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1

Gamification: Playful TeachingGamification: Playful Teaching for Generation-X/-Y/-Z/...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamification: Playful TeachingGamification: Playful Teaching for Generation-X/-Y/-Z/... Alexandru Curiosity* 4TUD Onderwijsdag/EducationDay'13 * "A Magical New Adventure" #12;Gamification* in Higher it if it ain't broken? = A play in 7 acts, 3 set pieces, and 75 minutes 3. What is Gamification? Any other

Iosup, Alexandru

2

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Oregon Institute of Technology (OIT) drilled a deep geothermal well on campus (to 5,300 feet deep) which produced 196oF resource as part of the 2008 OIT Congressionally Directed Project. OIT will construct a geothermal power plant (estimated at 1.75 MWe gross output). The plant would provide 50 to 75 percent of the electricity demand on campus. Technical support for construction and operations will be provided by OITís Geo-Heat Center. The power plant will be housed adjacent to the existing heat exchange building on the south east corner of campus near the existing geothermal production wells used for heating campus. Cooling water will be supplied from the nearby cold water wells to a cooling tower or air cooling may be used, depending upon the type of plant selected. Using the flow obtained from the deep well, not only can energy be generated from the power plant, but the ďwasteĒ water will also be used to supplement space heating on campus. A pipeline will be construction from the well to the heat exchanger building, and then a discharge line will be construction around the east and north side of campus for anticipated use of the ďwasteĒ water by facilities in an adjacent sustainable energy park. An injection well will need to be drilled to handle the flow, as the campus existing injection wells are limited in capacity.

Boyd, Tonya

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Gamification: Playful Teaching for Generation-X/-Y/-Z/...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamification: Playful Teaching for Generation-X/-Y/-Z/... Alexandru Iosup 1TUD-PDS Alexandru Iosup Games Gamification in Higher May 7 May 9 May 27 10am Taub 337 2TUD-PDS Scheduling in IaaS Clouds Gamification in Higher Education A TU Delft perspective on Big Data Processing and Preservation May 27 June 6

Iosup, Alexandru

4

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop jointly a licensing strategy for the Next Generation Nuclear plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR) for...

5

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

POWER GENERATION PLANT GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT Project objectives: Drilling a deep geothermal well on the Oregon Institute of Technology campus, Klamath Falls,...

6

Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A number of current and prospective power plant concepts were investigated to evaluate their potential to serve as the basis of the next generation geothermal power plant (NGGPP). The NGGPP has been envisaged as a power plant that would be more cost competitive (than current geothermal power plants) with fossil fuel power plants, would efficiently use resources and mitigate the risk of reservoir under-performance, and minimize or eliminate emission of pollutants and consumption of surface and ground water. Power plant concepts were analyzed using resource characteristics at ten different geothermal sites located in the western United States. Concepts were developed into viable power plant processes, capital costs were estimated and levelized busbar costs determined. Thus, the study results should be considered as useful indicators of the commercial viability of the various power plants concepts that were investigated. Broadly, the different power plant concepts that were analyzed in this study fall into the following categories: commercial binary and flash plants, advanced binary plants, advanced flash plants, flash/binary hybrid plants, and fossil/geothed hybrid plants. Commercial binary plants were evaluated using commercial isobutane as a working fluid; both air-cooling and water-cooling were considered. Advanced binary concepts included cycles using synchronous turbine-generators, cycles with metastable expansion, and cycles utilizing mixtures as working fluids. Dual flash steam plants were used as the model for the commercial flash cycle. The following advanced flash concepts were examined: dual flash with rotary separator turbine, dual flash with steam reheater, dual flash with hot water turbine, and subatmospheric flash. Both dual flash and binary cycles were combined with other cycles to develop a number of hybrid cycles: dual flash binary bottoming cycle, dual flash backpressure turbine binary cycle, dual flash gas turbine cycle, and binary gas turbine cycle. Results of this study indicate that dual flash type plants are preferred at resources with temperatures above 400 F. Closed loop (binary type) plants are preferred at resources with temperatures below 400 F. A rotary separator turbine upstream of a dual flash plant can be beneficial at Salton Sea, the hottest resource, or at high temperature resources where there is a significant variance in wellhead pressures from well to well. Full scale demonstration is required to verify cost and performance. Hot water turbines that recover energy from the spent brine in a dual flash cycle improve that cycle's brine efficiency. Prototype field tests of this technology have established its technical feasibility. If natural gas prices remain low, a combustion turbine/binary hybrid is an economic option for the lowest temperature sites. The use of mixed fluids appear to be an attractive low risk option. The synchronous turbine option as prepared by Barber-Nichols is attractive but requires a pilot test to prove cost and performance. Dual flash binary bottoming cycles appear promising provided that scaling of the brine/working fluid exchangers is controllable. Metastable expansion, reheater, Subatmospheric flash, dual flash backpressure turbine, and hot dry rock concepts do not seem to offer any cost advantage over the baseline technologies. If implemented, the next generation geothermal power plant concept may improve brine utilization but is unlikely to reduce the cost of power generation by much more than 10%. Colder resources will benefit more from the development of a next generation geothermal power plant than will hotter resources. All values presented in this study for plant cost and for busbar cost of power are relative numbers intended to allow an objective and meaningful comparison of technologies. The goal of this study is to assess various technologies on an common basis and, secondarily, to give an approximate idea of the current costs of the technologies at actual resource sites. Absolute costs at a given site will be determined by the specifics of a given pr

Brugman, John; Hattar, Mai; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a demonstration of the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology for the production of process heat, electricity, and hydrogen. This nuclear- based technology can provide high-temperature process heat (up to 950įC) that can be used as a substitute for the burning of fossil fuels for a wide range of commercial applications (see Figure 1). The substitution of the HTGR for burning fossil fuels conserves these hydrocarbon resources for other uses, reduces uncertainty in the cost and supply of natural gas and oil, and eliminates the emissions of greenhouse gases attendant with the burning of these fuels. The HTGR is a passively safe nuclear reactor concept with an easily understood safety basis that permits substantially reduced emergency planning requirements and improved siting flexibility compared to other nuclear technologies.

Dr. David A. Petti

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Should that prove to be impractical (e.g. due to excessive heat loss in the intermediate heat transfer loop), an earthen berm separating the two plants may be a suitable...

9

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

and passive heat dissipation to withstand design basis events with minimal fuel damage and source term generation. As such, the NGNP places a burden on the designer to...

10

NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION STRATEGY Presented by NGNP Industry Alliance November 30, 2009 I In nd du us st tr ry y A Al ll li ia an nc ce e Clean,...

11

Did English generators play cournot? : capacity withholding in the electricity pool  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Electricity generators can raise the price of power by withholding their plant from the market. We discuss two ways in which this could have affected prices in the England and Wales Pool. Withholding low-cost capacity which ...

Green, Richard

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Nevada's Beowawe Geothermal Plant Begins Generating Clean Energy...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Nevada's Beowawe Geothermal Plant Begins Generating Clean Energy Nevada's Beowawe Geothermal Plant Begins Generating Clean Energy April 20, 2011 - 1:45pm Addthis U.S. Energy...

13

Efficiently generate steam from cogeneration plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As cogeneration gets more popular, some plants have two choices of equipment for generating steam. Plant engineers need to have a decision chart to split the duty efficiently between (oil-fired or gas-fired) steam generators (SGs) and heat recovery steam generators (HRSGs) using the exhaust from gas turbines. Underlying the dilemma is that the load-versus-efficiency characteristics of both types of equipment are different. When the limitations of each type of equipment and its capability are considered, analysis can come up with several selection possibilities. It is almost always more efficient to generate steam in an HRSG (designed for firing) as compared with conventional steam generators. However, other aspects, such as maintenance, availability of personnel, equipment limitations and operating costs, should also be considered before making a final decision. Loading each type of equipment differently also affects the overall efficiency or the fuel consumption. This article describes the performance aspects of representative steam generators and gas turbine HRSGs and suggests how plant engineers can generate steam efficiently. It also illustrates how to construct a decision chart for a typical installation. The equipment was picked arbitrarily to show the method. The natural gas fired steam generator has a maximum capacity of 100,000 lb/h, 400-psig saturated steam, and the gas-turbine-exhaust HRSG has the same capacity. It is designed for supplementary firing with natural gas.

Ganapathy, V. [ABCO Industries, Abilene, TX (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Mesaba next-generation IGCC plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Through a US Department of Energy (DOE) cooperative agreement awarded in June 2006, MEP-I LLC plans to demonstrate a next generation integrated gasification-combined cycle (IGCC) electric power generating plant, the Mesaba Energy Project. The 606-MWe plant (the first of two similarly sized plants envisioned by project sponsors) will feature next-generation ConocoPhillips E-Gas{trademark} technology first tested on the DOE-funded Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering project. Mesaba will benefit from recommendations of an industry panel applying the Value Improving Practices process to Wabash cost and performance results. The project will be twice the size of Wabash, while demonstrating better efficient, reliability and pollutant control. The $2.16 billion project ($36 million federal cost share) will be located in the Iron Range region north of Duluth, Minnesota. Mesaba is one of four projects selected under Round II of the Clean Coal Power Initiative. 1 fig.

NONE

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

GENERATING CLIMBING PLANTS USING L-SYSTEMS Johan Knutzen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and heliotropism, as well pseudo- tropisms. The structure of the generated climbing plants is discretized

Assarsson, Ulf

16

Modeling a Helical-coil Steam Generator in RELAP5-3D for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Options for the primary heat transport loop heat exchangers for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant are currently being evaluated. A helical-coil steam generator is one heat exchanger design under consideration. Safety is an integral part of the helical-coil steam generator evaluation. Transient analysis plays a key role in evaluation of the steam generators safety. Using RELAP5-3D to model the helical-coil steam generator, a loss of pressure in the primary side of the steam generator is simulated. This report details the development of the steam generator model, the loss of pressure transient, and the response of the steam generator primary and secondary systems to the loss of primary pressure. Back ground on High Temperature Gas-cooled reactors, steam generators, the Next Generation Nuclear Plant is provided to increase the readers understanding of the material presented.

Nathan V. Hoffer; Piyush Sabharwall; Nolan A. Anderson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Optimization of Water Consumption in Second Generation Bioethanol Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Optimization of Water Consumption in Second Generation Bioethanol Plants Mariano MartŪna optimization of second generation bioethanol production plants from lignocellulosic switchgrass when using/gal and with no or low water discharge. Keywords: Energy, Biofuels, Alternative fuels, Water, Ethanol

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

18

Ownership Change, Incentives and Plant Efficiency: The Divestiture of U.S. Electric Generation Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ownership Change, Incentives and Plant Efficiency: The Divestiture of U.S. Electric Generation generating plants. Between 1998 and 2001, over 300 electric generating plants in the US, accounting Plants James B. Bushnell and Catherine Wolfram March 2005 Abstract Electric industry restructuring

Sadoulet, Elisabeth

19

Next Generation Nuclear Plant GAP Analysis Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a follow-up to the phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) studies conducted recently by NRC on next generation nuclear plant (NGNP) safety, a study was conducted to identify the significant 'gaps' between what is needed and what is already available to adequately assess NGNP safety characteristics. The PIRT studies focused on identifying important phenomena affecting NGNP plant behavior, while the gap study gives more attention to off-normal behavior, uncertainties, and event probabilities under both normal operation and postulated accident conditions. Hence, this process also involved incorporating more detailed evaluations of accident sequences and risk assessments. This study considers thermal-fluid and neutronic behavior under both normal and postulated accident conditions, fission product transport (FPT), high-temperature metals, and graphite behavior and their effects on safety. In addition, safety issues related to coupling process heat (hydrogen production) systems to the reactor are addressed, given the limited design information currently available. Recommendations for further study, including analytical methods development and experimental needs, are presented as appropriate in each of these areas.

Ball, Sydney J [ORNL; Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Corwin, William R [ORNL; Fisher, Stephen Eugene [ORNL; Forsberg, Charles W. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Morris, Robert Noel [ORNL; Moses, David Lewis [ORNL

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Licensing Strategy  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

reactor that is based on research and development (R&D) activities supported by the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative and shall be used to generate electricity,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Power generation using solar power plant.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Pursuing the commitment of California State to generate at least 20 percent of total generated energy from the renewable source by the year 2010 ratherÖ (more)

Amin, Parth

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain;Modeling Energy Taxes and Credits: The Genco's Choice ∑ Each Genco has a portfolio of power plants ∑ Each power plant can have different supply costs and transaction costs ∑ Supply costs can reflect capital

Nagurney, Anna

23

Next generation geothermal power plants. Draft final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this project is to develop concepts for the next generation geothermal power plant(s) (NGGPP). This plant, compared to existing plants, will generate power for a lower levelized cost and will be more competitive with fossil fuel fired power plants. The NGGPP will utilize geothermal resources efficiently and will be equipped with contingencies to mitigate the risk of reservoir performance. The NGGPP design will attempt to minimize emission of pollutants and consumption of surface water and/or geothermal fluids for cooling service.

Brugman, John; Hattar, John; Nichols, Kenneth; Esaki, Yuri

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Evaluation of Siting a HTGR Co-generation Plant on an Operating Commercial Nuclear Power Plant Site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper summarizes an evaluation by the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project of siting a High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant on an existing nuclear plant site that is located in an area of significant industrial activity. This is a co-generation application in which the HTGR Plant will be supplying steam and electricity to one or more of the nearby industrial plants.

L.E. Demick

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Power (NGNP) Project will demonstrate emissions-free nuclearassisted electricity and hydrogen production by 2015. The NGNP reactor will be a helium-cooled, graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor with a design goal outlet temperature of 1000 C or higher. The reactor thermal power and core configuration will be designed to assure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage during hypothetical accidents. The fuel cycle will be a once-through very high burnup low-enriched uranium fuel cycle. This paper provides a description of the project to build the NGNP at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). The NGNP Project includes an overall reactor design activity and four major supporting activities: materials selection and qualification, NRC licensing and regulatory support, fuel development and qualification, and the hydrogen production plant. Each of these activities is discussed in the paper. All the reactor design and construction activities will be managed under the DOEís project management system as outlined in DOE Order 413.3. The key elements of the overall project management system discussed in this paper include the client and project management organization relationship, critical decisions (CDs), acquisition strategy, and the project logic and timeline. The major activities associated with the materials program include development of a plan for managing the selection and qualification of all component materials required for the NGNP; identification of specific materials alternatives for each system component; evaluation of the needed testing, code work, and analysis required to qualify each identified material; preliminary selection of component materials; irradiation of needed sample materials; physical, mechanical, and chemical testing of unirradiated and irradiated materials; and documentation of final materials selections. The NGNP will be licensed by the NRC under 10 CFR 50 or 10 CFR 52, for the purpose of demonstrating the suitability of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors for commercial electric power and hydrogen production. Products that will support the licensing of the NGNP include the environmental impact statement, the preliminary safety analysis report, the NRC construction permit, the final safety analysis report, and the NRC operating license. The fuel development and qualification program consists of five elements: development of improved fuel manufacturing technologies, fuel and materials irradiations, safety testing and post-irradiation examinations, fuel performance modeling, and fission product transport and source term modeling. Two basic approaches will be explored for using the heat from the high-temperature helium coolant to produce hydrogen. The first technology of interest is the thermochemical splitting of water into hydrogen and oxygen. The most promising processes for thermochemical splitting of water are sulfur-based and include the sulfur-iodine, hybrid sulfur-electrolysis, and sulfur-bromine processes. The second technology of interest is thermally assisted electrolysis of water. The efficiency of this process can be substantially improved by heating the water to high-temperature steam before applying electrolysis.

F. H. Southworth; P. E. MacDonald

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Innovative Design of New Geothermal Generating Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This very significant and useful report assessed state-of-the-art geothermal technologies. The findings presented in this report are the result of site visits and interviews with plant owners and operators, representatives of major financial institutions, utilities involved with geothermal power purchases and/or wheeling. Information so obtained was supported by literature research and data supplied by engineering firms who have been involved with designing and/or construction of a majority of the plants visited. The interviews were conducted by representatives of the Bonneville Power Administration, the Washington State Energy Office, and the Oregon Department of Energy during the period 1986-1989. [DJE-2005

Bloomquist, R. Gordon; Geyer, John D.; Sifford, B. Alexander III

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Risk Framework for the Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sector projects, and recently elevated to Best Practice status. However, its current format is inadequate to address the unique challenges of constructing the next generation of nuclear power plants (NPP). To understand and determine the risks...

Yeon, Jaeheum 1981-

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

28

Has Restructuring Improved Operating Efficiency at U.S. Electricity Generating Plants?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in electricity generation, relative to IOU plants in stateselectricity generation sector restructuring in the United States on plant-plant over the year, measured by annual net megawatt-hours of electricity generation,

Fabrizio, Kira; Rose, Nancy; Wolfram, Catherine

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

New Generation Nuclear Plant -- High Level Functions and Requirements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This functions and requirements (F&R) document was prepared for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The highest-level functions and requirements for the NGNP preconceptual design are identified in this document, which establishes performance definitions for what the NGNP will achieve. NGNP designs will be developed based on these requirements by commercial vendor(s).

J. M. Ryskamp; E. J. Gorski; E. A. Harvego; S. T. Khericha; G. A. Beitel

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

EIS-0476: Vogtle Electric Generating Plant, Units 3 and 4  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS evaluates the environmental impacts of construction and startup of the proposed Units 3 and 4 at the Vogtle Electric Generating Plant in Burke County, Georgia. DOE adopted two Nuclear Regulatory Commission EISs associated with this project (i.e., NUREG-1872, issued 8/2008, and NUREG-1947, issued 3/2011).

31

Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain-term solution (e.g.,are long-term solution (e.g., solar power and wind power (solar power and wind power Heavy user of fossil fuels:Heavy user of fossil fuels: Electric power industryElectric power industry

Nagurney, Anna

32

Technology Data for Electricity and Heat Generating Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.................................................................................63 13 Centralised Biogas Plants

33

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years.

G. O. Hayner; E.L. Shaber

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

AVESTAR Center for Operational Excellence of Electricity Generation Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address industry challenges in attaining operational excellence for electricity generation plants, the U.S. Department of Energyís (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARTM). This presentation will highlight the AVESTARTM Center simulators, facilities, and comprehensive training, education, and research programs focused on the operation and control of high-efficiency, near-zero-emission electricity generation plants. The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real-time, high-fidelity dynamic simulators with full-scope operator training systems (OTSs) and 3D virtual immersive training systems (ITSs) into an integrated energy plant and control room environment. AVESTARís initial offering combines--for the first time--a ďgasification with CO2 captureĒ process simulator with a ďcombined-cycleĒ power simulator together in a single OTS/ITS solution for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with carbon dioxide (CO2) capture. IGCC systems are an attractive technology option for power generation, especially when capturing and storing CO2 is necessary to satisfy emission targets. The AVESTAR training program offers a variety of courses that merge classroom learning, simulator-based OTS learning in a control-room operations environment, and immersive learning in the interactive 3D virtual plant environment or ITS. All of the courses introduce trainees to base-load plant operation, control, startups, and shutdowns. Advanced courses require participants to become familiar with coordinated control, fuel switching, power-demand load shedding, and load following, as well as to problem solve equipment and process malfunctions. Designed to ensure work force development, training is offered for control room and plant field operators, as well as engineers and managers. Such comprehensive simulator-based instruction allows for realistic training without compromising worker, equipment, and environmental safety. It also better prepares operators and engineers to manage the plant closer to economic constraints while minimizing or avoiding the impact of any potentially harmful, wasteful, or inefficient events. The AVESTAR Center is also used to augment graduate and undergraduate engineering education in the areas of process simulation, dynamics, control, and safety. Students and researchers gain hands-on simulator-based training experience and learn how the commercial-scale power plants respond dynamically to changes in manipulated inputs, such as coal feed flow rate and power demand. Students also analyze how the regulatory control system impacts power plant performance and stability. In addition, students practice start-up, shutdown, and malfunction scenarios. The 3D virtual ITSs are used for plant familiarization, walk-through, equipment animations, and safety scenarios. To further leverage the AVESTAR facilities and simulators, NETL and its university partners are pursuing an innovative and collaborative R&D program. In the area of process control, AVESTAR researchers are developing enhanced strategies for regulatory control and coordinated plant-wide control, including gasifier and gas turbine lead, as well as advanced process control using model predictive control (MPC) techniques. Other AVESTAR R&D focus areas include high-fidelity equipment modeling using partial differential equations, dynamic reduced order modeling, optimal sensor placement, 3D virtual plant simulation, and modern grid. NETL and its partners plan to continue building the AVESTAR portfolio of dynamic simulators, immersive training systems, and advanced research capabilities to satisfy industryís growing need for training and experience with the operation and control of clean energy plants. Future dynamic simulators under development include natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) and supercritical pulverized coal (SCPC) plants with post-combustion CO2 capture. These dynamic simulators are targeted for us

Zitney, Stephen

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

35

Steam generator design considerations for modular HTGR plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Studies are in progress to develop a standard High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) plant design that is amenable to serial production and is licensable. Based on the results of trade studies performed in the DOE-funded HTGR program, activities are being focused to emphasize a modular concept based on a 350 MW(t) annular reactor core with prismatic fuel elements. Utilization of a multiplicity of the standard module affords flexibility in power rating for utility electricity generation. The selected modular HTGR concept has the reactor core and heat transport systems housed in separate steel vessels. This paper highlights the steam generator design considerations for the reference plant, and includes a discussion of the major features of the heat exchanger concept and the technology base existing in the US.

McDonald, C.F.; DeFur, D.D.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Plugging of steam generator tubes and consequences for plant operation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The simulation of pressurized water reactor (SIROP) code was created using the SICLE software developed by the study and research department at Electricite de France. It is the largest computer code with this software (260 tubes, 1800 computation points, 19 water-steam cavities, 9 pumps, 6 turbines, 32 control system elements). It simulates the general operating conditions of a 900-MW(electric) CP2 power plant by computing the main physical parameters from the reactor core to the condenser. The study was performed by the study and research department (Reactor Physics Division) with the help of SEPTEN following an SPT (power operation department) request. It consisted of identifying the change in margins with respect to emergency shutdown protections (especially for ..delta..T protections) as a function of the number of plugged steam generators (1, 2, or 3) and the degree of plugging (10, 20, and 30%) under the following operating conditions: (1) steady state at 100% full power; and (2) main transients: manual load rejection, load rejection induced by grid fault, turbine tripping. The purpose was to assess the effect of a large number of steam generator plugged tubes on the behavior of the plant to secure a long-term prediction for the date of replacement of these steam generators.

Agnoux, D.; Chenal, J.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Resilient Control System Functional Analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Control Systems and their associated instrumentation must meet reliability, availability, maintainability, and resiliency criteria in order for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) to be economically competitive. Research, perhaps requiring several years, may be needed to develop control systems to support plant availability and resiliency. This report functionally analyzes the gaps between traditional and resilient control systems as applicable to HTGRs, which includes the Next Generation Nuclear Plant; defines resilient controls; assesses the current state of both traditional and resilient control systems; and documents the functional gaps existing between these two controls approaches as applicable to HTGRs. This report supports the development of an overall strategy for applying resilient controls to HTGRs by showing that control systems with adequate levels of resilience perform at higher levels, respond more quickly to disturbances, increase operational efficiency, and increase public protection.

Lynne M. Stevens

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Selection and Qualification Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design is a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble bed thermal neutron spectrum reactor with an average reactor outlet temperature of at least 1000 C. The NGNP will use very high burn up, lowenriched uranium, TRISO-Coated fuel in a once-through fuel cycle. The design service life of the NGNP is 60 years.

R. Doug Hamelin; G. O. Hayner

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Hydrogen Production from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a high temperature gas-cooled reactor that will be capable of producing hydrogen, electricity and/or high temperature process heat for industrial use. The project has initiated the conceptual design phase and when completed will demonstrate the viability of hydrogen generation using nuclear produced process heat. This paper explains how industry and the U.S. Government are cooperating to advance nuclear hydrogen technology. It also describes the issues being explored and the results of recent R&D including materials development and testing, thermal-fluids research, and systems analysis. The paper also describes the hydrogen production technologies being considered (including various thermochemical processes and high-temperature electrolysis).

M. Patterson; C. Park

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the ďhighly rankedĒ phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the ďhighly rankedĒ phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the ďhighly rankedĒ phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Fuel cell power plants in a distributed generator application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

ONSI`s (a subsidiary of International Fuel Cells Corporation) world wide fleet of 200-kW PC25{trademark} phosphoric acid fuel cell power plants which began operation early in 1992 has shown excellent performance and reliability in over 1 million hours of operation. This experience has verified the clean, quiet, reliable operation of the PC25 and confirmed its application as a distributed generator. Continuing product development efforts have resulted in a one third reduction of weight and volume as well as improved installation and operating characteristics for the PC25 C model. Delivery of this unit began in 1995. International Fuel Cells (IFC) continues its efforts to improve product design and manufacturing processes. This progress has been sustained at a compounded rate of 10 percent per year since the late 1980`s. These improvements will permit further reductions in the initial cost of the power plant and place increased emphasis on market development as the pacing item in achieving business benefits from the PC25 fuel cell. Derivative product opportunities are evolving with maturation of the technologies in a commercial environment. The recent announcement of Praxair, Inc., and IFC introducing a non-cryogenic hydrogen supply system utilizing IFC`s steam reformer is an example. 11 figs.

Smith, M.J. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Materials Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production without greenhouse gas emissions. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a state-of-the-art thermodynamically efficient manner. The NGNP will use very high burn-up, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Project is envisioned to demonstrate the following: (1) A full-scale prototype VHTR by about 2021; (2) High-temperature Brayton Cycle electric power production at full scale with a focus on economic performance; (3) Nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen (with about 10% of the heat) with a focus on economic performance; and (4) By test, the exceptional safety capabilities of the advanced gas-cooled reactors. Further, the NGNP program will: (1) Obtain a Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) License to construct and operate the NGNP, this process will provide a basis for future performance based, risk-informed licensing; and (2) Support the development, testing, and prototyping of hydrogen infrastructures. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. The NGNP Materials R&D Program includes the following elements: (1) Developing a specific approach, program plan and other project management tools for managing the R&D program elements; (2) Developing a specific work package for the R&D activities to be performed during each government fiscal year; (3) Reporting the status and progress of the work based on committed deliverables and milestones; (4) Developing collaboration in areas of materials R&D of benefit to the NGNP with countries that are a part of the Generation IV International Forum; and (5) Ensuring that the R&D work performed in support of the materials program is in conformance with established Quality Assurance and procurement requirements. The objective of the NGNP Materials R&D Program is to provide the essential materials R&D needed to support the design and licensing of the reactor and balance of plant, excluding the hydrogen plant. The materials R&D program is being initiated prior to the design effort to ensure that materials R&D activities are initiated early enough to support the design process and support the Project Integrator. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge; thus, new materials and approaches may be required.

G.O. Hayner; R.L. Bratton; R.N. Wright

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Electric power generating plant having direct-coupled steam and compressed-air cycles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

Drost, M.K.

1981-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

46

Electric power generating plant having direct coupled steam and compressed air cycles  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electric power generating plant is provided with a Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) system which is directly coupled to the steam cycle of the generating plant. The CAES system is charged by the steam boiler during off peak hours, and drives a separate generator during peak load hours. The steam boiler load is thereby levelized throughout an operating day.

Drost, Monte K. (Richland, WA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Demonstrate safe and economical nuclearassisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen production [DOE 2004] and energy conversion technologies programs are described elsewhere.

P. E. MacDonald

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Research and Development Program Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research and development (R&D) on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. Use of a liquid salt coolant is also being evaluated. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: (1) Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (2) Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, will perform R&D that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: (1) High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior; (2) High temperature materials qualification; (3) Design methods development and validation; (4) Hydrogen production technologies; and (5) Energy conversion. The current R&D work is addressing fundamental issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs. This document describes the NGNP R&D planned and currently underway in the first three topic areas listed above. The NGNP Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development and Qualification Program is presented in Section 2, the NGNP Materials R&D Program Plan is presented in Section 3, and the NGNP Design Methods Development and Validation R&D Program is presented in Section 4. The DOE-funded hydrogen production [DOE 2004] and energy conversion technologies programs are described elsewhere.

None

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Dependable Hydrogen and Industrial Heat Generation from the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy is working with industry to develop a next generation, high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) as a part of the effort to supply the US with abundant, clean and secure energy. The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project, led by the Idaho National Laboratory, will demonstrate the ability of the HTGR to generate hydrogen, electricity, and high-quality process heat for a wide range of industrial applications. Substituting HTGR power for traditional fossil fuel resources reduces the cost and supply vulnerability of natural gas and oil, and reduces or eliminates greenhouse gas emissions. As authorized by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, industry leaders are developing designs for the construction of a commercial prototype producing up to 600 MWt of power by 2021. This paper describes a variety of critical applications that are appropriate for the HTGR with an emphasis placed on applications requiring a clean and reliable source of hydrogen. An overview of the NGNP project status and its significant technology development efforts are also presented.

Charles V. Park; Michael W. Patterson; Vincent C. Maio; Piyush Sabharwall

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Worldwide assessment of steam-generator problems in pressurized-water-reactor nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective is to assess the reliability of steam generators of pressurized water reactor (PWR) power plants in the United States and abroad. The assessment is based on operation experience of both domestic and foreign PWR plants. The approach taken is to collect and review papers and reports available from the literature as well as information obtained by contacting research institutes both here and abroad. This report presents the results of the assessment. It contains a general background of PWR plant operations, plant types, and materials used in PWR plants. A review of the worldwide distribution of PWR plants is also given. The report describes in detail the degradation problems discovered in PWR steam generators: their causes, their impacts on the performance of steam generators, and the actions to mitigate and avoid them. One chapter is devoted to operating experience of PWR steam generators in foreign countries. Another discusses the improvements in future steam generator design.

Woo, H.H.; Lu, S.C.

1981-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion: Small gas turbine induustrial plant study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) plants provide a coal-fired, high-efficiency, combined-cycle system for the generation of electricity and steam. The plants use lime-based sorbents in PFB combustors to meet environmental air standards without back-end gas desulfurization equipment. The second-generation system is an improvement over earlier PFBC concepts because it can achieve gas temperatures of 2100[degrees]F and higher for improved cycle efficiency while maintaining the fluidized beds at 1600[degrees]F for enhanced sulfur capture and minimum alkali release. Second-generation PFBC systems are capable of supplying the electric and steam process needs of industrial plants. The basic second-generation system can be applied in different ways to meet a variety of process steam and electrical requirements. To evaluate the potential of these systems in the industrial market, conceptual designs have been developed for six second-generation PFBC plants. These plants cover a range of electrical outputs from 6.3 to 41.5 MWe and steam flows from 46,067 to 442,337 lb/h. Capital and operating costs have been estimated for these six plants and for equivalent (in size) conventional, coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion cogeneration plants. Economic analyses were conducted to compare the cost of steam for both the second-generation plants and the conventional plants.

Shenker, J.; Garland, R.; Horazak, D.; Seifert, F.; Wenglarz, R.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion: Small gas turbine industrial plant study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Second-Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion (PFBC) plants provide a coal-fired, high-efficiency, combined-cycle system for the generation of electricity and steam. The plants use lime-based sorbents in PFB combustors to meet environmental air standards without back-end gas desulfurization equipment. The second-generation system is an improvement over earlier PFBC concepts because it can achieve gas temperatures of 2100{degrees}F and higher for improved cycle efficiency while maintaining the fluidized beds at 1600{degrees}F for enhanced sulfur capture and minimum alkali release. Second-generation PFBC systems are capable of supplying the electric and steam process needs of industrial plants. The basic second-generation system can be applied in different ways to meet a variety of process steam and electrical requirements. To evaluate the potential of these systems in the industrial market, conceptual designs have been developed for six second-generation PFBC plants. These plants cover a range of electrical outputs from 6.3 to 41.5 MWe and steam flows from 46,067 to 442,337 lb/h. Capital and operating costs have been estimated for these six plants and for equivalent (in size) conventional, coal-fired atmospheric fluidized bed combustion cogeneration plants. Economic analyses were conducted to compare the cost of steam for both the second-generation plants and the conventional plants.

Shenker, J.; Garland, R.; Horazak, D.; Seifert, F.; Wenglarz, R.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

MODELLING AND CONTROL OF CO-GENERATION POWER PLANTS UNDER CONSIDERATION OF  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MODELLING AND CONTROL OF CO-GENERATION POWER PLANTS UNDER CONSIDERATION OF LIFETIME CONSUMPTION of a combined cycle power plant under consideration of the real cost of lifetime usage is accomplished behavior of a combined cycle power plant. In order to model both the continuous/discrete dynamics

Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

54

Heat Generation by Heat Pump for LNG Plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?? Abstract The LNG production plant processing natural gas from the SnÝhvit field outside Hammerfest in northern Norway utilizes heat and power produced locally withÖ (more)

Moe, BjÝrn Kristian

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

AVESTAR Center for operational excellence of electricity generation plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address challenges in attaining operational excellence for clean energy plants, the U.S.Department of Energyís National Energy Technology Laboratory has launched a world-class facility for Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTARô). The AVESTAR Center brings together state-of-the-art, real time,high-fidelity dynamic simulators with operator training systems and 3D virtual immersive training systems into an integrated energy plant and control room environment.

Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Distributed Generation and Virtual Power Plants: Barriers and Solutions.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The present technological and regulatory power system needs to adapt to the increase in the share of distributed generation. This research focuses on the applicabilityÖ (more)

Olejniczak, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

CAES (conventional compressed-air energy storage) plant with steam generation: Preliminary design and cost analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A study was performed to evaluate the performance and cost characteristics of two alternative CAES-plant concepts which utilize the low-pressure expander's exhaust-gas heat for the generation of steam in a heat recovery steam generator (HRSG). Both concepts result in increased net-power generation relative to a conventional CAES plant with a recuperator. The HRSG-generated steam produces additional power in either a separate steam-turbine bottoming cycle (CAESCC) or by direct injection into and expansion through the CAES-turboexpander train (CAESSI). The HRSG, which is a proven component of combined-cycle and cogeneration plants, replaces the recuperator of a conventional CAES plant, which has demonstrated the potential for engineering and operating related problems and higher costs than were originally estimated. To enhance the credibility of the results, the analyses performed were based on the performance, operational and cost data of the 110-MW CAES plant currently under construction for the Alabama Electric Cooperative (AEC). The results indicate that CAESCC- and CAESSI-plant concepts are attractive alternatives to the conventional CAES plant with recuperator, providing greater power generation, up to 44-MW relative to the AEC CAES plant, with competitive operating and capital costs. 5 refs., 43 figs., 26 tabs.

Nakhamkin, M.; Swensen, E.C.; Abitante, P.A. (Energy Storage and Power Consultants, Mountainside, NJ (USA))

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

In-Plant Reliability Data base for nuclear plant components. Interim report: diesel generators, batteries, chargers and inverters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the In-Plant Reliability Data (IPRD) program is to develop a comprehensive, component-specific reliability data base for probabilistic risk assessment and for other statistical analyses relevant to component reliability evaluations. This document is the product of a pilot study that was undertaken to demonstrate the methodology and feasibility of applying IPRDS techniques to develop and analyze the reliability characteristics of key electrical components in five nuclear power plants. These electrical components include diesel generators, batteries, battery chargers and inverters. The sources used to develop the data base and produce the component failure rates and mean repair times were the plant equipment lists, plant drawings, maintenance work requests, Final Safety Analysis Reports (FSARs), and interviews with plant personnel. The data spanned approximately 33 reactor-years of commercial operation.

Kahl, W.K.; Borkowski, R.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Systems, Subsystems, and Components, establishes a baseline for the current technology readiness status, and provides a path forward to achieve increasing levels of technical maturity.

John Collins

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Co-Generation at a Practical Plant Level  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Steam Turbine: A basic description of how a steam turbine converts available heat into mechanical energy to define the formulae used for the cost comparisons in the subsequent examples. Co-Generation: Comparison between condensing cycle...

Feuell, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Improving heat capture for power generation in coal gasification plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Improving the steam cycle design to maximize power generation is demonstrated using pinch analysis targeting techniques. Previous work models the steam pressure level in composite curves based on its saturation temperature ...

Botros, Barbara Brenda

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes Electric Power Supply Chain Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, natural gas, uranium, and oil), or approximately 40 quadrillion BTU (see Edison Electric Institute (2000Modeling Generator Power Plant Portfolios and Pollution Taxes in Electric Power Supply Chain at the electric power industry with taxes applied according to the type of fuel used by the power generators

Nagurney, Anna

63

MHD (magnetohydrodynamics) retrofit of a coal-fired generating plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the following appendices on the design of a coal-fired MHD retrofit: AVCO part load study; AVCO full load calculations; MSE mass balance calculations; Corette/MHD combined plant overall efficiency estimate; Corette boiler efficiency estimate; dynamic modeling and control simulation; combustor and nozzle scaling approach; field inductance and energy calculations; diagnostic instrumentation listing; equipment list; cost estimate factors; equipment and vendor costs data; CFFF test information; HRSR-ESP seed/ash calculations; and K{sub 2}/S molar ratio.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Defense-in-Depth Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to (1) document the definition of defense-in-depth and the pproach that will be used to assure that its principles are satisfied for the NGNP project and (2) identify the specific questions proposed for preapplication discussions with the NRC. Defense-in-depth is a safety philosophy in which multiple lines of defense and conservative design and evaluation methods are applied to assure the safety of the public. The philosophy is also intended to deliver a design that is tolerant to uncertainties in knowledge of plant behavior, component reliability or operator performance that might compromise safety. This paper includes a review of the regulatory foundation for defense-in-depth, a definition of defense-in-depth that is appropriate for advanced reactor designs based on High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology, and an explanation of how this safety philosophy is achieved in the NGNP.

Edward G. Wallace; Karl N. Fleming; Edward M. Burns

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 6: Process Heat and Hydrogen Co-Generation PIRTs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) exercise was conducted to identify potential safety-0-related physical phenomena for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) when coupled to a hydrogen production or similar chemical plant. The NGNP is a very high-temperature reactor (VHTR) with the design goal to produce high-temperature heat and electricity for nearby chemical plants. Because high-temperature heat can only be transported limited distances, the two plants will be close to each other. One of the primary applications for the VHTR would be to supply heat and electricity for the production of hydrogen. There was no assessment of chemical plant safety challenges. The primary application of this PIRT is to support the safety analysis of the NGNP coupled one or more small hydrogen production pilot plants. However, the chemical plant processes to be coupled to the NGNP have not yet been chosen; thus, a broad PIRT assessment was conducted to scope alternative potential applications and test facilities associated with the NGNP. The hazards associated with various chemicals and methods to minimize risks from those hazards are well understood within the chemical industry. Much but not all of the information required to assure safe conditions (separation distance, relative elevation, berms) is known for a reactor coupled to a chemical plant. There is also some experience with nuclear plants in several countries that have produced steam for industrial applications. The specific characteristics of the chemical plant, site layout, and the maximum stored inventories of chemicals can provide the starting point for the safety assessments. While the panel identified events and phenomena of safety significance, there is one added caveat. Multiple high-temperature reactors provide safety-related experience and understanding of reactor safety. In contrast, there have been only limited safety studies of coupled chemical and nuclear plants. The work herein provides a starting point for those studies; but, the general level of understanding of safety in coupling nuclear and chemical plants is less than in other areas of high-temperature reactor safety.

Forsberg, Charles W [ORNL; Gorensek, M. B. [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Herring, S. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Pickard, P. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

New generation enrichment monitoring technology for gas centrifuge enrichment plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The continuous enrichment monitor, developed and fielded in the 1990s by the International Atomic Energy Agency, provided a go-no-go capability to distinguish between UF{sub 6} containing low enriched (approximately 4% {sup 235}U) and highly enriched (above 20% {sup 235}U) uranium. This instrument used the 22-keV line from a {sup 109}Cd source as a transmission source to achieve a high sensitivity to the UF{sub 6} gas absorption. The 1.27-yr half-life required that the source be periodically replaced and the instrument recalibrated. The instrument's functionality and accuracy were limited by the fact that measured gas density and gas pressure were treated as confidential facility information. The modern safeguarding of a gas centrifuge enrichment plant producing low-enriched UF{sub 6} product aims toward a more quantitative flow and enrichment monitoring concept that sets new standards for accuracy stability, and confidence. An instrument must be accurate enough to detect the diversion of a significant quantity of material, have virtually zero false alarms, and protect the operator's proprietary process information. We discuss a new concept for advanced gas enrichment assay measurement technology. This design concept eliminates the need for the periodic replacement of a radioactive source as well as the need for maintenance by experts. Some initial experimental results will be presented.

Ianakiev, Kiril D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Alexandrov, Boian S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hill, Thomas R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Macarthur, Duncan W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Marks, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moss, Calvin E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sheppard, Gregory A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swinhoe, Martyn T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

67

Ownership Change, Incentives and Plant Efficiency: The Divestiture of U.S. Electric Generation Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that were subject to incentive regulation also saw fuel e?a strong form of incentive regulation. This suggests thata speci?c focus on incentive regulation. from the generation

Bushnell, James B.; Wolfram, Catherine

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The importance of combined cycle generating plants in integrating large levels of wind power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integration of high wind penetration levels will require fast-ramping combined cycle and steam cycles that, due to higher operating costs, will require proper pricing of ancillary services or other forms of compensation to remain viable. Several technical and policy recommendations are presented to help realign the generation mix to properly integrate the wind. (author)

Puga, J. Nicolas

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

CONCEPTUAL DESIGN AND ECONOMICS OF A NOMINAL 500 MWe SECOND-GENERATION PFB COMBUSTION PLANT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research has been conducted under United States Department of Energy Contract DE-AC21-86MC21023 to develop a new type of coal-fired plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant, called a Second Generation Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustion Plant (2nd Gen PFB), offers the promise of efficiencies greater than 48 percent, with both emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than those of conventional pulverized coal-fired (PC) plants with wet flue gas desulfurization. The 2nd Gen PFB plant incorporates the partial gasification of coal in a carbonizer, the combustion of carbonizer char in a pressurized circulating fluidized bed boiler, and the combustion of carbonizer syngas in a gas turbine combustor to achieve gas turbine inlet temperatures of 2300 F and higher. A conceptual design and an economic analysis was previously prepared for this plant. When operating with a Siemens Westinghouse W501F gas turbine, a 2400psig/1000 F/1000 F/2-1/2 in. Hg. steam turbine, and projected carbonizer, PCFB, and topping combustor performance data, the plant generated 496 MWe of power with an efficiency of 44.9 percent (coal higher heating value basis) and a cost of electricity 22 percent less than a comparable PC plant. The key components of this new type of plant have been successfully tested at the pilot plant stage and their performance has been found to be better than previously assumed. As a result, the referenced conceptual design has been updated herein to reflect more accurate performance predictions together with the use of the more advanced Siemens Westinghouse W501G gas turbine. The use of this advanced gas turbine, together with a conventional 2400 psig/1050 F/1050 F/2-1/2 in. Hg. steam turbine increases the plant efficiency to 48.2 percent and yields a total plant cost of $1,079/KW (January 2002 dollars). The cost of electricity is 40.7 mills/kWh, a value 12 percent less than a comparable PC plant.

A. Robertson; H. Goldstein; D. Horazak; R. Newby

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Design Features and Technology Uncertainties for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the conclusions, observations, and recommendations of the Independent Technology Review Group (ITRG) regarding design features and important technology uncertainties associated with very-high-temperature nuclear system concepts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The ITRG performed its reviews during the period November 2003 through April 2004.

John M. Ryskamp; Phil Hildebrandt; Osamu Baba; Ron Ballinger; Robert Brodsky; Hans-Wolfgang Chi; Dennis Crutchfield; Herb Estrada; Jeane-Claude Garnier; Gerald Gordon; Richard Hobbins; Dan Keuter; Marilyn Kray; Philippe Martin; Steve Melancon; Christian Simon; Henry Stone; Robert Varrin; Werner von Lensa

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Analyzing Effects of Turbulence on Power Generation Using Wind Plant Monitoring Data: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, a methodology is developed to analyze how ambient and wake turbulence affects the power generation of a single wind turbine within an array of turbines. Using monitoring data from a wind power plant, we selected two sets of wind and power data for turbines on the edge of the wind plant that resemble (i) an out-of-wake scenario (i.e., when the turbine directly faces incoming winds) and (ii) an in-wake scenario (i.e., when the turbine is under the wake of other turbines). For each set of data, two surrogate models were then developed to represent the turbine power generation (i) as a function of the wind speed; and (ii) as a function of the wind speed and turbulence intensity. Support vector regression was adopted for the development of the surrogate models. Three types of uncertainties in the turbine power generation were also investigated: (i) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the published/reported power curve, (ii) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the estimated power response that accounts for only mean wind speed; and (iii) the uncertainty in power generation with respect to the estimated power response that accounts for both mean wind speed and turbulence intensity. Results show that (i) under the same wind conditions, the turbine generates different power between the in-wake and out-of-wake scenarios, (ii) a turbine generally produces more power under the in-wake scenario than under the out-of-wake scenario, (iii) the power generation is sensitive to turbulence intensity even when the wind speed is greater than the turbine rated speed, and (iv) there is relatively more uncertainty in the power generation under the in-wake scenario than under the out-of-wake scenario.

Zhang, J.; Chowdhury, S.; Hodge, B. M.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Modeling Hydrogen Generation Rates in the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes a project in which Hanford Site and Environmental Management Science Program investigators addressed issues concerning hydrogen generation rates in the Hanford waste treatment and immobilization plant. The hydrogen generation rates of radioactive wastes must be estimated to provide for safe operations. While an existing model satisfactorily predicts rates for quiescent wastes in Hanford underground storage tanks, pretreatment operations will alter the conditions and chemical composition of these wastes. Review of the treatment process flowsheet identified specific issues requiring study to ascertain whether the model would provide conservative values for waste streams in the plant. These include effects of adding hydroxide ion, alpha radiolysis, saturation with air (oxygen) from pulse-jet mixing, treatment with potassium permanganate, organic compounds from degraded ion exchange resins and addition of glass-former chemicals. The effects were systematically investigated through literature review, technical analyses and experimental work.

Camaioni, Donald M.; Bryan, Samuel A.; Hallen, Richard T.; Sherwood, David J.; Stock, Leon M.

2004-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

73

District heating from electric-generating plants and municipal incinerators: local planner's assessment guide  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide is designed to aid local government planners in the preliminary evaluation of the feasibility of district heating using heat recovered from electric generating plants and municipal incinerators. System feasibility is indicated by: (1) the existence of an adequate supply of nearby waste heat, (2) the presence of a sufficiently dense and large thermal load, and (3) a favorable cost comparison with conventional heating methods. 34 references.

Pferdehirt, W.; Kron, N. Jr.

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Effect of pressure on second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the search for a more efficient, less costly, and more environmentally responsible method for generating electrical power from coal, research and development has turned to advanced pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) and coal gasification technologies. A logical extension of this work is the second- generation PFBC plant, which incorporates key components of each of these technologies. In this new type of plant, coal devolatilized/carbonized before it is injected into the PFB combustor bed, and the low Btu fuel gas produced by this process is burned in a gas turbine topping combustor. By integrating coal carbonization with PFB coal/char combustion, gas turbine inlet temperatures higher than 1149{degrees}C (2100{degrees}F) can be achieved. The carbonizer, PFB combustor, and particulate-capturing hot gas cleanup systems operate at 871{degrees}C (1600{degrees}F), permitting sulfur capture by lime-based sorbents and minimizing the release of coal contaminants to the gases. This paper presents the performance and economics of this new type of plant and provides a brief overview of the pilot plant test programs being conducted to support its development.

Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); Bonk, D.L. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Recommended practice for fire protection for electric generating plants and high voltage direct current converter stations. 2005 ed.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The standard outlines fire safety recommendations for gas, oil, coal, and alternative fuel electric generating plants including high voltage direct current converter stations and combustion turbine units greater than 7500 hp used for electric generation. Provisions apply to both new and existing plants. The document provides fire prevention and fire protection recommendations for the: safety of construction and operating personnel; physical integrity of plant components; and continuity of plant operations. The 2005 edition includes revisions and new art that clarify existing provisions. 5 annexes.

NONE

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the Final Technical Report for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Prismatic HTGR Conceptual Design Project conducted by a team led by General Atomics under DOE Award DE-NE0000245. The primary overall objective of the project was to develop and document a conceptual design for the Steam Cycle Modular Helium Reactor (SC-MHR), which is the reactor concept proposed by General Atomics for the NGNP Demonstration Plant. The report summarizes the project activities over the entire funding period, compares the accomplishments with the goals and objectives of the project, and discusses the benefits of the work. The report provides complete listings of the products developed under the award and the key documents delivered to the DOE.

Saurwein, John

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

77

Evaluation of cracking in steam generator feedwater piping in pressurized water reactor plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cracking in feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to steam generators in 15 pressurized water reactor plants. Sections with cracks from nine plants are examined with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Using transmission electron microscopy, fatigue striations are observed on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a cyclic stress value of 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses and it is concluded that the overriding factor in the cracking problem was the presence of such undocumented cyclic loads.

Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Recovery Act: Johnston Rhode Island Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill in Johnston, Rhode Island. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives. 1) Meet environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas. 2) Utilize proven and reliable technology and equipment. 3) Maximize electrical efficiency. 4) Maximize electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Central Landfill. 5) Maximize equipment uptime. 6) Minimize water consumption. 7) Minimize post-combustion emissions. To achieve the Project Objective the project consisted of several components. 1) The landfill gas collection system was modified and upgraded. 2) A State-of-the Art gas clean up and compression facility was constructed. 3) A high pressure pipeline was constructed to convey cleaned landfill gas from the clean-up and compression facility to the power plant. 4) A combined cycle electric generating facility was constructed consisting of combustion turbine generator sets, heat recovery steam generators and a steam turbine. 5) The voltage of the electricity produced was increased at a newly constructed transformer/substation and the electricity was delivered to the local transmission system. The Project produced a myriad of beneficial impacts. 1) The Project created 453 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 25 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. 2) By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). 3) The Project will annually produce 365,292 MWh?s of clean energy. 4) By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO{sub 2} equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 28.3 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2013-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

79

Next-Generation Genetics in Plants: Evolutionary Trade-off, Immunity and Speciation (2010 JGI User Meeting)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Detlef Wiegel from the Max Planck Institute for Developmental Biology on "Next-generation genetics in plants: Evolutionary tradeoffs, immunity and speciation" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

Wiegel, Detlef

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

80

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 1: Main Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process was conducted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) design. This design (in the conceptual stage) is a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) that generates both electricity and process heat for hydrogen production. Expert panels identified safety-relevant phenomena, ranked their importance, and assessed the knowledge levels in the areas of accidents and thermal fluids, fission-product transport and dose, high-temperature materials, graphite, and process heat for hydrogen production. This main report summarizes and documents the process and scope of the reviews, noting the major activities and conclusions. The identified phenomena, analyses, rationales, and associated ratings of the phenomena, plus a summary of each panel's findings, are presented. Individual panel reports for these areas are provided as attached volumes to this main report and provide considerably more detail about each panel's deliberations as well as a more complete listing of the phenomena that were evaluated.

Ball, Sydney J [ORNL

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Microbial Gas Generation Under Expected Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Repository Conditions: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gas generation from the microbial degradation of the organic constituents of transuranic (TRU) waste under conditions expected in the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) was investigated. The biodegradation of mixed cellulosic materials and electron-beam irradiated plastic and rubber materials (polyethylene, polyvinylchloride, hypalon, leaded hypalon, and neoprene) was examined. We evaluated the effects of environmental variables such as initial atmosphere (air or nitrogen), water content (humid ({approx}70% relative humidity, RH) and brine inundated), and nutrient amendments (nitogen phosphate, yeast extract, and excess nitrate) on microbial gas generation. Total gas production was determined by pressure measurement and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) were analyzed by gas chromatography; cellulose degradation products in solution were analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography. Microbial populations in the samples were determined by direct microscopy and molecular analysis. The results of this work are summarized.

Gillow, J.B.; Francis, A.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Interim Report: Air-Cooled Condensers for Next Generation Geothermal Power Plants Improved Binary Cycle Performance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As geothermal resources that are more expensive to develop are utilized for power generation, there will be increased incentive to use more efficient power plants. This is expected to be the case with Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) resources. These resources will likely require wells drilled to depths greater than encountered with hydrothermal resources, and will have the added costs for stimulation to create the subsurface reservoir. It is postulated that plants generating power from these resources will likely utilize the binary cycle technology where heat is rejected sensibly to the ambient. The consumptive use of a portion of the produced geothermal fluid for evaporative heat rejection in the conventional flash-steam conversion cycle is likely to preclude its use with EGS resources. This will be especially true in those areas where there is a high demand for finite supplies of water. Though they have no consumptive use of water, using air-cooling systems for heat rejection has disadvantages. These systems have higher capital costs, reduced power output (heat is rejected at the higher dry-bulb temperature), increased parasitics (fan power), and greater variability in power generation on both a diurnal and annual basis (larger variation in the dry-bulb temperature). This is an interim report for the task ĎAir-Cooled Condensers in Next- Generation Conversion Systemsí. The work performed was specifically aimed at a plant that uses commercially available binary cycle technologies with an EGS resource. Concepts were evaluated that have the potential to increase performance, lower cost, or mitigate the adverse effects of off-design operation. The impact on both cost and performance were determined for the concepts considered, and the scenarios identified where a particular concept is best suited. Most, but not all, of the concepts evaluated are associated with the rejection of heat. This report specifically addresses three of the concepts evaluated: the use of recuperation, the use of turbine reheat, and the non-consumptive use of EGS make-up water to supplement heat rejection

Daniel S. Wendt; Greg L. Mines

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Recovery Act: Brea California Combined Cycle Electric Generating Plant Fueled by Waste Landfill Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary objective of the Project was to maximize the productive use of the substantial quantities of waste landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill near Brea, California. An extensive analysis was conducted and it was determined that utilization of the waste gas for power generation in a combustion turbine combined cycle facility was the highest and best use. The resulting Project reflected a cost effective balance of the following specific sub-objectives: ē Meeting the environmental and regulatory requirements, particularly the compliance obligations imposed on the landfill to collect, process and destroy landfill gas ē Utilizing proven and reliable technology and equipment ē Maximizing electrical efficiency ē Maximizing electric generating capacity, consistent with the anticipated quantities of landfill gas generated and collected at the Olinda Landfill ē Maximizing equipment uptime ē Minimizing water consumption ē Minimizing post-combustion emissions ē The Project produced and will produce a myriad of beneficial impacts. o The Project created 360 FTE construction and manufacturing jobs and 15 FTE permanent jobs associated with the operation and maintenance of the plant and equipment. o By combining state-of-the-art gas clean up systems with post combustion emissions control systems, the Project established new national standards for best available control technology (BACT). o The Project will annually produce 280,320 MWhís of clean energy o By destroying the methane in the landfill gas, the Project will generate CO2 equivalent reductions of 164,938 tons annually. The completed facility produces 27.4 MWnet and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

Galowitz, Stephen

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

84

According to the United Nations, universities have a vital role to play in shaping the way in which future generations cope with the complexi-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are key in relation to sustainability in order to decide whether specific initiatives, for example energy future generations cope with the complexi- ties of sustainable development. Aarhus University's BSc programme in Economics and Business Administration ­ Sustainability combines classic business administration

85

Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) at Fossil-Fueled Electric Generating Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Department of Energy-National Energy Technologies Laboratory (DOE-NETL) are evaluating and demonstrating integration of terrestrial carbon sequestration techniques at a coal-fired electric power plant through the use of Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) system gypsum as a soil amendment and mulch, and coal fly ash pond process water for periodic irrigation. From January to March 2002, the Project Team initiated the construction of a 40 ha Carbon Capture and Water Emissions Treatment System (CCWESTRS) near TVA's Paradise Fossil Plant on marginally reclaimed surface coal mine lands in Kentucky. The CCWESTRS is growing commercial grade trees and cover crops and is expected to sequester 1.5-2.0 MT/ha carbon per year over a 20-year period. The concept could be used to meet a portion of the timber industry's needs while simultaneously sequestering carbon in lands which would otherwise remain non-productive. The CCWESTRS includes a constructed wetland to enhance the ability to sequester carbon and to remove any nutrients and metals present in the coal fly ash process water runoff. The CCWESTRS project is a cooperative effort between TVA, EPRI, and DOE-NETL, with a total budget of $1,574,000. The proposed demonstration project began in October 2000 and has continued through December 2005. Additional funding is being sought in order to extend the project. The primary goal of the project is to determine if integrating power plant processes with carbon sequestration techniques will enhance carbon sequestration cost-effectively. This goal is consistent with DOE objectives to provide economically competitive and environmentally safe options to offset projected growth in U.S. baseline emissions of greenhouse gases after 2010, achieve the long-term goal of $10/ton of avoided net costs for carbon sequestration, and provide half of the required reductions in global greenhouse gases by 2025. Other potential benefits of the demonstration include developing a passive technology for water treatment for trace metal and nutrient release reductions, using power plant by-products to improve coal mine land reclamation and carbon sequestration, developing wildlife habitat and green-space around production facilities, generating Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) credits for the use of process water, and producing wood products for use by the lumber and pulp and paper industry. Project activities conducted during the five year project period include: Assessing tree cultivation and other techniques used to sequester carbon; Project site assessment; Greenhouse studies to determine optimum plant species and by-product application; Designing, constructing, operating, monitoring, and evaluating the CCWESTRS system; and Reporting (ongoing). The ability of the system to sequester carbon will be the primary measure of effectiveness, measured by accessing survival and growth response of plants within the CCWESTRS. In addition, costs associated with design, construction, and monitoring will be evaluated and compared to projected benefits of other carbon sequestration technologies. The test plan involves the application of three levels each of two types of power plant by-products--three levels of FGD gypsum mulch, and three levels of ash pond irrigation water. This design produces nine treatment levels which are being tested with two species of hardwood trees (sweet gum and sycamore). The project is examining the effectiveness of applications of 0, 8-cm, and 15-cm thick gypsum mulch layers and 0, 13 cm, and 25 cm of coal fly ash water for irrigation. Each treatment combination is being replicated three times, resulting in a total of 54 treatment plots (3 FGD gypsum levels X 3 irrigation water levels x 2 tree species x 3 replicates). Survival and growth response of plant species in terms of sequestering carbon in plant material and soil will be the primary measure of effectiveness of each treatment. Additionally, the ability of the site soils and unsaturated zone subsurface m

P. Alan Mays; Bert R. Bock; Gregory A. Brodie; L. Suzanne Fisher; J. Devereux Joslin; Donald L. Kachelman; Jimmy J. Maddox; N. S. Nicholas; Larry E. Shelton; Nick Taylor; Mark H. Wolfe; Dennis H. Yankee; John Goodrich-Mahoney

2005-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

86

Conceptual design and optimization of a 1-1/2 generation PFBC plant task 14. Topical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The economics and performance of advanced pressurized fluidized bed (PFBC) cycles developed for utility applications during the last 10 years (especially the 2nd-Generation PFBC cycle) are projected to be favorable compared to conventional pulverized coal power plants. However, the improved economics of 2nd-Generation PFBC cycles are accompanied by the perception of increased technological risk related to the pressurized carbonizer and its associated gas cleanup systems. A PFBC cycle that removed the uncertainties of the carbonizer while retaining the high efficiency and low cost of a 2nd-Generation PFBC cycle could improve the prospects for early commercialization and pave the way for the introduction of the complete 2nd-Generation PFBC cycle at some later date. One such arrangement is a PFBC cycle with natural gas topping combustion, referred to as the 1.5-Generation PFBC cycle. This cycle combines the advantages of the 2nd-Generation PFBC plant with the reduced risk associated with a gas turbine burning natural gas, and can potentially be part of a phased approach leading to the commercialization of utility 2nd-Generation PFBC cycles. The 1.5-Generation PFBC may also introduce other advantages over the more complicated 2nd-Generation PFBC system. This report describes the technical and economic evaluation of 1.5-Generation PFBC cycles for utility or industrial power generation.

White, J.S.; Witman, P.M.; Harbaugh, L.; Rubow, L.N.; Horazak, D.A.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Methods Research and Development Technical Program Plan -- PLN-2498  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the great challenges of designing and licensing the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) is to confirm that the intended VHTR analysis tools can be used confidently to make decisions and to assure all that the reactor systems are safe and meet the performance objectives of the Generation IV Program. The research and development (R&D) projects defined in the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Design Methods Development and Validation Program will ensure that the tools used to perform the required calculations and analyses can be trusted. The Methods R&D tasks are designed to ensure that the calculational envelope of the tools used to analyze the VHTR reactor systems encompasses, or is larger than, the operational and transient envelope of the VHTR itself. The Methods R&D focuses on the development of tools to assess the neutronic and thermal fluid behavior of the plant. The fuel behavior and fission product transport models are discussed in the Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) program plan. Various stress analysis and mechanical design tools will also need to be developed and validated and will ultimately also be included in the Methods R&D Program Plan. The calculational envelope of the neutronics and thermal-fluids software tools intended to be used on the NGNP is defined by the scenarios and phenomena that these tools can calculate with confidence. The software tools can only be used confidently when the results they produce have been shown to be in reasonable agreement with first-principle results, thought-problems, and data that describe the ďhighly rankedĒ phenomena inherent in all operational conditions and important accident scenarios for the VHTR.

Richard R. Schultz; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; David W. Nigg; Hans D. Gougar; Richard W. Johnson; William K. Terry; Chang H. Oh; Donald W. McEligot; Gary W. Johnsen; Glenn E. McCreery; Woo Y. Yoon; James W. Sterbentz; J. Steve Herring; Temitope A. Taiwo; Thomas Y. C. Wei; William D. Pointer; Won S. Yang; Michael T. Farmer; Hussein S. Khalil; Madeline A. Feltus

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production, with an outlet gas temperature in the range of 750įC, and a design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite-moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. This technology development plan details the additional research and development (R&D) required to design and license the NGNP RPV, assuming that A 508/A 533 is the material of construction. The majority of additional information that is required is related to long-term aging behavior at NGNP vessel temperatures, which are somewhat above those commonly encountered in the existing database from LWR experience. Additional data are also required for the anticipated NGNP environment. An assessment of required R&D for a Grade 91 vessel has been retained from the first revision of the R&D plan in Appendix B in somewhat less detail. Considerably more development is required for this steel compared to A 508/A 533 including additional irradiation testing for expected NGNP operating temperatures, high-temperature mechanical properties, and extensive studies of long-term microstructural stability.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Site Selection & Characterization Status Report for Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the near future, the US Department of Energy (DOE) will need to make important decisions regarding design and construction of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). One part of making these decisions is considering the potential environmental impacts that this facility may have, if constructed here at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 provides DOE decision makers with a process to systematically consider potential environmental consequences of agency decisions. In addition, the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (Title VI, Subtitel C, Section 644) states that the 'Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) shall have licensing and regulatory authority for any reactor authorized under this subtitle.' This stipulates that the NRC will license the NGNP for operation. The NRC NEPA Regulations (10 CFR Part 51) require tha thte NRC prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for a permit to construct a nuclear power plant. The applicant is required to submit an Environmental report (ER) to aid the NRC in complying with NEPA.

Mark Holbrook

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Research and Development Technology Development Roadmaps for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for process heat, hydrogen and electricity production. The reactor will be graphite moderated with helium as the primary coolant and may be either prismatic or pebble-bed. Although, final design features have not yet been determined. Research and Development (R&D) activities are proceeding on those known plant systems to mature the technology, codify the materials for specific applications, and demonstrate the component and system viability in NGNP relevant and integrated environments. Collectively these R&D activities serve to reduce the project risk and enhance the probability of on-budget, on-schedule completion and NRC licensing. As the design progresses, in more detail, toward final design and approval for construction, selected components, which have not been used in a similar application, in a relevant environment nor integrated with other components and systems, must be tested to demonstrate viability at reduced scales and simulations prior to full scale operation. This report and its R&D TDRMs present the path forward and its significance in assuring technical readiness to perform the desired function by: Choreographing the integration between design and R&D activities; and proving selected design components in relevant applications.

Ian McKirdy

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Management activities for retrieved and newly generated transuranic waste, Savannah River Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to assess the potential environmental impacts of the retrieval and processing of retrieved and newly generated transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste at the Savannah River Plant (SRP), including the transportation of the processes TRU waste to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) near Carlsbad, New Mexico. A new TRU Waste Facility (TWF) will be constructed at SRP to retrieve and process the SRP TRU waste in interim storage to meet WIPP criteria. This EA has been prepared in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969, as amended, and the requirements of the Council of Environmental Quality Regulations for implementing NEPA (40 CFR Parts 1500--1508). The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires the assessment of environmental consequences of all major federal actions that may affect the quality of the human environment. This document describes the environmental impact of constructing and operating the TWF facility for processing and shipment of the TRU waste to WIPP and considers alternatives to the proposed action. 40 refs., 12 figs., 12 tabs.

Not Available

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Preliminary materials selection issues for the next generation nuclear plant reactor pressure vessel.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the coming decades, the United States and the entire world will need energy supplies to meet the growing demands due to population increase and increase in consumption due to global industrialization. One of the reactor system concepts, the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), with helium as the coolant, has been identified as uniquely suited for producing hydrogen without consumption of fossil fuels or the emission of greenhouse gases [Generation IV 2002]. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has selected this system for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project, to demonstrate emissions-free nuclear-assisted electricity and hydrogen production within the next 15 years. The NGNP reference concepts are helium-cooled, graphite-moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactors with a design goal outlet helium temperature of {approx}1000 C [MacDonald et al. 2004]. The reactor core could be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The use of molten salt coolant, especially for the transfer of heat to hydrogen production, is also being considered. The NGNP is expected to produce both electricity and hydrogen. The process heat for hydrogen production will be transferred to the hydrogen plant through an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). The basic technology for the NGNP has been established in the former high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) and demonstration plants (DRAGON, Peach Bottom, AVR, Fort St. Vrain, and THTR). In addition, the technologies for the NGNP are being advanced in the Gas Turbine-Modular Helium Reactor (GT-MHR) project, and the South African state utility ESKOM-sponsored project to develop the Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR). Furthermore, the Japanese HTTR and Chinese HTR-10 test reactors are demonstrating the feasibility of some of the planned components and materials. The proposed high operating temperatures in the VHTR place significant constraints on the choice of material selected for the reactor pressure vessel for both the PBMR and prismatic design. The main focus of this report is the RPV for both design concepts with emphasis on material selection.

Natesan, K.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Shah, V. N.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

93

Considerations Associated with Reactor Technology Selection for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the inception of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and during predecessor activities, alternative reactor technologies have been evaluated to determine the technology that best fulfills the functional and performance requirements of the targeted energy applications and market. Unlike the case of electric power generation where the reactor performance is primarily expressed in terms of economics, the targeted energy applications involve industrial applications that have specific needs in terms of acceptable heat transport fluids and the associated thermodynamic conditions. Hence, to be of interest to these industrial energy applications, the alternative reactor technologies are weighed in terms of the reactor coolant/heat transport fluid, achievable reactor outlet temperature, and practicality of operations to achieve the very high reliability demands associated with the petrochemical, petroleum, metals and related industries. These evaluations have concluded that the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) can uniquely provide the required ranges of energy needs for these target applications, do so with promising economics, and can be commercialized with reasonable development risk in the time frames of current industry interest Ė i.e., within the next 10-15 years.

L.E. Demick

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Reactor Pressure Vessel Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2803)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900įC and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic, or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development Program is responsible for performing research and development on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. Studies of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels have been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual design studies. These design studies generally focus on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Three realistic candidate materials have been identified by this process: conventional light water reactor RPV steels A508/533, 2ľCr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and modified 9Cr 1Mo ferritic martenistic steel. Based on superior strength and higher temperature limits, the modified 9Cr-1Mo steel has been identified by the majority of design engineers as the preferred choice for the RPV. All of the vendors have concluded, however, that with adequate engineered cooling of the vessel, the A508/533 steels are also acceptable.

J. K. Wright; R. N. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Self-cooling mono-container fuel cell generators and power plants using an array of such generators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mono-container fuel cell generator contains a layer of interior insulation, a layer of exterior insulation and a single housing between the insulation layers, where fuel cells, containing electrodes and electrolyte, are surrounded by the interior insulation in the interior of the generator, and the generator is capable of operating at temperatures over about 650 C, where the combination of interior and exterior insulation layers have the ability to control the temperature in the housing below the degradation temperature of the housing material. The housing can also contain integral cooling ducts, and a plurality of these generators can be positioned next to each other to provide a power block array with interior cooling. 7 figs.

Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.

1998-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

96

Self-cooling mono-container fuel cell generators and power plants using an array of such generators  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A mono-container fuel cell generator (10) contains a layer of interior insulation (14), a layer of exterior insulation (16) and a single housing (20) between the insulation layers, where fuel cells, containing electrodes and electrolyte, are surrounded by the interior insulation (14) in the interior (12) of the generator, and the generator is capable of operating at temperatures over about 650.degree. C., where the combination of interior and exterior insulation layers have the ability to control the temperature in the housing (20) below the degradation temperature of the housing material. The housing can also contain integral cooling ducts, and a plurality of these generators can be positioned next to each other to provide a power block array with interior cooling.

Gillett, James E. (Greensburg, PA); Dederer, Jeffrey T. (Valencia, PA); Zafred, Paolo R. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Vygotsky on play: child's play or more  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(i.e., internalization, higher mental functions, concept development, and language) is presented. Vygotsky's theory of play, that it is the primary mechanism of child development, is considered in greater depth. The importance Vygotsky accorded...

Wagner, Carol Anne

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Nuclear Safeguards Infrastructure Required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) is a Very High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR) to be constructed near Idaho Falls, Idaho The NGNP is intrinsically safer than current reactors and is planned for startup ca. 2021 Safety is more prominent in the minds of the Public and Governing Officials following the nuclear reactor meltdown accidents in Fukushima, Japan The authors propose that the NGNP should be designed with International (IAEA) Safeguards in mind to support export to Non-Nuclear-Weapons States There are two variants of the NGNP design; one using integral Prismatic-shaped fuel assemblies in a fixed core; and one using recirculating fuel balls (or Pebbles) The following presents the infrastructure required to safeguard the NGNP This infrastructure is required to safeguard the Prismatic and Pebble-fueled NGNP (and other HTGR/VHTR) The infrastructure is based on current Safeguards Requirements and Practices implemented by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) for similar reactors The authors of this presentation have worked for decades in the area of International Nuclear Safeguards and are recognized experts in this field Presentation for INMM conference in July 2012.

Dr. Mark Schanfein; Philip Casey Durst

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 5: Graphite PIRTs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Here we report the outcome of the application of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) process to the issue of nuclear-grade graphite for the moderator and structural components of a next generation nuclear plant (NGNP), considering both routine (normal operation) and postulated accident conditions for the NGNP. The NGNP is assumed to be a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR), either a gas-turbine modular helium reactor (GTMHR) version [a prismatic-core modular reactor (PMR)] or a pebble-bed modular reactor (PBMR) version [a pebble bed reactor (PBR)] design, with either a direct- or indirect-cycle gas turbine (Brayton cycle) system for electric power production, and an indirect-cycle component for hydrogen production. NGNP design options with a high-pressure steam generator (Rankine cycle) in the primary loop are not considered in this PIRT. This graphite PIRT was conducted in parallel with four other NRC PIRT activities, taking advantage of the relationships and overlaps in subject matter. The graphite PIRT panel identified numerous phenomena, five of which were ranked high importance-low knowledge. A further nine were ranked with high importance and medium knowledge rank. Two phenomena were ranked with medium importance and low knowledge, and a further 14 were ranked medium importance and medium knowledge rank. The last 12 phenomena were ranked with low importance and high knowledge rank (or similar combinations suggesting they have low priority). The ranking/scoring rationale for the reported graphite phenomena is discussed. Much has been learned about the behavior of graphite in reactor environments in the 60-plus years since the first graphite rectors went into service. The extensive list of references in the Bibliography is plainly testament to this fact. Our current knowledge base is well developed. Although data are lacking for the specific grades being considered for Generation IV (Gen IV) concepts, such as the NGNP, it is fully expected that the behavior of these graphites will conform to the recognized trends for near isotropic nuclear graphite. Thus, much of the data needed is confirmatory in nature. Theories that can explain graphite behavior have been postulated and, in many cases, shown to represent experimental data well. However, these theories need to be tested against data for the new graphites and extended to higher neutron doses and temperatures pertinent to the new Gen IV reactor concepts. It is anticipated that current and planned future graphite irradiation experiments will provide the data needed to validate many of the currently accepted models, as well as providing the needed data for design confirmation.

Burchell, Timothy D [ORNL; Bratton, Rob [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Marsden, Barry [University of Manchester, UK; Srinivasan, Makuteswara [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Penfield, Scott [Technology Insights; Mitchell, Mark [PBMR (Pty) Ltd.; Windes, Will [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2804)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900įC and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Todayís high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760įC. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for application in heat exchangers and core internals for the NGNP. The primary candidates are Inconel 617, Haynes 230, Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy XR. Based on the technical maturity, availability in required product forms, experience base, and high temperature mechanical properties all of the vendor pre-conceptual design studies have specified Alloy 617 as the material of choice for heat exchangers. Also a draft code case for Alloy 617 was developed previously. Although action was suspended before the code case was accepted by ASME, this draft code case provides a significant head start for achieving codification of the material. Similarly, Alloy 800H is the material of choice for control rod sleeves. In addition to the above listed considerations, Alloy 800H is already listed in the nuclear section of the ASME Code; although the maximum use temperature and time need to be increased.

J. K. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Architecture that affords play  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Play is a form of behavior common to all people. A person's propensity to play depends not only on his physiological and emotional state, but also on his surroundings. This thesis investigates environmental qualities ...

Fallon, Paul Eric

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Threatened and endangered species evaluation for 75 licensed commercial nuclear power generating plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Endangered Species Act (ESA) of 1973, as amended, and related implementing regulations of the jurisdictional federal agencies, the U.S. Departments of Commerce and Interior, at 50 CFR Part 17. 1, et seq., require that federal agencies ensure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out under their jurisdiction is not likely to jeopardize the continued existence of any threatened or endangered species or result in the destruction or adverse modification of critical habitats for such species. The issuance and maintenance of a federal license, such as a construction permit or operating license issued by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for a commercial nuclear power generating facility is a federal action under the jurisdiction of a federal agency, and is therefore subject to the provisions of the ESA. The U.S. Department of the Interior (through the Fish and Wildlife Service), and the U.S. Department of Commerce, share responsibility for administration of the ESA. The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) deals with species that inhabit marine environments and anadromous fish, while the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is responsible for terrestrial and freshwater species and migratory birds. A species (or other distinct taxonomic unit such as subspecies, variety, and for vertebrates, distinct population units) may be classified for protection as `endangered` when it is in danger of extinction within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of its range. A `threatened` classification is provided to those animals and plants likely to become endangered within the foreseeable future throughout all or a significant portion of their ranges. As of February 1997, there were about 1067 species listed under the ESA in the United States. Additionally there were approximately 125 species currently proposed for listing as threatened or endangered, and another 183 species considered to be candidates for formal listing proposals.

Sackschewsky, M.R.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Performance of a Power Generator System Using Crude Plant Oil Blend with Diesel Fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

non-edible plant oils, Jatropha oil is the most potential one. Jatropha oil is non-eatable oil and has

Tsair-wang Chung; Kuan-ting Liu; Mai-tzu Chen

104

African oil plays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vast continent of Africa hosts over eight sedimentary basins, covering approximately half its total area. Of these basins, only 82% have entered a mature exploration phase, 9% have had little or no exploration at all. Since oil was first discovered in Africa during the mid-1950s, old play concepts continue to bear fruit, for example in Egypt and Nigeria, while new play concepts promise to become more important, such as in Algeria, Angola, Chad, Egypt, Gabon, and Sudan. The most exciting developments of recent years in African oil exploration are: (1) the Gamba/Dentale play, onshore Gabon; (2) the Pinda play, offshore Angola; (3) the Lucula/Toca play, offshore Cabinda; (4) the Metlaoui play, offshore Libya/Tunisia; (5) the mid-Cretaceous sand play, Chad/Sudan; and (6) the TAG-I/F6 play, onshore Algeria. Examples of these plays are illustrated along with some of the more traditional oil plays. Where are the future oil plays likely to develop No doubt, the Saharan basins of Algeria and Libya will feature strongly, also the presalt of Equatorial West Africa, the Central African Rift System and, more speculatively, offshore Ethiopia and Namibia, and onshore Madagascar, Mozambique, and Tanzania.

Clifford, A.J. (BHP Petroleum, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia))

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Verification of voltage/frequency requirement for emergency diesel generator in nuclear power plant using dynamic modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One major cause of the plant shutdown is the loss of electrical power. The study is to comprehend the coping action against station blackout including emergency diesel generator, sequential loading of safety system and to ensure that the emergency diesel generator should meet requirements, especially voltage and frequency criteria using modeling tool. This paper also considered the change of the sequencing time and load capacity only for finding electrical design margin. However, the revision of load list must be verified with safety analysis. From this study, it is discovered that new load calculation is a key factor in EDG localization and in-house capability increase.

Hur, Jin-Suk; Roh, Myung- Sub [KEPCO International Nuclear Graduate School, 1456-1 Shinam-ri, Seosaeng-myeon, Ulju-gun, Ulsan, 689-882 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

106

Hydrogen generation by metal corrosion in simulated Waste Isolation Pilot Plant environments. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The corrosion and gas-generation characteristics of four material types: low-carbon steel (the current waste packaging material for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), Cu-base and Ti-base (alternative packaging) materials, and Al-base (simulated waste) materials were determined in both the liquid and vapor phase of Brine A, a brine representative of an intergranular Salado Formation brine. Test environments consisted primarily of anoxic brine with overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}. Limited tests of low-carbon steel were also performed in simulated-backfill environments and in brine environments with pH values ranging from 3 to 11. Low-carbon steel reacted at a slow, measurable rate with anoxic brine, liberating H{sub 2} on an equimolar basis with Fe reacted. Presence of CO{sub 2} caused the initial reaction to proceed more rapidly, but CO{sub 2}-induced passivation stopped the reaction if the CO{sub 2} were present in sufficient quantities. Addition of H{sub 2}S to a CO{sub 2}-passivated system caused reversal of the passivation. Low-carbon steel immersed in brine with H{sub 2}S showed no reaction, apparently because of passivation of the steel by formation of FeS. Addition of CO{sub 2} to an H{sub 2}S-passivated system did not reverse the passivation. Cu- and Ti-base materials showed essentially no corrosion when exposed to brine and overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S except for the rapid and complete reaction between Cu-base materials and H{sub 2}S. The Al-base materials reacted at approximately the same rate as low-carbon steel when immersed in anoxic Brine A; considerably more rapidly in the presence of CO{sub 2} or H{sub 2}S; and much more rapidly when iron was present in the system as a brine contaminant. High-purity Al was much more susceptible to corrosion than the 6061 alloy. No significant reaction took place on any material in any environment in the vapor-phase exposures.

Telander, M.R.; Westerman, R.E. [Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

The New Generation of Uranium In Situ Recovery Facilities: Design Improvements Should Reduce Radiological Impacts Relative to First Generation Uranium Solution Mining Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last few years, there has been a significant increase in the demand for Uranium as historical inventories have been consumed and new reactor orders are being placed. Numerous mineralized properties around the world are being evaluated for Uranium recovery and new mining / milling projects are being evaluated and developed. Ore bodies which are considered uneconomical to mine by conventional methods such as tunneling or open pits, can be candidates for non-conventional recovery techniques, involving considerably less capital expenditure. Technologies such as Uranium In Situ Leaching / In Situ Recovery (ISL / ISR - also referred to as 'solution mining'), have enabled commercial scale mining and milling of relatively small ore pockets of lower grade, and are expected to make a significant contribution to overall world wide uranium supplies over the next ten years. Commercial size solution mining production facilities have operated in the US since the mid 1970's. However, current designs are expected to result in less radiological wastes and emissions relative to these 'first' generation plants (which were designed, constructed and operated through the 1980's). These early designs typically used alkaline leach chemistries in situ including use of ammonium carbonate which resulted in groundwater restoration challenges, open to air recovery vessels and high temperature calcining systems for final product drying vs the 'zero emissions' vacuum dryers as typically used today. Improved containment, automation and instrumentation control and use of vacuum dryers in the design of current generation plants are expected to reduce production of secondary waste byproduct material, reduce Radon emissions and reduce potential for employee exposure to uranium concentrate aerosols at the back end of the milling process. In Situ Recovery in the U.S. typically involves the circulation of groundwater, fortified with oxidizing (gaseous oxygen e.g) and complexing agents (carbon dioxide, e.g) into an ore body, solubilizing the uranium in situ, and then pumping the solutions to the surface where they are fed to a processing plant ( mill). Processing involves ion exchange and may also include precipitation, drying or calcining and packaging operations depending on facility specifics. This paper presents an overview of the ISR process and the health physics monitoring programs developed at a number of commercial scale ISL / ISR Uranium recovery and production facilities as a result of the radiological character of these processes. Although many radiological aspects of the process are similar to that of conventional mills, conventional-type tailings as such are not generated. However, liquid and solid byproduct materials may be generated and impounded. The quantity and radiological character of these by products are related to facility specifics. Some special monitoring considerations are presented which are required due to the manner in which radon gas is evolved in the process and the unique aspects of controlling solution flow patterns underground. The radiological character of these processes are described using empirical data collected from many operating facilities. Additionally, the major aspects of the health physics and radiation protection programs that were developed at these first generation facilities are discussed and contrasted to circumstances of the current generation and state of the art of uranium ISR technologies and facilities. In summary: This paper has presented an overview of in situ Uranium recovery processes and associated major radiological aspects and monitoring considerations. Admittedly, the purpose was to present an overview of those special health physics considerations dictated by the in situ Uranium recovery technology, to point out similarities and differences to conventional mill programs and to contrast these alkaline leach facilities to modern day ISR designs. As evidenced by the large number of ISR projects currently under development in the U.S. and worldwide, non conventional Uranium recovery techniques

Brown, S.H. [CHP, SHB INC., Centennial, Colorado (United States)

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Improving the Capacity or Output of a Steam Turbine Generator at XYZ Power Plant in Illinois  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and capacitance mapping ? Performed wedge tightness check by means of manual tap test ? Performed RTD functioning test ? Cleaned generator brush rigging ? Inspected generator brush rigging for signs of heating, arcing or other damage... turbine with a net generating rating of 366MW. The unit began commercial operation in 1976. Coal is received by rail and limestone by rail by rail or truck. Rail cars are unloaded in a rotary car dumper at a rate of 20-25 cars per hour. A 30 day...

Amoo-Otoo, John Kweku

2006-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

109

Power conversion unit studies for the next generation nuclear plant coupled to a high-temperature steam electrolysis facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-cooled Fast Reactor (GFR), Lead-cooled Fast Reactor (LFR), Molten Salt Reactor (MSR), Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR), Supercritical-water-cooled Reactor (SCWR) and the Very-high-temperature Reactor (VHTR). An international effort to develop these new... and the hydrogen production plant4,5. Davis et al. investigated the possibility of helium and molten salts in the IHTL2. The thermal efficiency of the power conversion unit is paramount to the success of this next generation technology. Current light water...

Barner, Robert Buckner

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

110

Estimates of health risks associated with radionuclide emissions from fossil-fueled steam-electric generating plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the Title III, Section 112 of the 1990 Clean Air Act Amendment, Congress directed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to perform a study of the hazards to public resulting from pollutants emitted by electric utility system generating units. Radionuclides are among the groups of pollutants listed in the amendment. This report updates previously published data and estimates with more recently available information regarding the radionuclide contents of fossil fuels, associated emissions by steam-electric power plants, and potential health effects to exposed population groups.

Nelson, C.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Abstract-Private investment in generation plants in Ecuador has been null over the last 10 years due to several political  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract- Private investment in generation plants in Ecuador has been null over the last 10 years and the Ministry of Electricity are the only ones initiating the construction of new hydro plants of significant in place for the last 10 years, particularly in relation to incentive to private investment. Arguments

Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

112

New technology for purging the steam generators of nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A technology for removal of undissolved impurities from a horizontal steam generator using purge water is developed on the basis of a theoretical analysis. A purge with a maximal flow rate is drawn off from the zone with the highest accumulation of sludge in the lower part of the steam generator after the main circulation pump of the corresponding loop is shut off and the temperatures of the heat transfer medium at the inlet and outlet of the steam generator have equilibrated. An improved purge configuration is used for this technology; it employs shutoff and regulator valves, periodic purge lines separated by a cutoff fixture, and a D{sub y} 100 drain union as a connector for the periodic purge. Field tests show that the efficiency of this technology for sludge removal by purge water is several times that for the standard method.

Budko, I. O.; Kutdjusov, Yu. F.; Gorburov, V. I. [Scientific-Research Center for Energy Technology 'NICE Centrenergo' (Russian Federation); Rjasnyj, S. I. [JSC 'The All-Rissia Nuklear Power Engineering Research and Development Institute' (VNIIAM) (Russian Federation)

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

113

Modeling and Control of Co-generation Power Plants: A Hybrid System Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cycle is driven by some fossil fuel (usually natural gas) and produces electric power via expansion of the gas turbine and generates both electricity and steam for the industrial processes. Clearly, the liberalization of the energy market has promoted the need of operating CCPPs in the most efficient way

Ferrari-Trecate, Giancarlo

114

Monitoring equipment environment during nuclear plant operation at Salem and Hope Creek generating stations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Monitoring of environmental parameters has become a significant issue for operating nuclear power plants. While the long-term benefits of plant life extension programs are being pursued with comprehensive environmental monitoring programs, the potential effect of local hot spots at various plant locations needs to be evaluated for its effect on equipment degradation and shortening of equipment qualified life. A significant benefit can be experienced from temperature monitoring when a margin exists between the design versus actual operating temperature. This margin can be translated into longer equipment qualified life and significant reduction in maintenance activities. At PSE and G, the immediate need for monitoring environmental parameters is being accomplished via the use of a Logic Beach Bitlogger. The Bitlogger is a portable data loggings system consisting of a system base, input modules and a communication software package. Thermocouples are installed on selected electrical equipment and cables are run from the thermocouples to the input module of the Bitlogger. Temperature readings are taken at selected intervals, stored in memory, and downloaded periodically to a PC software program, i.e., Lotus. The data is formatted into tabular or graphical documents. Because of their versatility, Bitloggers are being used differently at the authors Nuclear facility. At the Salem Station (2 Units-4 loop Westinghouse PWR), a battery powered, fully portable, calibrated Bitlogger is located in an accessible area inside Containment where it monitors the temperature of various electrical equipment within the Pressurizer Enclosure. It is planned that close monitoring of the local hot spot temperatures in this area will allow them to adjust and reconcile the environmental qualification of the equipment.

Blum, A.; Smith, R.J. [Public Service Electric and Gas Co., Hancocks Bridge, NJ (United States)

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

North Brawley Power Plant Placed in Service; Currently Generating 17 MW;  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:Community Nominations open for6.633492¬įPower Plant Jump

116

Model of sludge behavior in nuclear plant steam generators. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The accumulation of large amounts of sludge in pressurized water reactor steam generators is thought to be a cause of accelerated corrosion by trace impurities which concentrate in such deposits. Based on fundamental principles, this study develops a mathematical model for predicting the behavior (e.g., deposition and reentrainment) of sludge in steam generators. The calculated sludge behavior shows good agreement with the limited amount of experimental data available. The results suggest that the continued accumulation of sludge on the tubesheet might be preventable, and that if it could be, the incoming sludge would be removed by blowdown. An analysis of the uncertainties in the model led to suggested priorities for further analytical and experimental work to gain a better understanding of sludge behavior. 29 refs., 12 figs., 15 tabs.

Beal, S.K.; Chen, J.H.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Martin Next Generation Solar Energy Center Solar Power Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende New Energy Co LtdInformation Next Generation Solar

118

MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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119

Melting characteristics of the stainless steel generated from the uranium conversion plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The partition ratio of cerium (Ce) and uranium (U) in the ingot, slag and dust phases has been investigated for the effect of the slag type, slag concentration and basicity in an electric arc melting process. An electric arc furnace (EAF) was used to melt the stainless steel wastes, simulated by uranium oxide and the real wastes from the uranium conversion plant in Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). The composition of the slag former used to capture the contaminants such as uranium, cerium, and cesium during the melt decontamination process generally consisted of silica (SiO{sub 2}), calcium oxide (CaO) and aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}). Also, Calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2} ), nickel oxide (NiO), and ferric oxide (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) were added to provide an increase in the slag fluidity and oxidative potential. Cerium was used as a surrogate for the uranium because the thermochemical and physical properties of cerium are very similar to those of uranium. Cerium was removed from the ingot phase to slag phase by up to 99% in this study. The absorption ratio of cerium was increased with an increase of the amount of the slag former. And the maximum removal of cerium occurred when the basicity index of the slag former was 0.82. The natural uranium (UO{sub 2}) was partitioned from the ingot phase to the slag phase by up to 95%. The absorption of the natural uranium was considerably dependent on the basicity index of the slag former and the composition of the slag former. The optimum condition for the removal of the uranium was about 1.5 for the basicity index and 15 wt% of the slag former. According to the increase of the amount of slag former, the absorption of uranium oxide in the slag phase was linearly increased due to an increase of its capacity to capture uranium oxide within the slag phase. Through experiments with various slag formers, we verified that the slag formers containing calcium fluoride (CaF{sub 2}) and a high amount of silica were more effective for a melt decontamination of stainless steel wastes contaminated with uranium. During the melting tests with stainless steel wastes from the uranium conversion plant(UCP ) in KAERI, we found that the results of the uranium decontamination were very similar to those of the uranium oxide from the melting of stimulated metal wastes. (authors)

Choi, W.K.; Song, P.S.; Oh, W.Z.; Jung, C.H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (Korea, Republic of); Min, B.Y. [Chungnam National University, 220 Gung-Dong, Yusung-Gu Taejon 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Lessons Learned Applicable to the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to identify possible issues highlighted by these lessons learned that could apply to the NGNP in reducing technical risks commensurate with the current phase of design. Some of the lessons learned have been applied to the NGNP and documented in the Preconceptual Design Report. These are addressed in the background section of this document and include, for example, the decision to use TRISO fuel rather than BISO fuel used in the Peach Bottom reactor; the use of a reactor pressure vessel rather than prestressed concrete found in Fort St. Vrain; and the use of helium as a primary coolant rather than CO2. Other lessons learned, 68 in total, are documented in Sections 2 through 6 and will be applied, as appropriate, in advancing phases of design. The lessons learned are derived from both negative and positive outcomes from prior HTGR experiences. Lessons learned are grouped according to the plant, areas, systems, subsystems, and components defined in the NGNP Preconceptual Design Report, and subsequent NGNP project documents.

J. M. Beck; L. F. Pincock

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

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121

Evaluation of cracking in feedwater piping adjacent to the steam generators in Nine Pressurized Water Reactor Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cracking in ASTM A106-B and A106-C feedwater piping was detected near the inlet to the steam generators in a number of pressurized water reactor plants. We received sections with cracks from nine of the plants with the objective of identifying the cracking mechanism and assessing various factors that might contribute to this cracking. Variations were observed in piping surface irregularities, corrosion-product, pit, and crack morphology, surface elmental and crystal structure analyses, and steel microstructures and mechanical properties. However, with but two exceptions, namely, arrest bands and major surface irregularities, we were unable to relate the extent of cracking to any of these factors. Tensile and fracture toughness (J/sub Ic/ and tearing modulus) properties were measured over a range of temperatures and strain rates. No unusual properties or microstructures were observed that could be related to the cracking problem. All crack surfaces contained thick oxide deposits and showed evidence of cyclic events in the form of arrest bands. Transmission electron microscopy revealed fatigue striations on replicas of cleaned crack surfaces from one plant and possibly from three others. Calculations based on the observed striation spacings gave a value of ..delta..sigma = 150 MPa (22 ksi) for one of the major cracks. The direction of crack propagation was invariably related to the piping surface and not to the piping axis. These two factors are consistent with the proposed concept of thermally induced, cyclic, tensile surface stresses. Although surface irregularities and corrosion pits were sources for crack initiation and corrosion may have contributed to crack propagation, it is proposed that the overriding factor in the cracking problem is the presence of unforeseen cyclic loads.

Goldberg, A.; Streit, R.D.; Scott, R.G.

1980-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

122

Design guidance for play spaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design guidance for play spaces March 2006 Lindsey Houston, Roger Worthington, Paddy Harrop #12 Design Process 3 Play Spaces 4 Design Principles 6 Elements of Play 6 Existing Play Structures 8 Contacts, Jason Maclean, Andrew Norris, Bridgette Hall and Tania Crocket in #12;Design guidance for play spaces. 3

123

High-potential Working Fluids for Next Generation Binary Cycle Geothermal Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermo-economic model has been built and validated for prediction of project economics of Enhanced Geothermal Projects. The thermo-economic model calculates and iteratively optimizes the LCOE (levelized cost of electricity) for a prospective EGS (Enhanced Geothermal) site. It takes into account the local subsurface temperature gradient, the cost of drilling and reservoir creation, stimulation and power plant configuration. It calculates and optimizes the power plant configuration vs. well depth. Thus outputs from the model include optimal well depth and power plant configuration for the lowest LCOE. The main focus of this final report was to experimentally validate the thermodynamic properties that formed the basis of the thermo-economic model built in Phase 2, and thus build confidence that the predictions of the model could be used reliably for process downselection and preliminary design at a given set of geothermal (and/or waste heat) boundary conditions. The fluid and cycle downselected was based on a new proprietary fluid from a vendor in a supercritical ORC cycle at a resource condition of 200?C inlet temperature. The team devised and executed a series of experiments to prove the suitability of the new fluid in realistic ORC cycle conditions. Furthermore, the team performed a preliminary design study for a MW-scale turbo expander that would be used for a supercritical ORC cycle with this new fluid. The following summarizes the main findings in the investigative campaign that was undertaken: 1. Chemical compatibility of the new fluid with common seal/gasket/Oring materials was found to be problematic. Neoprene, Viton, and silicone materials were found to be incompatible, suffering chemical decomposition, swelling and/or compression set issues. Of the materials tested, only TEFLON was found to be compatible under actual ORC temperature and pressure conditions. 2. Thermal stability of the new fluid at 200?C and 40 bar was found to be acceptable after 399 hours of exposure?only 3% of the initial charge degraded into by products. The main degradation products being an isomer and a dimer. 3. In a comparative experiment between R245fa and the new fluid under subcritical conditions, it was found that the new fluid operated at 1 bar lower than R245fa for the same power output, which was also predicted in the Aspen HSYSY model. As a drop-in replacement fluid for R245fa, this new fluid was found to be at least as good as R245fa in terms of performance and stability. Further optimization of the subcritical cycle may lead to a significant improvement in performance for the new fluid. 4. For supercritical conditions, the experiment found a good match between the measured and model predicted state point property data and duties from the energy balance. The largest percent differences occurred with densities and evaporator duty (see Figure 78). It is therefore reasonable to conclude that the state point model was experimentally validated with a realistic ORC system. 5. The team also undertook a preliminary turbo-expander design study for a supercritical ORC cycle with the new working fluid. Variants of radial and axial turbo expander geometries went through preliminary design and rough costing. It was found that at 15MWe or higher power rating, a multi-stage axial turbine is most suitable providing the best performance and cost. However, at lower power ratings in the 5MWe range, the expander technology to be chosen depends on the application of the power block. For EGS power blocks, it is most optimal to use multi-stage axial machines. In conclusion, the predictions of the LCOE model that showed a supercritical cycle based on the new fluid to be most advantageous for geothermal power production at a resource temperature of ~ 200C have been experimentally validated. It was found that the cycle based on the new fluid is lower in LCOE and higher in net power output (for the same boundary conditions). The project, therefore has found a new optimal configuration for low temperature geothermal power production in the form of a su

Zia, Jalal [GE Global Research; Sevincer, Edip; Chen, Huijuan; Hardy, Ajilli; Wickersham, Paul; Kalra, Chiranjeev; Laursen, Anna Lis; Vandeputte, Thomas

2013-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

124

Evaluation of the Effectiveness of a New Technology for Extraction of Insoluble Impurities from Nuclear Power Plant Steam Generators with Purge Water  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental technology for the removal of insoluble impurities from a horizontal steam generator with purge water during planned shutdowns of the power generating unit is improved through a more representative determination of the concentration of impurities in the purge water ahead of the water cleanup facility and a more precise effective time for the duration of the purge process. Tests with the improved technique at power generating unit No. 1 of the Rostov Nuclear Power Plant show that the efficiency with which insoluble impurities are removed from the steam generator volume was more than two orders of magnitude greater than under the standard regulations.

Bud'ko, I. O. [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation)] [JSC NIITsE 'Tsentrenergo' (Russian Federation); Zhukov, A. G. [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)] [Rostov Nuclear Power Plant (Russian Federation)

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Graphite Creep Experiments for Irradiation in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energyís Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating six gas reactor graphite creep experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energyís lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the worldís premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These graphite irradiations are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States. The graphite experiments will be irradiated over the next six to eight years to support development of a graphite irradiation performance data base on the new nuclear grade graphites now available for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to obtain irradiation performance data at different temperatures and loading conditions to support design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Very High Temperature Gas Reactor, as well as other future gas reactors. The experiments will each consist of a single capsule that will contain seven separate stacks of graphite specimens. Six of the specimen stacks will have half of their graphite specimens under a compressive load, while the other half of the specimens will not be subjected to a compressive load during irradiation. The six stacks will be organized into pairs with a different compressive load being applied to the top half of each pair of specimen stacks. The seventh stack will not have a compressive load on the graphite specimens during irradiation. The specimens will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with on-line temperature and compressive load monitoring and control. There will also be the capability of sampling the sweep gas effluent to determine if any oxidation or off-gassing of the specimens occurs during initial start-up of the experiment. The final design phase for the first experiment was completed in September 2008, and the fabrication and assembly of the experiment test train as well as installation and testing of the control and support systems that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation are being completed in early calendar 2009. The first experiment is scheduled to be ready for insertion in the ATR by April 30, 2009. This paper will discuss the design of the experiment including the test train and the temperature and compressive load monitoring, control, and data collection systems.

S. Blaine Grover

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers, Volumes 1, 2.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this Nuclear Engineering Education Research (NEER) project was to integrate new, innovative, and existing technologies to develop a fault diagnostics and characterization system for nuclear plant steam generators (SG) and heat exchangers (HX). Issues related to system level degradation of SG and HX tubing, including tube fouling, performance under reduced heat transfer area, and the damage caused by stress corrosion cracking, are the important factors that influence overall plant operation, maintenance, and economic viability of nuclear power systems. The research at The University of Tennessee focused on the development of techniques for monitoring process and structural integrity of steam generators and heat exchangers. The objectives of the project were accomplished by the completion of the following tasks. All the objectives were accomplished during the project period. This report summarizes the research and development activities, results, and accomplishments during June 2001 √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬? September 2004. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development and testing of a high-fidelity nodal model of a U-tube steam generator (UTSG) to simulate the effects of fouling and to generate a database representing normal and degraded process conditions. Application of the group method of data handling (GMDH) method for process variable prediction. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development of a laboratory test module to simulate particulate fouling of HX tubes and its effect on overall thermal resistance. Application of the GMDH technique to predict HX fluid temperatures, and to compare with the calculated thermal resistance. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development of a hybrid modeling technique for process diagnosis and its evaluation using laboratory heat exchanger test data. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development and testing of a sensor suite using piezo-electric devices for monitoring structural integrity of both flat plates (beams) and tubing. Experiments were performed in air, and in water with and without bubbly flow. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development of advanced signal processing methods using wavelet transforms and image processing techniques for isolating flaw types. √?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬?√?¬∑ Development and implementation of a new nonlinear and non-stationary signal processing method, called the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), for flaw detection and location. This is a more robust and adaptive approach compared to the wavelet transform

Upadhyaya, Belle R.; Hines, J. Wesley; Lu, Baofu; Huang, Xuedong; Penha, Rosani, L.; Perillo, Sergio, R.; Zhao, Ke

2005-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

127

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall purpose of this Nuclear Engineering Education Research (NEER) project was to integrate new, innovative, and existing technologies to develop a fault diagnostics and characterization system for nuclear plant steam generators (SG) and heat exchangers (HX). Issues related to system level degradation of SG and HX tubing, including tube fouling, performance under reduced heat transfer area, and the damage caused by stress corrosion cracking, are the important factors that influence overall plant operation, maintenance, and economic viability of nuclear power systems. The research at The University of Tennessee focused on the development of techniques for monitoring process and structural integrity of steam generators and heat exchangers. The objectives of the project were accomplished by the completion of the following tasks. All the objectives were accomplished during the project period. This report summarizes the research and development activities, results, and accomplishments during June 2001-September 2004. (1) Development and testing of a high-fidelity nodal model of a U-tube steam generator (UTSG) to simulate the effects of fouling and to generate a database representing normal and degraded process conditions. Application of the group method of data handling (GMDH) method for process variable prediction. (2) Development of a laboratory test module to simulate particulate fouling of HX tubes and its effect on overall thermal resistance. Application of the GMDH technique to predict HX fluid temperatures, and to compare with the calculated thermal resistance. (3) Development of a hybrid modeling technique for process diagnosis and its evaluation using laboratory heat exchanger test data. (4) Development and testing of a sensor suite using piezo-electric devices for monitoring structural integrity of both flat plates (beams) and tubing. Experiments were performed in air, and in water with and without bubbly flow. (5) Development of advanced signal processing methods using wavelet transforms and image processing techniques for isolating flaw types. (6) Development and implementation of a new nonlinear and non-stationary signal processing method, called the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT), for flaw detection and location. This is a more robust and adaptive approach compared to the wavelet transform. (7) Implementation of a moving-window technique in the time domain for detecting and quantifying flaw types in tubular structures. A window zooming technique was also developed for flaw location in tubes. (8) Theoretical study of elastic wave propagation (longitudinal and shear waves) in metallic flat plates and tubing with and without flaws. (9) Simulation of the Lamb wave propagation using the finite-element code ABAQUS. This enabled the verification of the experimental results. The research tasks included both analytical research and experimental studies. The experimental results helped to enhance the robustness of fault monitoring methods and to provide a systematic verification of the analytical results. The results of this research were disseminated in scientific meetings. A journal manuscript was submitted for publication. The new findings of this research have potential applications in aerospace and civil structures. The report contains a complete bibliography that was developed during the course of the project.

Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Wesley Hines

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

128

Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI): On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring for Next Generation Nuclear Plants - Phase I Annual Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

OAK-B135 This OSTI ID belongs to an IWO and is being released out of the system. The Program Manager Rebecca Richardson has confirmed that all reports have been received. The objective of this project is to design and demonstrate the operation of the real-time intelligent self-diagnostic and prognostic system for next generation nuclear power plant systems. This new self-diagnostic technology is titled, ''On-Line Intelligent Self-Diagnostic Monitoring System'' (SDMS). This project provides a proof-of-principle technology demonstration for SDMS on a pilot plant scale service water system, where a distributed array of sensors is integrated with active components and passive structures typical of next generation nuclear power reactor and plant systems. This project employs state-of-the-art sensors, instrumentation, and computer processing to improve the monitoring and assessment of the power reactor system and to provide diagnostic and automated prognostics capabilities.

L. J. Bond; S. R. Doctor; R. W. Gilbert; D. B. Jarrell; F. L. Greitzer; R. J. Meador

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Modeling a Printed Circuit Heat Exchanger with RELAP5-3D for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main purpose of this report is to design a printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE) for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant and carry out Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA) simulation using RELAP5-3D. Helium was chosen as the coolant in the primary and secondary sides of the heat exchanger. The design of PCHE is critical for the LOCA simulations. For purposes of simplicity, a straight channel configuration was assumed. A parallel intermediate heat exchanger configuration was assumed for the RELAP5 model design. The RELAP5 modeling also required the semicircular channels in the heat exchanger to be mapped to rectangular channels. The initial RELAP5 run outputs steady state conditions which were then compared to the heat exchanger performance theory to ensure accurate design is being simulated. An exponential loss of pressure transient was simulated. This LOCA describes a loss of coolant pressure in the primary side over a 20 second time period. The results for the simulation indicate that heat is initially transferred from the primary loop to the secondary loop, but after the loss of pressure occurs, heat transfers from the secondary loop to the primary loop.

Not Available

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

injection wells capacity; temperature; costs; legal reviews by Oregon DoJ. * Partners: Johnson Controls?? Overview 3 | US DOE Geothermal Program eere.energy.gov Project Objectives...

131

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 4: High-Temperature Materials PIRTs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Phenomena Identification and Ranking Table (PIRT) technique was used to identify safety-relevant/safety-significant phenomena and assess the importance and related knowledge base of high-temperature structural materials issues for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), a very high temperature gas-cooled reactor (VHTR). The major aspects of materials degradation phenomena that may give rise to regulatory safety concern for the NGNP were evaluated for major structural components and the materials comprising them, including metallic and nonmetallic materials for control rods, other reactor internals, and primary circuit components; metallic alloys for very high-temperature service for heat exchangers and turbomachinery, metallic alloys for high-temperature service for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV), other pressure vessels and components in the primary and secondary circuits; and metallic alloys for secondary heat transfer circuits and the balance of plant. These materials phenomena were primarily evaluated with regard to their potential for contributing to fission product release at the site boundary under a variety of event scenarios covering normal operation, anticipated transients, and accidents. Of all the high-temperature metallic components, the one most likely to be heavily challenged in the NGNP will be the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). Its thin, internal sections must be able to withstand the stresses associated with thermal loading and pressure drops between the primary and secondary loops under the environments and temperatures of interest. Several important materials-related phenomena related to the IHX were identified, including crack initiation and propagation; the lack of experience of primary boundary design methodology limitations for new IHX structures; and manufacturing phenomena for new designs. Specific issues were also identified for RPVs that will likely be too large for shop fabrication and transportation. Validated procedures for on-site welding, post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), and inspections will be required for the materials of construction. High-importance phenomena related to the RPV include crack initiation and subcritical crack growth; field fabrication process control; property control in heavy sections; and the maintenance of high emissivity of the RPV materials over their service lifetime to enable passive heat rejection from the reactor core. All identified phenomena related to the materials of construction for the IHX, RPV, and other components were evaluated and ranked for their potential impact on reactor safety.

Corwin, William R [ORNL; Ballinger, R. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT); Majumdar, S. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Weaver, K. D. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL)

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Techno-economic analysis of using corn stover to supply heat and power to a corn ethanol plant - Part 2: Cost of heat and power generation systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents a techno-economic analysis of corn stover fired process heating (PH) and the combined heat and power (CHP) generation systems for a typical corn ethanol plant (ethanol production capacity of 170 dam3). Discounted cash flow method was used to estimate both the capital and operating costs of each system and compared with the existing natural gas fired heating system. Environmental impact assessment of using corn stover, coal and natural gas in the heat and/or power generation systems was also evaluated. Coal fired process heating (PH) system had the lowest annual operating cost due to the low fuel cost, but had the highest environmental and human toxicity impacts. The proposed combined heat and power (CHP) generation system required about 137 Gg of corn stover to generate 9.5 MW of electricity and 52.3 MW of process heat with an overall CHP efficiency of 83.3%. Stover fired CHP system would generate an annual savings of 3.6 M$ with an payback period of 6 y. Economics of the coal fired CHP system was very attractive compared to the stover fired CHP system due to lower fuel cost. But the greenhouse gas emissions per Mg of fuel for the coal fired CHP system was 32 times higher than that of stover fired CHP system. Corn stover fired heat and power generation system for a corn ethanol plant can improve the net energy balance and add environmental benefits to the corn to ethanol biorefinery.

Mani, Sudhagar [University of Georgia; Sokhansanj, Shahabaddine [ORNL; Togore, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy; Turhollow Jr, Anthony F [ORNL

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant/Advanced Gas Reactor Fuel Irradiation Experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Department of Energyís Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Program will be irradiating eight separate low enriched uranium (LEU) tri-isotopic (TRISO) particle fuel (in compact form) experiments in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) located at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The ATR has a long history of irradiation testing in support of reactor development and the INL has been designated as the new United States Department of Energyís lead laboratory for nuclear energy development. The ATR is one of the worldís premiere test reactors for performing long term, high flux, and/or large volume irradiation test programs. These irradiations and fuel development are being accomplished to support development of the next generation reactors in the United States, and will be irradiated over the next ten years to demonstrate and qualify new particle fuel for use in high temperature gas reactors. The goals of the irradiation experiments are to provide irradiation performance data to support fuel process development, to qualify fuel for normal operating conditions, to support development and validation of fuel performance and fission product transport models and codes, and to provide irradiated fuel and materials for post irradiation examination (PIE) and safety testing. The experiments, which will each consist of at least six separate capsules, will be irradiated in an inert sweep gas atmosphere with individual on-line temperature monitoring and control of each capsule. The sweep gas will also have on-line fission product monitoring on its effluent to track performance of the fuel in each individual capsule during irradiation. The first experiment (designated AGR-1) started irradiation in December 2006, and the second experiment (AGR-2) is currently in the design phase. The design of test trains, as well as the support systems and fission product monitoring system that will monitor and control the experiment during irradiation will be discussed. In addition, the purpose and differences between the two experiments will be compared and the irradiation results to date on the first experiment will be presented.

S. Blaine Grover

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Reactor Physics Parametric and Depletion Studies in Support of TRISO Particle Fuel Specification for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reactor physics calculations were initiated to answer several major questions related to the proposed TRISO-coated particle fuel that is to be used in the prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) or the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). These preliminary design evaluation calculations help ensure that the upcoming fuel irradiation tests will test appropriate size and type of fuel particles for a future NGNP reactor design. Conclusions from these calculations are expected to confirm and suggest possible modifications to the current particle fuel parameters specified in the evolving Fuel Specification. Calculated results dispel the need for a binary fuel particle system, which is proposed in the General Atomics GT-MHR concept. The GT-MHR binary system is composed of both a fissile and fertile particle with 350- and 500- micron kernel diameters, respectively. For the NGNP reactor, a single fissile particle system (single UCO kernel size) can meet the reactivity and power cycle length requirements demanded of the NGNP. At the same time, it will provide substantial programmatic cost savings by eliminating the need for dual particle fabrication process lines and dual fuel particle irradiation tests required of a binary system. Use of a larger 425-micron kernel diameter single fissile particle (proposed here), as opposed to the 350-micron GT-MHR fissile particle size, helps alleviate current compact particle packing fractions fabrication limitations (<35%), improves fuel block loading for higher n-batch reload options, and tracks the historical correlation between particle size and enrichment (10 and 14 wt% U-235 particle enrichments are proposed for the NGNP). Overall, the use of the slightly larger kernel significantly broadens the NGNP reactor core design envelope and provides increased design margin to accommodate the (as yet) unknown final NGNP reactor design. Maximum power-peaking factors are calculated for both the initial and equilibrium NGNP cores. Radial power-peaking can be fully controlled with particle packing fraction zoning (no enrichment zoning required) and discrete burnable poison rods. Optimally loaded NGNP cores can expect radial powerpeaking factors as low as 1.14 at beginning of cycle (BOC), increasing slowly to a value of 1.25 by end of cycle (EOC), an axial power-peaking value of 1.30 (BOC), and for individual fuel particles in the maximum compact <1.05 (BOC) and an approximate value of 1.20 (EOC) due to Pu-239 buildup in particles on the compact periphery. The NGNP peak particle powers, using a conservative total power-peaking factor (~2.1 factor), are expected to be <150 mW/particle (well below the 250 mW/particle limit, even with the larger 425-micron kernel size).

James W. Sterbentz; Bren Phillips; Robert L. Sant; Gray S. Chang; Paul D. Bayless

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Maintaining a Technology-Neutral Approach to Hydrogen Production Process Development through Conceptual Design of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project was authorized in the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct), tasking the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) with demonstrating High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology. The demonstration is to include the technical, licensing, operational, and commercial viability of HTGR technology for the production of electricity and hydrogen. The Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI), a component of the DOE Hydrogen Program managed by the Office of Nuclear Energy, is also investigating multiple approaches to cost effective hydrogen production from nuclear energy. The objective of NHI is development of the technology and information basis for a future decision on commercial viability. The initiatives are clearly intertwined. While the objectives of NGNP and NHI are generally consistent, NGNP has progressed to the project definition phase and the project plan has matured. Multiple process applications for the NGNP require process heat, electricity and hydrogen in varied combinations and sizes. Coupling these processes to the reactor in multiple configurations adds complexity to the design, licensing and demonstration of both the reactor and the hydrogen production process. Commercial viability of hydrogen production may depend on the specific application and heat transport configuration. A component test facility (CTF) is planned by the NGNP to support testing and demonstration of NGNP systems, including those for hydrogen production, in multiple configurations. Engineering-scale demonstrations in the CTF are expected to start in 2012 to support scheduled design and licensing activities leading to subsequent construction and operation. Engineering-scale demonstrations planned by NHI are expected to start at least two years later. Reconciliation of these schedules is recommended to successfully complete both initiatives. Hence, closer and earlier integration of hydrogen process development and heat transport systems is sensible. For integration purposes, an analysis comparing the design, cost and schedule impact of maintaining a technology neutral approach through conceptual design or making an early hydrogen process technology selection was performed. Early selection does not specifically eliminate a technology, but rather selects the first hydrogen technology for demonstration. A systems-engineering approach was taken to define decision-making criteria for selecting a hydrogen technology. The relative technical, cost and schedule risks of each approach were analyzed and risk mitigation strategies were recommended, including provisions to maintain close collaboration with the NHI. The results of these analyses are presented here.

Michael W. Patterson

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Virginia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

137

Ohio Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Ohio nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

138

Arkansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

139

Michigan Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

140

California Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

California nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Alabama Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

142

Texas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

143

Pennsylvania Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Pennsylvania nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

144

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Tennessee nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

145

Georgia Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

146

Nebraska Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Nebraska nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

147

Arizona Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

148

Connecticut Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Connecticut nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

149

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

150

Illinois Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Illinois nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

151

Florida Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Florida nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

152

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Wisconsin nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

153

Minnesota Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Minnesota nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

154

Protection from ground faults in the stator winding of generators at power plants in the Siberian networks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The experience of many years of experience in developing and utilization of ground fault protection in the stator winding of generators in the Siberian networks is generalized. The main method of protection is to apply a direct current or an alternating current with a frequency of 25 Hz to the primary circuits of the stator. A direct current is applied to turbo generators operating in a unit with a transformer without a resistive coupling to the external grid or to other generators. Applying a 25 Hz control current is appropriate for power generation systems with compensation of a capacitive short circuit current to ground. This method forms the basis for protection of generators operating on busbars, hydroelectric generators with a neutral grounded through an arc-suppression reactor, including in consolidated units with generators operating in parallel on a single low-voltage transformer winding.

Vainshtein, R. A., E-mail: vra@tpu.ru [Tomsk Polytechnical University (Russian Federation); Lapin, V. I. [ODU Sibiri (Integrated Dispatcher Control for Siberia), branch of JSC 'SO EES' (Russian Federation); Naumov, A. M.; Doronin, A. V. [JSC NPP 'EKRA' (Russian Federation); Yudin, S. M. [Tomsk Polytechnical University (Russian Federation)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

Shale Play Industry Transportation Challenges,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­ High volume commodi-es flows in and out of shale plays · Sand In....Oil in excess of 50 MMT/Yr. · Life of current Shale Oil & Gas explora-on trend ­ 2012) #12;Shale Play Oil Industry A Look at the Baaken · 2-3 Unit Trains

Minnesota, University of

156

Plug-and-Play Photovoltaics  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On December 7, 2012,†DOE announced $21 million in funding for the Plug-and-Play Photovoltaics funding opportunity. Part of the SunShot Systems Integration efforts, the following projects were...

157

Doubly Fed Induction Generator in an Offshore Wind Power Plant Operated at Rated V/Hz: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces the concept of constant Volt/Hz operation of offshore wind power plants. The deployment of offshore WPPs requires power transmission from the plant to the load center inland. Since this power transmission requires submarine cables, there is a need to use High-Voltage Direct Current transmission, which is economical for transmission distances longer than 50 kilometers. In the concept presented here, the onshore substation is operated at 60 Hz synced with the grid, and the offshore substation is operated at variable frequency and voltage, thus allowing the WPP to be operated at constant Volt/Hz.

Muljadi, E.; Singh, M.; Gevorgian, V.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Options for Generating Steam Efficiently  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper describes how plant engineers can efficiently generate steam when there are steam generators and Heat Recovery Steam Generators in their plant. The process consists of understanding the performance characteristics of the various equipment...

Ganapathy, V.

159

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Proposal for the Award of a Contract for the Supply and Installation of a gas Turbine for Combined Generation of Electricity and Heat in the Heating Plant on the Meyrin Site

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Plant power : the cost of using biomass for power generation and potential for decreased greenhouse gas emissions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To date, biomass has not been a large source of power generation in the United States, despite the potential for greenhouse gas (GHG) benefits from displacing coal with carbon neutral biomass. In this thesis, the fuel cycle ...

Cuellar, Amanda Dulcinea

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Fossil-Fu.e l and Geothermal Power Plants", Lawrencefrom fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants Control offrom fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants Radionuclide

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

average value for nuclear plants) aFinal Envir. Statement (Statement, Koshkonong Nuclear Plant, August 1976. U. S.rem; operation of the nuclear plants themselves only *Other

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Virtually simulating the next generation of clean energy technologies: NETL's AVESTAR Center is dedicated to the safe, reliable and efficient operation of advanced energy plants with carbon capture  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Imagine using a real-time virtual simulator to learn to fly a space shuttle or rebuild your car's transmission without touching a piece of equipment or getting your hands dirty. Now, apply this concept to learning how to operate and control a state-of-the-art, electricity-producing power plant capable of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) capture. That's what the National Energy Technology Laboratory's (NETL) Advanced Virtual Energy Simulation Training and Research (AVESTAR) Center (www.netl.doe.gov/avestar) is designed to do. Established as part of the Department of Energy's (DOE) initiative to advance new clean energy technology for power generation, the AVESTAR Center focuses primarily on providing simulation-based training for process engineers and energy plant operators, starting with the deployment of a first-of-a-kind operator training simulator for an integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) power plant with CO{sub 2} capture. The IGCC dynamic simulator builds on, and reaches beyond, conventional power plant simulators to merge, for the first time, a 'gasification with CO{sub 2} capture' process simulator with a 'combined-cycle' power simulator. Based on Invensys Operations Management's SimSci-Esscor DYNSIM software, the high-fidelity dynamic simulator provides realistic training on IGCC plant operations, including normal and faulted operations, as well as plant start-up, shutdown and power demand load changes. The highly flexible simulator also allows for testing of different types of fuel sources, such as petcoke and biomass, as well as co-firing fuel mixtures. The IGCC dynamic simulator is available at AVESTAR's two locations, NETL (Figure 1) and West Virginia University's National Research Center for Coal and Energy (www.nrcce.wvu.edu), both in Morgantown, W.Va. By offering a comprehensive IGCC training program, AVESTAR aims to develop a workforce well prepared to operate, control and manage commercial-scale gasification-based power plants with CO{sub 2} capture. The facility and simulator at West Virginia University promotes NETL's outreach mission by offering hands-on simulator training and education to researchers and university students.

Zitney, S.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

The effects of a steam-electric generating plant on suitability of adjacent estuarine waters for growth of phytoplankton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'F above normal levels. Roessler (1971) and Steidinger and Breedveld (1971) reported thermal discharges from power plants in Florida caused benthic macroalgae and grasses to be replaced by fil- amentous blue green algae mats. Morgan and Stross... on the north and east by a line running from Morgan's Point to Cedar Point then southeastward to Smith Point (Masch and Espy 1967). The Bay extends south and west from this line to form arm-like East and West Bays. Outlets to the Gulf of Mexico...

Kelsey, John Allen

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

165

Triple Play Support for the Next Generation Internet Mario Baldi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

opportunity to information providers or, at least, be economically self-sustainable. In other words, Internet of accessing any type of information: it must be a profitable business or, at least, economically self- sustainable. In order to achieve this objective, services people are willing to pay for must be offered over

Baldi, Mario

166

Low Cost Sorbent for Capturing CO{sub 2} Emissions Generated by Existing Coal-fired Power Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

TDA Research, Inc. has developed a novel sorbent based post-combustion CO{sub 2} removal technology. This low cost sorbent can be regenerated with low-pressure (ca. 1 atm) superheated steam without temperature swing or pressure-swing. The isothermal and isobaric operation is a unique and advantageous feature of this process. The objective of this project was to demonstrate the technical and economic merit of this sorbent based CO{sub 2} capture approach. Through laboratory, bench-scale and field testing we demonstrated that this technology can effectively and efficiently capture CO{sub 2} produced at an existing pulverized coal power plants. TDA Research, Inc is developing both the solid sorbent and the process designed around that material. This project addresses the DOE Program Goal to develop a capture technology that can be added to an existing or new coal fired power plant, and can capture 90% of the CO{sub 2} produced with the lowest possible increase in the cost of energy. .

Elliott, Jeannine

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

167

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project Technology Development Roadmaps: The Technical Path Forward for 750Ė800įC Reactor Outlet Temperature  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document presents the NGNP Critical PASSCs and defines their technical maturation path through Technology Development Roadmaps (TDRMs) and their associated Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs). As the critical PASSCs advance through increasing levels of technical maturity, project risk is reduced and the likelihood of within-budget and on-schedule completion is enhanced. The current supplier-generated TRLs and TDRMs for a 750Ė800įC reactor outlet temperature (ROT) specific to each supplier are collected in Appendix A.

John Collins

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Coupled multiphase flow and closure analysis of repository response to waste-generated gas at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A long-term assessment of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) repository performance must consider the impact of gas generation resulting from the corrosion and microbial degradation of the emplaced waste. A multiphase fluid flow code, TOUGH2/EOS8, was adapted to model the processes of gas generation, disposal room creep closure, and multiphase (brine and gas) fluid flow, as well as the coupling between the three processes. System response to gas generation was simulated with a single, isolated disposal room surrounded by homogeneous halite containing two anhydrite interbeds, one above and one below the room. The interbeds were assumed to have flow connections to the room through high-permeability, excavation-induced fractures. System behavior was evaluated by tracking four performance measures: (1) peak room pressure; (2) maximum brine volume in the room; (3) total mass of gas expelled from the room; and (4) the maximum gas migration distance in an interbed. Baseline simulations used current best estimates of system parameters, selected through an evaluation of available data, to predict system response to gas generation under best-estimate conditions. Sensitivity simulations quantified the effects of parameter uncertainty by evaluating the change in the performance measures in response to parameter variations. In the sensitivity simulations, a single parameter value was varied to its minimum and maximum values, representative of the extreme expected values, with all other parameters held at best-estimate values. Sensitivity simulations identified the following parameters as important to gas expulsion and migration away from a disposal room: interbed porosity; interbed permeability; gas-generation potential; halite permeability; and interbed threshold pressure. Simulations also showed that the inclusion of interbed fracturing and a disturbed rock zone had a significant impact on system performance.

Freeze, G.A.; Larson, K.W. [INTERA Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Davies, P.B. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Williston Lodgepole play fans out  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Williston basin Mississippian Lodgepole oil play is swelling the rig count and oil production in North Dakota. As much as 200 sq miles of 3D seismic surveys have been acquired in southwestern North Dakota, and at least as much more is expected to be gathered through next year. Exploratory drilling so far has moved south and east for Conoco Inc.`s 1993 Lodgepole discovery in Dickinson oil field. The play also seems destined to become active in Montana. OGJ estimates North Dakota`s oil production at about 84,000 b/d, up from 75,000 b/d at the same time a year ago. State restrictions pending field unitization have reined production. The paper briefly describes the boundary of the basin and give a summary of the field.

Petzet, G.A.

1995-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

170

Regenerative Heater Optimization for Steam Turbo-Generation Cycles of Generation IV Nuclear Power Plants with a Comparison of Two Concepts for the Westinghouse International Reactor Innovative and Secure (IRIS)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The intent of this study is to discuss some of the many factors involved in the development of the design and layout of a steam turbo-generation unit as part of a modular Generation IV nuclear power plant. Of the many factors involved in the design and layout, this research will cover feed water system layout and optimization issues. The research is arranged in hopes that it can be generalized to any Generation IV system which uses a steam powered turbo-generation unit. The research is done using the ORCENT-II heat balance codes and the Salisbury methodology to be reviewed herein. The Salisbury methodology is used on an original cycle design by Famiani for the Westinghouse IRIS and the effects due to parameter variation are studied. The vital parameters of the Salisbury methodology are the incremental heater surface capital cost (S) in $/ft{sup 2}, the value of incremental power (I) in $/kW, and the overall heat transfer coefficient (U) in Btu/ft{sup 2}-degrees Fahrenheit-hr. Each is varied in order to determine the effects on the cycles overall heat rate, output, as well as, the heater surface areas. The effects of each are shown. Then the methodology is then used to compare the optimized original Famiani design consisting of seven regenerative feedwater heaters with an optimized new cycle concept, INRC8, containing four regenerative heaters. The results are shown. It can be seen that a trade between the complexity of the seven stage regenerative Famiani cycle and the simplicity of the INRC8 cycle can be made. It is desired that this methodology can be used to show the ability to evaluate modularity through the value of size a complexity of the system as well as the performance. It also shows the effectiveness of the Salisbury methodology in the optimization of regenerative cycles for such an evaluation.

Williams, W.C.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

On the Relationship between Playing Rationally and Knowing how to Play  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zachmann (Computer Graphics) #12;On the Relationship between Playing Rationally and Knowing how to Play

Zachmann, Gabriel

172

Boiler and steam generator corrosion: Fossil fuel power plants. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning corrosion effects, mechanisms, detection, and inhibition in fossil fuel fired boilers. Fluidized bed combustors and coal gasification are included in the applications. The citations examine hot corrosion, thermal mechanical degradation, and intergranular oxidation corrosion studies performed on the water side and hot gas side of heat exchanger tubes and support structures. Coatings and treatment of material to inhibit corrosion are discussed. Corrosion affecting nuclear powered steam generators is examined in a separate bibliography. (Contains a minimum of 119 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

TRU (transuranic) waste certification compliance requirements for acceptance of newly generated contact-handled wastes to be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant: Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Compliance requirements are presented for certifying that unclassified, newly generated (NG), contact-handled (CH) transuranic (TRU) solid wastes from defense programs meet the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC). Where appropriate, transportation and interim storage requirements are incorporated; however, interim storage sites may have additional requirements consistent with these requirements. All applicable Department of Energy (DOE) orders must continue to be met. The compliance requirements for stored or buried waste are not addressed in this document. The compliance requirements are divided into four sections, primarily determined by the general feature that the requirements address. These sections are General Requirements, Waste Container Requirements, Waste Form Requirements, and Waste Package Requirements. The waste package is the combination of waste container and waste. 10 refs., 1 fig.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

North Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

175

New Jersey Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

176

South Carolina Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

South Carolina nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State...

177

New York Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant nametotal reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear net...

178

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in U. S. Conunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-Related Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. NeroResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Report LBL-5287. "Power Plant Reliability-Availability andConunercial Nuclear Power Plants", Report WASH-1400 (NUREG-Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

On-Line Monitoring and Diagnostics of the Integrity of Nuclear Plant Steam Generators and Heat Exchangers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrity monitoring and flaw diagnostics of flat beams and tubular structures was investigated in this research task using guided acoustic signals. A piezo-sensor suite was deployed to activate and collect Lamb wave signals that propagate along metallic specimens. The dispersion curves of Lamb waves along plate and tubular structures are generated through numerical analysis. Several advanced techniques were explored to extract representative features from acoustic time series. Among them, the Hilbert-Huang transform (HHT) is a recently developed technique for the analysis of non-linear and transient signals. A moving window method was introduced to generate the local peak characters from acoustic time series, and a zooming window technique was developed to localize the structural flaws. The time-frequency analysis and pattern recognition techniques were combined for classifying structural defects in brass tubes. Several types of flaws in brass tubes were tested, both in the air and in water. The techniques also proved to be effective under background/process noise. A detailed theoretical analysis of Lamb wave propagation was performed and simulations were carried out using the finite element software system ABAQUS. This analytical study confirmed the behavior of the acoustic signals acquired from the experimental studies. The report presents the background the analysis of acoustic signals acquired from piezo-electric transducers for structural defect monitoring. A comparison of the use of time-frequency techniques, including the Hilbert-Huang transform, is presented. The report presents the theoretical study of Lamb wave propagation in flat beams and tubular structures, and the need for mode separation in order to effectively perform defect diagnosis. The results of an extensive experimental study of detection, location, and isolation of structural defects in flat aluminum beams and brass tubes are presented. The results of this research show the feasibility of on-line monitoring of small structural flaws by the use of transient and nonlinear acoustic signal analysis, and its implementation by the proper design of a piezo-electric transducer suite.

Belle R. Upadhyaya; J. Wesley Hines

2004-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Experimental plug&play quantum coin flipping  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Performing complex cryptographic tasks will be an essential element in future quantum communication networks. These tasks are based on a handful of fundamental primitives, such as coin flipping, where two distrustful parties wish to agree on a randomly generated bit. Although it is known that quantum versions of these primitives can offer information-theoretic security advantages with respect to classical protocols, a demonstration of such an advantage in a practical communication scenario has remained elusive. Here, we experimentally implement a quantum coin flipping protocol that performs strictly better than classically possible over a distance suitable for communication over metropolitan area optical networks. The implementation is based on a practical plug&play system, designed for quantum key distribution. We also show how to combine our protocol with coin flipping protocols that are almost perfectly secure against bounded adversaries, hence enhancing them with a level of information-theoretic security. Our results offer a powerful toolbox for future secure quantum communications.

Anna Pappa; Paul Jouguet; Thomas Lawson; Andrť Chailloux; Matthieu Legrť; Patrick Trinkler; Iordanis Kerenidis; Eleni Diamanti

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

182

Second generation PFB for advanced power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted under a United States Department of Energy (USDOE) contract to develop a new type of coal-fueled plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant-called an advanced or second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (APFBC) plant-offers the promise of 45-percent efficiency (HHV), with emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than conventional pulverized-coal-fired plants with scrubbers. This paper summarizes the pilot plant R&D work being conducted to develop this new type of plant. Although pilot plant testing is still underway, preliminary estimates indicate the commercial plant Will perform better than originally envisioned. Efficiencies greater than 46 percent are now being predicted.

Robertson, A.; Van Hook, J.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Improving Vortex Generators to Enhance the Performance of Air-Cooled Condensers in a Geothermal Power Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes work at the Idaho National Laboratory to develop strategies to enhance air-side heat transfer in geothermal air-cooled condensers such that it should not significantly increase pressure drop and parasitic fan pumping power. The work was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy, NEDO (New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization) of Japan, Yokohama National University, and the Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur, India. A combined experimental and numerical investigation was performed to investigate heat transfer enhancement techniques that may be applicable to largescale air-cooled condensers such as those used in geothermal power applications. A transient heat transfer visualization and measurement technique was employed in order to obtain detailed distributions of local heat transfer coefficients on model fin surfaces. Pressure drop measurements were obtained for a variety of tube and winglet configurations using a single-channel flow apparatus that included four tube rows in a staggered array. Heat transfer and pressure drop measurements were also acquired in a separate multiple-tube row apparatus in the Single Blow Test Facility. In addition, a numerical modeling technique was developed to predict local and average heat transfer for these low-Reynolds number flows, with and without winglets. Representative experimental and numerical results were obtained that reveal quantitative details of local finsurface heat transfer in the vicinity of a circular tube with a single delta winglet pair downstream of the cylinder. Heat transfer and pressure-drop results were obtained for flow Reynolds numbers based on channel height and mean flow velocity ranging from 700 to 6500. The winglets were of triangular (delta) shape with a 1:2 or 1:3 height/length aspect ratio and a height equal to 90% of the channel height. Overall mean fin-surface heat transfer results indicate a significant level of heat transfer enhancement (in terms of Colburn j-factor) associated with deployment of the winglets with circular as well as oval tubes. In general, toe-in (common flow up) type winglets appear to have better performance than the toe-out (common flow down) type winglets. Comparisons of heat transfer and pressure drop results for the elliptical tube versus a circular tube with and without winglets are provided. During the course of their independent research, all of the researchers have established that about 10 to 30% enhancement in Colburn j-factor is expected. However, actual increase in heat transfer rate from a heat exchanger employing finned tubes with winglets may be smaller, perhaps on the order of 2 to 5%. It is also concluded that for any specific application, more full-size experimentation is needed to optimize the winglet design for a specific heat exchanger application. If in place of a circular tube, an oval tube can be economically used in a bundle, it is expected that the pressure drop across the tube bundle with the application of vortex generators (winglets) will be similar to that in a conventional circular tube bundle. It is hoped that the results of this research will demonstrate the benefits of applying vortex generators (winglets) on the fins to improve the heat transfer from the air-side of the tube bundle.

Manohar S. Sohal

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Major Oil Plays In Utah And Vicinity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.33 billion barrels (211 million m{sup 3}) of oil and hold 256 million barrels (40.7 million m{sup 3}) of proved reserves. The 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m3) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. However, in late 2005 oil production increased, due, in part, to the discovery of Covenant field in the central Utah Navajo Sandstone thrust belt ('Hingeline') play, and to increased development drilling in the central Uinta Basin, reversing the decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming can continue this new upward production trend. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios include descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary recovery techniques for each play. The most prolific oil reservoir in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province is the eolian, Jurassic Nugget Sandstone, having produced over 288 million barrels (46 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 5.1 trillion cubic feet (145 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the depositionally heterogeneous Nugget is also extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Nugget reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and gypsiferous beds in the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone, or a low-permeability zone at the top of the Nugget. The Nugget Sandstone thrust belt play is divided into three subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored shallow structures, (2) Absaroka thrust - Mesozoic-cored deep structures, and (3) Absaroka thrust - Paleozoic-cored shallow structures. Both of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays represent a linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline parallel to the leading edge of the Absaroka thrust. Fields in the shallow Mesozoic subplay produce crude oil and associated gas; fields in the deep subplay produce retrograde condensate. The Paleozoic-cored structures subplay is located immediately west of the Mesozoic-cored structures subplays. It represents a very continuous and linear, hanging wall, ramp anticline where the Nugget is truncated against a thrust splay. Fields in this subplay produce nonassociated gas and condensate. Traps in these subplays consist of long, narrow, doubly plunging anticlines. Prospective drilling targets are delineated using high-quality, two-dimensional and three-dimensional seismic data, forward modeling/visualization tools, and other state-of-the-art techniques. Future Nugget Sandstone exploration could focus on more structurally complex and subtle, thrust-related traps. Nugget structures may be present beneath the leading edge of the Hogsback thrust and North Flank fault of the Uinta uplift. The Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone play in the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province has produced over 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of oil and 93 billion cubic feet (2.6 billion m{sup 3}) of gas. Traps form on discrete subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity Twin Creek is extensively fractured. Hydrocarbons in Twin Creek reservoirs were generated from subthrust Cretaceous source rocks. The seals for the producing horizons are overlying argillaceous and clastic beds, and non-fractured units within the Twin Creek. The Twin Creek Limestone thrust belt play is divided into two subplays: (1) Absaroka thrust-Mesozoic-cored structures and (2) A

Thomas Chidsey

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

185

3rd Int'l Workshop on Micro & Nano Tech. for Power Generation & Energy Conv. (PowerMEMS'03), Makuhari, Japan, 4-5 Dec. 2003. PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF A MEMS STEAM TURBINE POWER PLANT-ON-A-CHIP  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

), Makuhari, Japan, 4-5 Dec. 2003. 1 PRELIMINARY DESIGN OF A MEMS STEAM TURBINE POWER PLANT-ON-A-CHIP Luc G-mail: lucf@alum.mit.edu ABSTRACT This paper presents the system-level and component design of a micro steam. The microfabricated device consists of a steam turbine that drives an integrated micropump and generator. Two

Frechette, Luc G.

186

Louisiana Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Louisiana nuclear power plants, summer capacity and net generation, 2010" "Plant NameTotal Reactors","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Share of State nuclear...

187

Hydrogen generation by metal corrosion in simulated Waste Isolation Pilot Plant environments. Progress report for the period November 1989 through December 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The corrosion and gas-generation characteristics of three material types: low-carbon steel (the current waste packaging material for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant), Cu-base materials, and Ti-base materials were determined in both the liquid and vapor phase of Brine A, a brine representative of an intergranular Salado Formation brine. Test environments included anoxic brine and anoxic brine with overpressures of CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}. Low-carbon steel reacted at a slow, measurable rate with anoxic brine, liberating H{sub 2} on an equimolar basis with Fe reacted. Presence of CO{sub 2} caused the initial reaction to proceed more rapidly, but CO{sub 2}-induced passivation stopped the reaction if the CO{sub 2} were present in sufficient quantities. Low-carbon steel immersed in brine with H{sub 2}S showed no reaction, apparently because of passivation of the steel by formation of a protective iron sulfide reaction product. Cu- and Ti-base materials showed essentially no corrosion when exposed to brine and overpressures of N{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, and H{sub 2}S except for the rapid and complete reaction between Cu-base materials and H{sub 2}S. No significant reaction took place on any material in any environment in the vapor-phase exposures.

Telander, M.R.; Westerman, R.E. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Economic Evaluation of By-Product Power/Co-Generation Systems for Industrial Plants with Fluidized-Bed Coal Burning Facilities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plant capacity to meet future of the following major expenses: operating labor, loads. maintenance labor, sorbent material,plant electric Requirements of the Fuel Use Act state that energy consumption, ash removal and disposal and mis- the new units...

Mesko, J. E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Components," Journal of Nuclear Materials, 212-215, 1223 (1994). 13. Arnold, L, Windscale 1957, Anatomy of a Nuclear Accident, St Martin Press, London, 1992. 14....

190

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

concern that were identified and categorized as high importance combined with medium to low knowledge follow: * core coolant bypass flows (normal operation), * powerflux...

191

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

High- importance phenomena related to the RPV include crack initiation and subcritical crack growth; field fabrication process control; property control in heavy...

192

RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH AND RELATED STANDARDS FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 2 OF HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA Energy and Environment

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper discusses the applications of Heat Recovery Steam Generator Simulation. Consultants, plant engineers and plant developers can evaluate the steam side performance of HRSGs and arrive at the optimum system which matches the needs...

Ganapathy, V.

194

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EMERGENCY PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSINGEmergency Planning for Nuclear Power Plants Determination ofproposed nuclear power plants . . . . . . . . . ē . . . .

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Mississippian Lodgepole Play, Williston Basin: A review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Waulsortian-type carbonate mud mounds in the lower Mississippian Lodgepole formation (Bottineau interval, Madison Group) comprise an important new oil play in the Williston basin with strong regional potential. The play is typified by wells capable of producing 1000-2500 bbl of oil per day and by reserves that have as much as 0.5-3.0 million bbl of oil per well. Currently centered in Stark County, North Dakota, along the southern flank of the basin, the play includes 38 wells, with 21 producers and 6 new fields. Initial discovery was made at a Silurian test in Dickinson field, traditionally productive from Pennsylvanian sands. The largest pool discovered to date is Eland field, which has 15 producers and estimated total reserves of 12-15 million bbl. This report summarizes geologic, well-log, seismic, and production data for this play, which promises to expand considerably in the years to come.

Montgomery, S.L. [Petroleum Consultant, Seattle, WA (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Power Plant Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) 2 Nevada Geodetic LaboratoryStillwater Power Plant Wabuska Power Plant Casa Diablo Power Plant Glass Mountain Geothermal Area Lassen Geothermal Area Coso Hot Springs Power Plants Lake City Geothermal Area Thermo Geothermal Area

Tingley, Joseph V.

197

Planting Food or Fuel: Developing an Interdisciplinary Approach to Understanding the Role of Culture in Farmersí Decisions to Grow Second-Generation Biofuel Feedstock Crops  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent interest in biofuels as an alternative energy source has spurred considerable changes in agricultural practice worldwide. These changes will be more pronounced as second-generation biofuels, such as switch grass, ...

White, Stacey Swearingen; Brown, J. Christopher; Gibson-Carpenter, Jane W.; Hanley, Eric; Earnhart, Dietrich H.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

S. Commercial Nuclear Power Plants. WASH-1400. October 1975.Content of for Nuclear Power Plants. Regulatory Guide 1.101.PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS: THE LICENSING PROCESS

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

RADIOLOGICAL EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANNING FOR NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS IN CALIFORNIA. VOLUME 4 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Rancho Seco nuclear plant was simulated, A total ofdistributions around the nuclear plant sites based on thegrowth surrounding nuclear plants after the issuance of the

Yen, W.W.S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removal Equipment (nuclear plant) Turbine Building ClosedCooling Water System (nuclear plant) SteamReheater (nuclear plant) Inspection Water Induction

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

surrounding a nuclear plant, and they are stronglylocation for a nuclear plant, but it is the measures thatand consequences of nuclear plant accidents and would match

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Active Open Space (playing fields) in a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmental and social benefits, the unintended consequence of implementing Bush Forever, Water Sensitive of the fringe growth sub- regions of Perth already have a shortage of active playing fields. The research as Regional Open Space, this shortage can only get worse. Background Open space is an inherent part

203

AMAROK PIKAP: INTERACTIVE PERCUSSION PLAYING AUTOMOBILE*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AMAROK PIKAP: INTERACTIVE PERCUSSION PLAYING AUTOMOBILE* Selçuk ARTUT Sabanci University Faculty project utilizes an interactive system on the surface of an automobile that is specially modified of an automobile campaign: Amarok Pikap. The structure that forms the design will also be subjected to a technical

Yanikoglu, Berrin

204

EIS-0036: Coal Conversion Program, New England Power Company, Brayton Point Generating Station Plants 1, 2 and 3, Sommerset, Bristol County, Massachusetts  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Economic Regulatory Administration developed this EIS to evaluate the site-specific environmental impacts of issuing a Notice of Effectiveness to New England Power Company's Brayton Point Generating Station, Units 1, 2 and 3 to prohibit burning of gas or oil as the primary source of fuel.

205

Kansas Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Wolf Creek Generating Station Unit 1","1,160","9,556",100.0,"Wolf Creek Nuclear Optg Corp" "1 Plant 1 Reactor","1,160","9,556",100.0...

206

MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the third quarter of the first project year (January 1 through March 31, 2003). This work included gathering field data and analyzing best practices in the eastern Uinta Basin, Utah, and the Colorado portion of the Paradox Basin. Best practices used in oil fields of the eastern Uinta Basin consist of conversion of all geophysical well logs into digital form, running small fracture treatments, fingerprinting oil samples from each producing zone, running spinner surveys biannually, mapping each producing zone, and drilling on 80-acre (32 ha) spacing. These practices ensure that induced fractures do not extend vertically out of the intended zone, determine the percentage each zone contributes to the overall production of the well, identify areas that may be by-passed by a waterflood, and prevent rapid water breakthrough. In the eastern Paradox Basin, Colorado, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of increasing the mud weight during drilling operations before penetrating the overpressured Desert Creek zone; centralizing treatment facilities; and mixing produced water from pumping oil wells with non-reservoir water and injecting the mixture into the reservoir downdip to reduce salt precipitation, dispose of produced water, and maintain reservoir pressure to create a low-cost waterflood. During this quarter, technology transfer activities consisted of technical presentations to members of the Technical Advisory Board in Colorado and the Colorado Geological Survey. The project home page was updated on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey Jr; Craig D. Morgan; Roger L. Bon

2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

FREE PLAY 2007_ Free Play is Next Wave's Independent Game Developers Conference  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AUGUST 9:00am to 8:30pm Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI) Federation Square, Flinders Street Nguyen, Free Play attendee Free Play is supported by ACMI, Film Victoria, Arts Victoria and Crumpler opportunities, and Amelia King (Film Victoria) Nick Blackmore (Corrs Chambers Westgarth) Paul Motion (Atari

Loke, Seng W. - Loke, Seng W.

208

Modulating lignin in plants  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Materials and methods for modulating (e.g., increasing or decreasing) lignin content in plants are disclosed. For example, nucleic acids encoding lignin-modulating polypeptides are disclosed as well as methods for using such nucleic acids to generate transgenic plants having a modulated lignin content.

Apuya, Nestor; Bobzin, Steven Craig; Okamuro, Jack; Zhang, Ke

2013-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

209

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generation by 18%. Natural gas combustion turbine capacitycycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine natural gasnuclear plants, combustion turbine natural gas plants, and

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Plant Phenotype Characterization System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is the final scientific report for the DOE Inventions and Innovations Project: Plant Phenotype Characterization System, DE-FG36-04GO14334. The period of performance was September 30, 2004 through July 15, 2005. The project objective is to demonstrate the viability of a new scientific instrument concept for the study of plant root systems. The root systems of plants are thought to be important in plant yield and thus important to DOE goals in renewable energy sources. The scientific study and understanding of plant root systems is hampered by the difficulty in observing root activity and the inadequacy of existing root study instrumentation options. We have demonstrated a high throughput, non-invasive, high resolution technique for visualizing plant root systems in-situ. Our approach is based upon low-energy x-ray radiography and the use of containers and substrates (artificial soil) which are virtually transparent to x-rays. The system allows us to germinate and grow plant specimens in our containers and substrates and to generate x-ray images of the developing root system over time. The same plant can be imaged at different times in its development. The system can be used for root studies in plant physiology, plant morphology, plant breeding, plant functional genomics and plant genotype screening.

Daniel W McDonald; Ronald B Michaels

2005-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

211

Latin American Plays in English Translation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

34 LATIN AMERICAN THEATRE REVIEW Latin American Plays in English Translation Aguilera Malta, Demetrio. Infierno negro (Blac\\ Hell). Trans. Elizabeth Lowe. Andrade, Jorge. A Moratůria (Time of the Harvest). Trans. Donald C. Robinson. Cantůn... Rosenberg. Dragķn, Osvaldo. Milagro en el mercado viejo (Miracle in the Old Market). Trans. Joe and Graciela Rosenberg, TAIUS (Texas A&I University Studies), Vol. XII, No. 1 (Nov. 1979). Garro, Elena. La seŮora en su balcůn (The Woman on the Balcony...

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Thermodynamics -2 A cogeneration plant (plant which provides both electricity and thermal energy) executes a cycle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Thermodynamics - 2 A cogeneration plant (plant which provides both electricity and thermal energy] Determine the rate of heat addition in the steam generator. Now consider an ideal, reversible cogeneration 1 2 3 45 6 Cogeneration Plant Boundary #12;

Virginia Tech

213

Major Oil Plays in Utah and Vicinity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced over 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 13.7 million barrels (2.2 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2002 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil-producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; locations of major oil pipelines; identification and discussion of land-use constraints; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play. This report covers research activities for the sixth quarter of the project (October 1 through December 31, 2003). This work included describing outcrop analogs for the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone and Mississippian Leadville Limestone, major oil producers in the thrust belt and Paradox Basin, respectively, and analyzing best practices used in the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin. Production-scale outcrop analogs provide an excellent view of reservoir petrophysics, facies characteristics, and boundaries contributing to the overall heterogeneity of reservoir rocks. They can be used as a ''template'' for evaluation of data from conventional core, geophysical and petrophysical logs, and seismic surveys. In the Utah/Wyoming thrust belt province, the Jurassic Twin Creek Limestone produces from subsidiary closures along major ramp anticlines where the low-porosity limestone beds are extensively fractured and sealed by overlying argillaceous and non-fractured units. The best outcrop analogs for Twin Creek reservoirs are found at Devils Slide and near the town of Peoa, Utah, where fractures in dense, homogeneous non-porous limestone beds are in contact with the basal siltstone units (containing sealed fractures) of the overlying units. The shallow marine, Mississippian Leadville Limestone is a major oil and gas reservoir in the Paradox Basin of Utah and Colorado. Hydrocarbons are produced from basement-involved, northwest-trending structural traps with closure on both anticlines and faults. Excellent outcrops of Leadville-equivalent rocks are found along the south flank of the Uinta Mountains, Utah. For example, like the Leadville, the Mississippian Madison Limestone contains zones of solution breccia, fractures, and facies variations. When combined with subsurface geological and production data, these outcrop analogs can improve (1) development drilling and production strategies such as horizontal drilling, (2) reservoir-simulation models, (3) reserve calculations, and (4) design and implementation of secondary/tertiary oil recovery programs and other best practices used in the oil fields of Utah and vicinity. In the southern Green River Formation play of the Uinta Basin, optimal drilling, development, and production practices consist of: (1) owning drilling rigs and frac holding tanks; (2) perforating sandstone beds with more than 8 percent neutron porosity and stimulate with separate fracture treatments; (3) placing completed wells on primary production using artificial lift; (4) converting wells relatively soon to secondary waterflooding maintaining reservoir pressure above the bubble point to maximize oil recovery; (5) developing waterflood units using an alternating injector--producer pattern on 40-acre (16-ha) spacing; and (6) recompleting producing wells by perforating all beds that are productive in the waterflood unit. As part of technology transfer activities during this quarter, an abstract describing outcrop reservoir analogs was accepted by the American Assoc

Thomas C. Chidsey; Craig D. Morgan; Kevin McClure; Douglas A. Sprinkel; Roger L. Bon; Hellmut H. Doelling

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

214

Next Generation Safeguards Initiative: Analysis of Probability of Detection of Plausible Diversion Scenarios at Gas Centrifuge Enrichment Plants Using Advanced Safeguards  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last decade, efforts by the safeguards community, including inspectorates, governments, operators and owners of centrifuge facilities, have given rise to new possibilities for safeguards approaches in enrichment plants. Many of these efforts have involved development of new instrumentation to measure uranium mass and uranium-235 enrichment and inspection schemes using unannounced and random site inspections. We have chosen select diversion scenarios and put together a reasonable system of safeguards equipment and safeguards approaches and analyzed the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed safeguards approach by predicting the probability of detection of diversion in the chosen safeguards approaches. We analyzed the effect of redundancy in instrumentation, cross verification of operator instrumentation by inspector instrumentation, and the effects of failures or anomalous readings on verification data. Armed with these esults we were able to quantify the technical cost benefit of the addition of certain instrument suites and show the promise of these new systems.

Hase, Kevin R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hawkins Erpenbeck, Heather [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Boyer, Brian D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

215

MAJOR OIL PLAYS IN UTAH AND VICINITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utah oil fields have produced a total of 1.2 billion barrels (191 million m{sup 3}). However, the 15 million barrels (2.4 million m{sup 3}) of production in 2000 was the lowest level in over 40 years and continued the steady decline that began in the mid-1980s. The Utah Geological Survey believes this trend can be reversed by providing play portfolios for the major oil producing provinces (Paradox Basin, Uinta Basin, and thrust belt) in Utah and adjacent areas in Colorado and Wyoming. Oil plays are geographic areas with petroleum potential caused by favorable combinations of source rock, migration paths, reservoir rock characteristics, and other factors. The play portfolios will include: descriptions and maps of the major oil plays by reservoir; production and reservoir data; case-study field evaluations; summaries of the state-of-the-art drilling, completion, and secondary/tertiary techniques for each play; locations of major oil pipelines; descriptions of reservoir outcrop analogs; and identification and discussion of land use constraints. All play maps, reports, databases, and so forth, produced for the project will be published in interactive, menu-driven digital (web-based and compact disc) and hard-copy formats. This report covers research activities for the first quarter of the first project year (July 1 through September 30, 2002). This work included producing general descriptions of Utah's major petroleum provinces, gathering field data, and analyzing best practices in the Utah Wyoming thrust belt. Major Utah oil reservoirs and/or source rocks are found in Devonian through Permian, Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary rocks. Stratigraphic traps include carbonate buildups and fluvial-deltaic pinchouts, and structural traps include basement-involved and detached faulted anticlines. Best practices used in Utah's oil fields consist of waterflood, carbon-dioxide flood, gas-injection, and horizontal drilling programs. Nitrogen injection and horizontal drilling programs have been successfully employed to enhance oil production from the Jurassic Nugget Sandstone (the major thrust belt oil-producing reservoir) in Wyoming's Painter Reservoir and Ryckman Creek fields. At Painter Reservoir field a tertiary, miscible nitrogen-injection program is being conducted to raise the reservoir pressure to miscible conditions. Supplemented with water injection, the ultimate recovery will be 113 million bbls (18 million m{sup 3}) of oil (a 68 percent recovery factor over a 60-year period). The Nugget reservoir has significant heterogeneity due to both depositional facies and structural effects. These characteristics create ideal targets for horizontal wells and horizontal laterals drilled from existing vertical wells. Horizontal drilling programs were conducted in both Painter Reservoir and Ryckman Creek fields to encounter potential undrained compartments and increase the overall field recovery by 0.5 to 1.5 percent per horizontal wellbore. Technology transfer activities consisted of exhibiting a booth display of project materials at the Rocky Mountain Section meeting of the American Association of Petroleum Geologists, a technical presentation to the Wyoming State Geological Survey, and two publications. A project home page was set up on the Utah Geological Survey Internet web site.

Thomas C. Chidsey, Jr.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Homemade GamesÖ how to make and play.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to their enjoyment for 3s money. The cla; .'iis bul 11.1 aw 'nation "qt bind .lie grou 'r and scrap boxes Color. Ulrlbb as po Soft work maple I. Be s. nw aa' ssification - of homemade g a m e s in lletin may help in planning for the ma1... wide rounded ledge for comfortable sitting during play. A large tractor tire also makes a usable sand container. The soft rim makes a comfortable seat. The sandbox should have a cover to protect the sand from .stray cats and dogs. Canvas weighted...

Moore, Lucille H.; Johnson, Eloise T.

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Stop Playing Favorites with the Tax Code  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

taxes on business?to?business transactions are a particularly pernicious form of playing favorites, because these frequently look like equity to the casual observer. Consider, for example, two ?irms. One is a large business; the other is a mom... and pop small business. Both need legal services. The large business has an in?house lawyer while the small business hires outside counsel as needed. A sales tax on legal services to business would fall on mom and pop and their outside lawyer...

Taylor, Lori L.

218

Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject: Guidance forGeospatial Grades: 9-12Play Fairway Analysis

219

Conductive Plays - Basement | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) | Open EnergyConductive Plays - Basement Jump to:

220

Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdf Flash2006-53.pdf0.pdfCostAnalysis Geothermal Play Fairway Analysis pfw-webinar.pptx

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

2010 Plant Molecular Biology Gordon Research Conference  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Plant Molecular Biology Conference has traditionally covered a breadth of exciting topics and the 2010 conference will continue in that tradition. Emerging concerns about food security have inspired a program with three main themes: (1) genomics, natural variation and breeding to understand adaptation and crop improvement, (2) hormonal cross talk, and (3) plant/microbe interactions. There are also sessions on epigenetics and proteomics/metabolomics. Thus this conference will bring together a range of disciplines, will foster the exchange of ideas and enable participants to learn of the latest developments and ideas in diverse areas of plant biology. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for individuals to discuss their research because additional speakers in each session will be selected from submitted abstracts. There will also be a poster session each day for a two-hour period prior to dinner. In particular, this conference plays a key role in enabling students and postdocs (the next generation of research leaders) to mingle with pioneers in multiple areas of plant science.

Michael Sussman

2010-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

222

Diophantine Generation,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diophantine Generation, Horizontal and Vertical Problems, and the Weak Vertical Method Alexandra Shlapentokh Diophantine Sets, Definitions and Generation Diophantine Sets Diophantine Generation Properties of Diophantine Generation Diophantine Family of Z Diophantine Family of a Polynomial Ring Going Down Horizontal

Shlapentokh, Alexandra

223

Test and demonstration of a 1-MW wellhead generator: helical screw expander power plant, Model 76-1. Final report to the International Energy Agency  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A 1-MW geothermal wellhead power plant incorporating a Lysholm or helical screw expander (HSE) was field tested between 1980 and 1983 by Mexico, Italy, and New Zealand with technical assistance from the United States. The objectives were to provide data on the reliability and performance of the HSE and to assess the costs and benefits of its use. The range of conditions under which the HSE was tested included loads up to 933 kW, mass flowrates of 14,600 to 395, 000 lbs/hr, inlet pressures of 64 to 220 psia, inlet qualities of 0 to 100%, exhaust pressures of 3.1 to 40 psia, total dissolved solids up to 310,000 ppM, and noncondensible gases up to 38% of the vapor mass flow. Typical machine efficiencies of 40 to 50% were calculated. For most operations efficiency increased approximately logarithmically with shaft power, while inlet quality and rotor speed had only small effects. The HSE was designed with oversized internal clearances in the expectation that adherent scale would form during operation. Improvements in machine efficiency of 3.5 to 4 percentage points were observed over some test periods with some scale deposition. A comparison with a 1-MW back-pressure turbine showed that the HSE can compete favorably under certain conditions. The HSE was found to be a rugged energy conversion machine for geothermal applications, but some subsystems were found to require further development. 7 refs., 28 figs., 5 tabs.

Not Available

1985-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

224

Software Roadmap to Plug and Play Petaflop/s  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1993). LBNL Software Roadmap to Plug and Play Petaflop/s 7.16, 2005. LBNL Software Roadmap to Plug and Play Petaflop/sChombo. LBNL Software Roadmap to Plug and Play Petaflop/s

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Rage against the machines: how subjects play against learning algorithms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

B. : Rage against the machinesóHow Subjects Learn to PlayARTICLE Rage against the machines: how subjects play againsterror. Rage against the machines representative of real

Duersch, Peter; Kolb, Albert; Oechssler, JŲrg; Schipper, Burkhard C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Related Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. NeroResponse Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California,"Densities Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero,

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standards for Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero and Y.C.Planning for Nuclear Power Plants in California," by W.W.S.Surrounding Nuclear Power Plants," by A.V. Nero, C.H.

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Mississippian ''Warsaw'' play makes waves in Illinois basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent completions of relatively prolific wells in the mid-Missippian Ullin limestone have generated considerable excitement about this Illinois basin play. Reservoirs found within this limestone, commonly referred to by industry as the Warsaw, are scattered and are prolific oil producers in some areas of the basin. The widespread development of reservoir quality facies at depths ranging from 2,400--4,400 ft and the stratigraphic proximity of thermally mature New Albany shale, the primary Illinois basin source rock are factors that make the Warsaw an excellent exploration target. The paper discusses a depositional model, reservoir development, reservoir facies of the upper and lower Warsaw, factors controlling porosity and permeability, and regional and structural considerations.

Lasemi, Z.; Grube, J.P. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

1995-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

229

Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL POWER GENERATION PLANT Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications Advanced Search New...

230

Steam generator tube failures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A review and summary of the available information on steam generator tubing failures and the impact of these failures on plant safety is presented. The following topics are covered: pressurized water reactor (PWR), Canadian deuterium uranium (CANDU) reactor, and Russian water moderated, water cooled energy reactor (VVER) steam generator degradation, PWR steam generator tube ruptures, the thermal-hydraulic response of a PWR plant with a faulted steam generator, the risk significance of steam generator tube rupture accidents, tubing inspection requirements and fitness-for-service criteria in various countries, and defect detection reliability and sizing accuracy. A significant number of steam generator tubes are defective and are removed from service or repaired each year. This wide spread damage has been caused by many diverse degradation mechanisms, some of which are difficult to detect and predict. In addition, spontaneous tube ruptures have occurred at the rate of about one every 2 years over the last 20 years, and incipient tube ruptures (tube failures usually identified with leak detection monitors just before rupture) have been occurring at the rate of about one per year. These ruptures have caused complex plant transients which have not always been easy for the reactor operators to control. Our analysis shows that if more than 15 tubes rupture during a main steam line break, the system response could lead to core melting. Although spontaneous and induced steam generator tube ruptures are small contributors to the total core damage frequency calculated in probabilistic risk assessments, they are risk significant because the radionuclides are likely to bypass the reactor containment building. The frequency of steam generator tube ruptures can be significantly reduced through appropriate and timely inspections and repairs or removal from service.

MacDonald, P.E.; Shah, V.N.; Ward, L.W.; Ellison, P.G.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

ORIGINAL PAPER Insect attraction to wind turbines: does colour play a role?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL PAPER Insect attraction to wind turbines: does colour play a role? C. V. Long & J. A at wind turbine installations has been generating increasing con- cern, both for the continued development the phenomenon of avian and bat mortality at wind turbine installations, an issue that could potentially

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

232

Plant design: Integrating Plant and Equipment Models  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Like power plant engineers, process plant engineers must design generating units to operate efficiently, cleanly, and profitably despite fluctuating costs for raw materials and fuels. To do so, they increasingly create virtual plants to enable evaluation of design concepts without the expense of building pilot-scale or demonstration facilities. Existing computational models describe an entire plant either as a network of simplified equipment models or as a single, very detailed equipment model. The Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) project (Figure 5) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) seeks to bridge the gap between models by integrating plant modeling and equipment modeling software. The goal of the effort is to provide greater insight into the performance of proposed plant designs. The software integration was done using the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN (Computer Aided Process EngineeringĖOpen), or CO interface. Several demonstration cases based on operating power plants confirm the viability of this co-simulation approach.

Sloan, David (Alstrom Power); Fiveland, Woody (Alstrom Power); Zitney, S.E.; Osawe, Maxwell (Ansys, Inc.)

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

1. Generation 1 1. Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Generation 1 _________________________________________________________________________ 1. Generation Sound and vibrations or, in more general terms, oscillations of matter (solids or fluids) are generated in many different dynamic processes. The basic mechanisms which underlie these oscillations

Berlin,Technische Universität

234

The expansion currently underway at Plant Vogtle is emblematic...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

total U. S. electricity generation. And more nuclear generation is on the way. At nearby Plant Vogtle, one of three Georgia nuclear stations operated by Southern Company,...

235

Power Plant Research and Siting Program (Maryland)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Power Plant Research and Siting Act of 1971 established the Power Plant Research Program (PPRP) to evaluate electric generation issues in the state and recommend responsible, long-term...

236

Minnesota Power Plant Siting Act (Minnesota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act regulates the siting of large electric power generating plants, which are defined as plants designed for or capable of operating with a capacity of 50,000 kW or more. The policy of the...

237

Effects of High Nighttime Temperature and Role of Plant Growth Regulators on Growth, Development and Physiology of Rice Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

betaine (GB), and salicylic acid (SA), which play different roles in inducing thermo-tolerance in plants. High nighttime temperature had no effect on plant height, number of tillers and panicles, or rice net leaf photosynthetic rates. However, HNT...

Mohammed, Abdul R.

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

238

Construction or Extended Operation of Nuclear Plant (Vermont)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Any petition for approval of construction of a nuclear energy generating plant within the state, or any petition for approval of the operation of a nuclear energy generating plant beyond the date...

239

Nature in Play: Measuring the Relationship of Nature and Unstructured Play through Case Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are given for three play spaces containing little nature, some nature, and complete nature in Bonn, Germany. The city has a rich environment and culture with a historic dedication to caring for the environment that made it ideal for a comparison... for encouraging me to apply to the Undergraduate Research Program and guiding me through the research process. She asked challenging questions that added depth to the project. Many individuals in Germany were helpful to my research. The resourceful Miriam...

McCleary, Lisa Christine

2009-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

240

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Summary of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The ImpactGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageVessel Design on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I)

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the Proposed Solar Power Plant Design The Impact ofGenerated by this Solar Power Plant The Impact of StorageDesign on the Solar Power Plant III I;l f> (I Q I) II (I

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Pinellas Plant facts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pinellas Plant, near St. Petersburg, Florida, is wholly owned by the United States Government. It is operated for the Department of Energy (DOE) by GE Aerospace, Neutron Devices (GEND). This plant was built in 1956 to manufacture neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators built at Neutron Devices consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. Production of these devices has necessitated the development of several uniquely specialized areas of competence and supporting facilities. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology; hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials; plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at Neutron Devices has led directly to the assignment of other weapon application products: the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Other product assignments such as active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator evolved from the plant`s materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life.

NONE

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel power plants. However,power plants, which are reviewed and licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and relatively few areas of geothermal and

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Energy Department Announces Funding to Develop "Plug-and-Play...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Funding to Develop "Plug-and-Play" Solar Energy Systems for Homeowners Energy Department Announces Funding to Develop "Plug-and-Play" Solar Energy Systems for Homeowners April 24,...

245

Design and simulation of a plant control system for a GCFR demonstration plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A plant control system is being designed for a 300 MW(e) Gas Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor (GCFR) demonstration plant. Control analysis is being performed as an integral part of the plant design process to ensure that control requirements are satisfied as the plant design evolves. Plant models and simulations are being developed to generate information necessary to further define control system requirements for subsequent plant design iterations.

Estrine, E.A.; Greiner, H.G.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Solana Generating Plant Solar Power Plant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDIT REPORTOpenWende New EnergyAnatoliaSciraShenhuaWindPowerSoham

247

Wisconsin Nuclear Profile - Point Beach Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Point Beach Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

248

Tennessee Nuclear Profile - Watts Bar Nuclear Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Watts Bar Nuclear Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License expiration...

249

Analysis of the Behavior of Electric Vehicle Charging Stations with Renewable Generations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Analysis of the Behavior of Electric Vehicle Charging Stations with Renewable Generations Woongsup between electric vehicle charging stations (EVCSs) with renewable electricity generation facilities (REGFs electricity generation [1]. Therefore, renewable power generation will play a significant role in smart grid

Wong, Vincent

250

Vermont Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mwh)","Share of State nuclear net generation (percent)","Owner" "Vermont Yankee Unit 1",620,"4,782",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Vermont Yankee" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",620,"4,782",100.0...

251

Massachusetts Nuclear Profile - Power Plants  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

(percent)","Owner" "Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Unit 1",685,"5,918",100.0,"Entergy Nuclear Generation Co" "1 Plant 1 Reactor",685,"5,918",100.0 "Note: Totals may not equal...

252

EIS-0362: Colorado Springs Utilities' Next Generation CFB Coal Generating Unit, CO  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This EIS analyzes DOE's decision to approve Colorado Springs Utilities design, construction, and operation of their Next- Generation Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) Coal Generating Unit demonstration plant near Fountain, El Paso County, Colorado.

253

MHD Generating system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

According to the present invention, coal combustion gas is the primary working fluid and copper or a copper alloy is the electrodynamic fluid in the MHD generator, thereby eliminating the heat exchangers between the combustor and the liquid-metal MHD working fluids, allowing the use of a conventional coalfired steam bottoming plant, and making the plant simpler, more efficient and cheaper. In operation, the gas and liquid are combined in a mixer and the resulting two-phase mixture enters the MHD generator. The MHD generator acts as a turbine and electric generator in one unit wherein the gas expands, drives the liquid across the magnetic field and thus generates electrical power. The gas and liquid are separated, and the available energy in the gas is recovered before the gas is exhausted to the atmosphere. Where the combustion gas contains sulfur, oxygen is bubbled through a side loop to remove sulfur therefrom as a concentrated stream of sulfur dioxide. The combustor is operated substoichiometrically to control the oxide level in the copper.

Petrick, Michael (Joliet, IL); Pierson, Edward S. (Chicago, IL); Schreiner, Felix (Mokena, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

CONTROL OF POPULATION DENSITIES SURROUNDING NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS. VOLUME 5 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA Energy and Environment

Nero, jA.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA Energy and Environment

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Coal-fired diesel generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the proposed project is to test the technical, environmental, and economic viability of a coal-fired diesel generator for producing electric power in small power generating markets. Coal for the diesel generator would be provided from existing supplies transported for use in the University`s power plant. A cleanup system would be installed for limiting gaseous and particulate emissions. Electricity and steam produced by the diesel generator would be used to supply the needs of the University. The proposed diesel generator and supporting facilities would occupy approximately 2 acres of land adjacent to existing coal- and oil-fired power plant and research laboratory buildings at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks. The environmental analysis identified that the most notable changes to result from the proposed project would occur in the following areas: power plant configuration at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks; air emissions, water use and discharge, and the quantity of solid waste for disposal; noise levels at the power plant site; and transportation of coal to the power plant. No substantive adverse impacts or environmental concerns were identified in analyzing the effects of these changes.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

THE DEFINITION OF ENGINEERING DEVELOPMENT AND RESEARCH PROBLEMS RELATING TO THE USE OF GEOTHERMAL FLUIDS FOR ELECTRIC POWER GENERATION AND NONELECTRIC HEATING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emission*from geothermal power plants W. Investigation ofI i. Plant size. Geothermal power plants are expected TheProcesses for Geothermal Electric Power Generation,

Apps, J.A.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Developer Installed Treatment Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-installed treatment plants. These treatment plants are more commonly known as package wastewater treatment plants. 1

unknown authors

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Sacred Playground: Adult Play and Transformation at Burning Man  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Press. Huizinga, Johan 1955 Homo Ludens: A Studyfor a species. Historian Johan Huizinga identified a ďplay-games to governments (Huizinga 1955; Malaby 2009a). Moving

Heller, Sarah Megan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A New 'Geothermal Play Type' Catalog: Streamlining Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

resources and ultimately to reserves and producing fields. A play type in petroleum geology represents a particular stratigraphic or structural geological setting,...

262

Learning how to play Nash, potential games and alternating ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Page 1 ... of the most important topic is how do players learn to play Nash equilibria (Chen and Gazzale [17]). Learning dynamics include Bayesian learning,†...

Megiddo

2012-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

263

Nuclear Plant/Hydrogen Plant Safety: Issues and Approaches  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, through its agents the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project and the Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative, is working on developing the technologies to enable the large scale production of hydrogen using nuclear power. A very important consideration in the design of a co-located and connected nuclear plant/hydrogen plant facility is safety. This study provides an overview of the safety issues associated with a combined plant and discusses approaches for categorizing, quantifying, and addressing the safety risks.

Steven R. Sherman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Distributed Generation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

come a long way in addressing interconnection standards for distributed generation, utilities have largely overlooked the untapped potential of these resources. Under certain...

265

Dynamic equivalencing of distribution network with embedded generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Renewable energy generation will play an important role in solving the climate change problem. With renewable electricity generation increasing, there will be some significant changes in electric power systems, ...

Feng, Xiaodan Selina

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

266

HAS222d Intro to Energy and Environement: 40% off energy use in US goes into generating electricity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

goes into generating electricity generation efficiency: 33% electric power loss: plant to consumer 7) http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_power_transmission#Losses http fuel power generation plants that dominate our electricity production. Remember that electricity

267

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

generate steam to drive a steam turbine, giving rise to theValves and Pi~ing STEAM TURBINE COMPONENT OUTAGE CAUSESbasically of a steam-driven turbine, an electric generator

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Zen Play: A fair play system connected to serious games to motivate energy sustainable behaviors inside dwellings:.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??ďZen Playď is a graduation project that has been conducted to create a feedback system within the back-end part of a serious game, developed byÖ (more)

Zanon, D.

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

World electric power plants database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This global database provides records for 104,000 generating units in over 220 countries. These units include installed and projected facilities, central stations and distributed plants operated by utilities, independent power companies and commercial and self-generators. Each record includes information on: geographic location and operating company; technology, fuel and boiler; generator manufacturers; steam conditions; unit capacity and age; turbine/engine; architect/engineer and constructor; and pollution control equipment. The database is issued quarterly.

NONE

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

270

THE CHALLENGE OF MOTION PLANNING FOR SOCCER PLAYING HUMANOID ROBOTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

characterized by teams composed by differential drive robots playing almost static games in a wall surrounded. The chosen deadline is the year 2050. Soccer playing requires multiple cognitive skills, like team strategy, online learning, and real time sensor processing. On top of that, by its very own nature, soccer involves

Kallmann, Marcelo

271

Distributed Power Generation: Requirements and Recommendations for an ICT Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Some of these are sustainable (wind and hydroelectric power plants, solar cells), some are controllable), distrib- uted generation, energy management systems (EMS) , IEC standards 1 Power Generation possible to generate energy efficiently in large-scale power plants, a complex infrastructure is needed

Appelrath, Hans-JŁrgen

272

Thermoelectric Generators 1. Thermoelectric generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Cold Hot I - -- - - - - -- Figure 1 Electron concentration in a thermoelectric material. #12;2 A large1 Thermoelectric Generators HoSung Lee 1. Thermoelectric generator 1.1 Basic Equations In 1821 on the direction of current and material [3]. This is called the Thomson effect (or Thomson heat). These three

Lee, Ho Sung

273

Evaluation of fossil plants versus hydro plants for load frequency control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The economics of using hydroplants with Francis turbines or fossil plants for load frequency control are evaluated. Using data from the TVA Gallatin steam plant and the TVA Cherokee, Wilson, and Fontana hydroplants, a cost comparison of different modes of operation for load frequency control was performed considering two plants at a time. The results showed that when the fossil plant was used for load frequency control instead of a hydro plant a lower system generation cost was incurred. Dynamic responses of fossil and hydro units, improved controls for fossil plants, and maneuvering costs of the Gallatin plant are also considered.

Broadwater, R.P.; Johnson, R.L.; Duckett, F.E.; Boston, W.T.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Mass Market Demand Response and Variable Generation Integration Issues: A Scoping Study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Smart Grid, and specifically AMI, can play in mitigating variable generation integrationSmart Grid could be the ďsilver bulletĒ for mitigating variable generation integrationSmart Grid could be the ďsilver bulletĒ for mitigating variable generation integration

Cappers, Peter

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

NREL: Wind Research - NREL Plays Founding, Developmental Role...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

NREL Plays Founding, Developmental Role in Major Wind Journal A screenshot of the Wind Energy publication for January 2013 with the picture of a spinning wind turbine on the front....

276

Gamification: Creating Gameful and Playful Application for Complementing Human Memory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamification: Creating Gameful and Playful Application for Complementing Human Memory Master thesis of this Master/Diploma thesis is to develop gamification-based design, approach and application that support

Nejdl, Wolfgang

277

GPR56 Plays Varying Roles in Endogenous Cancer Progression  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GPR56, a non-classical adhesion receptor, was previously reported to suppress tumor growth and metastasis in xenograft models using human melanoma cell lines. To understand whether GPR56 plays similar roles in the development ...

Xu, Lei

278

Being virtual: embodiment and experience in interactive computer game play  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis argues that the notion of player experience in relation to computer games is intrinsically linked to the body. Taking the idea of aesthetic experience, or sensuous experience, in computer game play as its ...

Sommerseth, Hanna Mathilde

2010-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

279

Updates to the EIA Eagle Ford Play Maps  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Houston, Texas, USA, April 10-13, 2011. Hentz, T.F., and Ambrose, W.A., and D.C. Smith, in press, Eaglebine play of the southwestern East Texas Basin: Stratigraphic and...

280

Performance Analysis & Optimization of Well Production in Unconventional Resource Plays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of proper physics often leads to unreasonable reservoir parameter estimates. The workflow demonstrates reduced non-uniqueness for the inverse history matching problem. The behavior of near-critical fluids in Liquid Rich Shale plays defies the production...

Sehbi, Baljit Singh

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Corporate Property Tax Reduction for New/Expanded Generating Facilities  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Montana generating plants producing one megawatt (MW) or more with an alternative renewable energy source are eligible for the new or expanded industry property tax reduction. This incentive...

282

San Diego Solar Panels Generate Clean Electricity Along with...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

of 20 MW of renewable energy systems. This includes systems generating energy from biogas and hydroelectric sources at the Point Loma Wastewater Treatment Plant - also a...

283

Exemption from Electric Generation Tax (Connecticut)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

In 2011, Connecticut created a new tax requiring electric power plants in the state that generate and upload electricity to the regional bulk power grid to pay $2.50 per megawatt hour. Renewable...

284

Red River play, Gulf Canada deal boost Williston basin  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High levels of activity in the Williston basin are assured this year with an expanding horizontal drilling play for oil in Ordovician Red River. The Red River play, like the Mississippian Lodgepole mound play, is centered in North Dakota. But the Red River play is much larger, extending into eastern Montana and northwestern South Dakota. More than 500 Red River B wells have been staked. One of the most recent companies to position itself in both plays is Gulf Canada Resources Ltd. The company forged an agreement with the Assiniboine and Sioux Indian tribes. The agreement initially provides Gulf access to about 800,000 acres on the Fort Peck Indian Reservation, mostly in Roosevelt County, Mont., on the western slope of the Williston basin. Under an option, Gulf`s access could later expand to cover the reservation`s remaining 1.3 million acres. The paper discusses the extent of the Red River play, and Gulf Canada`s role in its development.

NONE

1997-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

285

Plant salt-tolerance mechanisms  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Crop performance is severely affected by high salt concentrations in soils. To engineer more salt-tolerant plants it is crucial to unravel the key components of the plant salt-tolerance network. Here we review our understanding of the core salt-tolerance mechanisms in plants. Recent studies have shown that stress sensing and signaling components can play important roles in regulating the plant salinity stress response. We also review key Na+ transport and detoxification pathways and the impact of epigenetic chromatin modifications on salinity tolerance. In addition, we discuss the progress that has been made towards engineering salt tolerance in crops, including marker-assisted selection and gene stacking techniques. We also identify key open questions that remain to be addressed in the future.

Deinlein, Ulrich; Stephan, Aaron B.; Horie, Tomoaki; Luo, Wei; Xu, Guohua; Schroeder, Julian I.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

GCFR steam generator conceptual design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The gas-cooled fast reactor (GCFR) steam generators are large once-through heat exchangers with helically coiled tube bundles. In the GCFR demonstration plant, hot helium from the reactor core is passed through these units to produce superheated steam, which is used by the turbine generators to produce electrical power. The paper describes the conceptual design of the steam generator. The major components and functions of the design are addressed. The topics discussed are the configuration, operating conditions, design criteria, and the design verification and support programs.

Holm, R.A.; Elliott, J.P.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

A SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE FOR DEVELOPMENTAL MODELING IN PLANTS: THE COMPUTABLE PLANT PROJECT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dynamic objects and relationships; a C++ code generator to translate SBML into highly efficient simulationA SOFTWARE ARCHITECTURE FOR DEVELOPMENTAL MODELING IN PLANTS: THE COMPUTABLE PLANT PROJECT Victoria present the software architecture of the Computable Plant Project, a multidisciplinary computationally

Mjolsness, Eric

288

Microwave generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

1987-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - accumulator plant species Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: accumulator plant species Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Introduction Biodiversity in the sense of species richness may play a crucial role for maintaining ecosys-...

290

Power Generation Loading Optimization using a Multi-Objective Constraint-Handling Method via  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results of the power generation loading optimization based on a coal-fired power plant demonstrates algorithm in solving significant industrial problems. I. INTRODUCTION Most power generation plants have.e., heat rate/NOx vs. load, for a given plant condition. There are two objectives for the power generation

Li, Xiaodong

291

Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simultaneous wastewater treatment and biological electricity generation B.E. Logan Department accomplishing wastewater treatment in processes based on microbial fuel cell technologies. When bacteria oxidize.4 £ 106 L of wastewater, a wastewater treatment plant has the potential to become a 2.3 MW power plant

292

Hardware simulation of diesel generator and microgrid stability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Over the last few years, people have begun to depend less on large power plants with extensive distribution systems, and more on local distributed generation sources. A microgrid, a local collection of distributed generators, ...

Zieve, Michael M

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The compact Selaginella genome identifies changes in gene content associated with the evolution of vascular plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the genome sequence of the nonseed vascular plant, Selaginella moellendorffii, and by comparative genomics identify genes that likely played important roles in the early evolution of vascular plants and their subsequent evolution

Grigoriev, Igor V.; Banks, Jo Ann; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Bowman, John L.; Gribskov, Michael; dePamphilis, Claude; Albert, Victor A.; Aono, Naoki; Aoyama, Tsuyoshi; Ambrose, Barbara A.; Ashton, Neil W.; Axtell, Michael J.; Barker, Elizabeth; Barker, Michael S.; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Bonawitz, Nicholas D.; Chapple, Clint; Cheng, Chaoyang; Correa, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Dacre, Michael; DeBarry, Jeremy; Dreyer, Ingo; Elias, Marek; Engstrom, Eric M.; Estelle, Mark; Feng, Liang; Finet, Cedric; Floyd, Sandra K.; Frommer, Wolf B.; Fujita, Tomomichi; Gramzow, Lydia; Gutensohn, Michael; Harholt, Jesper; Hattori, Mitsuru; Heyl, Alexander; Hirai, Tadayoshi; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Iwata, Mineko; Karol, Kenneth G.; Koehler, Barbara; Kolukisaoglu, Uener; Kubo, Minoru; Kurata, Tetsuya; Lalonde, Sylvie; Li, Kejie; Li, Ying; Litt, Amy; Lyons, Eric; Manning, Gerard; Maruyama, Takeshi; Michael, Todd P.; Mikami, Koji; Miyazaki, Saori; Morinaga, Shin-ichi; Murata, Takashi; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Nelson, David R.; Obara, Mari; Oguri, Yasuko; Olmstead, Richard G.; Onodera, Naoko; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Pils, Birgit; Prigge, Michael; Rensing, Stefan A.; Riano-Pachon, Diego Mauricio; Roberts, Alison W.; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Schulz, Burkhard; Schulz, Christian; Shakirov, Eugene V.; Shibagaki, Nakako; Shinohara, Naoki; Shippen, Dorothy E.; Sorensen, Iben; Sotooka, Ryo; Sugimoto, Nagisa; Sugita, Mamoru; Sumikawa, Naomi; Tanurdzic, Milos; Theilsen, Gunter; Ulvskov, Peter; Wakazuki, Sachiko; Weng, Jing-Ke; Willats, William W.G.T.; Wipf, Daniel; Wolf, Paul G.; Yang, Lixing; Zimmer, Andreas D.; Zhu, Qihui; Mitros, Therese; Hellsten, Uffe; Loque, Dominique; Otillar, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Shapiro, Harris; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Rokhsar, Daniel

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

294

Planning for coal power plant transition : lessons learned from communities in Massachusetts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

As coal-fired power plants across the U.S. are retiring in increasing numbers - a trend likely to continue in the years ahead - the communities that host these plants will play a critical role in balancing local concerns ...

Nochur, Aditya Kumar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Methodology for Scaling Fusion Power Plant Availability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Normally in the U.S. fusion power plant conceptual design studies, the development of the plant availability and the plant capital and operating costs makes the implicit assumption that the plant is a 10th of a kind fusion power plant. This is in keeping with the DOE guidelines published in the 1970s, the PNL report1, "Fusion Reactor Design Studies - Standard Accounts for Cost Estimates. This assumption specifically defines the level of the industry and technology maturity and eliminates the need to define the necessary research and development efforts and costs to construct a one of a kind or the first of a kind power plant. It also assumes all the "teething" problems have been solved and the plant can operate in the manner intended. The plant availability analysis assumes all maintenance actions have been refined and optimized by the operation of the prior nine or so plants. The actions are defined to be as quick and efficient as possible. This study will present a methodology to enable estimation of the availability of the one of a kind (one OAK) plant or first of a kind (1st OAK) plant. To clarify, one of the OAK facilities might be the pilot plant or the demo plant that is prototypical of the next generation power plant, but it is not a full-scale fusion power plant with all fully validated "mature" subsystems. The first OAK facility is truly the first commercial plant of a common design that represents the next generation plant design. However, its subsystems, maintenance equipment and procedures will continue to be refined to achieve the goals for the 10th OAK power plant.

Lester M. Waganer

2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

296

SIGNAL GROUPING FOR CONDITION MONITORING OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SIGNAL GROUPING FOR CONDITION MONITORING OF NUCLEAR POWER PLANT COMPONENTS Piero Baraldi Chevalier EDF R&D ­ Simulation and information Technologies for Power generation system Department 6, Quai Monitoring, Empirical Modeling, Power Plants, Safety Critical Nuclear Instrumentation, Autoassociative models

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

297

Economic Analysis of a 3MW Biomass Gasification Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Collaborative, Biomass gasification / power generationANALYSIS OF A 3MW BIOMASS GASIFICATION POWER PLANT R obert Cas a feedstock for gasification for a 3 MW power plant was

Cattolica, Robert; Lin, Kathy

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Nuclear Plant Feedwater Heater Handbook. Volume 1. Primer. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is the first part of a three volume handbook covering closed feedwater heaters for electric power generating plants. This volume is a primer to the subject of feedwater heaters and their integration into the plant. 24 refs.

Bell, R.J.; Wells, T.G. Jr.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

North Dakota`s Dickinson Lodgepole play - an update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

North Dakota`s Dickinson Lodgepole play began in February 1993 with the drilling and completion of Conoco`s No.74 Dickinson State well. The serendipitous discovery was found while drilling an in-field wildcat. Production is from a 294-ft-thick {open_quotes}Waulsortian-like{close_quotes} carbonate buildup in the Lodgepole Formation (Mississippian). Conoco estimated the ultimate recovery from this feature to be 7.86 million barrels of oil and 3.7 billion cubic feet of gas at the time of unitization. The field is currently under pressure maintenance by waterflood. The activity associated with the {open_quotes}mound{close_quotes} was primarily a land acquisition and a seismic play until the second quarter of 1995. Activity in the play accelerated with the discovery of Duncan - No.1-11 Knopik that tested 2707 BOPD from a new buildup (now Eland Field). This discovery not only increased interest but also increased the number of companies involved in the play. Currently, five fields are producing from carbonate buildups. Cumulative production through July, 1995 is 1.5 MBO, 835 MMCFG, and 15,990 BW. There is a high potential for this play to expand from the Dickinson area around the perimeter of the Williston Basin.

LeFever, J.A. [North Dakota Geological Survey, Grand Forks, ND (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Evaluating Equipment Performance Using SCADA/PMS Data for Thermal Utility Plants - Case Studies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The equipment in cogeneration plants and thermal energy plants such as gas tubing generators, boilers, steam turbine generators, chillers and cooling towers are often critical to satisfying building needs. Their actual energy performance is very...

Deng, X.; Chen, Q.; Xu, C.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Related Standards for Fossil-Fuel and Geo- thermal Powerposed Nuclear, Geothermal, and Fossil-Fuel Sites and Facili-NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

POWER PLANT RELIABILITY-AVAILABILITY AND STATE REGULATION. VOLUME 7 OF THE FINAL REPORT ON HEALTH AND SAFETY IMPACTS OF NUCLEAR, GEOTHERMAL, AND FOSSIL-FUEL ELECTRIC GENERATION IN CALIFORNIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

entry are u Table 4-6 GAS TURBINE FOR 1965-1974 (OUTAGES)AVERAGE utage Cause Code GAS TURBINE GENERATOR FORCED OUTAGEof fossil units, and for gas turbine units, the basic data

Nero, A.V.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Plants & Animals  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email We sample many plants and animals, including wild and domestic crops, game animals, fish, and food products from animals, as well as...

304

A Wavelet-Based Variability Model (WVM) for Solar PV Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distributed generation (residential rooftop) plant in Ota City, Japan, and the Copper Mountain 48MW p utility

Lave, Matthew; Kleissl, Jan; Stein, Joshua S

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Maintenance implementation plan for B Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The B Plant facility, is located in the 200 East Area at the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. It consists of two major operating areas: the B Plant Canyon Building, and the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The B Plant was originally designed to chemically process spent nuclear fuels. After this initial mission was completed, the plant was modified to provide for the separation of strontium and cesium, individually, from the fission productwaste stream following plutonium and uranium recovery from irradiated reactor fuels in the Plutonium-Uranium Extraction Plant (PUREX). The recovered, purified, and concentrated strontium and cesium solutions were then transferred to the WESF for conversion to solid compounds, encapsulation, and interim storage. After strontium and cesium removal, the remaining waste was transferred from B Plant to tank farms. B Plantis an operating facility that is required to ensure safe storage And management of the WESF cesium and strontium capsules, as well as a substantial radiological inventory remaining in the plant from previous campaigns. There are currently no production activities at B Plant, but several operating systems are required to accomplish the current B Plant mission.B Plant receives and stores various chemicals from commercial suppliers for treatment of low-level waste generated at WESF and B Plant, generation of demineralized water, and conditioning of water used in heating, ventilation, and air conditioning units. This report describes the maintenance of B Plant, including personnel training and schedules.

Tritt, S.E.

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Maryland Nuclear Profile - Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer capacity (mw)","Net generation (thousand mwh)","Summer capacity factor (percent)","Type","Commercial operation date","License...

307

New York Nuclear Profile - R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

R E Ginna Nuclear Power Plant" "Unit","Summer Capacity (MW)","Net Generation (Thousand MWh)","Summer Capacity Factor (Percent)","Type","Commercial Operation Date","License...

308

Sensitivity analysis for the outages of nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Feb 17, 2012 ... Energy generation in France is a competitive market, whereas ... from wind farms, solar energy or run of river plant without pondage.

2012-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

309

Geothermal Power Plants ó Minimizing Solid Waste and Recovering Minerals  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Although many geothermal power plants generate no appreciable solid waste, the unique characteristics of some geothermal fluids require special attention to handle entrained solid byproducts.

310

Rock bed thermal storage for concentrating solar power plants.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??ENGLISH ABSTRACT: Concentrating solar power plants are a promising means of generating electricity. However, they are dependent on the sun as a source of energy,Ö (more)

Allen, Kenneth Guy

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Playing games against nature: optimal policies for renewable resource allocation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Playing games against nature: optimal policies for renewable resource allocation Stefano Ermon- cision processes that arise as a natural model for many renewable resource allocation problems. Upon for the allocation of renewable resources. A key and unique aspect of such a resource type is the fact that

Keinan, Alon

312

How Climate Change is Playing Out in Minnesota: Extreme Weather  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

How Climate Change is Playing Out in Minnesota: Extreme Weather Dr. Mark Seeley Dept of Soil, Water Climate Headlines Data Sources Changing Minnesota Climate Features Climate Consequences Implications for Severe Weather #12;Three Reasons to Accept That Climate Change is Real #12;#12;Stationary (1) Cyclical (2

Minnesota, University of

313

1 Statistics Statistics plays an important role throughout society, providing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Statistics STATISTICS Statistics plays an important role throughout society, providing data. They also explore how those skills can be applied to develop new initiatives. Statistics is one. UNDERGRADUATE Bachelor's program · Bachelor of Science with a major in statistics (http:// bulletin.gwu.edu/arts-sciences/statistics

Vertes, Akos

314

Sminaire de thme NEI Elveflow Plug and Play microfluidic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Séminaire de thème NEI Elveflow Plug and Play microfluidic Le 12 Mars 2013 à 14h Intervenant in microfluidic. We will present the last brand of Elveflow products for microfluidic: - OB1: pressure and flow rate controller for high precision multi channel microfluidic flow control - AF1 Standard: nomad

Ingrand, François

315

Architectural Building Blocks for Plug-and-Play System Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Architectural Building Blocks for Plug-and-Play System Design Shangzhu Wang, George S. Avrunin semantics. Our approach is also integrated with design-time verification to provide feedback about with each other. Given the com- plexity of the behavior that is being described and the large design space

Avrunin, George S.

316

The challenge of motion planning for humanoid robots playing soccer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

requires team strategy, online learning, and real time sensor processing, to say the least. On top of that a stage where teams composed by differential drive robots played almost static games in a wall surrounded and static constraints increases the overall difficulty. While the above challenges hold for any humanoid

Menegatti, Emanuele

317

Second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy, Foster Wheeler Corporation is developing second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) power plant technology that will enable this type of plant to operate with net plant efficiencies in the range of 43 to 46 percent (based on the higher heating value of the coal), with a reduction in the cost of electricity of at least 20 percent. A three-phase program is under way. Its scope encompasses the conceptual design of a commercial plant through the process of gathering needed experimental test data to obtain design parameters.

Wolowodiuk, W.; Robertson, A.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the sponsorship of the United States Department of Energy, Foster Wheeler Corporation is developing second-generation pressurized fluidized bed combustion (PFBC) power plant technology that will enable this type of plant to operate with net plant efficiencies in the range of 43 to 46 percent (based on the higher heating value of the coal), with a reduction in the cost of electricity of at least 20 percent. A three-phase program is under way. Its scope encompasses the conceptual design of a commercial plant through the process of gathering needed experimental test data to obtain design parameters.

Wolowodiuk, W.; Robertson, A.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Generation Technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Many local governments are using green power in their facilities and providing assistance to local businesses and residents to do the same. Green power is a subset of renewable energy that is produced with no GHG emissions, typically from solar, wind, geothermal, biogas, biomass, or low-impact small hydroelectric sources, includes three types of products: utility products (i.e., green power purchased from the utility through the electricity grid), renewable energy certificates (RECs), and on-site generation. Opportunities to purchase these products are increasing significantly, with annual green power market growth rates

Green Power

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Plutonium finishing plant dangerous waste training plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This training plan describes general requirements, worker categories, and provides course descriptions for operation of the Plutonium Finish Plant (PFP) waste generation facilities, permitted treatment, storage and disposal (TSD) units, and the 90-Day Accumulation Areas.

ENTROP, G.E.

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Alloy Design for a Fusion Power Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Fusion power is generated when hot deuterium and tritium nuclei react, producing alpha particles and 14 MeV neutrons. These neutrons escape the reaction plasma and are absorbed by the surrounding material structure of the plant, transferring...

Kemp, Richard

322

Milliwatt Generator Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers progress on the Milliwatt Generator Project from April 1986 through March 1988. Activities included fuel processing and characterization, production of heat sources, fabrication of pressure-burst test units, compatibility studies, impact testing, and examination of surveillance units. The major task of the Los Alamos Milliwatt Generator Project is to fabricate MC2893A heat sources (4.0 W) for MC2730A radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGS) and MC3599 heat sources (4.5 W) for MC3500 RTGs. The MWG Project interfaces with the following contractors: Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (designer); E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. (Inc.), Savannah River Plant (fuel); Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Facility (metal hardware); and General Electric Company, Neutron Devices Department (RTGs). In addition to MWG fabrication activities, Los Alamos is involved in (1) fabrication of pressure-burst test units, (2) compatibility testing and evaluation, (3) examination of surveillance units, and (4) impact testing and subsequent examination of compatibility and surveillance units.

Latimer, T.W.; Rinehart, G.H.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Sedimentary Basins: Origin, Depositional Histories, and Petroleum Systems 1 Multiage Plays in Offshore Nigeria: Hidden Plays of Neogene Shale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Offshore Nigeria: Hidden Plays of Neogene Shale Structures, and Robust Lower Miocene to Paleogene Akata Shale and structural styles of mobile shale features and focuses new atten- tion towards sets showing only thick sections of seismi- cally opaque facies commonly interpreted as shale `diapirs

Connors, Christopher D.

324

SYMPOSIUM ON PLANT PROTEIN PHOSPHORYLATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation play key roles in many aspects of plant biology, including control of cell division, pathways of carbon and nitrogen metabolism, pattern formation, hormonal responses, and abiotic and biotic responses to environmental signals. A Symposium on Plant Protein Phosphorylation was hosted on the Columbia campus of the University of Missouri from May 26-28, 2010. The symposium provided an interdisciplinary venue at which scholars studying protein modification, as it relates to a broad range of biological questions and using a variety of plant species, presented their research. It also provided a forum where current international challenges in studies related to protein phosphorylation could be examined. The symposium also stimulated research collaborations through interactions and networking among those in the research community and engaged students and early career investigators in studying issues in plant biology from an interdisciplinary perspective. The proposed symposium, which drew 165 researchers from 13 countries and 21 States, facilitated a rapid dissemination of acquired knowledge and technical expertise regarding protein phosphorylation in plants to a broad range of plant biologists worldwide.

JOHN C WALKER

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

steam generator of a CSP plant nor does it consider hybridstorage to some proposed CSP plants in order to boost theirfor an individual CSP plant in Sioshansi and Denholm (2010).

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Wind Energy's New Role in Supplying the World's Energy: What Role Will Structural Health Monitoring Play?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wind energy installations are leading all other forms of new energy installations in the United States and Europe. In Europe, large wind plants are supplying as much as 25% of Denmark's energy needs and 8% of the electric needs for Germany and Spain, who have more ambitious goals on the horizon. Although wind energy only produces about 2% of the current electricity demand in the United States, the U.S. Department of Energy, in collaboration with wind industry experts, has drafted a plan that would bring the U.S. installed wind capacity up to 20% of the nation's total electrical supply. To meet these expectations, wind energy must be extremely reliable. Structural health monitoring will play a critical role in making this goal successful.

Butterfield, S.; Sheng, S.; Oyague, F.

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Managing nuclear predominant generating capacity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The most common belief, associated with nuclear power plant, leads to the conclusion that it can only operate, as a base load plant. This observation can be reversed, by just looking at large generating capacity, using an important nuclear generation mix. Nuclear plants may certainly load follow and contribute to the grid frequency control. The French example illustrates these possibilities. The reactor control of French units has been customized to accommodate the grid requests. Managing such a large nuclear plant fleet requires various actions be taken, ranging from a daily to a multi-annual perspective. The paper describes the various contributions leading to safe, reliable, well accepted and cost competitive nuclear plants in France. The combination of all aspects related to operations, maintenance scheduling, nuclear safety management, are presented. The use of PWR units carries considerable weight in economic terms, with several hundred million francs tied in with outage scheduling every year. This necessitates a global view of the entire generating system which can be mobilized to meet demand. There is considerable interaction between units as, on the one hand, they are competing to satisfy the same need, and, on the other hand, reducing maintenance costs means sharing the necessary resources, and thus a coordinated staggering of outages. In addition, nuclear fuel is an energy reserve which remains in the reactor for 3 or 4 years, with some of the fuel renewed each year. Due to the memory effect, the fuel retains a memory of past use, so that today's choices impact upon the future. A medium-term view of fuel management is also necessary.

Bouget, Y.H.; Herbin, H.C.; Carbonnier, D.

1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Foote Hydroelectric Plant spillway rehabilitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1993 the spillway of the 9 MW Foote Hydroelectric Plant located on the AuSable River, near Oscoda, Michigan was rehabilitated. The Foote Plant, built in 1917, is owned and operated by Consumers Power Company. In the 76 years of continuous operation the spillway had deteriorated such that much of the concrete and associated structure needed to be replaced to assure safety of the structure. The hydro station includes an earth embankment with concrete corewall, a concrete spillway with three tainter gates and a log chute, a penstock structure and a steel and masonry powerhouse. The electric generation is by three vertical shaft units of 3,000 KW each. A plan of the plant with spillway and an elevation of the spillway section is shown. This paper describes the evaluation and repair of the plant spillway and associated structure.

Sowers, D.L. [Consumers Power Co., Jackson, MI (United States); Hasan, N.; Gertler, L.R. [Raytheon Infrastructures Services, New York, NY (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Thermoelectric generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A thermoelectric generator unit is described comprising: a hot side heat exchanger including a plate having extruded retention posts projecting from one surface of the plate, and fins adapted for contact with a heating source. The fins are positioned between two of the retention posts. Retention rods are inserted between the retention posts and the base of the fins to retain the fin in thermal contact with the plate surface upon insertion of the retention rod between the engaging surface of the post and the corresponding fin. Thermoelectric semi-conductor modules are in thermal contact with the opposite side of the hot side heat exchanger plate from the contact with the fins. The modules are arranged in a grid pattern so that heat flow is directed into each of the modules from the hot side heat exchanger. The modules are connected electrically so as to combine their electrical output; and a cold side heat exchanger is in thermal contact with the modules acting as a heat sink on the opposite side of the module from the hot side heat exchanger plate so as to produce a thermal gradient across the modules.

Shakun, W.; Bearden, J.H.; Henderson, D.R.

1988-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

330

Abstract People in developing countries mostly depend for their diet on special staple crops, so called orphan crops. These crops play a key role in food secu-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, including proven food or energy value and that the plant has been widely cultivated in the past83 Abstract People in developing countries mostly depend for their diet on special staple crops, so called orphan crops. These crops play a key role in food secu- rity since they are grown by many resource

Kuhlemeier, Cris

331

Inorganic Plant Nutrients: Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Silicate Introduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Lab 3: Inorganic Plant Nutrients: Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Silicate Introduction Compounds of nitrogen. Silicate can play a regulating role in the growth of such organisms that carry shells of silicate. Most important are diatoms, which may form phytoplankton blooms under conditions of sufficient silicate

Jochem, Frank J.

332

TECHNICAL ARTICLES PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TECHNICAL ARTICLES #12;2 PLANTS USED IN CONSTRUCTED WETLANDS AND THEIR FUNCTIONS Hans Brix Risskov, Denmark ABSTRACT Vegetation plays an important role in wastewater treatment wetlands. Plants treatment systems aesthetically pleasing. Wetland species of all growth forms have been used in treatment

Brix, Hans

333

EECBG Success Story: North Carolina Playing Fields Score Brighter Lights |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct,Final9: DraftPlant,Community'IntoEnergy

334

NERSC Played Key Role in Nobel Laureate's Discovery  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challengeMultiscaleLogos NERSC Logos NERSC logos arePlayed Key Role in Nobel

335

Conductive, Intracratonic Play Geothermal Development in the Paris Basin |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin:2003) | Open EnergyConductive Plays - Basement Jump to:Open

336

Play Fairway Analysis Poster Session | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' Research | Department ofpermitPerformance Audit ofProducing cleanDisease |Play

337

North Carolina Playing Fields Score Brighter Lights | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S iPartnership ProgramDepartment ofCatalystsCarolina Playing

338

Introduction Minimal generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction Minimal generation Random generation Minimal and probabilistic generation of finite generation of finite groups #12;Introduction Minimal generation Random generation Some motivation Let x1 random elements of G = x1, . . . , xk . (G is the group generated by x1, . . . , xk : all possible

St Andrews, University of

339

Coherence as ultrashort pulse train generator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Intense, well-controlled regular light pulse trains start to play a crucial role in many fields of physics. We theoretically demonstrate a very simple and robust technique for generating such periodic ultrashort pulses from a continuous probe wave which propagates in a dispersive thermal gas media.

Gevorg Muradyan; Mariam Hovhannisyan

2010-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

340

Analysis of electrical signatures in synchronous generators characterized by bearing faults  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Synchronous generators play a vital role in power systems. One of the major mechanical faults in synchronous generators is related to bearings. The popular vibration analysis method has been utilized to detect bearing faults for years. However...

Choi, Jae-Won

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Software Roadmap to Plug and Play Petaflop/s Editor: Bill Kramer (wtkramer@lbl.gov)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-59999 Software Roadmap to Plug and Play Petaflop/s Editor: Bill Kramer (wtkramer Software Roadmap to Plug and Play Petaflop/s 1 Software Roadmap to Plug and Play Petaflop/s In the next

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

342

Biomass plants face wood supply risks Report warns giant new biomass power plants will be hugely reliant on wood chip  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biomass plants face wood supply risks Report warns giant new biomass power plants will be hugely's biomass energy sector could be undermined unless businesses move to resolve the supply chain issues-scale biomass plants will leave generators largely reliant on biomass from overseas such as wood chips, elephant

343

EECBG Success Story: Playing Around with Lighting Efficiency | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct,Final9: DraftPlant,Community'IntoEnergyIllinois Countytoof

344

Bagdad Plant  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd: Scope ChangeL-01-06Hot-Humid- EngineB2Bagdad Plant 585 Silicon

345

Genomic Aspects of Research Involving Polyploid Plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Almost all extant plant species have spontaneously doubled their genomes at least once in their evolutionary histories, resulting in polyploidy which provided a rich genomic resource for evolutionary processes. Moreover, superior polyploid clones have been created during the process of crop domestication. Polyploid plants generated by evolutionary processes and/or crop domestication have been the intentional or serendipitous focus of research dealing with the dynamics and consequences of genome evolution. One of the new trends in genomics research is to create synthetic polyploid plants which provide materials for studying the initial genomic changes/responses immediately after polyploid formation. Polyploid plants are also used in functional genomics research to study gene expression in a complex genomic background. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in genomics research involving ancient, young, and synthetic polyploid plants, with a focus on genome size evolution, genomics diversity, genomic rearrangement, genetic and epigenetic changes in duplicated genes, gene discovery, and comparative genomics. Implications on plant sciences including evolution, functional genomics, and plant breeding are presented. It is anticipated that polyploids will be a regular subject of genomics research in the foreseeable future as the rapid advances in DNA sequencing technology create unprecedented opportunities for discovering and monitoring genomic and transcriptomic changes in polyploid plants. The fast accumulation of knowledge on polyploid formation, maintenance, and divergence at whole-genome and subgenome levels will not only help plant biologists understand how plants have evolved and diversified, but also assist plant breeders in designing new strategies for crop improvement.

Yang, Xiaohan [ORNL; Ye, Chuyu [ORNL; Tschaplinski, Timothy J [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Tight Oklahoma gas sands remain an attractive play  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Cherokee tight gas sands of Oklahoma remain an attractive play because of improvements in drilling and completion practices and actions by the Oklahoma Corporation Commission (OCC) that allow separate allowables for new wells. The expired federal tax credits for tight gas wells have not been the only reason for increased activity. Since decontrol of most regulated gas pricing and since 1986, the number of wells drilled and gas production per well have been increasing in the cherokee area while overall drilling in Oklahoma has decreased. These conclusions are based on wells as categorized by permit date and not by the spud, completion, or first production date. A few wells outside but adjacent to the Cherokee area may have been included, although, their impact on the conclusions is considered nominal. The paper discusses the tight gas credit, proration units, the concept of separate allowables, costs, completion efficiency, and the economic outlook for this area.

Cartwright, G.L. [Marathon Oil Co., Oklahoma City, OK (United States)

1995-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

347

Formal Verification of Safety I&C System Designs: Two Nuclear Power Plant Related Applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C4.2 Formal Verification of Safety I&C System Designs: Two Nuclear Power Plant Related Applications and control (I&C) systems play a crucial role in the operation of nuclear power plants (NPP) and other safety is available. The use of model checking to verify two nuclear power plant related systems is described: an arc

Heljanko, Keijo

348

Distributed generation - the fuel processing example  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The increased costs of transportation and distribution are leading many commercial and industrial firms to consider the on-site generation for energy and other commodities used in their facilities. This trend has been accelerated by the development of compact, efficient processes for converting basic raw materials into finished services at the distributed sites. Distributed generation with the PC25{trademark} fuel cell power plant is providing a new cost effective technology to meet building electric and thermal needs. Small compact on-site separator systems are providing nitrogen and oxygen to many industrial users of these gases. The adaptation of the fuel processing section of the PC25 power plant for on-site hydrogen generation at industrial sites extends distributed generation benefits to the users of industrial hydrogen.

Victor, R.A. [Praxair, Inc., Tonawanda, NY (United States); Farris, P.J.; Maston, V. [International Fuel Cells Corp., South Windsor, CT (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

349

Dose reduction at nuclear power plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The collective dose equivalent at nuclear power plants increased from 1250 rem in 1969 to nearly 54,000 rem in 1980. This rise is attributable primarily to an increase in nuclear generated power from 1289 MW-y to 29,155 MW-y; and secondly, to increased average plant age. However, considerable variation in exposure occurs from plant to plant depending on plant type, refueling, maintenance, etc. In order to understand the factors influencing these differences, an investigation was initiated to study dose-reduction techniques and effectiveness of as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) planning at light water plants. Objectives are to: identify high-dose maintenance tasks and related dose-reduction techniques; investigate utilization of high-reliability, low-maintenance equipment; recommend improved radioactive waste handling equipment and procedures; examine incentives for dose reduction; and compile an ALARA handbook.

Baum, J.W.; Dionne, B.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Steam-Electric Power-Plant-Cooling Handbook  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Steam-Electric Power Plant Cooling Handbook provides summary data on steam-electric power plant capacity, generation and number of plants for each cooling means, by Electric Regions, Water Resource Regions and National Electric Reliability Council Areas. Water consumption by once-through cooling, cooling ponds and wet evaporative towers is discussed and a methodology for computation of water consumption is provided for a typical steam-electric plant which uses a wet evaporative tower or cooling pond for cooling.

Sonnichsen, J.C.; Carlson, H.A.; Charles, P.D.; Jacobson, L.D.; Tadlock, L.A.

1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Plant Operational Status - Pantex Plant  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinanInformation Desert Southwest RegionatSearch Welcome to theNews & Blog ¬ĽPhysics PhysicsWeek ¬ĽPlant

352

Generating Electricity with your Steam System: Keys to Long Term Savings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The application of combined heat and power principals to existing plant steam systems can help produce electricity at more than twice efficiency of grid generated electricity. In this way, steam plant managers can realize substantial savings...

Bullock, B.; Downing, A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Power System Modeling of 20percent Wind-Generated Electricity by 2030  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas combustion turbine capacity is In the WinDS model themodel selects from electricity generation technologies that include pulverized coal plants, combined cycle natural gas plants, combustion turbine

Hand, Maureen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

ASSESSING AND FORECASTING, BY PLAY, NATURAL GAS ULTIMATE RECOVERY GROWTH AND QUANTIFYING THE ROLE OF TECHNOLOGY ADVANCEMENTS IN THE TEXAS GULF COAST BASIN AND EAST TEXAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A detailed natural gas ultimate recovery growth (URG) analysis of the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas has been undertaken. The key to such analysis was determined to be the disaggregation of the resource base to the play level. A play is defined as a conceptual geologic unit having one or more reservoirs that can be genetically related on the basis of depositional origin of the reservoir, structural or trap style, source rocks and hydrocarbon generation, migration mechanism, seals for entrapment, and type of hydrocarbon produced. Plays are the geologically homogeneous subdivision of the universe of petroleum pools within a basin. Therefore, individual plays have unique geological features that can be used as a conceptual model that incorporates geologic processes and depositional environments to explain the distribution of petroleum. Play disaggregation revealed important URG trends for the major natural gas fields in the Texas Gulf Coast Basin and East Texas. Although significant growth and future potential were observed for the major fields, important URG trends were masked by total, aggregated analysis based on a broad geological province. When disaggregated by plays, significant growth and future potential were displayed for plays that were associated with relatively recently discovered fields, deeper reservoir depths, high structural complexities due to fault compartmentalization, reservoirs designated as tight gas/low-permeability, and high initial reservoir pressures. Continued technology applications and advancements are crucial in achieving URG potential in these plays.

William L. Fisher; Eugene M. Kim

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

The Economics of Steam Electric Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by manufacturers, data available from past installations and recent installations. 7) Labor costs were based on labor rates in ~he Lansing, Michigan area. 8) Power plant labor and supervision costs were based on manning data supplied by the Board of Water...-service. No other figures, including labor, fuel cost, outside services and other costs have been escalated. 12) Operating costs were established, based on steam generation. Credit has been allotted to any program for the electric power generated during...

Ophaug, R. A.; Birget, C. D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Understanding and Managing Generation Y  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There are four generations in the workplace today; they consist of the Silent Generation, Baby Boom Generation, Generation X, and Generation Y. Generation Y, being the newest generation, is the least understood generation although marketers...

Wallace, Kevin

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

357

Pinellas Plant facts. [Products, processes, laboratory facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This plant was built in 1956 in response to a need for the manufacture of neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. The neutron generators consist of a miniaturized linear ion accelerator assembled with the pulsed electrical power supplies required for its operation. The ion accelerator, or neutron tube, requires ultra clean, high vacuum technology: hermetic seals between glass, ceramic, glass-ceramic, and metal materials: plus high voltage generation and measurement technology. The existence of these capabilities at the Pinellas Plant has led directly to the assignment of the lightning arrester connector, specialty capacitor, vacuum switch, and crystal resonator. Active and reserve batteries and the radioisotopically-powered thermoelectric generator draw on the materials measurement and controls technologies which are required to ensure neutron generator life. A product development and production capability in alumina ceramics, cermet (electrical) feedthroughs, and glass ceramics has become a specialty of the plant; the laboratories monitor the materials and processes used by the plant's commercial suppliers of ferroelectric ceramics. In addition to the manufacturing facility, a production development capability is maintained at the Pinellas Plant.

Not Available

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Regulation of Neuroblast Cell-Cycle Kinetics Plays a Crucial Role in the Generation of Unique Features of Neocortical Areas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compared in areas 3, 6, 17, and 18a in the adult mouse. The relationship between height in the cortex areas 3, 4, and 6 have marked interareal differences in the timetables of layer formation (Pol- leux et

Polleux, Franck

359

Software Roadmap to Plug and Play Petaflop/s  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the next five years, the DOE expects to build systemsthat approach a petaflop in scale. In the near term (two years), DOE willhave several near-petaflops systems that are 10 percent to 25 percent ofa peraflop-scale system. A common feature of these precursors to petaflopsystems (such as the Cray XT3 or the IBM BlueGene/L) is that they rely onan unprecedented degree of concurrency, which puts stress on every aspectof HPC system design. Such complex systems will likely break current bestpractices for fault resilience, I/O scaling, and debugging, and evenraise fundamental questions about languages and application programmingmodels. It is important that potential problems are anticipated farenough in advance that they can be addressed in time to prepare the wayfor petaflop-scale systems. This report considers the following fourquestions: (1) What software is on a critical path to make the systemswork? (2) What are the strengths/weaknesses of the vendors and ofexisting vendor solutions? (3) What are the local strengths at the labs?(4) Who are other key players who will play a role and canhelp?

Kramer, Bill; Carter, Jonathan; Skinner, David; Oliker, Lenny; Husbands, Parry; Hargrove, Paul; Shalf, John; Marques, Osni; Ng, Esmond; Drummond, Tony; Yelick, Kathy

2006-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

360

NEXT GENERATION TURBINE SYSTEM STUDY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rolls-Royce has completed a preliminary design and marketing study under a Department of Energy (DOE) cost shared contract (DE-AC26-00NT40852) to analyze the feasibility of developing a clean, high efficiency, and flexible Next Generation Turbine (NGT) system to meet the power generation market needs of the year 2007 and beyond. Rolls-Royce evaluated the full range of its most advanced commercial aerospace and aeroderivative engines alongside the special technologies necessary to achieve the aggressive efficiency, performance, emissions, economic, and flexibility targets desired by the DOE. Heavy emphasis was placed on evaluating the technical risks and the economic viability of various concept and technology options available. This was necessary to ensure the resulting advanced NGT system would provide extensive public benefits and significant customer benefits without introducing unacceptable levels of technical and operational risk that would impair the market acceptance of the resulting product. Two advanced cycle configurations were identified as offering significant advantages over current combined cycle products available in the market. In addition, balance of plant (BOP) technologies, as well as capabilities to improve the reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM) of industrial gas turbine engines, have been identified. A customer focused survey and economic analysis of a proposed Rolls-Royce NGT product configuration was also accomplished as a part of this research study. The proposed Rolls-Royce NGT solution could offer customers clean, flexible power generation systems with very high efficiencies, similar to combined cycle plants, but at a much lower specific cost, similar to those of simple cycle plants.

Frank Macri

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Steam generator operating experience update, 1982-1983. [PWR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a continuation of earlier reports by the staff addressing pressurized water reactor steam generator operating experience. NUREG-0886, Steam Generator Tube Experience, published in February 1982 summarized experience in domestic and foreign plants through December 1981. This report summarizes steam generator operating experience in domestic plants for the years 1982 and 1983. Included are new problems encountered with secondary-side loose parts, sulfur-induced stress-assisted corrosion cracking, and flow-induced vibrational wear in the new preheater design steam generators. The status of Unresolved Safety Issues A3, A4, and A5 is also discussed.

Frank, L.

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Pressurized circulating fluidized-bed combustion for power generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Second-generation Pressurized Circulating Fluidized Bed Combustion (PCFBC) is the culmination of years of effort in the development of a new generation of power plants which can operate on lower-quality fuels with substantially improved efficiencies, meet environmental requirements, and provide a lower cost of electricity. Air Products was selected in the DOE Clean Coal Technology Round V program to build, own, and operate the first commercial power plant using second-generation PCFBC technology, to be located at an Air Products chemicals manufacturing facility in Calvert City, Kentucky. This paper describes the second-generation PCFBC concept and its critical technology components.

Weimer, R.F.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

ADVANCED CERAMIC MATERIALS FOR NEXT-GENERATION NUCLEAR APPLICATIONS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Rising global energy demands coupled with increased environmental concerns point to one solution; they must reduce their dependence on fossil fuels that emit greenhouse gases. As the global community faces the challenge of maintaining sovereign nation security, reducing greenhouse gases, and addressing climate change nuclear power will play a significant and likely growing role. In the US, nuclear energy already provides approximately one-fifth of the electricity used to power factories, offices, homes, and schools with 104 operating nuclear power plants, located at 65 sites in 31 states. Additionally, 19 utilities have applied to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for construction and operating licenses for 26 new reactors at 17 sites. This planned growth of nuclear power is occurring worldwide and has been termed the 'nuclear renaissance.' As major industrial nations craft their energy future, there are several important factors that must be considered about nuclear energy: (1) it has been proven over the last 40 years to be safe, reliable and affordable (good for Economic Security); (2) its technology and fuel can be domestically produced or obtained from allied nations (good for Energy Security); and (3) it is nearly free of greenhouse gas emissions (good for Environmental Security). Already an important part of worldwide energy security via electricity generation, nuclear energy can also potentially play an important role in industrial processes and supporting the nation's transportation sector. Coal-to-liquid processes, the generation of hydrogen and supporting the growing potential for a greatly increased electric transportation system (i.e. cars and trains) mean that nuclear energy could see dramatic growth in the near future as we seek to meet our growing demand for energy in cleaner, more secure ways. In order to address some of the prominent issues associated with nuclear power generation (i.e., high capital costs, waste management, and proliferation), the worldwide community is working to develop and deploy new nuclear energy systems and advanced fuel cycles. These new nuclear systems address the key challenges and include: (1) extracting the full energy value of the nuclear fuel; (2) creating waste solutions with improved long term safety; (3) minimizing the potential for the misuse of the technology and materials for weapons; (4) continually improving the safety of nuclear energy systems; and (5) keeping the cost of energy affordable.

Marra, J.

2010-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

364

Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation (Louisiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Incentive Cost Recovery Rule for Nuclear Power Generation establishes guidelines for any utility seeking to develop a nuclear power plant in Louisiana. The rule clarifies, as well as...

365

Thermohydraulic analysis of U-tube steam generators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent trends in plant safety analysis reveal a need for benchmark analytical representations of the steam generators to aid in the improvement of system codes and of fast codes for operator assistance. A model for such ...

da Silva, Hugo Cardoso

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A Simulated Field Trip: "The Visual Aspects of Power Plant Sitings1"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Simulated Field Trip: "The Visual Aspects of Power Plant Sitings1" Bill Bottom 2 Alex Young 3 of conventional thermal (fossil fuel and nuclear), geo- thermal, wind and solar power plants. There are several be dependent on conventional thermal power plants to generate electricity. These power plants are powered

Standiford, Richard B.

367

HIGH EFFICIENCY GENERATION OF HYDROGEN FUELS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ¬∑ Solar (Solar thermal, Photovoltaic) ¬∑ Renewables (Hydropower, Geothermal, Wind, Biomass) Nuclear power power generation ¬≠ Electrolysis ¬∑ Overall efficiency approximately 25-30% (efficiency of electric power ¬∑ Splits water at moderate temperatures (~700-900¬įC vs ~5,000¬įC for thermolysis) ¬∑ Plant efficiencies

368

CASE CRITICAL The Navajo Generating Station  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Republic The Navajo Generating Station, the largest coal-fired power plant in the West, provides electrical discussions focusing on the environmental, social, and economic implications of high-stakes threats power to customers in three states and for the Central Arizona Project to pump Colorado River water

Hall, Sharon J.

369

NEXT GENERATION TURBINE PROGRAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Next Generation Turbine (NGT) Program's technological development focused on a study of the feasibility of turbine systems greater than 30 MW that offer improvement over the 1999 state-of-the-art systems. This program targeted goals of 50 percent turndown ratios, 15 percent reduction in generation cost/kW hour, improved service life, reduced emissions, 400 starts/year with 10 minutes to full load, and multiple fuel usage. Improvement in reliability, availability, and maintainability (RAM), while reducing operations, maintenance, and capital costs by 15 percent, was pursued. This program builds on the extensive low emissions stationary gas turbine work being carried out by Pratt & Whitney (P&W) for P&W Power Systems (PWPS), which is a company under the auspices of the United Technologies Corporation (UTC). This study was part of the overall Department of Energy (DOE) NGT Program that extends out to the year 2008. A follow-on plan for further full-scale component hardware testing is conceptualized for years 2002 through 2008 to insure a smooth and efficient transition to the marketplace for advanced turbine design and cycle technology. This program teamed the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), P&W, United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), kraftWork Systems Inc., a subcontractor on-site at UTRC, and Multiphase Power and Processing Technologies (MPPT), an off-site subcontractor. Under the auspices of the NGT Program, a series of analyses were performed to identify the NGT engine system's ability to serve multiple uses. The majority were in conjunction with a coal-fired plant, or used coal as the system fuel. Identified also was the ability of the NGT system to serve as the basis of an advanced performance cycle: the humid air turbine (HAT) cycle. The HAT cycle is also used with coal gasification in an integrated cycle HAT (IGHAT). The NGT systems identified were: (1) Feedwater heating retrofit to an existing coal-fired steam plant, which could supply both heat and peaking power (Block 2 engine); (2) Repowering of an older coal-fired plant (Block 2 engine); (3) Gas-fired HAT cycle (Block 1 and 2 engines); (4) Integrated gasification HAT (Block 1 and 2 engines). Also under Phase I of the NGT Program, a conceptual design of the combustion system has been completed. An integrated approach to cycle optimization for improved combustor turndown capability has been employed. The configuration selected has the potential for achieving single digit NO{sub x}/CO emissions between 40 percent and 100 percent load conditions. A technology maturation plan for the combustion system has been proposed. Also, as a result of Phase I, ceramic vane technology will be incorporated into NGT designs and will require less cooling flow than conventional metallic vanes, thereby improving engine efficiency. A common 50 Hz and 60 Hz power turbine was selected due to the cost savings from eliminating a gearbox. A list of ceramic vane technologies has been identified for which the funding comes from DOE, NASA, the U.S. Air Force, and P&W.

William H. Day

2002-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

370

Safety at coal mines: what role does methane play?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent Sago Mine disaster in West Virginia and other widely publicized coal mine accidents around the world have received a great deal of attention and have generated some confusion about the link between methane drainage and safety. In response, this article provides an overview of safety concerns faced by coal mines and how they do or do not relate to methane. The first section explains the variety of safety issues a coal mine must take into consideration, including methane build-up. The second section summarizes the recent coal mines accident at Sago Mine in West Virginia. The final section describes the regulatory and legislative responses in the US. 2 refs., 2 figs.

NONE

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

State power plant productivity programs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The findings of a working group formed to review the status of efforts by utilities and utility regulators to increase the availability and reliability of generating units are presented. Representatives from nine state regulatory agencies, NRRI, and DOE, participated on the Working Group. The Federal government has been working cooperatively with utilities, utility organizations, and with regulators to encourage and facilitate improvements in power plant productivity. Cooperative projects undertaken with regulatory and energy commissions in California, Illinois, New York, Ohio, Texas, North Carolina and Mighigan are described. Following initiation of these cooperative projects, DOE funded a survey to determine which states were explicitly addressing power plant productivity through the regulatory process. The Working Group was formed following completion of this survey. The Working Group emphasized the need for those power plant productivity improvements which are cost effective. The cost effectiveness of proposed availability improvement projects should be determined within the context of opportunities for operating and capital improvements available to an entire utility. The Working Group also identified the need for: allowing for plant designs that have a higher construction cost, but are also more reliable; allowing for recovery and reducing recovery lags for productivity-related capital expenditures; identifying and reducing disincentives in the regulatory process; ascertaining that utilities have sufficient money available to undertake timely maintenance; and support of EPRI and NERC to develop a relevant and accurate national data base. The DOE views these as extremely important aspects of any regulatory program to improve power plant productivity.

Not Available

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

The renewable electric plant information system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report explains the procedures used for creating the Renewable Electric Plant Information System (REPiS) database, describes the database fields, and summarizes the data. The REPiS database contains comprehensive information on grid-connected renewable electric generation plants in the United States. Originally designed in 1987 and updated in 1990, the database includes information through 1994. The report also illustrates ways of using the data for analysis is and describes how researchers validated the data.

Sinclair, K.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

PUREX Plant waste analysis plan. Revision 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility develop and follow a written waste analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous wastes are managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Plant to characterize the designate waste that is generated within the plant, stored in Tanks F18, U3/U4, and managed through elementary neutralization in Tank 31.

Villalobos, C.N.

1995-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

374

PUREX Plant waste analysis plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Washington Administrative Code 173-303-300 requires that a facility shall develop and follow a written analysis plan which describes the procedures that will be followed to ensure that its dangerous wastes are managed properly. This document covers the activities at the PUREX Plant to characterize and designate waste that is generated within the plant and stored in Tanks F18 and U3/U4 prior to transfer to Tank Farms.

Ellis, M.W.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

375

Innovative Self- Generating Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Steam Driven Cooling Water Pump Blast Furnace Coke Plant Flares Boilers Steam Header Electric Cooling Water Pump (Back-up) Process Steam (Main Plant) Coal Hot Mill Reheat Furnace COG Bunker Oil ESL-IE-13-05-06 Proceedings... Driven Cooling Pump (New Back-up) Blast Furnace Coke Plant Flares Boilers Parastic Loads Natural Gas Turbine Steam Header Electric Cooling Water Pump (with Power Meter) Net ElectricityG Process Steam (Main Plant) Coal Hot Mill Reheat...

Kelly, L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

New geothermal power plants in Azores and Kenya  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two geothermal power plants were recently completed. One is 3 MW unit in Azores and another is 15 MW unit in Kenya. Both plants have very simple construction. For Azores, a packaged portable turbine generator is adopted to save the cost and installation term. 15 MW Olkaria plant which is adopted single flash cycle has produced first electricity by the geothermal energy in Africa. This turbine generator has been installed on a steel foundation. Special site conditions have been taken into consideration and both plants are successfully running with certification of the suitable design concept.

Tahara, M.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Representation and Mimesis in Generative Art: Creating Fifty Sisters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the Ars Electronica Museum in Linz. The work consists of fifty 1m 1m images of computer-synthesized plant-forms, algorithmically `grown' from computer code using artificial evolution and generative grammars. Each plant petrochemical industry and Middle East oil production from the mid­1940s until the oil crisis of the 1970s

McCormack, Jon

378

Modelling of a Coil Steam Generator for Concentrated Solar Power Applications.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The project investigates a new design for a CSP plant steam generation system, the Coil Steam Generator(CSG). This system allows faster start-ups and therefore higherÖ (more)

PELAGOTTI, LEONARDO

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Generation gaps in engineering?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

There is much enthusiastic debate on the topic of generation gaps in the workplace today; what the generational differences are, how to address the apparent challenges, and if the generations themselves are even real. ...

Kim, David J. (David Jinwoo)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

CONSULTANT REPORT DISTRIBUTED GENERATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CONSULTANT REPORT DISTRIBUTED GENERATION INTEGRATION COST STUDY Analytical Framework energy development, or distributed generation, in California. In May 2012, Southern California Edison Southern California Edison's approach to evaluating distributed generation impacts, and to conduct

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Coal based electric generation comparative technologies report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ohio Clean Fuels, Inc., (OCF) has licensed technology that involves Co-Processing (Co-Pro) poor grade (high sulfur) coal and residual oil feedstocks to produce clean liquid fuels on a commercial scale. Stone Webster is requested to perform a comparative technologies report for grassroot plants utilizing coal as a base fuel. In the case of Co-Processing technology the plant considered is the nth plant in a series of applications. This report presents the results of an economic comparison of this technology with other power generation technologies that use coal. Technologies evaluated were:Co-Processing integrated with simple cycle combustion turbine generators, (CSC); Co-Processing integrated with combined cycle combustion turbine generators, (CCC); pulverized coal-fired boiler with flue gas desulfurization and steam turbine generator, (PC) and Circulating fluidized bed boiler and steam turbine generator, (CFB). Conceptual designs were developed. Designs were based on approximately equivalent net electrical output for each technology. A base case of 310 MWe net for each technology was established. Sensitivity analyses at other net electrical output sizes varying from 220 MWe's to 1770 MWe's were also performed. 4 figs., 9 tabs.

Not Available

1989-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

382

Waste Treatment Plant Overview  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

contracted Bechtel National, Inc., to design and build the world's largest radioactive waste treatment plant. The Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP), also known as the...

383

TS Power Plant, Eureka County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Not all coal-fired power plants are constructed by investor-owned utilities or independent power producers selling to wholesale markets. When Newmont Mining Corp. recognised that local power supplies were inadequate and too expensive to meet long-term electricity needs for its major gold- and copper-mining operations in northern Nevada, it built its own generation. What is more, Newmont's privately owned 200-MW net coal-fired plant features power plant technologies that will surely become industry standards. Newmont's investment in power and technology is also golden: the capital cost will be paid back in about eight years. 4 figs.

Peltier, R. [DTE Energy Services (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

384

Small Generator Aggregation (Maine)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This section establishes requirements for electricity providers to purchase electricity from small generators, with the goal of ensuring that small electricity generators (those with a nameplate...

385

Next Generation Reactors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Nuclear Advances We are coordinating the Generation IV Nuclear Systems Initiative - an international effort to develop the next generation of nuclear power reactors. Skip...

386

Concentrated Solar Power Generation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Solar power generation is the most promising technology to transfer energy consumption reliance from fossil fuel to renewable sources. Concentrated solar power generation is aÖ (more)

Jin, Zhilei

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Distributed Dynamic State Estimator, Generator Parameter Estimation and Stability Monitoring Demonstration  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is the final report for this project that was performed in the period: October1, 2009 to June 30, 2013. In this project, a fully distributed high-fidelity dynamic state estimator (DSE) that continuously tracks the real time dynamic model of a wide area system with update rates better than 60 times per second is achieved. The proposed technology is based on GPS-synchronized measurements but also utilizes data from all available Intelligent Electronic Devices in the system (numerical relays, digital fault recorders, digital meters, etc.). The distributed state estimator provides the real time model of the system not only the voltage phasors. The proposed system provides the infrastructure for a variety of applications and two very important applications (a) a high fidelity generating unit parameters estimation and (b) an energy function based transient stability monitoring of a wide area electric power system with predictive capability. Also the dynamic distributed state estimation results are stored (the storage scheme includes data and coincidental model) enabling an automatic reconstruction and ďplay backĒ of a system wide disturbance. This approach enables complete play back capability with fidelity equal to that of real time with the advantage of ďplaying backĒ at a user selected speed. The proposed technologies were developed and tested in the lab during the first 18 months of the project and then demonstrated on two actual systems, the USVI Water and Power Administration system and the New York Power Authorityís Blenheim-Gilboa pumped hydro plant in the last 18 months of the project. The four main thrusts of this project, mentioned above, are extremely important to the industry. The DSE with the achieved update rates (more than 60 times per second) provides a superior solution to the ďgrid visibilityĒ question. The generator parameter identification method fills an important and practical need of the industry. The ďenergy functionĒ based transient stability monitoring opens up new ways to protect the power grid, better manage disturbances, confine their impact and in general improve the reliability and security of the system. Finally, as a by-product of the proposed research project, the developed system is able to ďplay backĒ disturbances by a click of a mouse. The importance of this by-product is evident by considering the tremendous effort exerted after the August 2003 blackout to piece together all the disturbance recordings, align them and recreate the sequence of events. This project has moved the state of art from fault recording by individual devices to system wide disturbance recording with ďplay backĒ capability.

Meliopoulos, Sakis; Cokkinides, George; Fardanesh, Bruce; Hedrington, Clinton

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

The design of future central receiver power plants based on lessons learned from the Solar One Pilot Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 10-MW{sub e} Solar One Pilot Plant was the world's largest solar central receiver power plant. During its power production years it delivered over 37,000 MWhrs (net) to the utility grid. In this type of electric power generating plant, large sun-tracking mirrors called heliostats reflect and concentrate sunlight onto a receiver mounted on top a of a tower. The receiver transforms the solar energy into thermal energy that heats water, turning it into superheated steam that drives a turbine to generate electricity. The Solar One Pilot Plant successfully demonstrated the feasibility of generating electricity with a solar central receiver power plant. During the initial 2 years the plant was tested and 4 years the plant was operated as a power plant, a great deal of data was collected relating to the efficiency and reliability of the plant's various systems. This paper summarizes these statistics and compares them to goals developed by the US Department of Energy. Based on this comparison, improvements in the design and operation of future central receiver plants are recommended. Research at Sandia National Laboratories and the US utility industry suggests that the next generation of central receiver power plants will use a molten salt heat transfer fluid rather than water/steam. Sandia has recently completed the development of the hardware needed in a molten salt power plant. Use of this new technology is expected to solve many of the performance problems encountered at Solar One. Projections for the energy costs from these future central receiver plants are also presented. For reference, these projections are compared to the current energy costs from the SEGS parabolic trough plants now operating in Southern California.

Kolb, G.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

ZERO EMISSION POWER GENERATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Clean Energy Systems (CES) was previously funded by DOE's ''Vision 21'' program. This program provided a proof-of-concept demonstration that CES' novel gas generator (combustor) enabled production of electrical power from fossil fuels without pollution. CES has used current DOE funding for additional design study exercises which established the utility of the CES-cycle for retrofitting existing power plants for zero-emission operations and for incorporation in zero-emission, ''green field'' power plant concepts. DOE funding also helped define the suitability of existing steam turbine designs for use in the CES-cycle and explored the use of aero-derivative turbines for advanced power plant designs. This work is of interest to the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. California's air quality districts have significant non-attainment areas in which CES technology can help. CEC is currently funding a CES-cycle technology demonstration near Bakersfield, CA. The Norwegian government is supporting conceptual studies for a proposed 40 MW zero-emission power plant in Stavager, Norway which would use the CES-cycle. The latter project is called Zero-Emission Norwegian Gas (ZENG). In summary, current engineering studies: (1) supported engineering design of plant subsystems applicable for use with CES-cycle zero-emission power plants, and (2) documented the suitability and availability of steam turbines for use in CES-cycle power plants, with particular relevance to the Norwegian ZENG Project.

Ronald Bischoff; Stephen Doyle

2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

390

Women playing a man's game : reconstructing ceremonial and ritual history of the Mesoamerican ballgame  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

284(5422): 1988-1991. Huizinga, Johan 1955 Homo Ludens: Amen to teach them their playingĒ (Johan Huizinga, 1955: 1)The observation that Huizinga makes suggests that play is

Ramos, Maria Isabel

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

E-Print Network 3.0 - atp-binding motifs play Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

play Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: atp-binding motifs play Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Chemistry & Biology, Vol. 11, 865874,...

392

Promoting play in low-functioning children with autism though video modelling†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most significant impairments in children with autism is their inability to play. This study explores the efficacy of using video modelling to teach functional and symbolic play behaviours to two low-functioning ...

Francescon, Alexia

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Diesel Engines: What Role Can They Play in an Emissions-Constrained...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

What Role Can They Play in an Emissions-Constrained World? Diesel Engines: What Role Can They Play in an Emissions-Constrained World? 2004 Diesel Engine Emissions Reduction (DEER)...

394

Balance of Plant Requirements for a Nuclear Hydrogen Plant  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document describes the requirements for the components and systems that support the hydrogen production portion of a 600 megawatt thermal (MWt) Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). These systems, defined as the "balance-of-plant" (BOP), are essential to operate an effective hydrogen production plant. Examples of BOP items are: heat recovery and heat rejection equipment, process material transport systems (pumps, valves, piping, etc.), control systems, safety systems, waste collection and disposal systems, maintenance and repair equipment, heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC), electrical supply and distribution, and others. The requirements in this document are applicable to the two hydrogen production processes currently under consideration in the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative. These processes are the sulfur iodide (S-I) process and the high temperature electrolysis (HTE) process. At present, the other two hydrogen production process - the hybrid sulfur-iodide electrolytic process (SE) and the calcium-bromide process (Ca-Br) -are under flow sheet development and not included in this report. While some features of the balance-of-plant requirements are common to all hydrogen production processes, some details will apply only to the specific needs of individual processes.

Bradley Ward

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Impact of Wind Power Plants on Voltage and Transient Stability of Power Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A standard three-machine, nine-bus wind power system is studied and augmented by a radially connected wind power plant that contains 22 wind turbine generators.

Muljadi, E.; Nguyen, Tony B.; Pai, M. A.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

Excess Titanium from NNSA's Y-12 Plant to be Used by the Army...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Excess Titanium from NNSA's Y-12 Plant to be Used by the Army for New Generation of Protective Body Armor for Combat Troops | National Nuclear Security Administration Facebook...

397

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: neutron flux, cur- rent noise, vibration diagnostics: Swedish Nuclear Powe

PŠzsit, Imre

398

Ethylene insensitive plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nucleic acid and polypeptide sequences are described which relate to an EIN6 gene, a gene involved in the plant ethylene response. Plant transformation vectors and transgenic plants are described which display an altered ethylene-dependent phenotype due to altered expression of EIN6 in transformed plants.

Ecker, Joseph R. (Carlsbad, CA); Nehring, Ramlah (La Jolla, CA); McGrath, Robert B. (Philadelphia, PA)

2007-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

399

Building Our Skills Inside and Out Block play is an essential part of our  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BLOCK PLAY Building Our Skills Inside and Out #12;Block play is an essential part of our curriculum and gain a deeper understanding of math concepts by building towers, bridges and buildings. #12;Math in Block Play As children's ideas and building skills grow more complex, designs and patterns emerge. #12

de Lijser, Peter

400

Disease in Natural Plant Populations, Communities, and Ecosystems: Insights into Ecological and Evolutionary Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) included both crop landscapes and patches of unman- aged vegetation in models of soybean rust epidemiology and illus- trated that noncrop plants (such as kudzu, Pueraria montana var. lobata) could play an important role in overwintering survival...

Alexander, Helen M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

S-nitrosothiols and reactive oxygen species in plant disease resistance and development†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nitric oxide (NO) as well as reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in defence signalling in plants. After successful recognition of an invading pathogen, an increase in ROS occurs, the íoxidative burstí; ...

Brzezek, Kerstin

2014-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

402

PLANT ANIMAL INTERACTIONS Limited impact of elevated levels of polyphenol oxidase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by plants, the ecological and physiological roles played by PPO are still not completely clear (Mayer 2006 with induced PPO levels (Felton et al. 1989; Duffey and Stout 1996; Karban and Baldwin 1997; Constabel and Rya

Constabel, Peter

403

Plant maintenance and plant life extension issue, 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The focus of the March-April issue is on plant maintenance and plant life extension. Major articles include the following: Exciting time to be at the U.S. NRC, by Dale Klein, Nuclear Regulatory Commission; Extraordinary steps to ensure a minimal environmental impact, by George Vanderheyden, UniStar Nuclear Energy, LLC.; Focused on consistent reduction of outages, by Kevin Walsh, GE Hitachi Nuclear Energy; On the path towards operational excellence, by Ricardo Perez, Westinghouse Electric Company; Ability to be refuelled on-line, by Ian Trotman, CANDU Services, Atomic Energy of Canada, Ltd.; ASCA Application for maintenance of SG secondary side, by Patrick Wagner, Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation, Phillip Battaglia and David Selfridge, Westinghouse Electric Company; and, An integral part of the landscape and lives, by Tyler Lamberts, Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. The Industry Innovation article is titled Steam generator bowl drain repairs, by John Makar and Richard Gimple, Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation.

Agnihotri, Newal (ed.)

2008-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

ENERGY GENERATION RESEARCH PIER Energy Generation Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ENERGY GENERATION RESEARCH PIER Energy Generation Research www.energy.ca.gov/research/ renewable/ November 2010 Sonoma County RESCO A Local Level Approach to Renewable Energy Portfolios. The Issue To address energy usage that contributes to climate change, California has enacted legislation to guide

405

Gamma ray generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An embodiment of a gamma ray generator includes a neutron generator and a moderator. The moderator is coupled to the neutron generator. The moderator includes a neutron capture material. In operation, the neutron generator produces neutrons and the neutron capture material captures at least some of the neutrons to produces gamma rays. An application of the gamma ray generator is as a source of gamma rays for calibration of gamma ray detectors.

Firestone, Richard B; Reijonen, Jani

2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

406

Generation to Generation: The Heart of Family Medicine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ageism in the Workplace. Generations Spring, 5. Westman,of caring for multiple generations simultaneously. StronglyGeneration to Generation: The Heart of Family Medicine

Winter, Robin O

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Plant fatty acid hydroxylases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); Broun, Pierre (Burlingame, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

SENSIBLE HEAT STORAGE FOR A SOLAR THERMAL POWER PLANT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design. Propofied Solar Cooling Tower Type Wet-Cooled Powerdry-cooling tower was used in the proposed solar power plantTower ē Power-Generation Subsystem Summary An Overall Summary of the Proposed Solar

Baldwin, Thomas F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project 2009 Status Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mission of the NGNP Project is to broaden the environmental and economic benefits of nuclear energy technology to the United States and other economies by demonstrating its applicability to market sectors not served by light water reactors (LWRs). Those markets typically use fossil fuels to fulfill their energy needs, and high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) like the NGNP can reduce this dependence and the resulting carbon footprint.

Larry Demick; Jim Kinsey; Keith Perry; Dave Petti

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Purchase and Installation of a Geothermal Power Plant to Generate...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

feasibility of the use of an existing low-temperature geothermal resource for combined heat and power; and Maintain and enhance existing geothermal district heating operation....

411

NEXT GENERATION NUCLEAR PLANT NGNP Technology Development Roadmapping  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ISR Inner Side Reflector Kc Fracture Toughness kg Kilogram K-T Kepner-Tregoe KTA German nuclear technical committee kW Kilowatt LANL Los Alamos National Laboratory LBE Licensing...

412

Summary for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant Project in Review  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the major progress that the NGNP Project has made toward developing and commercializing the HTGR technology. Significant R&D progress has been made in addressing key technical issues for qualification of the HTGR fuel and graphite, codification of high temperature materials and verification and validation of design codes. Work is also progressing in heat transfer/transport design and testing and in development of the high temperature steam electrolysis hydrogen production process. A viable licensing strategy has been formulated in coordination with the NRC and DOE. White papers covering key licensing issues have been and will continue to be submitted and necessary discussions of these key issues have begun with the NRC. Continued government support is needed to complete the Project objectives as established in the 2005 Energy Policy Act.

L.E. Demick

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Lidar characterization of crystalline silica generation and gravel plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The lidar vertical pro?les and wind speed data were used toof wind speed and concentration (based on lidar verticalvertical plane at a given height, z, was calculated as the product of the wind speed

Trzepla-Nabaglo, K.; Shiraki, R.; Holm'en, B. A.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Energy Secretary Ernest Moniz Remarks at Vogtle Electric Generating Plant  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy UsageAUDITVehiclesTanklessDOJ TitleDr.Double |DepartmentEfficiency CompetitionLoan

415

Updated Capital Cost Estimates for Utility Scale Electricity Generating Plants  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched Ferromagnetism inS-4500II Field Emission SEM with EDAXUpdated Capital Cost Estimates

416

Industry Participation Sought for Design of Next Generation Nuclear Plant |  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA,Fermi NationalBusiness PlanPosting Thomas F. Edgar, Ph.D.,

417

Purchase and Installation of a Geothermal Power Plant to Generate  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Careerlumens_placard-green.epsEnergy1.pdfMarket37963 Vol. 79,Department of

418

Air-Cooled Condensers for Next Generation Power Plants  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment ofEnergy Natural Gas: Transmission,Air

419

Springerville Generating Station Solar System Solar Power Plant | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov Pty Ltd JumpGTZHolland, Illinois:5717551¬įFarmsSESLogMillsSpringdale is a town

420

Nevada's Beowawe Geothermal Plant Begins Generating Clean Energy |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F S i DOETowardExecutiveRate principles

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Experience in the repair of steam generator auxiliary feedwater nozzle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The auxiliary feedwater nozzle is quite often subjected to more thermal stress cycles and other loading mechanisms during their service life than the material was designed and fabricated for at the nozzle of the earlier steam generators in many nuclear plants. During plant operation, the auxiliary feedwater nozzle outlet is exposed to the hot steam from the generator side, while the auxiliary feedwater piping which contains subcooled water from the inlet often induces water hammer as a result of the steam-water mixing phenomena. The thermal cycles and the steam bubble collapse at the nozzle may cause cracking in the nozzle liner and interior surface of the nozzle, and subsequently results in structural damage to the steam generator. This presentation is intended to share the lessons learned from the evaluation of the nozzle condition and the subsequent modification and repair made to the auxiliary feedwater nozzle at the Palisades Nuclear Plant. Other nuclear plant owners may benefit from this experience.

Chao, K.K.N. [Consumers Power Co., Jackson, MI (United States)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

The Guy at the Controls: Labor Quality and Power Plant Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of power plants. Although electricity generation is a fuelplant managers both suggest that labor poli- cies in electricity generationplant that had been built by the government-owned Central Electricity Generation

Bushnell, Jim B; Wolfram, Catherine D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

,"Plant","Primary Energy Source","Operating Company","Net Summer...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Road Generating Plant","Natural Gas","Lake Road Generating Co LP",745 4,"Kleen Energy Systems Project","Natural Gas","Kleen Energy Systems, LLC",622 5,"New Haven...

424

U.S. Nuclear Power Plants: Continued Life or Replacement After 60? (released in AEO2010)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

Nuclear power plants generate approximately 20% of U.S. electricity, and the plants in operation today are often seen as attractive assets in the current environment of uncertainty about future fossil fuel prices, high construction costs for new power plants (particularly nuclear plants), and the potential enactment of greenhouse gas regulations. Existing nuclear power plants have low fuel costs and relatively high power output. However, there is uncertainty about how long they will be allowed to continue operating.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Generating Project Development Activity  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Northwest Conservation & Electric Power Plan Proposed Combined-cycle Power Plant Planning Assumptions Jeff King Northwest Power and Conservation Council Power Committee Portland,...

426

MHD power plant instrumentation and control  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) has awarded a contract to the MHD Development Corporation (MDC) to develop instrumentation and control requirements and strategies for commercial MHD power plants. MDC subcontracted MSE to do the technical development required. MSE is being assisted by Montana State University (MSU) for the topping cycle development. A computer model of a stand-alone MHD/steam plant is being constructed. The plant is based on the plant design set forth in the MDC proposal to the Federal Clean Coal Technology 5 solicitation. It consists of an MHD topping plant, a Heat Recovery Seed Recovery (HRSR) plant, and a steam turbo-generator. The model is based on the computer code used for a study of the Corette plant retrofitted with an MHD plant. Additional control strategies, based on MHD testing results and current steam bottoming plant control data, will be incorporated. A model will be devised and implemented for automatic control of the plant. Requirements regarding instrumentation and actuators will be documented. Instrumentation and actuators that are not commercially available will be identified. The role and desired characteristics of an expert system in the automated control scheme is being investigated. Start-up and shutdown procedures will be studied and load change dynamic performance will be evaluated. System response to abnormal topping cycle and off-design system operation will be investigated. This includes use of MHD topping cycle models which couple gasdynamic and electrical behavior for the study of controlling of the MHD topping cycle. A curvefitter, which uses cubic Hermitian spline interpolation functions in as many as five dimensions, allows much more accurate reproduction of nonlinear, multidimensional functions. This project will be the first to investigate plant dynamics and control using as many as seven independent variables or control inputs to the MHD topping cycle.

Lofftus, D.; Rudberg, D. [MSE Inc., Butte, MT (United States); Johnson, R.; Hammerstrom, D. [Montana State Univ., Bozeman, MT (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

Cylindrical neutron generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

Leung, Ka-Ngo

2005-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

428

Cylindrical neutron generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

429

Cylindrical neutron generator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A cylindrical neutron generator is formed with a coaxial RF-driven plasma ion source and target. A deuterium (or deuterium and tritium) plasma is produced by RF excitation in a cylindrical plasma ion generator using an RF antenna. A cylindrical neutron generating target is coaxial with the ion generator, separated by plasma and extraction electrodes which contain many slots. The plasma generator emanates ions radially over 360.degree. and the cylindrical target is thus irradiated by ions over its entire circumference. The plasma generator and target may be as long as desired. The plasma generator may be in the center and the neutron target on the outside, or the plasma generator may be on the outside and the target on the inside. In a nested configuration, several concentric targets and plasma generating regions are nested to increase the neutron flux.

Leung, Ka-Ngo (Hercules, CA)

2009-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

430

Water protection in coke-plant design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wastewater generation, water consumption, and water management at coke plants are considered. Measures to create runoff-free water-supply and sewer systems are discussed. Filters for water purification, corrosion inhibitors, and biocides are described. An integrated single-phase technology for the removal of phenols, thiocyanides, and ammoniacal nitrogen is outlined.

G.I. Alekseev [Giprokoks, the State Institute for the Design of Coke-Industry Enterprises, Kharkov (Ukraine)

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

431

James P. Mosquera Director, Reactor Plant Components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the application of nuclear reactor power to capital ships of the U.S. Navy, and other assigned projects. Mr for steam generator technology (within the Nuclear Components Division); and power plant systems engineer working for the U.S. Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program (a.k.a. Naval Reactors). This program is a joint

432

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined Heat and Power Plant Steam Turbine Steam Turbine Chiller Campus Heat Load Steam (recovered waste heat) Gas Turbine University Substation High Pressure Natural Gas Campus Electric Load Southern Generator Heat Recovery Alternative Uses: 1. Campus heating load 2. Steam turbine chiller to campus cooling

Rose, Michael R.

433

Combined cycle power plant incorporating coal gasification  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A combined cycle power plant incorporating a coal gasifier as the energy source. The gases leaving the coal gasifier pass through a liquid couplant heat exchanger before being used to drive a gas turbine. The exhaust gases of the gas turbine are used to generate both high pressure and low pressure steam for driving a steam turbine, before being exhausted to the atmosphere.

Liljedahl, Gregory N. (Tariffville, CT); Moffat, Bruce K. (Simsbury, CT)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Power plant report (EIA-759), current (for microcomputers). Data file  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of Form EIA-759, formerly FPC-4, Power Plant Report, is to collect data necessary to fulfill regulatory responsibility; ensure power reliability; and measure fuel consumption and power production. The data diskette contains data collected by the survey. Specific ownership code, prime mover code, fuel code, company code, plant name, current capacity, fuel name, old capacity, effective date - month/year, status, multistate code, current year, generation, consumption, stocks, electric plant code, and NERC code are included.

NONE

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Proceedings: Sixth International Conference on Fossil Plant Cycle Chemistry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purity of boiler water, feedwater, and steam is central to ensuring component availability and reliability in fossil-fired plants. These conference proceedings address the state of the art in fossil plant and combined cycle/heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) cycle chemistry as well as international practices for control of corrosion and water preparation and purification.

None

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Integrated Plant for the Municipal Solid Waste of Madrid  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as steam- boiler water treatment, compressed-air, control and instrumentation, etc. The incinerator of the project was to recover the energy content of RDF generated by the recycling plant of the city of Madrid and Composting Plant The MSW is brought by the collecting trucks which unload in the storage area with a two

Columbia University

437

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the worldwide nuclear fuel market. Long term projections of U.S. nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed. A discussion on decommissioning of nuclear power plants is included.

NONE

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Effect of Ambient Design Temperature on Air-Cooled Binary Plant Output  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air-cooled binary plants are designed to provide a specified level of power production at a particular air temperature. Nominally this air temperature is the annual mean or average air temperature for the plant location. This study investigates the effect that changing the design air temperature has on power generation for an air-cooled binary plant producing power from a resource with a declining production fluid temperature and fluctuating ambient temperatures. This analysis was performed for plants operating both with and without a geothermal fluid outlet temperature limit. Aspen Plus process simulation software was used to develop optimal air-cooled binary plant designs for specific ambient temperatures as well as to rate the performance of the plant designs at off-design operating conditions. Results include calculation of annual and plant lifetime power generation as well as evaluation of plant operating characteristics, such as improved power generation capabilities during summer months when electric power prices are at peak levels.

Dan Wendt; Greg Mines

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Generating Resources Advisory Committee  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

plants 10:45 AM Break 11:00 AM Peaking Technologies Continued... 11:30 AM Combined Cycle Combustion Turbine and Utility Scale Solar PV Reference plant updates Levelized cost of energy 12:00 PM Lunch in the PNW Technology and development Offshore 2:30 PM Hydropower Scoping Study ­ Preliminary Plan

440

Market Designs for High Levels of Variable Generation: Preprint  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Variable renewable generation is increasing in penetration in modern power systems, leading to higher variability in the supply and price of electricity as well as lower average spot prices. This raises new challenges, particularly in ensuring sufficient capacity and flexibility from conventional technologies. Because the fixed costs and lifetimes of electricity generation investments are significant, designing markets and regulations that ensure the efficient integration of renewable generation is a significant challenge. This papers reviews the state of play of market designs for high levels of variable generation in the United States and Europe and considers new developments in both regions.

Milligan, M.; Holttinen, H.; Kiviluoma, J.; Orths, A.; Lynch, M.; Soder, L.

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

New wave generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present the results of a combined experimental and numerical study of the generation of internal waves using the novel internal wave generator design of Gostiaux et al. (Exp. Fluids, vol. 42, 2007, pp. 123Ė130). This ...

Mercier, Matthieu J.

442

Technology Data for Energy Plants June 2010  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

............................................................................................... 79 13 Centralised Biogas Plants

443

Trends in hydrogen plant design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding important design considerations for H{sub 2} production via steam reforming require detailed attention to the many elements that make up the process. This paper discusses design trends focus on improvements to the plant's three principal unit operations: Generation of H{sub 2}/CO syngas, Conversion of CO in the syngas and Separation/purification of H{sub 2} from syngas. Natural gas, LPG, oil, coal and coke are all potential raw materials for H{sub 2} production. For the first step in the process, generation of H{sub 2} syngas, the processes available are: Reforming the steam; Autothermal reforming with oxygen and steam; and Partial oxidation with oxygen (POX). Most syngas is presently produced by steam reforming of natural gas or light hydrocarbons up to naphtha.

Johansen, T.; Raghuraman, K.S.; Hackett, L.A. (KTI, Zoetermeer (NL))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Aquatic plant control research  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest region of the United States contains extensive canal systems that transport water for hydropower generation. Nuisance plants, including algae, that grow in these systems reduce their hydraulic capacity through water displacement and increased surface friction. Most control methods are applied in an ad hoc fashion. The goal of this work is to develop cost-effective, environmentally sound, long-term management strategies to prevent and control nuisance algal growth. This paper reports on a multi-year study, performed in collaboration with the Pacific Gas & Electric Company, to investigate algal growth in their canal systems, and to evaluate various control methodologies. Three types of controls, including mechanical, biological and chemical treatment, were selected for testing and evaluation. As part of this study, water quality data were collected and algal communities were sampled from numerous stations throughout the distribution system at regular intervals. This study resulted in a more comprehensive understanding of conditions leading to the development of nuisance algal growth, a better informed selection of treatment plans, and improved evaluation of the effectiveness for the control strategies selected for testing.

Pryfogle, P.A.; Rinehart, B.N. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Ghio, E.G. [Pacific Gas & Electric Company, San Francisco, CA (United States). Hydro Generation Engineering

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Del Mar, CA); Jin, RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO); Keith, Kevin (Three Forks, MT); Copenhaver, Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

446

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, RongGuan (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

447

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Keith, Kevin; Copenhaver, Gregory; Preuss, Daphne

2006-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

448

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach, Jennifer (Chicago, IL); Zieler, Helge (Chicago, IL); Jin, James (Chicago, IL); Keith, Kevin (Chicago, IL); Copenhaver, Gregory (Chapel Hill, NC); Preuss, Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

449

Plant centromere compositions  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for the nucleic acid sequences of plant centromeres. This will permit construction of stably inherited recombinant DNA constructs and minichromosomes which can serve as vectors for the construction of transgenic plant and animal cells.

Mach; Jennifer M. (Chicago, IL), Zieler; Helge (Del Mar, CA), Jin; RongGuan (Chesterfield, MO), Keith; Kevin (Three Forks, MT), Copenhaver; Gregory P. (Chapel Hill, NC), Preuss; Daphne (Chicago, IL)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

450

Methods and systems for seed planting management and control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A seed planting system providing optimal seed spacing in an agricultural field. The seed planting system includes a mobile seed planter having one or more planting shoes, or members being adapted for towing by a farm vehicle or being self-propelled. Sensors, disposed proximate to respective planting shoes, detect seed planting events and send corresponding signals to a computer. Contemporaneously, a geospatial locator acquires, and transmits to the computer, the geospatial location of each planted seed. The computer correlates the geospatial location data with the seed deposition data and generates a seed distribution profile indicating the location of each seed planted in a zone of interest to enable the control of speed spacing.

Svoboda, John M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Hess, J. Richard (Idaho Falls, ID); Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Harker, David J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

A COMPUTATIONAL WORKBENCH ENVIRONMENT FOR VIRTUAL POWER PLANT SIMULATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report is described the work effort to develop and demonstrate a software framework to support advanced process simulations to evaluate the performance of advanced power systems. Integrated into the framework are a broad range of models, analysis tools, and visualization methods that can be used for the plant evaluation. The framework provides a tightly integrated problem-solving environment, with plug-and-play functionality, and includes a hierarchy of models, ranging from fast running process models to detailed reacting CFD models. The framework places no inherent limitations on the type of physics that can be modeled, numerical techniques, or programming languages used to implement the equipment models, or the type or amount of data that can be exchanged between models. Tools are provided to analyze simulation results at multiple levels of detail, ranging from simple tabular outputs to advanced solution visualization methods. All models and tools communicate in a seamless manner. The framework can be coupled to other software frameworks that provide different modeling capabilities. Three software frameworks were developed during the course of the project. The first framework focused on simulating the performance of the DOE Low Emissions Boiler System Proof of Concept facility, an advanced pulverized-coal combustion-based power plant. The second framework targeted simulating the performance of an Integrated coal Gasification Combined Cycle - Fuel Cell Turbine (IGCC-FCT) plant configuration. The coal gasifier models included both CFD and process models for the commercially dominant systems. Interfacing models to the framework was performed using VES-Open, and tests were performed to demonstrate interfacing CAPE-Open compliant models to the framework. The IGCC-FCT framework was subsequently extended to support Virtual Engineering concepts in which plant configurations can be constructed and interrogated in a three-dimensional, user-centered, interactive, immersive environment. The Virtual Engineering Framework (VEF), in effect a prototype framework, was developed through close collaboration with NETL supported research teams from Iowa State University Virtual Reality Applications Center (ISU-VRAC) and Carnegie Mellon University (CMU). The VEF is open source, compatible across systems ranging from inexpensive desktop PCs to large-scale, immersive facilities and provides support for heterogeneous distributed computing of plant simulations. The ability to compute plant economics through an interface that coupled the CMU IECM tool to the VEF was demonstrated, and the ability to couple the VEF to Aspen Plus, a commercial flowsheet modeling tool, was demonstrated. Models were interfaced to the framework using VES-Open. Tests were performed for interfacing CAPE-Open-compliant models to the framework. Where available, the developed models and plant simulations have been benchmarked against data from the open literature. The VEF has been installed at NETL. The VEF provides simulation capabilities not available in commercial simulation tools. It provides DOE engineers, scientists, and decision makers with a flexible and extensible simulation system that can be used to reduce the time, technical risk, and cost to develop the next generation of advanced, coal-fired power systems that will have low emissions and high efficiency. Furthermore, the VEF provides a common simulation system that NETL can use to help manage Advanced Power Systems Research projects, including both combustion- and gasification-based technologies.

Mike Bockelie; Dave Swensen; Martin Denison; Adel Sarofim; Connie Senior

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

452

Changes in the Economic Value of Variable Generation at High Penetration Levels: A Pilot Case Study of California  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

conventional power plants and wind power. IEEE Transactionsplanning with significant wind power generation. IEEEmix with high level of wind power penetration. Applied

Mills, Andrew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Reduce generating costs and eliminate brownouts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving the manoeuverability of a coal-fired plant to allow it to participate in primary frequency support will reduce generation cost and minimize brownouts. The challenge is to do so without compromising efficiency or emissions. This article describes an approach - activation of stored energy - that is cost-effective and applicable to both greenfield and brownfield installations. It requires a new control philosophy, plus the correct application of new level and flow measurement 'best practices'. 4 refs., 1 tab.

Nogaja, R.; Menezes, M. [Emerson Process Management (United States)

2007-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

454

Play analysis and stratigraphic position of Uinta Basin tertiary - age oil and gas fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tertiary-age sediments in the Uinta basin produce hydrocarbons from five types of plays. These play types were determined by hydrocarbon type, formation, depositional environment, rock type, porosity, permeability, source, and per-well recovery. Each well was reviewed to determine the stratigraphic position and producing characteristics of each producing interval. The five types of plays are as follows: (1) naturally fractured oil reservoirs, (2) low-permeability oil reservoirs, (3) high-permeability of oil reservoirs, (4) low-permeability gas reservoirs, and (5) tight gas sands. Several fields produce from multiple plays, which made it necessary to segregate the hydrocarbon production into several plays. The stratigraphic position of the main producing intervals is shown on a basin-wide cross section, which is color-coded by play type. This 61-well cross section has several wells from each significant Tertiary oil and gas field in the Uinta basin.

Williams, R.A. (Pennzoil Exploration and Production Co., Houston, TX (United States))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Topping PCFB combustion plant with supercritical steam pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research is being conducted to develop a new type of coal fired plant for electric power generation. This new type of plant, called a second generation or topping pressurized circulating fluidized bed combustion (topping PCFB) plant, offers the promise of efficiencies greater than 46 percent (HHV), with both emissions and a cost of electricity that are significantly lower than conventional pulverized coal fired plants with scrubbers. The topping PCFB plant incorporates the partial gasification of coal in a carbonizer, the combustion of carbonizer char in a pressurized circulating fluidized bed combustor (PCFB), and the combustion of carbonizer fuel gas in a topping combustor to achieve gas turbine inlet temperatures of 2,300 F and higher. After completing pilot plant tests of a carbonizer, a PCFB, and a gas turbine topping combustor, all being developed for this new plant, the authors calculated a higher heating value efficiency of 46.2 percent for the plant. In that analysis, the plant operated with a conventional 2,400 psig steam cycle with 1,000 F superheat and reheat steam and a 2.5 inch mercury condenser back pressure. This paper identifies the efficiency gains that this plant will achieve by using supercritical pressure steam conditions.

Robertson, A. [Foster Wheeler Development Corp., Livingston, NJ (United States); White, J. [Parsons Power Group Inc., Reading, PA (United States)

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Pinellas Plant feasibility study. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pinellas Plant was built in 1956 to manufacture neutron generators, a principal component in nuclear weapons. In September 1990, the Department of Health and Rehabilitative Services (HRS) entered into an agreement with DOE to independently examine environmental monitoring data from the plant and health data from Pinellas County to determine if an epidemiological study is technically feasible to measure possible off-site health effects from ionizing radiation. Through normal plant operations, some radioactive materials have been released to the environment. Eighty percent of the total plant releases of 107,707 curies occurred in the early years of plant operation (1957--1960). The primary materials released were tritium gas, tritium oxide and krypton-85. Environmental monitoring for radioactive releases from the plant has been done regularly since 1975. The US Public Health Service Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), in assisting HRS, has determined that sufficient radiological data exist by which a dose reconstruction can be done. A dose reconstruction can provide an estimate of how much radiological exposure someone living in the vicinity of the Pinellas Plant may have suffered from environmental releases.

NONE

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Poisonous Plant Management.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Carefully examine plants being grazed. Generally, a Significant quantity of toxic plant must be consumed to be lethaL Many times these plants are readily identified in the field by evidence of grazing. Also helpful at this time is a rumen sample... poisonous plants were most severe at heavy stocking rates, while few losses occurred at light stocking levels. Death ? losses were also directly related to kinds or combinations of livestock being grazed. When combinations of cattle, sheep and goats...

McGinty, Allan

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Mobile plant for low-level radioactive waste reprocessing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Along with nuclear power plants, many scientific and industrial enterprises generate radioactive wastes, especially low-level liquid wastes. Some of these facilities generate only small amounts on the order of several dozen cubic meters per year. The Moscow scientific industrial association, Radon, developed a mobile pilot system, EKO, for the processing of LLW with a low salt content. The plant consists of three modules: ultrafiltration module; electrodialysis module; and filtration module. The paper describes the technical parameters and test results from the plant on real LLW.

Sobolev, I.A.; Panteleyev, V.I.; Demkin, V.I. [Government of Moscow (Russian Federation). Dept. of Engineering Supply

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

459

Power Plant Cycling Costs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides a detailed review of the most up to date data available on power plant cycling costs. The primary objective of this report is to increase awareness of power plant cycling cost, the use of these costs in renewable integration studies and to stimulate debate between policymakers, system dispatchers, plant personnel and power utilities.

Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Lefton, S.; Agan, D.; Hilleman, D.

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

NUCLEAR PLANT AND CONTROL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NUCLEAR PLANT OPERATIONS AND CONTROL KEYWORDS: software require- ments, safety analysis, formal for the digital protection systems of a nuclear power plant. When spec- ifying requirements for software and CRSA processes are described using shutdown system 2 of the Wolsong nuclear power plants as the digital

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

PHYSICAL PLANT POLICY & PROCEDURES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gasoline and 2,000 gallons of diesel fuel. Generator tanks vary in fuel capacity, see attached generator list. At least one time per quarter, each emergency generator diesel and propane fuel tank shall

Fernandez, Eduardo

462

Project Profile: Plug-and-Play Solar Photovoltaics for American Homes  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Fraunhofer USA, Inc., Center for Sustainable Energy Systems and its partners, under the Plug-and-Play Photovoltaics FOA, are developing technologies, components, systems, and standards that enable...

463

Nuclear power generation and fuel cycle report 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear power is an important source of electric energy and the amount of nuclear-generated electricity continued to grow as the performance of nuclear power plants improved. In 1996, nuclear power plants supplied 23 percent of the electricity production for countries with nuclear units, and 17 percent of the total electricity generated worldwide. However, the likelihood of nuclear power assuming a much larger role or even retaining its current share of electricity generation production is uncertain. The industry faces a complex set of issues including economic competitiveness, social acceptance, and the handling of nuclear waste, all of which contribute to the uncertain future of nuclear power. Nevertheless, for some countries the installed nuclear generating capacity is projected to continue to grow. Insufficient indigenous energy resources and concerns over energy independence make nuclear electric generation a viable option, especially for the countries of the Far East.

NONE

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

EEE 463 Electrical Power Plants (3) [F] Course (Catalog) Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Environmental impact of electric generation (3 lectures) 9. Advanced energy conversion systems (geothermalEEE 463 Electrical Power Plants (3) [F] Course (Catalog) Description: Generation of electric power using fossil, nuclear and renewable, including solar, geothermal, wind, hydroelectric, biomass and ocean

Zhang, Junshan

465

Progress in estimation of power plant emissions from satellite retrievals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-fired power plants increased dramatically in recent years ­ Electricity generation and fuel consumption have, coal sulfur content, electricity generation, fuel consumption, and exact time when the unit came into operation and/or retired, etc. 4 Data source: Thermal Performance Review (2005-2012) CEA, Government

Jacob, Daniel J.

466

Wearable Play  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. In addition, 3D printing and water jet technologies were also utilized to produce repetitive units. In order to suggest to viewers how such pieces as Wood Block I and Felt Slinky could be worn, I displayed photographs of people interacting...

Cheong, Sunyoung

2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

467

BOILER MATERIALS FOR ULTRASUPERCRITICAL COAL POWER PLANTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The principal objective of this project is to develop materials technology for use in ultrasupercritical (USC) plant boilers capable of operating with 760 C (1400 F), 35 MPa (5000 psi) steam. This project has established a government/industry consortium to undertake a five-year effort to evaluate and develop of advanced materials that allow the use of advanced steam cycles in coal-based power plants. These advanced cycles, with steam temperatures up to 760 C, will increase the efficiency of coal-fired boilers from an average of 35% efficiency (current domestic fleet) to 47% (HHV). This efficiency increase will enable coal-fired power plants to generate electricity at competitive rates (irrespective of fuel costs) while reducing CO{sub 2} and other fuel-related emissions by as much as 29%. Success in achieving these objectives will support a number of broader goals. First, from a national prospective, the program will identify advanced materials that will make it possible to maintain a cost-competitive, environmentally acceptable coal-based electric generation option. High sulfur coals will specifically benefit in this respect by having these advanced materials evaluated in high-sulfur coal firing conditions and from the significant reductions in waste generation inherent in the increased operational efficiency. Second, from a national prospective, the results of this program will enable domestic boiler manufacturers to successfully compete in world markets for building high-efficiency coal-fired power plants.

R. Viswanathan; K. Coleman; R.W. Swindeman; J. Sarver; J. Blough; W. Mohn; M. Borden; S. Goodstine; I. Perrin

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

468

Andrew Ford 1 Flight Simulator An Interative Model of Power Plant Construction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Andrew Ford 1 Flight Simulator . An Interative Model of Power Plant Construction Informal Summary to dominate the construction of new power plants. Figure 2 shows the main screen of the flight simulator part for power plant construction. Their goal was to build the cash reserves of GenCo1, a 5 GW generating company

Ford, Andrew

469

Model-Free Based Water Level Control for Hydroelectric Power Plants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Model-Free Based Water Level Control for Hydroelectric Power Plants Cédric JOIN Gérard ROBERT for hydroelectric run-of-the river power plants. To modulate power generation, a level trajectory is planned, the set-point is followed even in severe operating conditions. Keywords: Hydroelectric power plants

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

470

GASIFICATION PLANT COST AND PERFORMANCE OPTIMIZATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of this series of design and estimating efforts was to start from the as-built design and actual operating data from the DOE sponsored Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project and to develop optimized designs for several coal and petroleum coke IGCC power and coproduction projects. First, the team developed a design for a grass-roots plant equivalent to the Wabash River Coal Gasification Repowering Project to provide a starting point and a detailed mid-year 2000 cost estimate based on the actual as-built plant design and subsequent modifications (Subtask 1.1). This unoptimized plant has a thermal efficiency of 38.3% (HHV) and a mid-year 2000 EPC cost of 1,681 $/kW. This design was enlarged and modified to become a Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant (Subtask 1.2) that produces hydrogen, industrial grade steam, and fuel gas for an adjacent Gulf Coast petroleum refinery in addition to export power. A structured Value Improving Practices (VIP) approach was applied to reduce costs and improve performance. The base case (Subtask 1.3) Optimized Petroleum Coke IGCC Coproduction Plant increased the power output by 16% and reduced the plant cost by 23%. The study looked at several options for gasifier sparing to enhance availability. Subtask 1.9 produced a detailed report on this availability analyses study. The Subtask 1.3 Next Plant, which retains the preferred spare gasification train approach, only reduced the cost by about 21%, but it has the highest availability (94.6%) and produces power at 30 $/MW-hr (at a 12% ROI). Thus, such a coke-fueled IGCC coproduction plant could fill a near term niche market. In all cases, the emissions performance of these plants is superior to the Wabash River project. Subtasks 1.5A and B developed designs for single-train coal and coke-fueled power plants. This side-by-side comparison of these plants, which contain the Subtask 1.3 VIP enhancements, showed their similarity both in design and cost (1,318 $/kW for the coal plant and 1,260 $/kW for the coke plant). Therefore, in the near term, a coke IGCC power plant could penetrate the market and provide a foundation for future coal-fueled facilities. Subtask 1.6 generated a design, cost estimate and economics for a multiple train coal-fueled IGCC powerplant, also based on the Subtaks 1.3 cases. The Subtask 1.6 four gasification train plant has a thermal efficiency of 40.6% (HHV) and cost 1,066 $/kW. The single-train advanced Subtask 1.4 plant, which uses an advanced ''G/H-class'' combustion turbine, can have a thermal efficiency of 45.4% (HHV) and a plant cost of 1,096 $/kW. Multi-train plants will further reduce the cost. Again, all these plants have superior emissions performance. Subtask 1.7 developed an optimized design for a coal to hydrogen plant. At current natural gas prices, this facility is not competitive with hydrogen produced from natural gas. The preferred scenario is to coproduce hydrogen in a plant similar to Subtask 1.3, as described above. Subtask 1.8 evaluated the potential merits of warm gas cleanup technology. This study showed that selective catalytic oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (SCOHS) is promising. As gasification technology matures, SCOHS and other improvements identified in this study will lead to further cost reductions and efficiency improvements.

Samuel S. Tam

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

AI in Computer Games: Generating Interesting Interactive Opponents by the use of Evolutionary Computation†  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Which features of a computer game contribute to the playerís enjoyment of it? How can we automatically generate interesting and satisfying playing experiences for a given game? These are the two key questions addressed ...

Yannakakis, Georgios N.

472

Air-cooled condensers eliminate plant water use  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

River or ocean water has been the mainstay for condensing turbine exhaust steam since the first steam turbine began generating electricity. A primary challenge facing today's plant developers, especially in drought-prone regions, is incorporating processes that reduce plant water use and consumption. One solution is to shed the conventional mindset that once-through cooling is the only option and adopt dry cooling technologies that reduce plant water use from a flood to a few sips. A case study at the Astoria Energy plant, New York City is described. 14 figs.

Wurtz, W.; Peltier, R. [SPX Cooling Technologies Inc. (United States)

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

473

The Fourth Generation of Nuclear Power  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The outlook for nuclear power in the U.S. is currently very bright. The economics, operations and safety performance of U.S. nuclear power plants is excellent. In addition, both the safety and economic regulation of nuclear power are being changed to produce better economic parameters for future nuclear plant operations and the licenses for plant operations are being extended to 60 years. There is further a growing awareness of the value of clean, emissions-free nuclear power. These parameters combine to form a firm foundation for continued successful U.S. nuclear plant operations, and even the potential In order to realize a bright future for nuclear power, we must respond successfully to five challenges: ē Nuclear power must remain economically competitive, ē The public must remain confident in the safety of the plants and the fuel cycle. ē Nuclear wastes and spent fuel must be managed and the ultimate disposition pathways for nuclear wastes must be politically settled. ē The proliferation potential of the commercial nuclear fuel cycle must continue to be minimized, and ē We must assure a sustained manpower supply for the future and preserve the critical nuclear technology infrastructure. The Generation IV program is conceived to focus the efforts of the international nuclear community on responding to these challenges.

Lake, James Alan

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Use of CAPE-OPEN Standard in US-UK Collaboration on Virtual Plant Simulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the auspices of a US-UK Memorandum of Understanding and Implementing Agreement for fossil energy R&D (http://us-uk.fossil.energy.gov/), the US Department of Energyís (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the UK Department of Trade and Industry (DTI) have recently completed a three-year collaboration on virtual plant modeling and simulation technology for advanced fossil-energy power generation systems. The R&D collaboration was aimed at taking full advantage of the synergies between NETLís ongoing Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) project and the UKís three-year Virtual Plant Demonstration Model (VPDM) project. The key objective of this collaboration has been the development of compatible, open standards-based US and UK technology for process/equipment co-simulation. To achieve plug-and-play model interoperability, the collaboration leveraged the process-industry CAPE-OPEN (CO) software standard which is managed and disseminated by the CO Laboratories Network (www.colan.org).

Zitney, S.E.

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Creating a Cognitive Agent in a Virtual World: Planning, Navigation, and Natural Language Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Language Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Language Generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Hewlett, William

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

LBB considerations for a new plant design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The leak-before-break (LBB) methodology is accepted as a technically justifiable approach for eliminating postulation of Double-Ended Guillotine Breaks (DEGB) in high energy piping systems. This is the result of extensive research, development, and rigorous evaluations by the NRC and the commercial nuclear power industry since the early 1970s. The DEGB postulation is responsible for the many hundreds of pipe whip restraints and jet shields found in commercial nuclear plants. These restraints and jet shields not only cost many millions of dollars, but also cause plant congestion leading to reduced reliability in inservice inspection and increased man-rem exposure. While use of leak-before-break technology saved hundreds of millions of dollars in backfit costs to many operating Westinghouse plants, value-impacts resulting from the application of this technology for future plants are greater on a per plant basis. These benefits will be highlighted in this paper. The LBB technology has been applied extensively to high energy piping systems in operating plants. However, there are differences between the application of LBB technology to an operating plant and to a new plant design. In this paper an approach is proposed which is suitable for application of LBB to a new plant design such as the Westinghouse AP600. The approach is based on generating Bounding Analyses Curves (BAC) for the candidate piping systems. The general methodology and criteria used for developing the BACs are based on modified GDC-4 and Standard Review Plan (SRP) 3.6.3. The BAC allows advance evaluation of the piping system from the LBB standpoint thereby assuring LBB conformance for the piping system. The piping designer can use the results of the BACs to determine acceptability of design loads and make modifications (in terms of piping layout and support configurations) as necessary at the design stage to assure LBB for the, piping systems under consideration.

Swamy, S.A.; Mandava, P.R.; Bhowmick, D.C.; Prager, D.E. [Westinghouse Electric Corp., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Steam generator support system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source is disclosed. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances. 4 figs.

Moldenhauer, J.E.

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

478

Steam generator support system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A support system for connection to an outer surface of a J-shaped steam generator for use with a nuclear reactor or other liquid metal cooled power source. The J-shaped steam generator is mounted with the bent portion at the bottom. An arrangement of elongated rod members provides both horizontal and vertical support for the steam generator. The rod members are interconnected to the steam generator assembly and a support structure in a manner which provides for thermal distortion of the steam generator without the transfer of bending moments to the support structure and in a like manner substantially minimizes forces being transferred between the support structure and the steam generator as a result of seismic disturbances.

Moldenhauer, James E. (Simi Valley, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Method of grid generation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides a method of grid generation that uses the geometry of the problem space and the governing relations to generate a grid. The method can generate a grid with minimized discretization errors, and with minimal user interaction. The method of the present invention comprises assigning grid cell locations so that, when the governing relations are discretized using the grid, at least some of the discretization errors are substantially zero. Conventional grid generation is driven by the problem space geometry; grid generation according to the present invention is driven by problem space geometry and by governing relations. The present invention accordingly can provide two significant benefits: more efficient and accurate modeling since discretization errors are minimized, and reduced cost grid generation since less human interaction is required.

Barnette, Daniel W. (Veguita, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Correct Marginal Utility Costs Underwrite Plant Profitability  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for an olefins plant. The base case for this system has excess 65 psig steam which is being condensed. This is quite common for olefins plants after furnace and turbine additions have occurred without a proportional increase in new 65 psig steam demand. Ge... of Step 1 and Step 2 for this analysis are shown iri Figure 1. Ba?? Loads Steam Rates Equipment EfficiencY MW 10001bs/h Boiler Process SteAm Generator 94.0 94.0 312 371 Turbine 1(600/200 9&19) 79.4 Turbine 2 (600/4"HII.abs.Cond)7J. 2 Turbine 3...

Ranade, S. M.; Robert, W. E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "generating plants play" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

HON 201, Three Plays F 1-1:50, BH B21  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

" by Hugh Whitemore about Alan Turing who did fundamental work in mathematical logic and conceived play The third play deals with the career and personal problems of the British mathematician Alan Turing. The story of his life is found in an article in the New Yorker; see below. A link: http

Srinivasan, Bhama

482

EXPLORING THE CONCEPT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT THROUGH A ROLE-PLAY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EXPLORING THE CONCEPT OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT THROUGH A ROLE-PLAY Arnaud Buchs and Odile Blanchard April 2011 Abstract: The concept of sustainable development is used in everyday life: education, role-play, sustainable development JEL codes: A2, Q01 Arnaud Buchs is an economics doctoral

Paris-Sud XI, Universitť de

483

Playing Tangram with a Humanoid Robot Jochen Hirth, Norbert Schmitz, and Karsten Berns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based architecture that forms the basis of ROMAN's control sys- tem is given. Afterwards, the implementation the required skills, to enable the humanoid robot ROMAN to play the game, have been ralized. Experimental of the interaction partner. Figure 1: The humanoid robot ROMAN playing the Tan- gram game with a human interaction

Berns, Karsten

484

ACM-enabled satellite triple play over DVB-S2: A techno-economic study  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 ACM-enabled satellite triple play over DVB-S2: A techno-economic study N. Anastasiadou1 , G looks at the techno-economic perspectives of the use of DVB-S2 and its unique feature, Adaptive Coding and Modulation (ACM) in the provision of satellite triple play. For this study, current market economic data were

485

Talkiní Bout Wind Generation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The amount of electricity generated by the wind industry started to grow back around 1999, and since 2007 has been increasing at a rapid pace.

486

SNE TRAFIC GENERATOR  

Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

003027MLTPL00 Network Traffic Generator for Low-rate Small Network Equipment Software† http://eln.lbl.gov/sne_traffic_gen.html†

487

Solving chemical and mechanical problems of PWR steam generators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Steam generators in power plants, based on pressurized water reactors (PWRs), transfer heat from a primary coolant system (pressurized water) to a secondary coolant system. Primary coolant water is heated in the core and passes through the steam generator that transfers heat to the secondary coolant water to make steam. The steam then drives a turbine that turns an electric generator. Steam is condensed and returned to the steam generator as feedwater. Two types of PWR steam generators are in use: recirculating steam generators (RSGs) and once-through steam generators (OTSGs). Since most of the units are vertical, only vertical units are discussed in this article. Some vertical units have operated with a minimum of problems, while others have experienced a variety of corrosion and mechanically-induced problems that have caused unscheduled outages and expensive repairs.

Green, S.J.

1987-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Next-generation transcriptome assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

technologies - the next generation. Nat Rev Genet 11, 31-algorithms for next-generation sequencing data. Genomicsassembly from next- generation sequencing data. Genome Res

Martin, Jeffrey A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

HYBRID CONTROL OF DISTRIBUTED GENERATORS CONNECTED TO WEAK RURAL NETWORKS TO MITIGATE VOLTAGE VARIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thermal power plants will increase the total and proportion of capacity of Distributed Generation (DG@iee.org; Robin.Wallace@ed.ac.uk ABSTRACT Distributed generators are normally operated in automatic power factor-constrained bi- directional power flow may cause unacceptable voltage fluctuations that would cause generator

Harrison, Gareth

490

The potential impacts of climate-change policy on freshwater use in thermoelectric power generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential impacts of climate-change policy on freshwater use in thermoelectric power generation to generate electricity. We analyze what these changes could entail for electricity generation in the United carbon prices (4$50/tonne CO2), however, retrofitting coal plants to capture CO2 increases freshwater

Jackson, Robert B.

491

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 11 figures.

Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

492

Laser beam generating apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Laser beam generating apparatus including a septum segment disposed longitudinally within the tubular structure of the apparatus is described. The septum provides for radiatively dissipating heat buildup within the tubular structure and for generating relatively uniform laser beam pulses so as to minimize or eliminate radial pulse delays (the chevron effect). 7 figures.

Warner, B.E.; Duncan, D.B.

1994