm, R.W.; Branecky, R.J.; Sui, P.C.; Latusek, J.P.; Hsu, S.M.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Renewable energy research 1995---2009: a case study of wind power research in EU, Spain, Germany and Denmark  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper reports the developments and citation patterns over three time periods of research on Renewable Energy generation and Wind Power 1995---2011 in EU, Spain, Germany and Denmark. Analyses are based on Web of Science and incorporate journal articles ... Keywords: Citation analyses, Collaboration analyses, Denmark, EU, Germany, Publication analyses, Renewable energy research, Spain, Wind Power research

Elias Sanz-Casado; J. Carlos Garcia-Zorita; Antonio Eleazar Serrano-López; Birger Larsen; Peter Ingwersen

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas combined-cycle and combustion turbine power plantsnatural gas has become the fuel of choice for new power plants

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy’s Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energy’s lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the world’s premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In addition, the purpose and differences between the two experiments will be compared and the irradiation results to date on the first experiment will be presented.

S. Blaine Grover

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2}: Synthesis, crystal structure, and magnetic properties of the mixed-valent europium(II,III) fluoride sulfide EuF{sub 2}.(EuFS){sub 2}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the method to synthesize rare-earth metal(III) fluoride sulfides MFS (M=Y, La, Ce-Lu), in some cases we were able to obtain mixed-valent compounds such as Yb{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} instead. With Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} another isotypic representative has now been synthesized. Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} (tetragonal, I4/mmm, a=400.34(2), c=1928.17(9) pm, Z=2) is obtained from the reaction of metallic europium, elemental sulfur, and europium trifluoride in a molar ratio of 5:6:4 within seven days at 850 deg. C in silica-jacketed gas-tightly sealed platinum ampoules. The single-phase product consists of black plate-shaped single crystals with a square cross section, which can be obtained from a flux using equimolar amounts of NaCl as fluxing agent. The crystal structure is best described as an intergrowth structure, in which one layer of CaF{sub 2}-type EuF{sub 2} is followed by two layers of PbFCl-type EuFS when sheeted parallel to the (001) plane. Accordingly there are two chemically and crystallographically different europium cations present. One of them (Eu{sup 2+}) is coordinated by eight fluoride anions in a cubic fashion, the other one (Eu{sup 3+}) exhibits a monocapped square antiprismatic coordination sphere with four F{sup -} and five S{sup 2-} anions. Although the structural ordering of the different charged europium cations is plausible, a certain amount of charge delocalization with some polaron activity has to take place, which is suggested by the black color of the title compound. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements of Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} show Curie-Weiss behavior with an experimental magnetic moment of 8.19(5) mu{sub B} per formula unit and a paramagnetic Curie temperature of 0.3(2) K. No magnetic ordering is observed down to 4.2 K. In accordance with an ionic formula splitting like (Eu{sup II})(Eu{sup III}){sub 2}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} only one third of the europium centers in Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2} carry permanent magnetic moments. {sup 151}Eu-Moessbauer spectroscopic experiments at 4.2 K show one signal at an isomer shift of -12.4(1) mm/s and a second one at 0.42(4) mm/s. These signals occur in a ratio of 1:2 and correspond to Eu{sup 2+} and Eu{sup 3+}, respectively. The spectra at 78 and 298 K are similar, thus no change in the Eu{sup 2+}/Eu{sup 3+} fraction can be detected. - Graphical abstract: Crystal structure and {sup 151}Eu-Moessbauer spectra of mixed-valent Eu{sub 3}F{sub 4}S{sub 2}.

Grossholz, Hagen; Hartenbach, Ingo [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany); Kotzyba, Gunter [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Poettgen, Rainer, E-mail: pottgen@uni-muenster.d [Institut fuer Anorganische und Analytische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Trill, Henning; Mosel, Bernd D. [Institut fuer Physikalische Chemie, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Corrensstrasse 30, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Schleid, Thomas, E-mail: schleid@iac.uni-stuttgart.d [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 55, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Thermal and combined thermal and radiolytic reactions involving nitrous oxide, hydrogen, and nitrogen in the gas phase; comparison of gas generation rates in supernate and solid fractions of Tank 241-SY-101 simulated waste  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes progress made in evaluating me by which flammable gases are generated in Hanford double-shell tank wastes, based on the results of laboratory tests using simulated waste mixtures. Work described in this report. was conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the Flammable Gas Safety Project, the purpose of which is to develop information needed to support Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) in their efforts to ensure the safe interim storage of wastes at the Hanford Site. This work is related to gas generation studies being performed at Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), under subcontract to PNL, using simulated wastes, and to studies being performed at VMC using actual wastes.

Bryan, S.A.; Pederson, L.R.

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Trinidad and Tobago-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Trinidad and Tobago-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme Trinidad and Tobago-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Trinidad and Tobago-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

312

Uganda-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Uganda-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Uganda-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Uganda-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

313

Moldova-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Moldova-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Moldova-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Moldova-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

314

Thailand-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Thailand-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

315

Mexico-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Mexico-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

316

Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Peru-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

317

Bhutan-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bhutan-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Bhutan-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Bhutan-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

318

Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Tanzania-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

319

Vietnam-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Vietnam-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

320

Chile-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chile-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Chile-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Chile-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

Philippines-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Philippines-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Philippines-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

322

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) (Redirected from UNDP/EC-China-Climate Change Capacity Building Program) Jump to: navigation, search Name EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

323

Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment

324

Ecuador-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecuador-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Ecuador-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Ecuador-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

325

Egypt-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Egypt-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Egypt-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Egypt-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

326

Colombia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Colombia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Colombia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Colombia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

327

Malaysia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Malaysia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Malaysia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Malaysia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

328

Zambia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Zambia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Zambia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Zambia-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

329

Morocco-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Morocco-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Morocco-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Morocco-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

330

Kenya-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kenya-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Kenya-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

331

Contribution of Eu 4f states to the magnetic anisotropy of EuO  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Anisotropic x-ray magnetic linear dichroism (AXMLD) provides a novel element-, site-, shell-, and symmetry-selective techniques to study the magnetic anisotropy induced by a crystalline electric field. The weak Eu2+ M4,5 AXMLD observed in EuO(001) indicates that the Eu 4f states are not rotationally invariant and hence contribute weakly to the magnetic anisotropy of EuO. The results are contrasted with those obtained for 3d transition metal oxides.

Arenholz, E.; Schmehl, A.; Schlom, D.G.; van der Laan, G.

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

332

The effect of the operation modes of a gas discharge low-pressure amalgam lamp on the intensity of generation of 185 nm UV vacuum radiation  

SciTech Connect

The effect of the discharge current, mercury vapor pressure, and the inert gas pressure on the intensity and efficiency of the 185 nm line generation are considered. The spectra of the UV radiation (vacuum ultraviolet) transmission by protective coatings from the oxides of rare earth metals and aluminum are investigated.

Vasilyak, L. M., E-mail: vasilyak@ihed.ras.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Joint Institute of High Temperatures (Russian Federation); Drozdov, L. A., E-mail: lit@npo.lit.ru; Kostyuchenko, S. V.; Sokolov, D. V. [ZAO LIT (Russian Federation); Kudryavtsev, N. N.; Sobur, D. A., E-mail: soburda@gmail.com [Moscow Institute for Physics and Technology (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Apples with apples: accounting for fuel price risk in comparisons of gas-fired and renewable generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

operating costs, long-term fixed-price renewable energyRenewable Energy Gas Options, Gas Storage Option Premium or Storage Costrenewable power is more cost- competitive than previously believed’, Renewable Energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Advanced techniques for safety analysis applied to the gas turbine control system of ICARO co-generative plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The paper describes two complementary and integrable approaches, a probabilistic one and a deterministic one, based on classic and advanced modelling techniques for safety analysis of complex computer based systems. The probabilistic approach is based on classical and innovative probabilistic analysis methods. The deterministic approach is based on formal verification methods. Such approaches are applied to the gas turbine control system of ICARO co generative plant, in operation at ENEA CR Casaccia. The main difference between the two approaches, behind the underlining different theories, is that the probabilistic one addresses the control system by itself, as the set of sensors, processing units and actuators, while the deterministic one also includes the behaviour of the equipment under control which interacts with the control system. The final aim of the research, documented in this paper, is to explore an innovative method which put the probabilistic and deterministic approaches in a strong relation to overcome the drawbacks of their isolated, selective and fragmented use which can lead to inconsistencies in the evaluation results. 1.

Ro Bologna; Ester Ciancamerla; Piero Incalcaterra; Michele Minichino; Andrea Bobbio; Università Del Piemonte Orientale; Enrico Tronci

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

EU Actorship in the Non-Proliferation area.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The threat of nuclear weapons is depicted by the EU as the potentially greatest threat to security. How then does the EU counter this… (more)

Pettersson, Ylva

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

A summary of volatile impurity measurements and gas generation studies on MISSTD-1, a high-purity plutonium oxide produced by low-temperature calcination of plutonium oxalate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plutonium dioxide of high specific surface area was subjected to long-term tests of gas generation in sealed containers. The material preparation and the storage conditions were outside the bounds of acceptable parameters defined by DOE-STD-3013-2012 in that the material was stabilized to a lower temperature than required and had higher moisture content than allowed. The data provide useful information for better defining the bounding conditions for safe storage. Net increases in internal pressure and transient increases in H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} were observed, but were well within the bounds of gas compositions previously shown to not threaten integrity of 3013 containers.

Berg, John M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Narlesky, Joshua E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Veirs, Douglas K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

337

Natural gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

www.eia.gov Over time the electricity mix gradually shifts to lower-carbon options, led by growth in natural gas and renewable generation U.S. electricity net generation trillion kilowatthours 6

Adam Sieminski Administrator; Adam Sieminski Usnic; Adam Sieminski Usnic

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

A Life Cycle Comparison of Coal and Natural Gas for Electricity Generation and the Production of Transportation Fuels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, compressed natural gas (CNG), criteria emissions, demographic, E85, Energy Commission, environmental justice Category: Natural Gas for School Fleets, CNG Station, LNG or L/CNG Station · Bear Valley Unified School to the wholesale or retail distribution and sales stations. The projects will be assessed in two separate rounds

339

Natural gas fired electric generating technology: A key to the adequacy of electric generating capacity in North American Electric Reliability Councils. Topical report, May 1991  

SciTech Connect

Development and implementation of an enhanced modeling system for electricity market analysis is explained. The relevant geographic areas that must be used for accurate supply and demand modeling and analysis are defined. There is no national market for electricity in the United States. Surplus hydroelectric capacity from the Pacific Northwest cannot be made available in Florida. Any model of U.S. electricity consumer and producer interaction that does not differentiate by region would produce misleading results. The expected natural gas-dominated capacity expansion phase in electricity markets is described.

Makovick, L.

1991-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Eutricity Eu-Max ADR LED System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Eutricity Eu-Max ADR LED System Speaker(s): Brent Marsh Date: September 13, 2013 - 12:00pm - 1:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Francis Rubinstein Eutricity...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

EU Energy Wind Limited | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

company will be concentrating initially on bringing an innovative composite wind tower to market. References EU Energy (Wind) Limited1 LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

342

PLASMA GENERATOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent describes apparatus for producing an electricity neutral ionized gas discharge, termed a plasma, substantially free from contamination with neutral gas particles. The plasma generator of the present invention comprises a plasma chamber wherein gas introduced into the chamber is ionized by a radiofrequency source. A magnetic field is used to focus the plasma in line with an exit. This magnetic field cooperates with a differential pressure created across the exit to draw a uniform and uncontaminated plasma from the plasma chamber.

Foster, J.S. Jr.

1958-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

343

Advanced natural gas-fired turbine system utilizing thermochemical recuperation and/or partial oxidation for electricity generation, greenfield and repowering applications  

SciTech Connect

The performance, economics and technical feasibility of heavy duty combustion turbine power systems incorporating two advanced power generation schemes have been estimated to assess the potential merits of these advanced technologies. The advanced technologies considered were: Thermochemical Recuperation (TCR), and Partial Oxidation (PO). The performance and economics of these advanced cycles are compared to conventional combustion turbine Simple-Cycles and Combined-Cycles. The objectives of the Westinghouse evaluation were to: (1) simulate TCR and PO power plant cycles, (2) evaluate TCR and PO cycle options and assess their performance potential and cost potential compared to conventional technologies, (3) identify the required modifications to the combustion turbine and the conventional power cycle components to utilize the TCR and PO technologies, (4) assess the technical feasibility of the TCR and PO cycles, (5) identify what development activities are required to bring the TCR and PO technologies to commercial readiness. Both advanced technologies involve the preprocessing of the turbine fuel to generate a low-thermal-value fuel gas, and neither technology requires advances in basic turbine technologies (e.g., combustion, airfoil materials, airfoil cooling). In TCR, the turbine fuel is reformed to a hydrogen-rich fuel gas by catalytic contact with steam, or with flue gas (steam and carbon dioxide), and the turbine exhaust gas provides the indirect energy required to conduct the endothermic reforming reactions. This reforming process improves the recuperative energy recovery of the cycle, and the delivery of the low-thermal-value fuel gas to the combustors potentially reduces the NO{sub x} emission and increases the combustor stability.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Democratic Republic of Congo-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

345

Lebanon-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lebanon-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name Lebanon-EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind

346

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF)  

SciTech Connect

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluate the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and prepare an R D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is leading a team ofcompanies involved in this effort. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800[degrees]F in furnaces fired with cool-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor up to about 2400[degrees]F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuelgas is a relatively clean fuel, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need tobe a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Progress report No. 12, September--December 1994  

SciTech Connect

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluating the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and preparing an R&D plan to develop the concept further. There are two basic arrangements of our HIPPS cycle. Both are coal-fired combined cycles. One arrangement is the 35% natural gas HIPPS. Coal is converted to fuel gas and char in a pyrolysis process, and these fuels are fired in separate parts of a high temperature advanced furnace (HITAF). The char-fired furnace produces flue gas that is used to heat gas turbine air up to 1400 F. Alloy tubes are used for these tube banks. After leaving the alloy tube banks, the gas turbine air goes through a ceramic air heater where it is heated from 1400 F to 1800 F. The flue gas that goes through the ceramic air heater comes from the combustion of the fuel gas that is produced in the pyrolysis process. This fuel gas is cleaned to remove particulates and alkalies that would corrode and plug a ceramic air heater. The air leaving the ceramic air heater needs to be heated further to achieve the efficiency goal of 47%, and this is done by firing natural gas in the gas turbine combustor. An alternative arrangement of the HIPPS cycle is called the All Coal HIPPS. With this arrangement, the char is used to heat the gas turbine air to 1400 F as before, but instead of then going to a ceramic air heater, the air goes directly to the gas turbine combustor. The fuel gas generated in the pyrolyzer is used as fuel in the gas turbine combustor. In both cycle arrangements, heat is transferred to the steam cycle in the HITAF and a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG).

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Mechanism and computational model for Lyman-{alpha}-radiation generation by high-intensity-laser four-wave mixing in Kr-Ar gas  

SciTech Connect

We present a theoretical model combined with a computational study of a laser four-wave mixing process under optical discharge in which the non-steady-state four-wave amplitude equations are integrated with the kinetic equations of initial optical discharge and electron avalanche ionization in Kr-Ar gas. The model is validated by earlier experimental data showing strong inhibition of the generation of pulsed, tunable Lyman-{alpha} (Ly-{alpha}) radiation when using sum-difference frequency mixing of 212.6 nm and tunable infrared radiation (820-850 nm). The rigorous computational approach to the problem reveals the possibility and mechanism of strong auto-oscillations in sum-difference resonant Ly-{alpha} generation due to the combined effect of (i) 212.6-nm (2+1)-photon ionization producing initial electrons, followed by (ii) the electron avalanche dominated by 843-nm radiation, and (iii) the final breakdown of the phase matching condition. The model shows that the final efficiency of Ly-{alpha} radiation generation can achieve a value of {approx}5x10{sup -4} which is restricted by the total combined absorption of the fundamental and generated radiation.

Louchev, Oleg A.; Saito, Norihito; Wada, Satoshi [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Bakule, Pavel [STFC, ISIS Facility, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Yokoyama, Koji [Advanced Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan); Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Ishida, Katsuhiko; Iwasaki, Masahiko [Advanced Meson Science Laboratory, RIKEN Nishina Center, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a put option on natural gas generation, which increasesgeneration (DG) unit that operates on natural gas.While the long-term natural gas generation cost is

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Energy Department Partners with EU on Electric Vehicle and Smart...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Partners with EU on Electric Vehicle and Smart Grid Coordination Energy Department Partners with EU on Electric Vehicle and Smart Grid Coordination July 19, 2013 - 5:17pm Addthis...

352

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect

A major objective of the coal-fired high performance power systems (HIPPS) program is to achieve significant increases in the thermodynamic efficiency of coal use for electric power generation. Through increased efficiency, all airborne emissions can be decreased, including emissions of carbon dioxide. High Performance power systems as defined for this program are coal-fired, high efficiency systems where the combustion products from coal do not contact the gas turbine. Typically, this type of a system will involve some indirect heating of gas turbine inlet air and then topping combustion with a cleaner fuel. The topping combustion fuel can be natural gas or another relatively clean fuel. Fuel gas derived from coal is an acceptable fuel for the topping combustion. The ultimate goal for HIPPS is to, have a system that has 95 percent of its heat input from coal. Interim systems that have at least 65 percent heat input from coal are acceptable, but these systems are required to have a clear development path to a system that is 95 percent coal-fired. A three phase program has been planned for the development of HIPPS. Phase 1, reported herein, includes the development of a conceptual design for a commercial plant. Technical and economic feasibility have been analysed for this plant. Preliminary R&D on some aspects of the system were also done in Phase 1, and a Research, Development and Test plan was developed for Phase 2. Work in Phase 2 include s the testing and analysis that is required to develop the technology base for a prototype plant. This work includes pilot plant testing at a scale of around 50 MMBtu/hr heat input. The culmination of the Phase 2 effort will be a site-specific design and test plan for a prototype plant. Phase 3 is the construction and testing of this plant.

NONE

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Support of Industry Compliance with the EU Directive on ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Support of Industry Compliance with the EU Directive on Restriction of Certain Hazardous Substances (RoHS). Summary: ...

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

354

Non-pollutant fuel generator and fuel burner with a non-pollutant exhaust and supplementary dc generator. [for use in MHD generator, steam turbine, gas turbine, or fuel cell  

SciTech Connect

A system for generating non-polluting fuel and a burner for using such fuel to produce energy in the form of heat with a non-polluting exhaust, together with means for utilizing such exhaust to produce supplementary direct current power is disclosed. An electrolyzer is operated to produce hydrogen and oxygen in gaseous form which is then stored in suitable fuel tanks. As needed, the fuel is combined with air and supplied under pressure to a combustion chamber where the mixture is burned, producing heat and a pollution free exhaust. The heat so produced may be used as a conventional heat source to generate steam, drive a turbine, or the like, while the combustion gases are directed to a magnetohydrodynamic generator to produce an electrical current which is usable in any desired manner.

Barros, M.J.

1976-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

355

Life Cycle Greenhouse Gas Emissions of Trough and Tower Concentrating Solar Power Electricity Generation: Systematic Review and Harmonization  

SciTech Connect

In reviewing life cycle assessment (LCA) literature of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) systems, this analysis focuses on reducing variability and clarifying the central tendency of published estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through a meta-analytical process called harmonization. From 125 references reviewed, 10 produced 36 independent GHG emissions estimates passing screens for quality and relevance: 19 for parabolic trough (trough) technology and 17 for power tower (tower) technology. The interquartile range (IQR) of published estimates for troughs and towers were 83 and 20 grams of carbon dioxide equivalent per kilowatt-hour (g CO2-eq/kWh),1 respectively; median estimates were 26 and 38 g CO2-eq/kWh for trough and tower, respectively. Two levels of harmonization were applied. Light harmonization reduced variability in published estimates by using consistent values for key parameters pertaining to plant design and performance. The IQR and median were reduced by 87% and 17%, respectively, for troughs. For towers, the IQR and median decreased by 33% and 38%, respectively. Next, five trough LCAs reporting detailed life cycle inventories were identified. The variability and central tendency of their estimates are reduced by 91% and 81%, respectively, after light harmonization. By harmonizing these five estimates to consistent values for global warming intensities of materials and expanding system boundaries to consistently include electricity and auxiliary natural gas combustion, variability is reduced by an additional 32% while central tendency increases by 8%. These harmonized values provide useful starting points for policy makers in evaluating life cycle GHG emissions from CSP projects without the requirement to conduct a full LCA for each new project.

Burkhardt, J. J.; Heath, G.; Cohen, E.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Romanian power systems engineering towards EU integration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of electric power system analysis methods followed the present technical problems and business needs of electric utilities in Romania, before EU integration. Present technical requirements and the current stage of power system analysis ... Keywords: computer applications, computer simulation, fourier analysis, modelling, power systems, training

Stefania Popadiuc; Bogdan Popa; Frangiskos Topalis; Cristiana Geambasu

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Cluster generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described herein is an apparatus and a method for producing atom clusters based on a gas discharge within a hollow cathode. The hollow cathode includes one or more walls. The one or more walls define a sputtering chamber within the hollow cathode and include a material to be sputtered. A hollow anode is positioned at an end of the sputtering chamber, and atom clusters are formed when a gas discharge is generated between the hollow anode and the hollow cathode.

Donchev, Todor I. (Urbana, IL); Petrov, Ivan G. (Champaign, IL)

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

358

Most generator retirements over the past decade were older natural ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Older, less efficient natural gas-fired generators accounted for 64% of the total generator retirements between 2000-2010. However, natural gas-fired generators also ...

359

CO2 Intensity in Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prior to the launch of the EU Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) in 2005, the electricity sector was widely proclaimed to have more low-cost emission abatement opportunities than other sectors. If this were true, effects of the EU ETS on carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions would likely be visible in the electricity sector. Our study looks at the effect of the price of emission allowances (EUA) on CO2 emissions from Swedish electricity generation, using an econometric time series analysis for the period 2004–2008. We control for effects of other input prices and hydropower reservoir levels. Our results do not indicate any link between the price of EUA and the CO2 emissions of Swedish electricity production. A number of reasons may explain this result and we conclude that other determinants of fossil fuel use in Swedish electricity generation probably diminished the effects of the EU ETS.

Anna Widerberg; Markus Wråke; Anna Widerberg; Markus Wråke

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Allocation, incentives and distortions: the impact of EU ETS emissions allowance allocations to the electricity sector  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NE allocation is used. The allocation results in accelerated construction and operation of combined cycle gas turbines and thus lower CO2 emissions. For our given set of input parameters, the results for uniform-benchmark or fuel-specific benchmark... allocation on activities in Phase I is explicitly prohibited by the EU Directive, some MSs update allocations using fuel-specific benchmarks (FSB) where the benchmark is set higher for coal-fired plants than for gas-fired plants. Here, we assess the impact...

Neuhoff, Karsten; Keats, Kim; Sato, Misato

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund Jump to: navigation, search Name AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund Place New York, New York Zip 10170 Product AirShares is a commodity pool for exchange-traded futures contracts for EUAs. References AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund is a company located in New York, New York . References ↑ "AirShares EU Carbon Allowances Fund" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=AirShares_EU_Carbon_Allowances_Fund&oldid=341942" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations Stubs What links here Related changes

362

Convergence of Regional Liquid Natural Gas (LNG) Prices : A review of regional LNG import prices using Engle Granger’s Cointegration approach.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis investigates the bivariate long term stochastic relationship between the import Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) prices in Japan, USA and EU. The bivariate testing… (more)

Eliston, Anton Jayanand

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Gas turbine engine braking and method  

SciTech Connect

A method is described of decelerating a ground vehicle driven by a gas turbine engine having a gas generator section and a free turbine output power section driven by a gas flow from the gas generator section, comprising the steps of: altering the incidence of gas flow from the gas generator section onto the free turbine section whereby said gas flow opposes rotation of the free turbine section; increasing gas generator section speed; and subsequent to said altering and increasing steps, selectively mechanically interconnecting said gas generator and free turbine sections whereby the rotational inertia of the gas generator section tends to decelerate the free turbine section.

Mattson, G.; Woodhouse, G.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Portable Gamma and Thermal Neutron Detector Using LiI(Eu) Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simultaneous detection of gamma rays and neutrons emanating from an unknown source has been of special significance and importance to consequence management and first responders since the earliest days of the program. Bechtel Nevada scientists have worked with 6LiI(Eu) crystals and 6Li glass to develop field-operable dual sensors that detect gamma rays and neutrons simultaneously. The prototype 6LiI(Eu) counter, which has been built and tested, is designed to collect data for periods of one second to more than eight hours. The collection time is controlled by thumbwheel switches. A fourpole, high pass filter at 90 KHz reduces microphonic noise from shock or vibration. 6LiI(Eu) crystals generate completely separable gamma-ray and thermal neutron responses. The 6LiI(Eu) rate meter consists of a single crystal 3.8 x 3.8 cm (1.5 x 1.5 in) with a 2.54-cm-(1-in-) thick, annular, high-density, polyethylene ring around the cylinder. Special features are (1) thermal and epithermal neutron detection (0.025eV to 250keV) and (2) typical gamma resolution of 8% at 661.6 keV. Monte Carlo N-Particle calculations for characteristics of gamma spectral behavior, neutron attenuation length, relative neutron and gamma detection efficiency are reported.

S. Mukhopadhyay

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Mitigation of Hydrogen Gas Generation from the Reaction of Uranium Metal with Water in K Basin Sludge and Sludge Waste Forms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior laboratory testing identified sodium nitrate and nitrite to be the most promising agents to minimize hydrogen generation from uranium metal aqueous corrosion in Hanford Site K Basin sludge. Of the two, nitrate was determined to be better because of higher chemical capacity, lower toxicity, more reliable efficacy, and fewer side reactions than nitrite. The present lab tests were run to determine if nitrate’s beneficial effects to lower H2 generation in simulated and genuine sludge continued for simulated sludge mixed with agents to immobilize water to help meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) waste acceptance drainable liquid criterion. Tests were run at ~60°C, 80°C, and 95°C using near spherical high-purity uranium metal beads and simulated sludge to emulate uranium-rich KW containerized sludge currently residing in engineered containers KW-210 and KW-220. Immobilization agents tested were Portland cement (PC), a commercial blend of PC with sepiolite clay (Aquaset II H), granulated sepiolite clay (Aquaset II G), and sepiolite clay powder (Aquaset II). In all cases except tests with Aquaset II G, the simulated sludge was mixed intimately with the immobilization agent before testing commenced. For the granulated Aquaset II G clay was added to the top of the settled sludge/solution mixture according to manufacturer application directions. The gas volumes and compositions, uranium metal corrosion mass losses, and nitrite, ammonia, and hydroxide concentrations in the interstitial solutions were measured. Uranium metal corrosion rates were compared with rates forecast from the known uranium metal anoxic water corrosion rate law. The ratios of the forecast to the observed rates were calculated to find the corrosion rate attenuation factors. Hydrogen quantities also were measured and compared with quantities expected based on non-attenuated H2 generation at the full forecast anoxic corrosion rate to arrive at H2 attenuation factors. The uranium metal corrosion rates in water alone and in simulated sludge were near or slightly below the metal-in-water rate while nitrate-free sludge/Aquaset II decreased rates by about a factor of 3. Addition of 1 M nitrate to simulated sludge decreased the corrosion rate by a factor of ~5 while 1 M nitrate in sludge/Aquaset II mixtures decreased the corrosion rate by ~2.5 compared with the nitrate-free analogues. Mixtures of simulated sludge with Aquaset II treated with 1 M nitrate had uranium corrosion rates about a factor of 8 to 10 lower than the water-only rate law. Nitrate was found to provide substantial hydrogen mitigation for immobilized simulant sludge waste forms containing Aquaset II or Aquaset II G clay. Hydrogen attenuation factors of 1000 or greater were determined at 60°C for sludge-clay mixtures at 1 M nitrate. Hydrogen mitigation for tests with PC and Aquaset II H (which contains PC) were inconclusive because of suspected failure to overcome induction times and fully enter into anoxic corrosion. Lessening of hydrogen attenuation at ~80°C and ~95°C for simulated sludge and Aquaset II was observed with attenuation factors around 100 to 200 at 1 M nitrate. Valuable additional information has been obtained on the ability of nitrate to attenuate hydrogen gas generation from solution, simulant K Basin sludge, and simulant sludge with immobilization agents. Details on characteristics of the associated reactions were also obtained. The present testing confirms prior work which indicates that nitrate is an effective agent to attenuate hydrogen from uranium metal corrosion in water and simulated K Basin sludge to show that it is also effective in potential candidate solidified K Basin waste forms for WIPP disposal. The hydrogen mitigation afforded by nitrate appears to be sufficient to meet the hydrogen generation limits for shipping various sludge waste streams based on uranium metal concentrations and assumed waste form loadings.

Sinkov, Sergey I.; Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

2011-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

366

EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(LECBP) (LECBP) Jump to: navigation, search Name EU-UNDP Low Emission Capacity Building Programme (LECBP) Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), German Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety (BMU), Australian Department of Climate Change and Energy Efficiency (DCCEE), Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate Focus Area Renewable Energy, Non-renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Economic Development, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Goods and Materials, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, Finance, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment

367

Gas turbine engines  

SciTech Connect

A core engine or gas generator is described for use in a range of gas turbine engines. A multi-stage compressor and a single stage supersonic turbine are mounted on a single shaft. The compressor includes a number of stages of variable angle and the gas generator has an annular combustion chamber.

MacDonald, A.G.

1976-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

368

Evidence of Eu{sup 2+} 4f electrons in the valence band spectra of EuTiO{sub 3} and EuZrO{sub 3}  

SciTech Connect

We report on optical band gap and valence electronic structure of two Eu{sup 2+}-based perovskites, EuTiO{sub 3} and EuZrO{sub 3} as revealed by diffuse optical scattering, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and valence-band x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The data show good agreement with the first-principles studies in which the top of the valence band structure is formed by the narrow Eu 4f{sup 7} electron band. The O 2p band shows the features similar to those of the Ba(Sr)TiO{sub 3} perovskites except that it is shifted to higher binding energies. Appearance of the Eu{sup 2+} 4f{sup 7} band is a reason for narrowing of the optical band gap in the title compounds as compared to their Sr-based analogues.

Kolodiazhnyi, T. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Valant, M. [Materials Research Laboratory, University of Nova Gorica, Vipavska 13, 5000 Nova Gorica (Slovenia); Williams, J. R. [International Center for Young Scientists (ICYS), MANA, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Bugnet, M.; Botton, G. A. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4L7 (Canada); Ohashi, N. [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, MANA, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Sakka, Y. [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

369

Steam generator designs  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle is any one of combinations of gas turbines, steam generators or heat recovery equipment, and steam turbines assembled for the reduction in plant cost or improvement of cycle efficiency in the utility power generation process. The variety of combined cycles discussed for the possibilities for industrial applications include gas turbine plus unfired steam generator; gas turbine plus supplementary fired steam generator; gas turbine plus furnace-fired steam generator; and supercharged furnace-fired system generator plus gas turbine. These units are large enough to meet the demands for the utility applications and with the advent of economical coal gasification processes to provide clean fuel, the combined-cycle applications are solicited. (MCW)

Clayton, W.H.; Singer, J.G.

1973-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Rusland-Ukraine-EU Trianglen - strategier og konflikter.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Projektet søger at belyse hvilke strategier og interesser der ligger bag Rusland og EU's udenrigspolitiske tilgang til Ukraine samt hvordan disse konflikter med hinanden. Dette… (more)

Abild, Kasper

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

A New Combustion Synthesis Method for GaN:Eu3+ and Ga2O3 :Eu3+  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A New Combustion Synthesis Method for GaN:Eu3+ and Ga2O3 :Eu3+ Luminescent Powders G. A. Hirata1 between the precursors. The preparation of Eu-doped Ga2O3 powders was achieved using a new combustion)3 and Ga(NO3)3 as the precursors and hydrazine as (non-carbonaceous) fuel. A spontaneous combustion

McKittrick, Joanna

372

Solid aerosol generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved solid aerosol generator used to produce a gas borne stream of dry, solid particles of predetermined size and concentration. The improved solid aerosol generator nebulizes a feed solution of known concentration with a flow of preheated gas and dries the resultant wet heated aerosol in a grounded, conical heating chamber, achieving high recovery and flow rates.

Prescott, Donald S. (Shelley, ID); Schober, Robert K. (Midwest City, OK); Beller, John (Idaho Falls, ID)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price to Marginal Cost of Natural Gas Generation, p FigurePrice to Marginal Cost of Natural Gas Generation, p FigureP e Marginal Cost of Natural Gas Generation (US$/kWh e ), C

Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Gas Turbine Optimum Operation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Many offshore installations are dependent on power generated by gas turbines and a critical issue is that these experience performance deterioration over time. Performance deterioration… (more)

Flesland, Synnøve Mangerud

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

EU-UNDP Climate Change Capacity Building Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Building Program Building Program Jump to: navigation, search Name UNDP/EC Climate Change Capacity Building Program Agency/Company /Organization The European Union (EU), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) Partner Multiple Ministries Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass, Buildings, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Greenhouse Gas, Industry, Land Use, Offsets and Certificates, People and Policy, Solar, Transportation, Water Power, Wind Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Co-benefits assessment, - Energy Access, - Environmental and Biodiversity, GHG inventory, Implementation, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, -NAMA, -Roadmap, -TNA, Policies/deployment programs, Resource assessment Website http://www.lowemissiondevelopm

376

EU Energy Statistics 2010 (1990 - 2007)

These two datasets...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EU Energy Statistics 2010 (1990 - 2007)

These two datasets include energy statistics for the European Union (EU). The statistics are available from the 

377

Gas amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-amplified ionization detector for gas chromatography which possesses increased sensitivity and a very fast response time is described. Solutes eluding from a gas chromatographic column are ionized by uv photoionization of matter eluting therefrom. The detector is capable of generating easily measured voltage signals by gas amplification/multiplication of electron products resulting from the uv photoionization of at least a portion of each solute passing through the detector. 4 figs.

Huston, G.C.

1989-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

378

Unprecedented Generation Shifts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The economic recession, which reduced electricity demand, and falling natural gas costs have brought about unprecedented shifts in electric generation. These developments have affected coal-fired generation the most, leading to operational challenges (cycling and shut downs), deterioration of financial performance, and an awareness of the vulnerability of many units to retirement. A third force, though usually affecting natural gas unit operations more than coal, is the build-up of wind generation. This ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Fuel Switching on a Dime -- Boiler Capabilities of Electric Utilities and Industrial Companies: EPRI Report Series on Gas Demands for Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Electric utilities play an unusual and important role in the natural gas market because so much of their ongoing gas demand is price sensitive. This report, which focuses on the pattern of this demand, tracks how switching between gas and alternative fuels by major users affects the overall market. Events over the past four years and new plant-specific data have changed our understanding of this phenomenon.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hectares (Mha) of land would be required to meet the EU target for biofuels (5.75 per cent of transport29 III. Commercial viability of second generation biofuel technology27 The previous chapters focused on first generation biofuels. In this chapter we focus on second generation biofuels, specifically

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification -- Testimony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification Testimony Prepared for a Hearing on Power Generation

Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Optimal selection of on-site generation with combined heat and power applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the burning of natural gas for on-site power generation andnatural gas absorption chiller GenL i , m , t , h , u Generated power by distributed generation

Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Bailey, Owen; Hamachi LaCommare, Kristina

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Pennsylvania's Natural Gas Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sales to commercial and industrial customers ­ Natural gas, power, oil · Power generation ­ Fossil backed by a growing portfolio of assets. #12;Shale Gas Geography 5 | MARCELLUS SHALE COALITION #12;Shale Permits Price #12;Pricing Trend of Oil and Gas in the US $- $5.00 $10.00 $15.00 $20.00 $25.00 USDper

Lee, Dongwon

384

Control Scheme Modifications Increase Efficiency of Steam Generation System at ExxonMobil Gas Plant. Office of Industrial Technologies (OIT) Chemicals BestPractices Project Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study highlights control scheme modifications made to the steam system at ExxonMobil's Mary Ann Gas Plant in Mobile, Alabama, which improved steam flow efficiency and reduced energy costs.

Not Available

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Talkin' Bout Wind Generation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Administration Solar Generation Has a Bright Future Talkin' Bout Wind Generation Get Daily Energy Analysis Delivered to Your Website Natural Gas Production and U.S. Oil Imports...

386

De-Carbonizing California and the EU  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sources. Investment subsidy and a variable “green bonus”investment program), has a renewable portfolio requirement for electric generators (analog of green

Berck, Peter; Brannlund, Runar

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Biogas-fueled Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a case study of the use of digester gas produced at two wastewater treatment plants in Omaha, NE to fuel electric power generators.

2005-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

388

Solid oxide fuel cell generator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

Draper, Robert (Churchill Boro, PA); George, Raymond A. (Pittsburgh, PA); Shockling, Larry A. (Plum Borough, PA)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Natural Gas Monthly (NGM) - Energy Information Administration ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, ... Spot Prices of Natural Gas and Natural Gas Plant Liquids in the United States, ...

390

MHD Generating system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

According to the present invention, coal combustion gas is the primary working fluid and copper or a copper alloy is the electrodynamic fluid in the MHD generator, thereby eliminating the heat exchangers between the combustor and the liquid-metal MHD working fluids, allowing the use of a conventional coalfired steam bottoming plant, and making the plant simpler, more efficient and cheaper. In operation, the gas and liquid are combined in a mixer and the resulting two-phase mixture enters the MHD generator. The MHD generator acts as a turbine and electric generator in one unit wherein the gas expands, drives the liquid across the magnetic field and thus generates electrical power. The gas and liquid are separated, and the available energy in the gas is recovered before the gas is exhausted to the atmosphere. Where the combustion gas contains sulfur, oxygen is bubbled through a side loop to remove sulfur therefrom as a concentrated stream of sulfur dioxide. The combustor is operated substoichiometrically to control the oxide level in the copper.

Petrick, Michael (Joliet, IL); Pierson, Edward S. (Chicago, IL); Schreiner, Felix (Mokena, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

STM Stirling Engine-Generators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Stirling engines have recently been introduced to the distributed generation market. This project summarizes the experience of three projects implementing Stirling engine-generators from one manufacturer in applications where they are fueled with digester gas.

2007-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

392

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high temperature furnace (HITAF). Quarterly progress report No. 3, July--September 1992  

SciTech Connect

A concept for an advanced coal-fired combined-cycle power generating system is currently being developed. The first phase of this three-phase program consists of conducting the necessary research and development to define the system, evaluate the economic and technical feasibility of the concept, and prepare an R & D plan to develop the concept further. Foster Wheeler Development Corporation is leading a team ofcompanies involved in this effort. The system proposed to meet these goals is a combined-cycle system where air for a gas turbine is indirectly heated to approximately 1800{degrees}F in furnaces fired with cool-derived fuels and then directly heated in a natural-gas-fired combustor up to about 2400{degrees}F. The system is based on a pyrolyzing process that converts the coal into a low-Btu fuel gas and char. The fuelgas is a relatively clean fuel, and it is fired to heat tube surfaces that are susceptible to corrosion and problems from ash deposition. In particular, the high-temperature air heater tubes, which will need tobe a ceramic material, will be located in a separate furnace or region of a furnace that is exposed to combustion products from the low-Btu fuel gas only. A simplified process flow diagram is shown.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

"1. PSEG Salem Generating Station","Nuclear","PSEG Nuclear LLC...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Jersey" "1. PSEG Salem Generating Station","Nuclear","PSEG Nuclear LLC",2370 "2. PSEG Linden Generating Station","Gas","PSEG Fossil LLC",1587 "3. Bergen Generating...

394

TWO POSTDOC POSITIONS IN MULTISCALE MODELLING OF RELIABILITY OF NEW GENERATION NANO-DEVICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TWO POSTDOC POSITIONS IN MULTISCALE MODELLING OF RELIABILITY OF NEW GENERATION NANO-DEVICES Two nano-devices. These posts are part of an international MORDRED project funded by EU FP7 to develop new

Saunders, Mark

395

NuclearHydrogen Oil and gas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, and bio-energy from organic waste and manufacturing by-products. These technologies range from the generation of energy from waste, both to be fed back into the grid and for use in transport. Our civil technologies, from biomass energy and wind farms to nuclear waste facilities. Funded by the EU and the UK

Birmingham, University of

396

Generation of negative ions in the gas phase from a 12CaO{center_dot}7Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} membrane-coated ceramic heater under atmospheric pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

12CaO{center_dot}7Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} (C12A7) crystal is able to generate strong and high purity oxygen anion (O{sup -}) beam under reduced pressure. However, the emission of O{sup -} or related species under atmospheric pressure has not been evaluated. In this study, the characteristics of negative ion species emissions from the C12A7 membrane-coated ceramic heater under atmospheric pressure were investigated by quadrupole mass spectrometer. Negative ion species were confirmed to be emitted even under atmospheric pressure. It was supposed that the detected negative ion clusters, such as O{sup -}(H{sub 2}O){sub n}, O{sub 2}{sup -}(H{sub 2}O){sub n}, and CO{sub 4}{sup -}(H{sub 2}O){sub n}, were generated by the reaction of negative ions emitted from the heater with impurities in He gas.

Yamamoto, Mitsuo [College of Arts and Sciences, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 153-8902 (Japan); Shima, Akio [Department of Chemical System Engineering, University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); Nishioka, Masateru [Research Center for Compact Chemical Process, National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Miyagi 983-8551 (Japan); Sadakata, Masayoshi [Department of Environmental Chemical Engineering, Kogakuin University, Tokyo 192-0015 (Japan)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the natural gas fired fuel cell. Draft and final progress report for the period May 1, 1993--July 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report is an account of the work performed from May 1, 1993 to July 30,1993 on the economic feasibility generating electrical power by natural gas-fired fuel cells. The study is comprised of a survey of energy users, the development of numeric models of an energy distribution system and a central plant utilities system that includes a fuel cell. A model of the capital cost of the hardware elements is combined with a series of ownership scenarios and an operations model that provide the necessary input for a model of the cost of ownership of a fuel cell-based power generation system. The primary model development tasks are complete. The remaining study emphasis is to perform an economic analysis of varied ownership scenarios using the model. This report outlines the progress to date.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Grid4EU (Smart Grid Project) (Italy) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grid4EU (Smart Grid Project) (Italy) Grid4EU (Smart Grid Project) (Italy) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Grid4EU Country Italy Coordinates 41.910454°, 12.65625° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.910454,"lon":12.65625,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

399

GAS TURBINES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the age of volatile and ever increasing natural gas fuel prices, strict new emission regulations and technological advancements, modern IGCC plants are the answer to growing market demands for efficient and environmentally friendly power generation. IGCC technology allows the use of low cost opportunity fuels, such as coal, of which there is a more than a 200-year supply in the U.S., and refinery residues, such as petroleum coke and residual oil. Future IGCC plants are expected to be more efficient and have a potential to be a lower cost solution to future CO2 and mercury regulations compared to the direct coal fired steam plants. Siemens has more than 300,000 hours of successful IGCC plant operational experience on a variety of heavy duty gas turbine models in Europe and the U.S. The gas turbines involved range from SGT5-2000E to SGT6-3000E (former designations are shown on Table 1). Future IGCC applications will extend this experience to the SGT5-4000F and SGT6-4000F/5000F/6000G gas turbines. In the currently operating Siemens ’ 60 Hz fleet, the SGT6-5000F gas turbine has the most operating engines and the most cumulative operating hours. Over the years, advancements have increased its performance and decreased its emissions and life cycle costs without impacting reliability. Development has been initiated to verify its readiness for future IGCC application including syngas combustion system testing. Similar efforts are planned for the SGT6-6000G and SGT5-4000F/SGT6-4000F models. This paper discusses the extensive development programs that have been carried out to demonstrate that target emissions and engine operability can be achieved on syngas operation in advanced F-class 50 Hz and 60 Hz gas turbine based IGCC applications.

Power For L; Satish Gadde; Jianfan Wu; Anil Gulati; Gerry Mcquiggan; Berthold Koestlin; Bernd Prade

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

OATINGS FOR GAS TUR INE LADES  

Power generation Marine propulsion Advanced fusion plants Gas turbine engines Industrial regeneration ENEFITS For more information or licensing

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Epitaxial EuO thin films on GaAs  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate the epitaxial growth of EuO on GaAs by reactive molecular beam epitaxy. Thin films are grown in an adsorption-controlled regime with the aid of an MgO diffusion barrier. Despite the large lattice mismatch, it is shown that EuO grows well on MgO(001) with excellent magnetic properties. Epitaxy on GaAs is cube-on-cube and longitudinal magneto-optic Kerr effect measurements demonstrate a large Kerr rotation of 0.57 deg., a significant remanent magnetization, and a Curie temperature of 69 K.

Swartz, A. G.; Ciraldo, J.; Wong, J. J. I.; Li Yan; Han Wei; Lin Tao; Shi, J.; Kawakami, R. K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Riverside, California 92521 (United States); Mack, S.; Awschalom, D. D. [Center for Spintronics and Quantum Computation, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

402

An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell: a model of the operations cost.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This model description establishes the revenues, expenses incentives and avoided costs of Operation of a Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell-Based. Fuel is the major element of the cost of operation of a natural gas-fired fuel cell. Forecasts of the change in the price of this commodity a re an important consideration in the ownership of an energy conversion system. Differences between forecasts, the interests of the forecaster or geographical areas can all have significant effects on imputed fuel costs. There is less effect on judgments made on the feasibility of an energy conversion system since changes in fuel price can affect the cost of operation of the alternatives to the fuel cell in a similar fashion. The forecasts used in this model are only intended to provide the potential owner or operator with the means to examine alternate future scenarios. The operations model computes operating costs of a system suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

403

Annual Trilateral U.S. - EU - Japan Conference on Critical Materials...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Trilateral U.S. - EU - Japan Conference on Critical Materials for a Clean Energy Future, October 4-5, 2011 Annual Trilateral U.S. - EU - Japan Conference on Critical...

404

EU, CHINA AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGE IN AFRICA A case study from timber industry in Gabon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 EU, CHINA AND THE ENVIRONMENTAL CHALLENGE IN AFRICA A case study from timber industry: .....................................................................................................................................................2 Part I: The EU, China and the external environmental dimension....................................................................3 1.1 China as a competitor normative power in the environmental sector

405

Gas turbine noise control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of gas turbine powered generators and pumping stations are likely to increase over the next two decades. Alternative fuel systems utilizing fluidized coal beds are likely in the near future

Louis A. Challis and Associates Pty. Ltd.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

The future role of renewable energy sources in European electricity supply : A model-based analysis for the EU-15.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ambitious targets for the use of renewable electricity (RES-E) have been formulated by the EU Commission and the EU Member States. Taking into account technical,… (more)

Rosen, Johannes

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The EU’s CAP, the Doha Round and Developing Countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Political Economy of Beef Liberalisation: A collection ofTrade: Effects of trade liberalisation and EU enlargement on

Halderman, Michael; Nelson, Michael

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Regulations and Audit Opinions: Evidence from EU Banking Institutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we empirically investigate the relationship between financial and auditing requirements, capital requirements, official supervisory power, and the likelihood of receiving a qualified audit opinion. The sample consists of 71 qualified financial ... Keywords: Banking institutions, EU, Qualified audit opinion, Regulations

Chrysovalantis Gaganis; Fotios Pasiouras; Charalambos Spathis

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

EU signs ITER deal Negotiations on the ITER international nuclear  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Korea and the US, the agreement aims to develop a project that will test the feasibility of nuclearEU signs ITER deal Negotiations on the ITER international nuclear fusion project have been parties will contribute up to ten per cent. European Greens, fiercely opposed to nuclear energy, have

410

Oxygen off-stoichiometry and phase separation in EuO thin films  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on our study on the influence of the growth conditions on the europium/oxygen stoichiometry, morphology, magnetic properties, and electrical conductivity of EuO thin films. SQUID magnetometry and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were utilized as complementary techniques to determine the oxygen content of EuO{sub 1{+-}x} thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy with and without the employment of the so-called Eu distillation process. We found indications for phase separation to occur in Eu-rich as well as in over-oxidized EuO for films grown at substrate temperatures below the Eu distillation temperature. Only a fraction of the excess Eu contributes to the metal-insulator transition in Eu-rich films grown under these conditions. We also observed that the surfaces of these films were ill defined and may even contain more Eu excess than the film average. Only EuO films grown under distillation conditions are guaranteed to have the same magnetic and electrical properties as stoichiometric bulk EuO, and to have surfaces with the proper Eu/O stoichiometry and electronic structure.

Altendorf, S. G.; Efimenko, A.; Oliana, V. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, DE-50937 Koeln (Germany); Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Noethnitzerstr. 40, DE-01187 Dresden (Germany); Kierspel, H. [II. Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet zu Koeln, Zuelpicher Str. 77, DE-50937 Koeln (Germany); Rata, A. D.; Tjeng, L. H. [Max Planck Institute for Chemical Physics of Solids, Noethnitzerstr. 40, DE-01187 Dresden (Germany)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

New electric generators typically come online at the start of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Taking natural gas-fired generators as an example ... the trend toward summer online dates is more pronounced for gas combustion turbines and combined-cycle units, ...

412

Figure 29. Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Power sector electricity generation capacity by fuel in five cases, 2011 ... Natural gas combined cycle Natural gas combustion turbine Nuclear Renewable/other Reference

413

Natural gas leak mapper  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described that is suitable for use in determining the location of leaks of gases having a background concentration. The system is a point-wise backscatter absorption gas measurement system that measures absorption and distance to each point of an image. The absorption measurement provides an indication of the total amount of a gas of interest, and the distance provides an estimate of the background concentration of gas. The distance is measured from the time-of-flight of laser pulse that is generated along with the absorption measurement light. The measurements are formated into an image of the presence of gas in excess of the background. Alternatively, an image of the scene is superimosed on the image of the gas to aid in locating leaks. By further modeling excess gas as a plume having a known concentration profile, the present system provides an estimate of the maximum concentration of the gas of interest.

Reichardt, Thomas A. (Livermore, CA); Luong, Amy Khai (Dublin, CA); Kulp, Thomas J. (Livermore, CA); Devdas, Sanjay (Albany, CA)

2008-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

414

Natural Gas - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration ... almost every region consumed less gas for power generation, ... History Table; Working Gas in Underground Storage;

415

Phase equilibrium and intermediate phases in the Eu-Sb system  

SciTech Connect

Rapid heating rate thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, fluorescence spectrometry, and differential dissolution method were used to study the high-temperature phase equilibrium in the Eu-Sb system within the composition range between 37 and 96 at% Sb. The techniques were effective in determination of the vapor-solid-liquid equilibrium since intermediate phases except Eu{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} evaporated incongruently after melting. A thermal procedure was developed to determine the liquidus and solidus lines of the T-x diagram. Six stable phases were identified: two phases, EuSb{sub 2} and Eu{sub 4}Sb{sub 3}, melt congruently at 1045{+-}10 deg. C and 1600{+-}15 deg. C, the Eu{sub 2}Sb{sub 3}, Eu{sub 11}Sb{sub 10}, Eu{sub 5}Sb{sub 4}, and Eu{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} phases melt incongruently at 850{+-}8 deg. C, 950{+-}10 deg. C, 1350{+-}15 deg. C, and 1445{+-}15 deg. C, respectively. The exact composition shifting of Sb-rich decomposable phases towards Eu{sub 4}Sb{sub 3}, the most refractory compound, was determined. The topology of the Eu-Sb phase diagram was considered together with that of the Yb-Sb system. - Graphical abstract: The high-temperature range of the T-x phase diagram for the Eu-Sb system. Highlights: > The phase relations in the Eu-Sb system were studied over a large composition and temperature scale. > The liquidus and solidus lines of the T-x diagram were well established using effective techniques. > In the system, six binary phases are stable and they melt incongruently except EuSb{sub 2} and Eu{sub 4}Sb{sub 3}. > Incongruent evaporation was found to be typical of all the phases besides Eu{sub 4}Sb{sub 3}.

Abdusalyamova, M.N. [Institute of Chemistry of Tajik Academy of Sciences, Ajni Str. 299/2, 734063 Dushanbe (Tajikistan); Vasilyeva, I.G., E-mail: kamarz@niic.nsc.ru [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Lavrentiev Avenue, 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Development of a high-performance coal-fired power generating system with pyrolysis gas and char-fired high-temperature furnace (HITAF): Volume 4. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An outgrowth of our studies of the FWDC coal-fired high performance power systems (HIPPS) concept was the development of a concept for the repowering of existing boilers. The initial analysis of this concept indicates that it will be both technically and economically viable. A unique feature of our greenfields HIPPS concept is that it integrates the operation of a pressurized pyrolyzer and a pulverized fuel-fired boiler/air heater. Once this type of operation is achieved, there are a few different applications of this core technology. Two greenfields plant options are the base case plant and a plant where ceramic air heaters are used to extend the limit of air heating in the HITAF. The greenfields designs can be used for repowering in the conventional sense which involves replacing almost everything in the plant except the steam turbine and accessories. Another option is to keep the existing boiler and add a pyrolyzer and gas turbine to the plant. The study was done on an Eastern utility plant. The owner is currently considering replacing two units with atmospheric fluidized bed boilers, but is interested in a comparison with HIPPS technology. After repowering, the emissions levels need to be 0.25 lb SO{sub x}/MMBtu and 0.15 lb NO{sub x}/MMBtu.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

II. Greenhouse gas markets, carbon dioxide credits and biofuels17  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or biodiesel use in Europe. Nevertheless, the EU directive sets a target for the use of biofuels15 II. Greenhouse gas markets, carbon dioxide credits and biofuels17 The previous chapter analysed mandatory blends and utilization targets as policy measures that can provide incentives for expanded

418

Strategic Eurasian Natural Gas Model for Energy Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fossil fuels (such as coal or oil).4 In 2009, natural gas consumption in the EU totalled 503 billion cubic metres (bcm) (or about a quarter of total primary energy consumption) (IEA, 2010). By 2030, consumption was projected to grow at an average...

Chyong, Chi-Kong; Hobbs, Benjamin F.

2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

419

U.S. Crude Oil, Natural Gas, and Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. ... This category excludes natural gas plant liquids, ...

420

Easing the Natural Gas Crisis: Reducing Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification -- Testimony  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Prices Through Electricity Supply Diversification Testimony Prepared for a Hearing on Power Generation Resource Incentives &

Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation eu gas" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Utilization of coal mine ventilation exhaust as combustion air in gas-fired turbines for electric and/or mechanical power generation. Semi-annual topical report, June 1995--August 1995  

SciTech Connect

Methane emitted during underground coal mining operations is a hazard that is dealt with by diluting the methane with fresh air and exhausting the contaminated air to the atmosphere. Unfortunately this waste stream may contain more than 60% of the methane resource from the coal, and in the atmosphere the methane acts as a greenhouse gas with an effect about 24.5 times greater than CO{sub 2}. Though the waste stream is too dilute for normal recovery processes, it can be used as combustion air for a turbine-generator, thereby reducing the turbine fuel requirements while reducing emissions. Preliminary analysis indicates that such a system, built using standard equipment, is economically and environmentally attractive, and has potential for worldwide application.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Internet: http://ue.eu.int/ E-mail: press.office@consilium.eu.int  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Liquefied Natural Gas carriers. It was originally launched as a measure for the period foreseen.............................................................................................................11 REGULATION ON CONSUMER PROTECTION CO-OPERATION ...........................................12 regulation, which are crucial to the success of the relevant Community Action Plans and measures; 5

423

Quantifying the value that wind power provides as a hedge against volatile natural gas prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

natural gas- fired generation and in favor of investments in wind powerpower, which has nearly achieved economic parity with natural gas-fired generation

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Hedging Future Gas Price Risk with Wind Power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Prices: By displacing gas-fired generation, incremental wind generation reduces demand for natural gas Department Increased Renewables Penetration Displaces Natural Gas Demand Projected Gas Displacement in 2020 Energy Technologies Division · Energy Analysis Department Natural Gas Prices Are High and Volatile 0 2 4

425

Power generation method including membrane separation  

SciTech Connect

A method for generating electric power, such as at, or close to, natural gas fields. The method includes conditioning natural gas containing C.sub.3+ hydrocarbons and/or acid gas by means of a membrane separation step. This step creates a leaner, sweeter, drier gas, which is then used as combustion fuel to run a turbine, which is in turn used for power generation.

Lokhandwala, Kaaeid A. (Union City, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Method of making water gas  

SciTech Connect

The process of manufacturing water gas by alternate air and steam blasting is discussed. The process consists in providing two separate fuel beds of bituminous fuel in two intercommunicating water-gas generators; hot air blasting from the top part of the fuel bed in one generator to the top portion of the other fuel bed in the second generator; and blasting from the bottom part of the fuel bed in the first generator to the bottom part of the fuel bed in the second generator. By evolving volatile matter in the fuel bed in the first generator, and introducing secondary air between the fuel beds to burn the volatile matter and thereby facilitate the carbonization of raw fuel and to store heat in the fuel bed in the second generator, generation of water gas by steam blasting the heated fuel beds will result.

Evans, O.B.

1931-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

427

Natural Gas Supply in Denmark -A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Natural Gas Supply in Denmark - A Model of Natural Gas Transmission and the Liberalized Gas Market of the markets of natural gas and electricity and the existence of an abundance of de-centralized combined heat and power generators of which most are natural gas fired, leads to the natural assumption that the future

428

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

which could lead to more gas-fired electric generation. Other Market Trends: FERC Approves New Gas Infrastructure in Gulf Coast Region: The Federal Energy Regulatory...

429

Natural Gas Weekly Update, Printer-Friendly Version  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

from storage during the winter months, but prompted demand for natural-gas-fired power generation during the summer months. Overall, natural gas consumption in 2006 was...

430

Flashback and blowoff characteristics of gas turbine swirl combustor.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Gas turbines are extensively used in combined cycle power systems. These form about 20% of global power generating capacity, normally being fired on natural gas,… (more)

Abdulsada, Mohammed

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Competition among fuels for power generation driven by changes ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Most recently, a number of factors have led to a continuing electric power industry trend of substituting coal-fired generation with natural gas-fired generation: ...

432

NETL: News Release - Studies Begin on Next Generation of Mid...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the next generation of mid-size electric power generating gas turbines. MORE INFO Gas Turbine R&D Program. The Energy Department has selected: Pratt & Whitney, East...

433

The Gas/Electric Partnership  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric and gas industries are each in the process of restructuring and "converging" toward one mission: providing energy. Use of natural gas in generating electric power and use of electricity in transporting natural gas will increase as this occurs. Through an Electric Power Research Institute initiative, an inter-industry organization, the Gas/Electric Partnership, has formed between the electric utilities and gas pipelines. The initial focus of this partnership is to explore issues of culture, technology, and economics in using electric motor driven compressors for moving gas to market.

Schmeal, W. R.; Royall, D.; Wrenn, K. F. Jr.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Recent mix of electric generating capacity additions more diverse ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

tags: natural gas generation capacity electricity. Email Updates. RSS Feeds. Facebook. Twitter. YouTube. Add us to your site.

435

The Potential for Distributed Generation in Japanese Prototype Buildings: A DER-CAM Analysis of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, wood residues, biogas or spent pulping liquor as fuels. Technologies include gas turbine generators

436

Natural gas and electricity optimal power flow  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract — In this paper, the combined natural gas and electric optimal power flow (GEOPF) is presented. It shows fundamental modeling of the natural gas network to be used for the GEOPF, and describes the equality constraints which describe the energy transformation between gas and electric networks at combined nodes (i.e., generators). We also present the formulation of the natural gas loadflow problem, which includes the amount of gas consumed in compressor stations. Case studies are presented to show the sensitivity of the real power generation to wellhead gas prices. Results from the simulation demonstrate that the GEOPF can provide social welfare maximizing solutions considering both gas and electric networks. I.

Seungwon An

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Winning in electricity generation  

SciTech Connect

Should you be a buyer or a seller of generation? In general, spot buyers should do very well, while many generation owners will be fortunate to recover their stranded costs. Successful generators will capitalize on superior operating performance and market knowledge. The smartest natural gas strategy in the early 1980`s was to short natural gas. Will this lesson of restructuring be written again of the electricity generation business of the late 1990`s? The authors will examine whether and how winners might emerge in the generation business of the future. The U.S. electric generation market, already marked by intense competition for new capacity and industrial demand, will become even more competitive as it makes the transition from regulated local monopoly to marketbased commodity pricing. At risk is up to $150 billion of shareholder equity and the future viability of half of the country`s investor-owned utilities. The winners in year 2005 will be those who early on developed strategies that simultaneously recovered existing generation investments while restructuring their asset portfolios and repositioning their plants to compete in the new market. Losers will have spent the time mired in indecision, their strategies ultimately forced upon them by regulators or competitors.

Hashimoto, L. [McKinsey & Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., Los Angeles, CA (United States); Jansen, P. [McKinsey & Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)] [McKinsey & Co., San Francisco, CA (United States); Geyn, G. van [McKinsey & Co., Toronto (Canada)] [McKinsey & Co., Toronto (Canada)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

flat block of power, generation from natural gas fired CCGTsnatural gas plants. Even at high penetration adding power from a flat block does not displace any generation

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Ce-doped EuO: Magnetic properties and the indirect band gap  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have prepared and investigated thin films of EuO doped with the rare-earth element cerium. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy were used to determine the quality of these films prepared by pulsed laser deposition. Ce doping leads to an enhanced Curie temperature near 150 K, close to that seen for oxygen-deficient EuO{sub 1-x}. However, the magnetization of Ce-doped EuO exhibits differences from that observed for Gd-doped and oxygen-deficient samples. The high-resolution angular-resolved photoemission from Ce-doped EuO reveals filling of conduction-band states near the X point. This indicates that the band gap in EuO is indirect, and that at 2% doping Ce-doped EuO{sub 1-x} is at least semimetallic.

Liu Pan; Tang Jinke [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, Wyoming 82071 (United States); Colon Santana, Juan A.; Belashchenko, Kirill D.; Dowben, Peter A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Nebraska Center for Materials and Nanoscience, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, Nebraska 68588-0299 (United States)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Satoshi Hada Department of Gas Turbine Engineering,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Satoshi Hada Department of Gas Turbine Engineering, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd., Takasago must be prevented by developing envi- ronmentally friendly power plants. Industrial gas turbines play a major role in power generation with modern high temperature gas turbines being applied in the gas

Thole, Karen A.

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441

R u e d e l a L o i 1 7 5 B 1 0 4 8 B R U S S E L S T e l . : + 3 2 ( 0 ) 2 2 8 1 6 2 1 9 / 6 3 1 9 F a x : + 3 2 ( 0 ) 2 2 8 1 8 0 2 6 press.office@consilium.europa.eu http://www.consilium.europa.eu/Newsroom  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the savings potential and targets for renewables and biofuels referred to below should be achieved with a view % binding minimum target to be achieved by all Member States for the share of biofuels in overall EU character of this target is appropriate subject to production being sustainable, second-generation biofuels

442

EU Framework 6 Project: Predictive Toxicology (PredTox)-overview and outcome  

SciTech Connect

In this publication, we report the outcome of the integrated EU Framework 6 Project: Predictive Toxicology (PredTox), including methodological aspects and overall conclusions. Specific details including data analysis and interpretation are reported in separate articles in this issue. The project, partly funded by the EU, was carried out by a consortium of 15 pharmaceutical companies, 2 SMEs, and 3 universities. The effects of 16 test compounds were characterized using conventional toxicological parameters and 'omics' technologies. The three major observed toxicities, liver hypertrophy, bile duct necrosis and/or cholestasis, and kidney proximal tubular damage were analyzed in detail. The combined approach of 'omics' and conventional toxicology proved a useful tool for mechanistic investigations and the identification of putative biomarkers. In our hands and in combination with histopathological assessment, target organ transcriptomics was the most prolific approach for the generation of mechanistic hypotheses. Proteomics approaches were relatively time-consuming and required careful standardization. NMR-based metabolomics detected metabolite changes accompanying histopathological findings, providing limited additional mechanistic information. Conversely, targeted metabolite profiling with LC/GC-MS was very useful for the investigation of bile duct necrosis/cholestasis. In general, both proteomics and metabolomics were supportive of other findings. Thus, the outcome of this program indicates that 'omics' technologies can help toxicologists to make better informed decisions during exploratory toxicological studies. The data support that hypothesis on mode of action and discovery of putative biomarkers are tangible outcomes of integrated 'omics' analysis. Qualification of biomarkers remains challenging, in particular in terms of identification, mechanistic anchoring, appropriate specificity, and sensitivity.

Suter, Laura, E-mail: Laura.suter-dick@roche.com [Hoffmann-La Roche AG, Basel (Switzerland); Schroeder, Susanne [Nycomed GmbH, Barsbuettel (Germany); Meyer, Kirstin [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Gautier, Jean-Charles [Sanofi aventis R and D, Disposition, Safety and Animal Research, Vitry sur Seine (France); Amberg, Alexander [Sanofi aventis R and D, Disposition, Safety and Animal Research, Frankfurt (Germany); Wendt, Maria; Gmuender, Hans [Genedata AG, Basel (Switzerland); Mally, Angela [University of Wuerzburg, Institut fuer Toxikologie, Wuerzburg (Germany); Boitier, Eric [Sanofi aventis R and D, Disposition, Safety and Animal Research, Vitry sur Seine (France); Ellinger-Ziegelbauer, Heidrun [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Wuppertal (Germany); Matheis, Katja [Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH and Co. KG, Biberach (Germany); Pfannkuch, Friedlieb [Hoffmann-La Roche AG, Basel (Switzerland)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

443

Ruslands Gas.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is about Russian natural gas and the possibility for Russia to use its reserves of natural gas politically towards the European Union to… (more)

Elkjær, Jonas Bondegaard

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Innovation and Market Definition under the EU Regulatory Framework for Electronic Communications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

European Telecommunications market, Oxford University Press,Relevant Product and Service Markets within the ElectronicInnovation and Market Definition under the EU Regulatory

Madiega, Tambiama

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Civil society and democratic consolidation in Poland : ENGOs and the programming of EU funds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Poland and the other post-communist EU Member States are benefiting from large amounts of financial aid through the Cohesion and Structural Funds. This aid is… (more)

Cockbain, Paul Erik

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Export Potential of U.S. - Produced Switchgrass and Wood Pellets for the EU Market.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??European Union’s (EU) dependence on fossil fuel imports strongly affects its energy supply and economic and national stability. In order to reduce its dependence and… (more)

Grbovic, Mladen

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Gas utilization technologies  

SciTech Connect

One of the constant challenges facing the research community is the identification of technology needs 5 to 15 years from now. A look back into history indicates that the forces driving natural gas research have changed from decade to decade. In the 1970s research was driven by concerns for adequate supply; in the 1980s research was aimed at creating new markets for natural gas. What then are the driving forces for the 1990s? Recent reports from the natural gas industry have helped define a new direction driven primarily by market demand for natural gas. A study prepared by the Interstate Natural Gas Association of America Foundation entitled ``Survey of Natural Research, Development, and Demonstration RD&D Priorities`` indicated that in the 1990s the highest research priority should be for natural gas utilization and that technology development efforts should not only address efficiency and cost, but environmental and regulatory issues as well. This study and others, such as the report by the American Gas Association (A.G.A.) entitled ``Strategic Vision for Natural Gas Through the Year 2000,`` clearly identify the market sectors driving today`s technology development needs. The biggest driver is the power generation market followed by the industrial, transportation, appliance, and gas cooling markets. This is best illustrated by the GRI 1994 Baseline Projection on market growth in various sectors between the year 1992 and 2010. This paper highlights some of the recent technology developments in each one of these sectors.

Biljetina, R.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

GASIFICATION FOR DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A recent emphasis in gasification technology development has been directed toward reduced-scale gasifier systems for distributed generation at remote sites. The domestic distributed power generation market over the next decade is expected to be 5-6 gigawatts per year. The global increase is expected at 20 gigawatts over the next decade. The economics of gasification for distributed power generation are significantly improved when fuel transport is minimized. Until recently, gasification technology has been synonymous with coal conversion. Presently, however, interest centers on providing clean-burning fuel to remote sites that are not necessarily near coal supplies but have sufficient alternative carbonaceous material to feed a small gasifier. Gasifiers up to 50 MW are of current interest, with emphasis on those of 5-MW generating capacity. Internal combustion engines offer a more robust system for utilizing the fuel gas, while fuel cells and microturbines offer higher electric conversion efficiencies. The initial focus of this multiyear effort was on internal combustion engines and microturbines as more realistic near-term options for distributed generation. In this project, we studied emerging gasification technologies that can provide gas from regionally available feedstock as fuel to power generators under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification, primarily coal-fed, has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries. Commercial-scale gasification activities are under way at 113 sites in 22 countries in North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa, and Australia, according to the Gasification Technologies Council. Gasification studies were carried out on alfalfa, black liquor (a high-sodium waste from the pulp industry), cow manure, and willow on the laboratory scale and on alfalfa, black liquor, and willow on the bench scale. Initial parametric tests evaluated through reactivity and product composition were carried out on thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) equipment. These tests were evaluated and then followed by bench-scale studies at 1123 K using an integrated bench-scale fluidized-bed gasifier (IBG) which can be operated in the semicontinuous batch mode. Products from tests were solid (ash), liquid (tar), and gas. Tar was separated on an open chromatographic column. Analysis of the gas product was carried out using on-line Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR). For selected tests, gas was collected periodically and analyzed using a refinery gas analyzer GC (gas chromatograph). The solid product was not extensively analyzed. This report is a part of a search into emerging gasification technologies that can provide power under 30 MW in a distributed generation setting. Larger-scale gasification has been used commercially for more than 50 years to produce clean synthesis gas for the refining, chemical, and power industries, and it is probable that scaled-down applications for use in remote areas will become viable. The appendix to this report contains a list, description, and sources of currently available gasification technologies that could be or are being commercially applied for distributed generation. This list was gathered from current sources and provides information about the supplier, the relative size range, and the status of the technology.

Ronald C. Timpe; Michael D. Mann; Darren D. Schmidt

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

449