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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Industrial Revenue Bond Issuance Cost Assistance (Wisconsin) | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Revenue Bond Issuance Cost Assistance (Wisconsin) Revenue Bond Issuance Cost Assistance (Wisconsin) Industrial Revenue Bond Issuance Cost Assistance (Wisconsin) < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Wind Solar Program Info State Wisconsin Program Type Bond Program Provider Wisconsin Economic Development Corporation Industrial Revenue Bonds (IRB) are tax-exempt bonds that can be used to stimulate capital investment and job creation by providing private borrowers with access to financing at interest rates that are lower than conventional bank loans. The IRB process involves five separate entities - the borrower, lender, bond attorney, issuer, and WEDC. WEDC allocates the bonding authority or the volume cap for the program under Wis. Stat. §

2

REVENUE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Business intelligence is increasingly recognized as a strategic imperative by sophisticated enterprises around the world. The ability to access, analyze, and share data enables reduced costs, increased customer loyalty, and improved visibility throughout a complex business environment. Business Objects continues to achieve success by making business intelligence its core competency and sole focus. This dedication fosters the most innovative products, efficient service, and comprehensive solutions. Our industry leadership is reflected in the quality of customers who rely on

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Governmental costs and revenues associated with geothermal energy development in Imperial County. Special Publication 3241  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study estimates the cost and revenue impacts to local governments of three geothermal energy growth scenarios in Imperial County. The level of geothermal energy potential for the three development scenarios tested is 2,000, 4,000 and 8,000 MW--enough power to serve 270,000 to 1,000,000 people. The government agencies involved do not expect any substantial additional capital costs due to geothermal energy development; therefore, average costing techniques have been used for projecting public service costs and government revenues. The analysis of the three growth scenarios tested indicates that county population would increase by 3, 7 and 19 percent and assessed values would increase by 20, 60, and 165 percent for Alternatives No. 1, No. 2 and No. 3 respectively. Direct and indirect effects would increase new jobs in the county by 1,000, 3,000 and 8,000. Government revenues would tend to exceed public service costs for county and school districts, while city costs would tend to exceed revenues. In each of the alternatives, if county, cities and school districts are grouped together, the revenues exceed costs by an estimated $1,600 per additional person either directly or indirectly related to geothermal energy development in the operational stages. In the tenth year of development, while facilities are still being explored, developed and constructed, the revenues would exceed costs by an approximate $1,000 per additional person for each alternative. School districts with geothermal plants in their boundaries would be required by legislation SB 90 to reduce their tax rates by 15 to 87 percent, depending on the level of energy development. Revenue limits and school taxing methods will be affected by the Serrano-Priest decision and by new school legislation in process.

Goldman, G.; Strong, D.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Portfolio Revenues in a Changing Power Infrastructure: Responses of Existing Generation to New Wind Capacity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Owners of generating units must frequently reevaluate the financial and physical operations of their units in order to assess impacts of changing business regulatory conditions and to consider how investments to improve efficiency, flexibility, and emissions will perform. A little understood development now occurring is growth in wind capacity in response to state renewable performance standards. This report describes a case study of how new wind generation can affect the revenues and operation of existi...

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

5

Expenses Revenues  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expenses Expenses Revenues O&M Expense: /1 Reclamation $42,542,742 Western $57,084,199 Total O&M Expense $99,626,941 Purchase Power Expense: Custom Product and Supplemental Power /2 $201,512,000 $201,512,000 HBA Costs /3 $2,379,720 $0 Purchases for Project Use customers /4 $0 $0 Washoe Cost for BR /5 $471,500 $0 Total Purchase Power Expense/Revenue $204,363,220 $201,512,000 Interest Expense: Total Interest Expense $8,932,452 Other Expenses: Total Other Expenses $3,120,960 Project Repayment (Expense): Total Project Repayment $12,000,000 Other Pass-through Expenses & Revenues: CAISO Market & GMC Charges for 2207A (WSLW) and WPUL /6 $2,928,629 $0 CAISO Expenses & Revenues /6 $21,439,303 $20,749,986 PG&E costs incurred for Wheeling /7 $10,700,551 $9,883,246 PATH 15 revenues and expenses

6

Variable fuel tax models. [Revenue generated via 4 models for Alabama  

SciTech Connect

Four variable fuel tax models are investigated with respect to Alabama Highway Department operations. The Fixed Percentage Fuel Tax Model establishes the state gasoline tax as a constant percentage of the wholesale price of gasoline. The Price Index Economic Model pegs state fuel taxes to a ratio of price indexes. The Fuel Efficiency Tax Model relates the gasoline tax to the variables of Consumer Price Index and vehicle efficiency. The Sales Tax Model establishes a sales tax on the purchase of gasoline and motor fuel sold in the state. Estimates of the amount of revenue expected to be generated by each model are made. Advantages and disadvantages of each model are presented.

Vecellio, R.L.; Moore, R.K.

1977-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Analysis of refiners' total barrel costs and revenues from the sale of petroleum products, 1976 to 1979  

SciTech Connect

In this report, the Economic Regulatory Administration has evaluated refiners' costs and revenues from the sale of major petroleum products from July 1976 through December 1979. This report represents a continuing effort to assess No. 2 heating oil prices and margins in that it updates prior middle distillate studies through March 1980. The analysis examines selling prices and costs associated with each major petroleum product category and a combination of petroleum products (total barrel) from a sample of nine refiners. The total barrel approach was adopted to reduce distortions caused by varying methods of allocation of costs among regulated and unregulated products by refiners. This report determines the extent to which increased costs were recovered on controlled products and whether refiners obtained greater cost recoupment on decontrolled products than would have been allowed under continued controls. The principal methods of measurement used to evaluate product pricing levels for the nine refiners surveyed were cost recoupment (Chapter III), gross margins (Chapter IV), and net margins (Chapter V). Gross margins were derived by subtracting average crude oil costs from average product selling prices for individual product categories and the total barrel. Net margins were derived by subtracting average crude oil costs as well as average marketing, manufacturing, and purchased product costs from average selling prices for individual product categories and the total barrel.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Definition: Energy Revenue | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Revenue Revenue generated through the competitive energy market by buying power at low prices and selling at high prices.1 References SmartGrid.gov 'Description of Benefits'...

9

Electric sales and revenue: 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1993. Operating revenue includes energy charges, demand charges, consumer service charges, environmental surcharges, fuel adjustments, and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. Because electric rates vary based on energy usage, average revenue per kilowatthour are affected by changes in the volume of sales. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour data provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Portfolio Substitution and the Revenue Cost of the Federal Income Tax Exemption for State and Local Government Bonds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper illustrates how different assumptions about household portfolio behavior influence estimates of the amount of individual income tax revenue that would be collected if the interest tax exemption for state and ...

Poterba, James M.

11

World Bank Good Practice Guidelines: Financial Analysis of Revenue...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Revenue Generating-Entities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: World Bank Good Practice Guidelines: Financial Analysis of Revenue Generating-Entities Agency...

12

revenue | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

revenue revenue Dataset Summary Description EIA previously collected sales and revenue data in a category called "Other." This category was defined as including activities such as public street highway lighting, other sales to public authorities, sales to railroads and railways, and interdepartmental sales. EIA has revised its survey to separate the transportation sales and reassign the other activities to the commercial and industrial sectors as appropriate. Source Energy Information Administration (EIA) Date Released August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Date Updated August 01st, 2010 (4 years ago) Keywords EIA Electricity Generation revenue sales utilities Data application/vnd.ms-excel icon f8262010.xls (xls, 992.3 KiB) application/vnd.ms-excel icon f8262009.xls (xls, 1.5 MiB)

13

The Rising Cost of Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades.

Tobey Winters

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

The rising cost of electricity generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through most of its history, the electric industry has experienced a stable or declining cost structure. Recently, the economic fundamentals have shifted and generating costs are now rising and driving up prices at a time when the industry faces new challenges to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions. New plant investment faces the most difficult economic environment in decades. (author)

Winters, Tobey

2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Draft Submission; Social Cost of Energy Generation  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide a general understanding of the social costs associated with electric power generation. Based on a thorough review of recent literature on the subject, the report describes how these social costs can be most fully and accurately evaluated, and discusses important considerations in applying this information within the competitive bidding process. [DJE 2005

1990-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

16

Revenue in Truly Combinatorial Auctions and Adversarial Mechanism Design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Little is known about generating revenue in UNRESTRICTED combinatorial auctions. (In particular, the VCG mechanism has no revenue guarantees.) In this paper we determine how much revenue can be guaranteed in such auctions. ...

Micali, Silvio

17

Electric sales and revenue 1992, April 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Survey Management Division, Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. This publication provides information about sales of electricity, its associated revenue, and the average revenue per kilowatthour sold to residential, commercial, industrial, and other consumers throughout the United States. The sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1992. The electric revenue reported by each electric utility includes the applicable revenue from kilowatthours sold; revenue from income; unemployment and other State and local taxes; energy, demand, and consumer service charges; environmental surcharges; franchise fees; fuel adjustments; and other miscellaneous charges. The revenue does not include taxes, such as sales and excise taxes, that are assessed on the consumer and collected through the utility. Average revenue per kilowatthour is defined as the cost per unit of electricity sold and is calculated by dividing retail sales into the associated electric revenue. The sales of electricity, associated revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour provided in this report are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels.

Not Available

1994-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

18

Fuel cells provide a revenue-generating solution to power quality problems  

SciTech Connect

Electric power quality and reliability are becoming increasingly important as computers and microprocessors assume a larger role in commercial, health care and industrial buildings and processes. At the same time, constraints on transmission and distribution of power from central stations are making local areas vulnerable to low voltage, load addition limitations, power quality and power reliability problems. Many customers currently utilize some form of premium power in the form of standby generators and/or UPS systems. These include customers where continuous power is required because of health and safety or security reasons (hospitals, nursing homes, places of public assembly, air traffic control, military installations, telecommunications, etc.) These also include customers with industrial or commercial processes which can`t tolerance an interruption of power because of product loss or equipment damage. The paper discusses the use of the PC25 fuel cell power plant for backup and parallel power supplies for critical industrial applications. Several PC25 installations are described: the use of propane in a PC25; the use by rural cooperatives; and a demonstration of PC25 technology using landfill gas.

King, J.M. Jr.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Proposed Revenues, Financial Strategy, and Program Costs for FY 1992 and 1993 : Technical Appendix, BPA Programs in Perspective.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Programs in Perspective is the Bonneville Power Administration's public involvement process (PIP) for engaging customers and other stakeholders in a regional dialog to set strategic direction and broad program plans for BPA effort. This planning leads into a biennial rate setting cycle and offers a more accessible and flexible opportunity for dialog on broad issues than is possible under the strict administrative procedures of ratemaking. The self-financed character of BPA has made this public process a necessary and valuable one to assure that those who pay BPA's rates have a clear understanding and a strong voice in the plans for use of the resulting revenues. During 1989, the previous PIP engaged the region in discussion of major strategic, issues focussing on major areas. In 1990, BPA seeks discussion of the directions and plans specifically for fiscal years 1992 and 1993. The steps taken for those years will lay the foundation for the years beyond. Thus, we have subtitled this year's process, Staying fit for the long run.'' We have consulted extensively with customers and others in the region in developing these plans. In dozens of program--specific meetings, BPA staff have talked and listened to what others think our plans ought to be. PIP now gives us a chance to review their sum total, along with projections for revenues and our overall financial position. 8 tabs., 8 figs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Reduce generating costs and eliminate brownouts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improving the manoeuverability of a coal-fired plant to allow it to participate in primary frequency support will reduce generation cost and minimize brownouts. The challenge is to do so without compromising efficiency or emissions. This article describes an approach - activation of stored energy - that is cost-effective and applicable to both greenfield and brownfield installations. It requires a new control philosophy, plus the correct application of new level and flow measurement 'best practices'. 4 refs., 1 tab.

Nogaja, R.; Menezes, M. [Emerson Process Management (United States)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation An...

22

External Costs Associated to Electricity Generation Options in Brazil  

SciTech Connect

This presentation discusses external costs associated with electricity generation options in Brazil.

Jacomino, V.M.F.; Arrone, I.D.; Albo, J.; Grynberg, S.; Spadaro, J.

2004-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

23

Definition: Ancillary Services Revenue | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Revenue generated through the competitive ancillary services market for spinning reserves or frequency regulation.1 View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Related Terms...

24

World Bank Good Practice Guidelines: Financial Analysis of Revenue  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Good Practice Guidelines: Financial Analysis of Revenue Good Practice Guidelines: Financial Analysis of Revenue Generating-Entities Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: World Bank Good Practice Guidelines: Financial Analysis of Revenue Generating-Entities Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Topics: Finance Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: siteresources.worldbank.org/INTRANETFINANCIALMGMT/Resources/FMB-Notes/ References: World Bank Good Practice Guidelines: Financial Analysis of Revenue Generating-Entities[1] References ↑ "World Bank Good Practice Guidelines: Financial Analysis of Revenue Generating-Entities" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=World_Bank_Good_Practice_Guidelines:_Financial_Analysis_of_Revenue_Generating-Entities&oldid=329414"

25

Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

on Facebook icon Twitter icon Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation Jump to: navigation, search Name Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide...

26

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Other Agencies You are here Home Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power...

27

EIA - Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2011. ... such as investment or production tax credits for specified generation sources, ...

28

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

SciTech Connect

This revised ITP tip sheet on benchmarking the fuel cost of steam provides how-to advice for improving industrial steam systems using low-cost, proven practices and technologies.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Cost-Causation and Integration Cost Analysis for Variable Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DeCesaro, Kevin Lynn United States Department of Energy Introduction Wind and solar power generation are prized for their environmental benefits, their low and stable...

30

Cost-Causation and Integration Cost Analysis for Variable Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines how wind and solar integration studies have evolved, what analysis techniques work, what common mistakes are still made, what improvements are likely to be made in the near future, and why calculating integration costs is such a difficult problem and should be undertaken carefully, if at all.

Milligan, M.; Ela, E.; Hodge, B. M.; Kirby, B.; Lew, D.; Clark, C.; DeCesaro, J.; Lynn, K.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Comparing the Costs of Intermittent and Dispatchable Electricity Generating Technologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economic evaluations of alternative electric generating technologies typically rely on comparisons between their expected life-cycle production costs per unit of electricity supplied. The standard life-cycle cost metric ...

Joskow, Paul L.

32

Energy Tips: Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation | ENERGY...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

You are here Home Buildings & Plants Energy Tips: Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login...

33

Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sheet3 Sheet2 Sheet1 Figure 38. Levelized costs of nuclear electricity generation in two cases, 2025 (2011 dollars per megawatthour) Reference Small Modular Reactor

34

EIA - Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Almost all of these factors can vary by region, as do capacity factors for renewable generation, operations and maintenance costs associated with individual ...

35

EIA - Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... by the costs has changed significantly. Prior estimates were for a highly efficient plant employing gasification and a combined cycle generator; the new ...

36

Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

BestPractices Steam tip sheet regarding ways to assess steam system efficiency. To determine the effective cost of steam, use a combined heat and power simulation model that includes all the significant effects.

Papar, R. [U.S. Department of Energy (US)

2000-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

37

Minimizing electricity costs with an auxiliary generator using stochastic programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the problem of minimizing a facility's electricity costs by generating optimal responses using an auxiliary generator as the parameter of the control systems. The-goal of the thesis is to find an ...

Rafiuly, Paul, 1976-

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

You are here You are here Home » Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Program Info State Louisiana Program Type Fees Generating Facility Rate-Making Provider Louisiana Public Service Commission The Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation establishes guidelines for any utility seeking to develop a nuclear power plant in Louisiana. The rule clarifies, as well as supplements the Louisiana Public Service Commission's 1983 General Order for the acquisition of nuclear generation resources. The goal of the rule is to provide a transparent process that identifies the responsibilities parties in the regulatory

39

OPEC Revenues Fact Sheet  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report includes estimates of OPEC net oil export revenues, based on historical estimates and forecasts from the latest EIA Short-Term Energy Outlook.

2013-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

40

Revenue model innovations in the Chinese online game market  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper examines how incumbent firms with different levels of market dominance respond to revenue model innovation, i.e. the process by which revenues are generated and captured, and investigates the relationship between market dominance and different ... Keywords: chinese online game market, evolutionary model innovation, levels of market dominance, revenue model innovation, revolutionary model innovation

Jessie Qun Ren; Philip Hardwick

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Installation, Operation, and Maintenance Costs for Distributed Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Distributed generation (DG) is a broad term that encompasses both mature and emerging onsite power generation technologies with power output as small as 1 kW and as large as 20 MW. While the equipment or purchase cost of a DG system is very important, installation, operation, and maintenance (IOM) costs also are significant and often overlooked. This report reviews IOM costs for both mature and emerging DG technologies. Some equipment cost data is included for reference, but is not the focus of this repo...

2003-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

42

Energy Tips: Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Type (sales unit) Type (sales unit) Energy Content Combustion (Btu/sales unit) Efficiency (%) Natural Gas (therm) 100,000 81.7 Natural Gas (cubic foot) 1,030 81.7 Distillate/No. 2 Oil (gallon) 138,700 84.6 Residual/No. 6 Oil (gallon) 149,700 86.1 Coal (ton) 27,000,000 87.6 Benchmark the Fuel Cost of Steam Generation Benchmarking the fuel cost of steam generation ($/1000 lbs of steam) is an effective way to assess the efficiency of your steam system. This cost is dependent upon fuel type, unit fuel cost, boiler efficiency, feedwater temperature, and steam pressure. This calculation provides a good first approximation for the cost of generating steam and serves as a tracking device to allow for boiler performance monitoring. Table 1 shows the heat input required to produce one pound of saturated

43

Electric $ales and revenue 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This publication provides information on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers in the United States.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1.6 mb) 1.6 mb) Appendix A - Photovoltaic (PV) Cost and Performance Characteristics for Residential and Commercial Applications (1.0 mb) Appendix B - The Cost and Performance of Distributed Wind Turbines, 2010-35 (0.5 mb) Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector Release date: August 7, 2013 Distributed generation in the residential and commercial buildings sectors refers to the on-site generation of energy, often electricity from renewable energy systems such as solar photovoltaics (PV) and small wind turbines. Many factors influence the market for distributed generation, including government policies at the local, state, and federal level, and project costs, which vary significantly depending on time, location, size, and application.

45

World Bank Good Practice Guidelines: Financial Analysis of Revenue  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Practice Guidelines: Financial Analysis of Revenue Practice Guidelines: Financial Analysis of Revenue Generating-Entities (Redirected from General Renewable Energy-Economic and Financial Analysis) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: World Bank Good Practice Guidelines: Financial Analysis of Revenue Generating-Entities Agency/Company /Organization: World Bank Topics: Finance Resource Type: Guide/manual Website: siteresources.worldbank.org/INTRANETFINANCIALMGMT/Resources/FMB-Notes/ References: World Bank Good Practice Guidelines: Financial Analysis of Revenue Generating-Entities[1] References ↑ "World Bank Good Practice Guidelines: Financial Analysis of Revenue Generating-Entities" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=World_Bank_Good_Practice_Guidelines:_Financial_Analysis_of_Revenue_Generating-Entities&oldid=329414

46

Electric Sales, Revenue, and Average Price 2011 - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Electricity. Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, ... Trade and Reliability; All Reports See All Electricity Reports

47

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to compare and contrast utility scale power plant characteristics used in data sets that support energy market models. Characteristics include both technology cost and technology performance projections to the year 2050. Cost parameters include installed capital costs and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. Performance parameters include plant size, heat rate, capacity factor or availability factor, and plant lifetime. Conventional, renewable, and emerging electricity generating technologies were considered. Six data sets, each associated with a different model, were selected. Two of the data sets represent modeled results, not direct model inputs. These two data sets include cost and performance improvements that result from increased deployment as well as resulting capacity factors estimated from particular model runs; other data sets represent model input data. For the technologies contained in each data set, the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) was also evaluated, according to published cost, performance, and fuel assumptions.

Tidball, R.; Bluestein, J.; Rodriguez, N.; Knoke, S.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

revenues | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

revenues revenues Dataset Summary Description The data included in this submission is United States Department of Transportation (DOT) data on rates and revenue statistics up to 1995. The data includes state motor-fuel tax receipts, 1919-1995, state motor fuel taxes and related receipts, 1950-1995, and state and federal motor fuel tax rates, 1919-1995 The data is presented in .xlsx format. Source DOT Date Released Unknown Date Updated Unknown Keywords DOT highway motor vehicles rates revenues Data application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon State motor-fuel tax receipts, 1919-1995 (xlsx, 13.8 KiB) application/vnd.openxmlformats-officedocument.spreadsheetml.sheet icon State motor fuel taxes and related receipts, 1950-1995 (xlsx, 78.5 KiB)

49

Integration of Variable Generation and Cost-Causation (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Variable renewable energy generation sources, such as wind and solar energy, provide benefits such as reduced environmental impact, zero fuel consumption, and low and stable costs. Advances in both technologies can reduce capital costs and provide significant control capabilities. However, their variability and uncertainty - which change with weather conditions, time of day, and season - can cause an increase in power system operating costs compared to a fully controllable power plant. Although a number of studies have assessed integration costs, calculating them correctly is challenging because it is difficult to accurately develop a baseline scenario without variable generation that properly accounts for the energy value. It is also difficult to appropriately allocate costs given the complex, nonlinear interactions between resources and loads.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Transportation in the Balance: A Comparative Analysis of Costs, User Revenues, and Subsidies for Highway, Air, and High Speed Rail Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transportation than air or HSR, but the opportunities to recover some of these social coststransportation modes in dollar cost per passenger kilometer traveled, some public subsidy is justified on the basis of lower social costs,transportation modes in dollar cost per passenger kilometer traveled, some public subsidy is justified on the basis of lower social costs,

Chan, Evelyn; Kanafani, Adib; Canetti, Thomas

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Regional comparison of nuclear and fossil electric power generation costs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear's main disadvantages are its high capital investment cost and uncertainty in schedule compared with alternatives. Nuclear plant costs continue to rise whereas coal plant investment costs are staying relative steady. Based on average experience, nuclear capital investment costs are nearly double those of coal-fired generation plants. The capital investment cost disadvantage of nuclear is balanced by its fuel cost advantages. New base load nuclear power plants were projected to be competitive with coal-fired plants in most regions of the country. Nuclear power costs wre projected to be significantly less (10% or more) than coal-fired power costs in the South Atlantic region. Coal-fired plants were projected to have a significant economic advantage over nuclear plants in the Central and North Central regions. In the remaining seven regions, the levelized cost of power from either option was projected to be within 10%. Uncertainties in future costs of materials, services, and financing affect the relative economics of the nuclear and coal options significantly. 10 figures.

Bowers, H.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Background - Revenue Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Revenue Collection Revenue Collection The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) collects Federal fuel taxes from large oil companies or large oil distribution firms with storage facilities prior to distribution of the fuels to customers. The Federal fuel taxes are imposed when the fuel is first removed from bulk storage and sold. Although these taxes are "passed on" to the individual purchaser, data at the individual purchaser level are simply not available. Additional Federal heavy vehicle non-fuel-based fees include (1) the retail sales excise tax on tractors and trailers, (2) the tax on heavy vehicle tire sales, and (3) the heavy vehicle-use tax. Truck registration was once used as a proxy for truck taxes, but was rejected because it did not accurately reflect on-highway usage in a particular State. In fact, the State where the heavy vehicle and/or tires are purchased is not necessarily the State in which these purchases will be used.

53

On-site generated nitrogen cuts cost of underbalanced drilling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of on-site generated nitrogen, instead of liquid nitrogen, has reduced the cost of drilling underbalanced horizontal wells in Canada and the western US. Because nitrogen is inert and inflammable, it is the preferred gas for underbalanced drilling. Nitrogen can be supplied for oil field use by three different methods: cryogenic liquid separation, pressure swing adsorption, and hollow fiber membranes. The selection of nitrogen supply from one of these methods depends on the cost of delivered nitrogen, the required flow rates and pressure, the required nitrogen purity, and the availability and reliability of the equipment for nitrogen generation. These three methods are described, as well as the required equipment.

Downey, R.A. [Energy Ingenuity Co., Englewood, CO (United States)

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

54

The revenue imperative  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I contend that the revenue imperative, the government's acute need for additional funds, governed Civil War fiscal policy. My thesis questions the prevalent "Beard-Hacker thesis" that asserts the Republican administration purposefully inaugurated an era of "industrial-capitalism" through its business-friendly policies. The Republicans reactively, rather than proactively, inaugurated a system of national internal taxation to meet the unexpected and unprecedented expenses incurred in fighting the war. Further, by reviewing the tariff history of the antebellum era, I find that the revenue imperative, more than a desire to impose a "protectionist" or "free trade" doctrine, motivated changes in antebellum tariff legislation.

Flaherty, Jane

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Alternative methods of modeling wind generation using production costing models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper examines the methods of incorporating wind generation in two production costing models: one is a load duration curve (LDC) based model and the other is a chronological-based model. These two models were used to evaluate the impacts of wind generation on two utility systems using actual collected wind data at two locations with high potential for wind generation. The results are sensitive to the selected wind data and the level of benefits of wind generation is sensitive to the load forecast. The total production cost over a year obtained by the chronological approach does not differ significantly from that of the LDC approach, though the chronological commitment of units is more realistic and more accurate. Chronological models provide the capability of answering important questions about wind resources which are difficult or impossible to address with LDC models.

Milligan, M.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Pang, C.K. [P Plus Corp., Cupertino, CA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercury. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

DRENNEN, THOMAS E.; KAMERY, WILLIAM

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim).  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electricity Generation Cost Simulation Model (GenSim) is a user-friendly, high-level dynamic simulation model that calculates electricity production costs for variety of electricity generation technologies, including: pulverized coal, gas combustion turbine, gas combined cycle, nuclear, solar (PV and thermal), and wind. The model allows the user to quickly conduct sensitivity analysis on key variables, including: capital, O&M, and fuel costs; interest rates; construction time; heat rates; and capacity factors. The model also includes consideration of a wide range of externality costs and pollution control options for carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur dioxide, and mercuty. Two different data sets are included in the model; one from the US. Department of Energy (DOE) and the other from Platt's Research Group. Likely users of this model include executives and staff in the Congress, the Administration and private industry (power plant builders, industrial electricity users and electric utilities). The model seeks to improve understanding of the economic viability of various generating technologies and their emissions trade-offs. The base case results, using the DOE data, indicate that in the absence of externality costs, or renewable tax credits, pulverized coal and gas combined cycle plants are the least cost alternatives at 3.7 and 3.5 cents/kwhr, respectively. A complete sensitivity analysis on fuel, capital, and construction time shows that these results coal and gas are much more sensitive to assumption about fuel prices than they are to capital costs or construction times. The results also show that making nuclear competitive with coal or gas requires significant reductions in capital costs, to the $1000/kW level, if no other changes are made. For renewables, the results indicate that wind is now competitive with the nuclear option and is only competitive with coal and gas for grid connected applications if one includes the federal production tax credit of 1.8cents/kwhr.

Kamery, William (Hobart and William Smith Colleges, Geneva, NY); Baker, Arnold Barry; Drennen, Thomas E.

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Updated Capital Cost Estimates Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants April 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants ii This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

59

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: Jordan Macknick

60

New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

form form View source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: New Zealand Interactive Electricity Generation Cost Model 2010 Agency/Company /Organization: New Zealand Energy Authority Sector: Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.med.govt.nz/templates/MultipageDocumentTOC____45553.aspx Country: New Zealand Cost: Free Australia and New Zealand Coordinates: -40.900557°, 174.885971°

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Avoiding Distribution System Upgrade Costs Using Distributed Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

PNNL, in cooperation with three utilities, developed a database and methodology to analyze and characterize the avoided costs of Distributed Generation (DG) deployment as an alternative to traditional distribution system investment. After applying a number of screening criteria to the initial set of 307 cases, eighteen were selected for detailed analysis. Alternative DG investment scenarios were developed for these cases to permit capital, operation, maintenance, and fuel costs to be identified and incorporated into the analysis. The customer-owned backup power generator option was also investigated. The results of the analysis of the 18 cases show that none yielded cost savings under the alternative DG scenarios. However, the DG alternative systems were configured using very restrictive assumptions concerning reliability, peak rating, engine types and acceptable fuel. In particular it was assumed that the DG alternative in each case must meet the reliability required of conventional distribution systems (99.91% reliability). The analysis was further constrained by a requirement that each substation meet the demands placed upon it by a one in three weather occurrence. To determine if, by relaxing these requirements, the DG alternative might be more viable, one project was re-examined. The 99.91% reliability factor was still assumed for normal operating conditions but redundancy required to maintain reliability was relaxed for the relatively few hours every three years where extreme weather caused load to exceed present substation capacity. This resulted in the deferment of capital investment until later years and reduced the number of engines required for the project. The cost of both the conventional and DG alternative also dropped because the centralized power generation, variable O&M, and DG fuels costs were calculated based on present load requirements in combination with long-term forecasts of load growth, as opposed to load requirements plus a buffer based on predictions of extraordinary weather conditions. Application of the relaxed set of assumptions reduced the total cost of the DG alternative by roughly 57 percent from $7.0 million to $3.0 million. The reduction, however, did not change the overall result of the analysis, as the cost of the conventional distribution system upgrade alternative remained lower at $1.7 million. This paper also explores the feasibility of using a system of backup generators to defer investment in distribution system infrastructure. Rather than expanding substation capacity at substations experiencing slow load growth rates, PNNL considered a scenario where diesel generators were installed on location at customers participating in a program designed to offer additional power security and reliability to the customer and connection to the grid. The backup generators, in turn, could be used to meet peak demand for a limited number of hours each year, thus deferring distribution system investment. Data from an existing program at one of the three participating utilities was used to quantify the costs associated with the backup generator scenario. The results of the customer owned backup power generator analysis showed that in all cases the nominal cost of the DG scenario is more than the nominal cost of the base-case conventional distribution system upgrade scenario. However, in two of the cases the total present value costs of the alternative backup generator scenarios were between 15 and 22% less than those for the conventional scenarios. Overall, the results of the study offer considerable encouragement that the use of DG systems can defer conventional distribution system upgrades under the right conditions and when the DG configurations are intelligently designed. Using existing customer-owned DG to defer distribution system upgrades appears to be an immediate commercially-viable opportunity.

Schienbein, Lawrence A.; Balducci, Patrick J.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Brown, Daryl R.; DeSteese, John G.; Speer, Gregory A.

2004-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

62

Cost and schedule reduction for next-generation Candu  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AECL has developed a suite of technologies for Candu{sup R} reactors that enable the next step in the evolution of the Candu family of heavy-water-moderated fuel-channel reactors. These technologies have been combined in the design for the Advanced Candu Reactor TM1 (ACRTM), AECL's next generation Candu power plant. The ACR design builds extensively on the existing Candu experience base, but includes innovations, in design and in delivery technology, that provide very substantial reductions in capital cost and in project schedules. In this paper, main features of next generation design and delivery are summarized, to provide the background basis for the cost and schedule reductions that have been achieved. In particular the paper outlines the impact of the innovative design steps for ACR: - Selection of slightly enriched fuel bundle design; - Use of light water coolant in place of traditional Candu heavy water coolant; - Compact core design with unique reactor physics benefits; - Optimized coolant and turbine system conditions. In addition to the direct cost benefits arising from efficiency improvement, and from the reduction in heavy water, the next generation Candu configuration results in numerous additional indirect cost benefits, including: - Reduction in number and complexity of reactivity mechanisms; - Reduction in number of heavy water auxiliary systems; - Simplification in heat transport and its support systems; - Simplified human-machine interface. The paper also describes the ACR approach to design for constructability. The application of module assembly and open-top construction techniques, based on Candu and other worldwide experience, has been proven to generate savings in both schedule durations and overall project cost, by reducing premium on-site activities, and by improving efficiency of system and subsystem assembly. AECL's up-to-date experience in the use of 3-D CADDS and related engineering tools has also been proven to reduce both engineering and construction costs through more efficient work planning and use of materials, through reduced re-work and through more precise configuration management. Full-scale exploitation of AECL's electronic engineering and project management tools enables further reductions in cost. The Candu fuel-channel reactor type offers inherent manufacturing and construction advantages through the application of a simple, low-pressure low-temperature reactor vessel along with modular fuel channel technology. This leads to cost benefits and total project schedule benefits. As a result, the targets which AECL has set for replication units - overnight capital cost of $1000 US/kW and total project schedule (engineering/manufacturing/construction/commissioning) of 48 months, have been shown to be achievable for the reference NG Candu design. (authors)

Hopwood, J.M.; Yu, S.; Pakan, M.; Soulard, M. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, 2251 Speakman Drive, Mississauga, Ontario, L5K 1B2 (Canada)

2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Distributed Generation System Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector August 2013 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the Buildings Sector i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

64

Electric sales and revenue 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1996. 16 figs., 20 tabs.

NONE

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Alliance revenue management in practice : techniques and simulation analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The primary motivations for the formation of airline alliances have been to increase revenues and decrease costs for alliance partners. A major advantage comes through increase in the number of destinations served by an ...

Jain, Himanshu, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

New low cost IGCC designs for competitive power generation  

SciTech Connect

Design studies of coal based 450 MW new IGCC power plants reveal their ability to compete in today's power generation market. Single train unit designs coupled with significant improvements in IGCC net output and efficiency have brought down the installed costs to the range of 850--1,000 $/kW and net thermal efficiency up to 43--47%. These improvements are shown to result from IGCC design configurations integrating new generation gas turbine combined cycles with High Pressure Texaco Gasification Technology and Elevated Pressure Air Separation Units.

Brdar, D.R.; Depuy, R.A.; Gulko, G.; Jandrisevits, M.; Paolino, J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Low cost high performance generator technology program. Addendum report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a system weight, efficiency, and size analysis which was performed on the 500 W(e) low cost high performance generator (LCHPG) are presented. The analysis was performed in an attempt to improve system efficiency and specific power over those presented in June 1975, System Design Study Report TES-SNSO-3-25. Heat source volume, configuration, and safety as related to the 500 W(e) LCHPG are also discussed. (RCK)

Not Available

1975-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

other than distributed generation. The cost reductionsWind Solar Thermal Photovoltaic Distributed Generation-Base Distributed Generation-Peak D Vintage PLANT TYPE C

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Electric sales and revenue 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Electric Power Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the US. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1997. 16 figs., 17 tabs.

NONE

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Electric sales and revenue 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Sales and Revenue is prepared by the Coal and Electric Data and Renewables Division; Office of Coal, Nuclear, Electric and Alternate Fuels; Energy Information Administration (EIA); US Department of Energy. Information is provided on electricity sales, associated revenue, average revenue per kilowatthour sold, and number of consumers throughout the United States. The data provided in the Electric Sales and Revenue are presented at the national, Census division, State, and electric utility levels. The information is based on annual data reported by electric utilities for the calendar year ending December 31, 1994.

NONE

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Next-Generation Low-Cost Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on Facebook Tweet about SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on Twitter Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on Google Bookmark SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on Delicious Rank SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on Digg Find More places to share SunShot Initiative: Next-Generation Low-Cost Reflector on AddThis.com... Concentrating Solar Power Systems Components Competitive Awards CSP Research & Development Thermal Storage CSP Recovery Act Baseload CSP SunShot Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative CSP Heat Integration for Baseload Renewable Energy Deployment

72

Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

costs, the levelized cost ... 4 These results do not include targeted tax credits such as the production or investment tax credit available for some technologies.

73

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Electricity Generation Plants  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This paper provides information on the cost of building new electricity power plants. These cost estimates are critical inputs in the development of energy projections and analyses.

Michael Leff

2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

74

Marginal cost of electricity 1980-1995: an approximation based on the cost of new coal and nuclear generating plants  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimates of the costs of new coal and nuclear base-load generating capacity which is either currently under construction or planned by utilities to meet their load-growth expectations during the period from 1980 to 1995. These capacity cost estimates are used in conjunction with announced plant capacities and commercial-operation dates to develop state-level estimates of busbar costs of electricity. From these projected busbar costs, aggregated estimates of electricity costs at the retail level are developed for DOE Regions. The introductory chapter explains the rationale for using the cost of electricity from base-load plants to approximate the marginal cost of electricity. The next major section of the report outlines the methodology and major assumptions used. This is followed by a detailed description of the empirical analysis, including the equations used for each of the cost components. The fourth section presents the resultant marginal cost estimates.

Nieves, L.A.; Patton, W.P.; Harrer, B.J.; Emery, J.C.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Forecasting for airline network revenue management : revenue and competitive impacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airline revenue management entails protecting enough seats for late-booking, high-fare passengers while still selling seats which would have otherwise gone empty at discounted fares to earlier-booking customers. In the ...

Zickus, Jeffrey S.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Cost Analysis of Proposed National Regulation of Coal Combustion Residuals from the Electric Generating Industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This analysis quantifies the potential cost to the coal-fired electric generation industry from EPA's proposed rule on the disposal of coal combustion residuals. It includes an assessment of the incremental compliance costs of the Subtitle C proposed regulatory option. Costs for this analysis were developed at the individual generating unit and plant level and aggregated to develop a national industry cost estimate. The analytical model used to estimate the costs utilizes a Monte Carlo framework to accou...

2010-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

77

Private Activity Revenue Bonds (Maryland)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Private Activity Revenue Bonds are available in the form of both taxable bonds and tax-exempt bonds. Both types of bonds provide access to long-term capital markets for fixed asset financing....

78

Revenue management: models and methods  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Revenue management is the collection of strategies and tactics firms use to scientifically manage demand for their products and services. The practice has grown from its origins in airlines to its status today as a mainstream business practice ...

Kalyan T. Talluri; Garrett J. van Ryzin; Itir Z. Karaesmen; Gustavo J. Vulcano

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation sources Home > Groups > DOE Wind Vision Community In the US DOEnergy, are there calcuations for real cost of energy considering the negative, socialized costs of all commercial large scale power generation soruces ? I am talking about the cost of mountain top removal for coal mined that way, the trip to the power plant, the sludge pond or ash heap, the cost of the gas out of the stack, toxificaiton of the lakes and streams, plant decommision costs. For nuclear yiou are talking about managing the waste in perpetuity. The plant decomission costs and so on. What I am tring to get at is the 'real cost' per MWh or KWh for the various sources ? I suspect that the costs commonly quoted for fossil fuels and nucelar are

80

Local Government Revenue Bonds (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Government Revenue Bonds (Montana) Government Revenue Bonds (Montana) Local Government Revenue Bonds (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Commercial Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Bond Program Provider Any interested county or municipality. Limited obligation local government bonds ("special revenue bonds") may be issued for qualified electric energy generation facilities, including those powered by renewables. These bonds generally are secured by the project itself. The taxing power or general credit of the government may not be used to secure the bonds. Local governments may not operate any project

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Modeling of Cost Curves 1.0 Costs of Generating Electrical Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

production costs. Some typical average costs of fuel are given in the following table for coal, petroleum [1] Petroleum [2] Natural Gas [3] All Fossil Fuels Receipts (Billion BTU) Average Cost Avg. Sulfur fuel, kerosene, petroleum coke (converted to liquid petroleum, see Technical Notes for conversion

McCalley, James D.

82

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types of power plants? EIA has historical data on the average annual operation, maintenance, ...

83

How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Reserves, production, prices, employ- ment and productivity, distribution, ... How much does it cost to generate electricity with different types of power plants?

84

Quantifying the system balancing cost when wind energy is incorporated into electricity generation system.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Incorporation of wind energy into the electricity generation system requires a detailed analysis of wind speed in order to minimize system balancing cost and avoid (more)

Issaeva, Natalia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Low-Cost High-Pressure Hydrogen Generator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electrolysis of water, particularly in conjunction with renewable energy sources, is potentially a cost-effective and environmentally friendly method of producing hydrogen at dispersed forecourt sites, such as automotive fueling stations. The primary feedstock for an electrolyzer is electricity, which could be produced by renewable sources such as wind or solar that do not produce carbon dioxide or other greenhouse gas emissions. However, state-of-the-art electrolyzer systems are not economically competitive for forecourt hydrogen production due to their high capital and operating costs, particularly the cost of the electricity used by the electrolyzer stack. In this project, Giner Electrochemical Systems, LLC (GES) developed a low cost, high efficiency proton-exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis system for hydrogen production at moderate pressure (300 to 400 psig). The electrolyzer stack operates at differential pressure, with hydrogen produced at moderate pressure while oxygen is evolved at near-atmospheric pressure, reducing the cost of the water feed and oxygen handling subsystems. The project included basic research on catalysts and membranes to improve the efficiency of the electrolysis reaction as well as development of advanced materials and component fabrication methods to reduce the capital cost of the electrolyzer stack and system. The project culminated in delivery of a prototype electrolyzer module to the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for testing at the National Wind Technology Center. Electrolysis cell efficiency of 72% (based on the lower heating value of hydrogen) was demonstrated using an advanced high-strength membrane developed in this project. This membrane would enable the electrolyzer system to exceed the DOE 2012 efficiency target of 69%. GES significantly reduced the capital cost of a PEM electrolyzer stack through development of low cost components and fabrication methods, including a 60% reduction in stack parts count. Economic analysis indicates that hydrogen could be produced for $3.79 per gge at an electricity cost of $0.05/kWh by the lower-cost PEM electrolyzer developed in this project, assuming high-volume production of large-scale electrolyzer systems.

Cropley, Cecelia C.; Norman, Timothy J.

2008-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

86

Distributed Generation System Characteristics and Costs in the...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

on-site generation of energy, often electricity from renewable energy systems such as solar photovoltaics (PV) and small wind turbines. Many factors influence the market for...

87

Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

88

LBNL-52559 Learning and Cost Reductions for Generating  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) incorporates endogenous learning into its cost calculations for power plants. The parameters that affect reductions due to learning for each of 21 power plants types. Technological learning is represented two ways, solar thermal, and photovoltaic plants. The initial TOFs are shown in Table 3. In NEMS, the first plant

89

NREL Sheds Light on Integration Costs of Variable Generation and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, such as wind and solar energy, provide benefits such as reduced environmental impact, lack of fuel consumption, and low and stable costs. However, their variability and uncertainty--which can change with weather and not unique to wind and solar. Key Result Operational changes--such as wind and solar forecasting, larger

90

Dynamic Analysis of Hybrid Energy Systems under Flexible Operation and Variable Renewable Generation -- Part I: Dynamic Performance Analysis and Part II: Dynamic Cost  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic analysis of hybrid energy systems (HES) under flexible operation and variable renewable generation is considered in order to better understand various challenges and opportunities associated with the high system variability arising from the integration of renewable energy into the power grid. Unique consequences are addressed by devising advanced HES solutions in which multiple forms of energy commodities, such as electricity and chemical products, may be exchanged. Dynamic models of various unit operations are developed and integrated within two different HES options. One HES option, termed traditional, produces electricity only and consists of a primary heat generator (PHG) (e.g., a small modular reactor), a steam turbine generator, a wind farm, and a battery storage. The other HES option, termed advanced, includes not only the components present in the traditional option but also a chemical plant complex to repurpose excess energy for non-electricity services, such as for the production of chemical goods (e.g., transportation fuel). In either case, a given HES is connected to the power grid at a point of common coupling and requested to deliver a certain electricity generation profile as dictated by a regional power grid operator based on a predicted demand curve. Dynamic analysis of these highly-coupled HES are performed to identify their key dynamical properties and limitations and to prescribe solutions for best managing and mitigating the high variability introduced from incorporating renewable energy into the energy mix. A comparative dynamic cost analysis is also conducted to determine best HES options. The cost function includes a set of metrics for computing fixed costs, such as fixed operations and maintenance (O&M) and overnight capital costs, and also variable operational costs, such as cost of variability, variable O&M cost, and cost of environmental impact, together with revenues. Assuming different options for implementing PHG (e.g., natural gas, coal, nuclear), preliminary results identify the level of renewable penetration at which a given advanced HES option (e.g., a nuclear hybrid) becomes increasingly more economical than a traditional electricity-only generation solution. Conditions are also revealed under which carbon resources may be better utilized as carbon sources for chemical production rather than as combustion material for electricity generation.

Humberto E. Garcia; Amit Mohanty; Wen-Chiao Lin; Robert S. Cherry

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

NUFinancials Revenue / Cash Receipt Ticket (CRT)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Troubleshoot CRT errors Related Resources Refer to your revenue budget ­ or to the Office of Budget

Shull, Kenneth R.

92

On-Site Diesel Generation- How You Can Reduce Your Energy Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Interruptible power rates, Utility special rate negotiations, and the emergence of a spot electrical power market all can lead to lower industrial energy costs. The installation of low cost on-site diesel powered generation, or the proposed intention to install, provides the means for obtaining lower purchased power costs. The functionality of a standby power system and its inherent value in the coming free market purchase of electrical energy are added benefits. Project feasibility, conceptual design, on-site generation facility requirements, interconnection requirements, and operation and maintenance costs will be examined. Installation costs in the range of $350 to $400 per KW and operating costs of approximately $0.06 to $0.07 per kWhr compared to purchased power rates determine the feasibility of an on-site generation system. In some cases avoided demand charges offer an opportunity for savings such that special rates are not needed for a feasible project. Depending on the manufacturer, low capital cost diesel generators are available in 1000 to 2000 KW blocks. Capacity requirements determine the number of engines required. Large capacity installations are somewhat restricted by voltage and current ratings. Some variants for multiple engine generator installations will yield greater reliability or lower costs depending on objectives. Specific requirements for basic building blocks of an on-site generation system will be examined as well as an example of a 5,500 KW installation. IEA provides an alternative to installing and operating an on-site generation system. IEA owns and operates diesel standby generation systems for customers, with responsibility for all maintenance and operation as well as associated costs. This allows customers to focus on core business, not the generation of electrical energy.

Charles, D.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Tradeoffs between revenue enhancements and emissions reductions with energy storage-coupled photovoltaics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy storage has the potential to dramatically change the operation of photovoltaics by allowing for a delay between generation and use. This flexibility has the potential to impact both the revenue from generating ...

Heidel, Timothy David

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Hybrid forecasting for airline revenue management in semi-restricted fare structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent years, the airline industry has seen diminished performance of traditional Revenue Management (RM) systems largely due to the growth of Low Cost Carriers and the increased use of their "simplified" fare structures. ...

Reyes, Michael H. (Michael Hamilton)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Effect of Corruption on Tax Revenues in the Middle East  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Working Paper should not be reported as representing the views of the IMF. The views expressed in this Working Paper are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent those of the IMF or IMF policy. Working Papers describe research in progress by the authors and are published to elicit comments and to further debate. This study estimates the impact of corruption on the revenue-generating capacity of different tax categories in the Middle East. We find that the low revenue collection as a share of GDP there compared to other middle-income regions is due in part to corruption, and certain taxes are more affected than others. Taxes that require frequent interaction between the tax authority and individuals, such as taxes on international trade, seem to be more affected by corruption than most other types of taxation. This suggests that if governments need to raise more tax revenues in a way that minimizes distortions and maximizes social welfare, they should implement reforms that either reduce corruption or raise revenues from tax categories that are less susceptible to corruption. Possible reforms of the revenue system and

Patrick A. Imam; Davina F. Jacobs; International Monetary; Fund Wp; Prepared Patrick; A. Imam; Davina F. Jacobs; Thanos Catsambas

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Than 4  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Than 4 cents per kWh - Without New Dams Hydropower Upgrades to Yield Added Generation at Average Costs Less Than 4 cents per kWh - Without New Dams November 4, 2009 - 12:00am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu today announced up to $30.6 million in Recovery Act funding for the selection of seven hydropower projects that modernize hydropower infrastructure by increasing efficiency and reducing environmental impacts at existing facilities. The expanded hydro generation projects have estimated incremental costs of less than 4 cents per kWh on average. The selections announced today will deploy innovative technologies such as high-efficiency, fish-friendly turbines, improved water intakes, and

97

Low Cost High Performance Generator Technology Program. Volume 5. Heat Pipe Topical  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress towards the development of a heat pipe for use in the Low Cost High Performance Thermoelectric Generator Program is reported for the period May 15, 1975 through June 1975. (TFD)

Not Available

1975-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Short-run interfuel substitution in West European power generation : a restriced cost function approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyzes short-run interfuel substitution between fossil fuels in West European power generation. The problem is studied within a restricted translog cost model, which is estimated by pooling time-series data ...

Sderholm, Patrik

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

General Equilibrium, Electricity Generation Technologies and the Cost of Carbon Abatement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity generation is a major contributor to carbon dioxide emissions, and a key determinant of abatement costs. Ex-ante assessments of carbon policies mainly rely on either of two modeling paradigms: (i) partial ...

Lanz, Bruno, 1980-

100

Low-Cost Superconducting Wire for Wind Generators: High Performance, Low Cost Superconducting Wires and Coils for High Power Wind Generators  

SciTech Connect

REACT Project: The University of Houston will develop a low-cost, high-current superconducting wire that could be used in high-power wind generators. Superconducting wire currently transports 600 times more electric current than a similarly sized copper wire, but is significantly more expensive. The University of Houstons innovation is based on engineering nanoscale defects in the superconducting film. This could quadruple the current relative to todays superconducting wires, supporting the same amount of current using 25% of the material. This would make wind generators lighter, more powerful and more efficient. The design could result in a several-fold reduction in wire costs and enable their commercial viability of high-power wind generators for use in offshore applications.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

102

Staff Draft Report. Comparative Cost of California Central Station Electricity Generation Technologies.  

SciTech Connect

This Energy Commission staff draft report presents preliminary levelized cost estimates for several generic central-station electricity generation technologies. California has traditionally adopted energy policies that balance the goals of supporting economic development, improving environmental quality and promoting resource diversity. In order to be effective, such policies must be based on comprehensive and timely gathering of information. With this goal in mind, the purpose of the report is to provide comparative levelized cost estimates for a set of renewable (e.g., solar) and nonrenewable (e.g., natural gas-fired) central-station electricity generation resources, based on each technology's operation and capital cost. Decision-makers and others can use this information to compare the generic cost to build specific technology. These costs are not site specific. If a developer builds a specific power plant at a specific location, the cost of siting that plant at that specific location must be considered. The Energy Commission staff also identifies the type of fuel used by each technology and a description of the manner in which the technology operates in the generation system. The target audiences of this report are both policy-makers and anyone wishing to understand some of the fundamental attributes that are generally considered when evaluating the cost of building and operating different electricity generation technology resources. These costs do not reflect the total cost to consumers of adding these technologies to a resources portfolio. These technology characterizations do not capture all of the system, environmental or other relevant attributes that would typically be needed by a portfolio manager to conduct a comprehensive ''comparative value analysis''. A portfolio analysis will vary depending on the particular criteria and measurement goals of each study. For example, some form of firm capacity is typically needed with wind generation to support system reliability. [DJE-2005

Badr, Magdy; Benjamin, Richard

2003-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

103

Financing Distributed Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper introduces the engineer who is undertaking distributed generation projects to a wide range of financing options. Distributed generation systems (such as internal combustion engines, small gas turbines, fuel cells and photovoltaics) all require an initial investment, which is recovered over time through revenues or savings. An understanding of the cost of capital and financing structures helps the engineer develop realistic expectations and not be offended by the common requirements of financing organizations. This paper discusses several mechanisms for financing distributed generation projects: appropriations; debt (commercial bank loan); mortgage; home equity loan; limited partnership; vendor financing; general obligation bond; revenue bond; lease; Energy Savings Performance Contract; utility programs; chauffage (end-use purchase); and grants. The paper also discusses financial strategies for businesses focusing on distributed generation: venture capital; informal investors (''business angels''); bank and debt financing; and the stock market.

Walker, A.

2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

104

Financing Distributed Generation  

SciTech Connect

This paper introduces the engineer who is undertaking distributed generation projects to a wide range of financing options. Distributed generation systems (such as internal combustion engines, small gas turbines, fuel cells and photovoltaics) all require an initial investment, which is recovered over time through revenues or savings. An understanding of the cost of capital and financing structures helps the engineer develop realistic expectations and not be offended by the common requirements of financing organizations. This paper discusses several mechanisms for financing distributed generation projects: appropriations; debt (commercial bank loan); mortgage; home equity loan; limited partnership; vendor financing; general obligation bond; revenue bond; lease; Energy Savings Performance Contract; utility programs; chauffage (end-use purchase); and grants. The paper also discusses financial strategies for businesses focusing on distributed generation: venture capital; informal investors (''business angels''); bank and debt financing; and the stock market.

Walker, A.

2001-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

105

IRS Internal Revenue Bulletin | Data.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

digital@treasury.gov Unique Identifier TREAS-4431 Public Access Level public Data Dictionary http:www.irs.govapppicklistlistinternalRevenueBulletins.html Data Download URL...

106

Algorithms for revenue metering and their evaluation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Power components are measured for revenue metering and other purposes such as power control and power factor compensation. The definitions of the power components (active, (more)

Martinez-Lagunes, Rodrigo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)  

SciTech Connect

This report describes how Learning-by-Doing (LBD) is implemented endogenously in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for generating plants. LBD is experiential learning that correlates to a generating technology's capacity growth. The annual amount of Learning-by-Doing affects the annual overnight cost reduction. Currently, there is no straightforward way to integrate and make sense of all the diffuse information related to the endogenous learning calculation in NEMS. This paper organizes the relevant information from the NEMS documentation, source code, input files, and output files, in order to make the model's logic more accessible. The end results are shown in three ways: in a simple spreadsheet containing all the parameters related to endogenous learning; by an algorithm that traces how the parameters lead to cost reductions; and by examples showing how AEO 2004 forecasts the reduction of overnight costs for generating technologies over time.

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

108

Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Amonix, Inc. Amonix, Inc. Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation Amonix, Inc. A series of brief fact sheet on various topics including:Low Cost High Concentration PV Systems for Utility Power Generation,High Efficiency Concentrating Photovoltaic Power System,Reaching Grid Parity Using BP Solar Crystalline Silicon Technology, Fully Integrated Building Science Solutions for Residential and Commercial Photovoltaic Energy Generation,A Value Chain Partnership to Accelerate U.S. Photovoltaic Industry Growth,AC Module PV System,Flexible Organic Polymer-Based PV For Building Integrated Commercial Applications,Flexable Integrated PV System,Delivering Grid-Parity Solar Electricity On Flat Commercial Rooftops,Fully Automated Systems Technology, Concentrating Solar Panels: Bringing the Highest Power and Lowest Cost to

109

Analysis of the Department of Energy's Clinch River Breeder Reactor cost estimate  

SciTech Connect

Much of the current congressional debate about the Clinch River Breeder Reactor (CRBR) centers around the estimated cost of designing, constructing, and operating it for a 5-year demonstration period. The Department of Energy (DOE) recently linked the revenue-generating potential of the CRBR beyond the demonstration period to the justification for continued funding. GAO presents information that points out many uncertainties in DOE's estimates of revenue and cost. GAO believes that because these estimates are based on numerous assumptions and calculations concerning events as far as 37 years in the future, they should be viewed with caution. Changes in the underlying assumptions could produce wide variance in the cost estimates. Further, GAO points out that CRBR is a research and development project and that judging its merits solely on cost and revenue estimates projected far into the future may not be appropriate.

Bowsher, C.A.

1982-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

110

DOE Receives $57.2 Million in Revenue Sharing Agreement | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Receives $57.2 Million in Revenue Sharing Agreement Receives $57.2 Million in Revenue Sharing Agreement DOE Receives $57.2 Million in Revenue Sharing Agreement February 3, 2009 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) has received a payment of $57.2 million from the Dakota Gasification Company (DGC), a subsidiary of Basin Electric Power Generation, pursuant to the revenue sharing provision of an Asset Purchase Agreement among DOE, DGC and Basin. The current payment of $57.2 million brings the total to $380 million of revenue sharing payments DOE has received from the sale of synthetic natural gas produced from the Great Plains Synfuels Plant. The Great Plains Synfuels Plant has been successfully operated for more than 20 years and has brought significant opportunities to study and benefit from the

111

Cost of New Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) Coal Electricity Generation...................... 17  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Future demand for electricity can be met with a range of technologies, with fuels including coal, nuclear, natural gas, biomass and other renewables, as well as with energy efficiency and demand management approaches. Choices among options will depend on factors including capital cost, fuel cost, market and regulatory uncertainty, greenhouse gas emissions, and other environmental impacts. This paper estimates the costs of new electricity generation. The approach taken here is to provide a transparent and verifiable analysis based mainly on recent data provided

Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas; Seth Borin; Todd Levin; Valerie M. Thomas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Design of a low-cost thermoacoustic electricity generator and its experimental verification  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the design and testing of a low cost thermoacoustic generator. A travelling-wave thermoacoustic engine with a configuration of a looped-tube resonator is designed and constructed to convert heat to acoustic power. A commercially available, low-cost loudspeaker is adopted as the alternator to convert the engine's acoustic power to electricity. The whole system is designed using linear thermoacoustic theory. The optimization of different parts of the thermoacoustic generator, as well as the matching between the thermoacoustic engine and the alternator are discussed in detail. A detailed comparison between the preliminary test results and linear thermoacoustic predictions is provided.

Backhaus, Scott N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Yu, Z [UNIV OF MANCHESTER; Jaworski, A J [UNIV OF MANCHESTER

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

CAES (conventional compressed-air energy storage) plant with steam generation: Preliminary design and cost analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was performed to evaluate the performance and cost characteristics of two alternative CAES-plant concepts which utilize the low-pressure expander's exhaust-gas heat for the generation of steam in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). Both concepts result in increased net-power generation relative to a conventional CAES plant with a recuperator. The HRSG-generated steam produces additional power in either a separate steam-turbine bottoming cycle (CAESCC) or by direct injection into and expansion through the CAES-turboexpander train (CAESSI). The HRSG, which is a proven component of combined-cycle and cogeneration plants, replaces the recuperator of a conventional CAES plant, which has demonstrated the potential for engineering and operating related problems and higher costs than were originally estimated. To enhance the credibility of the results, the analyses performed were based on the performance, operational and cost data of the 110-MW CAES plant currently under construction for the Alabama Electric Cooperative (AEC). The results indicate that CAESCC- and CAESSI-plant concepts are attractive alternatives to the conventional CAES plant with recuperator, providing greater power generation, up to 44-MW relative to the AEC CAES plant, with competitive operating and capital costs. 5 refs., 43 figs., 26 tabs.

Nakhamkin, M.; Swensen, E.C.; Abitante, P.A. (Energy Storage and Power Consultants, Mountainside, NJ (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Robust Controls for Network Revenue Management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Revenue management models traditionally assume that future demand is unknown but can be described by a stochastic process or a probability distribution. Demand is, however, often difficult to characterize, especially in new or nonstationary markets. ... Keywords: network, regret, revenue management, robust optimization, yield management

Georgia Perakis; Guillaume Roels

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Revenue Management and E-Commerce  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We trace the history of revenue management in an effort to illustrate a successful e-commerce model of dynamic, automated sales. Our discourse begins with a brief overview of electronic distribution as practiced in the airline industry, emphasizing the ... Keywords: Revenue management; e-commerce; airline industry

E. Andrew Boyd; Ioana C. Bilegan

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Railway Revenue Management: Overview and Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The railway industry offers similar revenue management opportunities to those found in the airline industry. The railway industry caters for the delivery and management of cargo as well as the transport of passengers. Unlike the airline industry, the railway industry has seen relatively little attention to revenue management problems. We provide an overview of the published literature for both passenger and freight rail revenue management. We include a summary of the some the available models and include some possible extensions. From the existing literature and talks with industry, it is clear that that there is room to exploit revenue management techniques in the railway industry, an industry that has revenues of $60 billion in the US and promises huge growth in Europe in the forthcoming years.

Er Armstrong; Joern Meissner

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Cost Effectiveness of On-Site Chlorine Generation for Chlorine Truck Attack Prevention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A chlorine tank truck attack could cause thousands of fatalities. As a means of preventing chlorine truck attacks, I consider the on-site generation of chlorine or hypochlorite at all U.S. facilities currently receiving chlorine by truck. I develop and ... Keywords: applications, cost-effectiveness, public policy, risk analysis, terrorism, uncertainty

Anthony M. Barrett

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

FUEL CELL SYSTEM ECONOMICS: COMPARING THE COSTS OF GENERATING POWER WITH STATIONARY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

during many months of the year). * Similarly, use of PEM fuel cell waste heat for hot water heating wouldFUEL CELL SYSTEM ECONOMICS: COMPARING THE COSTS OF GENERATING POWER WITH STATIONARY AND MOTOR VEHICLE PEM FUEL CELL SYSTEMS UCD-ITS-RP-04-21 April 2004 by Timothy Lipman University of California

Kammen, Daniel M.

119

Bulk Electricity Generating Technologies This appendix describes the technical characteristics and cost and performance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

foundations complete Start of boiler steel erection to commercial operation Time to complete (single unit factor of 1.10. May 2005 I-10 #12;petrochemical industry for processing of coal and petroleum residues the North American power generation industry. This is attributable to the availability of low- cost natural

120

Revenues from Ancillary Services and the Value of Operational Flexibility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The movement toward competitive regional wholesale power markets is creating the requirement and opportunity for generators to sell ancillary services in addition to energy. Calculation of revenues and net income from these sources is critical to assessing asset values, evaluating investments in order to obtain greater operating flexibility, and determining whether to retire or mothball units. This report reviews the status of ancillary services market development in the United States and Canada, and dem...

2002-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - August...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for August 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short...

122

A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - February...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for February 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short...

123

A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - February...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for February 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short...

124

A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - August...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for August 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short...

125

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for April 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short...

126

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for November 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data...

127

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for July 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short...

128

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for May 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short...

129

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for June 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short...

130

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for August 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short...

131

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for January 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data...

132

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for February 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data...

133

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County...

134

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for September 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data...

135

Single-Leg Airline Revenue Management With Overbooking  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

models that give upper and lower bounds on its optimal expected net revenue. ... then and now, in airline revenue management is to determine how to reserve...

136

Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Central Illinois Pub Serv Co for December 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short...

137

Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Central Illinois Pub Serv Co for January 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short...

138

2012 Revenue for Delivery Service Providers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revenue for Delivery Service Providers" Revenue for Delivery Service Providers" "(Data from form EIA-861 schedule 4C)" ,,,"Revenue (Thousands Dollars)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Pacific Gas & Electric Co","CA","Investor Owned",38657,306699,232366,2843,580565 "San Diego Gas & Electric Co","CA","Investor Owned",1019.1,62400.1,84143.3,0,147562.5 "Southern California Edison Co","CA","Investor Owned",6706,456007,69193,".",531906 "Connecticut Light & Power Co","CT","Investor Owned",362262,514043,100262,6681,983248

139

Journal of Power Sources xxx (2005) xxxxxx Vehicle-to-grid power fundamentals: Calculating capacity and net revenue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As the light vehicle fleet moves to electric drive (hybrid, battery, and fuel cell vehicles), an opportunity opens for vehicle-to-grid (V2G) power. This article defines the three vehicle types that can produce V2G power, and the power markets they can sell into. V2G only makes sense if the vehicle and power market are matched. For example, V2G appears to be unsuitable for baseload powerthe constant round-theclock electricity supplybecause baseload power can be provided more cheaply by large generators, as it is today. Rather, V2Gs greatest near-term promise is for quick-response, high-value electric services. These quick-response electric services are purchased to balance constant fluctuations in load and to adapt to unexpected equipment failures; they account for 510 % of electric cost $ 12 billion per year in the US. This article develops equations to calculate the capacity for grid power from three types of electric drive vehicles. These equations are applied to evaluate revenue and costs for these vehicles to supply electricity to three electric markets (peak power, spinning reserves, and regulation). The results suggest that the engineering rationale and economic motivation for V2G power are compelling. The societal advantages of developing V2G include an additional revenue stream for cleaner vehicles, increased stability and reliability of the electric grid, lower electric system costs, and eventually, inexpensive storage and backup for renewable electricity.

Willett Kempton; Jasna Tomi?

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Cargo revenue management for space logistics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis covers the development of a framework for the application of revenue management, specifically capacity control, to space logistics for use in the optimization of mission cargo allocations, which in turn affect ...

Armar, Nii A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Nuclear electric generation: Political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia. Master`s thesis  

SciTech Connect

Indonesia, the largest archipelagic country with a population the fourth biggest in the world, is now in the process of development. It needs a large quantity of energy electricity to meet the industrial and household demands. The currently available generating capacity is not sufficient to meet the electricity demand for the rapidly growing industries and the increasing population. In order to meet the future demand for electricity, new generating capacity is required to be added to the current capacity. Nuclear electricity generation is one possible alternative to supplement Indonesia`s future demand of electricity. This thesis investigates the possibility of developing nuclear electricity generation in Indonesia, considering the political, social, and economic cost and benefit to Indonesia.

Waliyo

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

An Examination of Avoided Costs in Utah  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cost inpu t assumptions, the Utah Wind Working Group may wish to consider pursuing two other poss ible sources of revenue: renewable energy

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Computing confidence intervals on solution costs for stochastic grid generation expansion problems.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A range of core operations and planning problems for the national electrical grid are naturally formulated and solved as stochastic programming problems, which minimize expected costs subject to a range of uncertain outcomes relating to, for example, uncertain demands or generator output. A critical decision issue relating to such stochastic programs is: How many scenarios are required to ensure a specific error bound on the solution cost? Scenarios are the key mechanism used to sample from the uncertainty space, and the number of scenarios drives computational difficultly. We explore this question in the context of a long-term grid generation expansion problem, using a bounding procedure introduced by Mak, Morton, and Wood. We discuss experimental results using problem formulations independently minimizing expected cost and down-side risk. Our results indicate that we can use a surprisingly small number of scenarios to yield tight error bounds in the case of expected cost minimization, which has key practical implications. In contrast, error bounds in the case of risk minimization are significantly larger, suggesting more research is required in this area in order to achieve rigorous solutions for decision makers.

Woodruff, David L..; Watson, Jean-Paul

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Benchmarking Distributed Generation Cost of Electricity and Characterization of Green House Gas Emission  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Understanding the economic competitiveness and green house gas (GHG) footprint of all energy supply-side options has been identified by EPRI advisors as a key priority. This project benchmarks the cost of electricity and characterizes the GHG footprint of distributed generation (DG) options in various applications. DG technologies include small gas turbines, spark-ignited and diesel internal combustion engines, micro turbines, several types of fuel cells, Stirling engines, and photovoltaic systems.

2009-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

145

Low Cost High Performance Generator Technology Program. Volume 2. Design study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The systems studies directed towards up-rating the performance of an RTG using selenide thermoelectrics and a heat source with improved safety are reported. The resulting generator design, designated LCHPG, exhibits conversion efficiency of greater than 10 percent, a specific power of 3 W/lb., and a cost of $6,000/W(e). In the course of system analyses, the significant development activities required to achieve this performance by the 1980 time period are identified.

Not Available

1975-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Sulphide Precipitation and Ion Exchange Technologies for Cost ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... eliminates residual waste sludge, improves water conservation, generates revenues from wastewater, and delivers overall improvements to the environment .

147

Airline alliance revenue management : improving joint revenues through partner sharing of flight leg opportunity costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Airlines participating in alliances offer code share itineraries (with flight segments operated by different partners) to expand the range of origin-destination combinations offered to passengers, thus increasing market ...

Michel, Alyona

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Electric Utility Rate Design Study: embedded generation costs on a time-of-day basis for Iowa Southern Utilities Company  

SciTech Connect

This report develops a method for determining average embedded generation costs on a time-of-day basis and describes the application of the method to Iowa Southern Utilities. These costs are not allocated to customer classes. Since average embedded costs are composed of the running (or variable) costs and the capital costs, the analysis examines each of these separately. Running costs on a time-of-day basis are determined through the use of a generation dispatch model that reports the loadings by generating unit and the running costs of meeting the load. These costs are reported on an hour-by-hour basis. The dispatch model takes into account the operating characteristics of each unit and the major engineering constraints on a system; e.g., must-run units, minimum up and down time, startup cost. After reviewing several suggested capital-cost allocation procedures, a method is developed that allocates capital costs on a time-of-day basis by using a recontracting-for-capacity procedure that allows capacity to vary by hour for each month. The method results in allocations to customers who benefit from its use. An important and distinguishing feature of this method is that it allows calculation of the costs before rating periods are chosen.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions Through the Use of Virtual Environments  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this multi-phase project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. The project will test the suitability of immersive virtual reality technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups. This report presents the results of the completed project.

Timothy Shaw; Vaugh Whisker

2004-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

150

Advanced gas turbines: The choice for low-cost, environmentally superior electric power generation  

SciTech Connect

In July 1993, the US Department of Energy (DOE) initiated an ambitious 8-year program to advance state-of-the-art gas turbine technology for land-based electric power generation. The program, known as the Advanced Turbine System (ATS) Program, is a joint government/industry program with the objective to demonstrate advanced industrial and utility gas turbine systems by the year 2000. The goals of the ATS Program are to develop gas turbine systems capable of providing low-cost electric power, while maintaining environmental superiority over competing power generation options. A progress report on the ATS Program pertaining to program status at DOE will be presented and reviewed in this paper. The technical challenges, advanced critical technology requirements, and systems designs meeting the goals of the program will be described and discussed.

Zeh, C.M.

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Commercial national accounts program is a gas industry revenue builder  

SciTech Connect

The need for gas distributors to implement revenue-generating strategies is clearly evident in the commercial sector - their fastest growing market. One strategy is A.G.A.'s commercial national accounts marketing program, designed to establish working relationships with national and regional food, hotel, and retail chains and with the firms that design energy systems for them. The program supplies these chains with information on gas industry services and research aimed at increasing energy utilization efficiency. Regular communications and coordinated sales calls by gas utility executives on chain headquarters often produce increased gas sales, even of traditionally all-electric chains, as illustrated by several case histories.

Moskitis, T.L.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Maximizing Cloud Providers Revenues via Energy Aware Allocation Policies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud providers, like Amazon, offer their data centers' computational and storage capacities for lease to paying customers. High electricity consumption, associated with running a data center, not only reflects on its carbon footprint, but also increases the costs of running the data center itself. This paper addresses the problem of maximizing the revenues of Cloud providers by trimming down their electricity costs. As a solution allocation policies which are based on the dynamic powering servers on and off are introduced and evaluated. The policies aim at satisfying the conflicting goals of maximizing the users' experience while minimizing the amount of consumed electricity. The results of numerical experiments and simulations are described, showing that the proposed scheme performs well under different traffic conditions.

Mazzucco, Michele; Deters, Ralph

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds (Kansas) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Industrial Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Kansas Program Type Bond Program Provider Revenue Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bonds are issued by cities and counties for the purchase, construction, improvement or remodeling of a facility for agricultural, commercial, hospital, industrial, natural resources, recreational development or manufacturing purposes. The board of county commissioners of any county or the governing body of any city may approve an exemption of property funded by industrial revenue bonds (IRB's). Some

154

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales -  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

September 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for September 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-09 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place Mississippi Start Date 2008-09-01 End Date 2008-10-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 4960 Residential Sales (MWh) 49913 Residential Consumers 35998 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 2510 Commercial Sales (MWh) 24408 Commercial Consumers 8569 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1308 Industrial Sales (MWh) 17792 Industrial Consumers 19 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 8778 Total Sales (MWh) 92113 Total Consumers 44586 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly

155

Statistical recoupling: A new way to break the link between electric-utility sales and revenues  

SciTech Connect

In 1991, US electric utilities spent almost $1.8 billion on demand-side management (DSM) programs. These programs cut peak demands 5% and reduced electricity sales 1% that year. Utility projections suggest that these reductions will increase to 9% and 3%, respectively, by the year 2001. However, utility DSM efforts vary enormously across the country, concentrated in a few states along the east and west coasts and the upper midwest. To some extent, this concentration is a function of regulatory reforms that remove disincentives to utility shareholders for investments in DSM programs. A key component of these reforms is recovery of the net lost revenues caused by utility DSM programs. These lost revenues occur between rate cases when a utility encourages its customers to improve energy efficiency and cut demand. The reduction in sales means that the utility has less revenue to cover its fixed costs. This report describes a new method, statistical recoupling (SR), that addresses this net-lost-revenue problem. Like other decoupling approaches, SR breaks the link between electric-utility revenues and sales. Unlike other approaches, SR minimizes changes from traditional regulation. In particular, the risks of revenue swings associated with year-to-year changes in weather and the economy remain with the utility under SR. Statistical recoupling uses statistical models, based on historical data, that explain retail electricity sales as functions of the number of utility customers, winter and summer weather, the condition of the local economy, electricity price, and perhaps a few other key variables. These models, along with the actual values of the explanatory variables, are then used to estimate ``allowed`` electricity sales and revenues in future years.

Hirst, E.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Low-Cost High-Concentration Photovoltaic Systems for Utility Power Generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Under DOE's Technology Pathway Partnership (TPP) program, Amonix, Inc. developed a new generation of high-concentration photovoltaic systems using multijunction technology and established the manufacturing capacity needed to supply multi-megawatt power plants buing using the new Amonix 7700-series solar energy systems. For this effort, Amonix Collaborated with a variety of suppliers and partners to complete project tasks. Subcontractors included: Evonik/Cyro; Hitek; the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL); Raytech; Spectrolab; UL; University of Nevada, Las Vegas; and TUV Rheinland PTL. The Amonix TPP tasks included: Task 1: Multijunction Cell Optimization for Field Operation, Task 2: Fresnel Lens R&D, Task 3: Cell Package Design & Production, Task 4: Standards Compliance and Reliability Testing, Task 5: Receiver Plate Production, Task 6: MegaModule Performance, Task 7: MegaModule Cost Reduction, Task 8: Factory Setup and MegaModule Production, Task 9: Tracker and Tracking Controller, Task 10: Installation and Balance of System (BOS), Task 11: Field Testing, and Task 12: Solar Advisor Modeling and Market Analysis. Amonix's TPP addressed nearly the complete PV value chain from epitaxial layer design and wafer processing through system design, manufacturing, deployment and O&M. Amonix has made progress toward achieving these reduced costs through the development of its 28%+ efficient MegaModule, reduced manufacturing and installation cost through design for manufacturing and assembly, automated manufacturing processes, and reduced O&M costs. Program highlights include: (1) Optimized multijunction cell and cell package design to improve performance by > 10%; (2) Updated lens design provided 7% increased performance and higher concentration; (3) 28.7% DC STC MegaModule efficiency achieved in Phase II exceeded Phase III performance goal; (4) New 16' focal length MegaModule achieved target materials and manufacturing cost reduction; (5) Designed and placed into production 25 MW/yr manufacturing capacity for complete MegaModules, including cell packages, receiver plates, and structures with lenses; (6) Designed and deployed Amonix 7700 series systems rated at 63 kW PTC ac and higher. Based on an LCOE assessment using NREL's Solar Advisor Model, Amonix met DOE's LCOE targets: Amonix 2011 LCOE 12.8 cents/kWh (2010 DOE goal 10-15); 2015 LCOE 6.4 cents/kWh (2015 goal 5-7) Amonix and TPP participants would like to thank the U.S. Department of Energy Solar Energy Technology Program for funding received under this program through Agreement No. DE-FC36-07GO17042.

McConnell, R.; Garboushian, V.; Gordon, R.; Dutra, D.; Kinsey, G.; Geer, S.; Gomez, H.; Cameron, C.

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

157

Performance of Dynamic Programming methods in airline Revenue Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis evaluates the performance of Dynamic Programming (DP) models as applied to airline Revenue Management (RM) compared to traditional Revenue Management models like EMSRb as DP models offer a theoretically attractive ...

Diwan, Sarvee

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Airline revenue management methods for less restricted fare structures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Traditional Revenue Management systems were developed to maximize airlines' revenues in restricted fare product environments, based on the assumption of independence of demand by fare class. With the rapid emergence of ...

Claz-Savoyen, Richard L

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for March 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2009-03 Utility...

160

How to Turn Property Tax Exemptions into Revenue for Local Governments Institute for Wisconsins Future  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wisconsin citizens want strong communities, reasonable state and local taxes and a revenue system in which all individuals, businesses and organizations pay a fair share. IWFs Fair and Adequate series of reports examines how the current tax system works and what changes are needed to create a fair system that adequately funds the services needed for the common good. Wisconsin Property Tax Executive Summary Property tax revenue is the fuel for community operations. It generates $9.4 billion a year to pay a major portion of the cost to run schools, public safety systems, all forms of transportation, technical colleges and the infrastructure that supports us. The property tax is Wisconsins oldest and largest mechanism for citizens and businesses to share the expense of basic and vital public structures. The property tax is also the tax some people love to hate the most. There are serious criticisms of the property tax structure in Wisconsin: Property taxes in this state are higher than in most other states; Middle-class families pay a higher percent of their income on property taxes for their homes than wealthy households; Property tax rates are not consistent, but vary widely from one community to another;

Dennis Collier; Jack Norman

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

SVM-Based Multiclass Cost-sensitive Classification with Reject Option for Fault Diagnosis of Steam Turbine Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The steam turbine generator faults not only damage the generator itself, but also cause outages and loss of profits, for this reason, many researchers work on the fault diagnosis. But misdiagnosing may also lead to serious losses. In order to improve ... Keywords: SVM, multiclass, cost-sensitive, fault diagnosis, reject option

Chao Zou; En-hui Zheng; Hong-wei Xu; Le Chen

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Insufficient Incentives for Investment in Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contracts, which are typically only signed once in a lifetime, with large commissions involved, and therefore require strict regulation. An institutional change, which would create a credible counterpart for generators to sign long-term contracts... . In our calculations we assume an open cycle gas turbine with investment costs of 300/kw.13,14 If contractual arrangements ensure constant revenue streams, then such peak units could be financed at weighted...

Neuhoff, Karsten; de Vries, Laurens

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

163

Estimating the maximum potential revenue for grid connected electricity storage : arbitrage and regulation.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The valuation of an electricity storage device is based on the expected future cash ow generated by the device. Two potential sources of income for an electricity storage system are energy arbitrage and participation in the frequency regulation market. Energy arbitrage refers to purchasing (stor- ing) energy when electricity prices are low, and selling (discharging) energy when electricity prices are high. Frequency regulation is an ancillary service geared towards maintaining system frequency, and is typically procured by the independent system operator in some type of market. This paper outlines the calculations required to estimate the maximum potential revenue from participating in these two activities. First, a mathematical model is presented for the state of charge as a function of the storage device parameters and the quantities of electricity purchased/sold as well as the quantities o ered into the regulation market. Using this mathematical model, we present a linear programming optimization approach to calculating the maximum potential revenue from an elec- tricity storage device. The calculation of the maximum potential revenue is critical in developing an upper bound on the value of storage, as a benchmark for evaluating potential trading strate- gies, and a tool for capital nance risk assessment. Then, we use historical California Independent System Operator (CAISO) data from 2010-2011 to evaluate the maximum potential revenue from the Tehachapi wind energy storage project, an American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) energy storage demonstration project. We investigate the maximum potential revenue from two di erent scenarios: arbitrage only and arbitrage combined with the regulation market. Our analysis shows that participation in the regulation market produces four times the revenue compared to arbitrage in the CAISO market using 2010 and 2011 data. Then we evaluate several trading strategies to illustrate how they compare to the maximum potential revenue benchmark. We conclude with a sensitivity analysis with respect to key parameters.

Byrne, Raymond Harry; Silva Monroy, Cesar Augusto.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Emission Cuts Realities Electricity Generation Cost and CO2 emissions projections for different electricity generation options for Australia to 2050 By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Five options for cutting CO2 emissions from electricity generation in Australia are compared with a Business as Usual ? option over the period 2010 to 2050. The six options comprise combinations of coal, gas, nuclear, wind and solar thermal technologies. The conclusions: The nuclear option reduces CO2 emissions the most, is the only option that can be built quickly enough to make the deep emissions cuts required, and is the least cost of the options that can cut emissions sustainably. Solar thermal and wind power are the highest cost of the options considered. The cost of avoiding emissions is lowest with nuclear and highest with solar and wind power.

Peter Lang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Does Competition Reduce Costs? Assessing the Impact of Regulatory Restructuring on U.S. Electric Generation Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. 3 One exception is Hiebert (2002), who uses stochastic frontier production functions to estimate generation plant efficiency over 1988-1997. One set of independent variables he includes is indicators for regulatory orders or legislative enactment... to customers. Joskow (1974) and Hendricks (1975) demonstrate that frictions in cost-of-service regulation, particularly those arising from regulatory lag (time between price- resetting hearings), may provide some incentives at the margin for cost...

Markiewicz, Karl; Rose, Nancy L; Wolfram, Catherine

2006-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

166

Nuclear economics 2000: Deterministic and probabilistic projections of nuclear and coal electric power generation costs for the year 2000  

SciTech Connect

The total busbar electric generating costs were estimated for locations in ten regions of the United States for base-load nuclear and coal-fired power plants with a startup date of January 2000. For the Midwest region a complete data set that specifies each parameter used to obtain the comparative results is supplied. When based on the reference set of input variables, the comparison of power generation costs is found to favor nuclear in most regions of the country. Nuclear power is most favored in the northeast and western regions where coal must be transported over long distances; however, coal-fired generation is most competitive in the north central region where large reserves of cheaply mineable coal exist. In several regions small changes in the reference variables could cause either option to be preferred. The reference data set reflects the better of recent electric utility construction cost experience (BE) for nuclear plants. This study assumes as its reference case a stable regulatory environment and improved planning and construction practices, resulting in nuclear plants typically built at the present BE costs. Today's BE nuclear-plant capital investment cost model is then being used as a surrogate for projected costs for the next generation of light-water reactor plants. An alternative analysis based on today's median experience (ME) nuclear-plant construction cost experience is also included. In this case, coal is favored in all ten regions, implying that typical nuclear capital investment costs must improve for nuclear to be competitive.

Williams, K.A.; Delene, J.G.; Fuller, L.C.; Bowers, H.I.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Total Cost Per MwH for all common large scale power generation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

per MWh or KWh for the various sources ? I suspect that the costs commonly quoted for fossil fuels and nucelar are artificially low and that these fake costs are used to 'sell'...

168

Abstract The natural gas price surged in 2004. As a result, the marginal cost of some generators burning gas also rose sharply.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract ­ The natural gas price surged in 2004. As a result, the marginal cost of some generators marginal cost, which is closely related to the natural gas price. Since gas units are usually the marginal the sensitivity of Var benefit with respect to generation cost. The U.S. natural gas industry has been

Tolbert, Leon M.

169

Mineral revenues: the 1983 report on receipts from Federal and Indian leases with summary data from 1920 to 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tables and figures abound for: mineral revenue management in 1983; offshore federal mineral revenues; onshore federal mineral revenues; Indian mineral revenues; distribution of federal and Indian mineral revenues; plus appended lease management data. (PSB)

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

A Low-Cost, High-Efficiency Periodic Flow Gas Turbine for Distributed Energy Generation  

SciTech Connect

The proposed effort served as a feasibility study for an innovative, low-cost periodic flow gas turbine capable of realizing efficiencies in the 39-48% range.

Dr. Adam London

2008-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

171

Potentially Low Cost Solution to Extend Use of Early Generation Computed Tomography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of image analysis. (Platforms: PC; Cost: Varies) MicroVisionII MicroVision II can be used for for visualising point-

Tonna, Joseph E; Balanoff, Amy M; Lewin, Matthew R; Saandari, Namjilmaa; Wintermark, Max

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Enabling Thin Silicon Technologies for Next Generation Low-cost c ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Solar Cell Silicon ... from fossil fuels to renewable sources has spurred companies to reduce the cost of their solar photovoltaics (PV) systems.

173

"2012 Non-Utility Power Producers- Revenue"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revenue" Revenue" "(Data from form EIA-861U)" ,,,"Revenue (thousand dollars)" "Entity","State","Ownership","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "Riceland Foods Inc.","AR","Non_Utility",".",".",1735,".",1735 "Constellation Solar Arizona LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",".",798,".",798 "FRV SI Transport Solar LP","AZ","Non_Utility",".",243,".",".",243 "MFP Co III, LLC","AZ","Non_Utility",".",603,".",".",603

174

Techno-Economic Feasibility of Highly Efficient Cost-Effective Thermoelectric-SOFC Hybrid Power Generation Systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) systems have the potential to generate exhaust gas streams of high temperature, ranging from 400 to 800 C. These high temperature gas streams can be used for additional power generation with bottoming cycle technologies to achieve higher system power efficiency. One of the potential candidate bottoming cycles is power generation by means of thermoelectric (TE) devices, which have the inherent advantages of low noise, low maintenance and long life. This study was to analyze the feasibility of combining coal gas based SOFC and TE through system performance and cost techno-economic modeling in the context of multi-MW power plants, with 200 kW SOFC-TE module as building blocks. System and component concepts were generated for combining SOFC and TE covering electro-thermo-chemical system integration, power conditioning system (PCS) and component designs. SOFC cost and performance models previously developed at United Technologies Research Center were modified and used in overall system analysis. The TE model was validated and provided by BSST. The optimum system in terms of energy conversion efficiency was found to be a pressurized SOFC-TE, with system efficiency of 65.3% and cost of $390/kW of manufacturing cost. The pressurization ratio was approximately 4 and the assumed ZT of the TE was 2.5. System and component specifications were generated based on the modeling study. The major technology and cost barriers for maturing the system include pressurized SOFC stack using coal gas, the high temperature recycle blowers, and system control design. Finally, a 4-step development roadmap is proposed for future technology development, the first step being a 1 kW proof-of-concept demonstration unit.

Jifeng Zhang; Jean Yamanis

2007-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

175

Replacement energy costs for nuclear electricity-generating units in the United States: 1997--2001. Volume 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report updates previous estimates of replacement energy costs for potential short-term shutdowns of 109 US nuclear electricity-generating units. This information was developed to assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its regulatory impact analyses, specifically those that examine the impacts of proposed regulations requiring retrofitting of or safety modifications to nuclear reactors. Such actions might necessitate shutdowns of nuclear power plants while these changes are being implemented. The change in energy cost represents one factor that the NRC must consider when deciding to require a particular modification. Cost estimates were derived from probabilistic production cost simulations of pooled utility system operations. Factors affecting replacement energy costs, such as random unit failures, maintenance and refueling requirements, and load variations, are treated in the analysis. This report describes an abbreviated analytical approach as it was adopted to update the cost estimates published in NUREG/CR-4012, Vol. 3. The updates were made to extend the time frame of cost estimates and to account for recent changes in utility system conditions, such as change in fuel prices, construction and retirement schedules, and system demand projects.

VanKuiken, J.C.; Guziel, K.A.; Tompkins, M.M.; Buehring, W.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Gas projects surge in the Middle East as governments seek new revenue sources  

SciTech Connect

The rapid development of natural gas and condensate reserves in the Middle East results from a simple motivation: the desire of governments to earn revenues. For the past decade, Middle East governments have run budget deficits, which they funded by drawing down foreign assets and issuing debt. Now in the process of structural economic reform, they have begun to use an under-utilized resource--natural gas, of which Middle East governments own about one third of the world`s reserves. Governments receive revenues from several sources in natural gas developments, which makes the projects very attractive. Revenue comes from the sale of the natural gas in the domestic market and, if exported, the international market; the sale of associated condensates; the additional exports of crude oil or refined products if natural gas is substituted for refined products in domestic markets; the increased sale of crude oil if natural gas is injected into reservoirs to maintain pressure; and the sale of petrochemicals where natural gas is used as feedstock. Large projects under way in the Middle East highlight the consequences of multiple revenue sources and interlinked costs of natural gas and condensate development. Other countries in the region are undertaking similar projects, so examples cited represent only a portion of what is occurring. The paper describes Abu Dhabi, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, and Iran.

Williams, M.D. [International Energy Agency, Paris (France)

1997-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

177

Electric Sales, Revenue, and Average Price 2011 - Energy Information...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

All Electricity Reports Electric Sales, Revenue, and Average Price With Data for 2011 | Release Date: September 27, 2012 | Next Release Date: September, 2013 Previous editions...

178

Chapter 5. Retail Sales, Revenue, and Average Retail Price of ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

106 U.S. Energy Information Administration/Electric Power Monthly June 2012 Chapter 5. Retail Sales, Revenue, and Average Retail Price of Electricity

179

Electric Sales, Revenue, and Average Price 2011 - Energy ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Class of Ownership, Number of Consumers, Sales, Revenue, and Average Retail Price for Power Marketers and Energy Service Providers by State: T12:

180

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - January 2009 Jump to:...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

An economic feasibility analysis of distributed electric power generation based upon the Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell: a model of the operations cost.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This model description establishes the revenues, expenses incentives and avoided costs of Operation of a Natural Gas-Fired Fuel Cell-Based. Fuel is the major element of the cost of operation of a natural gas-fired fuel cell. Forecasts of the change in the price of this commodity a re an important consideration in the ownership of an energy conversion system. Differences between forecasts, the interests of the forecaster or geographical areas can all have significant effects on imputed fuel costs. There is less effect on judgments made on the feasibility of an energy conversion system since changes in fuel price can affect the cost of operation of the alternatives to the fuel cell in a similar fashion. The forecasts used in this model are only intended to provide the potential owner or operator with the means to examine alternate future scenarios. The operations model computes operating costs of a system suitable for a large condominium complex or a residential institution such as a hotel, boarding school or prison. The user may also select large office buildings that are characterized by 12 to 16 hours per day of operation or industrial users with a steady demand for thermal and electrical energy around the clock.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

182

Reference Design Description and Cost Evaluation for Compressed Air Energy Storage Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed-air energy storage (CAES) is a valuable solution for mitigating the current challenges of renewable-power variability, facilitating higher renewable penetration levels, enhancing grid reliability, and improving the utilization of transmission and generation assets. However, capital costs play a critical role in evaluating the overall CAES value proposition, at least relative to direct-market revenues (energy and ancillary services). Although the first U.S. CAES plant in Alabama was built at co...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

183

Impacts of Renewable Generation on Fossil Fuel Unit Cycling: Costs and Emissions (Presentation)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prepared for the Clean Energy Regulatory Forum III, this presentation looks at the Western Wind and Solar Integration Study and reexamines the cost and emissions impacts of fossil fuel unit cycling.

Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.; Denholm, P.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Bucyrus say HydraCrowd could generate revenue  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Amongst news of new products from US suppliers is the announcement by Bucyrus International of HydraCrowd which eliminates the need for rope crowd change intervals in electric shovels. Active Control Technology has had its Wi-Fi mesh network system for underground communications and tracking system approved by the MSHA. The Spatial Solutions Division of Leica Geosystems has gone into partnership with Maptek to supply laser scanners and associated mine scanning software. 2 photos.

NONE

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Single-Issue Industrial Revenue Bond Program (Missouri) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Single-Issue Industrial Revenue Bond Program (Missouri) Single-Issue Industrial Revenue Bond Program (Missouri) Single-Issue Industrial Revenue Bond Program (Missouri) < Back Eligibility Commercial Construction Industrial Retail Supplier Systems Integrator Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Program Info State Missouri Program Type Bond Program Provider Missouri Development Finance Board The Missouri Development Finance Board administers a Single-Issue Tax-Exempt Industrial Revenue Bond Program as well as a Taxable Industrial Revenue Bond Program. The Tax-Exempt Program finances (i) the acquisition, construction and equipping of qualified manufacturing production facilities and/or equipment, and (ii) refinances outstanding tax-exempt bonds. It

186

Low Cost Production of InGaN for Next-Generation Photovoltaic Devices  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project is to develop a low-cost and low-energy technology for production of photovoltaic devices based on InGaN materials. This project builds on the ongoing development by Structured Materials Industries (SMI), of novel thin film deposition technology for Group III-Nitride materials, which is capable of depositing Group-III nitride materials at significantly lower costs and significantly lower energy usage compared to conventional deposition techniques. During this project, SMI demonstrated deposition of GaN and InGaN films using metalorganic sources, and demonstrated compatibility of the process with standard substrate materials and hardware components.

Nick M. Sbrockey, Shangzhu Sun, Gary S. Tompa,

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

187

Table 8.2c Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. ... 10 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, ...

188

Table 8.2a Electricity Net Generation: Total (All Sectors ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. ... 10 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, ...

189

Table 8.2b Electricity Net Generation: Electric Power Sector ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, demand & emissions. ... 10 Batteries, chemicals, hydrogen, pitch, ...

190

New-generation CRT-controller ICS cut display costs, increase capabilities  

SciTech Connect

The newest VLSI CRT-controller chips, by condensing into one 40-pin dip the capabilities of hundreds of TTL devices, are dramatically lowering the cost of advanced raster-scanned CRT displays. The author considers these CRT controllers, and their applications, including graphics terminals.

Cushman, R.H.

1982-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

191

Learning and cost reductions for generating technologies in the national energy modeling system (NEMS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

generation-peak, biomass, and advanced combustion turbineCombustion gas turbine, gas combined- cycle, conventional coal Biomass,Biomass plants change from Revolutionary to Evolutionary vintage, while the Advanced Combustion

Gumerman, Etan; Marnay, Chris

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

The economic impact of state ordered avoided cost rates for photovoltaic generated electricity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978 requires that electric utilities purchase electricity generated by small power producers (QFs) such as photovoltaic systems at rates that will encourage the ...

Bottaro, Drew

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Distributed Generation versus Centralised Supply: a Social Cost-Benefit Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the prospect of revolutionary new scenarios. In particular, the performance of the small power technologies (the reciprocating engine, gas turbine, and fuel cells) has improved remarkably over the last decade. This has aroused the interest of operators... include Stirling (1997) who provides some interesting arguments to support his thesis. However, we will try to demonstrate that such scepticism is perhaps exaggerated and that external cost methodologies can be very useful despite the considerable...

Gulli, Francesco

2004-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

194

Smoke-free law did not affect revenue from gaming in Delaware  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ordinances increase restaurant values. Contemporary Economicor a positive effect on restaurant and bar revenues, 4bingo revenue, 5 and restaurant values. 6 In response,

Mandel, Lev L MSc.; Alamar, Benjamin Ph.D.; Glantz, Stanton A. Ph.D.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Electricity prices in a competitive environment: Marginal cost pricing of generation services and financial status of electric utilities. A preliminary analysis through 2015  

SciTech Connect

The emergence of competitive markets for electricity generation services is changing the way that electricity is and will be priced in the United States. This report presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated {open_quotes}cost-of-service{close_quotes} pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers? This study is not intended to be a cost-benefit analysis of wholesale or retail competition, nor does this report include an analysis of the macroeconomic impacts of competitive electricity prices.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Final report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Mockups applied to design review of AP600/1000, Construction planning for AP 600, and AP 1000 maintenance evaluation. Proof of concept study also performed for GenIV PBMR models.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

197

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the use of Virtual Environments: Task 1 Completion Report  

SciTech Connect

OAK B204 The objective of this project is to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of using full-scale virtual reality simulation in the design, construction, and maintenance of future nuclear power plants. Specifically, this project will test the suitability of Immersive Projection Display (IPD) technology to aid engineers in the design of the next generation nuclear power plant and to evaluate potential cost reductions that can be realized by optimization of installation and construction sequences. The intent is to see if this type of information technology can be used in capacities similar to those currently filled by full-scale physical mockups.

Whisker, V.E.; Baratta, A.J.; Shaw, T.S.; Winters, J.W.; Trikouros, N.; Hess, C.

2002-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

198

Performance of multiple cabin optimization methods in airline revenue management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although many airlines offer seats in multiple cabins (economy vs. premium classes) with different service quality, previous work on airline revenue management has focused on treating the cabins separately. In this thesis, ...

Lepage, Pierre-Olivier

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-County Electric Power Assn for March 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-03 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place...

200

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-County Electric Power Assn for December 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-12 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-County Electric Power Assn for October 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-10 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place...

202

Office of Natural Resources Revenue | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Natural Resources Revenue Natural Resources Revenue Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Office of Natural Resources Revenue Name Office of Natural Resources Revenue Address Denver Federal Center, Bldg 85 P.O. Box 25165 Place Denver, CO Zip 80225-0165 Phone number (303) 231-3162 Website http://www.onrr.gov/ Coordinates 39.7233202°, -105.1108186° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7233202,"lon":-105.1108186,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

203

Industrial Revenue Bond Program (District of Columbia)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The District provides below market bond financing to lower the costs of borrowing for qualified capital construction and renovation projects. The program is available to non-profits, institutions,...

204

Realistic costs of carbon capture  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a growing interest in carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a means of reducing carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. However there are substantial uncertainties about the costs of CCS. Costs for pre-combustion capture with compression (i.e. excluding costs of transport and storage and any revenue from EOR associated with storage) are examined in this discussion paper for First-of-a-Kind (FOAK) plant and for more mature technologies, or Nth-of-a-Kind plant (NOAK). For FOAK plant using solid fuels the levelised cost of electricity on a 2008 basis is approximately 10 cents/kWh higher with capture than for conventional plants (with a range of 8-12 cents/kWh). Costs of abatement are found typically to be approximately US$150/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$120-180/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants the additional cost of electricity with capture is approximately 2-5 cents/kWh, with costs of the range of US$35-70/tCO2 avoided. Costs of abatement with carbon capture for other fuels and technologies are also estimated for NOAK plants. The costs of abatement are calculated with reference to conventional SCPC plant for both emissions and costs of electricity. Estimates for both FOAK and NOAK are mainly based on cost data from 2008, which was at the end of a period of sustained escalation in the costs of power generation plant and other large capital projects. There are now indications of costs falling from these levels. This may reduce the costs of abatement and costs presented here may be 'peak of the market' estimates. If general cost levels return, for example, to those prevailing in 2005 to 2006 (by which time significant cost escalation had already occurred from previous levels), then costs of capture and compression for FOAK plants are expected to be US$110/tCO2 avoided (with a range of US$90-135/tCO2 avoided). For NOAK plants costs are expected to be US$25-50/tCO2. Based on these considerations a likely representative range of costs of abatement from CCS excluding transport and storage costs appears to be US$100-150/tCO2 for first-of-a-kind plants and perhaps US$30-50/tCO2 for nth-of-a-kind plants.The estimates for FOAK and NOAK costs appear to be broadly consistent in the light of estimates of the potential for cost reductions with increased experience. Cost reductions are expected from increasing scale, learning on individual components, and technological innovation including improved plant integration. Innovation and integration can both lower costs and increase net output with a given cost base. These factors are expected to reduce abatement costs by approximately 65% by 2030. The range of estimated costs for NOAK plants is within the range of plausible future carbon prices, implying that mature technology would be competitive with conventional fossil fuel plants at prevailing carbon prices.

Al Juaied, Mohammed (Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (US). Belfer Center for Science and International Affiaris); Whitmore, Adam (Hydrogen Energy International Ltd., Weybridge (GB))

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Feasibility Study of Biomass Electrical Generation on Tribal Lands  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of the St. Croix Tribe are to develop economically viable energy production facilities using readily available renewable biomass fuel sources at an acceptable cost per kilowatt hour ($/kWh), to provide new and meaningful permanent employment, retain and expand existing employment (logging) and provide revenues for both producers and sellers of the finished product. This is a feasibility study including an assessment of available biomass fuel, technology assessment, site selection, economics viability given the foreseeable fuel and generation costs, as well as an assessment of the potential markets for renewable energy.

Tom Roche; Richard Hartmann; Joohn Luton; Warren Hudelson; Roger Blomguist; Jan Hacker; Colene Frye

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

206

Analyzing and minimizing the impact of opportunity cost in QoS-aware job scheduling.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Quality of service (QoS) mechanisms allowing users to request for turn-around time guarantees for their jobs have recently generated much interest. In our previous work we had designed a framework, QoPS, to allow for such QoS. This framework provides an admission control mechanism that only accepts jobs whose requested deadlines can be met and, once accepted, guarantees these deadlines. However, the framework is completely blind to the revenue these jobs can fetch for the supercomputer center. By accepting a job, the supercomputer center might relinquish its capability to accept some future arriving (and potentially more expensive) jobs. In other words, while each job pays an explicit price to the system for running it, the system may also be viewed as paying an implicit opportunity cost by accepting the job. Thus, accepting a job is profitable only when the job's price is higher than its opportunity cost. In this paper we analyze the impact such opportunity cost can have on the overall revenue of the supercomputer center and attempt to minimize it through predictive techniques. Specifically, we propose two extensions to QoPS, Value-aware QoPS (VQoPS) and Dynamic Value-aware QoPS (DVQoPS), to provide such capabilities. We present detailed analysis of these schemes and demonstrate using simulation that they not only achieve several factors improvement in system revenue, but also good service differentiation as a much desired side-effect.

Islam, M.; Balaji, P.; Sabin, G.; Sadayappan, P. (Mathematics and Computer Science); (Ohio State Univ.)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Microsoft Word - 20110321_LTI_PPM_Tetra Tech_Cost Effective Wireless Application in Power Generation Markets.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

11/1483 11/1483 Cost-Effective Wireless Application in the Power Generation Market 21 March, 2011 Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe on privately owned rights. Reference therein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by the United States Government or

208

Steam generation in line-focus solar collectors: a comparative assessment of thermal performance, operating stability, and cost issues  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The engineering and system benefits of using direct steam (in situ) generation in line-focus collectors are assessed. The major emphasis of the analysis is a detailed thermal performance comparison of in situ systems (which utilize unfired boilers). The analysis model developed for this study is discussed in detail. An analysis of potential flow stability problems is also provided along with a cursory cost analysis and an assessment of freeze protection, safety, and control issues. Results indicated a significant thermal performance advantage over the more conventional oil and flash systems and the flow stability does not appear to be a significant problem. In particular, at steam temperatures of 220/sup 0/C (430/sup 0/F) under the chosen set of assumptions, annual delivered energy predictions indicate that the in situ system can deliver 15% more energy than an oil system and 12% more energy than a flash system, with all of the systems using the same collector field. Further, the in situ system may result in a 10% capital cost reduction. Other advantages include improvement in simpler control when compared with flash systems, and fluid handling and safety enhancement when compared with oil systems.

Murphy, L.M.; May, E.K.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Microsoft Word - CLPUD Revenue Metering CX.doc  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gregory Vassallo Gregory Vassallo TPC-ALVEY Proposed Action: New Revenue Meters at Central Lincoln's Florence and Berrydale Substations Budget Information: Work Order # 00004866, Task 04 Categorical Exclusion Applied (from Subpart D, 10 C.F.R. Part 1021): B4.6 Additions or modifications to electric power transmission facilities that would not affect the environment beyond the previously developed facility... Location: Lane County, Oregon Proposed by: Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) Description of the Proposed Action: BPA plans to upgrade revenue metering at Central Lincoln People's Utility District's (Central Lincoln) Florence and Berrydale Substations to 115-kV. Bonneville will retire the 12.5-kV revenue metering at Central Lincoln's Florence, Berrydale, and Heceta Beach Substations once

210

What is U.S. electricity generation by energy source? - FAQ - U.S ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, ... Energy sources and percent share of total electricity generation in 2012 were:

211

City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - May 2008 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - May 2008 City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - May 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for City of Detroit for May 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-05 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date 2008-05-01 End Date 2008-06-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 1.4 Residential Sales (MWh) 15.6 Residential Consumers 82 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 3889 Commercial Sales (MWh) 38146 Commercial Consumers 121 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 49 Other Sales (MWh) 376 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 3939.4 Total Sales (MWh) 38537.6 Total Consumers 204 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1]

212

City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008 City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for City of Detroit for March 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-03 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date 2008-03-01 End Date 2008-04-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 1.4 Residential Sales (MWh) 16 Residential Consumers 81 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 3467 Commercial Sales (MWh) 38666 Commercial Consumers 117 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 50 Other Sales (MWh) 455 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 3518.4 Total Sales (MWh) 39137 Total Consumers 199 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1]

213

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - November  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

November November 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for November 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-11 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place Mississippi Start Date 2008-11-01 End Date 2008-12-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 4227 Residential Sales (MWh) 35279 Residential Consumers 35982 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 2029 Commercial Sales (MWh) 15195 Commercial Consumers 8707 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1178 Industrial Sales (MWh) 14250 Industrial Consumers 19 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 7434 Total Sales (MWh) 64724 Total Consumers 44708 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly

214

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - February  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

February February 2009 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for February 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2009-02 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place Mississippi Start Date 2009-02-01 End Date 2009-03-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 6100 Residential Sales (MWh) 57003 Residential Consumers 36097 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 2044 Commercial Sales (MWh) 16286 Commercial Consumers 8682 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1219 Industrial Sales (MWh) 14517 Industrial Consumers 19 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 9363 Total Sales (MWh) 87806 Total Consumers 44798 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly

215

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

The Transportation Revenue Estimator and Needs Determination System (TRENDS) Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................................... 15 3.3 Indexing the Motor Fuels Tax, inflation rates, taxes, fees and other elements. The output is a set of tables and graphs showing a forecast................................................................................................. 12 TRENDS Model Revenue Enhancements Tab 3.1 State Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Variables

217

Total revenues up, profits down for OGJ400  

SciTech Connect

After moving up sharply the previous 2 years, profits for the biggest 400 U.S. public oil and gas companies sagged in fiscal 1989. The total: $20.34 billion, down 8.6% from 1988. Revenues, however, gained 6.1% to $459.2 billion. Company-by-company financial results and operating statistics appear in this report.

Beck, R.J.; Biggs, J.B.

1990-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

218

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - February  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for February 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-02 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place Mississippi Start Date 2008-02-01 End Date 2008-03-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 5156 Residential Sales (MWh) 58360 Residential Consumers 35731 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 1765 Commercial Sales (MWh) 16880 Commercial Consumers 8063 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1345 Industrial Sales (MWh) 18516 Industrial Consumers 20 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 8266 Total Sales (MWh) 93756 Total Consumers 43814 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly

219

A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008 A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for March 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-03 Utility Company A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) Place Virginia Start Date 2008-03-01 End Date 2008-04-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 3137.475 Residential Sales (MWh) 25920.427 Residential Consumers 30081 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 1274.236 Commercial Sales (MWh) 11114.985 Commercial Consumers 4104 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1204.511 Industrial Sales (MWh) 13352.88 Industrial Consumers 17 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 5616.222 Total Sales (MWh) 50388.292 Total Consumers 34202 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly

220

A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2008 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2008 A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for February 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-02 Utility Company A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) Place Maryland Start Date 2008-02-01 End Date 2008-03-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 26.62 Residential Sales (MWh) 219.596 Residential Consumers 281 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 6.541 Commercial Sales (MWh) 51.4 Commercial Consumers 48 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 33.161 Total Sales (MWh) 270.996 Total Consumers 329 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008 A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for March 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-03 Utility Company A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) Place Maryland Start Date 2008-03-01 End Date 2008-04-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 22.803 Residential Sales (MWh) 184.316 Residential Consumers 282 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 4.944 Commercial Sales (MWh) 37.174 Commercial Consumers 48 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 27.747 Total Sales (MWh) 221.49 Total Consumers 330 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next

222

Non-linear revenue creating business platform for IT service companies using cloud computing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Indian Information Technology (IT) & Business process outsourcing (BPO) companies are going through an inflection point. They have been growing revenue by over 20% on a yearly basis for the last decade. This revenue ...

Sinha, Prasanta, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - July 2008...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for July 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name...

224

A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - June 2008...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for June 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name...

225

A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - July 2008...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for July 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name...

226

Capacity control in network revenue management : clustering and risk-aversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Network revenue management is the practice of using optimal decision policies to increase revenues by controlling limited quantities of multiple resources' availability and prices over finite time. It is widely practiced ...

Park, Joongwoo Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - December 2008 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

& N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - December 2008 & N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - December 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for December 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-12 Utility Company A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) Place Virginia Start Date 2008-12-01 End Date 2009-01-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 3387.979 Residential Sales (MWh) 26238.158 Residential Consumers 29955 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 1371.134 Commercial Sales (MWh) 11120.987 Commercial Consumers 4091 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1247.948 Industrial Sales (MWh) 12732.6 Industrial Consumers 17 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 6007.061 Total Sales (MWh) 50091.745 Total Consumers 34063

228

City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - November 2008 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - November 2008 City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - November 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for City of Detroit for November 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-11 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date 2008-11-01 End Date 2008-12-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 1.709 Residential Sales (MWh) 17.18 Residential Consumers 79 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 4219 Commercial Sales (MWh) 41796 Commercial Consumers 126 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 38.9 Other Sales (MWh) 376.3 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 4259.609 Total Sales (MWh) 42189.48 Total Consumers 206 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly

229

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - March  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for March 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2009-03 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place Mississippi Start Date 2009-03-01 End Date 2009-04-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 4997 Residential Sales (MWh) 45336 Residential Consumers 36181 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 1847 Commercial Sales (MWh) 14202 Commercial Consumers 8631 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1402 Industrial Sales (MWh) 14267 Industrial Consumers 18 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 8246 Total Sales (MWh) 73805 Total Consumers 44830 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1]

230

Different approaches to estimating transition costs in the electric- utility industry  

SciTech Connect

The term ``transition costs`` describes the potential revenue shortfall (or welfare loss) a utility (or other actor) may experience through government-initiated deregulation of electricity generation. The potential for transition costs arises whenever a regulated industry is subject to competitive market forces as a result of explicit government action. Federal and state proposals to deregulate electricity generation sparked a national debate on transition costs in the electric-utility industry. Industry-wide transition cost estimates range from about $20 billion to $500 billion. Such disparate estimates raise important questions on estimation methods for decision makers. This report examines different approaches to estimating transition costs. The study has three objectives. First, we discuss the concept of transition cost. Second, we identify the major cost categories included in transition cost estimates and summarize the current debate on which specific costs are appropriately included in these estimates. Finally, we identify general and specific estimation approaches and assess their strengths and weaknesses. We relied primarily on the evidentiary records established at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and the California Public Utilities Commission to identify major cost categories and specific estimation approaches. We also contacted regulatory commission staffs in ten states to ascertain estimation activities in each of these states. We refined a classification framework to describe and assess general estimation options. We subsequently developed and applied criteria to describe and assess specific estimation approaches proposed by federal regulators, state regulators, utilities, independent power companies, and consultants.

Baxter, L.W.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Revenue forecasting using a least-squares support vector regression model in a fuzzy environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Revenue forecasting is difficult but essential for companies that want to create high-quality revenue budgets, especially in an uncertain economic environment with changing government policies. Under these conditions, the subjective judgment of decision ... Keywords: Genetic algorithms, Least-squares support vector regression, Membership function, Revenue forecasting

Kuo-Ping Lin; Ping-Feng Pai; Yu-Ming Lu; Ping-Teng Chang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

"2012 Total Electric Industry- Revenue (Thousands Dollars)"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revenue (Thousands Dollars)" Revenue (Thousands Dollars)" "(Data from forms EIA-861- schedules 4A-D, EIA-861S and EIA-861U)" "State","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Total" "New England",7418025.1,6137400,3292222.3,37797.4,16885444.6 "Connecticut",2212594.3,1901294.3,451909.7,18679.5,4584477.8 "Maine",656822,467228,241624.4,0,1365674.3 "Massachusetts",3029291.6,2453106,2127180,17162,7626739.5 "New Hampshire",713388.2,598371.1,231041,0,1542800.3 "Rhode Island",449603.6,431951.9,98597.2,1955.9,982108.6 "Vermont",356325.4,285448.7,141870,0,783644.1 "Middle Atlantic",20195109.9,20394744.7,5206283.9,488944,46285082.4

233

Electric Utility Sales and Revenue - EIA-826 detailed data file  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Form EIA-826 detailed data Form EIA-826 detailed data The Form EIA-826 "Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report with State Distributions" collects retail sales of electricity and associated revenue, each month, from a statistically chosen sample of electric utilities in the United States. The respondents to the Form EIA-826 are chosen from the Form EIA-861, "Annual Electric Utility Report." Methodology is based on the "Model-Based Sampling, Inference and Imputation." In 2003, EIA revised the survey to separate the transportation sales and reassign the other activities to the commercial and industrial sectors as appropriate. The "other" sector activities included public street and highway lighting, sales to public authorities, sales to railroads and railways, interdepartmental sales, and agricultural irrigations.

234

User manual for PACTOLUS: a code for computing power costs.  

SciTech Connect

PACTOLUS is a computer code for calculating the cost of generating electricity. Through appropriate definition of the input data, PACTOLUS can calculate the cost of generating electricity from a wide variety of power plants, including nuclear, fossil, geothermal, solar, and other types of advanced energy systems. The purpose of PACTOLUS is to develop cash flows and calculate the unit busbar power cost (mills/kWh) over the entire life of a power plant. The cash flow information is calculated by two principal models: the Fuel Model and the Discounted Cash Flow Model. The Fuel Model is an engineering cost model which calculates the cash flow for the fuel cycle costs over the project lifetime based on input data defining the fuel material requirements, the unit costs of fuel materials and processes, the process lead and lag times, and the schedule of the capacity factor for the plant. For nuclear plants, the Fuel Model calculates the cash flow for the entire nuclear fuel cycle. For fossil plants, the Fuel Model calculates the cash flow for the fossil fuel purchases. The Discounted Cash Flow Model combines the fuel costs generated by the Fuel Model with input data on the capital costs, capital structure, licensing time, construction time, rates of return on capital, tax rates, operating costs, and depreciation method of the plant to calculate the cash flow for the entire lifetime of the project. The financial and tax structure for both investor-owned utilities and municipal utilities can be simulated through varying the rates of return on equity and debt, the debt-equity ratios, and tax rates. The Discounted Cash Flow Model uses the principal that the present worth of the revenues will be equal to the present worth of the expenses including the return on investment over the economic life of the project. This manual explains how to prepare the input data, execute cases, and interpret the output results. (RWR)

Huber, H.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - March  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-County Electric 4-County Electric Power Assn for March 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-03 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place Mississippi Start Date 2008-03-01 End Date 2008-04-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 4327 Residential Sales (MWh) 47531 Residential Consumers 35777 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 1611 Commercial Sales (MWh) 14718 Commercial Consumers 8072 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1263 Industrial Sales (MWh) 14908 Industrial Consumers 20 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 7201 Total Sales (MWh) 77157 Total Consumers 43869 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=4-County_Electric_Power_Assn_(Mississippi)_EIA_Revenue_and_Sales_-_March_2008&oldid=14733

236

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - October  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-County Electric 4-County Electric Power Assn for October 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-10 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place Mississippi Start Date 2008-10-01 End Date 2008-11-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 4860 Residential Sales (MWh) 41611 Residential Consumers 36025 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 2534 Commercial Sales (MWh) 20639 Commercial Consumers 8686 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1229 Industrial Sales (MWh) 15293 Industrial Consumers 19 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 8623 Total Sales (MWh) 77543 Total Consumers 44730 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=4-County_Electric_Power_Assn_(Mississippi)_EIA_Revenue_and_Sales_-_October_2008&oldid=18430"

237

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - May 2008  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

May 2008 May 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for May 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-05 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place Mississippi Start Date 2008-05-01 End Date 2008-06-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 3585 Residential Sales (MWh) 34492 Residential Consumers 35775 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 1809 Commercial Sales (MWh) 16055 Commercial Consumers 8087 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1467 Industrial Sales (MWh) 17891 Industrial Consumers 20 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 6861 Total Sales (MWh) 68438 Total Consumers 43882 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1]

238

Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2008  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

March 2008 March 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Central Illinois Pub Serv Co for March 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-03 Utility Company Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) Place Illinois Start Date 2008-03-01 End Date 2008-04-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 25715 Residential Sales (MWh) 250621 Residential Consumers 337464 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 15187 Commercial Sales (MWh) 156079 Commercial Consumers 52810 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1664 Industrial Sales (MWh) 17211 Industrial Consumers 529 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 106 Other Sales (MWh) 880 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 42672 Total Sales (MWh) 424791 Total Consumers 390804 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly

239

Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - May 2008 |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Illinois Central Illinois Pub Serv Co for May 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-05 Utility Company Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) Place Illinois Start Date 2008-05-01 End Date 2008-06-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 24553 Residential Sales (MWh) 218454 Residential Consumers 337410 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 19095 Commercial Sales (MWh) 187996 Commercial Consumers 55845 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1116 Industrial Sales (MWh) 34382 Industrial Consumers 519 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 52 Other Sales (MWh) 702 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 44816 Total Sales (MWh) 441534 Total Consumers 393775 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1]

240

City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - August 2008 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City of Detroit for City of Detroit for August 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-08 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date 2008-08-01 End Date 2008-09-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 1.75 Residential Sales (MWh) 18.6 Residential Consumers 77 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 4689 Commercial Sales (MWh) 45432 Commercial Consumers 124 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 51 Other Sales (MWh) 403 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 4741.75 Total Sales (MWh) 45853.6 Total Consumers 202 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Detroit_(Michigan)_EIA_Revenue_and_Sales_-_August_2008&oldid=17335

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - April 2008 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

April 2008 April 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for City of Detroit for April 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-04 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date 2008-04-01 End Date 2008-05-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 1.2 Residential Sales (MWh) 13 Residential Consumers 81 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 4537 Commercial Sales (MWh) 41373 Commercial Consumers 121 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 55 Other Sales (MWh) 400 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 4593.2 Total Sales (MWh) 41786 Total Consumers 203 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next Retrieved from

242

Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - January  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

January January 2009 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Central Illinois Pub Serv Co for January 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2009-01 Utility Company Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) Place Illinois Start Date 2009-01-01 End Date 2009-02-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 38208 Residential Sales (MWh) 442616 Residential Consumers 329875 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 18652 Commercial Sales (MWh) 197785 Commercial Consumers 47346 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1173 Industrial Sales (MWh) 16509 Industrial Consumers 453 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 100 Other Sales (MWh) 1537 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 58133 Total Sales (MWh) 658447 Total Consumers 377675

243

City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - January 2009 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City of Detroit for City of Detroit for January 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2009-01 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date 2009-01-01 End Date 2009-02-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 2.5 Residential Sales (MWh) 27 Residential Consumers 81 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 4964 Commercial Sales (MWh) 48160 Commercial Consumers 120 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 63.5 Other Sales (MWh) 513 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 5030 Total Sales (MWh) 48700 Total Consumers 202 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Detroit_(Michigan)_EIA_Revenue_and_Sales_-_January_2009&oldid=12026

244

City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - June 2008 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City of Detroit for City of Detroit for June 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-06 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date 2008-06-01 End Date 2008-07-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 1.6 Residential Sales (MWh) 17.7 Residential Consumers 77 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 4376 Commercial Sales (MWh) 44180 Commercial Consumers 123 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 49 Other Sales (MWh) 386 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 4426.6 Total Sales (MWh) 44583.7 Total Consumers 201 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Detroit_(Michigan)_EIA_Revenue_and_Sales_-_June_2008&oldid=16285

245

City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - March 2009 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

9 9 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for City of Detroit for March 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2009-03 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date 2009-03-01 End Date 2009-04-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 2.1 Residential Sales (MWh) 20.7 Residential Consumers 79 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 3720 Commercial Sales (MWh) 36330 Commercial Consumers 112 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 60.4 Other Sales (MWh) 560 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 3782.5 Total Sales (MWh) 36910.7 Total Consumers 192 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next Retrieved from

246

City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - July 2008 | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City of Detroit for City of Detroit for July 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-07 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date 2008-07-01 End Date 2008-08-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 1.7 Residential Sales (MWh) 18.1 Residential Consumers 77 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 4597 Commercial Sales (MWh) 44891 Commercial Consumers 123 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 52 Other Sales (MWh) 408 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 4650.7 Total Sales (MWh) 45317.1 Total Consumers 201 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Detroit_(Michigan)_EIA_Revenue_and_Sales_-_July_2008&oldid=16810"

247

Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - April 2008  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Illinois Central Illinois Pub Serv Co for April 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-04 Utility Company Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) Place Illinois Start Date 2008-04-01 End Date 2008-05-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 24400 Residential Sales (MWh) 247343 Residential Consumers 331573 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 14383 Commercial Sales (MWh) 152042 Commercial Consumers 52280 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1241 Industrial Sales (MWh) 13081 Industrial Consumers 524 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 92 Other Sales (MWh) 1113 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 40116 Total Sales (MWh) 413579 Total Consumers 384378 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1]

248

Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - December  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Illinois Central Illinois Pub Serv Co for December 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-12 Utility Company Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) Place Illinois Start Date 2008-12-01 End Date 2009-01-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 35185 Residential Sales (MWh) 410509 Residential Consumers 327240 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 19393 Commercial Sales (MWh) 208884 Commercial Consumers 48125 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1172 Industrial Sales (MWh) 15357 Industrial Consumers 466 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 78 Other Sales (MWh) 1202 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 55828 Total Sales (MWh) 635952 Total Consumers 375832 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1]

249

City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2009 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City of Detroit for City of Detroit for February 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2009-02 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date 2009-02-01 End Date 2009-03-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 2.1 Residential Sales (MWh) 22.5 Residential Consumers 78 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 4175 Commercial Sales (MWh) 41864 Commercial Consumers 117 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 76.9 Other Sales (MWh) 786 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 4254 Total Sales (MWh) 42672.5 Total Consumers 196 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Detroit_(Michigan)_EIA_Revenue_and_Sales_-_February_2009&oldid=12572

250

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - December  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

4-County Electric 4-County Electric Power Assn for December 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-12 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place Mississippi Start Date 2008-12-01 End Date 2009-01-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 5629 Residential Sales (MWh) 49312 Residential Consumers 35980 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 2031 Commercial Sales (MWh) 15395 Commercial Consumers 8710 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1337 Industrial Sales (MWh) 14148 Industrial Consumers 19 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 8997 Total Sales (MWh) 78855 Total Consumers 44709 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=4-County_Electric_Power_Assn_(Mississippi)_EIA_Revenue_and_Sales_-_December_2008&oldid=19495

251

Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - June 2008 |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

June 2008 June 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Central Illinois Pub Serv Co for June 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-06 Utility Company Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) Place Illinois Start Date 2008-06-01 End Date 2008-07-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 39796 Residential Sales (MWh) 376563 Residential Consumers 348410 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 25354 Commercial Sales (MWh) 244206 Commercial Consumers 62285 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1913 Industrial Sales (MWh) 11642 Industrial Consumers 542 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 54 Other Sales (MWh) 697 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 67117 Total Sales (MWh) 633108 Total Consumers 411238 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly

252

Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - February  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

February February 2009 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Central Illinois Pub Serv Co for February 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2009-02 Utility Company Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) Place Illinois Start Date 2009-02-01 End Date 2009-03-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 28078 Residential Sales (MWh) 297866 Residential Consumers 341636 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 15755 Commercial Sales (MWh) 165037 Commercial Consumers 49052 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 639 Industrial Sales (MWh) 16720 Industrial Consumers 474 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 128 Other Sales (MWh) 2187 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 44600 Total Sales (MWh) 481810 Total Consumers 391163

253

Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - January  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

January January 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Central Illinois Pub Serv Co for January 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-01 Utility Company Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) Place Illinois Start Date 2008-01-01 End Date 2008-02-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 38361 Residential Sales (MWh) 457391 Residential Consumers 334784 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 20964 Commercial Sales (MWh) 244215 Commercial Consumers 52783 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1321 Industrial Sales (MWh) 21368 Industrial Consumers 539 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 52 Other Sales (MWh) 707 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 60698 Total Sales (MWh) 723681 Total Consumers 388107

254

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - August  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

August August 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for August 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-08 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place Mississippi Start Date 2008-08-01 End Date 2008-09-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 5720 Residential Sales (MWh) 58786 Residential Consumers 36069 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 2643 Commercial Sales (MWh) 26367 Commercial Consumers 8540 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1445 Industrial Sales (MWh) 19022 Industrial Consumers 20 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 9808 Total Sales (MWh) 104175 Total Consumers 44629 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1]

255

City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - January 2008 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

January 2008 January 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for City of Detroit for January 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-01 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date 2008-01-01 End Date 2008-02-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 1.7 Residential Sales (MWh) 19 Residential Consumers 76 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 4458 Commercial Sales (MWh) 47480 Commercial Consumers 123 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 63.3 Other Sales (MWh) 537 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 4523 Total Sales (MWh) 48036 Total Consumers 200 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next Retrieved from

256

Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - October  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Central Illinois Central Illinois Pub Serv Co for October 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-10 Utility Company Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) Place Illinois Start Date 2008-10-01 End Date 2008-11-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 27599 Residential Sales (MWh) 248769 Residential Consumers 329654 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 19506 Commercial Sales (MWh) 193998 Commercial Consumers 48492 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1811 Industrial Sales (MWh) 14741 Industrial Consumers 477 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 55 Other Sales (MWh) 713 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 48971 Total Sales (MWh) 458221 Total Consumers 378624 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1]

257

City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - December 2008 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City of Detroit for City of Detroit for December 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-12 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date 2008-12-01 End Date 2009-01-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 1.8 Residential Sales (MWh) 18.3 Residential Consumers 80 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 3407 Commercial Sales (MWh) 34836 Commercial Consumers 118 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 38.9 Other Sales (MWh) 376 Other Consumers 1 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 3447.7 Total Sales (MWh) 35230.3 Total Consumers 199 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=City_of_Detroit_(Michigan)_EIA_Revenue_and_Sales_-_December_2008&oldid=19459

258

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - June  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

June June 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for June 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-06 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place Mississippi Start Date 2008-06-01 End Date 2008-07-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 4308 Residential Sales (MWh) 43136 Residential Consumers 35693 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 2163 Commercial Sales (MWh) 20896 Commercial Consumers 8204 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1584 Industrial Sales (MWh) 20161 Industrial Consumers 21 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 8055 Total Sales (MWh) 84193 Total Consumers 43918 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1]

259

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - January  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

January January 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for January 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-01 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place Mississippi Start Date 2008-01-01 End Date 2008-02-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 4728 Residential Sales (MWh) 52804 Residential Consumers 35677 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 1764 Commercial Sales (MWh) 17519 Commercial Consumers 8082 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1337 Industrial Sales (MWh) 17398 Industrial Consumers 20 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 7829 Total Sales (MWh) 87721 Total Consumers 43779 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1]

260

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - April  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

April April 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for April 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-04 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place Mississippi Start Date 2008-04-01 End Date 2008-05-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 3675 Residential Sales (MWh) 35568 Residential Consumers 35751 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 1765 Commercial Sales (MWh) 14949 Commercial Consumers 8105 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1350 Industrial Sales (MWh) 18637 Industrial Consumers 20 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 6790 Total Sales (MWh) 69154 Total Consumers 43876 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1]

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - July  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

July July 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for July 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-07 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place Mississippi Start Date 2008-07-01 End Date 2008-08-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 5325 Residential Sales (MWh) 54199 Residential Consumers 35931 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 2496 Commercial Sales (MWh) 24576 Commercial Consumers 8442 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1484 Industrial Sales (MWh) 18327 Industrial Consumers 21 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 9305 Total Sales (MWh) 97102 Total Consumers 44394 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1]

262

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON ENERGY CONVERSION, VOL. 19, NO. 1, MARCH 2004 151 Production Cost Analysis of Dispersed Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) resources to meet forecasted load growth, particularly the application of photovoltaic (PV) generation. II, called area , has self-sufficiency in generation capacity to meet its current and forecasted load for area to meet its forecasted load effectively. This re- quires the installation of additional generation

Gross, George

263

System performance and cost sensitivity comparisons of stretched membrane heliostat reflectors with current generation glass/metal concepts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heliostat costs have long been recognized as a major factor in the cost of solar central receiver plants. Research on stretched membrane heliostats has been emphasized because of their potential as a cost-effective alternative to current glass/metal designs. However, the cost and performance potential of stretched membrane heliostats from a system perspective has not been studied until this time. The optical performance of individual heliostats is predicted here using results established in previous structural studies. These performance predictions are used to compare both focused and unfocused stretched membrane heliostats with state-of-the-art glass/metal heliostats from a systems perspective. We investigated the sensitivity of the relative cost and performance of fields of heliostats to a large number of parameter variations, including system size, delivery temperature, heliostat module size, surface specularity, hemispherical reflectance, and macroscopic surface quality. The results indicate that focused stretched membrane systems should have comparable performance levels to those of current glass/metal heliostat systems. Further, because of their relatively lower cost, stretched membrane heliostats should provide an economically attractive alternative to current glass/metal heliostats over essentially the entire range of design parameters studied. Unfocused stretched membrane heliostats may also be attractive for a somewhat more limited range of applications, including the larger plant sizes and lower delivery temperatures.

Murphy, L.M.; Anderson, J.V.; Short, W.; Wendelin, T.

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 5 Report: Generation IV Reactor Virtual Mockup Proof-of-Principle Study  

SciTech Connect

Task 5 report is part of a 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. Created a virtual mockup of PBMR reactor cavity and discussed applications of virtual mockup technology to improve Gen IV design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

265

Conceptual design and cost evaluation of organic Rankine cycle electric generating plant powered by medium temperature geothermal water  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The economic production of electrical power from high temperature steam and liquid dominated geothermal resources has been demonstrated. Large quantities of geothermal energy are considered to exist at moderate temperatures, however, the economics of converting this energy into electricity has not been established. This paper presents the design concept of a dual boiler isobutane cycle selected for use with the moderate temperature hydrothermal resource and presents a cost estimate for a 10 and 50 MW power plant. Cost of electrical power from these plants is estimated and compared with that from coal, oil and nuclear plants. The impact of selling a portion of the residual heat in the geothermal effluent is assessed. (auth)

Dart, R.H.; Neill, D.T.; Whitbeck, J.F.

1975-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - January 2009 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A & N Electric Coop A & N Electric Coop for January 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2009-01 Utility Company A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) Place Maryland Start Date 2009-01-01 End Date 2009-02-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 33.241 Residential Sales (MWh) 268.236 Residential Consumers 283 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 7.293 Commercial Sales (MWh) 55.35 Commercial Consumers 48 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 40.534 Total Sales (MWh) 323.586 Total Consumers 331 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_%26_N_Electric_Coop_(Maryland)_EIA_Revenue_and_Sales_-_January_2009&oldid=12012

267

A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - December 2008 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A & N Electric Coop A & N Electric Coop for December 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-12 Utility Company A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) Place Maryland Start Date 2008-12-01 End Date 2009-01-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 24.33 Residential Sales (MWh) 185.391 Residential Consumers 283 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 5.013 Commercial Sales (MWh) 35.107 Commercial Consumers 48 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 29.343 Total Sales (MWh) 220.498 Total Consumers 331 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_%26_N_Electric_Coop_(Maryland)_EIA_Revenue_and_Sales_-_December_2008&oldid=19445

268

A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - January 2008 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A & N Electric Coop A & N Electric Coop for January 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-01 Utility Company A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) Place Maryland Start Date 2008-01-01 End Date 2008-02-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 27.415 Residential Sales (MWh) 227.468 Residential Consumers 280 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 6.434 Commercial Sales (MWh) 50.297 Commercial Consumers 48 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 33.849 Total Sales (MWh) 277.765 Total Consumers 328 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_%26_N_Electric_Coop_(Maryland)_EIA_Revenue_and_Sales_-_January_2008&oldid=13616"

269

A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - January 2008 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

8 8 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for January 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-01 Utility Company A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) Place Virginia Start Date 2008-01-01 End Date 2008-02-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 2520.599 Residential Sales (MWh) 21314.163 Residential Consumers 29923 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 713.471 Commercial Sales (MWh) 6200.643 Commercial Consumers 4127 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 988.903 Industrial Sales (MWh) 11242.109 Industrial Consumers 17 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 4222.973 Total Sales (MWh) 38756.915 Total Consumers 34067 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly

270

A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) EIA Revenue and Sales - June 2008 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

June 2008 June 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for A & N Electric Coop for June 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-06 Utility Company A & N Electric Coop (Virginia) Place Virginia Start Date 2008-06-01 End Date 2008-07-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 2705.705 Residential Sales (MWh) 20742.585 Residential Consumers 29861 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 1580.369 Commercial Sales (MWh) 12964.065 Commercial Consumers 4081 Industrial Revenue (Thousand $) 1437.835 Industrial Sales (MWh) 14640.78 Industrial Consumers 17 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 5723.909 Total Sales (MWh) 48347.43 Total Consumers 33959 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly

271

City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2008 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » City of Detroit (Michigan) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for City of Detroit for February 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-02 Utility Company City of Detroit (Michigan) Place Michigan Start Date 2008-02-01 End Date 2008-03-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 1.5 Residential Sales (MWh) 17 Residential Consumers 76 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 4083 Commercial Sales (MWh) 43432 Commercial Consumers 123 Other Revenue (Thousand $) 55 Other Sales (MWh) 494

272

A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) EIA Revenue and Sales - April 2008 | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A & N Electric Coop A & N Electric Coop for April 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-04 Utility Company A & N Electric Coop (Maryland) Place Maryland Start Date 2008-04-01 End Date 2008-05-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 19.183 Residential Sales (MWh) 150.454 Residential Consumers 282 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 6.078 Commercial Sales (MWh) 47.676 Commercial Consumers 48 Total Revenue (Thousand $) 25.261 Total Sales (MWh) 198.13 Total Consumers 330 Source: Energy Information Administration. Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data [1] Previous | Next Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=A_%26_N_Electric_Coop_(Maryland)_EIA_Revenue_and_Sales_-_April_2008&oldid=15216

273

Flash2007-33RevenueTierDiscounts.rtf  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REVENUE TIER DISCOUNT REVENUE TIER DISCOUNT S* Service Category Baseline $0-$9M Tier 1 $10-34M Tier 2 $ 35-74M Tier 3 $75-149M Tier 4 $150-199M Tier 5 $200M+ Express Next Day First AM MAS MAS MAS MAS MAS MAS Express Next Day Mid-Morning MAS 21.9% 24.0% 26.9% 29.2% 30.2% Express Next Day Afternoon MAS 21.9% 24.0% 26.9% 29.2% 30.2% Express Second Day MAS 21.9% 24.0% 26.9% 29.2% 30.2% Express Third Day MAS 21.9% 24.0% 26.9% 29.2% 30.2% Intl Priority - Puerto Rico MAS MAS MAS MAS MAS MAS Intl Economy - Puerto Rico MAS MAS MAS MAS MAS MAS Same Day Service MAS MAS MAS MAS MAS MAS Standard Ground** MAS 1.7% 4.8% 13.2% 15.2% 17.3% Ground $4,000 - $40,000** Not Offered 4.8% 11.1% 15.2% 17.3% 27.9% Ground $40,000+" Not Offered 39.2% 39.2% 39.2% 39.2% 39.2% *Discounts shown EXCLUDE the waiver of fuel surcharges and are thus understated

274

Reliable, Low-Cost Distributed Generator/Utility System Interconnect: Final Subcontract Report, November 2001-March 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the detailed study and development of new GE anti-islanding controls for two classes of distributed generation. One is inverter-interfaced, while the other is synchronous machine interfaced.

Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.; Li, L.; Zhou, R.; Garces, L.; Dame, M.

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Plant power : the cost of using biomass for power generation and potential for decreased greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To date, biomass has not been a large source of power generation in the United States, despite the potential for greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits from displacing coal with carbon neutral biomass. In this thesis, the fuel cycle ...

Cuellar, Amanda Dulcinea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Maximising Revenue in the Airline Industry Under One-Way Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 3, 2003 ... Maximising Revenue in the Airline Industry Under One-Way Pricing. Miguel F Anjos (anjos ***at*** stanfordalumni.org) Russell C H Cheng...

277

Oil revenue and economic development case of Libyan economy (1970-2007).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This study aims to investigate different aspects of the relationship between oil revenues and economic development for the Libyan economy. To do so this thesis (more)

Ali, Issa Saleh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Assessment of generic solar thermal systems for large power applications: analysis of electric power generating costs for systems larger than 10 MWe  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seven generic types of collectors, together with associated subsystems for electric power generation, were considered. The collectors can be classified into three categories: (1) two-axis tracking (with compound-curvature reflecting surfaces); (2) one-axis tracking (with single-curvature reflecting surfaces); and (3) nontracking (with low-concentration reflecting surfaces). All seven collectors were analyzed in conceptual system configurations with Rankine-cycle engines. In addition, two of the collectors were analyzed with Brayton-cycle engines, and one was analyzed with a Stirling-cycle engine. With these engine options, and the consideration of both thermal and electrical storage for the Brayton-cycle central receiver, 11 systems were formulated for analysis. Conceptual designs developed for the 11 systems were based on common assumptions of available technology in the 1990 to 2000 time frame. No attempt was made to perform a detailed optimization of each conceptual design. Rather, designs best suited for a comparative evaluation of the concepts were formulated. Costs were estimated on the basis of identical assumptions, ground rules, methodologies, and unit costs of materials and labor applied uniformly to all of the concepts. The computer code SOLSTEP was used to analyze the thermodynamic performance characteristics and energy costs of the 11 concepts. Year-long simulations were performed using meteorological and insolation data for Barstow, California. Results for each concept include levelized energy costs and capacity factors for various combinations of storage capacity and collector field size.

Apley, W.J.; Bird, S.P.; Brown, D.R.; Drost, M.K.; Fort, J.A.; Garrett-Price, B.A.; Patton, W.P.; Williams, T.A.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Transparent Cost Database | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hide data for this chart (-)Show data for this chart (+) Loading data... Transparent Cost Database Generation Showing: Historical Projections Year Published: Release mouse to...

280

The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the U.S., 1990-1991: Summary of Theory, Data, Methods, and Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to count all price-times-quantity oil revenues as the cost,cost simply as the quantity of crude oil embodied in highwaythe actual price-times-quantity payment for oil. That is, in

Delucchi, Mark A.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

General Electric Uses an Integrated Framework for Product Costing, Demand Forecasting, and Capacity Planning of New Photovoltaic Technology Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

General Electric (GE) Energy's nascent solar business has revenues of over $100 million, expects those revenues to grow to over $1 billion in the next three years, and has plans to rapidly grow the business beyond this period. GE Global Research (GEGR), ... Keywords: capital budgeting, cost analysis, facilities planning, forecasting, mathematical programming, risk

Bex George Thomas; Srinivas Bollapragada

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

The cost of geothermal energy in the western US region:a portfolio-based approach a mean-variance portfolio optimization of the regions' generating mix to 2013.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Energy planning represents an investment-decision problem. Investors commonly evaluate such problems using portfolio theory to manage risk and maximize portfolio performance under a variety of unpredictable economic outcomes. Energy planners need to similarly abandon their reliance on traditional, ''least-cost'' stand-alone technology cost estimates and instead evaluate conventional and renewable energy sources on the basis of their portfolio cost--their cost contribution relative to their risk contribution to a mix of generating assets. This report describes essential portfolio-theory ideas and discusses their application in the Western US region. The memo illustrates how electricity-generating mixes can benefit from additional shares of geothermal and other renewables. Compared to fossil-dominated mixes, efficient portfolios reduce generating cost while including greater renewables shares in the mix. This enhances energy security. Though counter-intuitive, the idea that adding more costly geothermal can actually reduce portfolio-generating cost is consistent with basic finance theory. An important implication is that in dynamic and uncertain environments, the relative value of generating technologies must be determined not by evaluating alternative resources, but by evaluating alternative resource portfolios. The optimal results for the Western US Region indicate that compared to the EIA target mixes, there exist generating mixes with larger geothermal shares at equal-or-lower expected cost and risk.

Beurskens, Luuk (ECN-Energy Research Centre of the Netherland); Jansen, Jaap C. (ECN-Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands); Awerbuch, Shimon Ph.D. (.University of Sussex, Brighton, UK); Drennen, Thomas E.

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce Operating Costs of Small Producers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title: Electrical Power Generation from Produced Water: Field Demonstration of Ways to Reduce produced water to create "green" electricity usable on site or for transmission off site . The goal the environmental impact by creating green electricity using produced water and no additional fossil fuel. Approach

284

Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO{sub 2} Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect

TDA Research, Inc. has developed a novel sorbent based post-combustion CO{sub 2} removal technology. This low cost sorbent can be regenerated with low-pressure (ca. 1 atm) superheated steam without temperature swing or pressure-swing. The isothermal and isobaric operation is a unique and advantageous feature of this process. The objective of this project was to demonstrate the technical and economic merit of this sorbent based CO{sub 2} capture approach. Through laboratory, bench-scale and field testing we demonstrated that this technology can effectively and efficiently capture CO{sub 2} produced at an existing pulverized coal power plants. TDA Research, Inc is developing both the solid sorbent and the process designed around that material. This project addresses the DOE Program Goal to develop a capture technology that can be added to an existing or new coal fired power plant, and can capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced with the lowest possible increase in the cost of energy. .

Elliott, Jeannine

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

COST FUNCTION STUDIES FOR POWER REACTORS  

SciTech Connect

A function to evaluate the cost of electricity produced by a nuclear power reactor was developed. The basic equation, revenue = capital charges + profit + operating expenses, was expanded in terms of various cost parameters to enable analysis of multiregion nuclear reactors with uranium and/or plutonium for fuel. A corresponding IBM 704 computer program, which will compute either the price of electricity or the value of plutonium, is presented in detail. (auth)

Heestand, J.; Wos, L.T.

1961-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Revenue Costs and Incentive Effects of the Mortgage Interest Deduction for Owner-Occupied Housing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We draw on household-level data from the 2004 Survey of Consumer Finances to analyze how changes in the income tax deduction for mortgage interest would affect the distribution of income tax liabilities and the consumption ...

Poterba, James M.

287

Analysis of the total system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 -- a fee levied on electricity generated in commercial nuclear power plants -- is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee and is consistent with the program strategy and plans contained in the DOE`s Draft 1988 Mission Plan Amendment. The total-system cost for the system with a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $24 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $31 to $33 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel to be disposed of. The $7 billion cost savings for the single-repository system in comparison with the two-repository system is due to the elimination of $3 billion for second-repository development and $7 billion for the second-repository facility. These savings are offset by $2 billion in additional costs at the first repository and $1 billion in combined higher costs for the MRS facility and transportation. 55 refs., 2 figs., 24 tabs.

NONE

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Carbon Tax Revenue and the Budget Deficit: A Win-Win-Win Solution?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bush-era tax cuts are scheduled to expire at the end of 2012, leading to interest in raising revenue through a carbon tax. This revenue could be used to either cut other taxes or to avoid cuts in Federal programs. There ...

Rausch, Sebastian

289

Pareto-improving and revenue-neutral congestion pricing schemes in two-mode traffic networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper studies a Pareto-improving and revenue-neutral congestion pricing scheme on a simple two-mode (highway and transit) network: this scheme aims at simultaneously improving system performance, making every individual user better off, and having ... Keywords: Congestion pricing, Pareto-improving, Revenue-neutral, Traffic equilibrium, Two-mode network

Yang Liu; Xiaolei Guo; Hai Yang

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group Maximizes Revenue Through Improved Demand Management and Price Optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under changing market conditions for the hospitality industry, the Carlson Rezidor Hotel Group CRHG collaborated with JDA Software Group to use operations research to drive higher revenue for its hoteliers and to stay ahead of the competition. This highly ... Keywords: competitor prices, demand forecasting, hospitality, hotel, price elasticity, price optimization, revenue management

Pelin Pekgn; Ronald P. Menich; Suresh Acharya; Phillip G. Finch; Frederic Deschamps; Kathleen Mallery; Jim Van Sistine; Kyle Christianson; James Fuller

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - January  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) EIA Revenue and Sales - January 2009 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for 4-County Electric Power Assn for January 2009. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2009-01 Utility Company 4-County Electric Power Assn (Mississippi) Place Mississippi Start Date 2009-01-01 End Date 2009-02-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 6009 Residential Sales (MWh) 56047 Residential Consumers 36041 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 2159 Commercial Sales (MWh) 17259 Commercial Consumers 8727

292

Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - February  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - February 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Central Illinois Pub Serv Co for February 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-02 Utility Company Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) Place Illinois Start Date 2008-02-01 End Date 2008-03-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 32207 Residential Sales (MWh) 371971 Residential Consumers 331256 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 18469 Commercial Sales (MWh) 200148 Commercial Consumers 52121

293

Form EIA-826 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

26 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data 26 Database Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Dataset Summary Description EIA previously collected sales and revenue data in a category called "Other." This category was defined as including activities such as public street highway lighting, other sales to public authorities, sales to railroads and railways, and interdepartmental sales. EIA has revised its survey to separate the transportation sales and reassign the other activities to the commercial and industrial sectors as appropriate. This is an electric utility data file that includes utility level retail sales of electricity and associated revenue by end-use sector, State, and reporting month. The data source is the survey: Form EIA-826, "Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Report

294

Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - November  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - November 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Central Illinois Pub Serv Co for November 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-11 Utility Company Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) Place Illinois Start Date 2008-11-01 End Date 2008-12-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 36996 Residential Sales (MWh) 319196 Residential Consumers 331439 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 20266 Commercial Sales (MWh) 191904 Commercial Consumers 48563

295

Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - September  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) EIA Revenue and Sales - September 2008 Jump to: navigation, search EIA Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data for Central Illinois Pub Serv Co for September 2008. Monthly Electric Utility Sales and Revenue Data Short Name 2008-09 Utility Company Central Illinois Pub Serv Co (Illinois) Place Illinois Start Date 2008-09-01 End Date 2008-10-01 Residential Revenue(Thousand $) 21156 Residential Sales (MWh) 187445 Residential Consumers 329283 Commercial Revenue(Thousand $) 14874 Commercial Sales (MWh) 128656 Commercial Consumers 48190

296

Reserved or On-Demand Instances? A Revenue Maximization Model for Cloud Providers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the problem of managing a server farm in a way that attempts to maximize the net revenue earned by a cloud provider by renting servers to customers according to a typical Platform-as-a-Service model. The Cloud provider offers its resources to two classes of customers: `premium' and `basic'. Premium customers pay upfront fees to reserve servers for a specified period of time (e.g. a year). Premium customers can submit jobs for their reserved servers at any time and pay a fee for the server-hours they use. The provider is liable to pay a penalty every time a `premium' job can not be executed due to lack of resources. On the other hand, `basic' customers are served on a best-effort basis, and pay a server-hour fee that may be higher than the one paid by premium customers. The provider incurs energy costs when running servers. Hence, it has an incentive to turn off idle servers. The question of how to choose the number of servers to allocate to each pool (basic and premium) is answered by analyzing a s...

Mazzucco, Michele

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Wind turbine reliability :understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce cost of energy.

Walford, Christopher A. (Global Energy Concepts. Kirkland, WA)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Wind turbine reliability :understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.  

SciTech Connect

Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce cost of energy.

Walford, Christopher A. (Global Energy Concepts. Kirkland, WA)

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Interim report on GAO's review of the total cost estimate for the Clinch River Breeder Reactor project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The following sctions discuss (1) the process used by the DOE to estimate CRBR project costs; (2) the inflation allowance used in DOE's cost estimate, which could overstate CRBR costs; (3) the cost of plutonium, revenue projections, and contingency allowances, which may understate the total cost estimate; and (4) several items which are not included in the cost estimate but which, in our view, either will or could result in cost to the Government.

Not Available

1982-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

300

The value of revenue management innovation in a competitive airline industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The value of revenue management to the airlines has been amply demonstrated, both by industry experience and in simulation studies of the reservation process. However, there have been no attempts to determine if the benefits ...

Wilson, John L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

"Case Name","CO2 Fees",,"Cap and Trade","Fee/Allowance Revenue...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"Table 1. CO2 FeeCap and Trade Runs for AEO Supplement" "Case Name","CO2 Fees",,"Cap and Trade","FeeAllowance Revenue Treatment",,,"Offsets" ,"Start ()","Real Rate of...

302

Federal Offshore Statistics, 1993. Leasing, exploration, production, and revenue as of December 31, 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document contains statistical data on the following: federal offshore lands; offshore leasing activity and status; offshore development activity; offshore production of crude oil and natural gas; federal offshore oil and natural gas sales volume and royalties; revenue from federal offshore leases; disbursement of federal offshore revenue; reserves and resource estimates of offshore oil and natural gas; oil pollution in US and international waters; and international activities and marine minerals. A glossary is included.

Francois, D.K.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

303

CAES Updated Cost Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed Air Energy Storage Systems (CAES) for bulk energy storage applications have been receiving renewed interest. Increased penetration of large quantities of intermittent wind generation are requiring utilities to re-examine the cost and value of CAES systems. New second generation CAES cycles have been identified which offer the potential for lower capital and operating costs. This project was undertaken to update and summarize the capital and operating costs and performance features of second ge...

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

304

Optimizing Ship Routing to Maximize Fleet Revenue at Danaos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present an innovative toolkit that Danaos Corporation developed and deployed to optimize ship routing. Operations Research In Ship MAnagement ORISMA provides a clear answer to the conventional dilemma of least-cost voyage versus faster ... Keywords: cargo transport optimization, dynamic programming, maritime routing, voyage planning

Takis Varelas; Sofia Archontaki; John Dimotikalis; Osman Turan; Iraklis Lazakis; Orestis Varelas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

EXPENDITURES General Fund Expenditures-2.0 % Page 12 NON-GENERAL FUND REVENUES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Key to revenue trend indicators: ?NEUTRAL ? = Variance of-1 % to +2 % compared to projections. ?POSITIVE ? = Positive variance of>+2 % compared to projections. ?WARNING ? = Negative variance of-1 % to-4 % compared to projections. ?NEGATIVE ? = Negative variance of>-4 % compared to projections. 1 First Quarter 2013- May 2013CITY FINANCIAL OVERVIEW EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Total General Fund revenue receipts for the first quarter of 2013, in the amount of $4,175,309, are above the projection by $172,955, or 4.3%. Total General Fund expenditures, in the amount of $4,508,707, are below the projection by $92,764, or 2.0%. Street Fund revenue receipts for the first quarter of 2013, including transfers in, total $511,302 and are $3,654, or 0.7%, above the projection. Street Fund expenditures, including transfers out, total $460,168 and are $19,734, or 4.1%, below the projection. Surface Water Utility Fund (SWM) revenue receipts for the first quarter of 2013 totaling $114,495 are $42,761, or 59.6%, above the projection. SWM expenditures total $691,401 and are $90,757, or 15.1%, above the projection. Real Estate Excise Tax (REET) revenue receipts for the first quarter of 2013 totaling $231,011 are $7,274, or 3.3%, ahead of the projection and

unknown authors

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Properties of Electricity Prices and the Drivers of Interconnector Revenue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

differences. This can be seen in Figure 1. One would expect electricity prices in the UK and the Netherlands to be driven by the cost of producing electricity from fossil fuels and electricity prices in Norway to be determined by the deviation of reservoir... in fuel prices. The consistent hourly, daily and seasonal price differences between the UK and the Netherlands are much lower. However, the stochastic price shocks in the two countries are not perfectly correlated, meaning that arbitrage opportunities...

Parail, Vladimir

307

Calculating Wind Integration Costs: Separating Wind Energy Value from Integration Cost Impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Accurately calculating integration costs is important so that wind generation can be fairly compared with alternative generation technologies.

Milligan, M.; Kirby, B.

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Revenue ruling 73-538: the service's assault on percentage depletion for ''D'' miners  

SciTech Connect

In this article, the author examines the Internal Revenue Service's ruling that storage and loading for shipment at the mine site are nonmining processes for ores and minerals described in section 613(c)(4)(D) of the Internal Revenue Code. He explains the tax consequences of the ruling and discusses the correctness of the position taken by the Internal Revenue Service in light of the relevant case law and the language and legislative history of the statute. The effect of the ruling is to reduce the percentage depletion deduction available to many miners of ores and minerals described in section 613(c)(4)(D), including miners of lead, zinc, copper, gold, silver, uranium, fluorspar, potash, soda ash, garnet and tungsten. (JMT)

Barnes, D.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity (Thousands Dollars) by State by Provide  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity (Thousands Dollars) by State by Provider, 1990-2012" Revenue from Retail Sales of Electricity (Thousands Dollars) by State by Provider, 1990-2012" "Year","State","Industry Sector Category","Residential","Commercial","Industrial","Transportation","Other","Total" 2012,"AK","Total Electric Industry",386304,429152,232325,0,"NA",1047781 2012,"AL","Total Electric Industry",3491380,2318146,2100936,0,"NA",7910462 2012,"AR","Total Electric Industry",1664696,933567,971266,52,"NA",3569581 2012,"AZ","Total Electric Industry",3718357,2829551,813094,0,"NA",7361001 2012,"CA","Total Electric Industry",13821565,16327164,4925482,49095,"NA",35123306

310

Point to Point and Flow-based Financial Transmission Rights: Revenue Adequacy and Performance Incen-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mechanism for defining transmission rights in North Ameri- can restructured electricity markets is throughCHAPTER 3: Point to Point and Flow-based Financial Transmission Rights: Revenue Adequacy and Performance Incen- tives Shmuel S. Oren1 Abstract We provide an introduction to financial transmission rights

Oren, Shmuel S.

311

Supply chain network equilibrium with revenue sharing contract under demand disruptions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Contract is a common and effective mechanism for supply chain coordination, which has been studied extensively in recent years. For a supply chain network model, contracts can be used to coordinate it because it is too ideal to obtain the network equilibrium ... Keywords: Supply chain network, coordination, demand disruptions, equilibrium, revenue sharing contract

A. -Ting Yang; Lin-Du Zhao

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Assessing the Impact of Heat Rejection Technology on CSP Plant Revenue: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper explores the impact of cooling technology on revenue for hybrid-cooled plants with varying wet cooling penetration for four representative locations in the American Southwest. The impact of ACC design-point initial temperature difference (ITD - the difference between the condensing steam temperature and ambient dry-bulb) is also included in the analysis.

Wagner, M. J.; Kutscher, C. F.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Virtual item sales as a revenue model: identifying attributes that drive purchase decisions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global market for virtual items, characters and currencies was estimated to exceed 2.1 Billion USD in 2007. Selling virtual goods for real money is an increasingly common revenue model not only for online games and virtual worlds, but for social ... Keywords: Business model, Consumer behaviour, Online communities, Purchase drivers, RMT, Virtual consumption

Vili Lehdonvirta

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Tax-versus-trading and efficient revenue recycling as issues for greenhouse gas abatement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Tax-versus-trading and efficient revenue recycling as issues for greenhouse gas abatement Final, climate policy, global Abstract. We give empirical welfare results for global greenhouse gas emission recycling together. #12;1. Introduction Designing policy mechanisms for abating greenhouse gas emissions

Pezzey, Jack

315

Wind Generation in the Future Competitive California Power Market  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this work is to develop improved methods for assessing the viability of wind generation in competitive electricity markets. The viability of a limited number of possible wind sites is assessed using a geographic information system (GIS) to determine the cost of development, and Elfin, an electric utility production costing and capacity expansion model, to estimate the possible revenues and profits of wind farms at the sites. This approach improves on a simple profitability calculation by using a site-specific development cost calculation and by taking the effect of time varying market prices on revenues into account. The first component of the work is to develop data characterizing wind resources suitable for use in production costing and capacity expansion models, such as Elfin, that are capable of simulating competitive electricity markets. An improved representation of California wind resources is built, using information collected by the California Energy Commission (CE C) in previous site evaluations, and by using a GIS approach to estimating development costs at 36 specific sites. These sites, which have been identified as favorable for wind development, are placed on Digital Elevation Maps (DEMs) and development costs are calculated based on distances to roads and transmission lines. GIS is also used to develop the potential capacity at each site by making use of the physical characteristics of the terrain, such as ridge lengths. In the second part of the effort, using a previously developed algorithm for simulating competitive entry to the California electricity market, the Elfin model is used to gauge the viability of wind farms at the 36 sites. The results of this exercise are forecasts of profitable development levels at each site and the effects of these developments on the electricity system as a whole. Under best guess assumptions, including prohibition of new nuclear and coal capacity, moderate increase in gas prices and some decline in renewable capital costs, about 7.35 GW of the 10 GW potential capacity at the 36 specific sites is profitably developed and 62 TWh of electricity produced per annum by the year 2030. Most of the development happens during the earlier years of the forecast. Sensitivity of these results to future gas price scenarios is also presented. This study also demonstrates that an analysis based on a simple levelized profitability calculation approach does not sufficiently capture the implications of time varying prices in a competitive market.

Sezgen, O.; Marnay, C.; Bretz, S.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Distributed Generation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Untapped Value of Backup Generation Untapped Value of Backup Generation While new guidelines and regulations such as IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) 1547 have come a long way in addressing interconnection standards for distributed generation, utilities have largely overlooked the untapped potential of these resources. Under certain conditions, these units (primarily backup generators) represent a significant source of power that can deliver utility services at lower costs than traditional centralized solutions. These backup generators exist today in large numbers and provide utilities with another option to reduce peak load, relieve transmission congestion, and improve power reliability. Backup generation is widely deployed across the United States. Carnegie Mellon's Electricity

317

WSRC Nuclear Materials Cost Module  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Office (GAO) WSRC NM Cost Module Generates WSRC monthly and fiscal year to date Inventory and Manufacturing Statement for government owned accountable nuclear materials....

318

Changes related to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Changes related to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation" Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation...

319

Optimal Siting and Sizing of Solar Photovoltaic Distributed Generation to Minimize Loss, Present Value of Future Asset Upgrades and Peak Demand Costs on a Real Distribution Feeder.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The increasing penetration of distributed generation (DG) in power distribution systems presents technical and economic benefits as well as integration challenges to utility engineers. Governments (more)

Mukerji, Meghana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Federal offshore statistics: 1992. Leasing, exploration, production, and revenues as of December 31, 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act, enacted in 1953 and amended several times, charges the Secretary of the Interior with the responsibility for administering and managing mineral exploration and development of the outer continental shelf, as well as for conserving its natural resources. This report documents the following: Federal offshore lands; offshore leasing activity and status; offshore development activity; offshore production of crude oil and natural gas; Federal offshore oil and natural gas sales volume and royalties; revenue from Federal offshore leases; disbursement of Federal offshore revenue; reserves and resource estimates of offshore oil and natural gas; oil pollution in US and international waters; and international activities and marine minerals. 11 figs., 83 tabs.

Francois, D.K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Utilizing the heat content of gas-to-liquids by-product streams for commercial power generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Gas-to-liquids (GTL) processes produce a large fraction of by-products whose disposal or handling ordinarily becomes a cost rather than benefit. As an alternative strategy to market stranded gas reserves, GTL provides middle distillates to an unsaturated global market and offers opportunities to generate power for commercial purposes from waste by-product streams, which normally are associated with increased expenses incurred from additional handling cost. The key concept investigated in this work is the possibility of integrating the GTL process with power generation using conventional waste by-product steam streams. Simulation of the integrated process was conducted with the aim of identifying the critical operating conditions for successful integration of the GTL and power generation processes. About 500 MW of electric power can be generated from 70% of the exit steam streams, with around 20 to 25% steam plant thermal efficiency. A detailed economic analysis on the LNG, stand-alone GTL, and Integrated GTL Power-Generation plants indicates that the integrated system is more profitable than the other options considered. Justifying the technology and economics involved in the use of the by-product streams to generate power could increase the net revenue and overall profitability of GTL projects. This technology may be transferable to GTL projects in the world, wherever a market for generated power exists.

Adegoke, Adesola Ayodeji

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Examination of incentive mechanisms for innovative technologies applicable to utility and nonutility power generators  

SciTech Connect

Innovative technologies, built by either utility or nonutility power generators, have the potential to lower costs with less environmental emissions than conventional technologies. However, the public-good nature of information, along with uncertain costs, performance, and reliability, discourages rapid adoption of these technologies. The effect of regulation of electricity production may also have an adverse impact on motivation to innovate. Slower penetration of cleaner, more efficient technologies could result in greater levels of pollution, higher electricity prices, and a reduction in international competitiveness. Regulatory incentives could encourage adoption and deployment of innovative technologies of all kinds, inducting clean coal technologies. Such incentives must be designed to offset risks inherent in innovative technology and encourage cost-effective behavior. To evaluate innovative and conventional technologies equally, the incremental cost of risk (ICR) of adopting the innovative technology must be determined. Through the ICR, the magnitude of incentive required to make a utility (or nonutility) power generator equally motivated to use either conventional or innovative technologies can be derived. Two technology risks are examined: A construction risk, represented by a 15% cost overrun, and an operating risk, represented by a increased forced outage rate (decreased capacity factor). Different incentive mechanisms and measurement criteria are used to assess the effects of these risks on ratepayers and shareholders. In most cases, a regulatory incentive could offset the perceived risks while encouraging cost-effective behavior by both utility and nonutility power generators. Not only would the required incentive be recouped, but the revenue requirements would be less for the innovative technology; also, less environmental pollution would be generated. In the long term, ratepayers and society would benefit from innovative technologies.

McDermott, K.A. [Illinois Commerce Commission, Springfield, IL (United States); Bailey, K.A.; South, D.W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment and Information Sciences Div.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Construction Cost Reductions through the Use of Virtual Environments - Task 4 Report: Virtual Mockup Maintenance Task Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

Task 4 report of 3 year DOE NERI-sponsored effort evaluating immersive virtual reality (CAVE) technology for design review, construction planning, and maintenance planning and training for next generation nuclear power plants. Program covers development of full-scale virtual mockups generated from 3D CAD data presented in a CAVE visualization facility. This report focuses on using Full-scale virtual mockups for nuclear power plant training applications.

Timothy Shaw; Anthony Baratta; Vaughn Whisker

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

324

Preliminary estimates of the total-system cost for the restructured program: An addendum to the May 1989 analysis of the total-system life cycle cost for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program  

SciTech Connect

The total-system life-cycle cost (TSLCC) analysis for the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program is an ongoing activity that helps determine whether the revenue-producing mechanism established by the Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 - a fee levied on electricity generated and sold by commercial nuclear power plants - is sufficient to cover the cost of the program. This report provides cost estimates for the sixth annual evaluation of the adequacy of the fee. The costs contained in this report represent a preliminary analysis of the cost impacts associated with the Secretary of Energy`s Report to Congress on Reassessment of the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program issued in November 1989. The major elements of the restructured program announced in this report which pertain to the program`s life-cycle costs are: a prioritization of the scientific investigations program at the Yucca Mountain candidate site to focus on identification of potentially adverse conditions, a delay in the start of repository operations until 2010, the start of limited waste acceptance at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility in 1998, and the start of waste acceptance at the full-capability MRS facility in 2,000. Based on the restructured program, the total-system cost for the system with a repository at the candidate site at Yucca Mountain in Nevada, a facility for monitored retrievable storage (MRS), and a transportation system is estimated at $26 billion (expressed in constant 1988 dollars). In the event that a second repository is required and is authorized by the Congress, the total-system cost is estimated at $34 to $35 billion, depending on the quantity of spent fuel and high-level waste (HLW) requiring disposal. 17 figs., 17 tabs.

NONE

1990-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

COSTS OF NUCLEAR POWER  

SciTech Connect

The discussion on the costs of nuclear power from stationary plants, designed primarily for the generation of electricity. deals with those plants in operation, being built, or being designed for construction at an early date. An attempt is made to consider the power costs on the basis of consistent definitions and assumptions for the various nuclear plants and for comparable fossil-fuel plants. Information on several new power reactor projects is included. (auth)

1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Wind turbine reliability : understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.  

SciTech Connect

Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. Cost of energy (COE) is a key project evaluation metric, both in commercial applications and in the U.S. federal wind energy program. To reflect this commercial reality, the wind energy research community has adopted COE as a decision-making and technology evaluation metric. The COE metric accounts for the effects of reliability through levelized replacement cost and unscheduled maintenance cost parameters. However, unlike the other cost contributors, such as initial capital investment and scheduled maintenance and operating expenses, costs associated with component failures are necessarily speculative. They are based on assumptions about the reliability of components that in many cases have not been operated for a complete life cycle. Due to the logistical and practical difficulty of replacing major components in a wind turbine, unanticipated failures (especially serial failures) can have a large impact on the economics of a project. The uncertainty associated with long-term component reliability has direct bearing on the confidence level associated with COE projections. In addition, wind turbine technology is evolving. New materials and designs are being incorporated in contemporary wind turbines with the ultimate goal of reducing weight, controlling loads, and improving energy capture. While the goal of these innovations is reduction in the COE, there is a potential impact on reliability whenever new technologies are introduced. While some of these innovations may ultimately improve reliability, in the short term, the technology risks and the perception of risk will increase. The COE metric used by researchers to evaluate technologies does not address this issue. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce COE.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Wind turbine reliability : understanding and minimizing wind turbine operation and maintenance costs.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind turbine system reliability is a critical factor in the success of a wind energy project. Poor reliability directly affects both the project's revenue stream through increased operation and maintenance (O&M) costs and reduced availability to generate power due to turbine downtime. Indirectly, the acceptance of wind-generated power by the financial and developer communities as a viable enterprise is influenced by the risk associated with the capital equipment reliability; increased risk, or at least the perception of increased risk, is generally accompanied by increased financing fees or interest rates. Cost of energy (COE) is a key project evaluation metric, both in commercial applications and in the U.S. federal wind energy program. To reflect this commercial reality, the wind energy research community has adopted COE as a decision-making and technology evaluation metric. The COE metric accounts for the effects of reliability through levelized replacement cost and unscheduled maintenance cost parameters. However, unlike the other cost contributors, such as initial capital investment and scheduled maintenance and operating expenses, costs associated with component failures are necessarily speculative. They are based on assumptions about the reliability of components that in many cases have not been operated for a complete life cycle. Due to the logistical and practical difficulty of replacing major components in a wind turbine, unanticipated failures (especially serial failures) can have a large impact on the economics of a project. The uncertainty associated with long-term component reliability has direct bearing on the confidence level associated with COE projections. In addition, wind turbine technology is evolving. New materials and designs are being incorporated in contemporary wind turbines with the ultimate goal of reducing weight, controlling loads, and improving energy capture. While the goal of these innovations is reduction in the COE, there is a potential impact on reliability whenever new technologies are introduced. While some of these innovations may ultimately improve reliability, in the short term, the technology risks and the perception of risk will increase. The COE metric used by researchers to evaluate technologies does not address this issue. This paper outlines the issues relevant to wind turbine reliability for wind turbine power generation projects. The first sections describe the current state of the industry, identify the cost elements associated with wind farm O&M and availability and discuss the causes of uncertainty in estimating wind turbine component reliability. The latter sections discuss the means for reducing O&M costs and propose O&M related research and development efforts that could be pursued by the wind energy research community to reduce COE.

Not Available

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Electricity Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Emissions Caps and the Impact of a Radical Change in Nuclear Electricity Costs journal International Journal of Energy Economics and Policy volume year month chapter...

329

A model of the Capital Cost of a natural gas-fired fuel cell based Central Utilities Plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This model defines the methods used to estimate the cost associated with acquisition and installation of capital equipment of the fuel cell systems defined by the central utility plant model. The capital cost model estimates the cost of acquiring and installing the fuel cell unit, and all auxiliary equipment such as a boiler, air conditioning, hot water storage, and pumps. The model provides a means to adjust initial cost estimates to consider learning associated with the projected level of production and installation of fuel cell systems. The capital cost estimate is an input to the cost of ownership analysis where it is combined with operating cost and revenue model estimates.

Not Available

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

330

Environmental externalities: Applying the concept to Asian coal-based power generation. [Includes external environmental and societal costs and methods of evaluating them  

SciTech Connect

This report examines the concept of environmental externality. It discusses various factors -- the atmospheric transformations, relationship of point-source emissions to ambient air quality, dose-response relationships, applicable cause-and-effect principles, and risk and valuation research -- that are considered by a number of state utilities when they apply the environmental externality concept to energy resource planning. It describes a methodology developed by Argonne National Laboratory for general use in resource planning, in combination with traditional methods that consider the cost of electricity production. Finally, it shows how the methodology can be applied in Indonesia, Thailand, and Taiwan to potential coal-fired power plant projects that will make use of clean coal technologies.

Szpunar, C.B.; Gillette, J.L.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Non-electrical uses of thermal energy generated in the production of fissile fuel in fusion--fission reactors: a comparative economic parametric analysis for a hybrid with or without synthetic fuel production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A parametric analysis has been carried out for testing the sensitivity of the synfuel production cost in relation to crucial economic and technologic quantities (investment costs of hybrid and synfuel plant, energy multiplication of the fission blanket, recirculating power fraction of the fusion driver, etc.). In addition, a minimum synfuel selling price has been evaluated, from which the fission--fusion--synfuel complex brings about a higher economic benefit than does the fusion--fission hybrid entirely devoted to fissile-fuel and electricity generation. Assuming an electricity cost of 2.7 cents/kWh, an annual investment cost per power unit of 4.2 to 6 $/GJ (132 to 189 k$/MWty) for the fission--fusion complex and 1.5 to 3 $/GJ (47 to 95 k$/MWty) for the synfuel plant, the synfuel production net cost (i.e., revenue = cost) varies between 6.5 and 8.6 $/GJ. These costs can compete with those obtained by other processes (natural gas reforming, resid partial oxidation, coal gasification, nuclear fission, solar electrolysis, etc.). This study points out a potential use of the fusion--fission hybrid other than fissile-fuel and electricity generation.

Tai, A.S.; Krakowski, R.A.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

An experimental investigation of the Hahn-Noll revenue neutral auction for emissions licenses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on three series of laboratory experiments designed to test the performance of the Hahn-Noll revenue neutral auction (RNA). An alternative institution, a no-rebate uniform price auction (UPA), is also examined as a benchmark. In these experiments, the RNA markets were little different from UPA markets in terms of either prices or market efficiencies. The two institutions did differ in terms of the distribution of the gains from exchange and of the propensity of bidders to engage in a certain type of overbidding. 25 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

Franciosi, R.; Isaac, R.M.; Pingry, D.E.; Reynolds, S.S. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Selected cost considerations for geothermal district heating in existing single-family residential areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In the past, district heating (geothermal or conventionally fueled) has not been widely applied to the single-family residential sector. Low-heat load density is the commonly cited reason for this. Although it`s true that load density in these areas is much lower than for downtown business districts, other frequently overlooked factors may compensate for load density. In particular, costs for distribution system installation can be substantially lower in some residential areas due to a variety of factors. This reduced development cost may partially compensate for the reduced revenue resulting from low-load density. This report examines cost associated with the overall design of the system (direct or indirect system design), distribution piping installation, and customer branch lines. It concludes with a comparison of the costs for system development and the revenue from an example residential area.

Rafferty, K.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Deterrence and theTax Treatment of Monetary Sanctions and Litigation Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

section 162 (f) of the Internal Revenue Code]. Litigationlegislation, the Internal Revenue Code of 1913, explicitlyyears later, in the Internal Revenue Code of 1916, Congress

Tabach, Avi

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Effects of a shortened depreciation schedule on the investment costs for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the depreciation permitted by the Internal Revenue Serviceunder the Internal Revenue Code have evolved from the simpleAccording to the Internal Revenue Code it is only admissible

Kranz, Nicole; Worrell, Ernst

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Investigation of the viability and cost effectiveness of solid fuel gasifiers close coupled to internal combustion engines for 200 kWe power generation. Technical progress report No. 9  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The viability and cost effectiveness of a 200 kWe engine generator unit fueled by a direct coupled, solid fuel gasifier were studied. Recent literature describing gasifier technology was obtained and personal visits were made to test facility sites and engine manufacturing plants to discuss the subject with researchers and engineers. Two prototype units were inspected, one of which was in partial operation. This report presents a brief discussion of fuel and gasifier technology, gas treatment (clean up) for engine use, engine use technology, other uses for gasifiers, the viability of close coupled units, and an estimate of cost effectiveness. Present small experimental gasifier systems perform as expected and have served to demonstrate the technology. Typically they operate with fuel species which are present and collected on the site of a processing plant. Certain needed development efforts are discussed. Also, fuel must be available at low cost and even then electric power produced in this way is unlikely to be competitive economically where utility poles are available. (LTN)

Mingle, J. G.; Junge, D. C.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Quarterly report on program cost and schedule; Second quarter FY 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is intended to provide a summary of the cost and schedule performance for the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management Program. Historical and current cost profiles (extracted from the DOE Financial Information System) are presented for each of the major program elements. Also included in this report are the program schedule baseline, the status of near-term program milestones and the status of the Nuclear Waste Fund revenues and disbursements. This report includes data through March 1992.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Cost, Energy Use, and Emissions of Tri-Generation Systems - DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program FY 2012 Annual Progress Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 7 FY 2012 Annual Progress Report DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Mark F. Ruth* (Primary Contact), Michael E. Goldsby † , Timothy J. Sa † , Victor Diakov* *National Renewable Energy Laboratory 15013 Denver West Pkwy. Golden, CO 80401 Phone: (303) 817-6160 Email: Mark.Ruth@nrel.gov † Sandia National Laboratories DOE Manager HQ: Fred Joseck Phone: (202) 586-7932 Email: Fred.Joseck@ee.doe.gov Project Start Date: December 1, 2010 Project End Date: October 31, 2011 Fiscal Year (FY) 2012 Objectives Develop a macro-system model (MSM): * Aimed at performing rapid cross-cutting analysis - Utilizing and linking other models - Improving consistency between models - Incorporate tri-generation systems into the MSM and * develop a methodology for MSM users to analyze

339

Cost of Fuel to General Electricity  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of Fuel to Generate Electricity of Fuel to Generate Electricity Cost of Fuel to Generate Electricity Herb Emmrich Gas Demand Forecast, Economic Analysis & Tariffs Manager SCG/SDG&E SCG/SDG&E Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) 2009 Fall Meeting November 18, 2009 Ontario, California The Six Main Costs to Price Electricity are:  Capital costs - the cost of capital investment (debt & equity), depreciation, Federal & State income taxes and property taxes and property taxes  Fuel costs based on fuel used to generate electricity - hydro, natural gas, coal, fuel oil, wind, solar, photovoltaic geothermal biogas photovoltaic, geothermal, biogas  Operating and maintenance costs  Transmission costs  Distribution costs  Social adder costs - GHG adder, low income adder,

340

papers are available from the author. Reviews, Reputation, and Revenue: The Case of Yelp.com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Do online consumer reviews affect restaurant demand? I investigate this question using a novel dataset combining reviews from the website Yelp.com and restaurant data from the Washington State Department of Revenue. Because Yelp prominently displays a restaurant's rounded average rating, I can identify the causal impact of Yelp ratings on demand with a regression discontinuity framework that exploits Yelp?s rounding thresholds. I present three findings about the impact of consumer reviews on the restaurant industry: (1) a one-star increase in Yelp rating leads to a 5-9 percent increase in revenue, (2) this effect is driven by independent restaurants; ratings do not affect restaurants with chain affiliation, and (3) chain restaurants have declined in market share as Yelp penetration has increased. This suggests that online consumer reviews substitute for more traditional forms of reputation. I then test whether consumers use these reviews in a way that is consistent with standard learning models. I present two additional findings: (4) consumers do not use all available information and are more responsive to quality changes that are more visible and (5) consumers respond more strongly when a rating contains more information. Consumer response to a restaurant?s average rating is affected by the number of reviews and whether the reviewers are certified as elite by Yelp, but is unaffected by the size of the reviewers ? Yelp friends network. Harvard Business School,

Michael Luca; Michael Luca

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

REVENUE EFFECTS OF WATER CONSERVATION AND CONSERVATION PRICING: ISSUES AND PRACTICES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared by The National Regulatory Research Institute (NRRI) with funding provided by participating member commissions of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC). The views and opinions of the authors do not necessarily state or reflect the views, opinions, or policies of the NRRI, the NARUC, or NARUC member commissions. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Water conservation can be exceedingly beneficial to the environment, society, and consumers, but not necessarily to water supply utilities (especially in the short term). Philosophical support for water conservation invariably encounters the practical issues of water utility economics. Conservation behavior and conservation pricing affect the balance between the price of water and the quantity of water demanded. Depending on a utility's predetermined revenue requirement, changes in quantity or in price mayor may not result in revenue deficits, surpluses, or consequential instability. The disincentive for water utilitie $ to promote ' conservation appears to be strong. Traditional economic ' regulation tends to reinforce the disincentive for utility-sponsored conservation. Regulated utilities generally are more motivated to invest in supply-side

Janice A. Beecher, Ph.D.; Patrick C. Mann, Ph.D.; John D. Stanford

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

· Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408: Mining the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12;· Marginal Cost: ­ Change in total cost ­ Any production process involves fixed and variable costs. As production increases/expands, fixed costs are unchanged, so

Boisvert, Jeff

343

Estimating the impact on fuel tax revenues from a changing light vehicle fleet with increased advanced internal combustion engine vehicles and electric vehicles.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Advanced fuel economies in both traditional internal combustion engine vehicles (ICEs) and electric vehicles (EVs) have a strong influence on transportation revenue by reducing fuel (more)

Hall, Andrea Lynn

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Reducing the Costs of Manufacturing Flow...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and power generation. * Design and material cost reductions are a means to reducing battery costs. * Is it possible to accelerate the knowledge building that comes from...

345

FORM EIA-826 MONTHLY ELECTRIC SALES AND REVENUE WITH STATE DISTRIBUTIONS REPORT  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

MONTHLY ELECTRIC SALES AND REVENUE WITH STATE DISTRIBUTIONS REPORT OMB No. 1905-0129 Approval Expires: 12/31/2016 Burden: 1.37 hours NOTICE: This report is mandatory under the Federal Energy Administration Act of 1974 (Public Law 93-275). Failure to comply may result in criminal fines, civil penalties and other sanctions as provided by law. For further information concerning sanctions and data protections see the provision on sanctions and the provision concerning the confidentiality of information in the instructions. Title 18 USC 1001 makes it a criminal offense for any person knowingly and willingly to make to any Agency or Department of the United States any false, fictitious, or fraudulent statements as to any

346

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Price to Marginal Cost of Natural Gas Generation, p FigurePrice to Marginal Cost of Natural Gas Generation, p FigureP e Marginal Cost of Natural Gas Generation (US$/kWh e ), C

Siddiqui, Afzal

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Medical Resident FICA Refund Claim Information The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recently announced that it will refund the employer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Medical Resident FICA Refund Claim Information The Internal Revenue Service (IRS) recently announced that it will refund the employer and employee portion of FICA taxes paid for medical residents of all of our medical schools and medical centers for tax periods dating back to January 1, 1995. FICA

Russell, Lynn

348

Emissions Scenarios, Costs, and Implementation Considerations of REDD Programs  

SciTech Connect

Greenhouse gas emissions from the forestry sector are estimated to be 8.4 GtCO2-eq./year or about 17percent of the global emissions. We estimate that the cost forreducing deforestation is low in Africa and several times higher in Latin America and Southeast Asia. These cost estimates are sensitive to the uncertainties of how muchunsustainable high-revenue logging occurs, little understood transaction and program implementation costs, and barriers to implementation including governance issues. Due to lack of capacity in the affected countries, achieving reduction or avoidance of carbon emissions will require extensive REDD-plus programs. Preliminary REDD-plus Readiness cost estimates and program descriptions for Indonesia, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ghana, Guyana and Mexico show that roughly one-third of potential REDD-plus mitigation benefits might come from avoided deforestation and the rest from avoided forest degradation and other REDD-plus activities.

Sathaye, Jayant; Andrasko, Ken; Chan, Peter

2011-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

349

Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS) + Bonus Depreciation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS) + Bonus Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS) + Bonus Depreciation (2008-2012) Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS) + Bonus Depreciation (2008-2012) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Commercial Heating & Cooling Manufacturing Buying & Making Electricity Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Wind Water Solar Heating & Cooling Heating Water Heating Program Info Start Date 1986 Program Type Corporate Depreciation Provider U.S. Internal Revenue Service Under the federal Modified Accelerated Cost-Recovery System (MACRS), businesses may recover investments in certain property through depreciation deductions. The MACRS establishes a set of class lives for various types of property, ranging from three to 50 years, over which the property may be

350

Pages that link to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

icon Pages that link to "Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation" Cost and Performance of Carbon Dioxide Capture from Power Generation...

351

HTGR Cost Model Users' Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The High Temperature Gas-Cooler Reactor (HTGR) Cost Model was developed at the Idaho National Laboratory for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project. The HTGR Cost Model calculates an estimate of the capital costs, annual operating and maintenance costs, and decommissioning costs for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The user can generate these costs for multiple reactor outlet temperatures; with and without power cycles, including either a Brayton or Rankine cycle; for the demonstration plant, first of a kind, or nth of a kind project phases; for a single or four-pack configuration; and for a reactor size of 350 or 600 MWt. This users manual contains the mathematical models and operating instructions for the HTGR Cost Model. Instructions, screenshots, and examples are provided to guide the user through the HTGR Cost Model. This model was design for users who are familiar with the HTGR design and Excel. Modification of the HTGR Cost Model should only be performed by users familiar with Excel and Visual Basic.

A.M. Gandrik

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Modeling of GE Appliances: Cost Benefit Study of Smart Appliances in Wholesale Energy, Frequency Regulation, and Spinning Reserve Markets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is the second in a series of three reports describing the potential of GEs DR-enabled appliances to provide benefits to the utility grid. The first report described the modeling methodology used to represent the GE appliances in the GridLAB-D simulation environment and the estimated potential for peak demand reduction at various deployment levels. The third report will explore the technical capability of aggregated group actions to positively impact grid stability, including frequency and voltage regulation and spinning reserves, and the impacts on distribution feeder voltage regulation, including mitigation of fluctuations caused by high penetration of photovoltaic distributed generation. In this report, a series of analytical methods were presented to estimate the potential cost benefit of smart appliances while utilizing demand response. Previous work estimated the potential technical benefit (i.e., peak reduction) of smart appliances, while this report focuses on the monetary value of that participation. The effects on wholesale energy cost and possible additional revenue available by participating in frequency regulation and spinning reserve markets were explored.

Fuller, Jason C.; Parker, Graham B.

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

353

The Market Value and Cost of Solar Photovoltaic Electricity Production  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy generation from wind, geothermal, biomass, and central station solar thermal, with a 5% annual increase in the real cost

Borenstein, Severin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Better Engineered Solutions. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Better Engineered Solutions. What Listening Generates. Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis September 2004 Steve Cohen NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop NREL H 2 Electrolysis - Utility Integration Workshop 2 Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis Hydrogen Generation by Electrolysis  Intro to Teledyne Energy Systems  H 2 Generator Basics & Major Subsystems  H 2 Generating & Storage System Overview  Electrolysis System Efficiency & Economics  Focus for Attaining DOE H 2 Production Cost Goals 3 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Teledyne Energy Systems Locations - ISO 9001 Hunt Valley, Maryland  State-of-the-art thermoelectric,

355

A Round-based Pricing Scheme for Maximizing Service Provider's Revenue in P2PTV Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze a round-based pricing scheme that encourages favorable behavior from users of real-time P2P applications like P2PTV. In the design of pricing schemes, we consider price to be a function of usage and capacity of download/upload streams, and quality of content served. Users are consumers and servers at the same time in such networks, and often exhibit behavior that is unfavorable towards maximization of social benefits. Traditionally, network designers have overcome this difficulty by building-in traffic latencies. However, using simulations, we show that appropriate pricing schemes and usage terms can enable designers to limit required traffic latencies, and be able to earn nearly 30% extra revenue from providing P2PTV services. The service provider adjusts the prices of individual programs incrementally within rounds, while making relatively large-scale adjustments at the end of each round. Through simulations, we show that it is most beneficial for the service provider to carry out ...

Bhutani, Gitanjali

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Heat exchanger Exergoeconomic lifecycle cost optimization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considering lifecycle cost analysis during the design phase of thermal systems gives the design effort more worth. Furthermore thermodynamic exergetic optimization is proven to be useful method for determining the most lifecycle cost optimal design of ... Keywords: entropy generation, exergy destruction, heat exchanger, operating cost, optimization, thermodynamics

Liaquat Ali Khan; Ali El-Ghalban

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Types of Costs Types of Cost Estimates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

05-1 · Types of Costs · Types of Cost Estimates · Methods to estimate capital costs MIN E 408) costs apply to those items that are consumed in production process and are roughly proportional to level in cash flow analysis and in the decision to use the equipment for reclamation? Types of Costs #12

Boisvert, Jeff

358

Cost Reduction Strategies for Mixed Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for generating mixed waste is a reality at all nuclear power plants. The report provides utilities with a means for developing cost reduction strategies to minimize the volume of waste generated, optimize treatment and disposal options, and maximize overall cost savings.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

359

Heliostat cost reduction study.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power towers are capable of producing solar-generated electricity and hydrogen on a large scale. Heliostats are the most important cost element of a solar power tower plant. Since they constitute {approx} 50% of the capital cost of the plant it is important to reduce heliostat cost as much as possible to improve the economic performance of power towers. In this study we evaluate current heliostat technology and estimate a price of $126/m{sup 2} given year-2006 materials and labor costs for a deployment of {approx}600 MW of power towers per year. This 2006 price yields electricity at $0.067/kWh and hydrogen at $3.20/kg. We propose research and development that should ultimately lead to a price as low as $90/m{sup 2}, which equates to $0.056/kWh and $2.75/kg H{sup 2}. Approximately 30 heliostat and manufacturing experts from the United States, Europe, and Australia contributed to the content of this report during two separate workshops conducted at the National Solar Thermal Test Facility.

Jones, Scott A.; Lumia, Ronald. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Davenport, Roger (Science Applications International Corporation, San Diego, CA); Thomas, Robert C. (Advanced Thermal Systems, Centennial, CO); Gorman, David (Advanced Thermal Systems, Larkspur, CO); Kolb, Gregory J.; Donnelly, Matthew W.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

2017 Levelized Costs AEO 2012 Early Release  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 2018 Levelized Costs AEO 2013 1 January 2013 Levelized Cost of New Generation Resources in the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 This paper presents average levelized costs for generating technologies that are brought on line in 2018 1 as represented in the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) for the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013) Early Release Reference case. 2 Both national values and the minimum and maximum values across the 22 U.S. regions of the NEMS electricity market module are presented. Levelized cost is often cited as a convenient summary measure of the overall competiveness of different generating technologies. It represents the per-kilowatthour cost (in real dollars) of building and operating a generating plant over an assumed financial life and duty cycle. Key

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Costs of electronuclear fuel production  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory (LASL) proposes to study the electronuclear fuel producer (EFP) as a means of producing fissile fuel to generate electricity. The main advantage of the EFP is that it may reduce the risks of nuclear proliferation by breeding /sup 233/U from thorium, thereby avoiding plutonium separation. A report on the costs of electronuclear fuel production based upon two designs considered by LASL is presented. The findings indicate that the EFP design variations considered are not likely to result in electricity generation costs as low as the uranium fuel cycle used in the US today. At current estimates of annual fuel output (500 kg /sup 233/U per EFP), the costs of electricity generation using fuel produced by the EFP are more than three times higher than generating costs using the traditional fuel cycle. Sensitivity analysis indicates that electronuclear fuel production would become cost competitive with the traditional uranium fuel cycle when U/sub 3/O/sub 8/ (yellowcake) prices approach $1000 per pound.

Flaim, T.; Loose, V.

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Capital cost models for geothermal power plants  

SciTech Connect

A computer code, titled GEOCOST, has been developed at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories, to rapidly and systematically calculate the potential costs of geothermal power. A description of the cost models in GEOCOST for the geothermal power plants is given here. Plant cost models include the flashed steam and binary systems. The data sources are described, along with the cost data correlations, resulting equations, and uncertainties. Comparison among GEOCOST plant cost estimates and recent A-E estimates are presented. The models are intended to predict plant costs for second and third generation units, rather than the more expensive first-of-a-kind units.

Cohn, P.D.; Bloomster, C.H.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Electric power monthly, July 1995 - with data for April 1995  

SciTech Connect

This publication provides statistical data on net generation, fuel consumption, fossil fuel stocks, electricity sales, revenue, and average revenue per kilowatthour of electricity sold. Data on fossil fuel stocks and costs are also included.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

PAFC Cost Challenges  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PAFC Cost Challenges Sridhar Kanuri Manager, PAFC Technology *Sridhar.Kanuri@utcpower.com 2 AGENDA Purecell 400 cost challenge Cost reduction opportunities Summary 3 PURECELL ...

365

Annual Report on U.S. Wind Power Installation, Cost, and Performance Trends: 2006  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

not represent wind energy generation costs, and generationXcel-UWIG We Energies Wind Capacity Penetration Cost ($/MWh)Wind Energy Program is currently funding additional efforts to better understand the drivers for O&M costs and

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Cost Sensitive Conditional Planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While POMDPs provide a general platform for conditional planning under a wide range of quality metrics they have limited scalability. On the other hand, uniform probability conditional planners scale very well, but many lack the ability to optimize plan quality metrics. We present an innovation to planning graph based heuristics that helps uniform probability conditional planners both scale and generate high quality plans when using actions with non uniform costs. We make empirical comparisons with two state of the art planners to show the benefit of our techniques.

Daniel Bryce; Subbarao Kambhampati

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Welfare and Profit Maximization with Production Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combinatorial Auctions are a central problem in Algorithmic Mechanism Design: pricing and allocating goods to buyers with complex preferences in order to maximize some desired objective (e.g., social welfare, revenue, or profit). The problem has been well-studied in the case of limited supply (one copy of each item), and in the case of digital goods (the seller can produce additional copies at no cost). Yet in the case of resources---oil, labor, computing cycles, etc.---neither of these abstractions is just right: additional supplies of these resources can be found, but at increasing difficulty (marginal cost) as resources are depleted. In this work, we initiate the study of the algorithmic mechanism design problem of combinatorial pricing under increasing marginal cost. The goal is to sell these goods to buyers with unknown and arbitrary combinatorial valuation functions to maximize either the social welfare, or the seller's profit; specifically we focus on the setting of \\emph{posted item prices} with buyer...

Blum, Avrim; Mansour, Yishay; Sharma, Ankit

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure development program: Cost analysis requirements  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared to support development of the Department of Energy Environmental Management cost infrastructure -- a new capability to independently estimate and analyze costs. Currently, the cost data are reported according to a structure that blends level of effort tasks with product and process oriented tasks. Also. the budgetary inputs are developed from prior year funding authorizations and from contractor-developed parametric estimates that have been adjusted to planned funding levels or appropriations. Consequently, it is difficult for headquarters and field-level activities to use actual cost data and technical requirements to independently assess the costs generated and identify trends, potential cost savings from process improvements, and cost reduction strategies.

Custer, W.R. Jr.; Messick, C.D.

1996-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Minimum Changeover Cost Arborescence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

having minimum changeover cost, a cost that we now describe. ... We define the changeover cost at j, denoted by d(j), as the sum of the costs at j paid for each of ...

370

NREL: Energy Analysis - Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bookmark and Share Bookmark and Share Energy Technology Cost and Performance Data for Distributed Generation Transparent Cost Database Button Recent cost estimates for distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies are available across capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M) costs, and levelized cost of energy (LCOE). Use the tabs below to navigate the charts. The LCOE tab provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and DG technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, O&M, performance, and fuel costs. If you are seeking utility-scale technology cost and performance estimates, please visit the Transparent Cost Database website for NREL's information regarding vehicles, biofuels, and electricity generation. Capital Cost (September 2013 Update)

371

Electric power substation capital costs  

SciTech Connect

The displacement or deferral of substation equipment is a key benefit associated with several technologies that are being developed with the support of the US Department of Energy`s Office of Utility Technologies. This could occur, for example, as a result of installing a distributed generating resource within an electricity distribution system. The objective of this study was to develop a model for preparing preliminary estimates of substation capital costs based on rudimentary conceptual design information. The model is intended to be used by energy systems analysts who need ``ballpark`` substation cost estimates to help establish the value of advanced utility technologies that result in the deferral or displacement of substation equipment. This cost-estimating model requires only minimal inputs. More detailed cost-estimating approaches are recommended when more detailed design information is available. The model was developed by collecting and evaluating approximately 20 sets of substation design and cost data from about 10 US sources, including federal power marketing agencies and private and public electric utilities. The model is principally based on data provided by one of these sources. Estimates prepared with the model were compared with estimated and actual costs for the data sets received from the other utilities. In general, good agreement (for conceptual level estimating) was found between estimates prepared with the cost-estimating model and those prepared by the individual utilities. Thus, the model was judged to be adequate for making preliminary estimates of typical substation costs for US utilities.

Dagle, J.E.; Brown, D.R.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

October 11, 2011 Wind Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(CC) Power Plant #12;Wind Investors Face These Costs #12;Fixed Costs #12;Variable Costs #12;BottomESRP 285 October 11, 2011 Wind Generation · Videos · Power Point Lecture #12;Wind Videos Wind by the end of 2010 and at current rates of growth, it could double by 2014 to reach 400 GW 120 GW #12

Ford, Andrew

373

Bulk Energy Storage Technologies, 2013: Performance Potential, Grid Services, and Cost Expectations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulk energy storage (BES) is a valuable technology option that can enhance grid flexibility, facilitate better utilization of existing grid assets, enhance wind farm economics, and facilitate higher penetration of renewables. Significant changes are now occurring that are enhancing the economic viability of BES, including technology advancements, new market products, regulatory incentives, generator retirements, and improved evaluation of BES revenues. As a result, a wide variety of BES technologies ...

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

374

CLASSIFY-Profiles: Volume 5: Next Generation Residential Energy Services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As electric utilities prepare for an increasingly deregulated environment, many have begun exploring opportunities to offer expanded services. Such services can strengthen the customer relationship while generating new revenue streams. This guide describes five customer-driven strategic service concepts involving household enhancements, indoor air and water quality, waste management, whole-house technology integration, and simplified energy management. Included in the guide are detailed findings of the r...

1997-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

375

2006 Update of Business Downtime Costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to assess the downtime cost of power outages to businesses in the commercial and industrial sectors, updating and improving upon studies that have already been published on this subject. The goal is to produce a study that, relative to existing studies, (1) applies to a wider set of business types (2) reflects more current downtime costs, (3) accounts for the time duration factor of power outages, and (4) includes data on the costs imposed by real outages in a well-defined market. This study examines power outage costs in 11 commercial subsectors and 5 industrial subsectors, using data on downtime costs that was collected in the 1990's. This study also assesses power outage costs for power outages of 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours duration. Finally, this study incorporates data on the costs of real power outages for two business subsectors. However, the current limited state of data availability on the topic of downtime costs means there is room to improve upon this study. Useful next steps would be to generate more recent data on downtime costs, data that covers outages shorter than 20 minutes duration and longer than 4 hours duration, and more data that is based on the costs caused by real-world outages. Nevertheless, with the limited data that is currently available, this study is able to generate a clear and detailed picture of the downtime costs that are faced by different types of businesses.

Hinrichs, Mr. Doug [Sentech, Inc.; Goggin, Mr. Michael [Sentech, Inc.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

2006 Update of Business Downtime Costs  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to assess the downtime cost of power outages to businesses in the commercial and industrial sectors, updating and improving upon studies that have already been published on this subject. The goal is to produce a study that, relative to existing studies, (1) applies to a wider set of business types (2) reflects more current downtime costs, (3) accounts for the time duration factor of power outages, and (4) includes data on the costs imposed by real outages in a well-defined market. This study examines power outage costs in 11 commercial subsectors and 5 industrial subsectors, using data on downtime costs that was collected in the 1990's. This study also assesses power outage costs for power outages of 20 minutes, 1 hour, and 4 hours duration. Finally, this study incorporates data on the costs of real power outages for two business subsectors. However, the current limited state of data availability on the topic of downtime costs means there is room to improve upon this study. Useful next steps would be to generate more recent data on downtime costs, data that covers outages shorter than 20 minutes duration and longer than 4 hours duration, and more data that is based on the costs caused by real-world outages. Nevertheless, with the limited data that is currently available, this study is able to generate a clear and detailed picture of the downtime costs that are faced by different types of businesses.

Hinrichs, Mr. Doug [Sentech, Inc.; Goggin, Mr. Michael [Sentech, Inc.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Transacting generation attributes across market boundaries: Compatible information systems and the treatment of imports and exports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

more renewable energy generation at lower costs, and (2) arelative incremental cost of renewable energy is low, and/orin higher costs for regulatory mandates and renewable energy

Grace, Robert; Wiser, Ryan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Unprecedented Generation Shifts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The economic recession, which reduced electricity demand, and falling natural gas costs have brought about unprecedented shifts in electric generation. These developments have affected coal-fired generation the most, leading to operational challenges (cycling and shut downs), deterioration of financial performance, and an awareness of the vulnerability of many units to retirement. A third force, though usually affecting natural gas unit operations more than coal, is the build-up of wind generation. This ...

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

379

Strategic Industrial Energy Efficiency: Reduce Expenses, Build Revenues, and Control Risk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some manufacturing companies successfully boost their financial performance through optimized energy use. This leads not only to reduced energy consumption and associated environmental benefits, but also to capacity improvements that generate additional

Russell, C.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Cost Study Manual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28, 2012 28, 2012 Cost Study Manual Executive Summary This Cost Study Manual documents the procedures for preparing a Cost Study to compare the cost of a contractor's employee benefits to the industry average from a broad-based national benefit cost survey. The annual Employee Benefits Cost Study Comparison (Cost Study) assists with the analysis of contractors' employee benefits costs. The Contracting Officer (CO) may require corrective action when the average benefit per capita cost or the benefit cost as a percent of payroll exceeds the comparator group by more than five percent. For example, if per capita benefit costs for the comparator group are $10,000 and the benefit costs as a percent of payroll for the comparator group are 20%, the threshold for the contractor's benefits as a

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Regulatory Considerations for Developing Distributed Generation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

solution 2 What size generator? What fuel or energy source? Does it include storage? Who pays the up-front cost of the generator? Who owns the generator? Who...

382

Liquefaction and Pipeline Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

factors add 20 percent to liquefaction plant total installed cost 6 Distribution Pipeline Costs Collected historical Oil & Gas Journal data, and surveyed for current urban and...

383

Feasibility of Achieving a Zero-Net-Energy, Zero-Net-Cost Homes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE). 12Sep2005. "EEREConsumer'sGuide:SizingandRenewableEnergy(EERE),whichmadethefollowinggenerationcosts. Figure16:EEREForecastedCostofPV

Al-Beaini, S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Sizing storage and wind generation capacities in remote power systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Global adoption of renewable energy is increasing due to growing concern over climate change, increasing costs associated with conventional generation, and decreasing capital investment costs (more)

Gassner, Andy

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Highly Insulating Windows - Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Cost The following is an estimate of the cost effective incremental cost of highly-insulating windows (U-factor=0.20 Btu/hr-ft2-F) compared to regular ENERGY STAR windows (U-factor 0.35 Btu/hr-ft2-F). Energy savings from lower U-factors were simulated with RESFEN over an assumed useful window life of 25 years. To determine the maximum incremental cost at which highly-insulating windows would still be cost-effective, we used a formula used by many utility companies to calculate the cost of saved energy from energy efficiency programs, based on the programs' cost and savings. We turned this formula around so that the cost of saved energy equals the present energy prices in the studied locations, whereas the program cost (the incremental cost of the windows) is the dependent variable. By entering 5%

386

Electricity Prices in a Competitive Environment: Marginal Cost Pricing  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Presents the results of an analysis that focuses on two questions: (1) How are prices for competitive generation services likely to differ from regulated prices if competitive prices are based on marginal costs rather than regulated cost-of-service pricing? (2) What impacts will the competitive pricing of generation services (based on marginal costs) have on electricity consumption patterns, production costs, and the financial integrity of electricity suppliers?

Information Center

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

NUCLEAR ENERGY SYSTEM COST MODELING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energys Fuel Cycle Technologies (FCT) Program is preparing to perform an evaluation of the full range of possible Nuclear Energy Systems (NES) in 2013. These include all practical combinations of fuels and transmuters (reactors and sub-critical systems) in single and multi-tier combinations of burners and breeders with no, partial, and full recycle. As part of this evaluation, Levelized Cost of Electricity at Equilibrium (LCAE) ranges for each representative system will be calculated. To facilitate the cost analyses, the 2009 Advanced Fuel Cycle Cost Basis Report is being amended to provide up-to-date cost data for each step in the fuel cycle, and a new analysis tool, NE-COST, has been developed. This paper explains the innovative Island approach used by NE-COST to streamline and simplify the economic analysis effort and provides examples of LCAE costs generated. The Island approach treats each transmuter (or target burner) and the associated fuel cycle facilities as a separate analysis module, allowing reuse of modules that appear frequently in the NES options list. For example, a number of options to be screened will include a once-through uranium oxide (UOX) fueled light water reactor (LWR). The UOX LWR may be standalone, or may be the first stage in a multi-stage system. Using the Island approach, the UOX LWR only needs to be modeled once and the module can then be reused on subsequent fuel cycles. NE-COST models the unit operations and life cycle costs associated with each step of the fuel cycle on each island. This includes three front-end options for supplying feedstock to fuel fabrication (mining/enrichment, reprocessing of used fuel from another island, and/or reprocessing of this islands used fuel), along with the transmuter and back-end storage/disposal. Results of each island are combined based on the fractional energy generated by each islands in an equilibrium system. The cost analyses use the probability distributions of key parameters and employs Monte Carlo sampling to arrive at an islands cost probability density function (PDF). When comparing two NES to determine delta cost, strongly correlated parameters can be cancelled out so that only the differences in the systems contribute to the relative cost PDFs. For example, one comparative analysis presented in the paper is a single stage LWR-UOX system versus a two-stage LWR-UOX to LWR-MOX system. In this case, the first stage of both systems is the same (but with different fractional energy generation), while the second stage of the UOX to MOX system uses the same type transmuter but the fuel type and feedstock sources are different. In this case, the cost difference between systems is driven by only the fuel cycle differences of the MOX stage.

Francesco Ganda; Brent Dixon

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

EIA - Electricity Data - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Sales, revenue and prices, power plants, fuel use, stocks, generation, trade, ... Petroleum Coke Natural Gas All Fossil Fuels Receipts Average Cost Receipts

389

Unit costs of waste management operations  

SciTech Connect

This report provides estimates of generic costs for the management, disposal, and surveillance of various waste types, from the time they are generated to the end of their institutional control. Costs include monitoring and surveillance costs required after waste disposal. Available data on costs for the treatment, storage, disposal, and transportation of spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive, low-level radioactive, transuranic radioactive, hazardous, mixed (low-level radioactive plus hazardous), and sanitary wastes are presented. The costs cover all major elements that contribute to the total system life-cycle (i.e., ``cradle to grave``) cost for each waste type. This total cost is the sum of fixed and variable cost components. Variable costs are affected by operating rates and throughput capacities and vary in direct proportion to changes in the level of activity. Fixed costs remain constant regardless of changes in the amount of waste, operating rates, or throughput capacities. Key factors that influence cost, such as the size and throughput capacity of facilities, are identified. In many cases, ranges of values for the key variables are presented. For some waste types, the planned or estimated costs for storage and disposal, projected to the year 2000, are presented as graphics.

Kisieleski, W.E.; Folga, S.M.; Gillette, J.L.; Buehring, W.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

External Costs of Energy Technologies Position Statement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Nuclear Society believes that decisions concerning national energy policy should appropriately take external costs into account. In some energy options, external costs are not included in the cost of the energy produced; instead, they are borne by parties not involved in the original transaction, generally without consent or due compensation. External costs 1 may be related to many factors, including impacts on public health, environmental impacts, degradation of quality of life, degradation of agricultural land, depletion of natural resources, and reduction in security. These costs are incurred at various stages of the life cycle of an energy technology. While some energy technologies may appear to have smaller environmental impacts than others, their external costs may be significant when the complete life cycle costs are taken into account. Particularly, an energy source that is inherently intermittent will require, for applications demanding reliable performance, either a backup energy supply or an energy storage facility, whose external costs are not negligible. On the other hand, practically all the costs to make nuclear power technology safe and secure, including the costs of waste management and disposal, are already incorporated into the cost of electricity generation. 2 Appropriately accounting for external costs should be an essential element in energy policy since in doing so, the final product is compared based on a consistent set of parameters for all technologies, and the resulting mix of energy sources will more appropriately balance the competing economic, environmental, and social needs from energy production and consumption.

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Defense waste transportation: cost and logistics studies  

SciTech Connect

Transportation of nuclear wastes from defense programs is expected to significantly increase in the 1980s and 1990s as permanent waste disposal facilities come into operation. This report uses models of the defense waste transportation system to quantify potential transportation requirements for treated and untreated contact-handled transuranic (CH-TRU) wastes and high-level defense wastes (HLDW). Alternative waste management strategies in repository siting, waste retrieval and treatment, treatment facility siting, waste packaging and transportation system configurations were examined to determine their effect on transportation cost and hardware requirements. All cost estimates used 1980 costs. No adjustments were made for future changes in these costs relative to inflation. All costs are reported in 1980 dollars. If a single repository is used for defense wastes, transportation costs for CH-TRU waste currently in surface storage and similar wastes expected to be generated by the year 2000 were estimated to be 109 million dollars. Recovery and transport of the larger buried volumes of CH-TRU waste will increase CH-TRU waste transportation costs by a factor of 70. Emphasis of truck transportation and siting of multiple repositories would reduce CH-TRU transportation costs. Transportation of HLDW to repositories for 25 years beginning in 1997 is estimated to cost $229 M in 1980 costs and dollars. HLDW transportation costs could either increase or decrease with the selection of a final canister configuration. HLDW transportation costs are reduced when multiple repositories exist and emphasis is placed on truck transport.

Andrews, W.B.; Cole, B.M.; Engel, R.L.; Oylear, J.M.

1982-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Transportation in the Balance: A Comparative Analysis of Costs, User Revenues, and Subsidies for Highway, Air, and High Speed Rail Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1994. Vaca, Erin. Intercity Rail Ridership Forecasting andImplementation of High-Speed Rail in California. UniversityOffice. Intercity Passenger Rail: Financial and Operating

Chan, Evelyn; Kanafani, Adib; Canetti, Thomas

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Transportation in the Balance: A Comparative Analysis of Costs, User Revenues, and Subsidies for Highway, Air, and High Speed Rail Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gallon) ($ millions) MOTOR FUEL TAX Gasoline tax Diesel fuelExcise taxes Gasoline Gasohol Diesel Special Motor fuelsand tax credits) Diesel powered vehicle rebate Diesel fuel used in buses Diesel fuel-other Special motor fuel Gasohol Gasoline

Chan, Evelyn; Kanafani, Adib; Canetti, Thomas

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Cyber Security Recommendations for Digital I&C Systems Within Power Generation Facilities Unregulated by North American Electric Rel iability Corporation Critical Infrastructure Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fossil generating facilities represent a significant investment, as well as a primary source of revenue, for many electric utilities. The digital instrumentation and control (I&C) systems of these generation facilities are essential to their successful operations. As such, the security of digital I&C systems is fundamental to ensure continued, reliable production. It is therefore prudent to employ appropriate ...

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

395

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE ...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating Procedures INDEPENDENT COST REVIEW (ICR) and INDEPENDENT COST ESTIMATE (ICE) Standard Operating...

396

Energy Replacement Generation Tax Exemption | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Replacement Generation Tax Exemption Replacement Generation Tax Exemption Energy Replacement Generation Tax Exemption < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Local Government Residential Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Bioenergy Wind Maximum Rebate None Program Info Start Date 01/01/2008 (retroactively effective) State Iowa Program Type Corporate Exemption Rebate Amount 100% exemption for self-generators, landfill gas and wind Reduced rate for large hydro Provider Iowa Department of Revenue Iowa imposes a replacement generation tax of 0.06 cents ($0.0006) per kilowatt-hour (kWh) on various forms of electricity generated within the state. This tax is imposed in lieu of a property tax on generation facilities. Under the Energy Replacement Generation Tax Exemption, the following

397

Early Station Costs Questionnaire  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Early Station Costs Questionnaire Early Station Costs Questionnaire Marc Melaina Hydrogen Technologies and Systems Center Market Readiness Workshop February 16-17th, 2011 Washington, DC Questionnaire Goals * The Early Station Costs questionnaire provides an anonymous mechanism for organizations with direct experience with hydrogen station costs to provide feedback on current costs, near-term costs, economies of scale, and R&D priorities. * This feedback serves the hydrogen community and government agencies by increasing awareness of the status of refueling infrastructure costs National Renewable Energy Laboratory Innovation for Our Energy Future Questions for Market Readiness Workshop Attendees * Are these questions the right ones to be asking?

398

Low Cost, Durable Seal  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost, Durable Seal Cost, Durable Seal George M. Roberts UTC Power Corporation February 14, 2007 This presentation does not contain any proprietary or confidential information 1 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Outline * Project Objective * Technical Approach * Timeline * Team Roles * Budget * Q&A 2 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL Project Objective Develop advanced, low cost, durable seal materials and sealing techniques amenable to high volume manufacture of PEM cell stacks. DOE Targets/Goals/Objectives Project Goal Durability Transportation: 5,000 hr Stationary: 40,000 hr Durability Improve mechanical and chemical stability to achieve 40,000 hr of useful operating life. Low Cost Low Cost A material cost equivalent to or less than the cost of silicones in common use. 3 LOW COST, DURABLE SEAL

399

Requirements for low cost electricity and hydrogen fuel production from multi-unit intertial fusion energy plants with a shared driver and target factory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

steam generators (SG),steam turbines(T), generators andawith the costs of modern steam turbine generator plants forSteam generators Remote maintenance equipment Turbine plant

Logan, B. Grant; Moir, Ralph; Hoffman, Myron A.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

OOTW COST TOOLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports the results of a study of cost tools to support the analysis of Operations Other Than War (OOTW). It recommends the continued development of the Department of Defense (DoD) Contingency Operational Support Tool (COST) as the basic cost analysis tool for 00TWS. It also recommends modifications to be included in future versions of COST and the development of an 00TW mission planning tool to supply valid input for costing.

HARTLEY, D.S.III; PACKARD, S.L.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Pollution prevention cost savings potential  

SciTech Connect

The waste generated by DOE facilities is a serious problem that significantly impacts current operations, increases future waste management costs, and creates future environmental liabilities. Pollution Prevention (P2) emphasizes source reduction through improved manufacturing and process control technologies. This concept must be incorporated into DOE`s overall operating philosophy and should be an integral part of Total Quality Management (TQM) program. P2 reduces the amount of waste generated, the cost of environmental compliance and future liabilities, waste treatment, and transportation and disposal costs. To be effective, P2 must contribute to the bottom fine in reducing the cost of work performed. P2 activities at LLNL include: researching and developing innovative manufacturing; evaluating new technologies, products, and chemistries; using alternative cleaning and sensor technologies; performing Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (PPOAs); and developing outreach programs with small business. Examples of industrial outreach are: innovative electroplating operations, printed circuit board manufacturing, and painting operations. LLNL can provide the infrastructure and technical expertise to address a wide variety of industrial concerns.

Celeste, J.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Energy and Maintenance Cost Savings Review at Several US ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Energy and Maintenance Cost Savings Review at Several US ... Weight-Time Curves Generated with the PoDFA / Prefil Footprinter Method.

403

Survey of Transmission Cost Allocation Methodologies for Regional Transmission Organizations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents transmission cost allocation methodologies for reliability transmission projects, generation interconnection, and economic transmission projects for all Regional Transmission Organizations.

Fink, S.; Porter, K.; Mudd, C.; Rogers, J.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Lower power prices and high repair costs drive nuclear retirements ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

However, concerns over the length of the review process and the high costs associated with steam generator repairs led SCE to retire both reactors.

405

Volatile Energy Costs and the Floundering Deregulation of Electricity...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A generation capacity shortage, combined with spiraling natural gas costs and a flawed electricity market structure, have led to unprecedented wholesale electricity prices,...

406

Photovoltaic Power Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report is an overview of photovoltaic power generation. The purpose of the report is to provide the reader with a general understanding of photovoltaic power generation and how PV technology can be practically applied. There is a brief discussion of early research and a description of how photovoltaic cells convert sunlight to electricity. The report covers concentrating collectors, flat-plate collectors, thin-film technology, and building-integrated systems. The discussion of photovoltaic cell types includes single-crystal, poly-crystalline, and thin-film materials. The report covers progress in improving cell efficiencies, reducing manufacturing cost, and finding economic applications of photovoltaic technology. Lists of major manufacturers and organizations are included, along with a discussion of market trends and projections. The conclusion is that photovoltaic power generation is still more costly than conventional systems in general. However, large variations in cost of conventional electrical power, and other factors, such as cost of distribution, create situations in which the use of PV power is economically sound. PV power is used in remote applications such as communications, homes and villages in developing countries, water pumping, camping, and boating. Gridconnected applications such as electric utility generating facilities and residential rooftop installations make up a smaller but more rapidly expanding segment of PV use. Furthermore, as technological advances narrow the cost gap, more applications are becoming economically feasible at an accelerating rate. iii TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES AND FIGURES ...................................................................................v

Tom Penick; Gale Greenleaf Instructor; Thomas Penick; Bill Louk; Bill Louk

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Working Paper No. 527 Financing Job Guarantee Schemes by Oil Revenue: The Case of Iran by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Levy Institute scholars and conference participants. The purpose of the series is to disseminate ideas to and elicit comments from academics and professionals. The Levy Economics Institute of Bard College, founded in 1986, is a nonprofit, nonpartisan, independently funded research organization devoted to public service. Through scholarship and economic research it generates viable, effective public policy responses to important economic problems that profoundly affect the quality of life in the United States and abroad.

Zahra Karimi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

TAX AND FEE PAYMENTS BY MOTOR VEHICLE USERS FOR THE USE OF HIGHWAYS, FUELS, AND VEHICLES Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oak Ridge, Tennessee, March (1991). Internal RevenueService, Internal Revenue Report of Excise Taxes, U. S.February 9 (1994). Internal Revenue Service, Excise Taxes

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Tax barriers to solar central receiver generation technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Tax loads and required revenues are estimated for current and future solar central receiver and gas-fired plants competing in the same market. An economic measure of tax equity is used to evaluate the equity of the tax loads under past and present tax codes. The same measure is used to devise a tax strategy which produces the following two types of equitable taxation: (1) the two plants carry nearly equal tax loads, and (2) local, state and federal governments receive the same distribution of revenues from the solar plant as from the gas-fired plant `Me results show that central receivers (and likely other capital-intensive technologies) carry higher tax loads compared to competing gasfired generation, that tax loads are highly correlated with competitiveness, and that equitable taxation is feasible within the boundaries of the study.

Jenkins, A.F. [California Energy Commission, Sacramento, CA (United States); Reilly, H.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

410

Price and cost impacts of utility DSM programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More US utilities are running more and larger demand-side management (DSM) programs. Assessing the cost-effectiveness of these programs raises difficult questions for utilities and their regulators. In particular, should these programs aim to minimize the total cost of providing electric-energy services or should they minimize the price of electricity Most of the debates about the appropriate economic tests to use in assessing utility programs do not address the magnitude of the impacts. As a result, questions remain about the relationships among utility DSM programs and acquisition of supply resources and the effects of these choices on electricity prices and costs. This study offers quantitative estimates on the tradeoffs between total costs and electricity prices. A dynamic model is used to assess the effects of energy-efficiency programs on utility revenues, total resource costs, electricity prices, and electricity consumption for the period 1990 to 2010. These DSM programs are assessed under alternative scenarios for three utilities: a base that is typical of US utilities; a surplus utility that has excess capacity, few planned retirements, and slow growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes; and a deficit utility that has little excess capacity, many planned retirements, and rapid growth in fossil-fuel prices and incomes. Model results show that DSM programs generally reduce electricity costs and increase electricity prices. However, the percentage reduction in costs is usually greater than the percentage increase in prices. On the other hand, most of the cost benefits of DSM programs can be obtained without raising electricity prices.

Hirst, E. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

PRODCOST: an electric utility generation simulation code  

SciTech Connect

The PRODCOST computer code simulates the operation of an electric utility generation system. Through a probabilistic simulation the expected energy production, fuel consumption, and cost of operation for each plant are determined. Total system fuel consumption, energy generation by type, total generation costs, as well as system loss of load probability and expected unserved energy are also calculated.

Hudson, II, C. R.; Reynolds, T. M.; Smolen, G. R.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Operations Cost Allocation Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project Operations Consolidation Project (OCP) Cost Allocation Presentation - September 20, 2011 OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation List of Acronyms OCP Cost Allocation Spreadsheets OCP Cost Allocation Customer Presentation - Questions and Answers - September 19 - 20, 2011 Additional Questions and Answers Customer Comments/Questions and Answers: Arizona Municipal Power Users Association Arizona Power Authority Central Arizona Project Colorado River Commission Colorado River Energy Distributors Association City of Gilbert, AZ Irrigation and Electrical Districts Association of Arizona Town of Marana, AZ City of Mesa, AZ Town of Wickenburg, AZ Western's Final Decision Regarding the Long-Term Cost Allocation Methodology for Operations Staff Costs

413

Minimum Cost Arborescences ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze the cost allocation problem when a group of agents or nodes have to be connected to a source, and where the cost matrix describing the cost of connecting each pair of agents is not necessarily symmetric, thus extending the well-studied problem of minimum cost spanning tree games, where the costs are assumed to be symmetric. The focus is on rules which satisfy axioms representing incentive and fairness properties. We show that while some results are similar, there are also significant differences between the frameworks corresponding to symmetric and asymmetric cost matrices.

Bhaskar Dutta; Debasis Mishra; We Thank Daniel Granot; Anirban Kar; Herve Moulin For Comments

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Nuclear fuel cycle costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The costs for the back-end of the nuclear fuel cycle, which were developed as part of the Nonproliferation Alternative Systems Assessment Program (NASAP), are presented. Total fuel cycle costs are given for the pressurized water reactor once-through and fuel recycle systems, and for the liquid-metal fast breeder reactor system. These calculations show that fuel cycle costs are a small part of the total power costs. For breeder reactors, fuel cycle costs are about half that of the present once-through system. The total power cost of the breeder reactor system is greater than that of light-water reactor at today's prices for uranium and enrichment.

Burch, W.D.; Haire, M.J.; Rainey, R.H.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Environmental protection using social costing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions and other residual wastes come from industrial production, commercial and household activities, and transportation. These wastes damage the environment, including human health. As economies grow, so does concern about balancing that growth with the desire for environmental protection. At issue is how much environmental protection we should have. We address this issue using the concept of social costing. The issue is discussed in the context of electric power generation. There is particular concern about the use of fossil fuels such as petroleum, the major fuel used in the Republic of China, and coal which is the most common fuel used in the U. S. Electric power generation is a major source of airborne pollutants such as SO{sub 2}, NO{sub x} particulate matter, volatile organic compounds, CO, and CO{sub 2}. It also results in liquid and solid wastes, and other effects such as changes in land use. To generate electric power, fuel (such as petroleum, coal or enriched uranium) or some other resource (e.g., wind or geothermal) is needed. A fuel cycle consists of a sequence of activities and processes involved in generating electric power. These activities include fuel extraction, treatment and processing; fuel conversion into electricity; transmission; waste disposal; and transportation of fuel and wastes between the different stages of the fuel cycle. Each stage results in emissions or other residuals. Several recent-studies have been about the environmental costs of electricity.

Lee, R.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Program Record (Offices of Fuel Cell Technologies) Record #: 11007 Date: March 25, 2011 Title: Hydrogen Threshold Cost Calculation Originator: Mark Ruth & Fred Joseck Approved by: Sunita Satyapal Date: March 24, 2011 Description: The hydrogen threshold cost is defined as the hydrogen cost in the range of $2.00-$4.00/gge (2007$) which represents the cost at which hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles (FCEVs) are projected to become competitive on a cost per mile basis with the competing vehicles [gasoline in hybrid-electric vehicles (HEVs)] in 2020. This record documents the methodology and assumptions used to calculate that threshold cost. Principles: The cost threshold analysis is a "top-down" analysis of the cost at which hydrogen would be

417

Hydrogen Pathway Cost Distributions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pathway Cost Distributions Pathway Cost Distributions Jim Uihlein Fuel Pathways Integration Tech Team January 25, 2006 2 Outline * Pathway-Independent Cost Goal * Cost Distribution Objective * Overview * H2A Influence * Approach * Implementation * Results * Discussion Process * Summary 3 Hydrogen R&D Cost Goal * Goal is pathway independent * Developed through a well defined, transparent process * Consumer fueling costs are equivalent or less on a cents per mile basis * Evolved gasoline ICE and gasoline-electric hybrids are benchmarks * R&D guidance provided in two forms * Evolved gasoline ICE defines a threshold hydrogen cost used to screen or eliminate options which can't show ability to meet target * Gasoline-electric hybrid defines a lower hydrogen cost used to prioritize projects for resource allocation

418

Documents: Cost Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis Search Documents: Search PDF Documents View a list of all documents Cost Analysis PDF Icon Summary of the Cost Analysis Report for the Long-term Management of Depleted UF6...

419

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduce Oil Dependence Costs U.S. Petroleum Use, 1970-2010 Nearly 40% of the oil we use is imported, costing us roughly 300 billion annually. Increased domestic oil production from...

420

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Presented by: J.M. Hieb, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CHPRC1204-04 Chemical Lifecycle Management Cost Everyone is trying to stretch a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Cost Estimation Recommendations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...D.P. Hoult and C.L. Meador, Manufacturing Cost Estimating, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

422

Electricity generation from coal and natural gas both increased ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Historically, the average fuel cost of operating a combined-cycle natural gas generator exceeded that for a coal-fired generator. Until 2010, ...

423

Distributed Generation Investment by a Microgrid Under Uncertainty  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to a put option on natural gas generation, which increasesgeneration (DG) unit that operates on natural gas.While the long-term natural gas generation cost is

Siddiqui, Afzal; Marnay, Chris

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

New England Wind Forum: Cost Trends  

Wind Powering America (EERE)

Cost Trends Cost Trends Figure 1: Cost of Energy and Cumulative Domestic Capacity This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. Click on the image to view a larger version. This graph shows how the cumulative domestic wind capacity (MW) has increased since 1980, while the cost of energy from wind power has declined by a factor of approximately 20 times during the same period but has increased slightly since 2001. View a larger version of the graph. Overall, the wind industry is experiencing long-term decreases in the cost to produce wind-generated electricity (Figure 1), despite recent short-term increases in upfront equipment costs. Even in the short term, however, the effect of increases in up-front capital costs on the cost of energy from wind power projects has been dampened by improvements in energy capture from the wind and decreases in operating and maintenance costs.

425

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Maximization of revenues for power sales from a solid waste resources recovery facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report discusses the actual implementation of the best alternative in selling electrical power generated by an existing waste-to-energy facility, the Metro-Dade County Resources Recovery Plant. After the plant processes and extracts various products out of the municipal solid waste, it burns it to produce electrical power. The price for buying power to satisfy the internal needs of our Resources Recovery Facility (RRF) is substantially higher than the power price for selling electricity to any other entity. Therefore, without any further analysis, it was decided to first satisfy those internal needs and then export the excess power. Various alternatives were thoroughly explored as to what to do with the excess power. Selling power to the power utilities or utilizing the power in other facilities were the primary options.

Not Available

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1994 through 1997  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and cost indices for domestic oil and natural gas field equipment and production operations for 1994, 1995, 1996, and 1997. The costs of all equipment and services are those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of the total number of oil wells to the total number of gas wells. The detail provided in this report is unavailable elsewhere. The body of this report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (compliance costs and lease availability) have a significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas equipment and production operations.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Steam generator designs  

SciTech Connect

A combined cycle is any one of combinations of gas turbines, steam generators or heat recovery equipment, and steam turbines assembled for the reduction in plant cost or improvement of cycle efficiency in the utility power generation process. The variety of combined cycles discussed for the possibilities for industrial applications include gas turbine plus unfired steam generator; gas turbine plus supplementary fired steam generator; gas turbine plus furnace-fired steam generator; and supercharged furnace-fired system generator plus gas turbine. These units are large enough to meet the demands for the utility applications and with the advent of economical coal gasification processes to provide clean fuel, the combined-cycle applications are solicited. (MCW)

Clayton, W.H.; Singer, J.G.

1973-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Method of grid generation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a method of grid generation that uses the geometry of the problem space and the governing relations to generate a grid. The method can generate a grid with minimized discretization errors, and with minimal user interaction. The method of the present invention comprises assigning grid cell locations so that, when the governing relations are discretized using the grid, at least some of the discretization errors are substantially zero. Conventional grid generation is driven by the problem space geometry; grid generation according to the present invention is driven by problem space geometry and by governing relations. The present invention accordingly can provide two significant benefits: more efficient and accurate modeling since discretization errors are minimized, and reduced cost grid generation since less human interaction is required.

Barnette, Daniel W. (Veguita, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

electric generation | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(TCDB) advanced vehicles electric generation NREL OpenEI renewables tcdb This new web application collects cost and performance estimates and makes it available to everyone...

431

GAO Cost Estimating and Assessment Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U.S. Government Accountability Office is responsible for, among other things, assisting the Congress in its oversight of the federal government, including agencies stewardship of public funds. To use public funds effectively, the government must meet the demands of todays changing world by employing effective management practices and processes, including the measurement of government program performance. In addition, legislators, government officials, and the public want to know whether government programs are achieving their goals and what their costs are. To make those evaluations, reliable cost information is required and federal standards have been issued for the cost accounting that is needed to prepare that information. 1 We developed the Cost Guide in order to establish a consistent methodology that is based on best practices and that can be used across the federal government for developing, managing, and evaluating capital program cost estimates. For the purposes of this guide, a cost estimate is the summation of individual cost elements, using established methods and valid data, to estimate the future costs of a program, based on what is known today. 2 The management of a cost estimate involves continually updating the estimate with actual data as they become available, revising the estimate to reflect changes, and analyzing differences between estimated and actual costsfor example, using data from a reliable earned value management (EVM) system. 3 The ability to generate reliable cost estimates is a critical function, necessary to support the Office of Management and Budgets (OMB) capital programming process. 4 Without this ability, agencies are at risk of experiencing cost overruns, missed deadlines, and performance shortfallsall recurring problems that our program assessments too often reveal. Furthermore, cost increases often mean that the government

Best Practices For Developing

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Definition: Reduced Congestion Cost | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cost Cost Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Reduced Congestion Cost Transmission congestion is a phenomenon that occurs in electric power markets. It happens when scheduled market transactions (generation and load) result in power flow over a transmission element that exceeds the available capacity for that element. Since grid operators must ensure that physical overloads do not occur, they will dispatch generation so as to prevent them. The functions that provide this benefit provide lower cost energy, decrease loading on system elements, shift load to off-peak, or allow the grid operator to manage the flow of electricity around constrained interfaces (i.e. dynamic line capability or power flow control).[1] Related Terms power, transmission lines, load, element, electricity

433

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and Performance H2 Fueling Appliances Cost and Performance Project Summary Full Title: H2 Production Infrastructure Analysis - Task 2: Cost and Performance of H2 Fueling Appliances Project ID: 80 Principal Investigator: Brian James Keywords: Costs; steam methane reforming (SMR); autothermal reforming (ATR); hydrogen fueling Purpose The purpose of the analysis was to estimate the capital cost and the resulting cost of hydrogen of several types of methane-fueled hydrogen production systems. A bottoms-up cost analysis was conducted of each system to generate a system design and detailed bill-of-materials. Estimates of the overall capital cost of the hydrogen production appliance were generated. This work supports Systems Analysis Milestone A1. ("Complete techno-economic analysis on production and delivery technologies currently

434

Commercial equipment cost database  

SciTech Connect

This report, prepared for DOE, Office of Codes and Standards, as part of the Commercial Equipment Standards Program at Pacific Northwest Laboratory, specifically addresses the equipment cost estimates used to evaluate the economic impacts of revised standards. A database including commercial equipment list prices and estimated contractor costs was developed, and through statistical modeling, estimated contractor costs are related to equipment parameters including performance. These models are then used to evaluate cost estimates developed by the ASHRAE 90.1 Standing Standards Project Committee, which is in the process of developing a revised ASHRAE 90.1 standard. The database will also be used to support further evaluation of the manufacturer and consumer impacts of standards. Cost estimates developed from the database will serve as inputs to economic modeling tools, which will be used to estimate these impacts. Preliminary results suggest that list pricing is a suitable measure from which to estimate contractor costs for commercial equipment. Models developed from these cost estimates accurately predict estimated costs. The models also confirm the expected relationships between equipment characteristics and cost. Cost models were developed for gas-fired and electric water heaters, gas-fired packaged boilers, and warm air furnaces for indoor installation. Because of industry concerns about the use of the data, information was not available for the other categories of EPAct-covered equipment. These concerns must be addressed to extend the analysis to all EPAct equipment categories.

Freeman, S.L.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Clean Energy Technologies: A Preliminary Inventory of the Potential for Electricity Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2000. Distributed Power Generation, Marcel Dekker. pp.180-This greatly influences power generation costs and reducesand Ogden, 2000) total power generation is estimated at 5.3

Bailey, Owen; Worrell, Ernst

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Heliostat manufacturing cost analysis. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study has two primary objectives. The first is to provide a detailed cost evaluation of the second generation of DOE heliostats, from which repowering heliostat designs are likely to be derived. A second objective is to provide an analytical foundation for the evaluation of futue heliostat designs. The approach taken for this study was to produce a cost estimate for the production of the McDonnell Douglas prototype design by generating estimates of the materials, labor, overhead, and facilities costs for two different production scenarios, 25,000 heliostats per year and 250,000 heliostats per year. The primary conclusion of this study is that the second generation of heliostat designs should cost approximately $100/m/sup 2/ at volumes of 25,000 units/year. This price falls to approximately $80/m/sup 2/ at volumes of 250,000 units/year. A second conclusion is that cost reduction begins at relatively low production volumes and that many production benefits can be obtained at production rates of 5,000 to 15,000 units/year. A third conclusion is that the SAMICS model and the SAMIS III program can be useful tools in heliostat manufacturing, costing, and economic studies.

Drumheller, K; Schulte, S C; Dilbeck, R A; Long, L W

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

How to Reduce Energy Supply Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rising energy costs have many businesses looking for creative ways to reduce their energy usage and lower the costs of energy delivered to their facilities. This paper explores innovative renewable and alternative energy technologies that can help customers control their supply-side costs of energy. Specific topics include distributive wind power generation and solid fuel boilers. It identities factors to consider in determining whether these technologies are economically viable for customers and stresses the importance of fully researching alternatives before committing to major equipment investments.

Swanson, G.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Practical Application of Second Law Costing Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The key to proper allocation of fuel and feedstock costs to the products from a plant or from any one of its components is the commodity called exergy - the central concept of the Second Law of Thermodynamics, commonly named available energy or availability. The methods for composing exergy cost flow diagrams will be explained. The results will be shown for several plants - electric-power, co-generation, coal-gasification, and others. The application of such results will be shown for cost-accounting, for plant operation economics, for maintenance decisions, and for design decisions - at both the preliminary and detailed design states.

Wepfer, W. J.; Gaggioli, R. A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Costs and indices for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations 1990 through 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report presents estimated costs and indice for domestic oil and gas field equipment and production operations for 1990, 1991, 1992, and 1993. The costs of all equipment and serives were those in effect during June of each year. The sums (aggregates) of the costs for representative leases by region, depth, and production rate were averaged and indexed. This provides a general measure of the increased or decreased costs from year to year for lease equipment and operations. These general measures do not capture changes in industry-wide costs exactly because of annual variations in the ratio of oil wells to gas wells. The body of the report contains summary tables, and the appendices contain detailed tables. Price changes for oil and gas, changes in taxes on oil and gas revenues, and environmental factors (costs and lease availability) have significant impact on the number and cost of oil and gas wells drilled. These changes also impact the cost of oil and gas production equipment and operations.

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

440

Methods | Transparent Cost Database  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Methods Methods Disclaimer The data gathered here are for informational purposes only. Inclusion of a report in the database does not represent approval of the estimates by DOE or NREL. Levelized cost calculations DO NOT represent real world market conditions. The calculation uses a single discount rate in order to compare technology costs only. About the Cost Database For emerging energy technologies, a variety of cost and performance numbers are cited in presentations and reports for present-day characteristics and potential improvements. Amid a variety of sources and methods for these data, the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's technology development programs determine estimates for use in program planning. The Transparent Cost Database collects program cost and performance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Low cost MCFC anodes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper outlines a project, funded under a DOE SBIR grant, which tested a potentially lower cost method of manufacturing MCFC stack anodes and evaluated the feasibility of using the technology in the existing M-C Power Corp. manufacturing facility. The procedure involves adding activator salts to the anode tape casting slurry with the Ni and Cr or Al powders. Two different processes occur during heat treatment in a reducing environment: sintering of the base Ni structure, and alloying or cementation of the Cr or Al powders. To determine whether it was cost-effective to implement the cementation alloying manufacturing process, the M-C Power manufacturing cost model was used to determine the impact of different material costs and processing parameters on total anode cost. Cost analysis included equipment expenditures and facility modifications required by the cementation alloying process.

Erickson, D.S.

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

442

What solar heating costs  

SciTech Connect

Few people know why solar energy systems cost what they do. Designers and installers know what whole packages cost, but rarely how much goes to piping, how much for labor and how much for the collectors. Yet one stands a better chance of controlling costs if one can compare where the money is going against where it should be going. A detailed Tennessee Valley Authority study of large solar projects shows how much each component contributes to the total bill.

Adams, J.A.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Cost analysis guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first phase of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program (Program)--management strategy selection--consists of several program elements: Technology Assessment, Engineering Analysis, Cost Analysis, and preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). Cost Analysis will estimate the life-cycle costs associated with each of the long-term management strategy alternatives for depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF6). The scope of Cost Analysis will include all major expenditures, from the planning and design stages through decontamination and decommissioning. The costs will be estimated at a scoping or preconceptual design level and are intended to assist decision makers in comparing alternatives for further consideration. They will not be absolute costs or bid-document costs. The purpose of the Cost Analysis Guidelines is to establish a consistent approach to analyzing of cost alternatives for managing Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) stocks of depleted uranium hexafluoride (DUF6). The component modules that make up the DUF6 management program differ substantially in operational maintenance, process-options, requirements for R and D, equipment, facilities, regulatory compliance, (O and M), and operations risk. To facilitate a consistent and equitable comparison of costs, the guidelines offer common definitions, assumptions or basis, and limitations integrated with a standard approach to the analysis. Further, the goal is to evaluate total net life-cycle costs and display them in a way that gives DOE the capability to evaluate a variety of overall DUF6 management strategies, including commercial potential. The cost estimates reflect the preconceptual level of the designs. They will be appropriate for distinguishing among management strategies.

Strait, R.S.

1996-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

Target Cost Management Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Target cost management (TCM) is an innovation of Japanese management accounting system and by common sense has been considered with great interest by practitioners. Nowadays, TCM related

Okano, Hiroshi

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Cost Affordable Titanium IV  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... Enhancing the Cost Effectiveness of High Performance Titanium Alloy Component Production by Powder Metallurgy Evolution of Texture in...

446

Cost Effective Single Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

three relevant technologies, namely casting, alloy development and orientation measurement, developed by Rolls-Royce to enable the cost effective production.

447

Sharing Supermodular Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the costs collectively incurred by a group of cooperating agents. ..... Mixed integer programming formulations for production planning and scheduling prob- lems.

448

Petroleum well costs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This is the first academic study of well costs and drilling times for Australia?s petroleum producing basins, both onshore and offshore. I analyse a substantial (more)

Leamon, Gregory Robert

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

COST REVIEW and ESTIMATING  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Programming Guide. OMB Circular A-94, Guidelines and Discount Rates for Benefit-Cost Analysis of Federal Programs, dated October 29, 1992 Page | 41 APPENDIX A ICRICE...

450

The Cost of Debt ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We estimate firm-specific marginal cost of debt functions for a large panel of companies between 1980 and 2007. The marginal cost curves are identified by exogenous variation in the marginal tax benefits of debt. The location of a given companys cost of debt function varies with characteristics such as asset collateral, size, book-to-market, asset tangibility, cash flows, and whether the firm pays dividends. By integrating the area between benefit and cost functions we estimate that the equilibrium net benefit of debt is 3.5 % of asset value, resulting from an estimated gross benefit of debt of 10.4 % of asset value and an estimated cost of debt of 6.9%. We find that the cost of being overlevered is asymmetrically higher than the cost of being underlevered and that expected default costs constitute approximately half of the total ex ante cost of debt. We thank Rick Green (the Acting Editor), and an anonymous referee, Heitor Almeida, Ravi Bansal,

Jules H. Van Binsbergen; John R. Graham; Jie Yang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FUEL CELL TECHNOLOGIES PROGRAM Hydrogen and Infrastructure Costs Hydrogen Infrastructure Market Readiness Workshop Washington D.C. February 17, 2011 Fred Joseck U.S. Department of...

452

Reducing Energy Costs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy expense is becoming increasingly dominant in the operating costs of high-performance computing (HPC) systems. At the same time, electricity prices vary significantly at...

453

Comparative analysis of energy costing methodologies. Appendix: report on levelized busbar-costing workshop held at MITRE/Metrek, June 29-30, 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The proceedings of a workshop on levelized busbar costing methodologies which was held at MITRE/Metrek on June 29 and 30, 1978 are described. Particular emphasis was placed on consideration of geothermal energy sources. The objective of the workshop was to determine whether a consensus could be developed regarding the most appropriate methodologies and assumptions for levelized energy costing. The workshop was attended by representatives from energy resource, utility and engineering design companies, and by representatives of the Division of Geothermal Energy and R and D contractors for this Division. It was found that year-by-year calculations in current dollars were generally preferred, using either Discounted Cash Flow or Revenue Requirements methods. No consensus emerged on choice of discount rate or financial parameters such as debt/equity ratio, and tax credit carry forward/carry back provisions. It was felt that engineering aspects deserve close attention.

Leigh, J.G.

1979-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Mitigation potential and cost in tropical forestry - relative role for agroforestry  

SciTech Connect

This paper summarizes studies of carbon mitigation potential (MP) and costs of forestry options in seven developing countries with a focus on the role of agroforestry. A common methodological approach known as comprehensive mitigation assessment process (COMAP) was used in each study to estimate the potential and costs between 2000 and 2030. The approach requires the projection of baseline and mitigation land-use scenarios derived from the demand for forest products and forestland for other uses such as agriculture and pasture. By using data on estimated carbon sequestration, emission avoidance, costs and benefits, the model enables one to estimate cost effectiveness indicators based on monetary benefit per t C, as well as estimates of total mitigation costs and potential when the activities are implemented at equilibrium level. The results show that about half the MP of 6.9 Gt C (an average of 223 Mt C per year) between 2000 and 2030 in the seven countries could be achieved at a negative cost, and the other half at costs not exceeding $100 per t C. Negative cost indicates that non-carbon revenue is sufficient to offset direct costs of about half of the options. The agroforestry options analyzed bear a significant proportion of the potential at medium to low cost per t C when compared to other options. The role of agroforestry in these countries varied between 6% and 21% of the MP, though the options are much more cost effective than most due to the low wage or opportunity cost of rural labor. Agroforestry options are attractive due to the large number of people and potential area currently engaged in agriculture, but they pose unique challenges for carbon and cost accounting due to the dispersed nature of agricultural activities in the tropics, as well as specific difficulties arising from requirements for monitoring, verification, leakage assessment and the establishment of credible baselines.

Makundi, Willy R.; Sathaye, Jayant A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Cost-Affordable Titanium III  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cost-Effective Production and Thermomechanical Consolidation of Titanium Alloy Powders Cost Affordable Developments in Titanium Technology and...

456

Operation of Distributed Generation Under Stochastic Prices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-site DG installed by a microgrid in the presence of stochastic electricity and fuel prices. We proceed (natural gas generating cost) exceeds the natural gas generating cost (electricity price) by a significant fraction of energy conversion from primary fuels to electricity takes place closer to loads, i

457

Software Cost Estimation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Software cost estimation is the process of predicting the effort required to develop a software system. Many estimation models have been proposed over the last 30 years. This paper provides a general overview of software cost estimation methods including the recent advances in the field. As a number of these models rely on a software size estimate as input, we first provide an overview of common size metrics. We then highlight the cost estimation models that have been proposed and used successfully. Models may be classified into 2 major categories: algorithmic and non-algorithmic. Each has its own strengths and weaknesses. A key factor in selecting a cost estimation model is the accuracy of its estimates. Unfortunately, despite the large body of experience with estimation models, the accuracy of these models is not satisfactory. The paper includes comment on the performance of the estimation models and description of several newer approaches to cost estimation.

Hareton Leung Zhang; Zhang Fan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Energy Efficiency Improvement and Cost Saving Opportunities for the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry An ENERGY STAR(R) Guide for Energy and Plant Managers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. (1994). Understand Steam Generator Performance. Chemical1999). Rebuilding steam turbine generator reduces costs at awho rebuilt their steam turbine generators at their Burns

Worrell, Ernst

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Transmission line capital costs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The displacement or deferral of conventional AC transmission line installation is a key benefit associated with several technologies being developed with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy`s Office of Energy Management (OEM). Previous benefits assessments conducted within OEM have been based on significantly different assumptions for the average cost per mile of AC transmission line. In response to this uncertainty, an investigation of transmission line capital cost data was initiated. The objective of this study was to develop a database for preparing preliminary estimates of transmission line costs. An extensive search of potential data sources identified databases maintained by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Western Area Power Administration (WAPA) as superior sources of transmission line cost data. The BPA and WAPA data were adjusted to a common basis and combined together. The composite database covers voltage levels from 13.8 to 765 W, with cost estimates for a given voltage level varying depending on conductor size, tower material type, tower frame type, and number of circuits. Reported transmission line costs vary significantly, even for a given voltage level. This can usually be explained by variation in the design factors noted above and variation in environmental and land (right-of-way) costs, which are extremely site-specific. Cost estimates prepared from the composite database were compared to cost data collected by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) for investor-owned utilities from across the United States. The comparison was hampered because the only design specifications included with the FERC data were voltage level and line length. Working within this limitation, the FERC data were not found to differ significantly from the composite database. Therefore, the composite database was judged to be a reasonable proxy for estimating national average costs.

Hughes, K.R.; Brown, D.R.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Prime movers reduce energy costs  

SciTech Connect

Many industrial plants have found that reciprocating engines used to power generator sets and chiller systems are effective in reducing energy costs as part of a load management strategy, while meeting other plant energy needs. As the trend towards high electric utility costs continues, familiarity with basic analyses used to determine the economic viability of engine-driven systems is essential. A basic method to determine the economic viability of genset or chiller systems is to review the supplying utility`s rate structure, determine approximate costs to install and operate an engine-driven system, and calculate a simple equipment payback period. If the initial analysis shows that significant savings are possible and a quick payback is likely, a thorough analysis should be conducted to analyze a plant`s actual electric load profile. A load profile analysis takes into consideration average loads, peak loads, and peak duration. A detailed study should cover myriad considerations, including local air quality regulations and permitting, space availability, auxiliary system components, and financing options. A basic analysis takes relatively little time and can rule out the need for a detailed study.

Swanson, J.E. [Caterpillar, Inc., Mossville, IL (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generation costs revenue" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Synthesis of Reversible Functions Beyond Gate Count and Quantum Cost  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many synthesis approaches for reversible and quantum logic have been proposed so far. However, most of them generate circuits with respect to simple metrics, i.e. gate count or quantum cost. On the other hand, to physically realize reversible and quantum hardware, additional constraints exist. In this paper, we describe cost metrics beyond gate count and quantum cost that should be considered while synthesizing reversible and quantum logic for the respective target technologies. We show that the evaluation of a synthesis approach may differ if additional costs are applied. In addition, a new cost metric, namely Nearest Neighbor Cost (NNC) which is imposed by realistic physical quantum architectures, is considered in detail. We discuss how existing synthesis flows can be extended to generate optimal circuits with respect to NNC while still keeping the quantum cost small.

Robert Wille; Mehdi Saeedi; Rolf Drechsler

2010-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

462

Higher Tobacco Prices and Taxes in South East Asia: An Effective Tool to Reduce Tobacco Use, Save Lives and Generate Revenue  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 3. PRICES, TAXES AND GOVERNMENTWonder Marlboro Local brand Price per pack (20 sticks) LCU2003 b Minimum retail prices as of November 2002 Figure 1.

Guindon, G. Emmanuel; Perucic, Anne-Marie; Boisclair, David

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

LEGAL ISSUES FOR MARKET FINANCING OF CALIFORNIA WATER In part, this study investigates market methods for generating revenues for water resource system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The energy crisis of the 1970's triggered the downfall of natural gas regulation. Regulators and industry from the natural gas and electric industries where de-coupling has taken place, and the last section UTILITIES Similar to the natural gas and electricity industries, California's water supply system can

Lund, Jay R.

464

Tax and Fee Payments by Motor-Vehicle Users for the Use of Highways, Fuels, and Vehicles: Report #17 in the series: The Annualized Social Cost of Motor-Vehicle Use in the United States, based on 1990-1991 Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Oak Ridge, Tennessee, March (1991). Internal RevenueService, Internal Revenue Report of Excise Taxes, U. S.February 9 (1994). Internal Revenue Service, Excise Taxes

Delucchi, Mark

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

User manual for GEOCITY: a computer model for geothermal district heating cost analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A computer model called GEOCITY has been developed to systematically calculate the potential cost of district heating using hydrothermal geothermal resources. GEOCITY combines climate, demographic factors, and heat demand of the city, resource conditions, well drilling costs, design of the distribution system, tax rates, and financial factors into one systematic model. The GEOCITY program provides the flexibility to individually or collectively evaluate the impact of different economic and technical parameters, assumptions, and uncertainties on the cost of providing district heat from a geothermal resource. Both the geothermal reservoir and distribution system are simulated to model the complete district heating system. GEOCITY consists of two major parts: the geothermal reservoir submodel and the distribution submodel. The reservoir submodel calculates the unit cost of energy by simulating the exploration, development, and operation of a geothermal reservoir and the transmission of this energy to a distribution center. The distribution submodel calculates the unit cost of heat by simulating the design and operation of a district heating distribution system. GEOCITY calculates the unit cost of energy and the unit cost of heat for the district heating system based on the principle that the present worth of the revenues will be equal to the present worth of the expenses including investment return over the economic life of the distribution system.

Huber, H.D.; McDonald, C.L.; Bloomster, C.H.; Schulte, S.C.

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Summary of the cost analysis report for the long-term management of depleted uranium hexafluoride  

SciTech Connect

This report is a summary of the Cost Analysis Report which provides comparative cost data for the management strategy alternatives. The PEIS and the Cost Analysis Report will help DOE select a management strategy. The Record of Decision, expected in 1998, will complete the first part of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program. The second part of the Program will look at specific sites and technologies for carrying out the selected strategy. The Cost Analysis Report estimates the primary capital and operating costs for the different alternatives. It reflects the costs of technology development construction of facilities, operation, and decontamination and decommissioning. It also includes potential revenues from the sale of by-products such as anhydrous hydrogen fluoride (ABF). These estimates are based on early designs. They are intended to help in comparing alternatives, rather than to indicate absolute costs for project budgets or bidding purposes. More detailed estimates and specific funding sources will be considered in part two of the Depleted Uranium Hexafluoride Management Program.

Dubrin, J.W.; Rahm-Crites, L.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Lookin g for data personnel costs, indirect costs, equipment costs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Negotiating Group Question/Answer Sessions November 19, 2009 Q: What happens now? A: The negotiation process starts tomorrow [November 20, 2009], when DOE will be sending the Awardees an e-mail with information about which website to go to for clarification and direction, information from the Office of Civil Rights, and answers to some of the questions that came up in the meeting. DOE will be gathering information about the questions concerning cyber requirements, metrics, and reporting requirements and will be getting back to the awardees about those issues the week after Thanksgiving. We have done a review of the budgets, and emails will be sent giving opportunities to address any issues. We will also re-review technical and cost proposals.

468

Entanglement Cost of Quantum Channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The entanglement cost of a quantum channel is the minimal rate at which entanglement (between sender and receiver) is needed in order to simulate many copies of a quantum channel in the presence of free classical communication. In this paper we show how to express this quantity as a regularized optimization of the entanglement formation over states that can be generated between sender and receiver. Our formula is the channel analog of a well-known formula for the entanglement cost of quantum states in terms of the entanglement of formation; and shares a similar relation to the recently shattered hope for additivity. The entanglement cost of a quantum channel can be seen as the analog of the quantum reverse Shannon theorem in the case where free classical communication is allowed. The techniques used in the proof of our result are then also inspired by a recent proof of the quantum reverse Shannon theorem and feature the one-shot formalism for quantum information theory, the post-selection technique for quantum channels as well as von Neumann's minimax theorem. We discuss two applications of our result. First, we are able to link the security in the noisy-storage model to a problem of sending quantum rather than classical information through the adversary's storage device. This not only improves the range of parameters where security can be shown, but also allows us to prove security for storage devices for which no results were known before. Second, our result has consequences for the study of the strong converse quantum capacity. Here, we show that any coding scheme that sends quantum information through a quantum channel at a rate larger than the entanglement cost of the channel has an exponentially small fidelity.

Mario Berta; Fernando Brandao; Matthias Christandl; Stephanie Wehner

2011-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

469

Development of an Operations and Maintenance Cost Model to Identify Cost of Energy Savings for Low Wind Speed Turbines: July 2, 2004 -- June 30, 2008  

SciTech Connect

The report describes the operatons and maintenance cost model developed by Global Energy Concepts under contract to NREL to estimate the O&M costs for commercial wind turbine generator facilities.

Poore, R.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

transmission were ignored. on the characteristics, constraints, and operating costs of generators, the availability

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

Update on Revenue Meters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update provides utilities with an overview of recent activities within AEIC and their subcommittees and working groups. Contained within this document is background information on the overall AEIC organization with expanded detail on the AEIC Meter & Service Committee. Additionally, their role as an integral part and catalyst with EEIs Metering Committee is demonstrated. Summaries of recent minutes and supporting documentation on specific proposals that include revisions to ...

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

472

cost | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

cost cost Dataset Summary Description The following data-set is for a benchmark residential home for all TMY3 locations across all utilities in the US. The data is indexed by utility service provider which is described by its "unique" EIA ID ( Source National Renewable Energy Laboratory Date Released April 05th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated April 06th, 2012 (2 years ago) Keywords AC apartment CFL coffeemaker Computer cooling cost demand Dishwasher Dryer Furnace gas HVAC Incandescent Laptop load Microwave model NREL Residential television tmy3 URDB Data text/csv icon Residential Cost Data for Common Household Items (csv, 14.5 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Some Review Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Annually Time Period License License Open Data Commons Public Domain Dedication and Licence (PDDL)

473

Vehicle Cost Calculator  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Electric Plug-in Hybrid Electric Natural Gas (CNG) Flex Fuel (E85) Biodiesel (B20) Next Vehicle Cost Calculator U.S. Department of Energy Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy...

474

Rocky Flats Closure Unit Cost Data  

SciTech Connect

The Rocky Flats Closure Project has completed the process of stabilizing residual nuclear materials, decommissioning nuclear facilities, remediating environmental media and closing the Rocky Flats Site (Site). The project cost approximately $4.1 B and included the decommissioning of over 700 structures including 5 major plutonium facilities and 5 major uranium facilities, shipping over 14,600 cubic meters of transuranic and 565,000 cubic meters of low level radioactive waste, and remediating a 385-acre industrial area and the surrounding land. Actual costs were collected for a large variety of closure activities. These costs can be correlated with metrics associated with the facilities and environmental media to capture cost factors from the project that could be applicable to a variety of other closure projects both within and outside of the Department of Energy's weapons complex. The paper covers four general topics: the process to correlate the actual costs and metrics, an example of the correlated data for one large sub-project, a discussion of the results, and the additional activities that are planned to correlate and make this data available to the public. The process to collect and arrange the project control data of the Closure Project relied on the actual Closure Project cost information. It was used to correlate these actual costs with the metrics for the physical work, such as building area or waste generated, to support the development of parametric cost factors. The example provides cost factors for the Industrial Sites Project. The discussion addresses the strengths and weaknesses of the data, followed by a section identifying future activities to improve and extend the analyses and integrate it within the Department's Environmental Cost Analysis System. (authors)

Sanford, P.C. [1129 Business Parkway South, Westminister, MD (United States); Skokan, B. [United States Department of Energy, Washington, DC (United States)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Corporate Property Tax Reduction for New/Expanded Generating Facilities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Property Tax Reduction for New/Expanded Generating Property Tax Reduction for New/Expanded Generating Facilities Corporate Property Tax Reduction for New/Expanded Generating Facilities < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Water Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount Taxable value reduced by 50% for 5 years; reduction in taxable value declines each year thereafter until there is no reduction in tenth year. Provider Montana Department of Revenue Montana generating plants producing one megawatt (MW) or more with an alternative renewable energy source are eligible for the new or expanded industry property tax reduction. This incentive reduces the local mill levy

476

Generation Facility Corporate Tax Exemption | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation Facility Corporate Tax Exemption Generation Facility Corporate Tax Exemption Generation Facility Corporate Tax Exemption < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Solar Home Weatherization Water Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Property Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption for 5 years Provider Montana Department of Revenue New electricity generating facilities built in Montana with a capacity of up to one megawatt (MW) that use an alternative renewable energy source are exempt from property taxes for five years after operation begins. The taxable value of the property varies depending on the property ownership and class. The assessed value of personal property is adjusted yearly based

477

Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Commercial Savings Category Bioenergy Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Energy Sources Solar Home Weatherization Program Info Start Date 07/01/2011 Expiration Date 10/01/2013 State Connecticut Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption Provider Connecticut Department of Revenue Services In 2011, Connecticut created a new tax requiring electric power plants in the state that generate and upload electricity to the regional bulk power grid to pay $2.50 per megawatt hour. Renewable energy facilities and customer-sited facilities are exempt from the tax. The tax and related

478

Electrical Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) Electrical Generation Tax Reform Act (Montana) < Back Eligibility Utility Fed. Government Commercial Agricultural Investor-Owned Utility State/Provincial Govt Industrial Municipal/Public Utility Local Government Residential Installer/Contractor Rural Electric Cooperative Tribal Government Low-Income Residential Schools Institutional Multi-Family Residential Systems Integrator Nonprofit General Public/Consumer Transportation Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Montana Program Type Fees Provider Montana Department of Revenue This Act reforms taxes paid by electricity generators to reduce tax rates and imposes replacement taxes in response to the 1997 restructuring of the

479

NREL: Energy Analysis - Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Levelized Cost of Energy Calculator Transparent Cost Database Button The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) calculator provides a simple calculator for both utility-scale and distributed generation (DG) renewable energy technologies that compares the combination of capital costs, operations and maintenance (O&M), performance, and fuel costs. Note that this does not include financing issues, discount issues, future replacement, or degradation costs. Each of these would need to be included for a thorough analysis. To estimate simple cost of energy, use the slider controls or enter values directly to adjust the values. The calculator will return the LCOE expressed in cents per kilowatt-hour (kWh). The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program

480

Expert judgement in cost estimating: Modelling the reasoning process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Expert Judgement (EJ) is used extensively during the generation of cost estimates. Cost estimators have to make numerous assumptions and judgements about what they think a new product will cost. However, the use of EJ is often frowned upon, not well accepted or understood by non-cost estimators within a concurrent engineering environment. Computerised cost models, in many ways, have reduced the need for EJ but by no means have they, or can they, replace it. The cost estimates produced from both algorithmic and non-algorithmic cost models can be widely inaccurate; and, as the work of this paper highlights, require extensive use of judgement in order to produce a meaningful result. Very little research tackles the issues of capturing and integrating EJ and rationale into the cost estimating process. Therefore, this

Christopher Rush; Rajkumar Roy

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z